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Sample records for model dentin adhesives

  1. [Dentin adhesives. An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandini, R; Novelli, C; Pierleoni, P

    1991-11-01

    Even if mechanical bonding to enamel utilizing the acid-etch technique has been very successful, adhesion to dentin is still a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Dentin is a vital tissue and differs in composition from enamel: acid-etching does not enhance the bond strength of composite resins to dentin and may elicit a severe pulpal response. For an effective bond to occur, a dentin bonding system has to be used. The first generation of methacrylate-based dentin adhesives was capable of chemical bonding to the inorganic phase of dentin. The chemical basis for this resin-dentin adhesive was the interaction between a phosphate group attached to the methacrylate and the calcium ions on the dentin surface. This system yielded rather low bond strengths which were clinically unsatisfying. The second generation of dentin adhesives became available to the profession recently. Each of these new bonding systems use similar chemical composition for the same purpose of bonding with physicochemical interaction to the hard tooth tissues. All these systems contain a mild acid dentin conditioner to remove the smear layer and an aqueous resin containing primer to improve monomer penetration into the hydrophilic dentin surface. The second generation dentin bonding systems are extremely sensitive to variations upon the completeness of instructions and how accurately these are followed by dental practitioners.

  2. Swelling equilibrium of dentin adhesive polymers formed on the water-adhesive phase boundary: Experiments and micromechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    During their application to the wet, oral environment, dentin adhesives can experience phase separation and composition change which can compromise the quality of the hybrid layer formed at the dentin-adhesive interface. The chemical composition of polymer phases formed in the hybrid layer can be represented using a ternary water-adhesive phase diagram. In this paper, these polymer phases have been characterized using a suite of mechanical tests and swelling experiments. The experimental results were evaluated using granular micromechanics based model that incorporates poro-mechanical effects and polymer-solvent thermodynamics. The variation of the model parameters and model-predicted polymer properties has been studied as a function of composition along the phase boundary. The resulting structure-property correlations provide insight into interactions occurring at the molecular level in the saturated polymer system. These correlations can be used for modeling the mechanical behavior of hybrid layer, and are expected to aid in the design and improvement of water-compatible dentin adhesive polymers. PMID:24076070

  3. The dentinal surface: its influence on dentinal adhesion. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J D; Cobb, C M; Chappell, R P; Spencer, P; Robinson, S J

    1991-12-01

    Three categories of dentinal adhesive are proposed: category I includes adhesives with shear bond strength values between 5 and 7 MPa; category II includes dentinal adhesives with shear bond strengths between 8 and 14 MPa; and category III includes adhesives with shear bond strength values up to 20 MPa. In part I of this article, photomicrographs of the dentinal smear layer and three category I first-generation dentin-adhesive interfaces are presented. The photomicrographs show that the wetting and penetration of the first-generation dentinal adhesives were not adequate to produce high shear bond strengths. When the category I adhesives were tested for shear bond strength, failures occurred at the interface or in the resin adhesive. Future articles will explain wetting and adhesive performance of category II and III adhesives.

  4. Dentin bond strengths of simplified adhesives: effect of dentin depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Perdigão, Jorge; Lopes, Mariana de F; Vieira, Luiz Clovis Cardoso; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro, Sylvio

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of 3 simplified adhesive systems applied on shallow vs deep dentin. For superficial dentin, 30 human molars were sectioned with a diamond saw to expose dentin immediately below the dentoenamel junction. For deep dentin, 30 molars were sectioned 3 mm below the dentoenamel junction. The teeth were mounted, polished to 600-grit, and randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=10): Single Bonda and OptiBond Solo, total-etch adhesives, and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, a self-etching primer adhesive. Adhesives were applied, the restorative material Filtek Z250 inserted in a No. 5 gelatin capsule, and light-cured. After 24 hours in water at 37 degrees C, shear bond strength was measured with an Instron at 5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Duncan's post-hoc test. The results showed the following shear bond strengths (mean +/- SD in MPa): Single Bond/superficial dentin = 22.1 +/- 2.8; Single Bond/deep dentin = 14.2 +/- 7.0; OptiBond Solo/superficial dentin = 18.9 +/- 4.1; OptiBond Solo/deep dentin = 18.4 +/- 4.8; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/superficial dentin = 21.0 +/- 7.4; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/deep dentin = 17.6 +/- 5.9. There were no significant differences between mean shear bond strength for the factor "adhesive system" (P>.822). The Duncan's test showed that Single Bond resulted in higher shear bond strength on superficial dentin than on deep dentin. The mean shear bond strength for Clearfil Liner Bond 2V and OptiBond Solo were not influenced by dentin depth. When data were pooled for dentin depth, deep dentin resulted in statistically lower bond strengths than superficial dentin (Pcomposition of the dentin adhesive.

  5. The effects of current dentinal adhesives on the dentinal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, R P; Spencer, P; Eick, J D

    1994-12-01

    The effects of the dentinal surface treatments from six currently available commercial dentinal adhesives are presented. The adhesives are All-Bond 2, etched and unetched, Syntac, Prisma Universal Bond 3, Scotchbond Multipurpose, Tenure Solution, and Adhesive By Choice. Unerupted third molar human teeth were sectioned and treated with the appropriate adhesive according to the manufacturer's directions. After the teeth were treated, they were processed for observation by scanning electron microscopy. Scanning-electron microscopic photomicrographs were made of each step in the process to show the effects of the constituents, including the adhesives, on the dentinal surface. For All-Bond 2, unetched, the smear layer was not removed before the primer and the adhesive were applied. The primer for Prisma Universal Bond 3 altered the smear layer by reacting with it but did not produce a large demineralized zone in the dentin. All the other adhesives did remove the smear layer before the tooth was treated with the primer and adhesive.

  6. Effect of self-etching adhesives on dentin permeability in a fluid flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Geneviève; Guignes, Philippe; Millas, Arlette

    2005-01-01

    Numerous self-etching bonding systems exist, with composition differing from one product to another. It is important for the clinician to know if they are all equally effective, and whether they provide an effective seal between dentin and restorative materials. This study was designed to measure the hydraulic conductance of physiologic saline across dentin after application of various self-etching bonding systems or of a 1-bottle adhesive system preceded by a phosphoric acid etch. One hundred extracted noncarious human third molars from patients 18-25 years old were used for this study. Dentin disks were cut from crown segments parallel to the occlusal surface at the top of the pulp cavity. The 100 disks, each 1 mm thick, were divided into 10 groups (n=10 per group), each of which was treated with 1 of 9 self-etching systems-AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond, Etch & Prime 3.0, Prime & Bond NRC Nt, One-Up Bond F, optiBond solo Plus Self Etch, Prompt L-Pop, or Xeno III-or a control bonding system (Prime & Bond NT) preceded by a phosphoric acid etch. Hydraulic conductance, the volume of fluid transported across a known area of surface (0.28 cm2) per unit time under a unit pressure gradient (200 cm H2O), was analyzed for the adhesive systems using a fluid flow apparatus (Flodec). First, both sides of each specimen were etched with 36% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds, and the hydraulic conductance was measured every 30 seconds for 15 minutes. The initial set of measurements served as the reference value for each specimen. The measurements were repeated when a smear layer had been formed and, finally, after 1 of the 10 bonding systems had been applied. The data were analyzed using a 1-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range test (alpha=.05). The control 1-bottle adhesive used with a phosphoric acid pre-etch did not provide the largest reduction in penetration (42.3%). The greatest mean reduction (68.9%, PAdheSE, 58.2%; Etch & Prime 3.0, 56.8%; Adper Prompt L

  7. Adhesion to bovine dentin--surface characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Smith, D C

    1991-06-01

    X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the dentin surface, to determine the effects of different pre-conditioning procedures on the elemental composition of the dentin surface, and to investigate the interaction between dentin and a dentin bonding agent (ScotchBond) by studying the changes in the elemental composition of dentin as a result of the interaction. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize sample surface morphology, which was then correlated with surface elemental composition. The results showed that: (a) the elemental composition of the smear layer was similar to that of the underlying dentin; (b) cleaning with hydrogen-peroxide did not produce any modification in the elemental composition of the dentin surface; and (c) acid-etching led to an almost complete demineralization of the dentin, leaving behind an organic-rich surface. The results suggest that bonding systems that use acid-etching as a pre-conditioning procedure should be based on agents able to interact with the organic components of dentin, since bonding agents that rely on a chelation-to-calcium reaction are unlikely to be successful. The investigation of the interaction between the bonding agent and dentin led to a postulated adhesive-bonding reaction mechanism and suggested a partially cohesive failure in the bonding agent during fracturing of a dentin-bonding-agent-bonded assembly.

  8. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Bonini, Gabriela; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS) of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days). Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond), or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250). Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37 °C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400 ×). Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time.

  9. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros CRUZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days. Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond, two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond, or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250. Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37°C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05. After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time.

  10. A clinical perspective on dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmiller, F C

    1993-01-01

    The newer generation of dentin adhesives has changed the practice of restorative dentistry. Two features common to most of the bonding restorative materials are the ability to alter, through the use of acidic etching agents, the surface of the dentin and the ability to completely wet and re-infiltrate the altered dentin surface with a hydrophilic polymerizable monomer. The acidic etchants remove or break up the smear layer, partially demineralize and/or alter the mineral in the first few microns of the dentin surface, and expose the collagen fibril network. The hydrophilic adhesive monomers that contain both acidic and methacrylate groups on the same molecule are bifunctional in nature. These monomers are able to infiltrate the demineralized dentin due to their hydrophilic nature and polymerize to encapsulate the exposed collagen fibers. Available products can be divided into two broad categories: systems that contain a low concentration of adhesive monomer diluted in a volatile solvent and systems that use adhesive resins of moderate to high viscosity. Knowledge of the features and properties of dentin adhesives provides the needed rationale for the protocol of application and the proper choice of materials in restorative dentistry.

  11. Contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M; de Gee, A J; Kaga, M; Feilzer, A J

    2006-08-01

    Adhesives cured under constrained conditions develop contraction stresses. We hypothesized that, with dentin as a bonding substrate, the stress would reach a maximum, followed by a continuous decline. Stress development was determined with a tensilometer for two total-etch systems and two systems with self-etching primers. The adhesives were placed in a thin layer between a glass plate and a flat dentin surface pretreated with phosphoric acid or self-etching primer. After an initial maximum shortly after light-curing, the stress decreased dramatically for the total-etch systems (70%) and, to a lesser extent, for the adhesives with self-etching primers (30%). The greater stress decrease for the total-etch systems was ascribed to water and/or solvents released into the adhesives from the fully opened dentinal tubules by the pulling/sucking action of the contraction stress. This happened less with the adhesives with self-etching primers, where the tubules remained mainly closed.

  12. Dentin infiltration ability of different classes of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Alina; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the dentin infiltration ability of various types of adhesives and compares four classes of adhesive systems with regard to this property. The infiltration is determined quantitatively, characterized as tag length and ratio of infiltration, and qualitatively, characterized as homogeneity, regularity, and continuity of the resin tags. Flat dentin surfaces from 140 halves of caries-free molars were bonded with four classes of adhesive systems. The adhesives (n = 20) were labeled with rhodamine B isothiocyanate and applied on the occlusal dentin following the manufacturer's recommendations and were subsequently light cured, 20 s. Then a 2-mm thick composite layer was applied and light cured, 20 s. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C, 24 h. Two slices were sectioned mesio-distally from each sample and were investigated with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The measurements were done at 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5 mm from the enamel-dentin junction. The data were analyzed by using analysis of variance and the general linear model. The class of adhesive, the composition, and the dentin position were significant factors affecting the investigated parameters. The use of etch and rinse adhesives in comparison to self-etch adhesives provided the formation of longer, more homogeneous, very regularly distributed but mostly fractured tags. A comparison of adhesives confirmed that etch and rinse systems remain better in bond infiltration. While the importance of tags formation on bonding is still controversially discussed, adhesive systems with a high ratio of infiltration might better protect the tooth against microorganism contamination.

  13. Current status of dentin adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinfelder, K F

    1998-12-01

    Undoubtedly, dentin bonding agents have undergone a major evolution during the last several years. The shear bond strength of composite resin to the surface of dentin is actually greater than the inherent strength of the dentin itself under well-controlled conditions. No longer must the clinician depend only upon the bonding to enamel as the sole bonding mechanism. Bonding to both types of dental structure permits even better reinforcement of the tooth itself. Perhaps even more important than the high level of bonding exhibited by the current dentin adhesives is their ability to seal the dentin. So effective is this sealing capability that it is now possible to protect the pulpal tissue from microbial invasion through the dentinal tubules. Further, by enclosing the odontoblastic processes and preventing fluid flow, the potential for postoperative sensitivity is diminished considerably. In fact, so evolutionary is the concept of bonding that the procedures associated with the restoration of teeth has changed dramatically. Undoubtedly, far greater improvements can be anticipated in the future.

  14. Chemical characterization of the dentin/adhesive interface by Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, P; Byerley, T J; Eick, J D; Witt, J D

    1992-01-01

    Irreversible bonding of composite materials to tooth structure depends on chemical as well as mechanical adhesion. The proposed bonding mechanism for several commercial dental adhesives is chemical adhesion to the dentin surface. The purpose of this in vitro investigation was to characterize the chemical nature of the surface interaction between dentin and two commercial adhesives by use of Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR/PAS). The occlusal thirds of the crowns of freshly extracted, non-carious, unerupted human molars were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis. Dentin disks, 6 mm x 2 mm, were prepared from these sectioned teeth. The exposed dentin surface was treated with either Scotchbond 2, a BIS-GMA resin, or Dentin-Adhesit, a polyurethane resin. All spectra were recorded from 4000 to 400 cm-1 by use of an Analect RFX-65 FTIR spectrometer equipped with an MTEC Photoacoustics Model 200 photoacoustic cell. An initial spectrum of the dentin surface was collected. This surface was primed according to manufacturer's instructions and spectra recorded of the primed surface plus one to three layers of adhesive. By comparison of these spectra, it was possible for us to record changes in the phosphate and amide I and II bands due to surface interactions between the adhesive and the dentin. Although early results do not indicate covalent bonding between the dentin and these adhesives, this technique presents several advantages for spectroscopic evaluation of the dentin/adhesive interface.

  15. Quantifying adhesive penetration in adhesive/dentin interface using confocal Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Spencer, Paulette

    2002-01-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRM) provides an important and novel means of analyzing the chemical composition of the adhesive/dentin (a/d) interface. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for quantitative determination of the degree of adhesive penetration at the a/d interface using CRM. Three commercial dentin adhesive systems [Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP+), Single Bond (SB), and Primer Bond NT (PBNT)] based on the total etch and "wet" bonding technique were examined in this study. Human dentin specimens treated with these adhesives were analyzed with CRM mapping across the a/d interface. Also, Raman spectra were collected on model mixtures of adhesive and type I collagen, and the ratios of the relative intensities of the Raman bands corresponding to adhesive and collagen were used for the construction of calibration curves. By comparing the Raman band ratios of interface specimens to the calibration curves, the percent of adhesive as a function of spatial position across the a/d interface was determined. The results show that there is a gradual decrease in penetration as a function of position for all three adhesive systems while the adhesive concentration gradient decreases in the order of SBMP+ > SB > PBNT. These differences in penetration of the three adhesives at the a/d interface also are discussed relative to the composition and phase segregation in adhesives. Additionally, our results indicate that confocal Raman microspectroscopy is a reliable in situ analytical technique for simple and rapid quantitative determination of adhesive penetration at its interface with prepared dentin. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  17. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  18. Adhesion to enamel, dentin, metal, and porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanca, J

    1994-01-01

    Adhesion has an inseparable association with cosmetic dentistry. The ability to bond well to tooth structure has allowed the placement of countless porcelain veneers and many ceramic inlays and onlays. Improved materials and techniques have offered clinicians the ability to place these restorations with skill and reliability. The past year has seen many developments and additions to the armamentarium of the cosmetic dentist. The compiled data have been placed in different sections to facilitate the learning process. Review of the following material will familiarize the clinician with the current state of the art in the adhesive aspect of cosmetic dentistry. The ability to employ adhesive techniques has revolutionized the practice of dentistry. Clinicians have at their command materials that allow the placement of thin pieces of ceramic onto tooth structure without shattering, the routine placement of composite materials into posterior teeth, the diminishing reliance on liners and bases, and lessened postoperative discomfort with the use of dentin bonding systems. It is, as previously noted, useful to separate the analyses of adhesion to each of the substrates. Advances continue to be made in each of these areas that although not necessarily facilitating treatment ease, improve the reliability of the procedure. This review attempts to highlight the significant literature of the previous year.

  19. Spectroscopic and morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemor, R. M.; Kruger, Michael B.; Wieliczka, David M.; Swafford, Jim R.; Spencer, Paulette

    1999-01-01

    The potential environmental risks associated with mercury release have forced many European countries to ban the use of dental amalgam. Alternative materials such as composite resins do not provide the clinical function for the length of time characteristically associated with dental amalgam. The weak link in the composite restoration is the dentin/adhesive bond. The purpose of this study was to correlate morphologic characterization of the dentin/adhesive bond with chemical analyses using micro- Fourier transform infrared and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A commercial dental adhesive was placed on dentin substrates cut from extracted, unerupted human third molars. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface were investigated using infrared radiation produced at the Aladdin synchrotron source; visible radiation from a Kr+ laser was used for the micro-Raman spectroscopy. Sections of the dentin/adhesive interface, differentially stained to identify protein, mineral, and adhesive, were examined using light microscopy. Due to its limited spatial resolution and the unknown sample thickness the infrared results cannot be used quantitatively in determining the extent of diffusion. The results from the micro-Raman spectroscopy and light microscopy indicate exposed protein at the dentin/adhesive interface. Using a laser that reduces background fluorescence, the micro-Raman spectroscopy provides quantitative chemical and morphologic information on the dentin/adhesive interface. The staining procedure is sensitive to sites of pure protein and thus, complements the Raman results.

  20. Tensile bond strength and SEM evaluation of caries-affected dentin using dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, M; Sano, H; Burrow, M F; Tagami, J; Yoshiyama, M; Ebisu, S; Ciucchi, B; Russell, C M; Pashley, D H

    1995-10-01

    Tensile bond strength measurements are commonly used for the evaluation of dentin adhesive systems. Most tests are performed using extracted non-carious human or bovine dentin. However, the adhesion of resins to caries-affected dentin is still unclear. The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that bonding to caries-affected dentin is inferior to bonding to normal dentin, and that the quality of the hybrid layer plays a major role in creating good adhesion. We used a micro-tensile bond strength test to compare test bond strengths made to either caries-affected dentin or normal dentin, using three commercial adhesive systems (All Bond 2, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, and Clearfil Liner Bond II). For scanning electron microscopy, the polished interfaces between the adhesive bond and dentin were subjected to brief exposure to 10% phosphoric acid solution and 5% sodium hypochlorite, so that the quality of the hybrid layers could be observed. Bonding to normal dentin with either All Bond 2 (26.9 +/- 8.8 MPa) or Clearfil Liner Bond II (29.5 +/- 10.9 MPa) showed tensile bond strengths higher than those to caries-affected dentin (13.0 +/- 3.6 MPa and 14.0 +/- 4.3 MPa, respectively). The tensile bond strengths obtained with Scotchbond Multi-Purpose were similar in normal and caries-affected dentin (20.3 +/- 5.5 MPa and 18.5 +/- 4.0 MPa, respectively). The hybrid layers created by All Bond 2 in normal dentin and by Clearfil Liner Bond II in normal or caries-affected dentin showed phosphoric acid and sodium hypochlorite resistance, whereas the hybrid layers created by All Bond 2 in caries-affected dentin and those created by Scotchbond Multi-Purpose to normal and caries-affected dentin showed partial susceptibility to the acid and sodium hypochlorite treatment. The results indicate that the strength of adhesion to dentin depends upon both the adhesive system used and the type of dentin. Moreover, the quality of the hybrid layer may not always contribute

  1. Self-etching adhesives increase collagenolytic activity in radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Raquel

    2006-09-01

    Endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) release from crown dentin and their activation results in degradation of hybrid layers created by dentin adhesives. This study tested the hypothesis that instrumented intraradicular dentin possesses latent collagenolytic activity that is activated by mild self-etching adhesives. Root dentin shavings were produced from 50 cleaned and shaped, saline-irrigated root canals using Gates Glidden drills and rinsed with sodium azide to prevent bacterial growth. Dried dentin powder aliquots were treated with two clinically-relevant MMP inhibitors, 2% chlorhexidine for 10 minutes and 17% EDTA for 1 minute. Additional dentin powder was mixed with Clearfil Liner Bond 2V or Clearfil Tri-S Bond for 1 minute followed by extracting the adhesives with acetone. Dentin powder was also treated with 2% chlorhexidine for 10 minutes before or after adhesive application. Collagenolytic activities of the nine groups were assayed with a fluorometer in 96-well plates, by recording the changes in fluorescence before and after addition of fluorescein-labeled type I collagen. Epoxy resin-embedded powders were examined with TEM for the extent of demineralization. Instrumented, mineralized intraradicular dentin possessed low but detectable collagenolytic activity that was inhibited by chlorhexidine (p dentin powder and activated latent MMPs, with 14- to 15-fold increases in collagenolytic activities (p MMPs without denaturing these enzymes, and may adversely affect the longevity of bonded root canal fillings and posts.

  2. Bond durability of contemporary adhesive systems to pulp chamber dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Muhammet Kerim

    2015-12-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term bond strengths of dentin adhesive systems, which include one-step self-etch adhesive systems (Optibond All-in-one, Kerr; Adper Prompt L-POP, 3 M ESPE), a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Optibond FL, Kerr) and two-step self-etch adhesive (AdheSE Bond, Ivoclar), applied to pulp chamber dentin surfaces after 12-month water storage by using microtensile bond strength (µTBS) test. Materials and methods: Dentin adhesive systems were applied to unprepared pulp chamber dentin surfaces according to manufacturer's directions, respectively (n = 5). After applying adhesive systems, composite buildups were done incrementally. Bond strengths to pulp chamber dentin surfaces were determined using µTBS test after water storage for 24 h and 12 month. Kruskal-Wallis analysis and Mann-Whitney U-test for pairwise comparisons were used to determine statistical differences in µTBS between the groups at a significance level of 5%. Results: There were no significant differences in µTBS between storage periods for tested adhesives regardless adhesive class. Conclusion: Bond durability of tested adhesive systems, including one-bottle self-etch adhesives with pulp chamber dentin surfaces, may be considered stable after 12-month water storage. Therefore, one-step self-etch, also called "user-friendly" adhesives may perform and traditional three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives in the long-term when used for bonding to pulp chamber dentin surfaces.

  3. Identification of collagen encapsulation at the dentin/adhesive interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Paulette; Wang, Yong; Katz, J Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dentin/adhesive interfacial characteristics of three current commercial adhesives with different relative hydrophilic/hydrophobic composition, using a nondestructive staining technique. Dentin surfaces of 18 unerupted human third molars were randomly selected for treatment with one of three commercial dentin bonding agents according to manufacturers' instructions for the "wet" bonding technique. The adhesives were ranked based on hydrophilic/hydrophobic component ratios (ie, ability to dissolve in water), highest to lowest, as follows: Uno (Pulpdent) > Prime&Bond NT (PBNT, Dentsply Caulk) > Single Bond (SB, 3M ESPE). Dentin/adhesive (d/a) interface sections were stained with Goldner's trichrome, a classical bone stain, and examined using light microscopy. The extent and degree to which the adhesive encapsulates the demineralized dentin matrix is reflected in the color differences in the stained sections. The depth of demineralization appeared comparable among these bonding systems, but adhesive infiltration varied from highest to lowest as follows: Uno > PBNT > SB. The differential staining technique provided a clear representation of the depth of dentin demineralization and extent/degree of adhesive encapsulation of the exposed collagen at the d/a interface. This technique provides a mechanism for readily identifying vulnerable sites at the d/a interface. The composition of the one-bottle adhesive systems has a substantial effect on the interfacial structure of the d/a bond.

  4. SEM evaluation of resin-carious dentin interfaces formed by two dentin adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Kuang-Wei; Marshall, Sally J.; Pinzon, Lilliam M.; Watanabe, Larry; Saiz, Eduardo; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the influence of dentin tubule direction and identifiable zone of carious dentin on the microstructure and the thickness of the hybrid-like layer (HL) formed by self-etch and etch-rinse adhesive systems. Methods An etch-rinse and a self-etching adhesive were bonded to dentin carious zones divided into groups with parallel or perpendicular orientation relative to the dentin tubules at the resin-carious dentin interface (N = 5/variable). Bonds were prepared to each of the four zones of carious dentin apparent after staining with Caries Detector: pink, light pink, transparent and apparently normal Six non-carious third molars were controls. The microstructure and thickness of the HL were determined by SEM.and compared using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons (pcarious zone. PMID:18155289

  5. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

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    Parvin Mirzakoucheki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003. Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064. Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant.

  6. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker's saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Oguri, Makoto; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker's and non-smoker's saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPHSpectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers' instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher's protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker's and nonsmoker's saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker's or nonsmoker's saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group.

  7. Polymerization contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin and enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hashimoto; A.J. de Gee; A.J. Feilzer

    2008-01-01

    Objective In a previous study on of polymerization contraction stress determinations of adhesives bonded to dentin a continuous decline of stress was observed after the adhesives had been light-cured. The decline was ascribed to stress relief caused by diffusion into the adhesive layer of water and/

  8. Polymerization contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin and enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashimoto, M.; de Gee, A.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In a previous study on of polymerization contraction stress determinations of adhesives bonded to dentin a continuous decline of stress was observed after the adhesives had been light-cured. The decline was ascribed to stress relief caused by diffusion into the adhesive layer of water

  9. [Influence of different dentin depths on microtensile bond strength of two dentin adhesive systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tie-li; Huang, Cui; Zheng, Zhi-xing

    2009-10-01

    To determine the microtensile bond strength of two adhesives systems to either superficial or deep dentin. The crowns extracted human premolars were transversally sectioned next to the occlusal DEJ to expose flat dentin surfaces. The surfaces were bonded with: (1)two-step, total-etch adhesive Prime&Bond NT (PB),(2)wo-step, self-etching adhesive FL-Bond (FB), according to manufacturers' directions. Composite build-ups were constructed incrementally. After storage for 24 hours in water at 37 degrees, the teeth were longitudinally sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded sticks with a cross-sectional area of 0.81mm(2) with a slow-speed diamond saw. The remaining dentin thickness (RDT) was measured to assess the superficial dentin group (RDT> or =3mm) and the deep dentin group (RDT0.05). No cohesive failure was observed in either superficial or deep dentin. Most of the failure was adhesive failure. From this study, it can be concluded that different dentin depths can not influence the microtensile bond strengths of Prime&Bond NT and FL-Bond adhesive systems.

  10. Localized mechanics of dentin self-etching adhesive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Bruniera Anchieta

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of composite resins (CRs to dentin is influenced by the interfacial microstructure of the hybrid layer (HL and the resin tags (TAG. The contemporary self-etching primer adhesive systems overcame the inconvenient of the etch-and-rinse protocol. Studies, however, have demonstrated that HL thickness and TAG length vary according to the wetting time and additional use of acid-etching prior to self-etching primers. This study investigated the localized stress distribution in the HL and the dentin/adhesive interface. Two HL thicknesses (3 or 6 µm, two TAG lengths (13 or 17 µm and two loading conditions (perpendicular and oblique-25º were investigated by the finite element (FE analysis. Five two-dimensional FE models (M of a dentin specimen restored with CR (38 x 64 µm were constructed: M1 - no HL and no TAG; M2 - 3 µm of HL and 13 µm of TAG; M3 - 3 µm of HL and 17 µm of TAG; M4 - 6 µm of HL and 13 µm of TAG; and M5 - 6 µm of HL and 17 µm of TAG. Two distributed loadings (L (20N were applied on CR surface: L1 - perpendicular, and L2 - oblique (25º. Fixed interfacial conditions were assigned on the border of the dentin specimen. Ansys 10.0 (Ansys®, Houston, PA, USA software was used to calculate the stress fields. The peak of von Mises (sigmavM and maximum principal stress (sigmamax was higher in L2 than in L1. Microstructures (HL and TAG had no effect on local stresses for L1. Decreasing HL decreased sigmavM and sigmamax in all structures for L2, but the TAG length had influence only on the peributular dentin. The thickness of HL had more influence on the sigmavM and sigmamax than TAG length. The peritubular dentin and its adjacent structures showed the highest sigmavM and sigmamax, mainly in the oblique loading.

  11. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-06-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch's t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality.

  12. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch’s t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality. PMID:26273561

  13. Inhibition of enzymatic degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, J; Van den Steen, P E; Mine, A; Van Landuyt, K L; Poitevin, A; Opdenakker, G; Van Meerbeek, B

    2009-12-01

    Adhesive procedures activate dentin-associated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and so iatrogenically initiate bond degradation. We hypothesized that adding MMP inhibitors to adhesive primers may prevent this endogenous enzymatic degradation, thereby improving bond durability. A non-specific MMP inhibitor (chlorhexidine) and a MMP-2/9-specific inhibitor (SB-3CT) were admixed to the primers of an etch & rinse and a self-etch adhesive, both considered as gold-standard adhesives within their respective categories. For dentin powder exposed to the adhesives under clinical application conditions, gelatin zymography revealed the release of MMP-2 (not of MMP-9) by the etch & rinse adhesive, while no release of enzymes could be detected for the mild self-etch adhesive, most likely because of its limited dentin demineralization effect. The built-in MMP inhibitors appeared effective in reducing bond degradation only for the etch & rinse adhesive, and not for the self-etch adhesive. Water sorption of adhesive interfaces most likely remains the principal mechanism of bond degradation, while endogenous enzymes appear to contribute to bond degradation of only etch & rinse adhesives.

  14. Resin adhesion to enamel and dentin: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, Edmond R

    2003-06-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge base regarding resin adhesion to enamel and dentin. A descriptive classification system for adhesive resin products as well as clinical considerations derived from the review are also presented to assist the clinician in the selection and application of these products.

  15. Alternative adhesive strategies to optimize bonding to radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillaguet, Serge; Bertossa, Bruno; Krejci, Ivo; Wataha, John C; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2007-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that bond strengths of filling materials to radicular dentin might be optimized by using an indirect dentin bonding procedure with an acrylic core material. Roots of human teeth were endodontically prepared and obturated with EndoREZ, Epiphany, or the bonding of an acrylic point with SE Bond by using a direct or an indirect bonding technique. Bond strengths of endodontic sealers to radicular dentin were measured with a thin slice push-out test. Push-out strengths of EndoREZ and Epiphany to radicular dentin were less than 5 megapascals (MPa). The direct bonding technique with acrylic points and the self-etching adhesive had push-out strengths of 10 MPa, increasing to 18 MPa with the indirect technique. The use of the indirect bonding protocol with an acrylic point to compensate for polymerization stresses appears to be a viable means for optimizing bond strengths of endodontic filling materials to radicular dentin.

  16. Effects of matrix metallproteinases on dentin bonding and strategies to increase durability of dentin adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hyun Lee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The limited durability of resin-dentin bonds severely compromises the longevity of composite resin restorations. Resin-dentin bond degradation might occur via degradation of water-rich and resin sparse collagen matrices by host-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. This review article provides overview of current knowledge of the role of MMPs in dentin matrix degradation and four experimental strategies for extending the longevity of resin-dentin bonds. They include: (1 the use of broad-spectrum inhibitors of MMPs, (2 the use of cross-linking agents for silencing the activities of MMPs, (3 ethanol wet-bonding with hydrophobic resin, (4 biomimetic remineralization of water-filled collagen matrix. A combination of these strategies will be able to overcome the limitations in resin-dentin adhesion.

  17. Effect of dentin location and long-term water storage on bonding effectiveness of dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Vivan Cardoso, Marcio; De Almeida Neves, Aline; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Dentin is a variable substrate with properties that change considerable in a single surface. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding effectiveness to these different dentin locations and evaluate these differences over time. After bonding procedures with five different adhesives, small micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) beams were prepared and dichotomously divided in 'center' and 'periphery' dentin specimens. After 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months of water storage the µTBS of specimens of each group was determined, enabling a paired study design. The bond strengths of both etch&rinse adhesives were insensitive to regional variability. For the two-step self-etch adhesives, a marked increase in bond strengths was observed with increasing amount of intertubular dentin. Regional variability did not affect the long-term bonding effectiveness for any of the adhesives tested. In conclusion, only for the mild self-etch adhesives, µTBS to 'periphery' dentin was higher than for the 'center' specimens.

  18. Dentin-enamel adhesives in pediatric dentistry: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Godoy, Franklin; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Adhesives and composite technology have made composite resins and polyacid-modified resin-based composites (compomers) very popular as materials to restore primary and permanent anterior and posterior teeth. More conservative preparations can be performed that maintain more tooth structure due to the adhesive properties of the adhesives used with composites and compomers. Meticulous care in the placement of adhesives and, subsequently, resin-based composites and compomers is necessary to produce long-term satisfactory results. The purpose of this paper is to update the current status in regards to dentin-enamel adhesives in primary teeth.

  19. Adhesion of multimode adhesives to enamel and dentin after one year of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; Reis, André Figueiredo; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ultramorphological characteristics of tooth-resin interfaces and the bond strength (BS) of multimode adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Multimode adhesives (Scotchbond Universal (SBU) and All-Bond Universal) were tested in both self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes and compared to control groups (Optibond FL and Clearfil SE Bond (CSB)). Adhesives were applied to human molars and composite blocks were incrementally built up. Teeth were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile BS and TEM analysis. Specimens were tested after storage for either 24 h or 1 year. SEM analyses were performed to classify the failure pattern of beam specimens after BS testing. Etching increased the enamel BS of multimode adhesives; however, BS decreased after storage for 1 year. No significant differences in dentin BS were noted between multimode and control in either evaluation period. Storage for 1 year only reduced the dentin BS for SBU in self-etch mode. TEM analysis identified hybridization and interaction zones in dentin and enamel for all adhesives. Silver impregnation was detected on dentin-resin interfaces after storage of specimens for 1 year only with the SBU and CSB. Storage for 1 year reduced enamel BS when adhesives are applied on etched surface; however, BS of multimode adhesives did not differ from those of the control group. In dentin, no significant difference was noted between the multimode and control group adhesives, regardless of etching mode. In general, multimode adhesives showed similar behavior when compared to traditional adhesive techniques. Multimode adhesives are one-step self-etching adhesives that can also be used after enamel/dentin phosphoric acid etching, but each product may work better in specific conditions.

  20. The role of host-derived dentinal matrix metalloproteinases in reducing dentin bonding of resin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which might result in reduced bond strength. Most MMPs are synthesized and released from odontoblasts in the form of proenzymes, requiring activation to degrade extracellular matrix components. Unfortunately, they can be activated by modem self-etch and etch-and-rinse adhesives. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge of the role of dentinal host-derived MMPs in dentin matrix degradation. We also discuss various available MMP inhibitors, especially chlorhexidine, and suggest that they could provide a potential pathway for inhibiting collagen degradation in bonding interfaces thereby increasing dentin bonding durability.

  1. Shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using different dentin adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farimah Sardari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using four dentin adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: One hundred human molars were selected. After enamel removal, a dentin cylinder with 3 mm thickness was prepared. Eighty specimens were resorted with amalgam and four dentin adhesive systems as follows (n=20: group 1, Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose; group 2, One Coat Bond; group 3, PQ1; and group 4, Panavia-F. In group 5, 20 specimens were resorted with amalgam and varnish as control group. The specimens were incubated at 37°C for 24 h. The shear bond strengths were then measured by using push out method. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Duncan's tests.Results: Mean values for bond strengths of test groups were as follows: group 1=21.03±8.9, group 2=23.47±9, group 3=13.16±8.8, group 4=20.07±8.9 and group 5=14.15±8.7 MPa±SD. One-way ANOVA showed the statistically significant difference between the bond strengths of five groups (P=0.001. Post hoc Duncan's test showed significant difference between groups 1and 3 (P=0.008, groups 1 and 5 (P=0.019, groups 2 and 5 (P=0.0008, groups 4 and 5 (P=0.042, and groups 3 and 4 (P=0.018.Conclusion: Results of this study showed that the bond strength of amalgam to dentin using One Coat Bond as dentin adhesive system was higher than that observed in other dentin adhesive systems.

  2. Adhesion of different resin cements to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Ella A; Ernst, Saskia; Schaper, Katharina; Arnold, Wolfgang H; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of five different resin cements to human enamel and dentin under different storage conditions. Five resin cements and their dedicated systems were tested. Teeth were embedded, ground flat to expose enamel or dentin and polished with sandpaper. Adhesive systems were applied according to the manufacturers'instructions. V2A steel cylinders with were silicated, coated, and cemented onto the teeth. Specimens were stored at three different conditions and subsequently thermocycled. SBS was measured. Significant differences were observed between the tested resin cements depending on the tooth surface. Different storage conditions influenced the bond strength, independent of the tooth surface, in all test cements. The bond strength of all experimental materials to enamel is higher than that to dentin surfaces. Furthermore, the adhesiveness decreases after wetness (hydro-) and hydrothermal stress, regardless of the tooth surface.

  3. Characterization and Streptococcus mutans adhesion on air polishing dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kazuhiro; Oda, Hirotake; Inatomi, Michitomo; Sato, Soh

    2014-07-01

    Air polishing is known as an effective and time saving tooth cleaning method. However, this method increased surface roughness and bacterial adhesion on dentin surface. The aim of this study was to characterize and examine Streptococcus mutans adhesion on dentin surface after air polishing as compared to the conventional method. The dentin blocks (4 × 4 × 1 mm) were polished by a rubber cup with polishing material (Polishing) and air-polished by 25 μm glycine (G25), 65 μm glycine (G65), and 65 μm sodium bicarbonate (NHC65) microparticles. Surface roughness (Ra) was measured by a laser electron microscope. The amount of adhered S. mutans was quantified using a resazurin reduction assay (alamarBlue(®)). The Ra of G25 and G65 was significantly (p Polishing. However, there was no significant difference in S. mutans adhesion among Polishing, G25, and G65, while NHC65 showed significantly (p polishing using glycine microparticles conditioned S. mutans adhesion on dentin surface in a similar fashion than the conventional method, and less than air polishing using sodium bicarbonate microparticles.

  4. Effect of Nanofiller Addition to an Experimental Dentin Adhesive on Microtensile Bond Strength to Human Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH. Kasraei

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of adding nanofiller particles to a dentin bonding agent on resin-dentin bond strength.Materials and Methods: Fifty-four human intact premolar teeth were divided in to 6 groups of nine. The teeth were ground on occlusal surfaces and polished with 320 and then 600 grit silicon carbide papers. An experimental bonding system based on acetone/alcoholsolvent was provided with filler contents of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 weight percent fumed silica nanofiller. After dentin surface etching, rinsing and blot drying, the experimentalbonding agents were applied to dentin surface. A composite resin was, then,bonded to the dentin on the bonding agent. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles and sectioned in stick form. After two week of storage in distilled water, resin-dentin microtensile bond strength of the specimens was measured. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA and DunnettT3 tests.Results: Bond strength to dentin was significantly affected by the filler level. Minimum and maximum resin-microtensile bond strength was in the experimental bonding agent with no filler (5.88 MPa and with filler level of 1.0 weight percent (15.15 MPa, respectively,and decreased with the increase of filler content down to 8.95 MPa for the filler level of 10.0 weight percent.Conclusion: Filler content seems to be one of the important factors influencing the bond strength of dental adhesives. Maximum dentin bond strength was obtained with 1% silanized nanofiller silica added to experimental adhesive system.

  5. Dentinal tubules driven wetting of dentin: Cassie-Baxter modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, S. M. M.; Alderete, L.; Farge, P.

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the wetting properties of dentin surfaces submitted to a phosphoric acid etching followed by an air drying procedure, as in clinical situations of adhesive dentistry. The surface topography of the etched surfaces was characterized by AFM, and the wetting properties of water on these rough and heterogeneous surfaces were studied, by contact angle measurements. We showed that the contact angle increases with the acid exposure time and consequently with both surface roughness and the organic-mineral ratio of the dentin components. From the whole results, obtained on dentin and also on synthesized hydroxyapatites samples, we inferred a water contact angle of ˜ 133° on the dentinal tubule. These experimental results may be described by the Cassie-Baxter approach, and it is suggested that small air pockets could be formed inside the dentinal tubules.

  6. Adhesion performance of new hydrolytically stable one-component self-etching enamel/dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-02-01

    To demonstrate that hydrolytically stable methacrylamide monomers allow one-component self-etching adhesives with comparable adhesive properties and better storage stability than hitherto available methyacrylate-based adhesive formulations. The shear bond strength and storage stability of the new one-component self-etching, methacrylamide-based adhesive AdheSE One F (Ivoclar Vivadent) to enamel and dentin was compared to the methacrylate-based Clearfil S3 Bond (Kuraray), G-Bond (GC), Hybrid Bond (Sun Medical), iBond (Heraeus Kulzer), Optibond All In One (Sybron-Kerr), and the methacrylamide-based Xeno V (Dentsply). Hydrolytic stability and adhesive performance of these adhesives was evaluated by accelerated aging at 42 degrees C over 16 weeks and monthly assessment of shear bond strength to dentin. The null hypothesis was that the bond strength of one-bottle self-etching dental adhesives is independent of storage duration and that, disregarding their higher stability against hydrolysis, methacrylamide- based materials offer performance beyond shelf-life time, comparable to methacrylate-based adhesives. Statistical analysis included 1-way-ANOVA and the Tukey-B post-hoc test (p AdheSE One F) to 16.6 MPa (iBond) and on dentin from 36.1 MPa (Optibond All In One) to 20.5 MPa (G-Bond). During accelerated aging, methacrylate-based adhesives with a pH AdheSE One F and Xeno V were stable for 16 weeks regarding shear bond strength to dentin. The shelf life of one-component self-etching adhesives is determined by their chemical composition. In conventional methacrylate-based adhesives, the inherently acidic environment of such formulations leads to monomer degradation due to hydrolysis. In contrast, methacrylamide-based adhesives are stable to aqueous acid and exhibit much superior storage stability without monomer degradation-related losses in adhesion performance.

  7. Making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting for enhanced adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-11-01

    Good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is an important factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. In this study, we developed a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  8. Comparison of depth of dentin etching and resin infiltration with single-step adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mitsuo; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2005-07-01

    Adhesion of resin composites to dentin is currently believed to result from impregnation of adhesive resin into superficially demineralized dentin. The purpose of this study was to use micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the extent of resin penetration into etched dentin with single-step adhesive systems. Adhesive systems used were One-Up Bond F (Tokuyama Dental) and Reactmer Bond (Shofu, Inc.). A self-etching primer system Mac Bond II (Tokuyama Dental) was employed as a control. Resin composites were bonded to bovine dentin with the adhesive systems, and specimens were sectioned parallel to dentinal tubules. Raman spectra were successively recorded along a line perpendicular to the dentin-adhesive interface in steps of 0.2 microm and the spectra were obtained. SEM observations of the resin-dentin interface were also conducted. The dentin-resin interface of single-step adhesive systems showed a gradual transition in the relative amount of adhesive from the resin side to dentin side. The widths of resin penetration into demineralized dentin detected by Raman microscopy were greater than those obtained by the morphological analysis using SEM. From the results of this study, a gradual variation in the composition of the dentin-resin interface was detected, and the degree of resin impregnation observed with SEM observation was less than that detected with the Raman microscopy.

  9. Adhesion of adhesive resin cements to dental zirconia ceramic and human dentin

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the long-term bond strengths of adhesive resin cements to zirconia ceramic and human dentin were evaluated, and resin-ceramic and resin-dentin bonding mechanisms were investigated. In chapter 3, the influence of surface pre-treatment on the bonding durability of three resin cements (Super-Bond C&B resin cement : SB, Clearfil™ Esthetic cement: CEC, Chemiace II: CH) to zirconia ceramic was studied. Most importantly, the influence of chemical reactions of functional monomers in...

  10. Effectiveness and biological compatibility of different generations of dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João M F; Rodrigues, José R; Camargo, Carlos H R; Fernandes, Virgilio Vilas Boas; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schweikl, Helmut; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Besides possessing good mechanical properties, dental materials should present a good biological behavior and should not injure the involved tissues. Bond strength and biocompatibility are both highly significant properties of dentin adhesives. For that matter, these properties of four generations of adhesive systems (Multi-Purpose/Single Bond/SE Plus/Easy Bond) were evaluated. Eighty bovine teeth had their dentin exposed (500- and 200-μm thickness). Adhesive was applied on the dentin layer of each specimen. Following that, the microshearing test was performed for all samples. A dentin barrier test was used for the cytotoxicity evaluation. Cell cultures (SV3NeoB) were collected from testing materials by means of 200- or 500-μm-thick dentin slices and placed in a cell culture perfusion chamber. Cell viability was measured 24 h post-exposition by means of a photometrical test (MTT test). The best bonding performance was shown by the single-step adhesive Easy Bond (21 MPa, 200 μm; 27 MPa, 500 μm) followed by Single Bond (15.6 MPa, 200 μm; 23.4 MPa, 500 μm), SE Plus (18.2 MPa, 200 μm; 20 MPa, 500 μm), and Multi-Purpose (15.2 MPa, 200 μm; 17.9 MPa, 500 μm). Regarding the cytotoxicity, Multi-Purpose slightly reduced the cell viability to 92% (200 μm)/93% (500 μm). Single Bond was reasonably cytotoxic, reducing cell viability to 71% (200 μm)/64% (500 μm). The self-etching adhesive Scotchbond SE decreased cell viability to 85% (200 μm)/71% (500 μm). Conversely, Easy Bond did not reduce cell viability in this test, regardless of the dentin thickness. Results showed that the one-step system had the best bond strength performance and was the least toxic to pulp cells. In multiple-step systems, a correct bonding technique must be done, and a pulp capping strategy is necessary for achieving good performance in both properties. The study showed a promising system (one-step self-etching), referring to it as a good alternative for specific cases, mainly due to its

  11. Tensile and bending fatigue of the adhesive interface to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Braem, Marc; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fatigue limits of the dentin-composite interfaces established either with an etch-and-rinse or an one-step self-etch adhesive systems under tensile and bending configurations. Flat specimens (1.2 mm×5 mm×35 mm) were prepared using a plexiglass mold where dentin sections from human third molars were bonded to a resin composite, exhibiting the interface centrally located. Syntac Classic and G-Bond were used as adhesives and applied according to the manufacturer's instructions. The fluorochrome Rhodamine B was added to the adhesives to allow for fractographic evaluation. Tensile strength was measured in an universal testing machine and the bending strength (n=15) in a Flex machine (Flex, University of Antwerp, Belgium), respectively. Tensile (TFL) and bending fatigue limits (BFL) (n=25) were determined under wet conditions for 10(4) cycles following a staircase approach. Interface morphology and fracture mechanisms were observed using light, confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed using three-way ANOVA (mod LSD test, pbending characteristic strengths at 63.2% failure probability for Syntac were 23.8 MPa and 71.5 MPa, and 24.7 MPa and 72.3 MPa for G-Bond, respectively. Regarding the applied methods, no significant differences were detected between adhesives. However, fatigue limits for G-Bond (TFL=5.9 MPa; BFL=36.2 MPa) were significantly reduced when compared to Syntac (TFL=12.6 MPa; BFL=49.7 MPa). Fracture modes of Syntac were generally of adhesive nature, between the adhesive resin and dentin, while G-Bond showed fracture planes involving the adhesive-dentin interface and the adhesive resin. Cyclic loading under tensile and bending configurations led to a significant strength degradation, with a more pronounced fatigue limit decrease for G-Bond. The greater decrease in fracture strength was observed in the tensile configuration. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental

  12. A Mechanistic study of Plasma Treatment Effects on Demineralized Dentin Surfaces for Improved Adhesive/Dentin Interface Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that non-thermal plasma treatment of demineralized dentin significantly (p<0.05) improved adhesive/dentin bonding strength for dental composite restoration as compared with the untreated controls. This study is to achieve mechanistic understanding of the plasma treatment effects on dentin surface through investigating the plasma treated dentin surfaces and their interaction with adhesive monomer, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The plasma treated dentin surfaces from human third molars were evaluated by water contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that plasma-treated dentin surface with subsequent HEMA immersion (Plasma/HEMA Treated) had much lower water contact angle compared with only plasma-treated (Plasma Treated) or only HEMA immersed (HEMA Treated) dentin surfaces. With prolong water droplet deposition time, water droplets spread out completely on the Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces. SEM images of Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces verified that dentin tubules were opened-up and filled with HEMA monomers. Extracted type I collagen fibrils, which was used as simulation of the exposed dentinal collagen fibrils after acid etching step, were plasma treated and analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. FT-IR spectra of the Plasma/HEMA Treated collage fibrils showed broadened amide I peak at 1660 cm−1 and amide II at 1550 cm−1, which indicate secondary structure changes of the collagen fibrils. CD spectra indicated that 67.4% collagen helix structures were denatured after plasma treatment. These experimental results demonstrate that non-thermal argon plasma treatment was very effective in loosing collagen structure and enhancing adhesive monomer penetration, which are beneficial to thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tag formation, and consequently enhance adhesive/dentin interface bonding. PMID:25267936

  13. Dentine bond strength and antimicrobial activity evaluation of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Carolina Bosso; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo Almeida; Duque, Thais Mageste; Stipp, Rafael Nobrega; Chan, Daniel Chi Ngai; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the dentine bond strength (BS) and the antibacterial activity (AA) of six adhesives against strict anaerobic and facultative bacteria. Three adhesives containing antibacterial components (Gluma 2Bond (glutaraldehyde)/G2B, Clearfil SE Protect (MDPB)/CSP and Peak Universal Bond (PUB)/chlorhexidine) and the same adhesive versions without antibacterial agents (Gluma Comfort Bond/GCB, Clearfil SE Bond/CSB and Peak LC Bond/PLB) were tested. The AA of adhesives and control groups was evaluated by direct contact method against four strict anaerobic and four facultative bacteria. After incubation, according to the appropriate periods of time for each microorganism, the time to kill microorganisms was measured. For BS, the adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' recommendations and teeth restored with composite. Teeth (n=10) were sectioned to obtain bonded beams specimens, which were tested after artificial saliva storage for one week and one year. BS data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Saliva storage for one year reduces the BS only for GCB. In general G2B and GCB required at least 24h for killing microorganisms. PUB and PLB killed only strict anaerobic microorganisms after 24h. For CSP the average time to eliminate the Streptococcus mutans and strict anaerobic oral pathogens was 30 min. CSB showed no AA against facultative bacteria, but had AA against some strict anaerobic microorganisms. Storage time had no effect on the BS for most of the adhesives. The time required to kill bacteria depended on the type of adhesive and never was less than 10 min. Most of the adhesives showed stable bond strength after one year and the Clearfil SE Protect may be a good alternative in restorative procedures performed on dentine, considering its adequate bond strength and better antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bond Strength of Methacrylate-Based Composite to Dentin using a Silorane Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    Lambrechts P, Vanherle G. Adhesion to enamel and dentin: current status and future challenges. Oper Dent 2003;28:215-235. Van Meerbeek B...Composite to Dentin using Silorane Adhesive is appropriately acknowledged and , beyond brief excerpts, is with the permission of the copyright owner...Based Composite to Dentin Using a Si lorane Adhesive 7. Intended publication/meeting: Presented as a poster at the International Association of

  15. Anti-proteolytic property and bonding durability of mussel adhesive protein-modified dentin adhesive interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hui; Li, Quan-Li; Han, Min; Mei, May Lei; Chu, Chun Hung

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of mussel adhesive protein (MAP) on collagenase activity, dentin collagen degradation and microtensile dentin bond strength (μTBS). Three groups were designed: 1. experimental group: treated with MAP; 2. positive control: treated with GM6001 (collagenase-inhibitor); 3. negative control: treated with distilled water (DW). For collagenase activity, Clostridiopeptidase-A was added to each group (n=5), and collagenase activity was assessed by colorimetric assay. For dentin collagen degradation, thirty dentin slabs were allocated to the three above groups (n=10). Dentin collagen degradation was evaluated by measuring released hydroxyproline by colorimetric assay after being incubated in Clostridiopeptidase-A for 7 days. For microtensile bond strength, sixty human third molars with flat dentin surfaces were etched by phosphoric acid and then assigned to the three above groups (n=20). An etch-and-rinse adhesive system was applied to all three groups as stated in standard clinic protocol. The test of μTBS was performed before and after thermocycling and collagenase challenge. The collagenase activities (nmol/min/mg) in the group of MAP was significantly less inactive compared to the group of GM6001 and DW (MAP0.06), the value of μTBSs after thermocycling and collagenase challenge was significantly greater in the group of MAP and GM6001 compared to the group of DW (MAP, GM6000>DW, pcomposite restoration over time. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Overestimating hybrid layer quality in polished adhesive/dentin interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Spencer, Paulette

    2004-03-15

    The most popular techniques for determining the quality of the hybrid layer (HL) have relied on morphologic characterization of the polished adhesive/dentin (a/d) interfaces before and after acid-bleach chemical treatment. Using these techniques, the existence of smooth, acid-resistant layers has been consistently reported for most adhesive systems. The purpose of this study was to determine whether popular specimen preparation techniques that include polishing and acid-bleach treatment modify the a/d interface, mask the complexity of the HL, and lead to inaccurate assessment of the quality of the HL. To understand the impact of specimen preparation techniques on the morphology of the resin-dentin interface, polished and unpolished specimens from the same tooth were closely compared after different acid-bleach chemical treatment procedures. Two one-bottle adhesives, that is, 3M Single Bond and Pulpdent UNO, exhibiting distinct differences in hydrophilic/hydrophobic composition, were used in this investigation. Using specimens from the same tooth, the effect of chemical treatments on the morphology of the resin-dentin interdiffusion zone and the differences in the morphology of polished and unpolished specimens after these same treatments were studied with scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that conventional specimen preparation techniques that include polishing and acid-bleach treatment can adversely affect and even obscure the structural detail of the a/d interface in specimens that possess a porous HL. The results indicated that the Pulpdent UNO/dentin interface had better quality than the 3M Single Bond/dentin interface. The difference in the quality of HL can be attributed to factors such as compositional differences that impact the adhesive interaction with water, that is present within the substrate during wet bonding. The inability of the conventional acid-bleach procedure to reveal the differences in the scanning electron microscopy interfacial

  17. Hydrolytic stability of self-etch adhesives bonded to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, S; Koshiro, K; Yoshida, Y; De Munck, J; Nagakane, K; Suzuki, K; Sano, H; Van Meerbeek, B

    2005-12-01

    Functional monomers chemically interact with hydroxyapatite that remains within submicron hybrid layers produced by mild self-etch adhesives. The functional monomer 10-MDP interacts most intensively with hydroxyapatite, and its calcium salt appeared most hydrolytically stable, as compared with 4-MET and phenyl-P. We investigated the hypothesis that additional chemical interaction of self-etch adhesives improves bond stability. The micro-tensile bond strength (muTBS) of the 10-MDP-based adhesive did not decrease significantly after 100,000 cycles, but did after 50,000 and 30,000 cycles, respectively, for the 4-MET-based and the phenyl-P-based adhesives. Likewise, the interfacial ultrastructure was unchanged after 100,000 thermocycles for the 10-MDP-based adhesive, while that of both the 4-MET- and phenyl-P-based adhesives contained voids and less-defined collagen. The findings of this study support the concept that long-term durability of adhesive-dentin bonds depends on the chemical bonding potential of the functional monomer.

  18. Effects of acidic primer/adhesives on primary and permanent dentin

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of primary and permanent dentin by Fourier transformed Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Methods: The middle dentin of crowns was reached by carbide bur abrading providing a uniform smear layer. Self-etching primers were applied in order to simulate the etching of self-etching adhesive systems. The groups were (n = 6): G1 (primary dentin smear layer); G2 (primary dentin etched by primer of...

  19. Enzymatic degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces produced by mild self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-10-01

    Endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) released by adhesive procedures may degrade collagen in the hybrid layer and so compromise the bonding effectiveness of etch-and-rinse adhesives. In this study, endogenous enzymatic degradation was evaluated for several simplified self-etch adhesives. In addition, primers were modified by adding two MMP inhibitors: chlorhexidine, a commonly used disinfectant, but also a non-specific MMP inhibitor; and SB-3CT, a specific inhibitor of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Gelatin zymography of fresh human dentin powder was used to identify the enzymes released by the adhesives. Micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) testing was used to assess the mechanical properties of resin-dentin interfaces over time. In none of the experimental groups treated with the mild self-etch adhesives was MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 identified. Also, no difference in the μTBS was measured for the inhibitor-modified and the control inhibitor-free adhesives after 6 months of water storage. It is concluded that in contrast to etch-and-rinse adhesives, the involvement of endogenous MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the bond-degradation process is minimal for mild self-etch adhesives.

  20. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  1. What's new in dentine bonding? Self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J Trevor

    2004-12-01

    Bonding to dentine is an integral part of contemporary restorative dentistry, but early systems were not user-friendly. The introduction of new systems which have a reduced number of steps--the self-etch adhesives--could therefore be an advantage to clinicians, provided that they are as effective as previous adhesives. These new self-etch materials appear to form hybrid layers as did the previous generation of materials. However, there is a need for further clinical research on these new materials. Advantages of self-etch systems include, no need to etch and rinse, reduced post-operative sensitivity and low technique sensitivity. Disadvantages include, the inhibition of set of self- or dual-cure resin materials and the need to roughen untreated enamel surfaces prior to bonding.

  2. Cytotoxic effect of a dentin bonding agent: AdheSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banava S.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: An important requirement for a dentin bonding agent is biological compatibility. Since dentin bonding agents are placed in cavity preparations with subgingival extensions, with direct contact to gingival and mucosal tissues, tissue response to these materials must be investigated. The aim of this study was to examine the cytotoxicity of AdheSE, a self etching adhesive, on human gingival fibroblasts."nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, primary human gingival fibroblasts were exposed to different dilutions of primer & bond of AdheSE (Vivadent, Liechtenstein. The toxicity of the primer was tested in 30 seconds, 300 seconds and 24 hours. The cytotoxicity of the bond was analyzed in uncured mode after 20 seconds, 5 minutes and 24 hours. In cured mode, tested materials were analyzed after 24 and 48 hours. Cytotoxic effects were evaluated using MTT, cell counting and DNA condensation assays. Data were analyzed by two way repeated measure ANOVA with p<0.05 as the level of significance."nResults: MTT Assay revealed that uncured AdheSE Bond was toxic only in 10-1 dilution and the difference with control group was significant (P<0.05. By increasing the time to 300sec. and 24h, dilutions of 10-2 and 10-4 were the most cytotoxic respectively. Cytotoxicity of uncured primer after 30 sec. and 300 sec. began from 10-2 and after 24h began from 10-2 and reached to 10-1. AdheSE in cured mode showed significant difference with control group in 1:2 (P<0.001,1:4 & 1:6 (P<0.01 dilutions. In cell counting assay only the 1:2 dilution was significantly more toxic than control group. Apoptosis (a morphological and biochemical distinct form of cell death that regulates cell turnover comprised in less than 5% of total death in both cured and uncured adhesives."nConclusions: Based on the results of this study, by increasing the exposure time, smaller amounts of bonding could be cytotoxic. Cytotoxicity was related to material

  3. Effect of Repeated Container Lid Opening on Dentin Shear Bond Strength of Two Dentin Adhesive Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hassanzadeh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Comparing the effect of repeated opening of the container lid of two dentin adhesive systems, Prime&Bond NT (P&B NT and iBond (iB, on shear bond strength.Materials and Methods: Intact bovine lower incisors (n=60, fixed in acrylic were ran-domly divided into six groups (n=10. Groups I and II were set as control groups. P&B NT and iB were applied on the samples after five days a week, three times a day for two weeks of use in groups III and VI; and after four weeks of use in groups V and VI. The samples were evaluated by a universal testing-machine (Instron, cross-head speed 1mm/min and stereomicroscope.Results: There was no significant difference between the bond strengths in any of the three P&B NT. The mean amount of the shear bond strength for iB after 60 times of use (15.31 MPa was significantly lowerthan that at the baseline (23.51 MPa. There was no significant difference between iB at the baseline and after 30 times of use (19.26 Mpa, and also between iB after 30 times of use and after 60 times of use. All P&B NT groups showed significantly highershear bond strengths when compared with their similar iB groups in iB.Conclusion: Repeated use (60 times of the all-in-one adhesive container seems to reduce dentin shear bond strength. Therefore, containers with a lower content of the same adhe-sive or a single-dose of the adhesive are preferred.

  4. Effect of dentine conditioning on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, H H; Burrow, M F; Yiu, C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of phosphoric acid as a surface treatment compared to traditional conditioning agents to dentine bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC) adhesives. Forty human molars were utilized in microtensile bond strength testing, while another 16 were used for evaluation of the bonded interface with scanning electron microscopy. Three RMGIC adhesives were evaluated: Fuji Bond LC (GC Corp); Riva Bond LC (SDI Ltd); and Ketac N100 (3M-ESPE). Surface treatments were 37% phosphoric acid (5 s) or 25-30% polyacrylic acid (PAA) (10 s), or the manufacturer's method - Fuji Bond LC: Cavity Conditioner (20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 10 s) or Ketac N100 primer: Ketac Nano priming agent (15 s). Teeth were finished with 600-grit SiC paper, surfaces treated and bonded with RMGIC adhesive and stored in distilled water for 24 h then subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed adhesion was affected by the 'type of RMGIC adhesive' and 'method of dentine surface treatment' (p adhesives a brief etch with phosphoric acid does not adversely effect short-term bond strengths, but is no better than traditional conditioning with PAA. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Mechanisms regulating the degradation of dentin matrices by endogenous dentin proteases and their role in dental adhesion. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Pashley, David H

    2014-08-01

    This systematic review provides an overview of the different mechanisms proposed to regulate the degradation of dentin matrices by host-derived dentin proteases, particularly as it relates to their role in dental adhesion. Significant developments have taken place over the last few years that have contributed to a better understanding of all the factors affecting the durability of adhesive resin restorations. The complexity of dentin-resin interfaces mandates a thorough understanding of all the mechanical, physical and biochemical aspects that play a role in the formation of hybrid layers. The ionic and hydrophilic nature of current dental adhesives yields permeable, unstable hybrid layers susceptible to water sorption, hydrolytic degradation and resin leaching. The hydrolytic activity of host-derived proteases also contributes to the degradation of the resin-dentin bonds. Preservation of the collagen matrix is critical to the improvement of resin-dentin bond durability. Approaches to regulate collagenolytic activity of dentin proteases have been the subject of extensive research in the last few years. A shift has occurred from the use of proteases inhibitors to the use of collagen cross-linking agents. Data provided by 51 studies published in peer-reviewed journals between January 1999 and December 2013 were compiled in this systematic review. Appraisal of the data provided by the studies included in the present review yielded a summary of the mechanisms which have already proven to be clinically successful and those which need further investigation before new clinical protocols can be adopted.

  6. Correlative transmission electron microscopy examination of nondemineralized and demineralized resin-dentin interfaces formed by two dentin adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meerbeek, B; Conn, L J; Duke, E S; Eick, J D; Robinson, S J; Guerrero, D

    1996-03-01

    The resin-dentin interface formed by two dentin adhesives, Optibond (OPTI, Kerr) and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP, 3M), was ultramorphologically examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ultrastructural information from nondemineralized and demineralized sections was correlated. It was hypothesized that the different chemical formulations of the two adhesives would result in a different morphological appearance of the hybrid layer. Ultrastructural TEM examination proved that each of the two dentin adhesive systems was able to establish a micromechanical bond between dentin and resin with the formation of a hybrid layer. However, the interfacial hybridization process that took place to produce this resin-dentin bond appeared to be specifically related to the chemical composition and application modes of both systems. OPTI consistently presented with a hybrid layer with a relatively uniform ultrastructure, electron density, and acid resistance. These three parameters were found to be more variable for the hybrid layer formed by SBMP. Characteristic of SBMP was the identification of an amorphous phase deposited at the outer surface of the hybrid layer. Although both adhesive systems investigated follow a total-etch concept, their specific chemical formulations result in different interfacial ultrastructures that are probably related to different underlying bonding mechanisms. The clinical significance of these morphological findings, however, is still unknown.

  7. Bonding performance of different adhesive systems to deproteinized dentin: microtensile bond strength and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa de Souza, Fábio; Silva, Cláudio Heliomar Vicente; Guenka Palma Dibb, Regina; Sincler Delfino, Carina; Carneiro de Souza Beatrice, Lúcia

    2005-10-01

    Deproteinization has been shown to optimize dentin bonding, but differences in adhesive composition should be considered. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentin deproteinization on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of four total-etch adhesive systems (Single Bond/SB, Prime & Bond NT/PB, One Coat Bond/OC, and PQ1/PQ). The ultrastructure of the resin-dentin interfaces was also examined using scanning electron microscopy. Tukey's multiple-comparison tests indicated that PB and PQ produced significantly higher microTBS (padhesive system, as well as the adhesive dentin specificity to the oxidant effect of sodium hypochlorite. Incorporation of fillers in the adhesive, a possible self-etching action, and the presence of a volatile solvent (acetone) were the main factors for a better union between the adhesive system and deproteinized substrate. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2005.

  8. Effects of solvent evaporation time on immediate adhesive properties of universal adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Martinez, Issis V; Perdigão, Jorge; Muñoz, Miguel A; Sezinando, Ana; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL) of three universal or multi-mode adhesives, applied with increasing solvent evaporation times. One-hundred and forty caries-free extracted third molars were divided into 20 groups for bond strength testing, according to three factors: (1) Adhesive - All-Bond Universal (ABU, Bisco, Inc.), Prime&Bond Elect (PBE, Dentsply), and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SBU, 3M ESPE); (2) Bonding strategy - self-etch (SE) or etch-and-rinse (ER); and (3) Adhesive solvent evaporation time - 5s, 15s, and 25s. Two extra groups were prepared with ABU because the respective manufacturer recommends a solvent evaporation time of 10s. After restorations were constructed, specimens were stored in water (37°C/24h). Resin-dentin beams (0.8mm(2)) were tested at 0.5mm/min (μTBS). For NL, forty extracted molars were randomly assigned to each of the 20 groups. Dentin disks were restored, immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate, sectioned and processed for evaluation under a FESEM in backscattered mode. Data from μTBS were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (adhesive vs. drying time) for each strategy, and Tukey's test (α=0.05). NL data were computed with non-parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, α=0.05). Increasing solvent evaporation time from 5s to 25s resulted in statistically higher mean μTBS for all adhesives when used in ER mode. Regarding NL, ER resulted in greater NL than SE for each of the evaporation times regardless of the adhesive used. A solvent evaporation time of 25s resulted in the lowest NL for SBU-ER. Residual water and/or solvent may compromise the performance of universal adhesives, which may be improved with extended evaporation times. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Role of Host-derived Dentinal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Reducing Dentin Bonding of Resin Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which migh...

  10. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker’s saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Makoto; O’Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPH-Spectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers’ instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher’s protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker’s or nonsmoker’s saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group. PMID:20155506

  11. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Purwanta, K.; Dogan, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft caries-infect

  12. Microtensile bond strength of three simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Purwanta, K.; Dogan, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  13. Microtensile Bond Strength of Three Simplified Adhesive Systems to Caries-affected Dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J.; Feilzer, Albert J.

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft

  14. Microtensile Bond Strength of Three Simplified Adhesive Systems to Caries-affected Dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes; Purwanta, Kenny; Dogan, Nilgun; Kleverlaan, Cees J.; Feilzer, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the microtensile bond strength of three different simplified adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extracted human molars with primary carious lesions were ground flat until dentin was exposed. Soft caries-infect

  15. Effect of water storage on the bonding effectiveness of 6 adhesives to Class I cavity dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Shirai, Kenichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Van Landuyt, Kirsten; Lambrechts, Paul; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Shintani, Hideaki; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Adhesive-dentin interfaces degrade with time. This study determined the effect water storage may have on the bonding effectiveness of adhesives to occlusal Class I cavity-bottom dentin. Six adhesives, all representing contemporary classes of adhesives, were applied: a 3-step (OptiBond FL, Kerr) and 2-step (Scotchbond 1*, 3M ESPE) etch-and-rinse adhesive, a 2-step (Clearfil SE, Kuraray) and 1-step (Adper prompt, 3M ESPE) self-etch adhesive and a 2-step (FujiBond LC, GC) and 1-step (Reactmer, Shofu) resin-modified glass-ionomer adhesive. Bonding effectiveness was assessed by microtensile bond strength testing (MTBS) and electron microscopy (Feg-SEM and TEM). The MTBS was determined after 1 day and 1 year water storage of the entire restored cavity (indirect exposure of the adhesive-dentin interface to water) and prepared microTBS-beams (direct exposure of the adhesive-dentin interface to water). The hypotheses tested were: (1) resin-dentin bonds formed at the bottom of Class I cavities resist 1-year water storage and (2) an adjacent composite-enamel bond protects the composite-dentin bond against degradation. Non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis statistically analyzed the microTBSs. The first hypothesis was rejected, as only the microTBS of OptiBond FL and Clearfil SE did not significantly decrease after 1-year direct and/or indirect water storage. The second hypothesis was corroborated, as the bonding effectiveness of most simplified adhesives (Scotchbond 1, Adper Prompt, FujiBond LC and Reactmer) approached 0 (because of the frequent pre-testing failures) after 1-year direct water exposure. The second hypothesis concluded that the 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive must still be regarded the "gold standard." Though microTBS decreased significantly, Clearfil SE, as a 2-step self-etch adhesive, was the only simplified adhesive to perform reliably after 1-year direct water exposure.

  16. Effect of digluconate chlorhexidine on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin: A systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    ...) on bond strength between dental adhesive systems and dentin of composite restorations. The electronic databases that were searched to identify manuscripts for inclusion were Medline via PubMed and Google search engine...

  17. The effect of thermocycling on the adhesion of self-etching adhesives on dental enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Araby, Alaa Morsy; Talic, Yousef F

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of one total-etch self-priming adhesive and two one-step self-etching adhesive systems on the adhesion of a resin composite to both dentin and enamel. The effect of thermocycling on the adhesion was also investigated. The null hypothesis tested was thermocycling would not affect bond strengths to enamel and dentin treated with self-etching adhesives or a total-etch adhesive. Two single-step self-etching adhesives [Xeno III (XE3) and Prompt L-Pop (PP)] and one two-step total-etch adhesive system (Prime & Bond NT) (P&B NT) were used in this study. Thirty caries-free unrestored human third molars were used to make specimens of enamel and dentin. Different adhesives were applied on enamel and dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions then hybrid composite restorative material was condensed on the surface using a mold. The bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 masculineC for 24 hours before being tested. Half of the bonded specimens were tested for shear bond strength without thermocycling. The other half of the test specimens were thermocycled using a thermocycling apparatus in water baths held at 5 masculineC and 55 masculineC with a dwell time of one minute each for 10,000 cycles prior to shear testing. The mean shear bond strength before and after thermocycling was calculated, and the results were subjected to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and repeated measure design to show the interaction between different materials and different times. The results showed shear bond strength on both enamel and dentin of the total-etch adhesive and the self-etching adhesives decreased after the specimens were subjected to thermocycling. The null hypothesis tested "thermocycling would not affect bond strengths treated with self-etching adhesives" was rejected. Furthermore, the study revealed the following: 1. The shear bond strength to both enamel and dentin of the total

  18. Dentin bond strength and degree of conversion evaluation of experimental self-etch adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdi, Fatemeh Maleknejad; Moosavi, Horieh; Atai, Mohammad; Zeynali, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) monomer in one-step self-etch experimental adhesives on dentinal microshear bond strength (µSBS), their degree of conversion and bonded micro structure. Material and Methods Composite resin cylinders (Clearfil AP-X) were bonded on human sound molar dentinal surfaces by using five experimental one-step self-etching adhesives (1-SEAs) containing 0% ...

  19. Effect of chlorhexidine incorporation into dental adhesive resin on durability of resin-dentin bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Cynthia K; Hiraishi, Noriko; Tay, Franklin R; King, Nigel M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) incorporation into experimental dentin adhesives with different hydrophilicities on the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) to dentin. Flat, deep dentin surfaces were prepared from 60 extracted human third molars. Three ethanol-solvated (50 wt% ethanol/50 wt% comonomers) experimental adhesives with varying degrees of hydrophilicity were prepared for the CHX-free groups. For the CHX-containing groups, chlorhexidine diacetate was further added to the ethanol-solvated adhesives to form a concentration of 2.0 wt% CHX. Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s, rinsed and blot dried before bonding. The adhesives were generously applied to dentin with a microbrush for 15 s. A second application of fresh adhesive was made and light cured for 20 s (600 mW/cm2) after solvent evaporation. Composite buildups were made using Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE). The bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 mm x 0.9 mm beams and stressed to failure at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Testing was performed 24 h after specimen preparation and 12 months after storage in artificial saliva. The µTBS data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests. Fractographic analysis was performed by SEM. Significant differences were observed for the three factors "adhesive hydrophilicity" (p adhesives (p > 0.05). After storage in artificial saliva, significant reduction in bond strength was observed in all adhesive groups, except for CHX-containing adhesive I (p adhesive III was significantly higher than the corresponding CHX-free adhesive (p dental adhesives, chlorhexidine can partially reduce the degradation of the resin-dentin bonds.

  20. Regional bond strengths of adhesive resins to pulp chamber dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, S; Zhang, Y; Pereira, P N; Ozer, F; Pashley, D H

    2001-08-01

    Microleakage of oral microorganisms, which can occur due to the lack of sealing ability of permanent restorative materials, may cause failure of root canal treatments. Although a great deal of research has been done on sealing enamel and coronal dentin with resins, little research has been done on the adhesion of resins to the walls of pulp chambers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional bond strengths of two adhesive systems to the walls of pulp chambers. A section was made horizontally through the middle of the pulp chamber of extracted human third molars to divide the chamber into upper and lower halves. The pulp tissue was removed and the tooth segments were then divided into treatment subgroups. The pulp chambers were bonded with C&B Metabond (Parkell) or One-Step (Bisco), with or without 5% NaOCI pretreatment. The microtensile bond strengths of these resins to four different pulp chamber regions (bottom, wall, roof, and pulp horn areas) were then measured using an Instron machine. The data were expressed in MPa and were analyzed by a three-way ANOVA. Statistically significant differences were found among the test groups (p < 0.001). One-Step produced higher bond strengths to all pulp chamber regions except the floor, compared with C&B Metabond. The results indicated that high bond strengths can be achieved between adhesive resins and the various regions of the pulp chamber. This should permit the use of a thick layer of unfilled resin along the floor of the pulp chamber and over the canal orifices as a secondary protective seal after finishing root canal therapy.

  1. Bond strength of different adhesives to normal and caries-affected dentins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUAN Wei; HOU Ben-xiang; L(U) Yalin

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently, several systems of dentin substrate-reacting adhesives are available for use in the restorative treatment against caries. However, the bond effectiveness and property of different adhesive systems to caries-affected dentin are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different adhesives to both normal dentin (ND) and caries-affected dentin (CAD) and to analyze the dentin/adhesive interracial characteristics.Methods Twenty eight extracted human molars with coronal medium carious lesions were randomly assigned to four groups according to adhesives used. ND and CAD were bonded with etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper~(TM) Single Bond 2 (SB2) or self-etching adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Clearfil S~3 Bond (CS3), iBond GI (IB). Rectangular sticks of resin-dentin bonded interfaces 0.9 mm~2 were obtained. The specimens were subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean μTBS was statistically analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keuls tests. Interfacial morphologies were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).Results Etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper~(TM) Single Bond 2 yielded high bond strength when applied to both normal and caries-affected dentin. The two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond generated the highest bond strength to ND among all adhesives tested but a significantly reduced strength when applied to CAD. For the one-step self-etching adhesives, Clearfil S~3 Bond and iBond GI, the bond strength was relatively low regardless of the dentin type. SEM interfacial analysis revealed that hybrid layers were thicker with poorer resin tag formation and less resin-filled lateral branches in the CAD than in the ND for all the adhesives tested.Conclusion The etch-and-rinse adhesive performed more effectively to caries-affected dentin than the self-etching adhesives.

  2. Evaluation of the micro-shear bond strength of four adhesive systems to dentin with and without adhesive area limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yuan; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Xuehui; Niu, Guangliang; Du, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding ability of four representative dentin-adhesive systems by applying the micro-shear bond strength (μ-SBS) test method and to evaluate the influence of adhesive area limitation on the bond strength. Two different adhesive application methods were used in the μ-SBS test (with and without adhesives area limitation), and four representative adhesive systems were used in this study. Each dentin surface was treated with one of the four representative adhesive systems, and with twenty samples per group (n=20), each of the four groups underwent a μ-SBS test. The results showed that the bond strength was significantly influenced by the adhesive application method (padhesive type (padhesive systems, 3-E&R has a much better bond quality compared to the other adhesive systems. Furthermore, the micro-shear bond strength test method of restricting the area of both the adhesive and the resin is more reliable for evaluating the bonding property of adhesives to dentin, and it is also adequate for comparing the different adhesives systems.

  3. Effect of chemomechanical caries removal on bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer cement adhesives to caries-affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Hhh; Yiu, Cky; Burrow, M F

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of: (1) chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR); (2) dentine surface treatments and (3) dentine substrates on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesives. One hundred and twenty permanent molars exhibiting moderate cavitation on the occlusal surface into dentine were used. Seventy-five carious molars were used for bond strength testing; the remaining 45 for micromorphological evaluation of the bonded interface. Caries was excavated with NaOCl-based CMCR (Carisolv), enzyme-based CMCR (Papacarie), or conventional rotary caries removal methods. Dentine surface treatment was performed using 37% phosphoric acid, 25-30% PAA or 20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 . Three-way ANOVA revealed that all three factors 'caries removal methods', 'dentine surface treatments' and 'dentine substrates' did not significantly affect bond strength (p > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the acid-base resistant layer was thicker in caries-affected dentine compared to sound dentine. NaOCl- and enzyme-based CMCR methods have no adverse effect on adhesion of RMGIC adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentine. Dentine surface treatment with 37% phosphoric acid for 5 s has no negative effect on bonding of RMGIC adhesives to dentine compared with using polyacrylic acid for 10 s. RMGIC adhesives bonded well to both sound and caries-affected dentine. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  4. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy of resin-dentin interface morphology of seven dentin adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanumiharja, M; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J; Carpenter, J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resin-dentin interface morphology of 7 resin-based dentin adhesive systems (Solid Bond, EBS-Multi, PermaQuik, One Coat Bond, Gluma One Bond, Prime & Bond NT/NRC, and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V). Fourteen dentin disks 1.0 mm thick were obtained from superficial occlusal dentin of extracted human third molars, and finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Two dentin disks were bonded using each of the adhesives above according to the manufacturers' instructions, and a thin layer of flowable resin composite was applied. The specimens were kept in tap water for 24 h at 37 degrees C, and then assigned to one of two observational techniques: a fracture technique and an acid-base technique. Fracture technique: shallow grooves were cut, fixed in 10% buffered formalin, and dehydrated in an ascending ethanol series up to 100%, critical-point dried, and fractured along the prepared grooves. Acid-base technique: the specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned through the center, polished with diamond paste down to 0.25-micron particle size, and treated with 10% orthophosphoric acid for 10 s and 5% sodium hypochlorite for 5 min. All the specimens were mounted on aluminum stubs, gold sputter coated, and observed using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). All the dentin adhesive systems showed hybrid layer formation, but the thickness varied depending on the bonding system used. The self-etching priming systems (Prime & Bond NT/NRC and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V) showed the thinnest hybrid layer at 1 to 2 microns, whereas the "single-bottle" system (Gluma One Bond) exhibited the thickest hybrid layer at 8 to 16 microns. The ultramorphological structures of dentin bonding systems are determined by the composition of each system. Characterization of the interface of the adhesive system using the fracture technique provides additional information regarding the pattern of resin infiltration in some dentin bonding

  5. Effect of glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on shear bond strength of adhesives to primary dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of alternative pulpotomy agents such as glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Eighty human primary molar teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction and divided into experimental and control groups. Lingual dentin specimens in experimental groups were treated with glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate. Buccal surfaces soaked in water served as control group. Each group was then divided into two groups based on the adhesive system used: Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-250 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The failure mode analysis was performed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: The results revealed that glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate significantly reduced the shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin. Clearfil SE Bond showed much higher shear bond strength than Adper Prompt L Pop to primary dentin. SEM analysis revealed a predominant cohesive failure mode for both adhesive systems. Conclusion: This study revealed that the pulpotomy medicaments glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate adversely affected the bonding of self-etch adhesive systems to primary dentin.

  6. Evaluation of the interface between one-bottle adhesive systems and dentin by Goldner's trichrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Spencer, Paulette

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate the hybrid layers in interfaces between dentin and six contemporary one-bottle adhesive systems using a nondestructive differential staining micro-technique. The adhesive systems used in this study were divided to three groups based on hydrophilic/hydrophobic component ratios (i.e. ability to dissolve in water), from highest to lowest as follows: Group 1 (Dentastic UNO.DUO, PermaQuick PQ1) > Group 2 (One-Step, Primer&Bond NT) > Group 3 (Optibond Solo, Single Bond). The occlusal third of the crown was removed from 36 extracted, unerupted human 3rd molars. Smear layers were created by abrading the dentin with 600 grit SiC under water. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the adhesive systems per manufacturer's instructions. After 24 hours in water, 3-5 microm thin sections of the adhesive/dentin (adhesive/dentin ) interface were cut with a microtome and stained with Goldner's trichrome. Stained thin sections from each prepared tooth were imaged with light microscopy. The thickness and color difference of adhesive/dentin interfaces among these one-bottle adhesive systems were clearly visualized. The width of the hybrid layers varied, ranged from 4.1-9.2 microm for six adhesive systems. The color differences in the stained sections are reflected to the extent and degree to which the adhesive envelops the exposed collagen. Among these six bonding systems, resin encapsulation of collagen varied from highest to lowest as follows: Group 1 (UNO, PQ1) > Group 2 (OS, PBNT) > Group 3 (OP, SB). The differences in collagen encapsulation are dependent on the adhesive composition, or the ability to tolerate water during the infiltration of the wet demineralized matrix.

  7. Biocompatibilidad de los adhesivos dentinarios Biocompatibility of the dentin adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Paz Pumpido

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el proceso de aislamiento y posterior cultivo de los odontoblastos humanos, identificándolos por sus características fenotípicas y funcionales. Una vez identificados se procede la congelación de los mismos en nitrógeno líquido. Se preparan unos discos de cristal sobre los que se pincelan tres adhesivos dentinarios sobre los que se vierte una suspensión de odontoblastos en el medio de cultivo apropiado y se procede a su cultivo. Se estudian las características funcionales de lass células en cuanto a síntesis de DNA, actividad de la fosfatasa alcalina, síntesis de colágeno y formación de matriz.This is a description of the isolation and cultivation of human odontoblasts, and their identification via phenotypic and functional characteristics. Once they have been identified they are frozen in liquid nitrogen. Glass discs are then prepared and three dentin adhesives are applied with a brush, and then a suspension of odontoblasts in a suitable cultivation is poured on and the culture is prepared. The functional characteristics of the cells are studied in terms of DNA synthesis, alkaline phosphate activity, collagen synthesis and matrix formation.

  8. Effect of proanthocyanidin incorporation into dental adhesive resin on resin-dentine bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epasinghe, D J; Yiu, C K Y; Burrow, M F; Tay, F R; King, N M

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of proanthocyanidin (PA) incorporation into experimental dental adhesives on resin-dentine bond strength. Four experimental hydrophilic adhesives containing different PA concentrations were prepared by combining 50wt% resin comonomer mixtures with 50wt% ethanol. Proanthocyanidin was added to the ethanol-solvated resin to yield three adhesives with PA concentrations of 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0wt%, respectively. A PA-free adhesive served as the control. Flat dentine surfaces from 40 extracted third molars were etched with 32% phosphoric acid. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the four adhesive groups. Two layers of one of the four experimental adhesives were applied to the etched dentine and light-cured for 20s. Composite build-ups were performed using Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE). After storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24h, twenty-four bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 mm×0.9 mm beams and stressed to failure under tension for bond strength testing. Bond strength data were evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Interfacial nanoleakage was examined in the remaining teeth using a field-emission scanning electron microscope and analysed using the Chi-square test (α=0.05). No significant difference in bond strength was found amongst PA-free, 1% and 2% PA adhesives. However, incorporation of 3% PA into the adhesive significantly lowered bond strength as demonstrated by a greater number of adhesive failures and more extensive nanoleakage along the bonded interface. Incorporation of 2% proanthocyanidin into dental adhesives has no adverse effect on dentine bond strength. The addition of proanthocyanidin to an experimental adhesive has no adverse effect on the immediate resin-dentine bond strength when the concentration of proanthocyanidin in the adhesive is less than or equal to 2%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nanoleakage of fiber posts luted with different adhesive strategies and the effect of chlorhexidine on the interface of dentin and self-adhesive cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Araujo, Cintia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lucia Trazzi; de Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the nanoleakage of fiber posts luted using different adhesive strategies and to investigate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) on nanoleakage at the resin-dentin interfaces of self-adhesive cements. The self-adhesive and etch-and-rinse adhesive groups tested demonstrated similar results with regard to nanoleakage. Pretreatment with CHX promoted an adequate seal at the resin-dentin interface for self-adhesive cements.

  10. Micromorphological characterization of adhesive interface of sound dentin and total-etch and self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobac, Milan; Stojanac, Igor; Ramić, Bojana; Premović, Milica; Petrović, Ljubomir

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal in restorative dentistry has always been to achieve strong and permanent bond between the dental tissues and filling materials. It is not easy to achieve this task because the bonding process is different for enamel and dentin-dentin is more humid and more organic than enamel. It is moisture and organic nature of dentin that make this hard tissue very complex to achieve adhesive bond. One of the first and most widely used tools for examining the adhesive bond between hard dental tissues and composite restorative materials is scanning electron microscopy. The aim of this study was scanning electron microscopy analyzes the interfacial micro morphology of total-etch and self-etch adhesives. Micro morphological characteristics of interface between total-etch adhesive (Prime & Bond NT) in combination with the corresponding composite (Ceram X Mono) were compared with those of self-etching adhesive (AdheSE One) in, combination with the corresponding composite (Tetric EvoCeram). The specimens were observed under 1000 x magnification of scanning electron microscopy (JEOL, JSM-6460 Low Vacuum). Measurement of the thickness of the hybrid layer of the examined com posite systems was performed with the software of the device used (NIH Image Analyser). Micromorphological analysis of interface showed that the hybrid layer in sound dentin was well formed, its average thickness being 2.68 microm, with a large number of resin tags and a large amount of lateral branches for specimens with a composite system Prime & Bond NT-Ceram X Mono. However, the specimens' with composite systems Adhese One-Tetric EvoCeram did not show the presence of hybrid layer and the resin tags were poorly represented. The results of this study suggest that total-etch adhesives bond better with sound dentin than self-etch adhesive.

  11. Effect of Fluoride-Releasing Adhesive Systems on the Mechanical Properties of Eroded Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Moda, Mariana Dias; Suzuki, Thaís Yumi Umeda; Godas, André Gustavo de Lima; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of erosive pH cycling with solutions that simulate dental erosion on Martens hardness (HMV) and elastic modulus (Eit) of dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems. Twenty-seven bovine dentin slabs were restored with three adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch adhesive system, One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect fluoride-containing self-etching adhesive systems. The restorations were made with Filtek Z250. The HMV and Eit values at distances of 10, 30, 50 and 70 µm from the interface were evaluated using a dynamic ultra microhardness tester before and after immersion in deionized water, citric acid and hydrochloric acid (n=9). Data were submitted to repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (=0.05). After erosive cycling, HMV values of dentin decreased in all groups. For dentin restored with Adper Single Bond 2, the lowest values were found closer to the hybrid layer, while for One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect, the values remained unaltered at all distances. For dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems, a decrease in Eit was found, but after 30 µm this difference was not significant. The acid substances were able to alter HMV and Eit of the underlying dentin. For fluoride-releasing adhesives, the greater the distance from bonded interface, the lower the Eit values. The fluoride in One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect was able to protect the underlying dentin closer to the materials. In this way, the fluoride from adhesive systems could have some positive effect in the early stages of erosive lesions.

  12. EDTA conditioning of dentine promotes adhesion, migration and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, K M; Widbiller, M; Buchalla, W; Eidt, A; Hiller, K-A; Hoffer, P C; Schmalz, G

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of dentine conditioning on migration, adhesion and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells. Dentine discs prepared from extracted human molars were pre-treated with EDTA (10%), NaOCl (5.25%) or H2 O. Migration of dental pulp stem cells towards pre-treated dentine after 24 and 48 h was assessed in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Cell adhesion was evaluated indirectly by measuring cell viability. Expression of mineralization-associated genes (COL1A1, ALP, BSP, DSPP, RUNX2) in cells cultured on pre-treated dentine for 7 days was determined by RT-qPCR. Nonparametric statistical analysis was performed for cell migration and cell viability data to compare different groups and time-points (Mann-Whitney U-test, α = 0.05). Treatment of dentine with H2 O or EDTA allowed for cell attachment, which was prohibited by NaOCl with statistical significance (P = 0.000). Furthermore, EDTA conditioning induced cell migration towards dentine. The expression of mineralization-associated genes was increased in dental pulp cells cultured on dentine after EDTA conditioning compared to H2 O-pre-treated dentine discs. EDTA conditioning of dentine promoted the adhesion, migration and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells towards or onto dentine. A pre-treatment with EDTA as the final step of an irrigation protocol for regenerative endodontic procedures has the potential to act favourably on new tissue formation within the root canal. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Optical properties of human radicular dentin: ATR-FTIR characterization and dentine tubule direction influence on radicular post adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto, Jose; Zamataro, Claudia B.; Benetti, Carolina; Dias, Derly A.; Blay, Alberto; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge of dental structures is essential for understanding of laser interaction and its consequences during adhesion processes. Tubule density in dentin ranges from 4.900 to 90.000 per mm2, for diameters from 1 to 3 μm. Light propagation inside the tubules is associated with tubules orientation. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous work in literature characterizing physical-chemical alterations in dentin. The dentin samples were irradiated with a Er,Cr:YSGG Laser at wavelength 2.78 μm, with an energy density of 9.46 J/cm2 , above the ablation threshold. ATRFTIR at wavenumbers 2000 to 700 cm-1 was used to evaluate the differences among third root region and tubules orientation.

  14. Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop Adhesives to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alizadeh Oskoee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength to sound and caries-affected dentin using Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop adhesives.Materials and Methods: Sixteen extracted human molars with carious lesions extended halfway through dentin were ground to expose the caries affected and the surrounding normal dentin. The samples were divided into two groups of eight samples each, including Single Bond (two-step etch and rinse and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (one step self-etch. Z-100 (3M was used for composite build-ups. The teeth were then sectioned and prepared for micro tensile bond strength test, at cross head speed of 1.5 mm/min. Data were ana-lyzed by 1- and 2-way ANOVA.Results: Bond strengths of Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop adhesives to sound den-tin were significantly higher than to the caries-affected one (P<0.001, besides, bond strength of Single Bond to dentin was generally found to be higher than Adper Prompt-L-Pop adhesive (P<0.001.The interaction effect was not significant (P=0.116Conclusion: Bond strength to caries-affected dentin was compromised when one and two step adhesives were used.

  15. Micromorphology of Restorative System-Dentin Interface in Primary Teeth Using Different Adhesive Systems and Burs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Cristina Favieri de MELO-SILVA

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study in vitro evaluated the micromorphology of the resin-dentin interface in primary teeth, using different rotatory instruments and adhesive systems. Method: Twenty primary molars were selected and randomly divided into two groups (n=10. In group C, the occlusal surfaces of teeth were cut with a carbide bur at high-speed until the area of dentin exposure. In group D, the same procedure was conducted, but the dentin was cut with a diamond bur. The surface of each tooth was divided into two halves; one half of the occlusal surface received application of two-step total-etch adhesive system (Single-Bond – 3M, and the other half received application of one-step self-etching adhesive (One Up Bond F - Tokuyama. All teeth were restored with composite (Z-250 - 3M. The samples were thermocycled, embedded in acrylic resin, sectioned for achievement of the resin-dentin interface and the teeth were sputter- coated with gold and observed under SEM. Results: the two adhesive systems showed hybrid layer formation; the two-step adhesive system demonstrated better interface sealing than the self-etching; the dentin cut with carbide burs was not statistically different with regard to the adhesive system; and diamond bur with self-etching adhesive system showed the worst interface sealing with the highest gap values. Conclusion: the diamond bur presented negative influence only in the quality of the interface between restorative system and primary dentin when it was used the one step self-etching adhesive system.

  16. Evaluation of bond strength of self-adhesive cements to dentin with or without application of adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Daphne Câmara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Silva, Melissa Aline; Rangel, Patrícia Maria; Torres, Carlos Rocha; Fava, Marcelo

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of indirect restorations to dentin using self-adhesive cements with and without the application of adhesive systems. Seventy-two bovine incisors were used, in which the buccal surfaces were ground down to expose an area of dentin measuring a minimum of 4 x 4 mm. The indirect resin composite Resilab was used to make 72 blocks, which were cemented onto the dentin surface of the teeth and divided into 4 groups (n = 18): group 1: self-adhesive resin cement BiFix SE, applied according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 2: self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem, used according to manufacturer's recommendations; group 3: etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system + BiFix SE; group 4: etch-and-rinse Single Bond 2 adhesive system + RelyX Unicem. The specimens were sectioned into sticks and subjected to microtensile testing in a universal testing machine (EMIC DL- 200 MF). Data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 5%). The mean values (± standard deviation) obtained for the groups were: group 1: 15.28 (± 8.17)a, group 2: 14.60 (± 5.21)a, group 3: 39.20 (± 9.98)c, group 4: 27.59 (± 6.57)b. Different letters indicate significant differences (ANOVA; p = 0.0000). The application of adhesive systems before self-adhesive cements significantly increased the bond strength to dentin. In group 2, RelyX Unicem associated with the adhesive system Single Bond 2 showed significantly lower mean tensile bond strengths than group 3 (BiFix SE associated with the etch-and-rinse Solobond M adhesive system).

  17. Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop Adhesives to Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    P. Alizadeh Oskoee; AA. Ajami; S. Savadi Oskoee; F. Pournaghi-Azar

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength to sound and caries-affected dentin using Single Bond and Adper Prompt-L-Pop adhesives.Materials and Methods: Sixteen extracted human molars with carious lesions extended halfway through dentin were ground to expose the caries affected and the surrounding normal dentin. The samples were divided into two groups of eight samples each, including Single Bond (two-step etch and rinse) and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (one step s...

  18. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  19. Paucity of Nanolayering in Resin-Dentin Interfaces of MDP-based Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, F; Zhou, L; Zhang, Z; Niu, L; Zhang, L; Chen, C; Zhou, J; Yang, H; Wang, X; Fu, B; Huang, C; Pashley, D H; Tay, F R

    2016-04-01

    Self-assembled nanolayering structures have been reported in resin-dentin interfaces created by adhesives that contain 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP). These structures have been hypothesized to contribute to bond durability. The objective of the present study was to determine the extent of nanolayering in resin-dentin interfaces after application of commercialized 10-MDP-containing self-etch and universal adhesives to human dentin. Seven commercialized adhesives were examined: Adhese Universal (Ivoclar-Vivadent), All-Bond Universal (Bisco, Inc.), Clearfil SE Bond 2, Clearfil S3 Bond Plus, Clearfil Universal Bond (all from Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc.), G-Premio Bond (GC Corp.), and Scotchbond Universal (3M ESPE). Each adhesive was applied in the self-etch mode on midcoronal dentin according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. Bonded specimens (n = 6) were covered with flowable resin composite, processed for transmission electron microscopy, and examined at 30 random sites without staining. Thin-film glancing angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to detect the characteristic peaks exhibited by nanolayering (n = 4). The control consisted of 15%wt, 10%wt, and 5%wt 10-MDP (DM Healthcare Products, Inc.) dissolved in a mixed solvent (ethanol and water weight ratio 9:8, with photoinitiators). Experimental primers were applied to dentin for 20 s, covered with hydrophobic resin layer, and examined in the same manner. Profuse nanolayering with highly ordered periodicity (~3.7 nm wide) was observed adjacent to partially dissolved apatite crystallites in dentin treated with the 15% 10-MDP primer. Three peaks in the 2θ range of 2.40° (3.68 nm), 4.78° (1.85 nm), and 7.18° (1.23 nm) were identified from thin-film XRD. Reduction in the extent of nanolayering was observed in the 10% and 5% 10-MDP experimental primer-dentin interface along with lower intensity XRD peaks. Nanolayering and characteristic XRD peaks were rarely observed in

  20. Effectiveness of immediate bonding of etch-and-rinse adhesives to simplified ethanol-saturated dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Afonso Guimarães

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the immediate bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesives to demineralized dentin saturated with either water or absolute ethanol. The research hypothesis was that there would be no difference in bond strength to dentin between water or ethanol wet-bonding techniques. The medium dentin of 20 third molars was exposed (n = 5. The dentin surface was then acid-etched, left moist and randomly assigned to be saturated via either water wet-bonding (WBT or absolute ethanol wet-bonding (EBT. The specimens were then treated with one of the following etch-and-rinse adhesive systems: a 3-step, water-based system (Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose, or SBMP or a 2-step, ethanol/water-based system (Adper Single Bond 2, or SB. Resin composite build-ups were then incrementally constructed. After water storage for 24 h at 37°C, the tensile strength of the specimens was tested in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 5%. The failure modes were verified using a stereomicroscope (40'. For both adhesives, no significant difference in bond strength was observed between WBT and EBT (p > 0.05. The highest bond strength was observed for SB, regardless of the bonding technique (p < 0.05. No significant interaction between adhesives and bonding techniques was noticed (p = 0.597. There was a predominance of adhesive failures for all tested groups. The EBT and WBT displayed similar immediate bond strength means for both adhesives. The SB adhesive exhibited higher means for all conditions tested. Further investigations are needed to evaluate long-term bonding to dentin mediated by commercial etch-and-rinse adhesives using the EBT approach.

  1. Micro-Raman spectroscopic studies on the adhesive-dentine interface and the degree of conversion of dental adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Miletic, Vesna

    2010-01-01

    A series of studies on monomer to polymer conversion in adhesive systems was undertaken using micro-Raman spectroscopy. A database of micro-Raman spectra was compiled for identification of tooth tissues and materials. The degree of conversion was assessed as a function of time and light source. Linear and two-dimensional micro- Raman characterisations of the adhesive-dentine and resin-based composite-adhesivedentine interfaces were performed. The degree of monomer to polymer co...

  2. Degradation in the Fatigue Strength of Dentin by Cutting, Etching and Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.-H.; Majd, H.; Orrego, S.; Majd, B.; Romberg, E.; Mutluay, M.M.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    The processes involved in placing resin composite restorations may degrade the fatigue strength of dentin and increase the likelihood of fractures in restored teeth. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative changes in strength and fatigue behavior of dentin caused by bur preparation, etching and resin bonding procedures using a 3-step system. Methods Specimens of dentin were prepared from the crowns of unrestored 3rd molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. Four treated groups were prepared including dentin beams subjected to a burr treatment only with a conventional straight-sided bur, or etching treatment only. An additional treated group received both bur and etching treatments, and the last was treated by bur treatment and etching, followed by application of a commercial resin adhesive. The control group consisted of “as sectioned” dentin specimens. Results Under quasi-static loading to failure there was no significant difference between the strength of the control group and treated groups. Dentin beams receiving only etching or bur cutting treatments exhibited fatigue strengths that were significantly lower (p≤0.0001) than the control; there was no significant difference in the fatigue resistance of these two groups. Similarly, the dentin receiving bur and etching treatments exhibited significantly lower (p≤0.0001) fatigue strength than that of the control, regardless of whether an adhesive was applied. Significance The individual steps involved in the placement of bonded resin composite restorations significantly decrease the fatigue strength of dentin, and application of a bonding agent does not increase the fatigue strength of dentin. PMID:24985539

  3. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    OpenAIRE

    DI HIPÓLITO, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; Goes, Mario Fernando De

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bon...

  4. The effect of elevated temperatures on the dentin adhesion of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, William W; Covey, David A; Haisch, Larry D

    2003-01-01

    Although resin composite restorations may undergo relatively extreme temperature changes in the oral cavity, little is known about the effects of temperature on their adhesion to tooth structure. This study evaluated the effect of temperature on shear bond strength to dentin of three commercial resin dentin adhesives through testing of matured specimens over the 20 degrees to 55 degrees C temperature range. A significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed between 20 degrees C and 55 degrees C for all the materials, and for one of the materials, a significant difference was also observed between 20 degrees C and 37 degrees C.

  5. Hybridization quality in cervical cementum and superficial dentin using current adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Shimada, Yasushi; Ichinose, Shizuko; Tagami, Junji

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the hybridization quality of adhesives to gingival cementum and close superficial dentin using both total-etch and self-etch, one-step and two-step adhesives in vitro. Five adhesive systems were used and evaluated in this study; three kinds of two-step adhesives (total-etch--Single Bond and self-etch--Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil Protect Bond) and two one-step adhesives (Clearfil S3 Bond, G Bond). Fifteen extracted intact human third molars were used in this study. A diagonal cut which was approximately 45 degrees to the long axis of the roots, with the initiating point located 2 mm below the buccal enamel-cementum junction and ascending towards the pulp chamber was prepared on each tooth. Flat cervical cementum and dentin surfaces were ground with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper, and bonded with one of the adhesives and finished by applying a flowable resin composite. After 24 h storage at 37 degrees C in water, the bonded assemblies were sectioned into approximately 1mm thick slabs. Two central slabs from each tooth were chosen. One slab was totally demineralized in 0.5 M EDTA and the other was not demineralized and immersed into 50% (w/v) solution of ammoniacal silver nitrate for 24 h, and successively exposed to photodeveloping solution for 8 h. The specimens were then processed for TEM observation. Both the stained demineralized silver unchallenged and unstained non-demineralized silver challenged resin-cervical cementum/proximal superficial dentin interface were observed and evaluated under a transmission electron microscope. The nanoleakage pathway and extent vary among the different adhesives used and also between the resin-cementum interface and resin-dentin interface. Two-step self-etch adhesives showed better hybridization quality both in cementum and proximal superficial dentin as compared to those of two-step total-etch adhesive and one-step self-etch adhesives. Two-step self-etch adhesives may provide a

  6. Shear bond strength of three adhesive systems to enamel and dentin of permanent teeth

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    Niloofar Shadman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the shear bond strength of three new adhesive systems to enamel and dentin of permanent human teeth using three new etch and rinse and self-etch adhesive systems.Materials and Methods: Sixty intact caries-free third molars were selected and randomly divided into 6 groups. Flat buccal and lingual enamel and dentin surfaces were prepared and mounted in the acrylic resin perpendicular to the plan of the horizon. Adhesives used in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE and AdheSE-One F (Ivoclar/Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein. The adhesives were applied on the surfaces and cured with quartz tungsten halogen curing unit (600 mW/cm2 intensity for 20 s. After attaching composite to the surfaces and thermocycling (500 cycles, 5-55ºC, shear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The failure modes were examined under a stereomicroscope. The data were statistically analyzed using T-test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Fisher's exact tests.Results: In enamel, Tetric N-Bond (28.57±4.58 MPa and AdheSE (21.97±7.6 MPa had significantly higher bond strength than AdheSE-One F (7.16±2.09 MPa (P0.05.Conclusion: Shear bond strength to dentin in Tetric N-Bond (etch and rinse system( was higher than self-etch adhesives (AdheSE and AdheSE-One F. The bond strength to enamel and dentin in two-step self-etch (AdheSE was higher than one-step self-etch (AdheSE-One F.

  7. Effect of cleaning methods on bond strength of self-etching adhesive to dentin

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    Juliana Delatorre Bronzato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of cleaning methods to remove zinc oxide-eugenol-based root canal sealer (Endomethasone on the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the pulp chamber. A zinc oxide- and eugenol-based sealer was placed for 10 min in contact with the pulp chamber dentin. Specimens were divided into four groups according to the cleaning method of dentin used: G1, no root canal sealer (control; G2, 0.9% sodium chlorite (NaCl; G3, ethanol; and G4, followed by diamond drill. After cleaning, the teeth were restored with composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond. All specimens were sectioned to produce rectangular sticks and dentin/resin interface was submitted to microtensile bond testing. The mean bond strengths were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey (α = 0.05. Results: G3 and G4 showed bond strengths similar to the G1 (P > 0.05. A significant decrease in the bond strength in the G2 was observed (P < 0.05. G1, G3, and G4, the predominant failure mode was the mixed type. The prevalence of adhesive failure mode was verified in the G2. Conclusion: The cleaning methods affected the bond strength of the self-etching adhesive to dentin differently.

  8. Effect of silorane-based adhesive system on bond strength between composite and dentin substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Ricardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The complexities of the oral environment, the dentin substrate, and the different bond and composite resin systems represent a challenge to the maintenance of reasonable bond between the composite resin and the tooth structure. Aims: To evaluate the effect of the adhesive system on bond strength between silorane-based composite resin and dentin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen human molars extracted were selected and vertically cut into 3 dentin fragments, randomly divided among the experimental groups and restored with Z250 and P90 composite resin using different adhesive protocols (Adper Single Bond 2, Silorano primer, Adper SE Plus, and Scotchbond Multiuse. Two composite resin cylinders were built up on each dentin surface (n = 10 and subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P = 0.05. Results: According to the results, Kruskal-Wallis test evidenced at least one statistical significant difference (P = 0.001. The Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the group (P < 0.05. Group PSM8 (P90 + SM showed statically significant higher results when compared with groups PSP4 (P90 + SP, PSB2 (P90 + SB, and ZSE5 (Z250 + SE. Conclusion: The results evidenced that the monomer of the adhesive system has an effect on bond strength between the composite resin and dentin.

  9. Long-term bond strength of adhesive systems applied to etched and deproteinized dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoshka Uceda-Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and 12-month bond strength of two adhesive systems (Single Bond-SB and One Step-OS applied to demineralized dentin (WH and demineralized/NaOCl-treated dentin (H. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were exposed, etched, rinsed and slightly dried. For the H groups, a solution of 10% NaOCl was applied for 60 s, rinsed (15 s and slightly dried. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite resin crowns were incrementally constructed. After 24 h (water-37ºC, the specimens was sectioned in order to obtain resin-dentin sticks (0.8 mm². The specimens were tested in microtensile (0.5 mm/min immediately (IM or after 12 months of water storage (12M. The data (MPa were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. Only the main factors adhesive and time were significant (p=0.004 and p=0.003, respectively. SB (42.3±9.1 showed higher bond strengths than OS (33.6±11.6. The mean bond strength for IM-group (42.5±8.7 was statistically superior to 12M (33.3±11.8. The use of 10% NaOCl, after acid etching, did not improve the immediate and the long-term resin-dentin bond strength.

  10. Differences in tensile adhesion strength between HEMA and nonHEMA-based dentin bonding applied on superficial and deep dentin surfaces

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    Eresha Melati Kusuma Wurdani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improvement in dentistry shows some progresses, due to patients awareness on the importance of dental care. Cervical lesion is the most common phenomenon which oftenly found 46.36% in man and 38.13% in woman. Cervical lesions need composite restoration for treatment to stop the process of tissue damage. The process of adhesion of composite restoration material to the structure of the tooth is not easily separated and it needs optimal function in the oral cavity. Application of dentin bonding agents to attach the composite is needed. Selection of HEMA-based bonding material and Hema free-based bonding material which have a different solvent in their composition, as applied to the dentin superficial and deep dentin, affect the results of debonding test. Debonding test is done to measure the adhesion strength of a bonding material. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze differences in tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after application in superficial and deep dentine surfaces. Method: The tooth of the bovine was as samples. A superficial dentine sample was taken from 0.5-1 mm of dentino enamel junction and a deep dentine sample was taken from 0.5 mm culmination of pulp horn. Dentine surface area was equal to p x r2 = (3.14 x 22 = 12.56 mm2. Six samples of HEMA-based bonding was applied to the dentine superficial. Six samples of HEMAfree based bonding was applied to the superficial dentine. Six samples of HEMA-based bonding was applied to the deep dentine. Six samples of HEMA-free based bonding was applied to the deep dentine. Tensile strength was measured using an Autograph AG-10TE. Result: There were differences tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after the application on superficial (p=0.000 and deep dentine surfaces (p=0.000. Conclusion: There were differences tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after the

  11. Four-year water degradation of a total-etch and two self-etching adhesives bonded to dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I. Abdalla; A.J. Feilzer

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate effect of direct and indirect water storage on the microtensile dentin bond strength of one total-etch and two self-etching adhesives. Methods: The adhesive materials were: one total-etch adhesive; ‘Admira Bond’ and two selfetch adhesives; ‘Clearfil SE Bond’ and ‘Hybrid Bond’

  12. Four-year water degradation of a total-etch and two self-etching adhesives bonded to dentin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdalla, A.I.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate effect of direct and indirect water storage on the microtensile dentin bond strength of one total-etch and two self-etching adhesives. Methods: The adhesive materials were: one total-etch adhesive; ‘Admira Bond’ and two selfetch adhesives; ‘Clearfil SE Bond’ and ‘Hybrid

  13. Scanning transmission electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis of the dentin adhesive interface using a labeled 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J D; Robinson, S J; Byerley, T J; Chappell, R P; Spencer, P; Chappelow, C C

    1995-06-01

    In an attempt to compare the morphology of the dentin adhesive interface and the wetting and penetration of the adhesive in relation to the dentin surface, we studied four dentin adhesive systems using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). 2-Hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), a monomer common to many commercial dentin adhesive systems, was altered to produce a thiolated analogue (HETMA). Sulfur, traceable by EDS and STEM, was substituted for the oxygen atom in the backbone of the HEMA molecule. The resulting analogue, with solubility parameters and other wetting and physical properties very similar to those of HEMA, was applied to four sets of tooth specimens, each pre-treated with a different primer or etchant. Three separate pre-treatments--nitric acid, maleic acid, and citric acid/ferric chloride--created a demineralized zone approximately 1 to 3 microns thick at the dentin surface. The HETMA was found to permeate freely into this zone when either of the latter two pre-treatments was used. However, the band of dentin that was demineralized by the nitric acid pre-treatment appeared impermeable to the HETMA. The fourth pre-treatment, an alcohol-based solution including the phosphorus acid ester PENTA and HEMA, modified the smear layer of the tooth slightly and did not appear to demineralize the dentin. HETMA applied to the specimens pre-treated with PENTA and HEMA was clearly in intimate contact with the dentin or modified smear layer; however, it did not penetrate or diffuse into these areas. It did flow into the dentinal tubules, as was also evident with each of the other systems. It was concluded that the acid pre-treatment of the dentin greatly influenced the wetting behavior of the dentin adhesive and thus could substantially affect the resultant bond strength of the dentin adhesive systems.

  14. Long-term Adhesion Study of Self-etching Systems to Plasma-treated Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Ronaldo; Teixeira, Hellen; Ayres, Ana Paula Almeida; Machado, Lucas S; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-06-01

    To determine the influence of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment on the microtensile dentin bond strength of two self-etching adhesive systems after one year of water storage as well as observe the contact angle changes of dentin treated with plasma and the micromorphology of resin/dentin interfaces using SEM. For contact angle measurements, 6 human molars were sectioned to remove the occlusal enamel surface, embedded in PMMA resin, and ground to expose a flat dentin surface. Teeth were divided into two groups: 1) argon APP treatment for 30 s, and 2) blown air (control). For the microtensile test, 28 human third molars were used and prepared similarly to contact angle measurements. Teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 7) according to two self-etching adhesives and APP treatment (with/without). After making the composite resin buildup, teeth were sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface to obtain beam specimens. The specimens were tested after 24 h and one year of water storage until failure. Bond strength data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05%). Three beam specimens per group that were not used in the bond strength test were prepared for interfacial SEM analysis. APP application decreased the contact angle, but increased the bond strength only for one adhesive tested. SEM evaluation found signs of degradation within interfacial structures following 1-year aging in water. APP increased the dentin surface energy, but the effects of APP and 1-year water storage on dentin bond strength were product dependent. APP increased the dentin surface energy. It also increased the bond strength for Scotchbond Universal, but storage for one year negated the positive effect of APP treatment.

  15. Effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bond strength of adhesive layer can absorb unwanted stresses of polymerization shrinkage in composite resin restorations; increased microshear bond strength can prevent failure of restoration materials, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of adhesive layers on microshear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to dentin. Material and Methods Two different types of adhesive systems: universal adhesive (ExciTE) and newly developed adhesive (Nano-Bond), and one type of light-cured resin restorative material (Nanocomposite resin) were used in this study. The occlusal surfaces of extracted human molar teeth were ground perpendicular to the long axis of each tooth to expose a flat dentin surface. The adhesives were applied on dentin surfaces (single application or double application). Nanocomposite resin was then placed and light cured for 40 seconds. After 24 hours of immersion in water at 37°C, then subjected to thermocycling before testing, a microshear bond test was carried out. The data were analyzed by a two-way ANOVA. For comparison between groups, Tukey’s post-hoc test was used. Results The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with a single application were 8.8 and 16.6 MPa, respectively. The mean bond strengths of ExciTE and Nano-Bond adhesives with double application were 13.2 and 21.8MPa, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in microshear bond strengths between the single application of Nano-Bond and the double application of ExciTE adhesives. Conclusions Microshear bond strength increased significantly as the applied adhesive layer was doubled. Key words:Adhesive, microshear, bond, strength, nanocomposite. PMID:28210433

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of novel siloxane-methacrylate monomers used as dentin adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xueping; Ye, Qiang; Song, Linyong; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to synthesize two new siloxane-methacrylate (SM) monomers for application in dentin adhesives and to investigate the influence of different functionality of the siloxane-containing monomers on the adhesive photopolymerization, water sorption, and mechanical properties. Materials and method Two siloxane-methacrylate monomers (SM1 and SM2) with four and eight methacrylate groups were synthesized. Dentin adhesives containing BisGMA, HEMA and the siloxane-methacrylate monomers were photo-polymerized. The experimental adhesives were compared with the control adhesive (HEMA/BisGMA 45/55 w/w) and characterized with regard to degree of conversion (DC), water miscibility of the liquid resin, water sorption and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Results The experimental adhesives exhibited improved water miscibility as compared to the control. When cured in the presence of 12 wt % water to simulate the wet environment of the mouth, the SM-containing adhesives showed DC comparable to the control. The experimental adhesives showed higher rubbery modulus than the control under dry conditions. Under wet conditions, the mechanical properties of the formulations containing SM monomer with increased functionality were comparable with the control, even with more water sorption. Significance The concentration and functionality of the newly synthesized siloxane-methacrylate monomers affected the water miscibility, water sorption and mechanical properties of the adhesives. The experimental adhesives show improved water compatibility compared with the control. The mechanical properties were enhanced with an increase of the functionality of the siloxane-containing monomers. The results provide critical structure/property relationships and important information for future development of durable, versatile siloxane-containing dentin adhesives. PMID:24993811

  17. Micro-tensile bond strength of adhesives to pulp chamber dentin after irrigation with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Ç Barutcigil; Arslan, H.; Özcan, E.; O T Harorli

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different concentrations of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution on adhesion, that is, the bond strength of the different adhesive systems, to the pulp chamber dentin. Materials and Methods: Recently extracted, sound, human, third molars were cut horizontally to expose the pulp horn. The roof of the pulp chamber and pulp tissue was removed. The teeth were then divided into five main groups. The teeth in each group were ...

  18. Microhardness of dentin underneath fluoride-releasing adhesive systems subjected to cariogenic challenge and fluoride therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, Giovanna A; Takahashi, Marcos Kenzo; Rached, Rodrigo N; Giannini, Marcelo; Souza, Evelise M

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microhardness of dentin subjacent to the bonding interface of composite restorations using fluoride-releasing adhesive systems submitted to pH-cycling regimen associated or not to fluoride therapies. Thirty human third molars were prepared with class V cavities with dentin cervical margins. The adhesive systems One-Up Bond F Plus (OU), Prime&Bond NT (NT), Clearfil Protect Bond (CF), Optibond Solo Plus (OP) and also the controls [-] Single Bond 2 (SB) and [+] Ketac Molar (KM) were used previously to composite resin restorations. The restorations were sectioned into four slabs and submitted to different storage media for 15 days: distilled water, pH-cycling, pH-cycling associated to NaF 0.05% and associated to NaF 1.23%. The Knoop microhardness test was performed in dentin at 50, 100, 150 and 300 microm from the adhesive interface. Data was analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (p<0.05). KM resulted in significantly higher microhardness when compared to all the adhesive systems at 50 microm, with the exception of OU, that was similar to KM when submitted to pH-cycling alone or associated to 1.23% NaF. Microhardness of dentin was significantly higher with all the tested materials, when pH-cycling was associated to NaF 0.05%, at 50 microm and 100 microm depths. OU resulted in similar dentin hardness at all depths and storage media. The incorporation of NaF 0.05% fluoride therapy to the cariogenic challenge was capable to recover the original microhardness of dentin at 50 and 100 microm with all the tested materials. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adhesive/Dentin Interface: The Weak Link in the Composite Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Paulette; Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Topp, Elizabeth M.; Misra, Anil; Marangos, Orestes; Wang, Yong; Bohaty, Brenda S.; Singh, Viraj; Sene, Fabio; Eslick, John; Camarda, Kyle; Katz, J. Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Results from clinical studies suggest that more than half of the 166 million dental restorations that were placed in the United States in 2005 were replacements for failed restorations. This emphasis on replacement therapy is expected to grow as dentists use composite as opposed to dental amalgam to restore moderate to large posterior lesions. Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries, and increased frequency of replacement as compared to amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and premature failure. Under in vivo conditions the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface can be the first defense against these noxious, damaging substances. The intent of this article is to review structural aspects of the clinical substrate that impact bond formation at the adhesive/dentin interface; to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:20195761

  20. Preservation of resin-dentin interfaces treated with benzalkonium chloride adhesive blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Ortiz, Pilar A; Pashley, David H

    2015-04-01

    Reducing collagen degradation within hybrid layers may contribute to the preservation of adhesive interfaces. This study evaluated the stability of resin-dentin interfaces treated with benzalkonium chloride (BAC)-modified adhesive blends and assessed collagen degradation in dentin matrices treated with BAC. The etch-and-rinse adhesive, Adper Single Bond Plus, modified with 0.5% and 1.0% BAC, was evaluated for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL) after 24 h and 1 yr. Thirty completely demineralized dentin beams from human molars were dipped for 60 s in deionized water (DW; control), or in 0.5% or 1.0% BAC, and then incubated in simulated body fluid (SBF). Collagen degradation was assessed by quantification of the dry mass loss and the amount of hydroxyproline (HYP) released from hydrolyzed specimens after 1 or 4 wk. Although all groups demonstrated a significant increase in NL after 1 yr, adhesive modified with 0.5% BAC showed stable bond strength after 1 yr (9% decrease) relative to the control (44% decrease). Significantly less HYP release and dry mass loss were observed for both 0.5% and 1.0% BAC relative to the control. This in vitro study demonstrates that BAC contributes to the preservation of resin-dentin bonds for up to 1 yr by reducing collagen degradation.

  1. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm2 in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. Results: SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin. PMID:24926212

  2. Bonding effectiveness of a new 'multi-mode' adhesive to enamel and dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanabusa, Masao; Mine, Atsushi; Kuboki, Takuo; Momoi, Yasuko; Van Ende, Annelies; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Self-etch adhesives are well adopted in general practice, obviously primarily thanks to their ease of use and fast application time. Nevertheless, phosphoric acid is still often recommended to beforehand etch enamel following a so-called 'selective' enamel-etch technique, this in particular when most cavity margins end in enamel. The purpose of this study was to test if a new one-step adhesive can be applied in a multi-mode manner, this following different, either 'full' or 'selective', self-etch and etch-and-rinse approaches. Specific research hypotheses tested were that prior phosphoric-acid etching did not affect the bonding effectiveness of the one-step adhesive to enamel and dentine, and that the bonding effectiveness to dentine was also not affected when the adhesive was applied either following a 'dry-bonding' or 'wet-bonding' etch-and-rinse technique. The micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) of the one-step self-etch adhesive G-Bond Plus (GC, Tokyo, Japan; 1-SEA) was measured when it was bonded to bur-cut enamel following either a 'self-etch' or an 'etch-and-rinse' adhesive protocol, and to bur-cut dentine when applied following either a 'self-etch', a 'dry-bonding' or a 'wet-bonding' etch-and-rinse adhesive protocol. Bond-strength testing was corroborated by ultra-structural analysis of the interfacial interaction at enamel and dentine using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Prior phosphoric-acid etching significantly increased the bonding effectiveness of the 1-SEA to enamel. A clearly enhanced micro-retentive surface was revealed by TEM. To dentine, no statistically significant difference in bonding effectiveness was recorded when the 1-SEA was either applied following a self-etch or both etch-and-rinse approaches. The 'dry-bonding' etch-and-rinse protocol was significantly more effective than its 'wet-bonding' version. TEM however revealed indications of low-quality hybridisation following both etch-and-rinse approaches, in particular in the form

  3. Comparison between universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives in terms of dentin bond fatigue durability in self-etch mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-06-01

    This aim of this study was to compare universal adhesives and two-step self-etch adhesives in terms of dentin bond fatigue durability in self-etch mode. Three universal adhesives - Clearfil Universal, G-Premio Bond, and Scotchbond Universal Adhesive - and three-two-step self-etch adhesives - Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil SE Bond 2, and OptiBond XTR - were used. The initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength of resin composite bonded to adhesive on dentin in self-etch mode were determined. Scanning electron microscopy observations of fracture surfaces after bond strength tests were also made. The initial shear bond strength of universal adhesives was material dependent, unlike that of two-step self-etch adhesives. The shear fatigue strength of Scotchbond Universal Adhesive was not significantly different from that of two-step self-etch adhesives, unlike the other universal adhesives. The shear fatigue strength of universal adhesives differed depending on the type of adhesive, unlike those of two-step self-etch adhesives. The results of this study encourage the continued use of two-step self-etch adhesive over some universal adhesives but suggest that changes to the composition of universal adhesives may lead to a dentin bond fatigue durability similar to that of two-step self-etch adhesives. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  4. The effect of double-coating and times on the immediate and 6-month dentin bonding of universal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaev, Diial; Demirci, Mustafa; Tekçe, Neslihan; Tuncer, Safa; Baydemir, Canan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of double-application coats and times on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and adhesive-dentin interfaces created by dentin adhesive systems after 6 months of storage in water. Two-hundred sixteen extracted non-carious human third molars were selected for the study. Single-Bond Universal (SU) and All-Bond Universal (AU), Adper Easy One (Eo) Self-Etch adhesive and Adper Single-Bond 2 (Sb) etch-and-rinse adhesive were applied to a flat dentin surface using three methods (1): dentin adhesives were applied as recommended by the manufacturers; (2): two consecutive coats of dentin adhesives were applied before photo-polymerization; and (3): a single coat of adhesive was applied but with twice the manufacturers recommended application time. Microtensile bond strength was determined either immediately or after 6 months of water storage. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc tests. At 24 h, groups 1, 2, and 3 exhibited statistically similar results for all dentin adhesive systems. For AU-Er, group 3 showed significantly higher bond strength than all group of AU-Se after 6 months. Universal adhesives seemed more stable against water degradation than traditional two-step etch-and-rinse and all-in-one systems within the 6-month period.

  5. Halloysite nanotube incorporation into adhesive systems—effect on bond strength to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkatheeri, Mohammed S; Palasuk, Jadesada; Eckert, George J; Platt, Jeffrey A; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Halloysite® aluminosilicate clay nanotube (HNT) incorporation into a two-step etch-and-rinse (ER) and a one-step self-etch (SE) adhesive on human dentin shear bond strength (SBS). Ten groups (n = 12) were prepared according to the adhesive system (i.e., ER or SE) and amount of HNT incorporated (5-20%, w/v), as follows: commercial control (i.e., the adhesive was used as purchased, 0% HNT); experimental control (i.e., the adhesive was processed through mixing/stirring and sonication similarly to the HNT-incorporated experimental groups, but without HNT); and 5, 10, and 20% HNT. SBS testing was performed after 24 h of storage in deionized water at 37 °C. Failure modes were examined using a stereomicroscope (×40). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the resin-dentin interface of selected specimens was carried out. Two-way ANOVA revealed that incorporation of HNT up to 20% (w/v) in ER and up to 10% (w/v) in SE demonstrated an increased SBS compared to their experimental controls. Compared to the commercial control, SBS of HNT-modified dentin adhesives was not significantly different for ER adhesives (p > 0.05) but was significantly higher with 5% HNT in the SE adhesive (p adhesive and mixed failures. SEM micrographs of resin-dentin interfaces for ER-commercial control and ER-10% showed a similar morphology. A thicker adhesive layer and the presence of agglomerated HNT on the resin tags were seen in ER-10%. An increased number of short resin tags in SE-5% compared with SE-commercial control were observed. HNT addition up to 20% in ER and up to 10 % in SE showed increased SBS to dentin compared with the experimental control. HNT can be used not only to reinforce adhesive resins but also hold potential for the development of bioactive adhesives by the encapsulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors or anticariogenic agents.

  6. Does hybridized dentin affect bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Valle, Accácio-Lins; de Andrade, Gustavo-Henrique-Barbosa; Vidotti, Hugo-Alberto; Só, Marcus-Vinícius-Reis; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluate the influence of different hybridization bonding techniques of a self-adhesive resin cement. Material and Methods 30 human health molars were divided into six groups (n=10). The specimens received three longitudinal sections, allowing insertion of central cuts in PVC matrices. Each group received a different dentin pretreatment according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, except the control group (G1), as follows. G2 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Optibond™ FL, Kerr); G3 - a 3-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE); G4 - a 2-step total-etch adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE); G5 - a single-step self-etching system (Bond Force, Tokuyama); and G6 - universal bonding system (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then, cylinders made of self-adhesive resin cement with polypropylene matrix was cemented in all groups (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Bond strength was assessed by submitting the specimens to micro-shear test and was characterized according to the fracture pattern observed through optical microscopy. Results The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test, which indicated a statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.04), and Tukey’s multiple comparisons, which indicated a statistically significant difference between G1 and G3 (p<0.05). The microscopic analysis revealed a high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed fractures, and cohesive failures in the dentin. Conclusions The use of a previous dentin hybridization protocol is able to increase adhesive bonding resistance of self-adhesive resin cement, especially when used Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose system. Key words:Bonding, self-adhesive resin cement, adhesive systems, microshear. PMID:27703609

  7. [The adhesive properties of two bonding systems to tetracycline stained dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H L; Liang, K N; Cheng, L; Li, J Y; He, L B

    2016-01-01

    To investigate and compare the bonding properties of Single Bond 2 and SE Bond to tetracycline stained dentin in vitro. Ten extracted tetracycline stained human teeth and ten extracted normal human teeth were collected and the occlusal dentin surfaces of all extracted teeth were exposed. The tetracycline stained teeth and normal teeth were divided into two groups, respectively and randomly, based on the adhesives applied. Total-etch adhesive(Single Bond 2) and self-etch adhesive(SE Bond) were used. After application of the adhesives to the dentin surfaces, composite crowns were built up. After 24 h water storage, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally into sticks(0.9 mm×0.9 mm bonding area) for micro tensile testing or micro Raman spectroscopy detection. Bonding strength(μTBS) and resin conversion rate were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. The tetracycline Single Bond 2 group presented lower bonding strength[(16.17 ± 3.16) MPa] than the tetracycline SE Bond group[(25.82 ± 2.62) MPa], and also demonstrated lower bonding strength than the normal Single Bond 2 group[(29.13 ± 2.44) MPa] and the normal SE Bond group[(24.29±2.83) MPa] (P0.05). The resin conversion rate of tetracycline Single Bond 2 group[(55±6)%] was significantly lower than the tetracycline SE Bond group[(66±3)% ](P0.05). The bonding strength of total-etch adhesive system to the tetracycline stained dentin was significantly lower than that to the normal dentin.

  8. Long-term durability of one-step adhesive-composite systems to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, Richard M; Melo, Luciana; Stone, David G; Pilecki, Peter; Sherriff, Martin; Watson, Timothy F

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term durability of three one-step adhesive-composite systems to ground enamel and dentin. Twenty-seven teeth were randomly divided into three groups of nine. The first group had its crowns sectioned to expose superficial dentin, which was then ground with 600 grit SiC paper. One of three one-step adhesives: a trial bonding agent, OBF-2; i Bond or Adper Prompt L-Pop was applied to the dentin of three teeth and built-up with the corresponding resin composite (Estelite sigma, Venus or Filtek Supreme). The second group of nine teeth had their enamel approximal surfaces ground with wet 600-grit SiC paper, then one of the three one-step adhesives was applied and built-up with resin composite. The bonded specimens were sliced into 0.7 mm-thick slabs. After 24 hours and one year of water storage at 37 degrees C, the slabs were sectioned into beams for the microtensile bond strength test. Failure modes were observed using optical and electron scanning microscopy. The third group of nine teeth had approximal wedge-shaped cavities prepared above the CEJ into dentin. Two-to-three grains of rhodamine B were added to each of the three adhesives prior to restoring the cavities with resin composite. After 24 hours storage, the teeth were sectioned and their interfaces examined with a laser scanning confocal microscope. The bond strengths of the three adhesive-composite systems to both enamel and dentin significantly lessened after one year of water storage, however, there was no significant difference between the materials.

  9. Post-bleaching application of an antioxidant on dentin bond strength of three dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Saneie, Tahereh

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidizing agents have recently been suggested to compensate decreased bond strength of resin materials to bleached tooth tissues. This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different adhesives on bleached dentin immediately after bleaching, bleached/delayed for 1 week, and bleached/applied antioxidizing agent. The dentinal surfaces of 132 intact extracted molars were prepared and divided into 12 groups. The following adhesives were investigated: Optibond FL (OFL) (three-step etch-and-rinse), Optibond Solo Plus (two-step etch-and-rinse), and Optibond all-in-one (OA) (one-step self-etch) (Kerr, Orange, USA). Unbleached dentin groups (groups 1-3) were prepared as negative controls (NC). The remainder surfaces (groups 4-12) were bleached with 20% Opalescent PF (Ultradent, USA). Specimens were bonded immediately after bleaching (groups 4-6), after 1 week (groups 7-9), or after using 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) gel (groups 10-12). Subsequent to bonding of composite resin, the samples were tested for SBS and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (α=0.05). Regarding control groups, OA showed the highest SBS among the studied adhesives (Padhesives after bleaching except for OFL. No statistically significant difference in SBS were noted when the SA and delayed bonding groups were compared with their similar NC groups (P>0.05) except the of delay bonding with OA. The findings suggest that bond strength of resin to bleached dentin may be affected with the adhesive system. Reduced SBS to bleached dentin can be amended by the use of SA as an antioxidizing agent. However, the amount of reversed bond strength subsequent to applying antioxidant might be related to the kind of dental adhesive.

  10. Bonding of universal adhesives to dentine--Old wine in new bottles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Niu, L-N; Xie, H; Zhang, Z-Y; Zhou, L-Q; Jiao, K; Chen, J-H; Pashley, D H; Tay, F R

    2015-05-01

    Multi-mode universal adhesives offer clinicians the choice of using the etch-and-rinse technique, selective enamel etch technique or self-etch technique to bond to tooth substrates. The present study examined the short-term in vitro performance of five universal adhesives bonded to human coronal dentine. Two hundred non-carious human third molars were assigned to five groups based on the type of the universal adhesives (Prime&Bond Elect, Scotchbond Universal, All-Bond Universal, Clearfil Universal Bond and Futurabond U). Two bonding modes (etch-and-rinse and self-etch) were employed for each adhesive group. Bonded specimens were stored in deionized water for 24h or underwent a 10,000-cycle thermocycling ageing process prior to testing (N=10). Microtensile bond testing (μTBS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of resin-dentine interfaces in non-thermocycled specimens and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of tracer-infused water-rich zones within hybrid layers of thermocycled specimens were performed. Both adhesive type and testing condition (with/without thermocycling) have significant influences on μTBS. The use of each adhesive in either the etch-and-rinse or self-etch application mode did not result in significantly different μTBS to dentine. Hybrid layers created by these adhesives in the etch-and-rinse bonding mode and self-etch bonding mode were ∼5μm and ≤0.5μm thick respectively. Tracer-infused regions could be identified within the resin-dentine interface from all the specimens prepared. The increase in versatility of universal adhesives is not accompanied by technological advances for overcoming the challenges associated with previous generations of adhesives. Therapeutic adhesives with bio-protective and bio-promoting effects are still lacking in commercialized adhesives. Universal adhesives represent manufacturers' attempt to introduce versatility in product design via adaptation of a single-bottle self-etch adhesive for other application

  11. Evaluation of antibacterial and fluoride-releasing adhesive system on dentin--microtensile bond strength and acid-base challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Mirela Sanae; Yamauti, Monica; Inoue, Go; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji; Giannini, Marcelo; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2006-09-01

    This study evaluated the influence of a fluoride-containing adhesive on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to dentin, as well as analyzed the dentin-adhesive interface after acid-base challenge. Experimental groups were: G1--Clearfil SE Bond control (SE); G2--Clearfil Protect Bond control (PB); G3--Primer[SE]/Adhesive[PB]; G4--Primer[PB]/Adhesive[SE]. For microTBS evaluation, dentin surfaces were ground, bonded, and composite resin crowns were built up to obtain beams to be tested. For interfacial analysis, adhesive system was applied on dentin surface and a low-viscosity resin was placed between two dentin disks. Then, the specimens were subjected to acid-base challenge, sectioned, and polished to be observed by SEM. microTBS data showed no statistical differences among the groups (GI: 51.3, G2: 47.6, G3: 55.0, G4: 53.9; mean in MPa). Through SEM, it was observed that a thick acid-base resistant zone adjacent to the hybrid layer was created only when the fluoride-releasing adhesive was used. In conclusion, the presence of fluoride in an adhesive contributed significantly to preventing secondary caries, and did not interfere with dentin-adhesive bond strength.

  12. Composite-Dentin Bond Strength of Two Adhesives in Different Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Samimi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermo-cycling and curing mode of composites (light and chemical curing on dentin bond strength of one all-in-one and an one-bottle bonding systems.Methods and Materials: Occlusal enamels of eighty caries-free third molars were ground with a model trimmer to create flat surfaces in superficial dentin for bonding, and randomly divided into 4 groups. Teflon molds with 1 mm internal diameter were mounted on the flat surfaces, Prompt L-pop (all-in-one system (3M-ESPE and Single-Bond(one-bottle system (3M-ESPE were used and restored with FiltekZ250 (light-cured composite (3M-RSPE and Concise (chemically cured composite (3M-ESPE composites. Specimens were stored in 37°c distilled water for 24 hours. 10 specimens of each group were thermo-cycled 500 times between 5°c to 55°c. Micro- shear bond strength test was done with 0.5mm/min crosshead speed (Dartec, England. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan's tests.Results: The mean shear bond strengths of two adhesive systems with light-cured composite showed no significant differences with and without thermo-cycling (P<0.05. Also, there was no significant difference between bond strength of two adhesive systems with light cured composite (P<0.05. Use of chemically cured composite reduced the bond strength of Single-Bond significantly (P<0.001. There was not any bond between chemically cured composite to dentin, using prompt L-pop.Discussion: Thermal cycles, in the range that we used them, did not have any influence on the bond strengths of two mentioned systems. The effect of increasing cycles should be evaluated. Use of chemically cured composite decreases the bond strength of Single Bond and there was no bond between this kind of composite and Prompt L-pop system. So these systems, especially Prompt L-pop, shouldn't be used with chemically cured composite in routine dental treatments.

  13. Effect of adhesive system and application strategy on reduction of dentin permeability

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    Adriana Oliveira Carvalho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of adhesive systems and application strategies on dentin hydraulic conductance (HC. The buccal enamel was removed from bovine incisors to simulate laminate cavity preparations. After removing the roots and the coronal pulp, the buccal dentin was treated with EDTA solution (0.5 M for 5 minutes, rinsed, ultrasonicated for 12 minutes and connected to a permeability device. HC of the specimens was measured at 10 psi (n = 5. Permeability was measured before and after bonding procedures using G-Bond (GB, Clearfil Tri-S Bond (CTS, Hybrid Coat (HY, Bond Force (BF, Adper Easy Bond (AEB Silorane (SI, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SMP adhesives systems, which were applied following three strategies: 1 according to the manufacturers' instructions; 2 two coats of all-in-one self-etching adhesives (GB, CTS, HY, BF, AEB or priming step plus two coats of bonding resin for the other systems (SI, CSE and SMP; and 3 a thin layer of a flowable composite applied over one coat of all-in-one self-etching adhesives or primed surface for SI, CSE and SMP adhesives. No significant difference was observed among the application modes concerning their ability to reduce HC. None of the adhesives showed complete sealing (100% of the bovine tooth dentin. SI exhibited lower HC than SMP, however, they were not significantly different from the other systems. The results suggest that all systems tested result in an HC reduction of more than 90%. The wet bonding technique seemed to be more sensitive for dentin sealing.

  14. Immediate adhesive properties to dentin and enamel of a universal adhesive associated with a hydrophobic resin coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; Muñoz, M A; Sezinando, A; Luque-Martinez, I V; Staichak, R; Reis, A; Loguercio, A D

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acid etching and application of a hydrophobic resin coat on the enamel/dentin bond strengths and degree of conversion (DC) within the hybrid layer of a universal adhesive system (G-Bond Plus [GB]). A total of 60 extracted third molars were divided into four groups for bond-strength testing, according to the adhesive strategy: GB applied as a one-step self-etch adhesive (1-stepSE); GB applied as in 1-stepSE followed by one coat of the hydrophobic resin Heliobond (2-stepSE); GB applied as a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (2-stepER); GB applied as in 2-stepER followed by one coat of the hydrophobic resin Heliobond (3-stepER). There were 40 teeth used for enamel microshear bond strength (μSBS) and DC; and 20 teeth used for dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and DC. After restorations were constructed, specimens were stored in water (37°C/24 h) and then tested at 0.5 mm/min (μTBS) or 1.0 mm/min (μSBS). Enamel-resin and dentin-resin interfaces from each group were evaluated for DC using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance for each substrate and the Tukey test (α=0.05). For enamel, the use of a hydrophobic resin coat resulted in statistically significant higher mean enamel μSBS only for the ER strategy (3-stepER vs 2-stepER, penamel etching technique, because it improves bond strengths to enamel when applied with the ER strategy and to dentin when used with the SE adhesion strategy. The application of a hydrophobic resin coat may improve DC in resin-dentin interfaces formed with either the SE or the ER strategy. On enamel, DC may benefit from the application of a hydrophobic resin coat over 1-stepSE adhesives.

  15. Effect of dentin biomodifiers on the immediate and long-term bond strengths of a simplified etch and rinse adhesive to dentin

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    Payal Singh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This in vitro study evaluated the effect of dentin biomodifiers on the immediate and long-term bond strengths of a simplified etch and rinse adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods Flat coronal dentin surfaces were prepared in 120 extracted human molars. Teeth were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 24 according to 5 different surface pre-treatments: No pre-treatment (control; 1M carbodiimide (EDC; 0.1% epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG; 2% minocycline (MI; 10% sodium ascorbate (SA. After surface pre-treatment, adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB], 3M ESPE was applied. Composite was applied into transparent plastic tubes (2.5 mm in diameter, which was placed over the bonded dentin surface. From each group, 10 samples were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS evaluation at 24 hours (immediate and remaining 10 samples were tested after 6 months (delayed. Additionally, 4 samples per group were subjected to scanning electron microscopic analysis for observation of resin-dentin interface. The data were statistically analysed with Shaperio‑Wilk W test, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey's test. Results At 24 hours, SBS of all surface pre-treatment groups were comparable with the control group, with significant differences found between EDC and SA groups only (p = 0.009. After 6 months storage, EDC, EGCG, and MI pre-treatments preserved the resin-dentin bond strength with no significant fall. Conclusions Dentin pre-treatment with all the dentin biomodifiers except SA resulted in significant preservation of resin-dentin bond over 6 months storage period, without negatively affecting the immediate bond strength of the etch and rinse adhesive tested.

  16. Nanoleakage in Hybrid Layer and Acid-Base Resistant Zone at the Adhesive/Dentin Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Toru; Nurrohman, Hamid; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Sadr, Alireza; Ichinose, Shizuko; Tagami, Junji

    2015-10-01

    The aim of interfacial nanoleakage evaluation is to gain a better understanding of degradation of the adhesive-dentin interface. The acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) is recognized at the bonded interface under the hybrid layer (HL) in self-etch adhesive systems after an acid-base challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate nanoleakage in HL and ABRZ using three self-etch adhesives; Clearfil SE Bond (SEB), Clearfil SE One (SEO), and G-Bond Plus (GBP). One of the three adhesives was applied on the ground dentin surface and light cured. The specimens were longitudinally divided into two halves. One half remained as the control group. The others were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution, followed by photo developing solution under fluorescent light. Following this, the specimens were subjected to acid-base challenges with an artificial demineralization solution (pH4.5) and sodium hypochlorite, and prepared in accordance with common procedures for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination. The TEM images revealed silver depositions in HL and ABRZ due to nanoleakage in all the adhesives; however, the extent of nanoleakage was material dependent. Funnel-shaped erosion beneath the ABRZ was observed only in the all-in-one adhesive systems; SEO and GBP, but not in the two-step self-etch adhesive system; SEB.

  17. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Cécile; Villat, Cyril; Abouelleil, Hazem; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR) were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR). All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles). The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm(2) sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR) adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL).

  18. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

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    Cécile Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL and a two-steps/self-etch adhesive system (Optibond XTR were used. Composite buildups were performed with a nanohybrid composite (Herculite XTR. All specimens were submitted to thermocycling ageing (10000 cycles. The specimens were sectioned in 1 mm2 sticks. Microtensile bond strength tests were measured. Nonparametric statistical analyses were performed due to nonnormality of data. Optibond XTR on irradiated and nonirradiated teeth did not show any significant differences. However, Optibond FL bond strength was more effective on nonirradiated teeth than on irradiated teeth. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it can be concluded that radiotherapy had a significant detrimental effect on bond strength to human dentin. However, it seems that adhesive choice could be adapted to the substrata. According to the present study, the two-steps/self-etch (Optibond XTR adhesive system tested could be more effective on irradiated dentin compared to three-steps/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL.

  19. Adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin prepared by air-abrasion at different distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: michinelatti@gmail.com; Andreolli do Amaral, Thais Helena [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Borsatto, Maria Cristina [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori [School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto/University of Sao Paulo, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)

    2007-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces in cavities prepared by air-abrasion at different working distances. Thirty sound third human molars were selected and, on both their buccal and lingual surfaces, class V cavities were prepared by air-abrasion, at 2-, 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-mm working distances, or high-speed bur (control group). After preparation, all cavities were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel and restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z-250. Buccal and lingual surfaces were separated and restorations sectioned in a buccolingual direction, providing two sections of each cavity, which were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the distances of 6 and 8 mm promoted more homogeneous dentin/adhesive interfaces, with tags formation, and more uniform for enamel, which were similar to the control group. It may be concluded that the air-abrasion working distance can influence the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces, and the intermediate distances provided better adhesive interfaces.

  20. Adhesive interfaces of enamel and dentin prepared by air-abrasion at different distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinelatti, Michelle Alexandra; do Amaral, Thais Helena Andreolli; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces in cavities prepared by air-abrasion at different working distances. Thirty sound third human molars were selected and, on both their buccal and lingual surfaces, class V cavities were prepared by air-abrasion, at 2-, 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-mm working distances, or high-speed bur (control group). After preparation, all cavities were etched with 35% phosphoric acid gel and restored with Single Bond/Filtek Z-250. Buccal and lingual surfaces were separated and restorations sectioned in a buccolingual direction, providing two sections of each cavity, which were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that the distances of 6 and 8 mm promoted more homogeneous dentin/adhesive interfaces, with tags formation, and more uniform for enamel, which were similar to the control group. It may be concluded that the air-abrasion working distance can influence the morphology of enamel and dentin/adhesive interfaces, and the intermediate distances provided better adhesive interfaces.

  1. Effects of Type I Collagen Degradation on the Durability of Three Adhesive Systems in the Early Phase of Dentin Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Hu; Yu-hong Xiao; Ming Fang; Yu Gao; Li Huang; An-qi Jia; Ji-hua Chen

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding. Methods Bonded dentin specimens were prepared using three different types of adhesive systems. Micro-tensile bond strength and degradation of collagen were tested before, and after 1 month or 4 months of aging in artificial saliva. The relationship between micro-tensile bond strength and collagen degradation was analyzed by ...

  2. Synthesis and Evaluation of a Novel Co-Initiator for Dentin Adhesives: Polymerization Kinetics and Leachables Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xueping; Ye, Qiang; Song, Linyong; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Spencer, Paulette

    2015-04-01

    A new tertiary amine co-initiator containing three methacrylate-urethane groups was synthesized for the application in dentin adhesives. The photopolymerization kinetics and leaching of unreacted components from methacrylate-based dental polymers formulated with this new co-initiator were determined. The newly synthesized co-initiator showed good chemical stability and decreased amine release from the initiator system. This study provides important information for the future development of biocompatible dentin adhesives/composites.

  3. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching. PMID:27747220

  4. Influence of chlorhexidine on dentin adhesive interface micromorphology and nanoleakage expression of resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Menezes, Murilo De Sousa; Barreto, Bruno De Castro Ferreira; Naves, Lucas Zago; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2013-08-01

    This study focused on adhesive interface morphologic characterization and nanoleakage expression of resin cements bonded to human dentin pretreated with 1% chlorhexidine (CHX). Thirty-two non-carious human third molars were ground flat to expose superficial dentin. Resin composite blocks were luted to the exposed dentin using one conventional (RelyX ARC) and one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100), with/without CHX pretreatment. Four groups (n = 8) were obtained: control groups (ARC and U100); experimental groups (ARC/CHX and U100/CHX) were pretreated with 1% CHX prior to the luting process. After storage in water for 24 h, the bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 × 0.9 mm(2) sticks producing a minimum of 12 sticks per tooth. Four sticks from each tooth were prepared for hybrid layer evaluation by scanning electron microscope analysis. The remaining sticks were immersed in silver nitrate for 24 h for either nanoleakage evaluation along the bonded interfaces or after rupture. Nanoleakage samples were carbon coated and examined using backscattered electron mode. Well-established hybrid layers were observed in the groups luted with RelyX ARC. Nanoleakage evaluation revealed increase nanoleakage in groups treated with CHX for both resin cements. Group U100/CHX exhibited the most pronouncing nanoleakage expression along with porous zones adjacent to the CHX pretreated dentin. The results suggest a possible incompatibility between CHX and RelyX U100 that raises the concern that the use of CHX with self-adhesive cements may adversely affect resin-dentin bond.

  5. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Akiko; Kameyama, Atsushi; Kato, Junji; Takemoto, Shinji; Oda, Yutaka; Kawada, Eiji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Furusawa, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs) and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs) to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1) and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) (Pyrenees®) activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2). Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens) than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed). These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching.

  6. Resin Bonding of Self-Etch Adhesives to Bovine Dentin Bleached from Pulp Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Haruyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (μTBS of 1-step self-etch adhesives (1-SEAs and 2-step self-etch adhesives (2-SEAs to pulp chamber dentin immediately after bleaching with 2 types of common bleaching techniques. Pulp chamber dentin of bovine teeth was bleached using 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 solution with quartz-tungsten-halogen light-curing unit (Group 1 and 3.5% H2O2-containing titanium dioxide (TiO2 (Pyrenees® activated with 405-nm violet diode laser for 15 min (Group 2. Unbleached specimens were placed in distilled water for 15 min and used as controls. After treatment, dentin was bonded with resin composite using 1-SEA or 2-SEA and stored in water at 37°C for 24 h. Each specimen was sectioned and trimmed to an hourglass-shape and μTBS was measured. Fractured specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope to determine fracture modes. All specimens in Group 1 failed before proper bonding tests. In Group 2, the μTBS of 2-SEA was significantly greater (with no failed specimens than 1-SEA (where 21 out of 36 failed. These results indicate that 2-SEA is a better adhesive system than 1-SEA on bleached dentin. Our results also demonstrated that application of H2O2 significantly decreases bond strength of resin to dentin; however, in the case of nonvital tooth bleaching, Pyrenees® is a better alternative to the conventional 30% H2O2 bleaching.

  7. Effect Of 2% Chlorhexidine Application on the Bonding Effectiveness of Different Dentin Adhesives in Normal and Caries Affected Dentin in Primary Teeth: an in Vitro Study

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    Elham Farrokh gisour

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective:The bond strength of adhesives to dentin is one of the most important parameters for evaluating the efficacy of dental adhesives.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine on 24 hour shear bond strength of different adhesives in normal and caries affected dentin in primary teeth. Materials and Methods:Sixty extracted human primary molars were selected and sectioned in two halves and after preparing a flat surface of superficial dentin, were randomly divided into 12 groups; according to dentin condition (normal and caries affected, type of adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond [SE], Clearfil S3Bond [S3 ], Single Bond2 [S2 ] and treatment (with chlorhexidine [2%CHX] and without 2%CHX . In S2 group, after etching, CHX were applied and in SE and S3 groups were applied before use of bonding agents. Then composite was attached to the prepared surfaces and cured. The samples were maintained in distilled water at 37 ˚C for 24 hours and then thermocycled. Shear bond strength was calculated. Mode of failures was examined by stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using t-test and ANOVA with p<0.05 as the level of significance. Results:There were no significant differences in shear bond strength between the different types of adhesives (P=0.9, use of CHX (P=0.22 and type of dentin (P=0.9. The dominant fracture pattern was mixed. Conclusion:2% CHX had no effect on 24 hour shear bond strength of adhesive systems to normal and caries affected dentin in primary teeth.

  8. A zinc chloride-doped adhesive facilitates sealing at the dentin interface: A confocal laser microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the effect of Zn-doping of dental adhesives and mechanical load cycling on the micromorphology of the resin-dentin interdiffusion zone (of sound and caries affected dentin). The investigation considered two different Zn-doped adhesive approaches and evaluated the interface using a doubled dye fluorescent technique and a calcium chelator fluorophore under a confocal laser scanning microscopy. Sound and carious dentin-resin interfaces of unloaded specimens were deficiently resin-hybridized, in general. These samples showed a rhodamine B-labeled hybrid layer and adhesive layer completely affected by fluorescein penetration (nanoleakage) through the porous resin-dentin interface. It was thicker after phosphoric acid-etching and more extended in carious dentin. Zn-doping promoted an improved sealing of the resin-dentin interface, a decrease of the hybrid layer porosity, and an increment of dentin mineralization. Load cycling augmented the sealing of the Zn-doped resin-dentin interfaces, as porosity and nanoleakage diminished, and even disappeared in caries-affected dentin substrata conditioned with EDTA. Sound and carious dentin specimens analyzed with the xylenol orange technique produced a clearly outlined fluorescence when resins were Zn-doped, due to a consistent Ca-mineral deposition within the bonding interface and inside the dentinal tubules. It was more evident when load cycling was applied on specimens treated with self-etching adhesives that were Zn-doped. Micropermeability at the resin-dentin interface diminished after combining EDTA pretreatment, ZnCl2-doping and mechanical loading stimuli on restorations. It is clearly preferable to include the zinc compounds into the bonding constituents of the self-etching adhesives, instead of into the primer ingredients. The promoted new mineral segments contributed to reduce or avoid both porosity and nanoleakage from the load cycled Zn-doped resin dentin interfaces. EDTA+SB-ZnCl2

  9. Effect of the regional variability of dentinal substrate and modes of application of adhesive systems on the mechanical properties of the adhesive layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine Mendes Pupo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study assessed the effect of the dentin depth and the application mode on the hardness and elastic modulus of the adhesive layer. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surfaces of 48 caries-free human third molars were removed, at two levels: Superficial and deep dentin. For each type of surface, the test specimens were randomly divided into groups which underwent the application: A conventional two-step adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond [SB] and self-etch adhesives system (Adper™ SE Plus [SE] and AdheSE® [AD]. The adhesives applied were active or passive. Composite build-ups were constructed incrementally. The teeth were sectioned, embedded, and polished. The nanoindentation test was performed in the adhesive layer. The results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: In the adhesive layer, the higher hardness (0.307 ± 0.006 GPa and elastic modulus (4.796 ± 0.165 GPa of SE were obtained in superficial dentin in passive application. The elastic modulus of SE (4.115 ± 0.098 GPa was lowest in active application in superficial dentin. The active application significantly increased the hardness of the SB in the deep dentin (0.011 ± 0.314 GPa compared the superficial dentin (0.280 ± 0.010 GPa. For the AD, only the mode of application was statistically significant (P=0.0041 for the hardness, active application (0.289 ± 0.015 GPa being higher than passive application (0.261 ± 0.013 GPa (P=0.0042 in deep dentin. Conclusion: The experimental results reveal that the mechanical properties were influenced for the application mode of adhesive systems and dentin depth.

  10. Bonding to dentin: evaluation of three adhesive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, H; Davila, J M; Gwinnett, A J

    1992-01-01

    Dye penetration was observed in all specimens. SEM demonstrated isolated areas with no gap formation, suggesting a partial bond with dentin. A correlation is evident from the results of both techniques. Since dye-penetration was found to be similar in all the specimens, it was difficult to assess the effect of thermocycling on the amount of dye penetration. The use of posterior composites should be considered as a short-term tested procedure. It should be utilized carefully, following the manufacturer's instructions, and monitored routinely. Undoubtedly, the utilization of posterior composite materials is a very technique-sensitive procedure. Comparing the results of this in vitro study with those previously reported suggests that little improvement has been made in the bonding of the materials tested. Development of new materials and improved techniques are necessary.

  11. [Effect of a nano hydroxyapatite desensitizing paste application on dentin bond strength of three self-etch adhesive systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, D D; Liu, S Y; Yang, H Y; Gan, J; Huang, C

    2017-05-09

    Objective: To evaluate a nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) desensitizing paste application on the bond strength of three self-etch adhesives. Methods: Three dentin specimens of about 1 mm thick were cut from two teeth. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to evaluate the dentin surfaces without treatment, after citric acid treatment and after nano-HA treatment. Thirty-six intact third molars extracted for surgical reasons were cut to remove the occlusal enamel with isomet, and then were etched with 1% citric acid for 20 s to simulate the sensitive dentin and divided into two groups randomly using a table of random numbers (n=18): the control group (no treatment) and the HA treated group (with nano-HA paste treatment). Each group was divided into three subgroups randomly using a table of random numbers (n=6). Subgroup A, B and C was bonded with G-Bond, Clearfil S(3) Bond and FL-Bond Ⅱ according to the manufacture's instruction separately. At 24 h after bonding procedure, and after water storage for 6 months, microtensile bond strength of the specimens was tested and the failure mode was analyzed. Results: SEM obeservation showed that citric acid could open the dentin tubules to set up the sensitive dentin model, and the nano-HA could occlude the dentin tubules effectively. For subgroup A, bonding strength of specimens treated with nano-HA ([41.14±8.91] MPa) was significantly high than that of the control group ([34.27±6.16] MPa) at 24 h after bonding procedure (P0.05). For subgroup B, specimens with nano-HA application showed lower bonding strength ([30.87±6.41] MPa) than that of the control group ([36.73±5.82] MPa) at 24 h after bonding procedure (P0.05). Failure mode analysis showed that more than half of the samples in all groups were adhesive failure. Conclusions: Nano-HA treatment decreased the bond strength of subgroup B, while had no adverse effect on subgroup A and subgroup C.

  12. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  13. Durable bonds at the adhesive/dentin interface: an impossible mission or simply a moving target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    SPENCER, Paulette; Jonggu PARK, Qiang YE; MISRA, Anil; BOHATY, Brenda S.; SINGH, Viraj; PARTHASARATHY, Ranga; SENE, Fábio; de Paiva GONÇALVES, Sérgio Eduardo; LAURENCE, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Composite restorations have higher failure rates, more recurrent caries and increased frequency of replacement as compared to dental amalgam. Penetration of bacterial enzymes, oral fluids, and bacteria into the crevices between the tooth and composite undermines the restoration and leads to recurrent decay and failure. The gingival margin of composite restora tions is particularly vulnerable to decay and at this margin, the adhesive and its seal to dentin provides the primary barrier between the prepared tooth and the environment. The intent of this article is to examine physico-chemical factors that affect the integrity and durability of the adhesive/dentin interfacial bond; and to explore how these factors act synergistically with mechanical forces to undermine the composite restoration. The article will examine the various avenues that have been pursued to address these problems and it will explore how alterations in material chemistry could address the detrimental impact of physico-chemical stresses on the bond formed at the adhesive/dentin interface. PMID:24855586

  14. SEM analysis of microstructure of adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Yoshida, Eiji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the microstructure of the adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with a self-etching primer by SEM in order to clarify the adhesive efficiencies of four self-etch type resin cement systems, Bistite II (BII), Linkmax (LM), Panavia F2.0 (PF), and ResiCem (RC) to dentin. The fluidity and inorganic filler content of these cements were also determined to examine their influences on the adhesion. A hybrid layer with 0.5-1.5 µm thickness and many resin tags could be confirmed clearly at the interface between BII cement and dentin, but was not observed distinctly for the other resin cements. It was suggested that the hybrid layer and resin tags might contribute to the high adhesive efficiency for BII. As the fluidity of cement had been adjusted to be suitable for luting in all cements, it did not significantly influence the adhesive efficiency of cement.

  15. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies

    OpenAIRE

    Daood, Umer; Swee Heng, Chan; Neo Chiew Lian, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2014-01-01

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite–resin,...

  16. [Influence of thermalcycling on bonding durability of self-etch adhesives with dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fu-cong; Wang, Xiao-yan; Gao, Xue-jun

    2014-04-18

    To investigate influence of thermalcycling on the bonding durability of two one-step products [Adper Prompt (AP) and G-bond (GB)] and one two-step self-etching adhesive [Clearfil SE bond (SE)] with dentin in vitro. Forty-two extracted human molars were selected. The superficial dentin was exposed by grinding off the enamel. The teeth were randomly distributed into six groups with varied bonding protocols. The adhesives were applied to the dentin surface. Composite crowns were built up, then the samples were cut longitudinally into sticks with 1.0 mm×1.0 mm bonding area [for microtensile bond strength (MTBS) testing] or 1.0 mm thick slabs (for nanoleakage observation). Bonding performance was evaluated with or without thermalcyling. For the MTBS testing, the strength values were statistically analysed using One-Way ANOVA. Four slabs in each group were observed for nanoleakage by SEM with a backscattered electron detector. Thermalcycling procedures affected MTBS. In the two one-step groups, the MTBS decreased significantly (P<0.05) after thermalcycling [AP group from (19.06±1.50) MPa to (12.62±2.10) MPa; GB group from (17.75±1.10) MPa to (6.24±0.42)MPa]. But in SE groups, MTBS did not significantly affect [(45.80±2.97) MPa compared with(40.60±5.76) MPa]. As a whole, one-step self-etching adhesives showed lower MTBS than two-step bonding system after aging.For AP and GB, continuous nanoleakage appearance was notable and more obvious than for SE. Thermalcycling can affect the bonding performance of self-etch adhesives including decrease of bond strength and nanoleakage pattern. one-step self-etch adhesives showed more obvious change compared with their two-step counterparts.

  17. Micromorphology and adhesive performance of Er:YAG laser-treated dentin of primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluated (1) the micromorphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and (2) the adhesive performance by microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of diamond bur-treated dentin compared to Er:YAG laser-treated dentin of human primary teeth. (1) For qualitative SEM evaluation, dentin of 18 second primary molars (n = 3/method) was treated with either diamond bur as a control (group 1a: 40 μm diamond bur only (clinical situation); group 1b: grinding + 40 μm diamond bur) or with Er:YAG laser (group 2a (clinical situation, manufacturer's settings): 200 mJ/25 Hz (5 W) + 100 mJ/35 Hz (3.5 W) laser only; group 2b (experimental setting "high"): grinding + 400 mJ/20 Hz (8 W); group 2c (manufacturer's setting "finishing"): grinding + 100 mJ/35 Hz (3.5 W); group 2d (experimental setting "low"): grinding + 50 mJ/35 Hz (1.75 W)). (2) For evaluation of adhesive performance, 64 second primary molars were divided into four groups and treated as described for group 1b and groups 2b/c/d (n = 16/method), and μTBS of Clearfil SE/Clearfil Majesty Esthetic to dentin was measured. The SEM micrographs were qualitatively analyzed. The μTBS values were compared with a Kruskal-Wallis test. The significance level was set at α = 0.05. SEM micrographs showed the typical micromorphologies with a smear layer for the diamond bur groups and open dentin tubules for all laser-treated groups. However, in group 2d, the laser beam had insufficiently irradiated the dentin area, rendering the underlying ground surface partly visible. There were no statistically significant differences between μTBS values of the four groups (p = 0.394). This suggests that Er:YAG laser treatment of dentin of primary molars provides bond strengths similar to those obtained following diamond bur treatment.

  18. BIODEGRADATION AND DENTIN BONDING EFFECTIVENESS OF ONE "UNIVERSAL" SELF-ETCH ADHESIVE USED IN MULTI-MODE MANNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gateva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new type of one-step self-etch adhesives classified as "Universal" or "multi-mode" adhesives appeared in recent years. The idea is that these adhesives can be applied simultaneously with both techniques - etch and rinse and with self-etching technique, without compromising the bonding effectiveness. The aim of this study is to evaluate the micro-tensile adhesive bond strength to dentin of permanent teeth achieved after application of Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE adhesive system used in multi-mode manner. The results of our study show that the use of this universal adhesive system in multi-mode manner will not lead to the same results regarding the achieved bond strength with dentin. The additional etching with 37% phosphoric acid as well as the application of the adhesive in several layers deteriorates the bond strength right after application and after six months storage in artificial saliva medium (SAGF.

  19. Influence of zinc-oxide eugenol, formocresol, and ferric sulfate on bond strength of dentin adhesives to primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Fouad Saad

    2005-08-15

    This study evaluated in vitro the influence of a temporary filling {zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE)} and two pulpotomy agents {formocresol (FC) and ferric sulfate (FS)} on shear bond strength (SBS) of two dentin adhesives to the dentin of primary molars. A total of 80 dentin surfaces were prepared and randomly allocated into 10 groups of 8 specimens each. Groups were subjected to different treatments, which included covering with a paste of ZOE mixed at different powder:liquid (P:L) ratios, placement on a gauze soaked in FC or FS, or they received no pretreatment and served as a control. XRV Herculite composite cylinders were bonded to dentin surfaces using Prime and Bond NT adhesive resin or Opti Bond Solo Plus adhesive resin. SBSs were determined using the lnstron testing machine running at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The use of ZOE mixed at the lower P:L ratio of 10g:2g significantly decreased the values of SBS of the two adhesives. The use of two pulpotomy agents (FC and FS) significantly decreased the SBS of the two adhesives. The bond strength to dentin of primary teeth was influenced by the pulpotomy agents used and the ZOE P:L ratio but not by the adhesive system used.

  20. Adhesion of resin composite to hydrofluoric acid-exposed enamel and dentin in repair protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracoglu, A; Ozcan, M; Kumbuloglu, O; Turkun, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoral repairs of ceramic fixed-dental-prostheses (FDP) often include cervical recessions that require pretreatment of the exposed tooth surfaces either before or after the ceramic is conditioned with hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel. The sequence of repair protocol may cross-contaminate the exposed etched enamel or dentin surfaces during the application or rinsing process and thereby affect the adhesion. This study evaluated the influence of HF acid gel with two concentrations on bond strengths of composite to enamel and dentin. Human third molars (N=100, n=10 per group) with similar sizes were selected and randomly divided into 10 groups. Flat surfaces of enamel and dentin were created by wet ground finishing. Before or after the enamel (E) or dentin (D) was conditioned with phosphoric acid (P), substrate surfaces were conditioned with either 9.5% HF (HF(9.5)) or 5% HF (HF(5)). Subsequently, a bonding agent (B) was applied. The experimental groups by conditioning sequence were as follows where the first letter of the group abbreviation represents the substrate (E or D) followed by the acid type and concentration: group 1 (EPHF(9.5)), group 2 (EPHF(5)), group 3 (EHF(9.5)P), group 4 (EHF(5)P), group 5 (DPHF(9.5)), group 6 (DPHF(5)), group 7 (DHF(9.5)P), and group 8 (DHF(5)P). Group 9 (EPB) and group 10 (DPB) acted as the control groups. Repair resin was adhered incrementally onto the conditioned enamel and dentin in polyethylene molds. Each layer was photo-polymerized for 40 seconds. All specimens were thermocycled (×1000, 5°-55°C) and subjected to shear test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/min). Specimens that debonded during thermocycling were considered as 0 MPa. The bond strength data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and failure types using the chi-square test (α=0.05). Overall, the bond results (MPa) were lower on dentin than on enamel (penamel and dentin surfaces (64 out of 80) (padhesion was not ideal. Contamination of the enamel or dentin surfaces

  1. Adhesion of 10-MDP containing resin cements to dentin with and without the etch-and-rinse technique

    OpenAIRE

    Turp, Volkan; Sen, Deniz; Tuncelli, Betul; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion of 10-MDP containing self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin with and without the use of etch-and-rinse technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Human third molars (N=180) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=30 per group). Conventional (Panavia F2.0, Kuraray-PAN) and self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA, Kuraray-CSA) were bonded to dentin surfaces either after application of 3-step etch-and-rinse (35% H3PO4 + ED Primer) or two-step self-etc...

  2. Adhesion of composite luting cement to Er:YAG-laser-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Teresa C D; de Freitas, Patricia M; Navarro, Ricardo S; Eduardo, Carlos de P; Mori, Matsuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    Although some studies claim to the increase of composite resin adhesion to Er:YAG-laser-treated dentin, there are still no reports on the adhesion of composite resin cements to the irradiated surface. This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength (TBS) of a composite resin cement to dentin treated with the Er:YAG laser. Sixty human dentin samples were divided into four groups (n = 15): G1 (Control)-no treatment; G2-Er:YAG laser 60 mJ, 2 Hz, with water cooling, non-contact (19 J/cm(2)); G3-Er:YAG laser 60 mJ, 10 Hz, 50/10 fiber, contact, without water cooling (40 J/cm(2)); G4-Er:YAG laser 60 mJ, 10 Hz, 50/10 fiber, contact, with water cooling (40 J/cm(2)). After the surface treatment, each sample was submitted to bonding procedures. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests revealed no statistical significant difference on TBS values for groups G1 (13.73 +/- 3.05 MPa), G2 (12.60 +/- 2.09 MPa) and G4 (11.17 +/- 4.04 MPa). G4 was not statistically different from G3 (8.64 +/- 2.06 MPa). Er:YAG laser irradiation with different settings can constitute an alternative tool to the use of composite resin-luting cements.

  3. Adhesive dentistry: the development of immediate dentin sealing/selective etching bonding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvey, Gregg A

    2011-01-01

    A major objective of dental research over the past 60 years has been a search for the "dream-team" of dental adhesives. In fact, a recent Medline search produced more than 6,500 papers on dentin bonding and its techniques. Adhesive systems are designed to retain direct and indirect restorations, minimize leakage at the margin, and be simple to place while producing consistent results. The development of materials and techniques has an interesting history; some have recirculated from the past and are being used in some form today. Buonocore used the etchant phosphoric acid at the beginning of the adhesive revolution. Though not accepted for many years it eventually became the "gold standard" for etching enamel. Technique sensitivity moved it out of favor and, through the development of self-etching acidic primers, was eliminated from some adhesive systems. Although these primers may have successfully addressed postoperative sensitivity, adhesion was compromised. The bond strength of these systems has now been improved with the incorporation of phosphoric acid-etch to condition enamel prior to using the adhesive system. This article will trace the history of adhesive techniques and materials and how it has led to the creation of a new technique that combines two bonding methods.

  4. Shear bond strengths of self-adhesive luting resins fixing dentine to different restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Congxiao; Degrange, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the bond strengths of three self-adhesive resin cements (Rely X Unicem, Maxcem and Multilink Sprint) fixing dentine to four different restorative substrates (Ni-Cr alloy, E-Max glass-ceramic, Y-TZP Zirconia and Adoro micro-filled composite) and to compare their performances with those of two conventional dual-cured luting cements (Variolink II + Total-etch Excite DSC and Multilink Automix + Self-etching Primer A + B). Cylindric specimens (5 x 5 mm) were prepared with the four restorative materials for bonding to human dentine. Three surface treatments were performed depending on the restorative material: (i) Al2O3 50 microm sandblasting (Ni-Cr, Adoro), (ii) #800 SiC polishing (Zirconia, E-Max), (iii) hydrofluoric acid (HF)-etching (E-Max). Twenty-five groups (n = 10) were designed according to luting cements, restorative materials and surface pre-treatments. In some experimental groups, Variolink II and Multilink Automix were coupled with, respectively, a silane primer (Monobond S) and an alloy/zirconia primer (Multilink A/Z primer). Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then loaded in shear until failure. Variolink II and Multilink Automix showed the highest bond strengths, regardless of the restorative substrate, when used with dentine bonding systems and primers, while the weakest bonds were with Maxcem. The bond strength recorded with the two other self-adhesive cements depended on the nature of the restorative substrate. Increasing retention at the interfaces (i.e., HF ceramic etching) and using specific primers significantly improves the bond strength of luted restorative materials to dentine.

  5. Effect of double coating of one-step self-etching adhesive on micromorphology and microtensile bond strength to sound vs demineralized dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cerida Aurelia Rodrigues; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; do Amaral, Flavia Lucisano Botelho

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate (1) the one-step adhesive system application method (doubling the adhesive coatings) in regard to microtensile bond strength (MTB) and (2) the interfacial morphology of one-step adhesives to sound vs demineralized dentin. Forty dentin fragments were randomly allocated to 2 groups: D. demineralized dentin and S. sound dentin. Specimens were also subdivided into 2 groups (n = 10), according to the one-step adhesive [AEO (Adper Easy One), 3M ESPE] application method: M, According to the manufacturer's instructions, and D, based on the application of two consecutive layers. After adhesive light polymerization, a resin composite block (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) was built on the dentin surface. Resin-tooth blocks were sectioned into 0.9 mm thick slabs, and one slab of each block was prepared for adhesive interface analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The remaining slabs were sectioned into 0.8 mm(2) sticks that were subjected to tensile stress (0.5 mm/min). Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The application of two consecutive layers of AEO adhesive system did not Influence MTB values for sound dentin. When two consecutive layers of one-step adhesive system were applied, MTB was statistically greater in demineralized vs sound dentin. SEM analysis demonstrated that the application of two consecutive adhesive layers to sound and demineralized dentin produced longer resin tags. It can be concluded that the application of two consecutive adhesive layers improved bond strength to deminera-lized dentin, but no such effect was observed for sound dentin. Application of double coats of one-step self-etching adhesive improved bond strength to demineralized dentin.

  6. Pulpo-dentin complex response after direct capping with self-etch adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Alicja; Parafiniuk, Miroslaw; Lipski, Mariusz; Lichota, Damian; Buczkowska-Radlinska, Jadwiga

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate morphologically the response of feline teeth pulp to direct pulp capping with two different self-etch adhesive systems. Twenty-four cavities in feline teeth were mechanically exposed and assigned to one of two experimental groups: AdheSE + Tetric Ceram (the ASE group), or Adper Prompt L-Pop + Filtek Supreme (the APLP group). There was also a control group Dycal Ca(OH)(2) liner + Amalgam (the CH group eight teeth), and six teeth were used as an intact control group. The animals were sacrificed after 40 days. The teeth were removed and processed for standard histological evaluation, using a scoring system for inflammatory cell response, pulp tissue disorganisation, reparative tissue formation, and the presence of bacteria. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the ASE and APLP self-etching resin systems during the observation period. The majority of the specimens presented inflammatory pulp response with tissue disorganisation and a lack of dentinal bridge formation. CH capping resulted in a significantly smaller inflammatory pulp response and a considerably higher incidence of reparative dentin formation. ASE and APLP were comparably effective as direct pulp capping materials, but their application resulted in significantly greater pulp tissue damage than CH capping. Further in vivo human studies are necessary to determine which adhesive resin systems should be clinically used for direct pulp capping without incurring severe damage to the pulpal tissue.

  7. Influence of dentin contamination by temporary cements on the bond strength of adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimeri Hebling

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin contaminated by temporary cements with or without eugenol. Method: Flat dentin surfaces were obtained from twenty-four human third molars. With exception of the control group (n=8, the surfaces were covered with Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA or Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and kept in an oven at 37oC for seven days. After removing the cements, the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA or Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan were applied in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations, and then the crowns were constructed in of resin composite. The teeth were sectioned into specimens with a cross-sectional bond area of 0.81mm2, which were sub mitted to microtensile testing in a mechanical test machine at an actuator speed of 0.5mm/min. The data were analyzed by t- and ANOVA tests, complemented by Tukey tests (α=0.05. Results: For Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA, bond strength did not differ statistically (p>0.05 for all the experimental conditions. For Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan, only the Interim Restorative Material (Caulk Dentsplay, Milford, DE, USA Group showed significantly lower bond strength (30.1±13.8 MPa in comparison with the other groups; control (38.9±13.5 MPa and Cavit (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA (42.1±11.0 MPa, which showed no significant difference between them.Conclusion: It was concluded that the previous covering of dentin with temporary cement containing eugenol had a deleterious effect on the adhesive performance of the self-etching system only.

  8. The Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate on the Dentin Bond Durability of Two Self-etch Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamverdi, Zahra; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Rostamzadeh, Tayebeh

    2015-06-01

    Self-etch adhesives can activate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) which hydrolyzes organic matrix of demineralized dentin. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), especially found in green tea, could inhibit the activation of MMP. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) into two types of adhesives on dentin bond strength. In this experimental study, 64 extracted third molars were randomly divided into 16 groups. Clearfil SE Bond and Filtek Silorane System with 0 µM, 25µM, 50µM, and 100µM concentration of 95% EGCG were used for bonding. Following the bonding and fabrication of beams (1±0.1 mm(2)) and storage in distilled water, the specimens were subjected to thermal cycles. Microtensile bond strengths of 8 groups were examined after 24 hours and others were tested after 6 months. The fracture modes of specimens were evaluated by stereomicroscope and SEM. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t-test (α = 0.05). The results of the three- way ANOVA test showed that types of bonding, storage time and interactive effect of EGCG concentration and bonding influenced the bond strength of specimens significantly (pbond strength of Clearfil SE Bond with no EGCG (p= 0.017). The most common failure modes in Filtek Silorane System groups and Clearfil SE Bond groups were adhesive and mixed/cohesive, respectively. The results of SEM at different magnifications showed that most fractures have occurred in the hybrid layer. Although adding 100 µM volume of EGCG to Clearfil SE Bond can preserve the dentin bond, incorporation of EGCG in the silorane system, especially in high concentrations, decreases the bond strength after 6 months.

  9. The Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate on the Dentin Bond Durability of Two Self-etch Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Khamverdi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Self-etch adhesives can activate matrix metalloprotein-ase (MMP which hydrolyzes organic matrix of demineralized dentin. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, especially found in green tea, could inhibit the activation of MMP. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG into two types of adhesives on dentin bond strength. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 64 extracted third molars were randomly divided into 16 groups. Clearfil SE Bond and Filtek Silorane System with 0 µM, 25µM, 50µM, and 100µM concentration of 95% EGCG were used for bond-ing. Following the bonding and fabrication of beams (1±0.1 mm2 and storage in distilled water, the specimens were subjected to thermal cycles. Microtensile bond strengths of 8 groups were examined after 24 hours and others were tested after 6 months. The fracture modes of specimens were evaluated by stereomicroscope and SEM. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t-test (α = 0.05. Results: The results of the three- way ANOVA test showed that types of bonding, storage time and interactive effect of EGCG concentration and bonding influenced the bond strength of specimens significantly (p<0.05. The results of the t-test indi-cated that storage time only had significant effect on bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond with no EGCG (p= 0.017. The most common failure modes in Filtek Silorane System groups and Clearfil SE Bond groups were adhesive and mixed/cohesive, respectively. The results of SEM at different magnifications showed that most fractures have occurred in the hybrid layer. Conclusion: Although adding 100 µM volume of EGCG to Clearfil SE Bond can preserve the dentin bond, incorporation of EGCG in the silorane system, especially in high concentrations, decreases the bond strength after 6 months.

  10. Effects of Etch-and-Rinse and Self-etch Adhesives on Dentin MMP-2 and MMP-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, A.; Scaffa, P.; Carrilho, M.; Tjäderhane, L.; Di Lenarda, R.; Polimeni, A.; Tezvergil-Mutluay, A.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Breschi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Auto-degradation of collagen matrices occurs within hybrid layers created by contemporary dentin bonding systems, by the slow action of host-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). This study tested the null hypothesis that there are no differences in the activities of MMP-2 and -9 after treatment with different etch-and-rinse or self-etch adhesives. Tested adhesives were: Adper Scotchbond 1XT (3M ESPE), PQ1 (Ultradent), Peak LC (Ultradent), Optibond Solo Plus (Kerr), Prime&Bond NT (Dentsply) (all 2-step etch-and-rinse adhesives), and Adper Easy Bond (3M ESPE), Tri-S (Kuraray), and Xeno-V (Dentsply) (1-step self-etch adhesives). MMP-2 and -9 activities were quantified in adhesive-treated dentin powder by means of an activity assay and gelatin zymography. MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities were found after treatment with all of the simplified etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives; however, the activation was adhesive-dependent. It is concluded that all two-step etch-and-rinse and the one-step self-etch adhesives tested can activate endogenous MMP-2 and MMP-9 in human dentin. These results support the role of endogenous MMPs in the degradation of hybrid layers created by these adhesives. PMID:23128110

  11. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability.

  12. BIODEGRADATION AND DENTIN BONDING EFFECTIVENESS OF ONE "UNIVERSAL" SELF-ETCH ADHESIVE USED IN MULTI-MODE MANNER

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Gateva; Angela Gusyiska; Pavel Stanimirov; Ivan Raychev; Rossitza Kabaktchieva

    2017-01-01

    A new type of one-step self-etch adhesives classified as "Universal" or "multi-mode" adhesives appeared in recent years. The idea is that these adhesives can be applied simultaneously with both techniques - etch and rinse and with self-etching technique, without compromising the bonding effectiveness. The aim of this study is to evaluate the micro-tensile adhesive bond strength to dentin of permanent teeth achieved after application of Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE) adhesive system used in m...

  13. Influence of an arginine-containing toothpaste on bond strength of different adhesive systems to eroded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, Ana Cláudia Pietrobom; Bridi, Enrico Coser; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different adhesive systems to eroded dentin following toothbrushing with an arginine-containing toothpaste. Sixty standardized 3 × 3 × 2-mm fragments of root dentin (n = 10) were prepared. After all surfaces except the buccal surfaces were impermeabilized, specimens were subjected to an erosive wear protocol and stored for 24 hours at 37°C. The specimens underwent 1000 toothbrushing cycles with an arginine-containing toothpaste, an arginine-free toothpaste (positive control group), or artificial saliva (negative control group). Following application of a self-etching or an etch-and-rinse adhesive to the buccal surfaces of the specimens, 6-mm-high composite resin blocks were built up in 2-mm increments. After 24 hours' storage in 100% relative humidity, microtensile test specimens with an approximate area of 1 mm² were prepared. The test was performed at a speed of 0.5 mm/min until specimen fracture, and the failure patterns were evaluated using a stereoscopic loupe. Two-way analysis of variance revealed no significant difference between the toothpastes, the adhesive systems, or the interactions between toothpaste and adhesive system in terms of the bond strength to eroded dentin (P > 0.05). The predominant failure pattern was adhesive in all groups. It was concluded that a toothpaste containing arginine did not interfere with the bond between either the self-etching or the etch-and-rinse adhesive system and eroded dentin.

  14. One-day bonding effectiveness of new self-etch adhesives to bur-cut enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Vargas, Marcos; Iracki, Jacek; Van Landuyt, Kristen; Poitevin, André; Lambrechts, Paul; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2005-01-01

    Self-etch adhesives try to solve difficulties commonly associated with the clinical application of etch-and-rinse adhesives. Their application procedure is considered less time-consuming and, more importantly, less technique-sensitive. The main objective of this study was to determine the bonding effectiveness to and the interaction with enamel/dentin of three contemporary one- and two-step self-etch adhesives by microtensile bond strength testing (microTBS), Fe-SEM and TEM when compared to a control two-step self-etch and a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive. The one-step self-etch adhesive, Adper Prompt (3M ESPE), scored the lowest microTBS of all experimental and control adhesives tested. Conversely, the two-step self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE (Kuraray) and OptiBond Solo Plus Self-Etch (Kerr) approached the values obtained by the three-step etch-and-rinse control (OptiBond FL, Kerr) when bonded to enamel and dentin. Ultramorphological characterization showed that interfacial morphology and the pH of the self-etch primer/adhesive are strongly associated. The interaction with dentin varied from the formation of a submicron, hydroxyapatite-containing hybrid layer for the "mild" self-etch adhesive Clearfil SE to a 3-5 microm thick, hydroxyapatite-depleted hybrid layer for the "strong" self-etch adhesive Adper Prompt. The two-step self-etch adhesives AdheSE and OptiBond Solo Plus Self-Etch presented with a hybrid layer with a hydroxyapatite-depleted top part and a hydroxyapatite-containing base part and were therefore classified into a new group of self-etch adhesives, namely "intermediary strong" self-etch adhesives.

  15. Micro-tensile bond strength of self-etching primer adhesive systems to human coronal carious dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, J; Itota, T; Torii, Y; Nakabo, S; Yoshiyama, M

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-tensile bond strengths of three self-etching primer adhesive systems to normal dentin (ND), caries-affected dentin (CAD) and caries-infected dentin (CID). Human extracted molars with caries were used, and flat dentin surfaces ground by 600-grit SiC paper were prepared. The surfaces were dyed using Caries-Detector solution, treated with Clearfil SE Bond, Mac-Bond II and UniFil Bond, and then covered with resin composites according to manufacturer's instructions. After immersion in 37 degrees C water for 24 h, the teeth were serially sectioned into multiple slices. Each slice was distinguished into ND, CAD and CID groups by the degree of staining, and the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation was also performed. For statistical analysis, anova and Scheffe's test were used (P bond strengths of the three adhesive systems to CAD and CID were significantly lower than those to ND. There was significant difference in the bond strength to ND between Clearfil SE Bond and UniFil Bond, but no significant differences to CAD and CID among the three adhesive systems. On SEM, the hybrid layers in CAD and CID showed more porous structures compared with ND. The results indicated that the bond strengths to CAD and CID were not affected by a variety of self-etching primer adhesive systems because of the porous hybrid layer formation in carious dentin.

  16. Shear bond strengths and microleakage of four types of dentin adhesive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateyah, Nasrien Z; Elhejazi, Ahmed A

    2004-02-15

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the microleakage of composite resin (Z-100) and shear bond strength to bovine dentin using different types of adhesive systems (Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose, All-Bond 2, One-Step, and Perma Quick) to compare and correlate microleakage to shear bond strength. For the microleakage aspect of the study, 20 class V were prepared (bovine incisors) with 90-degree cavosurface margins and were located at the cemento-enamel junction using a template. Each dentin bonding system was applied to five cavities following the manufacturer's instructions and restored with Z-100 composite resin. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye. All teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction using a diamond saw, and each section was then inspected under a stereomacroscope. For the shear bond strength aspect of the study, 20 bovine incisors were centrally horizontally mounted in Teflon mold with cold cure acrylic resin. Flat labial dentin surfaces were prepared using different grit silicon carbide abrasive wheels. Five specimens were used for each of the bonding agent systems. Each specimen was bonded with restorative composite resin (Z-100) and applied to the treated dentinal surface through a split Teflon mold. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The bonds were stressed using shear forces at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min using an Instron Universal testing machine. Findings indicate none of the systems tested in this study were free from microleakage. Scotch bond multi-purpose achieved the best seal, with One-Step being second best, while All-Bond 2 and Perma Quick had the poorest seal. However, there were significant differences among the shear bond strengths of the four bonding systems tested. Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose has a higher bond strength to composite resin when compared to the other dentin adhesives. The study also concluded

  17. Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Posts to Intraradicular Dentin Using Multimode Adhesive System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Asgary, Saeed; Katebi, Katayoun

    2016-12-01

    Because there is little information about bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a universal adhesive system (UAS) with different resin cements, the aim of this study was to compare the effect of different bonding strategies in the application of UASs on push-out bond strength of fiber posts to intraradicular dentin. Seventy-two single-rooted teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups: self-adhesive resin cement (SAC), dual-cure resin cement (DCC), UAS in the etch-and-rinse (E&R) mode and SAC (E&R + SAC), UAS in the self-etch (SE) mode and SAC (SE + SAC), UAS in the E&R mode and DCC (E&R + DCC), and UAS in the SE mode and DCC (SE + DCC). The push-out test was conducted at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance (P strategies (P  .05). ClearfilSA Luting SAC (Kuraray Noritake Dental Inc, New York, NY) cannot be used alone for fiber post adhesion; it needs an adhesive. Universal adhesive in the SE mode is suggested. When UAS is used for luting fiber posts, the type of cement does not have any effect on bond strength. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  19. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    TÜRKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CİMİLLİ, Hale; ÖKSÜZ, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

  20. Composite resin's adhesive resistance to dentin: influence of Er:YAG laser focal distance variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Chimello, Daniela Thomazatti; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Pecora, Jesus Djalma; Dibb, Regina Guenka Palma

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze in vitro the influence of Er:YAG laser focal distance variation on tensile bond strength of a composite resin to dentin. Although there are several studies using the Er:YAG laser for dentin treatment, there is a lack of available literature related to the Er:YAG laser focal distance variation. Sixty vestibular and lingual dentin surfaces from extracted human third molars, kept in a 0.4% azide sodium solution, were ground and assigned to six groups. The control group was conditioned with 35% phosphoric acid (CA). In the lased groups, the dentin surface treatment was performed by irradiation with Er:YAG laser (80 mJ/2 Hz), varying the focal distance (11, 12, 14, 16, and 17 mm), followed by acid etching. The Single Bond/Filtek Z250 (3M) resinous system was used for the specimen manufacture. The tensile bond strength tests were performed in a Universal Testing Machine with 50 kgf load cell and 0.5 mm/min cross head speed. The averages in MPa were: CA: 18.03 (+/-2.09); 11 mm; 9.92 (+/-3.34); 12 mm: 9.49 (+/-2.29); 14 mm: 10.99 (+/-3.45); 16 mm: 10.56 (+/-1.93); and 17 mm: 17.05 (+/-2.31). It was concluded that the application of Er:YAG laser in a defocused mode (17 mm) associated with acid etching was similar to the treatment of acid solely. Er:YAG laser irradiation in a focused (12 mm) and a defocused (11, 14, and 16 mm) mode coupled with acid conditioning produced the lowest values of adhesion.

  1. Adhesion to pulp chamber dentin: Effect of ethanol-wet bonding technique and proanthocyanidins application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the microleakage of a simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive bonded to pulp chamber dentin with water-wet bonding (WWB or ethanol-wet bonding (EWB with and without proanthocyanidins (PA application. Materials and Methods: Total 88 non-carious extracted human molar teeth were sectioned horizontally to expose the pulp chambers 1.5 mm coronal to the cemento-enamel junction. After the pulp tissue extirpation, canal orifices were enlarged and the root ends were sealed. The samples were randomly divided equally into following four groups according to the four bonding techniques performed using Adper Single Bond 2 [SB] adhesive (1 WWB; (2 EWB; (3 WWB and PA application [WWB + PA]; (4 EWB and PA application [EWB + PA]. Composite resin restorations were performed in all the pulp chambers. Total 20 samples from each group were subjected to microleakage evaluation, and two samples per group were assessed under scanning electron microscope for interfacial micromorphology. Results: The least microleakage score was observed in group 2 (EWB with similar results seen in group 4 (EWB + PA (P = 0.918. Group 2 (EWB showed significantly less microleakage than group 1 (WWB; P = 0.002 and group 3 (WWB + PA; P = 0.009. Group 4 (EWB + PA also depicted significantly reduced microleakage as compared with group 1 (WWB; P = 0.001 and group 3 (WWB + PA; P = 0.003. Conclusion: The use of EWB technique in a clinically relevant simplified dehydration protocol significantly reduced microleakage in simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, Adper Single Bond 2, bonded to pulp chamber dentin. Application of PA had no significant effect on the microleakage of the adhesive bonded with either WWB or EWB.

  2. Effects of Er:YAG laser on bond strength of self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Ozmen, Bilal; Cortcu, Murat; Tokay, Ugur; Tosun, Gul; Erhan Sari, Mustafa

    2014-04-01

    The erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser may be effective the bond strength of adhesive systems on dentine surfaces, the chemical composition and aggressiveness of adhesive systems in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the Er:YAG laser system with the bonding ability of two different self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentine in primary molars. Ninety mid-coronal flat dentine surfaces obtained from sound and caries-affected human primary dentine were treated with an Er:YAG laser or a bur. The prepared surfaces were restored with an adhesive system (Xeno V; Clearfil S³) and a compomer (Dyract Extra). The restored teeth were sectioned with a low-speed saw and 162 samples were obtained. The bond strength of the adhesive systems was tested using the micro-tensile test method. The data were statistically analyzed. A restored tooth in each group was processed for scanning electron microscopy evaluation. The values of the highest bond strength were obtained from the Clearfil S³-Er:YAG laser-sound dentine group in all groups. (24.57 ± 7.27 MPa) (P > 0.05). The values of the lowest bond strength were obtained from the Xeno V-Er:YAG laser-sound dentine group in all groups (11.01 ± 3.89 MPa). It was determined that the Clearfil S³ increased the bond strength on the surface applied with Er:YAG laser according to the Xeno V. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The effect of storage and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of three dentinal adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino Carracho, A J; Chappell, R P; Glaros, A G; Purk, J H; Eick, J D

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of time of storage and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of three dentinal adhesives. The shear bond strength of Mirage Bond was significantly greater than that of Scotchbond 2, which was significantly greater than that of Scotchbond Dual Cure (P less than or equal to .05). Thermocycling significantly lowered the shear bond strength of Scotchbond Dual Cure and Scotchbond 2, but not that of Mirage Bond (P less than or equal to .05). Time of storage did not affect the shear bond strength of the other adhesives, but Mirage Bond had a significantly greater shear bond strength after 1 month of storage (P less than or equal to .05). Scanning electron microscopic observations showed that the fracture patterns were all at the smear layer-adhesive interface for Scotchbond Dual Cure, the majority of the fractures were at the primer-adhesive interface for Scotchbond 2, and most of the fractures were cohesive in the bonding agent for Mirage Bond.

  4. The difference of tensile bond strength between total and self etch adhesive systems in dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selly Yusalina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Total etch adhesive system has been widely used in teeth conservation area as an adhesive agent before implicating composite resin restoration agent. The aim of this research is to prove the difference of tensile bond strength between total etch (Single Bond and self etch adhesive system (Adper prompt L-Pop on dentin surface in vitro. The extracted and non carries maxillary premolar teeth were used in this research and were divided into 2 groups. The first group comprised 15 specimen teeth etched in phosphoric acid and was applicated with the Single Bond adhesive agent. The second group comprised 15 specimen teeth, applicated with the Adper Prompt-L-Pop. The composite resin (Z 350, 3M was applied incrementally and each of the layers was rayed for 20 seconds. The specimens were stored in physiologic solution before they were tested. Tensile bond strength was measured by LRX Plus Lloyd Instrument, with 1 N load and 1 mm/minute speed, and the measurement result was in Mpa unit. The result was evaluated statistically by the Student t-test with α = 0.05. Single Bond (the 5th generation showed a better bond strength compared to the Adper Prompt-L-Pop (the 6th generation.

  5. Assessment of the nanostructure of acid-base resistant zone by the application of all-in-one adhesive systems: Super dentin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Toru; Weerasinghe, Dinesh D S; Waidyasekera, Kanchana; Inoue, Go; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2009-01-01

    An acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) has been shown to be created under a hybrid layer in a self-etching adhesive system at the adhesive/dentin interface. The purpose of this study was to assess the nanostructure of the ABRZ by applying all-in-one adhesive systems. Human premolar dentin was treated with one of two all-in-one adhesive systems; Clearfil Tri-S Bond and G-Bond according to the manufacturers' instructions. After placement of a resin composite, the bonded interface was vertically sectioned and subjected to an acid-base challenge. Following this, the nanostructure of the ABRZ was examined by SEM and TEM. The SEM observations of the adhesive-dentin interface after the acid-base challenge indicated that a hybrid layer less than 1 mum thick was created, and a ABRZ was formed beneath the hybrid layer for each adhesive system. The TEM observations indicated that the ABRZ contained mineral components in both adhesive systems, however, the thickness of the ABRZ was material dependent. The application of the all-in-one adhesive systems created an ABRZ at the underlying dentin, which reinforced normal dentin against dental caries. Therefore, this zone was named 'Super Dentin'. Formation of 'Super Dentin' is a new approach in caries prevention.

  6. Interfacial fracture of dentin adhesively bonded to quartz-fiber reinforced composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Renata M. [Department of Dental Materials and Pronsthodontics at Sao Jose dos Campos Dental Shool, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12245-820 (Brazil); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@umassd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02720 (United States); Soboyejo, Wole [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2011-05-10

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of interfacial failure in a multilayered structure consisting of a dentin/resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced composite (FRC). Slices of dentin close to the pulp chamber were sandwiched by two half-circle discs made of a quartz-fiber reinforced composite, bonded with bonding agent (All-bond 2, BISCO, Schaumburg) and resin cement (Duo-link, BISCO, Schaumburg) to make Brazil-nut sandwich specimens for interfacial toughness testing. Interfacial fracture toughness (strain energy release rate, G) was measured as a function of mode mixity by changing loading angles from 0 deg. to 15 deg. The interfacial fracture surfaces were then examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the failure modes when loading angles changed. A computational model was also developed to calculate the driving forces, stress intensity factors and mode mixities. Interfacial toughness increased from {approx} 1.5 to 3.2 J/m{sup 2} when the loading angle increases from {approx} 0 to 15 deg. The hybridized dentin/cement interface appeared to be tougher than the resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced epoxy. The Brazil-nut sandwich specimen was a suitable method to investigate the mechanical integrity of dentin/cement/FRC interfaces.

  7. Influence of dentin and enamel pretreatment with acidic sulfur compounds on adhesive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, Alexis; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2013-11-01

    This study tested the potential hampering effects of acidic sulfur compounds (ASC) containing hydroxybenzene sulfonic acid, hydroxymethoxybenzene sulfonic acid, and sulfuric acid, prior to self-etch and etch-and-rinse bonding procedures on enamel and dentin. According to the manufacturer, ASC should be applied after cavity preparation and prior to application of a primer in order to reduce the remaining biofilm in the preparation cavity. Despite promoted marketing, data on the investigated liquid are almost completely lacking. One hundred and fifty-two extracted mandibular bovine incisors were embedded and polished to expose either enamel (E) or dentin (D). Then, specimens were randomly divided and conditioned as follows (n = 12/group): ASC and consecutive phosphoric acid application (E1/D1), ASC (E2/D2; E5/D5), phosphoric acid (E3/D3), and no conditioning (E4/D4; E6/D6). Groups were then treated with either Optibond FL(®) (etch-and-rinse; 1-4) or Clearfil SE Bond(®) (self-etch; 5-6). Hollow acrylic cylinders were bonded with a hybrid composite resin (Filtek Supreme XTE®) to the specimens, and the shear bond strength was measured (1 mm/min). In addition, failure types were assessed. Descriptive statistics and statistical analyses were performed with one-way ANOVA followed by the Scheffé post hoc test. For enamel, the highest shear bond strength values were obtained applying routine bonding procedures (23.5 ± 5.6 MPa for etch-and-rinse and 26.0 ± 6.0 MPa for self-etch, respectively). In contrast, dentin pretreatment with a combination of ASC and phosphoric acid led to the highest shear bond values (22.8 ± 4.1 MPa). This study shows that ASC prior to dental restoration placement cannot be recommended for etch-and-rinse procedures on enamel but is appropriate for dentin without interfering with routine bonding procedures. The application of acidic sulfur compounds prior to adhesive restoration placement should be restricted to dentin only as it may negatively

  8. Influence of different intrapulpal pressure simulation liquids on the microtensile bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, Enas H; El-Deeb, Heba A; Yousry, Mai M

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of three different liquids used for intrapulpal pressure (IPP) simulation on the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of three adhesive systems to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of sound human molars were ground flat down to mid-dentin depth. The teeth were bonded under 15 mmHg simulated IPP using distilled water, phosphate buffered saline, or human plasma as a simulating liquid. Three adhesive systems were tested: a single-bottle etch-and-rinse adhesive (SingleBond, 3M ESPE), and two single-step self-etching adhesives (G-Bond, GC) and (iBond, Heraeus Kulzer). Resin composite (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent) buildups were made in 2 increments, each 2 mm in height. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva under 20 mmHg IPP at 37°C for 24 h prior to testing. µTBS (n = 15) was tested using a universal testing machine, and failure modes were determined. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni post-hoc tests at p adhesive, distilled water showed significantly higher µTBS compared to plasma and phosphate buffered saline. With G-Bond, no significant difference was found between distilled water and phosphate buffered saline, whereas plasma showed significantly lower µTBS values. In contrast, no significant difference was encountered between the three IPP liquids for iBond adhesive. Predominant modes of failure were adhesive and mixed. A difference in intrapulpal pressure simulating liquids influences the bonding of adhesives to dentin. Etch-and-rinse adhesives are more sensitive to intrapulpal simulating liquids than are self-etching adhesives. Adhesives containing protein-coagulating components perform better with plasma perfusion than those lacking such components.

  9. Effect of Numbers of Load Cycling on the Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Total Etch Adhesives to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today load cycling is used for similarity of invitro and invivo studies, though different results were reported in different studies. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of two total etch adhesives to dentin. Methods: Enamel of 48 molar teeth were removed to expose the superficial dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into two equal groups, and were restored with Single bond (SB, ExciTE and Synergy composite. Then the teeth of each group were divided to 4 equal sub groups. Moreover, load cycling of 0, 50, 100, 200 k load cycle with 50 newton load was used. In each sub group, 12 hour glass slabs with 1mm2 thickness were made. Then the samples were loaded by Dartec testing machine (Model HC/10 with 1 mm/min cross head speed to make the fracture occur. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, t-test, Bonferroni tests. Results: The most micro tensile bond strength belonged to ExciTE without load cycling and lowest refered to SB with 200 k. There was a significant difference between the groups (p ExciTE= 0.0001, p SB = 0.001. Micro tensile bond strength in SB group was significantly lower than ExciTE (p= 0.001. Moreover, load cycling had negative effect on micro tensile bond strength. Conclusion: By increasing load cycling, micro tensile bond strength of both bondings decreased significantly

  10. Resin-dentin bond strength of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Silvia Terra; Cubas, Gloria Beatriz de Azevedo; Flores, Josiane Barcelos; Montemezzo, Murieli Leonor; Pinto, Marcia Bueno; Piva, Evandro

    2010-01-01

    To compare the resin-dentin bond degradation of 10 contemporary etch-and-rinse adhesive systems after one year of water storage, 100 bovine incisors were randomly separated into 10 groups and their superficial coronal dentin was exposed. According to manufacturers' instructions, dentin surfaces were bonded with one of seven two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives or one of three three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives. Composite buildups were constructed incrementally. Restored teeth were sectioned to obtain sticks (0.5 mm²). The specimens were subjected to a microtensile bond strength test after storage in distilled water (at 37°C) for one year. Data (MPa) were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey's tests at α = 0.05. Of the adhesives tested, One Step, All Bond 2, and Optibond FL attained the highest bond strength to dentin after one year in water storage, while Magic Bond DE and Master Bond presented a high number of premature debonded flaws.

  11. Effect of chemomechanical caries removal on bonding of self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Hamdi Hosni Hamdan; Yiu, Cynthia Kar Yung; Burrow, Michael Frances

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of enzyme-based (Papacárie) and sodium-hypochlorite-based (Carisolv) chemomechanical caries removal methods on bonding of self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentin, in comparison to the standard rotary-instrument caries removal method. Seventy-eight carious permanent molars exhibiting frank cavitation into dentin were used. Forty-eight teeth were randomly divided into three groups, according to the caries excavation methods: (i) Papacárie, (ii) Carisolv and (iii) a round steel bur. After caries removal, each group was subdivided into two groups for two-step (Clearfil SE Bond) or one-step (Clearfil S3 Bond) self-etching adhesive application and resin composite buildups. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams for microtensile bond strength testing. Bond strength data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. For interfacial nanoleakage evaluation using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, caries was similarly removed from the remaining thirty carious molars, bonding was performed as for bond strength testing, and the teeth were sectioned. RESULTS of three-way ANOVA revealed that bond strength was significantly affected by "adhesive" (p0.05). The bond strength of the two-step self-etching adhesive was significantly higher than that of the one-step self-etching adhesive (pChemomechanical caries removal did not affect the bonding of self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentin as compared to caries excavation with rotary instruments.

  12. Microshear bond strength and interfacial morphology of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems to superficial and deep dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousry, Mai Mahmoud; ElNaga, Abeer Abo; Hafez, Randa M; El-Badrawy, Wafa

    2011-10-01

    To compare microshear bond strength (uSBS) of two pairs of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives to superficial and deep dentin. Occlusal surfaces of 40 sound extracted noncarious human molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces (20 superficial and 20 deep dentin). Twenty-four teeth were used for uSBS test and 16 for scanning electron microscopic examination. Each dentin group was randomly assigned into four groups, according to the adhesive system tested. An etch-and-rinse and a self-etch adhesive from the same manufacturer were utilized: Scotchbond-MultiPurpose and Adper-Scotchbond SE and XP Bond and Xeno IV. CeramX was used for composite microcylinder construction (0.9 mm in diameter and 0.7 mm in height). Five composite microcylinders were constructed on each dentin surface (n = 15 per group). A Lloyd universal testing machine was used to test uSBS at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractographic analysis of the failure site was performed using a stereomicroscope and measured by image-analysis software. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan tests. In superficial dentin, Xeno IV showed significantly the highest uSBS, while in deep dentin, XP Bond showed the highest uSBS. The lowest uSBS values in both dentin depths were recorded for Adper-Scotchbond SE. Etch-and-rinse systems bonded better to deep than to superficial dentin, while self-etching systems showed similar performance at both dentin depths. Bond strength to dentin is both adhesive- and substrate-dependent. Contemporary adhesive systems may produce variable bonding results to superficial and deep dentin due to variations in their composition rather than their bonding approach or application technique.

  13. Influence of dentin pretreatment with titanium tetrafluoride and self-etching adhesive systems on microtensile bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridi, Enrico Coser; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of dentin pretreatment with 2.5% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of one- or two-step self-etching adhesive systems. 24 human sound third molars were used. A flat dentin surface of each tooth was exposed. After planing, teeth were divided into groups so that dentin would be left untreated or treated with a 2.5% TiF4 solution for 1 minute. Specimens were then subdivided into two groups to receive one of the following adhesive systems: one-step self-etching Adper Easy One (ADP) or two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (CLEAR). A block of composite measuring 5.0 mm high and 5.0 mm wide was made incrementally on the tooth. Specimens were taken to a metallographic cutter to fabricate sticks with a bond area of approximately 1 mm2. After 24 hours, specimens were submitted to microTBS testing and the failure mode was recorded by examining specimens under stereomicroscopy. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photomicrographs were obtained of the tooth/restoration interface. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test demonstrated that pretreatment of dentin with a TiF4 solution did not affect the microTBS values of either of the adhesive systems (P = 0.675). CLEAR provided higher bond strength than ADP, regardless of whether dentin was or was not pretreated with the TiF4 solution. Failure mode showed mostly adhesive failures in all groups, except when only ADP was used, causing mostly cohesive fractures in resin.

  14. Effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hu

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effects of type I collagen degradation on the durability of three adhesive systems in the early phase of dentin bonding.Bonded dentin specimens were prepared using three different types of adhesive systems. Micro-tensile bond strength and degradation of collagen were tested before, and after 1 month or 4 months of aging in artificial saliva. The relationship between micro-tensile bond strength and collagen degradation was analyzed by calculating their Pearson's correlation coefficient.Aging induced time-dependent reduction in micro-tensile bond strengths for all the tested adhesive systems, although such reduction for the single-step self-etching adhesive G-Bond (GB was not statistically significant. The bond strength of the two-step self-etching primer adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond (SEB was similar to that of the two-step etch-and-rinse self-priming adhesive system Single Bond 2 (SB, and they were both significantly reduced after one or four months of aging. A negative correlation was found between the degree of collagen degradation and magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength (r = -0.65, p = 0.003. The Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.426, indicating that 42.6% of the aging-induced reduction in bond strength can be explained by the degradation of collagen.In the early phase of dentin bonding, there was a negative correlation between the degree of collagen degradation and the magnitude of micro-tensile bond strength. The reduction of bond strength was accompanied by the degradation of collagen. These results provide evidence for the causative relationship between the degradation of collagen and the deterioration of dentin-adhesive interface.

  15. Adhesion to root canal dentine using one and two-step adhesives with dual-cure composite core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, R M; Nakajima, M; Tagami, J; Miura, H

    2005-02-01

    The regional tensile bond strengths of two dual-cure composite resin core materials to root canal dentine using either a one or two-step self-etching adhesive were evaluated. Extracted premolar teeth were decoronated and their root canals prepared to a depth of 8 mm and a width of 1.4 mm. In one group, a one-step self-etching adhesive (Unifil Self-etching Bond) was applied to the walls of the post-space and light-cured for 10 s. After which, the post-spaces were filled with the a dual-cure composite resin (Unifil Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. In the second group, a self-etching primer (ED Primer II) was applied for 30 s, followed by an adhesive resin (Clearfil Photo Bond), which was light-cured for 10 s. The post-spaces were filled with a dual-cure composite resin (DC Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. Chemical-cure composite resin was placed on the outer surfaces of all the roots, which were then stored in water for 24 h. They were serially sliced perpendicular to the bonded interface into 8, 0.6 mm-thick slabs, and then transversely sectioned into beams, approximately 8 x 0.6 x 0.6 mm, for the microtensile bond strength test (muTBS). Data were divided into two (coronal/apical half of post-space) and analysed using three-way anova and Scheffe's test (P composite resins and curing strategies, there were no significant differences in muTBS between the coronal and apical regions (P > 0.05). In addition, both dual-cure composite resins exhibited no significant differences in muTBS irrespective of whether polymerization was chemically or photoinitiated (P > 0.05). Both dual-cure composite resins exhibited good bonding to root canal dentin, which was not dependent upon region or mode of polymerization.

  16. Influence of fluoride- or triclosan-based desensitizing agents on adhesion of resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mine; Cal, Ebru; Gökçe, Bülent; Türkün, Murat; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2010-10-01

    Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of resin cements to dentin was evaluated. Intact premolars (N = 90) were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate; dentin surfaces were exposed, and they were randomly divided into two main groups of cements (Duolink (D), Variolink II (V); n = 45 per group) and then into three desensitizer subgroups (n = 15 per subgroup). Teeth in controls (C) were treated according to cements' adhesion protocols; the other two groups received either fluoride- [Aqua-Prep F (F)] or triclosan-based [Seal&Protect (T)] desensitizers. Ceramic disks (Empress 2) were adhered; specimens were thermocycled (×5,000 cycles, 5-55 ± 1°C, dwell time 30 s) and subjected to shear bond strength test (MPa ± SD) in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Failure types were classified using scanning electron microscope. For V, application of both desensitizers (29.6 ± 7.8 and 22.8 ± 2.8 for F and T, respectively) did not present significantly different results than that of the VC (21.2 ± 2.3; p > 0.05, one-way ANOVA). In D, F (20.6 ± 2.4) showed significantly higher results (p types.

  17. The effect of gelatinase production of Enterococcus faecalis on adhesion to dentin after irrigation with various endodontic irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneser, Mehmet Burak; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi

    2016-12-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the gelatinase production ability of Enterococcus faecalis provides any advantage on adhesion of this bacterium to dentin treated with various irrigants and their combinations. Materials and methods: Standardized dentin discs were randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): group 1: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), group 2: 2% chlorhexidine (CHX), group 3: NaOCl + Saline + CHX, group 4: NaOCl + EDTA + NaOCl, group 5: QMix. After incubation of dentin discs with irrigants, each group was divided into two subgroups (n = 10) according to the bacterial strains used; a gelatinase-producing and a gelatinase-deficient strain of E. faecalis. After incubation of the discs with the bacterial suspensions aerobically for 48 h, XTT assay was conducted for bacterial adherence evaluation. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests (p = .05). Results: Gelatinase-producing E. faecalis adhered to dentin was significantly more than gelatinase-deficient E. faecalis in all test groups (p irrigants, alone or in combination (p irrigation regimen resulted in fewer adhered bacteria to dentin. QMix was not as effective as CHX in terms of bacterial adhesion prevention.

  18. In vitro analysis of bond strength of self-etching adhesives applied on superficial and deep dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Eugenio J; Gomes, Osnara M M; Gomes, João C

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of three adhesive systems to superficial and deep dentine using the microtensile bond strength test (microTBS). The occlusal enamel of thirty human third molars was removed to expose a flat surface of superficial or deep dentin. For each type of surface, the test specimens were randomly divided into three groups which underwent the application of a conventional two-step adhesive system [Single Bond (SB)] as the control group (n=10), a two-bottle self-etching system [One Coat SE Bond (OCSE)] (n=10) and a one bottle one-step system [Clearfil S3 Bond (CFS3)] (n=10). Adhesives were applied, a 5-mm high "crown" as built-up with resin composite Z250 (3M) and the specimens with a cross-sectional area of 0.7 +/- 0.1 mm2 were tested in tension (0.5 mm/min). Four fractured sticks from each tooth were randomly selected and the dentin side was gently abraded with a 1200-grit SiC paper etched with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 s and air dried. SEM micrographs at 70X and 2400X magnification were taken using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to calculate the area of tubular dentin (ATD) and tubular density (TD) with Image Pro Plus 5. Two-way ANOVA (dentin depth-adhesive) showed higher bond strength values for SB. However the values did not depend on dentin depth. Linear regression showed a significant relationship between bond strength and area of intertubular dentin for SB (p = 0.004), and a significant inverse relationship between tubular density and bond strength for CFS3 (p = 0.009). OCSE exhibited a tendency that was similar to SB and opposite to CFS3, but was not statistically significant. The conventional two-step adhesive had higher bond strength values. The use of digital image analysis facilitates the manipulation of data and contributes to the interpretation of the behavior of new adhesive systems.

  19. Effect of Multiple Coatings of One-step Self-etching Adhesive on Microtensile Bond Strength to Primary Dentin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Ma; Jian-feng Zhou; Jian-guo Tan; Quan Jing; Ji-zhi Zhao; Kuo Wan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of multiple coatings of the one-step self-etching adhesive on immediate microtensile bond strength to primary dentin.Methods Twelve caries-free human primary molars were randomly divided into 2 groups with 6 teeth each. In group 1,each tooth was hemisected into two halves. One half was assigned to control subgroup 1,which was bonded with a single-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 1 in which the adhesive was applied three times before light curing. In group 2, the teeth were also hemisected into two halves. One half was assigned to control subgroup 2, which was bonded with the single-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 2 in which three layers of adhesive were applied with light curing each successive layer. Microtensile bond strength was immediately tested after specimen preparation.Results When the adhesive was applied three times before light curing, the bond strength of the experimental subgroup 1 (n=33, 57.49±11.61 MPa) was higher than that of the control subgroup 1 (n=31,49.71±11.43 MPa, P0.05).Conclusion multiple coatings of one-step self-etching adhesive can increase the immediate bond strength to primary dentin when using the technique of light-curing after applying three layers of adhesive.

  20. [Adhesion of sealer cements to dentin with and without smear layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettleman, B H; Messer, H H; ElDeeb, M E

    1991-01-01

    The influence of a smear layer on the adhesion of sealer cements to dentin was assessed in recently extracted human anterior teeth. A total of 120 samples was tested, 40 per sealer; 20 each with and without the smear layer. The teeth were split longitudinally, and the internal surfaces were ground flat. One-half of each tooth was left with the smear layer intact, while the other half had the smear removed by washing for 3 min with 17% EDTA followed by 5.25% NaOCI. Evidence of the ability to remove the smear layer was verified by scanning electron microscopy. Using a specially designed jig, the sealer was placed into a 4-mm wide x 4 mm deep well which was then set onto the tooth.

  1. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  2. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Pooran; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Shirban, Farinaz; Davoodi, Amin; Khoroushi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs) should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB) and Prompt L-Pop (PLP) adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1) Immediate light-curing, (2) delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3) self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05). PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  3. Chemical Interaction Analysis of an Adhesive Containing 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl Dihydrogen Phosphate (10-MDP) With the Dentin in Noncarious Cervical Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Bmb; Ulbaldini, Alm; Sato, F; Baesso, M L; Bento, A C; Andrade, Lhc; Lima, S M; Pascotto, R C

    2017-02-03

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical bonds of a self-etch 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) adhesive to natural noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs) and compare them with those occurring in sclerotic dentin in artificially prepared defects (APDs). Four human teeth with natural NCCLs on the buccal surface were selected. Artificial defects matching the natural lesions were prepared on the lingual surface of the same teeth serving as control. Micro-Raman (MR) spectroscopy was used to quantify mineral content in natural NCCLs and in APDs. Fourier transform infrared-photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) readouts were taken before and after adhesive application to analyze the protein matrix/mineral (M:M) ratio and chemical interactions between 10-MDP adhesive and dentin. The MR and FTIR-PAS spectra collected from natural NCCLs demonstrated a larger area of the band (961 cm(-1), PO4) and lower M:M ratio, respectively, characterizing a hypermineralized dentin, compared with APDs. FTIR-PAS demonstrated emergence of a peak (1179 cm(-1), P=O) in spectra after adhesive treatment, demonstrating a more intense chemical interaction in natural NCCLs. The results demonstrated that chemical bonding of 10-MDP adhesive to natural NCCLs is more intense, due to the hypermineralized surface, and suggest that it is unnecessary to remove the hypermineralized layer with burs, as this may decrease the chemical bonding potential of 10-MDP.

  4. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Bae; González-Cabezas, Carlos; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2015-08-10

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe(3+) additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe-catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives.

  5. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe3+ additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe–catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives. PMID:26176305

  6. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, padhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  7. Effect of different air-drying periods on microtensile bond strength of an adhesive to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Daneshkazemi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Today, use of adhesive systems is the most common materials in restorative dental procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different air-drying periods on the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin using adhesive.   Materials and Methods: 15 sound molar teeth were selected. The an occlusal surfaces of teeth were removed with silicon carbide disks (3M/USA to reach flat surface of dentin. Then according to the air drying of solvent, the teeth were divided to five groups. After 5 sec etching and rinsing for 15 sec , the teeth were air dried for 3 sec . Then Singlebond (3M was used with different air-drying times (0s, 2s, 5s, 10s, 30s and cured. Then after insertion and curing of Saremco (microhybrid low shrinkage/Switzerland composite, the teeth were thermocycled for 500 cycles. Then hour glass slabs with 1 mm2 interface was created. Specimens were then subjected to µTBS force until fracture. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni tests.   Results: Statistical tests showed that there were significant differences between bond strength of groups (P=0.002. The mean of µTBS for the 2 Sec and 30 Sec evaporating time was the most and the least vawes, respectively.   Conclusion: An optimum air-drying time for solvent evaporation was the lowest time recommended by the manufacturer. Over and under evaporation time decreased µTBS significantly.

  8. In vitro fracture resistance of root-filled teeth using new-generation dentine bonding adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürmüzlü, F; Serper, A; Siso, S H; Er, K

    2003-11-01

    To compare the fracture resistance of root-filled premolar teeth restored with new-generation dentine bonding adhesives. Sixty extracted single-rooted human maxillary premolar teeth were used. Access cavities were prepared, and the roots were instrumented with K-files to an apical size 50 using a step-back technique. Root fillings were accomplished using gutta percha (Sure-Endo, Seoul, Korea) and AH Plus root canal sealer (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) using the lateral condensation technique. The teeth were then randomly divided into six groups of 10 teeth each. A mesiodistocclusal (MOD) cavity was prepared in the teeth to the level of the canal orifices so that the thickness of the buccal wall of the teeth measured 2 mm at the occlusal surface and 3 mm at the cemento-enamel junction. Preparations were restored using the following adhesive systems: Etch & Prime 3.0 (Degussa AG, Hanau, Germany), Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan), Prompt L-Pop (ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), Panavia F (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan), Optibond Plus (Kerr, Orange, CA, USA) and Admira Bond (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany); all preparations except those of the Panavia F and Admira Bond groups were further restored with resin composites. The Panavia F group was restored with amalgam and the Admira Bond group with Ormocer (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany). The teeth were mounted in a Universal Testing Machine (Hounsfield, Surrey, UK), and the buccal walls were subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups were compared. Statistical analysis of the data was accomplished using one-way anova. There was no significant difference in the fracture resistance of any of the test groups. In this laboratory study, the type of dentine bonding agents had no influence in the fracture resistance of teeth.

  9. Exposed Dentin: Influence of Cleaning Procedures and Simulated Pulpal Pressure on Bond Strength of a Universal Adhesive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare various pre-treatments serving as cleaning procedures of dentin on the bond strength of resin composite promoted by a universal adhesive system applied either in the absence or presence of simulated pulpal pressure. Materials and Methods Prior to application of the adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) and resin composite (Filtek Z250), ground dentin surfaces were given one of five pre-treatments either without or with simulated pulpal pressure: 1) no pre-treatment, adhesive system in “self-etch” mode, 2) phosphoric acid etching, adhesive system in “total-etch” mode, 3) polishing with pumice on prophylaxis cup, 4) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PLUS powder, 5) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PERIO powder; n = 20/group of pre-treatment. After storage (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 h), micro shear bond strength was measured and data analyzed with parametric ANOVA including Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing followed by Student’s t tests (significance level: α = 0.05). Results The ANOVA found type of pre-treatment and simulated pulpal pressure to have no significant effect on dentin bond strength. The explorative post-hoc tests showed a negative effect of simulated pulpal pressure for phosphoric acid etching (adhesive system in “total-etch” mode; p = 0.020), but not for the other four pre-treatments (all p = 1.000). Conclusion Air abrasion with powders containing either erythritol and chlorhexidine (AIR-FLOW PLUS) or glycine (AIR-FLOW PERIO) yielded dentin bond strengths similar to no pre-treatment, phosphoric acid etching, or polishing with pumice. Simulated pulpal pressure reduced the bond strength only when the self-etch adhesive system was used in total-etch mode. PMID:28081572

  10. Effect of thermocycling on the durability of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives on dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwichit, Ketkamon; Kingkaew, Ruksaphon; Pongprueksa, Pong; Senawongse, Pisol

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to compare bond strengths of adhesives with/without thermocycling and to analyze the micromorphology of resindentin interfaces. Flat dentin surfaces were prepared and divided into eight groups to bond with four etch-and-rinse adhesives (Optibond FL, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, Optibond Solo Plus, and Single Bond 2) and four self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Adper SE Plus, Clearfil S(3) Bond and Adper Easy Bond). Specimens were further divided into two subgroups subjected for with/without thermocycling and then subjected to both micro-tensile test and resin-dentin interface evaluation. The results revealed that there were significant differences in bond strength between the groups with and without thermocycling for all etch-and-rinse groups and for the Adper Easy Bond self-etch group (pBond demonstrated highly durable bond strengths. Furthermore, more silver ion uptake was observed at the resin-dentin interfaces for all etch-and-rinse adhesives and Adper SE Plus and Adper Easy Bond after thermocycling.

  11. Effect of different evaporation periods on microtensile bond strength of an acetone-based adhesive to dentin

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    Abdolrahim Davari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Solvent content of a contemporary dental adhesive affect the bonding process, especially in the case of acetone based adhesives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different air-drying periods on microtensile bond strength (MTBS of a total-etch adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods: Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply-USA was used with different air-drying periods (0, 2, 5, 10, 30sec for bonding a composite resin to prepared dentin. The specimens were then subjected to a tensile force until fracture and the MTBSs of the samples were recorded. Failure modes of the fractured samples were also determined using stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni tests (P = 0.05. Results: With increasing the air-drying periods, the MTBSs were increased until the 5 second air-blowing; after that, with increasing the air-drying periods, the MTBSs decreased. Both, the most complicated failure and the strongest bond were seen in the 5 sec air-drying group. Conclusion: There is an optimum air-drying time for acetone based adhesives which results in the strongest bond to dentin.

  12. Effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of a new self-etch adhesive system to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Munaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the effect of saliva contamination on the shear bond strength of a new two-step self-etch adhesive (P90 system adhesive to dentin and to determine the effect of contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: The buccal surfaces of 40 human premolars were ground to expose dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Group 1 is uncontaminated and serves as the control group. Further groups were divided based on the step in the bonding sequence when the contamination had occurred as follows: Group 2 (primer, saliva contamination, rinse and dry, group 3 (after procedure of group 2, reapplication of primer, and group 4 (after procedure like in control group, saliva contamination, rinse and dry. Filtek P90 composite resin cylinders of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm length were fabricated on the surfaces. Shear bond strength testing was done in an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Student′s t-test. Results: With P90 system adhesive, group 2 and group 4 showed lower shear bond strength than group 1 (control and group 3 (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Saliva contamination significantly decreased the shear bond strength of the adhesive to dentin.

  13. Effects of residual water on microtensile bond strength of one-bottle dentin adhesive systems with different solvent bases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-xing; HUANG Cui; ZHENG Tie-li; WANG Sa; CHENG Xiang-rong

    2005-01-01

    Background The wet-bonding technique is recommended for the one-bottle dentin adhesive systems, but the moisture concept varies widely among the instructions of manufacturers as well as among investigators. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different dentin surface moisture on the microtensile bond strength(s) of an ethanol/water-based adhesive system and an acetone-based system to dentin. Methods Forty intact human premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were used. Superficial occlusal flat dentin surfaces of these premolars were exposed, finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Under four wet and dry conditions (overwet, blot dry, one-second dry and desiccated), resin composite was bonded to dentin by using Single Bond (SB) or Prime & Bond NT (PB) according to the manufacturers' instructions. The teeth were longitudinally sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded beams with a cross-sectional area of 0.81 mm2 with a slow-speed diamond saw. The bonded specimens were tested in tension at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until failure of the bonds. Failure modes were observed with a scanning electron microscope. The mean bond strengths were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Turkey's test. Results The bond strength of the overwet/SB, blot dry/SB, one-second dry/SB and desiccated/SB groups was 10.87 Mpa, 22.47 Mpa, 24.91 Mpa and 12.99 Mpa, respectively. The bond strength of the overwet/PB, blot dry/PB, one-second dry/PB and desiccated/PB groups was 10.02 Mpa, 20.67 Mpa, 21.82 Mpa and 10.09 Mpa, respectively. For both SB and PB, the blot dry group and one-second dry group revealed significantly higher bond strengths than the overwet and desiccated groups (P<0.05). Conclusions In order to achieve the highest bond strength to dentin, keeping the dentin surface in an appropriately moist condition is critical for the one-bottle dentin adhesive systems with ethanol/water or acetone solvent.

  14. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, F. L. A.; Carvalho, J. G.; Andrade, M. F.; Saad, J. R. C.; Hebling, J.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm2) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin.

  15. Effect of surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber-reinforced composite post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. Seventy-five single-rooted human teeth were prepared to receive a glass fiber post (Reblida). The posts were divided into five groups according to the surface treatment: Gr C (control; no treatment), Gr S (silanization for 60 s), Gr AP (airborne-particle abrasion), Gr HF (etching with 9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), and Gr M10 (etching with CH2Cl2 for 10 min). Dual-cure self-adhesive luting agent (Rely X Unicem) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion using micropush-out test. Failure types were examined with stereomicroscope and surface morphology of the posts was characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties of posts were assessed using a three-point bending test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Statistical significance was set at the 0.05 probability level. Groups treated with M10 showed significantly higher bond strength than those obtained with other surface treatments (P C > S > AP > HF. Most failure modes were adhesive type of failures between dentin and luting agent (48.2%). SEM analysis revealed that the fiber post surfaces were modified after surface treatments. The surface treatments did not compromise the flexural properties of fiber posts. Application of M10 to the fiber post surfaces enhanced the adhesion to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

  16. Effect of Re-Application of Microbrush on Micro Tensile Bond Strength of an Adhesive to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seied Majid Mosavi Nasab

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Re-application of microbrush may affect the micro tensile bond strength of adhesives to dentin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of re-application of microbrushes on the micro tensile bond strength of an adhesive to dentin.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted molars teeth were collected and enamel of occlusal surface were removed to expose superficial dentin. Then superficial dentin was etched, washed and partially air dried.According to the times of application of microbrush, teeth were divided into two test groups. In group 1, newmicrobrushs were used, but in group 2, the ones that were already used for twice were included. Ambar dentin bonding agent (FGM/Brazil was applied to the etched dentin with microbrushes according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Then the crown of teeth was built up with LLiss (FGM/Brazil composite resin. The teeth were sectioned in buccolingual direction to obtain 1mm slabs. Then 50 hourglass- shape samples were made from 30 teeth (25 Specimens per group. The microtensile bond strength of the specimens was tested using MTD500 (SD Mechatronik, Germany. The data were statistically analyzed by T-test.Results: The mean values for the microtensile bond strength were 30.49±7.18 and 23.61±9.06 MPa±SD for the first and second groups, respectively. There was significant difference between the groups (P=0.005.Conclusion: Microbrushes should not be used for more than one cavity preparation.

  17. Effect of different surface treatments on adhesion of In-Ceram Zirconia to enamel and dentin substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Ibrahim, Fatma; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-08-01

    Resin bonding of In-Ceram Zirconia (ICZ) ceramics is still a challenge, especially for minimally invasive applications. This study evaluated the adhesion of ICZ to enamel and dentin after different surface treatments of the ceramic. ICZ ceramic specimens (diameter: 6 mm; thickness: 2 mm) (N = 100) were fabricated following the manufacturer's instructions and randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 20), according to the surface treatment methods applied. The groups were as follows: group C: no treatment; group SB: sandblasting; group SCS-S: CoJet+silane; group SCS-P: CoJet+Alloy Primer; group GE-S: glaze+ hydrofluoric acid etching (9.6%) for 60 s+silane. Each group was randomly divided into two subgroups to be bonded to either enamel or dentin (n = 10 per group) using MDP-based resin cement (Panavia F2.0). All the specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5000x, 5°C-55°C). The specimens were mounted in a universal testing machine and tensile force was applied to the ceramic/cement interface until failure occurred (1 mm/min). After evaluating all the debonded specimens under SEM, the failure types were defined as either "adhesive" with no cement left on the ceramic surface (score 0) or "mixed" with less than 1/2 of the cement left adhered to the surface with no cohesive failure of the substrate (score 1). The data were statistically evaluated using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The highest tensile bond strength for the enamel surfaces was obtained in group GE-S (18.1 ± 2 MPa) and the lowest in group SB (7.1 ± 1.4 MPa). Regarding dentin, group CSC-P showed the highest (12 ± 1.3 MPa) and SB the lowest tensile bond strength (5.7 ± 0.4 MPa). Groups SB, CSC-S, CSC-P, and GE-S did not show significant differences between the different surface treatments on either enamel or dentin surfaces (p enamel and dentin substrates (p enamel substrates, exclusively adhesive failures from ICZ (score 0) were found, on dentin exclusively mixed failures were observed (score

  18. Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of a self-etching adhesive system to caries-affected dentin on the gingival wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengun, Abdulkadir; Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Sener, Yagmur; Ozer, Fusun

    2005-01-01

    A self-etching dentin adhesive was evaluated for its ability to bond to caries-affected and sound dentin after applying three desensitizers to the gingival walls. Sixty extracted human molars, with approximal dentin caries, were cut horizontally on the long axis of the tooth through caries-affected gingival walls. Carious dentin was removed with SiC paper by means of a caries detector to expose caries-affected dentin. The molars were randomly assigned to four groups: control and three experimental groups-Micro Prime, Glauma Desentizer and Cervitec. Desensitizers were applied to the dentinal surfaces according to manufacturers' instructions. A resin composite was bonded to both the caries-affected and sound dentin of each tooth using a bonding system and plastic rings. The restoration was debonded by shear bond strength. The application of Micro Prime and Gluma Desensitizer to caries-affected dentin did not show any effect on bond strength testing. However, Cervitec caused a decrease in bond strength to caries-affected dentin. The effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of the self-etch bonding agent to caries-affected dentin changed according to the chemical composition of the materials. Desensitizer application on sound dentin is recommended with self-etch bonding systems.

  19. The effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on dentin bonding and nanoleakage of etch-and-rinse adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjäderhane, Leo; Mehtälä, Pekka; Scaffa, Polliana; Vidal, Cristina; Pääkkönen, Virve; Breschi, Lorenzo; Hebling, Josimeri; Tay, Franklin R; Nascimento, Fabio D; Pashley, David H; Carrilho, Marcela R

    2013-10-01

    The objective was to examine the effect of a solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on resin-dentin bond durability, as well as potential functional mechanisms behind the effect. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) was evaluated in extracted human teeth in two separate experiments. Dentin specimens were acid-etched and assigned to pre-treatment with 0.5mM (0.004%) DMSO as additional primer for 30s and to controls with water pre-treatment. Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied and resin composite build-ups were created. Specimens were immediately tested for μTBS or stored in artificial saliva for 6 and 12 months prior to testing. Additional immediate and 6-month specimens were examined for interfacial nanoleakage analysis under SEM. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibition by DMSO was examined with gelatin zymography. Demineralized dentin disks were incubated in 100% DMSO to observe the optical clearing effect. The use of 0.5mM DMSO had no effect on immediate bond strength or nanoleakage. In controls, μTBS decreased significantly after storage, but increased significantly in DMSO-treated group. The control group had significantly lower μTBS than DMSO-group after 6 and 12 months. DMSO also eliminated the increase in nanoleakage seen in controls. 5% and higher DMSO concentrations significantly inhibited the gelatinases. DMSO induced optical clearing effect demonstrating collagen dissociation. DMSO as a solvent may be useful in improving the preservation of long-term dentin-adhesive bond strength. The effect may relate to dentinal enzyme inhibition or improved wetting of collagen by adhesives. The collagen dissociation required much higher DMSO concentrations than the 0.5mM DMSO used for bonding. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The competition between enamel and dentin adhesion within a cavity: an in vitro evaluation of class V restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Doudou, Wassila; Kunzelmann, Karl Heinz; Krejci, Ivo

    2012-08-01

    To gain more insight into the consequences of curing contraction within the tooth cavity, we assessed the margin behavior of 12 contemporary restorative systems in class V restorations with margins located on enamel and dentin after mechanical loading and water storage. Mixed class V cavities were prepared on extracted human molars and restored using five etch and rinse and seven self-etch adhesive systems with their corresponding composites. Marginal adaptation was evaluated by using a computer-assisted quantitative marginal analysis in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on epoxy replicas before, after thermal and mechanical stressing and after 1 year of water storage. The interactions of "testing conditions", "adhesive-composite combination" and "tooth substrate" with "marginal adaptation" were evaluated by two-way ANOVA. Fatigue, stress and storage conditions had significant effects on the marginal adaptation. Only two groups (Optibond FL and G Bond) presented equal percentages of marginal adaptation on enamel and dentin; in the other groups, the rate of degradation was product dependent. All materials tested showed a distinct behavior on enamel and dentin. In addition to mechanical resistance and long-term stability, differences within materials also exist in their ability to simultaneously bond to enamel and dentin.

  1. Micro-CT evaluation of internal adaptation in resin fillings with different dentin adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hoon Han

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of present study was to evaluate the internal adaptation of composite restorations using different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods Typical class I cavities were prepared in 32 human third molars. The teeth were divided into the following four groups: 3-step etch-and-rinse, 2-step etch-and-rinse, 2-step self-etch and 1-step self-etch system were used. After the dentin adhesives were applied, composite resins were filled and light-cured in two layers. Then, silver nitrate solution was infiltrated, and all of the samples were scanned by micro-CT before and after thermo-mechanical load cycling. For each image, the length to which silver nitrate infiltrated, as a percentage of the whole pulpal floor length, was calculated (%SP. To evaluate the internal adaptation using conventional method, the samples were cut into 3 pieces by two sectioning at an interval of 1 mm in the middle of the cavity and they were dyed with Rhodamine-B. The cross sections of the specimens were examined by stereomicroscope. The lengths of the parts where actual leakage was shown were measured and calculated as a percentage of real leakage (%RP. The values for %SP and %RP were compared. Results After thermo-mechanical loading, all specimens showed significantly increased %SP compared to before thermo-mechanical loading and 1-step self-etch system had the highest %SP (p < 0.05. There was a tendency for %SP and %RP to show similar microleakage percentage depending on its sectioning. Conclusions After thermo-mechanical load cycling, there were differences in internal adaptation among the groups using different adhesive systems.

  2. Effect of air-blowing duration on the bond strength of current one-step adhesives to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiale; Saikaew, Pipop; Kawano, Shimpei; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Hannig, Matthias; Sano, Hidehiko; Selimovic, Denis

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of different air-blowing durations on the micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) of five current one-step adhesive systems to dentin. One hundred and five caries-free human molars and five current one-step adhesive systems were used: ABU (All Bond Universal, Bisco, Inc.), CUB (CLEARFIL™ Universal Bond, Kuraray), GPB (G-Premio BOND, GC), OBA (OptiBond All-in-one, Kerr) and SBU (Scotchbond Universal, 3M ESPE). The adhesives were applied to 600 SiC paper-flat dentin surfaces according to each manufacturer's instructions and were air-dried with standard, oil-free air pressure of 0.25MPa for either 0s, 5s, 15s or 30s before light-curing. Bond strength to dentin was determined by using μTBS test after 24h of water storage. The fracture pattern on the dentin surface was analyzed by SEM. The resin-dentin interface of untested specimens was visualized by panoramic SEM image. Data from μTBS were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (adhesive vs. air-blowing time), and Games-Howell (a=0.05). Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect of materials (p=0.000) and air-blowing time (p=0.000) on bond strength to dentin. The interaction between factors was also significantly different (p=0.000). Maximum bond strength for each system were recorded, OBA/15s (76.34±19.15MPa), SBU/15s (75.18±12.83MPa), CUB/15s (68.23±16.36MPa), GPB/30s (55.82±12.99MPa) and ABU/15s (44.75±8.95MPa). The maximum bond strength of OBA and SUB were significantly higher than that of GPB and ABU (psystems is material-dependent (p=0.000), and was influenced by air-blowing duration (p=0.000). For the current one-step adhesive systems, higher bond strengths could be achieved with prolonged air-blowing duration between 15-30s. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of functional monomers in all-in-one adhesive systems on formation of enamel/dentin acid-base resistant zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Toru; Ichikawa, Chiaki; Li, Na; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Sadr, Alireza; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Tagami, Junji

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of functional monomers in all-in-one adhesive systems on formation of acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) in enamel and dentin. Experimental adhesive systems containing one of three functional monomers; MDP, 3D-SR and 4-META were applied to enamel or dentin surface and light-cured. A universal resin composite was then placed. The specimens were subjected to a demineralizing solution (pH 4.5) and 5% NaClO for acid-base challenge and then observed by SEM. The ABRZ was clearly observed in both enamel and dentin interfaces. However, enamel ABRZ was thinner than dentin ABRZ in all adhesives. Morphology of the ABRZ was different between enamel and dentin, and also among the adhesives. Funnel-shaped erosion was observed only in the enamel specimen with the 4-META adhesive. The formation of enamel/dentin ABRZ was confirmed in all adhesives, but the morphology was influenced by the functional monomers.

  4. Comparison of tensile bond strengths of four one-bottle self-etching adhesive systems with Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qianzhou; Chen, Minle; Ding, Jiangfeng

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the interaction of current one-bottle self-etching adhesives and Er:YAG laser with dentin using a tensile bond strength (TBS) test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in vitro. Two hundred and thirteen dentin discs were randomly distributed to the Control Group using bur cutting and to the Laser Group using an Er:YAG laser (200 mJ, VSP, 20 Hz). The following adhesives were investigated: one two-step total-etch adhesive [Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply)] and four one-step self-etch adhesives [G-Bond plus (GC), XENO V (Dentsply), iBond Self Etch (Heraeus) and Adper Easy One (3 M ESPE)]. Samples were restored with composite resin, and after 24-hour storage in distilled water, subjected to the TBS test. For morphological analysis, 12 dentin specimens were prepared for SEM. No significant differences were found between the control group and laser group (p = 0.899); dentin subjected to Prime & Bond NT, XENOV and Adper Easy One produced higher TBS. In conclusion, this study indicates that Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin can perform as well as bur on TBS, and some of the one-step one-bottle adhesives are comparable to the total-etch adhesives in TBS on dentin.

  5. Effect of collagen cross-linkers on the shear bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system to deep dentin

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    Sakhamuri Srinivasulu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin to deep dentin, bonded using a self-etch adhesive, after treatment with two collagen cross-linkers at varying time intervals. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted human incisors were sectioned longitudinally into equal mesial and distal halves ( n = 60. The proximal deep dentin was exposed and the specimens were divided based on the surface treatment of dentin prior to bonding as follows: Group I ( n = 12, control: No prior dentin surface treatment; group II ( n = 24: Dentin surface pretreated with 10% sodium ascorbate; and group III ( n = 24: Dentin surface pretreated with 6.5% proanthocyanidin. Groups II and III were further divided into two subgroups based on the pre-treatment time of five and 10 min. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested using universal testing machine and the data were statistically analyzed. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength to deep dentin was observed in teeth treated with 10% sodium ascorbate and 6.5% proanthocyanidin compared to control group. No significant difference was observed between 5 min and 10 min pre-treatment times. Conclusion: Dentin surface pre-treatment with both 10% sodium ascorbate and 6.5% proanthocyanidin resulted in significant improvement in bond strength of self-etch adhesive to deep dentin.

  6. A comparison between new dentinal adhesives (fifth generation) and traditional varnish in microleakage reduction of amalgam restorations in primary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Mortazavi M. Associate Professor; Bahrololoomi Z. Assistant Professor

    2003-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Microleakage presents the major cause for restorations failure in the oral cavity resulting in postoperative sensitivity, pulp irritation and secondary caries formation."nAim: The aim of this study was to compare two dentinal adhesive systems of fifth generation and copalite varnish in reducing microleakage of amalgam restorations in primary teeth."nMaterials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 100 class V amalgam restorations were prepared on the buccal or li...

  7. Do different dentin tubular patterns of primary molars affect the bond strength of total-etching and self-etching adhesive systems?

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    Henrique Castilhos Ruschel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the tensile bond strength of self-etching and total-etching adhesive systems to the different dentin surfaces of primary molars and to analyze the resin-dentin interface. Methodology: In this in vitro study, dentin samples 35 to 65% distant from the pulp (intermediate dentin were obtained from buccal and lingual surfaces at the middle third of the crown of fi rst and second primary molars. Dentin surfaces were prepared with 400 and 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Three adhesive systems (Prime & Bond NT, AdheSE and Clear fi l SE Bond were tested on the fi rst and second primary molar surfaces (n=15; inverted truncated cones of resin composite with a 2.0 mm bonding diameter were built. After 24 hour storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were submitted to the tensile bond strength test. To analyze the resin-dentin interface under scanning electron microscopy, samples were prepared with the same three adhesive systems (n=5. Results: No differences between fi rst and second primary molar dentin substrates could be observed in mean bond strength values (ANOVA; p>0.05. The following mean bond strength values (MPa were obtained: 15.65±3.70 (Prime & Bond NT, 19.47±7.09 (AdheSE and 17.14 ±5.35 (Clear fi l SE Bond. There were no statistically signi fi cant differences between the self-etching adhesive systems. The presence of hybrid a layer and tags were observed in all groups. Conclusions: Contemporary adhesive systems showed similar behaviors on both dentin tubular surfaces of primary molars. Follow-up studies of the clinical performance of these materials are needed.

  8. Multiple Coatings can Improve the Bond Durability of One-step Self-etching Adhesive to Primary Dentin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Ma; Jian-feng Zhou; Quan Jing; Ji-zhi Zhao; Kuo Wan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether multiple coatings can improve the bond durability of one-step self-etching adhesive to primary dentin.Methods Twelve caries-free human primary molars were randomly divided into 2 groups.In group 1,each tooth was hemisected into 2 halves.One half was assigned to the control subgroup 1,which was bonded with a commercially available one-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; the other half was assigned to experimental subgroup 1,in which the adhesive was applied three times before light curing.In group 2,one split half tooth was bonded with a commercially available one-step self-etching adhesive according to the manufacturer's instructions; for the other half,three layers of adhesive were applied with each successive layer of light curing.Specimens were stored in 0.9% NaCl containing 0.02% sodium azide at 37℃ for 18 months and then were subjected to microtensile bond strength test and the fracture mode analysis.Results When the adhesive was applied three times before light curing,the bond strength of the experimental subgroup 1 was significandy higher than that of the control subgroup 1 (47.46±13.91 vs.38.12±11.21 MPa,P<0.05).When using the technique of applying multiple layers of adhesive with each successive layer of light curing,no difference was observed in bond strength between the control subgroup and the experimental subgroup (39.40±8.87 vs.40.87±9.33 MPa,P>0.05).Conclusion Multiple coatings can improve the bond durability of one-step self-etching adhesive to primary dentin when using the technique of light-curing after applying 3 layers of adhesive.

  9. A comparison between new dentinal adhesives (fifth generation and traditional varnish in microleakage reduction of amalgam restorations in primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi M. Associate Professor

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Microleakage presents the major cause for restorations failure in the oral cavity resulting in postoperative sensitivity, pulp irritation and secondary caries formation."nAim: The aim of this study was to compare two dentinal adhesive systems of fifth generation and copalite varnish in reducing microleakage of amalgam restorations in primary teeth."nMaterials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 100 class V amalgam restorations were prepared on the buccal or lingual surfaces of primary molar and canine teeth. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (25 samples each. No liner was used for the first group and the second group restorations were lined with copalite varnish. Two dentin adhesives, called Syntac C and Single Bond, were used for the third and fourth groups, respectively. At the next stage, the samples were immersed in 5% fuschin solution for 24 hours, then sectioned buccolingually, and examined under a stereomicroscope for microleakage evaluation."nResults: There was a significant difference between four groups statistically (PO.000I, Comparing"nfour groups, the first and fourth ones, demonstrated the most and the least microleakage, respectively."nConclusion: The present study showed that new dentinal adhesive systems caused microleakage"nreduction in amalgam restorations of primary teeth.

  10. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  11. Evaluation of microshear bond strength and nanoleakage of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives to dentin pretreated with silver diamine fluoride/potassium iodide: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Karthik; Sampath, Vidhya; Sujatha, V; Mahalaxmi, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the microshear bond strength (MSBS) of etch-and-rinse and self-etch (ER and SE) bonding systems to dentin pretreated with silver diamine fluoride/potassium iodide (SDF/KI) and nanoleakage at the resin-dentin interface using transmission electron microscope (TEM). Seventy-two dentin slabs of 3 mm thickness were prepared from extracted human permanent third molars and divided into four groups (n = 18) based on the dentin surface treatment as follows: (1) ER adhesive bonding without dentin pretreatment; (2) SDF/KI pretreatment of dentin followed by ER adhesive bonding; (3) SE adhesive bonding without dentin pretreatment; and (4) SDF/KI pretreatment of dentin followed by SE adhesive bonding. Resin composite was built on the dentin slabs to a height of 4 mm incrementally, and dentin-composite beams of approximately 1 mm 2 cross-sectional area were prepared. The beams were subjected to MSBS analysis, and the fractured surface was observed under scanning electron microscope to determine the mode of failure. The resin-dentin interface was examined under TEM for evaluation of nanoleakage. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison tests. Pretreatment of dentin with SDF/KI increased the MSBS of ER and SE adhesives, though not statistically significant, except between Groups 2 and 3. In all the groups, the predominant mode of failure was adhesive followed by cohesive in resin, mixed and cohesive in dentin. TEM examination of resin-dentin interface showed that pretreatment with 38% SDF/KI reduced nanoleakage regardless of the type of bonding system used. Pretreatment of dentin with SDF/KI minimized nanoleakage at the resin-dentin interface without adversely affecting the bond strength of resin composite to dentin.

  12. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  13. Research of seal materials adhesion to walls of cavity in enamel and dentin formation by Er laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory B.; Belikov, Andrei V.; Vlasova, Svetlana N.; Erofeev, Andrew V.

    1994-12-01

    The present work represents the results of research of mechanical strength formed by submillisecond pulses of Er-laser at the border of enamel-seal and dentine-seal in a cavity. Comparative research of an adhesion of three of the most widespread types of modern seal materials (cement, amalgam, polymer) to walls of the laser cavity are conducted. The comparison of `laser adhesion' with adhesion of these materials to the walls of the cavity has been made by the usual mechanical tools. The dependence of free adhesion energy from the geometry of the cavity and energy density of laser radiation is considered. This work informs the reader about the results of research removal efficiency of some modern seal materials. The influence of water-spray on the efficiency of seal materials laser treatment process is considered.

  14. Effect of different gutta-percha solvents on the microtensile bond strength of various adhesive systems to pulp chamber dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demırbuga, Sezer; Pala, Kanşad; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Çayabatmaz, Muhammed; Topçuoğlu, Gamze; Uçar, Ebru Nur

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different endodontic solvents on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of various adhesives to pulp chamber dentin. A total of 120 human third molars were selected. Canals were prepared with the ProTaper Universal system and obturated. The access cavities were then restored with resin composite. After 1 week, a retreatment procedure was applied as follows: control, no solvent was applied to the pulp chamber and experimental groups, three different solvents (chloroform, eucalyptol, and orange oil) were applied to the pulp chamber for 2 min. The canal filling was removed and calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2) was placed into the canals. After 7 days, the Ca(OH)2 was removed from the canals and the canals were re-obturated. Teeth were then divided into three subgroups according to the adhesive used. The samples were restored with a nanohybrid resin composite using three different adhesives: Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Adper Easy One (AEO), and Single Bond 2 (SB2). The samples were aged with thermocycling. Teeth were sectioned, and a total of 20 dentin sticks were obtained for each subgroup. μTBS testing was then performed. The debonded surfaces were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests. Chloroform showed statistically lower mean μTBS values (14 ± 7.2 MPa) than control group did (19.2 ± 6.1 MPa) (p  0.05). Chloroform showed significantly lower bond strength for all adhesives (p adhesive systems significantly (p > 0.05), eucalyptol reduced the μTBS values of all the groups, but the results were only statistically significant for SB2 (p  0.05). According to the SEM analysis of the debonded surfaces, adhesive failures were the most common type in all the groups, followed by mixed failures. While chloroform reduced the mean bond strength of the adhesive resins, orange oil did not affect the bond strength of the adhesives

  15. Comparative study of the bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems with different pHs applied to enamel and dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Côrte Real de Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether the pH of the primer is capable of influencing the bond strength of three self-etching adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Methods: Forty enamel surfaces and 40 dentin surfaces were used, divided into eight groups (n=10 according to the adhesive system (Single Bond, ClearfilSE, AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-Pop. A 3 mm matrix was used to delimit the area restored with composite resin Z250. The test specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 hours and submitted to mechanical shear testing.Results: The ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests showed that there was no statistical difference among the groups in which the adhesivesystems Single Bond (control and Clearfil SE Bond were used and among the groups in which the AdheSE and Adper Prompt L-Pop systemswere used, both with statistical difference when compared with the Single Bond and Clearfil SE Bond groups. There was no statisticallysignificant difference between the bond strength values obtained, when the same adhesive systems were compared with regard to thesubstrates (enamel and dentin. The increased acidity of the self-etch adhesive systems was not capable of increasing the bond strengthvalues. Conclusion: The increasing of self-etch acidity of adhesive systems was not capable to increase the band strenght values. In the comparison between the same adhesive system in enamel or dentin, all adhesive presented similar performance, irrespective of the substrate used.

  16. The durability of a fluoride-releasing resin adhesive system to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masatoshi; Okuda, Mamiko; Ogata, Miwako; Pereira, Patricia N R; Tagami, Junji; Pashley, David H

    2003-01-01

    The durability of a fluoride-free (SE Bond) and a fluoride-containing (KBF) self-etching primer/ adhesive system were compared by measuring the microtensile bond strengths (microTBS) of these adhesive systems to human dentin in vitro. After bonding, the restored teeth were serially sectioned into multiple slabs that were trimmed to a 1 mm2 cross-sectional area at the bonded interface. For the three and six month specimens, half were fully covered with nail varnish (SE+, KBF+), while the other half were incubated at 37 degrees C in water without any protective varnish (SE-, KBF-). The microTBS of the one-day specimens were 44.6 +/- 11.2 MPa for SE Bond and 39.8 +/- 8.0 MPa for KBF (p > 0.05). When unprotected specimens were incubated in water for three and six months, the microTBS fell to 26.3 +/- 8.8 MPa and 23.6 +/- 10.7 MPa for SE-, respectively, but did not change in the specimens protected with nail varnish (SE+, 41.9 +/- 12.8 MPa and 41.8 +/- 9.8 MPa, respectively). In contrast, in specimens bonded with a fluoride-containing resin, KBF, the bond strengths of the unprotected specimens did not change over three and six months KBF-. Values were 32.4 +/- 6.1 MPa and 36.8 +/- 2.3 MPa, respectively. Similarly, varnish-protected KBF+ specimens did not change over three and six months (39.3 +/- 13.6 MPa and 40.9 +/- 14.7 MPa, respectively). The results indicate that decreases in bond strength over six months' storage are water-dependent but can be prevented by using fluoride-containing resins.

  17. Comparison of different dentin pretreatment protocols on the bond strength of glass fiber post using self-etching adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho, Frederico C; Carvalho, Claudio Antonio Talge; Oliveira, Luciane D; de Lacerda, Ana Júlia Farias; Xavier, Ana Cláudia Carvalho; Augusto, Marina Gullo; Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Pucci, Cesar Rogerio

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the influence of different irrigants with and without ultrasound or laser irradiation on the bond strength of glass fiber posts using a self-etching adhesive in a supplementary dentin pretreatment. Ninety bovine incisor roots were divided into 3 groups according to the irrigant tested: 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) (n = 30); 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (n = 30), and saline solution (control) (n = 30). Each group was randomly divided into 3 subgroups according to the supplementary dentin pretreatment: ultrasound, Nd:YAG laser, and nonsupplemented (control). A self-etching adhesive system (Futurabond DC; VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany) was used, and the glass fiber posts were cemented with dual-cure epoxy-based luting agent (Bifix QM, VOCO GmbH). All roots were sectioned transversely, and the push-out test was performed. Failure mode analysis was also evaluated. Bond strength decreased significantly after the use of 2.5% NaOCl in all root thirds (P .05). The supplementary dentin pretreatment using the Nd:YAG laser or ultrasound did not improve the bond strength values for both NaOCl and CHX (P > .05). Moreover, the apical third exhibited the lowest mean bond strength values (P irrigant used, the supplementary dentin pretreatment with ultrasound or laser irradiation showed no improvement in bond strength. Also, the use of NaOCl decreased the bond strength of glass fiber posts using a self-etching adhesive system, whereas CHX preserved it. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of bonding performance of self-etching and etch-and-rinse adhesives on human dentin using reliability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradna, Pavel; Vrbova, Radka; Dudek, Michal; Roubickova, Adela; Housova, Devana

    2008-12-01

    To estimate the in vitro reliability of typical self-etching and etch-and-rinse adhesives of various application protocols. The following adhesives were applied on flat dentin surfaces of extracted human teeth (n = 223): self-etching two-step adhesives: AdheSE (AH), Clearfil SE Bond (CL), OptiBond SE (OS); one-step adhesives: Adper Prompt L-Pop (ADP), Adper Prompt (AD), and Xeno III (XE); all-in-one adhesive: iBond (IB); etch-and-rinse three-step adhesives: OptiBond FL (OF), two-step Gluma Comfort Bond (G), Excite (E) and Prime & Bond NT (PB). Composite buildups were prepared using a microhybrid composite, Opticor New. Shear bond strength was determined after 24 h of storage at 37 degrees C in distilled water. The results were analyzed with a nested ANOVA (adhesive, type of adhesive) followed by the Fisher post-hoc tests of group homogeneity at alpha = 0.05. A two-parameter Weibull distribution was used to calculate the critical shear bond strength corresponding to 5% probability of failure as a measure of system reliability. ANOVA revealed a significant decrease (p AD=IB=XE>PB=ADP, but no significant difference (p > 0.48) between the etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives. The corresponding characteristic bond strength of Weibull distribution ranged between 24.1 and 12.1 MPa, Weibull modulus between 8.3 and 2.1, and the critical shear bond strength varied from 16.0 to 3.0 MPa. Pronounced differences in the critical shear bond strength suggest reliability variations in the adhesive systems tested, which originate from chemical composition rather than type of adhesive.

  19. New strategy to create “Super Dentin” using adhesive technology: Reinforcement of adhesive–dentin interface and protection of tooth structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Nikaido

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dentin bonding systems have been dramatically simplified and improved during the recent decades. Monomer penetration into dentin and its polymerization in situ creates a hybrid layer, which is essential to obtain good bonding to dentin. Moreover, the presence of an acid–base resistant zone below the hybrid layer has been documented with self-etching adhesive systems in an artificial secondary caries attack. When ultrastructure of the acid–base resistant zone is assessed by SEM and TEM observations, formation of the acid–base resistant zone is considered to be due to the monomer penetration potential and fluoride release in the adhesive systems. Natural dentin has a limited potential to resist an acid attack of secondary caries; however, the acid–base resistant zone does not purely consist of dentin in morphology, it is rather a combination of dentin and the adjacent hybrid layer. Therefore, the reinforced dentin has been called “Super Dentin” bearing the ability to prevent primary and secondary caries. Prospectively, the great potential of adhesive technology in creation of the “Super Dentin” would lead to the development of new materials for mechanical, chemical and biological protection of the dental structures.

  20. Dentine sealing provided by smear layer/smear plugs vs. adhesive resins/resin tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, Marcela R; Tay, Franklin R; Sword, Jeremy; Donnelly, Adam M; Agee, Kelli A; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Sadek, Fernanda T; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of five experimental resins, which ranged from hydrophobic to hydrophilic blends, to seal acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. The experimental resins (R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5) were evaluated as neat bonding agents (100% resin) or as solutions solvated with absolute ethanol (70% resin/30% ethanol). Fluid conductance was measured at 20 cm H(2)O hydrostatic pressure after sound dentine surfaces were: (i) covered with a smear layer; (ii) acid-etched; or (iii) bonded with neat or solvated resins, which were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. In general, the fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine was significantly higher than that of smear layer-covered dentine. However, when the most hydrophobic neat resins (R1 and R2) were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with ethanol, the fluid conductance was as low as that produced by smear layers. The fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine saturated with ethanol was significantly lower than for resin bonded to water-saturated dentine, except for resin R4. Application of more hydrophobic resins may provide better sealing of acid-etched dentine if the substrate is saturated with ethanol instead of with water.

  1. Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy study of physicochemical interaction between human dentin and etch-&-rinse adhesives in a simulated moist bond technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ubaldini, Adriana L M; Baesso, Mauro L; Sehn, Elizandra

    2012-01-01

    systems: (a) 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydrate (4-META), and (b) HEMA. The Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy was performed before and after dentin treatment with 37% phosphoric acid, with adhesive systems and also for the adhesive systems...

  2. Effect of Caries Removal Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Resin and Glass IonomerAdhesives to Primary Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There is no enough published data about the shear bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer adhesives on caries-affected primary tooth dentin excavated using minimally invasive systems. Objectives: To evaluate the shear bond strength of 2 different adhesives (one resin modified glass ionomer and one resin using two caries removal tech- niques on healthy and caries-affected primary dentin. Materials and Methods: Two caries removal methods including mechanical (handpiece and chemomechanical (Carisolv techniques and two types of ad- hesives including one resin adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond; CSEB, Kuraray and one resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive (Riva Bond LC; RBLC, SDI were used in this study. Ten extracted healthy primary teeth were used for the control group. The teeth were sectioned bucco-lingually and mesio-distally in order to obtain four specimens from each tooth. Thirty suitable specimens were selected as the “control” and randomly divided into two groups of “sound dentin” based on the type of the adhesive used. Sixty extracted caries affected teeth were used for the carious group; sectioned as mentioned above and sixty suitable specimens were selected as the “treatment”. Then the specimens were arbitrarily divided into four groups based on caries removal techniques and the type of ad- hesive used (n = 15. After bonding with either CSEB or RBLC, the specimens were restored with a resin composite by means of PVC tubes and subjected to the shear bond strength test. The data was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The specimens in Carisolv group bonded with CSEB (11.68 ± 3.1 showed a statistically significant higher mean bond strength followed by those in handpiece group bonded with CSEB (9.4 ± 2.7, which exhibited higher mean values than those groups with RBLC (p < 0.05. Shear bond strength values for Clearfil SE Bond was not significantly higher than Riva Bond LC when used in sound

  3. Effect of repeated use on dentin bond strength of two adhesive systems: All-in-one and one-bottle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiei Fershteh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To compare the effects of repeated use of two one-bottle adhesives with that of two all- in- one adhesives (with acetone solvent on bond strength to dentin. Materials and Methods: A flat dentin surface was prepared on 120 bovine incisors using 600- grit abrasive pape. The teeth were randomly assigned into 12 equal groups. The four adhesive systems [Prime and Bond NT (P&B NT, One-Step Plus (OS, iBond (iB, and G-Bond (GB] were used at baseline, after the lid of the container had been opened 30 times, and after it had been opened 60 times. Before each use of the adhesives, the lids of the containers were left open for 1 min. The resin composites were applied on the dentin in a cylindrical split mold. After thermocycling, shear bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min. We used Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests for statistical analysis. Results: There was no statistically significant difference among bond strength (MPa of the groups of P&B NT (31.9 ± 4.6, 31.8 ± 6.5, 26.1 ± 6.7 and OS (33.2 ± 5.1, 30.9 ± 7, 29.3 ± 5.9, respectively (P > 0.05. The mean of the bond strength of iB and GB after 60 times (15.3 ± 4.1 and 12.2 ± 3.9, respectively was significantly lower than that of iB and GB at baseline (23.5 ± 4.8 and 22.2 ± 4.5, respectively (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Repeated use (60 times of the all-in-one adhesive led to a decline in the dentin bond strength. To avoid this problem it would be advisable to have containers with smaller amounts of adhesive or perhaps those with only a singe dose.

  4. Clinical and Histological Evaluation of Direct Pulp Capping on Human Pulp Tissue Using a Dentin Adhesive System

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    Alicja Nowicka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study presents a clinical and histological evaluation of human pulp tissue responses after direct capping using a new dentin adhesive system. Methods. Twenty-eight caries-free third molar teeth scheduled for extraction were evaluated. The pulps of 22 teeth were mechanically exposed and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: Single Bond Universal or calcium hydroxide. Another group of 6 teeth acted as the intact control group. The periapical response was assayed, and a clinical examination was performed. The teeth were extracted after 6 weeks, and a histological analysis was performed. The pulp status was assessed, and the thickness of the dentin bridge was measured and categorized using a histological scoring system. Results. The clinical phase was asymptomatic for Single Bond Universal patients. Patients in the calcium hydroxide group reported mild symptoms of pain, although the histological examination revealed that dentin bridges with or without limited pulpitis had begun forming in each tooth. The universal adhesive system exhibited nonsignificantly increased histological signs of pulpitis (P>0.05 and a significantly weaker thin mineralized tissue layer (P<0.001 compared with the calcium hydroxide group. Conclusion. The results suggest that Single Bond Universal is inappropriate for human pulp capping; however, further long-term studies are needed to determine the biocompatibility of this agent.

  5. Clinical and Histological Evaluation of Direct Pulp Capping on Human Pulp Tissue Using a Dentin Adhesive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna; Sobolewska, Ewa; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study presents a clinical and histological evaluation of human pulp tissue responses after direct capping using a new dentin adhesive system. Methods. Twenty-eight caries-free third molar teeth scheduled for extraction were evaluated. The pulps of 22 teeth were mechanically exposed and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: Single Bond Universal or calcium hydroxide. Another group of 6 teeth acted as the intact control group. The periapical response was assayed, and a clinical examination was performed. The teeth were extracted after 6 weeks, and a histological analysis was performed. The pulp status was assessed, and the thickness of the dentin bridge was measured and categorized using a histological scoring system. Results. The clinical phase was asymptomatic for Single Bond Universal patients. Patients in the calcium hydroxide group reported mild symptoms of pain, although the histological examination revealed that dentin bridges with or without limited pulpitis had begun forming in each tooth. The universal adhesive system exhibited nonsignificantly increased histological signs of pulpitis (P > 0.05) and a significantly weaker thin mineralized tissue layer (P < 0.001) compared with the calcium hydroxide group. Conclusion. The results suggest that Single Bond Universal is inappropriate for human pulp capping; however, further long-term studies are needed to determine the biocompatibility of this agent. PMID:27803922

  6. Evaluation of plasma treatment effects on improving adhesive/dentin bonding by using the same tooth controls and varying cross-sectional surface areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Ritts, Andy Charles; Staller, Corey; Yu, Qingsong; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and verify the effectiveness of plasma treatment for improving adhesive/dentin interfacial bonding by performing micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) test using the same-tooth controls and varying cross-sectional surface areas. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns to expose the dentin surface. For each dentin surface, one half of it was treated with a non-thermal argon plasma brush, while another half was shielded with glass slide and used as untreated control. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were then applied as directed. The teeth thus prepared were further cut into micro-bar specimens with cross-sectional size of 1×1 mm2, 1×2 mm2 and 1×3 mm2 for μTBS test. The test results showed that plasma treated specimens gave substantially stronger adhesive/dentin bonding than their corresponding same tooth controls. As compared with their untreated controls, plasma treatment gave statistically significant higher bonding strength for specimens having cross-sectional area of 1×1 mm2 and 1×2 mm2, with mean increases of 30.8% and 45.1%, respectively. Interface examination using optical and electron microscopy verified that plasma treatment improved the quality of the adhesive/dentin interface by reducing defects/voids and increasing the resin tag length in dentin tubules. PMID:23841788

  7. [Morphological and failure mode study of different fiber posts luted with different adhesive systems to root dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Jin-Le; Hao, Liang

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the correlation of morphological characteristics and failure modes of two types of glass-fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cement and etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Thirty-six intact single-rooted premolars were collected and removed the crown. After root canal therapy, teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group A: Self-adhesive with POPO fiber post. Group B: Etch-and-rinse with POPO fiber posts. Group C: Self-adhesive with Para Post. Group D: Etch-and-rinse with Para Post. Each root was sectioned into six 1 mm-thick serial slices and a push-out test was performed. The dentin-cement-post adhesive interface of each specimen and failure modes after fracture were evaluated by stereomicroscope observation. Interface morphology observe indicated that voids present in group B (64.2%) and D (66.7%) were significantly higher than group A (5.8%) and C (13.7%) (P adhesive interface were discrepant with failure modes in different root region. There were interaction between adhesive systems and fiber posts.

  8. "No-bottle" vs "multi-bottle" dentin adhesives--a microtensile bond strength and morphological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberger, R; Perdigão, J; Rosa, B T; Lopes, M

    2001-09-01

    To compare the adhesive capability of the new adhesive Prompt L-Pop (ESPE) with that of two total-etch adhesive systems-EBS Multi (ESPE) and Prime&Bond NT (Dentsply). Extracted human molars were bonded and prepared for microtensile dentin bond strength (microTBS) testing using Prompt L-Pop, EBS Multi, and Prime&Bond NT combined with Pertac II (composite) or Hytac Aplitip (compomer). Prompt L-Pop was applied using five different protocols: (1) as an "all-in-one" self-conditioning adhesive, as per manufacturer's instructions (LP); (2) as a self-etching primer combined with a separate bonding resin (LP/self-etch 2-step); (3) as a classical primer used upon etching dentin with phosphoric acid, followed by a bonding resin (LP/total-etch 3-step); (4) as a multi-application "all-in-one" self-conditioning adhesive (LP/multi-coat) to leave a visibly glossy dentin surface; and (5) as a filled adhesive, upon adding quartz fillers to its composition (LP/filled). After 24h of storage in water at 37 degrees C the microTBS were measured in an Instron machine. Corresponding interfaces of the same specimens were micromorphologically analyzed using SEM and TEM. When used with a composite resin, LP/filled and LP/multi-coat resulted in significantly higher microTBS than LP. The addition of an extra adhesive bonding resin (LP/self-etch 2-step) had no effect on bond strength. The use of Prompt L-Pop as a primer of a fourth-generation adhesive (LP/total-etch 3-step) replacing the EBS Multi primer, resulted in lower bond strengths than those of the original EBS Multi. LP/multi-coat showed similar microTBS to Prime&Bond NT (P&BNT). When used with a compomer, LP exhibited higher bond strengths than when used with the resin composite and was as effective as the experimental groups LP/filled and LP/multi-coat and the control group P&BNT. The SEM evaluation showed an inconsistent hybrid layer for the LP specimens, whereas in both the LP/filled and LP/multi-coat specimens a hybrid layer was

  9. Dentin Bond Strength of Two One-Bottle Adhesives after Delayed Activation of Light-Cured Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafiei

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Adverse surface interactions between one-bottle adhesives and chemical-cured composites may occur with delayed light activation of light-cured composites. The purpose of this study was to assess the Effects of delayed activation of light-cured compositeson shear bond strength of two one-bottle adhesives with different acidity to bovine dentin.Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface was prepared on sixty-six bovine incisors using 600 grit carbide papers. Prime&Bond NT, and One-Step adhesives and resin composite were applied in six groups: 1 immediate curing of the composite, 2 the composite was left 2.5 minutes over the cured adhesive before light activation, 3 prior to delayed activation of the composite, the cured adhesive was covered with a layer of nonacidic hydrophobic porcelain bonding resin (Choice 2 and cured immediately. After thermocycling,shear bond strength (SBS test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed with Friedmans two-way Non-parametric ANOVA.Results: The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond was significantly lower than immediate activated (P<0.05. Decrease in the SBS of One-Step was not statistically significant after delayed activation. The SBS of delayed activation of Prime&Bond and One-Step with an additional resin layer was significantly higher than delayed activation (P<0.001.Conclusion: The bond strength of Prime&Bond might be compromised by the higher acidity of this adhesive during the 2.5 minutes delayed activation of light-cured composite.Addition of a layer of hydrophobic resin compensated the effect of delayed activation andimproved the bond strength.

  10. Influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength of resin composite bonded to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etching mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-09-28

    The influence of the number of cycles on shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using dental adhesives in self-etch mode was investigated. A two-step self-etch adhesive and two universal adhesives were used to bond to enamel and dentin in self-etch mode. Initial shear bond strength and shear fatigue strength to enamel and dentin using the adhesive in self-etch mode were determined. Fatigue testing was used with 20 Hz frequency and cycling periods of 50,000, 100,000 and 1,000,000 cycles, or until failure occurred. For each of the cycling periods, there was no significant difference in shear fatigue strength across the cycling periods for the individual adhesives. Differences in shear fatigue strength were found between the adhesives within the cycling periods. Regardless of the adhesive used in self-etch mode for bonding to enamel or dentin, shear fatigue strength was not influenced by the number of cycles used for shear fatigue strength testing.

  11. Caries-resistant bonding layer in dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-Na; Hu, Lin; Jiao, Kai; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-Juan; Tay, Franklin R; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2016-09-07

    The present study examined the mechanism for caries resistance and the pulp responses in vital teeth following the use of the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique. Dentin adhesives were applied to the surface of sound dentin disks in 4 experimental groups: non-antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (N-G), non-antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (N-H), antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (A-G), antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (A-H). The depth of demineralization induced by biological or chemical demineralization models was measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy and analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Pulp responses of vital dog's teeth to the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique were evaluated using light microscopy. Depth of demineralization was significantly affected by "adhesive type" and "intensity of adhesive displacement" for biological demineralization. For chemical demineralization, only "intensity of adhesive displacement" showed significant influence on lesion depth. Pulp response of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 MPa groups showed only moderate disorganization of the odontoblast layer at 24 hours that completely re-organized after 3 weeks. Augmented-pressure adhesive displacement improves the caries resistance property of bonded dentin and does not cause irreversible pulpal damage to vital teeth when the air pressure employed is equal or smaller than 0.3 MPa.

  12. Multi-step adhesive cementation versus one-step adhesive cementation: push-out bond strength between fiber post and root dentin before and after mechanical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Marina; Rippe, Marilia Pivetta; Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Monaco, Carlo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical cycling on resin push-out bond strength to root dentin, using two strategies for fiber post cementation. Forty bovine roots were embedded in acrylic resin after root canal preparation using a custom drill of the fiber post system. The fiber posts were cemented into root canals using two different strategies (N = 20): a conventional adhesive approach using a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system combined with a conventional resin cement (ScotchBond Multi Purpose Plus + RelyX ARC ), or a simplified adhesive approach using a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100). The core was built up with composite resin and half of the specimens from each cementation strategy were submitted to mechanical cycling (45 degree angle; 37 degrees C; 88 N; 4 Hz; 700,000 cycles). Each specimen was cross-sectioned and the disk specimens were pushed-out. The means from every group (n = 10) were statistically analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and a Tukey test (P = 0.05). The cementation strategy affected the push-out results (P < 0.001), while mechanical cycling did not (P = 0.3716). The simplified approach (a self-adhesive resin cement) had better bond performance despite the conditioning. The self-adhesive resin cement appears to be a good option for post cementation. Further trials are needed to confirm these results.

  13. Efficacy of Hydrophobic Layer On Sealing Ability of Dentin Adhesive Systems in Class V Composite Resin Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Maleknejad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Adhesive permeability is hindered by application of an additional layer of hydrophobic resin, which increases its concentration within the hydrophilic layer, reduces its affinity to water, and enhances its physical properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a hydrophobic layer on the microleakage of class V composite restorations using different adhesives. Materials and methods. The adhesives including total-etch Scotchbond MP and Single Bond, and the self-etch Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond were applied to 80 class V cavities in vitro on the buccal surface in CEJ and then were followed by hydrophobic resin (Margin Bond in half of the cavities in each group (n=10. After restoration with microhybrid composite, Z100 and immersion in fuchsine, the degree of microleakage was assessed. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Man-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests. Results. The hydrophobic layer significantly reduced the microleakage of Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond only in dentin (p0.05. Conclusion. Within the limitation of this study, only Clearfil S3 Bond could demonstrate the identical values of microleakage in enamel and dentinal margins.

  14. Microtensile bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems to demineralized dentin after the use of a papain-based chemomechanical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianini, Renato José; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the in vitro microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems to demineralized dentin after the use of a papain-based chemomechanical method. 36 demineralized human dentin slabs were randomly distributed into two groups according to the method of caries removal: (1). Mechanical removal with manual excavators; (2) Chemomechanical removal with a papain-based gel (Papacárie). Subsequently, three adhesive systems were applied (n=6): (a) an etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Single Bond); (b) a two-step self-etch adhesive system (AdheSE); (c) a one-step self-etch adhesive system (Adper Prompt). The slabs were restored with a microhybrid resin composite and each resin-dentin block was sectioned into 1.0 mm2 thick slabs, which were kept in receptacles containing distilled water at relative humidity, for 24 hours, at 37 degrees C. After that, they were subjected to tensile stress in a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at a 0.05 level of significance. The fractured specimens were observed under a stereomicroscope to assess the failure mode. The application of both chemomechanical and mechanical methods on demineralized dentin yielded microTBS values that were statistically similar among them, regardless of the adhesive system used. Caries removal with a chemomechanical papain-based method did not interfere in the adhesion of the tested adhesive systems to demineralized dentin.

  15. Effect of air moisture content on adhesion to dentine: a comparison of dental air/water syringe tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, A; Bennani, V; Chandler, N; Hanlin, S; Lowe, B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the spray pattern and air moisture content produced by single-use syringe and multiple-use syringe tips. The drying efficacy was evaluated by analyzing the spray and by detecting the presence of moisture in the air blast through the tips. Single-use tips had a more consistent spray pattern and produced a moisture-free airflow compared to the multiple-use tips. The differences were statistically significant. Adhesion to dentine between tooth preparations dried with the two tips was evaluated using a tensile test. The differences were statistically insignificant.

  16. Shear bond strength of different types of adhesive systems to dentin and enamel of deciduous teeth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensche, A; Dähne, F; Wagenschwanz, C; Richter, G; Viergutz, G; Hannig, C

    2016-05-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the suitability of self-etch adhesives for restoration of deciduous teeth compared with etch and rinse approaches. One hundred twenty primary teeth were divided into five groups, each being assigned to an adhesive system. Self-etch adhesives XenoV (XV) and Clearfil S(3) Bond (CB), Prime&Bond NT with (PBE)/without preliminary etching (PBN), and Optibond FL (OBFL) as an etch and rinse system were included. Enamel and dentin specimens were prepared (n = 36/group), adhesives applied, and compomer cylinders polymerized. After 24-h storage in 37 °C distilled water and thermo-cycling (1440 cycles, 5/55 °C, 27 s), shear bond tests and fracture mode classification based on SEM investigation were performed. Statistical analysis involved ANOVA and Scheffé procedure with Bonferroni-Holm correction (p ≤ 0.005). High shear bond strengths to primary enamel were determined for PBE (mean [M] = 22.48 ± 7.7 MPa) > OBFL (M = 19.06 ± 5.62 MPa) > CB (M = 17.6 ± 6.55 MPa), and XV (M = 16.85 ± 5.38 MPa) and PBN (M = 8.26 ± 4.46 MPa) formed significantly less reliable enamel-resin interfaces (p ≤ 0.005). PBE generated the highest bond strength on primary dentin (M = 21.97 ± 8.02 MPa); significantly lower values were measured for XV (M = 13.44 ± 5.43 MPa) and OBFL (M = 12.92 ± 4.31 MPa) (p ≤ 0.005). Adhesives requiring preliminary etching ensure optimal bond strength to primary enamel. If separate etching is to be avoided, selected self-etch adhesives obtain acceptable shear bond values on primary enamel and dentin. The treatment of pediatric patients presents a great challenge in dental practice, and optimization of treatment processes is important.

  17. Four-year water degradation of a total-etch and two self-etching adhesives bonded to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ali I; Feilzer, Albert J

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate effect of direct and indirect water storage on the microtensile dentin bond strength of one total-etch and two self-etching adhesives. The adhesive materials were: one total-etch adhesive; 'Admira Bond' and two self-etch adhesives; 'Clearfil SE Bond' and 'Hybrid Bond'. Freshly extracted human third molar teeth were used. In each tooth, a Class I cavity (4mmx4mm) was prepared in the occlusal surface with the pulpal floor extending approximately 1mm into dentin. The teeth were divided into three groups (n=18). Each group was restored with the resin composite 'Clearfil APX' using one of the tested adhesives. For each experimental group 3 test procedures (n=6) were carried out: Procedure A: the teeth were stored in water for 24h (control), then sectioned longitudinally, buccolingually and mesiodistally to get rectangular slabs of 1.0-1.2mm thickness on which a microtensile test was carried out. Procedure B: the teeth were also sectioned; however, the slabs were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 4 years before microtensile testing (direct water storage). Procedure C: the teeth were kept in water at 37 degrees C 4 years before sectioning and microtensile testing (Indirect water storage). During microtensile testing the slabs were placed in a universal testing machine and load was applied at cross-head speed of 0.5mm/min. For the 24h control, there was no significant difference in bond strength between the three tested adhesives. After 4 years of indirect water storage, the bond strength decreased but the reduction was not significantly different from those of 24h. After 4 years of direct water storage, the bond strengths of all tested adhesives were significantly reduced compared to their 24h results. All the tested adhesives showed no reduction in bond strength after indirect water exposure for 4 years. After 4-year direct water exposure, the bond produced by all tested adhesives was unable to resist deterioration.

  18. The effect of caries excavation methods on the bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives to caries affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, V; Singla, M; Yadav, S; Yadav, H

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of chemomechanical caries removal and conventional caries excavation on the microtensile bond strength of three different dentine adhesive systems. Thirty extracted human mandibular molars with radiographic signs of dental caries extending up to the middle third of dentine were sectioned longitudinally through the centre of the carious lesion in a buccolingual direction to yield two sections. One half of each tooth was excavated by tungsten carbide bur and the other half was chemomechanically treated with Carisolv(®) . Three dentine bonding systems: an etch-and-rinse single bottle adhesive (Single Bond, 3M ESPE); a two bottle, two-step self-etch bonding system (One Coat Self Etching Bond, Coltene Whaledent); and a single-step, single bottle self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy Bond Self-Etch Adhesive, 3M ESPE) were applied and composite build-up was done. The specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance and pair-wise multiple comparisons were done using the Holm-Sidak method. The etch-and-rinse adhesive and two bottle self-etch system showed significantly higher bond strength than the single bottle self-etch system. Caries excavation method had no influence on bond strength values. Carisolv(®) did not affect the microtensile bond strength values of different adhesive systems tested to the caries affected dentine. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  19. Long-term dentin retention of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijken, J.W.V. van; Pallesen, U.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems.......The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term retention to dentin of seven adhesive systems....

  20. Buonocore memorial lecture. Adhesion to enamel and dentin: current status and future challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Vargas, Marcos; Vijay, Padmini; Van Landuyt, Kirsten; Lambrechts, Paul; Vanherle, Guido

    2003-01-01

    .... In this paper, the basic bonding mechanism to enamel and dentin of these three approaches is demonstrated by means of ultramorphological and chemical characterization of tooth-biomaterial interfacial interactions...

  1. Sodium Hypochlorite as Fluorotic Dentin Pretreatment of Two-Step Self-Etch Adhesive with Silver Nanoparticle: Atomic Force Microscope and Adhesive Microtensile Bond Strength Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Josefina Monjarás-Ávila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of pretreatment with commercial sodium hypochlorite, 5.25%, with a self-etch adhesive (Optibond Versa in its original formula and with the incorporation of silver nanoparticles (NaAg on fluorotic dentin. 240 human molars were classified according to fluorosis severity with Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI and subdivided into three study subgroups according to the adhesive technique: (1 self-etch (SE control subgroup; (2 NaOCl/SE subgroup; (3 NaOCl/SE + NaAg subgroup. The nanostructural characteristics were observed by AFM, μTBS was tested, and hybrid layer formation was observed by SEM. One-way analyses of variance (ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post hoc tests were used. No statistically significant differences were found in roughness values in any of the subgroups and subgroups studied. Remnants of smear layer were detected in areas devoid of resin tags in SEM images of samples bonded with subgroup 2, in contrast to subgroup 3. No statistically significant difference between any of the results was found in μTBS and a greater number of adhesive failures were observed. The results show that the pretreatment technique of 5.25% NaOCl and the incorporation of NaAg to the self-adhesive system do not produce a surface more adequate for a better adhesion.

  2. A morphological and micro-tensile bond strength evaluation of a single-bottle adhesive to caries-affected human dentine after four different caries removal techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehreli, Zafer C; Yazici, A Rüya; Akca, Taner; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2003-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different caries removal techniques (conventional bur; chemomechanical removal/Carisolv()-MediTeam; a sonic preparation system/SonicsysMicro-Kavo and air abrasion/PrepStar-Danville Engineering) on microtensile bond strength to caries-affected human dentine. Occlusal surfaces of extracted human permanent third molars with coronal dentine caries extending approximately halfway through the dentine was ground perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth to expose a flat surface of normal dentine surrounding the carious lesion with laser fluorescence values of approximately 30 (DIAGNODent), KaVo). Carious lesions were excavated with one of the four techniques until laser fluorescence values decreased to 15 in the center of the lesions. An ethanol-based dentine adhesive (Single Bond, 3M) was used to bond composite resin (P60, 3M) to the substrate. Vertical slices (n=11/group), approximately 0.8 mm thick were made through the caries-affected portions of each tooth, perpendicular to the bonding surface. Specimens were subjected to tensile stress at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. SEM investigation was performed for the qualitative evaluation of resin-dentine hybridization. The microtensile bond strengths were as follows (mean+/-SD in MPa): 6.4+/-5.3 (bur), 8.4+/-3.3 (Carisolv), 8.5+/-5.9 (Sonicsys Micro), and 8.8+/-8.8 (air abrasion). Statistical analysis did not show significant differences between any of the treatment modalities (p=0.160). Tensile fracture was cohesive within caries-affected dentine in all specimens. The four different caries removal techniques used within this study did not influence the bond strength of the tested dentine adhesive to caries-affected human dentine.

  3. SHORT- AND LONG-TERM BOND STRENGTHS OF A GOLD STANDARD TWO-STEP SELF-ETCH ADHESIVE SYSTEM TO DENTIN: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Safa TUNCER; Tekçe, Neslihan; Dial PASHAEV; DEMİRCİ, Mustafa; Canan BAYDEMİR

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the micro tensile bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system following 1 year storage in water.Materials and Methods: 10 sound human molar teeth were used for micro tensile bond strength test. Two-step self-etch dentin adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond®) was applied to the flat dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Composite blocks (Z-250; 3M ESPE) of 5 mm in height have been prepared by using layering technique. Teeth were ...

  4. Effect of green tea extract on bonding durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carolina; Fernandes, Fernando Pelegrim; Freitas, Valeria da Penha; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho

    2016-01-01

    Green tea extract has been advocated as a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor; however, its effect on bond durability to caries-affected dentin has never been reported. Thus, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two MMP inhibitors (2% chlorhexidine and 2% green tea extract), applied after acid etching, on bond durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin. Occlusal enamel was removed from third molars to expose the dentin surface, and the molars were submitted to a caries induction protocol for 15 days. After removal of infected dentin, specimens were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid (15 seconds) and randomly divided into three groups, according to the type of dentin pretreatment (n=10): NT: no treatment; GT: 2% green tea extract; CLX: 2% chlorhexidine. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions, and composite resin restorations were built on the dentin. After 24 hours, at 37°C, the resin-tooth blocks were sectioned perpendicularly to the adhesive interface in the form of sticks (0.8 mm2 of adhesive area) and randomly subdivided into two groups according to when they were to be submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing: immediately or 6 months after storage in distilled water. Data were reported in MPa and submitted to two-way ANOVA for completely randomized blocks, followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). After 24 hours, there was no significant difference in the μTBS of the groups. After 6 months, the GT group had significantly higher μTBS values. It was concluded that the application of 2% green tea extract was able to increase bond durability of the etch-and-rinse system to dentin. Neither the application of chlorhexidine nor non-treatment (NT - control) had any effect on bond strength after water storage.

  5. In vitro evaluation of influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nujella B.P Suryakumari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems - (the V generation at various stages during the bonding procedure and to investigate the effect of the contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: In this study the V generation one-bottle system - (Adper Single Bond was tested. Fifty caries-free human molars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into five groups of ten teeth each: Group I had 15 second etching with 35% Ortho Phosphoric acid, 15 second rinse and blot dried (Uncontaminated; Group II contaminated and blot dried; Group III contaminated and completely dried; Group IV contaminated, washed, blot dried; Group V contaminated, retched washed, and blot dried. The bonding agent was applied and resin composite (Z-100 3M ESPE was bonded to the treated surfaces using the Teflon mold. The specimens in each group were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm / minute and the data were subjected to one way ANOVA for comparison among the groups (P<0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between the group that was dried with strong oil-free air after contamination (Group III and the other groups. When the etched surface was contaminated by saliva, there was no statistical difference between the just blot dry, wash, or the re-etching groups (Groups II, IV, V if the dentin surface was kept wet before priming. When the etched dentin surface was dried (Group III the shear bond strength decreased considerably. Conclusion: The bond strengths to the tooth structure of the recent dentin bonding agents are less sensitive to common forms of contamination than assumed. Re-etching without additional mechanical preparation is sufficient to provide or achieve the expected bond strength.

  6. Effect of Cigarette Smoke on Resin Composite Bond Strength to Enamel and Dentin Using Different Adhesive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobaldo, J D; Catelan, A; Rodrigues-Filho, U; Marchi, G M; Lima, Danl; Aguiar, Fhb

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the microshear bond strength of composite resin restorations in dental blocks with or without exposure to cigarette smoke. Eighty bovine dental blocks were divided into eight groups (n=10) according to the type of adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA [SBMP]; Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE [SB]; Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Medical Inc, Okayama, Japan [CSEB]; Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE [SBU]) and exposure to smoke (no exposure; exposure for five days/20 cigarettes per day). The adhesive systems were applied to the tooth structure, and the blocks received a composite restoration made using a matrix of perforated pasta. Data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey test (α<0.05). For enamel, there was no difference between the presence or absence of cigarette smoke (p=0.1397); however, there were differences among the adhesive systems (p<0.001). CSEB showed higher values and did not differ from SBU, but both were statistically different from SB. The SBMP showed intermediate values, while SB demonstrated lower values. For dentin, specimens subjected to cigarette smoke presented bond strength values that were lower when compared with those not exposed to smoke (p<0.001). For the groups without exposure to cigarette smoke, CSEB showed higher values, differing from SBMP. SB and SBU showed intermediary values. For the groups with exposure to cigarette smoke, SBU showed values that were higher and statistically different from SB and CSEB, which presented lower values of bond strength. SBMP demonstrated an intermediate value of bond strength. The exposure of dentin to cigarette smoke influenced the bonding strength of adhesives, but no differences were noted in enamel.

  7. The Effect of Temperature on Shear Bond Strength of Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Single Bond Adhesive Systems to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Nouri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Monomer viscosity and solvent evaporation can be affected by the adhesive system temperature. Higher temperature can elevate the vapor pressure in solution and penetration of adhesive in smear layer. Bonding mechanism may be influenced by the adhesive temperature. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pre-heating on shear bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives to ground bovine dentin surfaces, at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 60 maxillary bovine incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10. The central part of labial dentin surfaces was exposed with a diamond bur and standardized smear layer was creat-ed by using silicon carbide paper (600 grit under water-coolant while the specimens were mounted in acrylic resin. Two adhesive systems, an etch-and-rinse (Adper single bond and a self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond were stored at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C for 30 minutes and were then applied on the prepared labial surface according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The composite resin (Z350 was packed in Teflon mold (5 mm in diameter on this surface and was cured. The shear bond strength (MPa was evaluated by universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020, Germany at cross head speed of 1mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests (p< 0.05. Results: No significant difference was found between the shear bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond adhesive in different temperature and single Bond adhesive sys-tem at 25 ̊C and 40 ̊C. However, there were significant differences between 4 ̊C of Adper single bond in comparison with 25˚C and 40˚C (p= 0.0001. Conclusion: Pre-heating did not affect the shear bond strength of SE Bond, but could promote the shear bond strength of Adper Single Bond.

  8. Determination of molecular species of calcium salts of MDP produced through decalcification of enamel and dentin by MDP-based one-step adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yoko; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Enamel and dentin particles were added to an experimental 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP)-based one-step adhesive to react for 30 s. After enamel and dentin reactants were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P NMR) techniques, curve-fitting analysis was performed on the (31)P NMR spectra of enamel and dentin reactants. By varying the molar ratio of calcium chloride to MDP, a series of three types of MDP-Ca salts were synthesized. The molecular species of calcium salts of MDP (MDP-Ca salts) produced by decalcification of enamel or dentin were determined based on the XRD and (31)P NMR analysis results of these three types of synthesized MDP-Ca salts. Curve-fitting analysis showed that enamel and dentin developed several types of MDP-Ca salts and amorphous dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) during decalcification. The molecular species of MDP-Ca salts produced by enamel and dentin were mono-calcium salts of MDP monomer and MDP dimer. In addition, dentin produced a di-calcium of MDP dimer.

  9. Sealing effectiveness of etch-and-rinse vs self-etching adhesives after water aging: influence of acid etching and NaOCl dentin pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticelli, Francesca; Toledano, Manuel; Silva, Ana Simoes; Osorio, Estrella; Osorio, Raquel

    2008-06-01

    To determine the marginal leakage of Class V restorations bonded with etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives applied after different dentin pretreatments over a maximum storage time of 24 months. Standardized mixed Class V cavities (5 mm x 3 mm and 2 mm deep) were cut on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 180 human molars. Two self-etching adhesive systems, Adper Prompt L-Pop (3M ESPE) and Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), and one etch-and-rinse bonding agent (One Step, Bisco) were applied as follows: 1. according to manufacturers' instructions; 2. after 37% H3PO4 etching for 15 s; 3. after 37% H3PO4 etching for 15 s and 5% NaOCl aq application for 2 min. Teeth were stored for 24 h, 6, 12, and 24 months in saline solution at 37 degrees C before being stained in 0.5% solution of basic fuchsine. Dye penetration was scored on a 0 to 3 ordinal scale and analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis H test (p < 0.05), Mann-Whitney U-test (p < 0.01), and Wilcoxon paired test (p < 0.05). Significant differences exist after using the tested adhesives at dentin and enamel margins. Adhesive type and substrate pretreatment had a significant effect on the long-term sealing of Class V restorations, and aging increased leakage overtime. The extent of leakage at the enamel margins was lower than that at dentin margins. One Step recorded the best results after 24 months. Optimal adhesion of restorative materials to enamel and dentin is hampered by a reduction in marginal seal over time. Alternative dentinal treatments (etching or collagen removal) might increase bonding efficacy, depending on the adhesive system used.

  10. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daood, Umer; Swee Heng, Chan; Neo Chiew Lian, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2015-06-26

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite-resin, and sectioned into resin-dentin slabs and beams to be stored for 24 h or 9 months in artificial saliva. Micro-tensile bond testing was performed with scanning electron microscopy to analyse the failure of debonded beams. The degree of conversion was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at different time points along with micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis. Data was analyzed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's for pair-wise comparison. Modification with 1% and 3% riboflavin increased the micro-tensile bond strength compared to the control at 24 h and 9-month storage with no significant differences in degree of conversion (Pbond strengths and bond durability after 9-month storage in artificial saliva without adversely affecting the degree of conversion of the adhesive monomers and resin infiltration.

  11. In vivo model for microbial invasion of tooth root dentinal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittan, Jane L; Sprague, Susan V; Macdonald, Emma L; Love, Robert M; Jenkinson, Howard F; West, Nicola X

    2016-04-01

    Objective Bacterial penetration of dentinal tubules via exposed dentine can lead to root caries and promote infections of the pulp and root canal system. The aim of this work was to develop a new experimental model for studying bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules within the human oral cavity. Material and Methods Sections of human root dentine were mounted into lower oral appliances that were worn by four human subjects for 15 d. Roots were then fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically for evidence of bacterial invasion. Levels of invasion were expressed as Tubule Invasion Factor (TIF). DNA was extracted from root samples, subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes, and invading bacteria were identified by comparison of sequences with GenBank database. Results All root dentine samples with patent tubules showed evidence of bacterial cell invasion (TIF value range from 5.7 to 9.0) to depths of 200 mm or more. A spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell morphotypes were visualized, and molecular typing identified species of Granulicatella, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas as dentinal tubule residents. Conclusion A novel in vivo model is described, which provides for human root dentine to be efficiently infected by oral microorganisms. A range of bacteria were able to initially invade dentinal tubules within exposed dentine. The model will be useful for testing the effectiveness of antiseptics, irrigants, and potential tubule occluding agents in preventing bacterial invasion of dentine.

  12. In vivo model for microbial invasion of tooth root dentinal tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane L. BRITTAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Bacterial penetration of dentinal tubules via exposed dentine can lead to root caries and promote infections of the pulp and root canal system. The aim of this work was to develop a new experimental model for studying bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules within the human oral cavity. Material and Methods Sections of human root dentine were mounted into lower oral appliances that were worn by four human subjects for 15 d. Roots were then fixed, sectioned, stained and examined microscopically for evidence of bacterial invasion. Levels of invasion were expressed as Tubule Invasion Factor (TIF. DNA was extracted from root samples, subjected to polymerase chain reaction amplification of 16S rRNA genes, and invading bacteria were identified by comparison of sequences with GenBank database. Results All root dentine samples with patent tubules showed evidence of bacterial cell invasion (TIF value range from 5.7 to 9.0 to depths of 200 mm or more. A spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell morphotypes were visualized, and molecular typing identified species of Granulicatella, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas as dentinal tubule residents. Conclusion A novel in vivo model is described, which provides for human root dentine to be efficiently infected by oral microorganisms. A range of bacteria were able to initially invade dentinal tubules within exposed dentine. The model will be useful for testing the effectiveness of antiseptics, irrigants, and potential tubule occluding agents in preventing bacterial invasion of dentine.

  13. Micro-tensile bond strength of adhesives to pulp chamber dentin after irrigation with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ç Barutcigil

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that EDTA irrigation can affect the bond strength of adhesive systems on pulp chamber lateral walls. Clinically, low EDTA concentrations can be recommended if self-etch adhesives have been selected.

  14. "The effect of an addicional adhesive layer on dentin bond strength : comparison with manufacture protocol"

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Ana Soraia Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    Tese de Mestrado, Medicina Dentária, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, 2014 The aesthetic requirements of today's society led to the development of a new concept of adhesive dentistry, in which manufacturers are challenged to design the simplest, user-friendly and least technique-sensitive-adhesive. Thus, a newly developed class of dental adhesives has appeared on the market the universal adhesives systems. Purpose: To evaluate the micro-tensile bond strength to denti...

  15. Polymerization- and solvent-induced phase separation in hydrophilic-rich dentin adhesive mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Farhana; Ye, Qiang; Good, Holly J; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-07-01

    Current dental resin undergoes phase separation into hydrophobic-rich and hydrophilic-rich phases during infiltration of the over-wet demineralized collagen matrix. Such phase separation undermines the integrity and durability of the bond at the composite/tooth interface. This study marks the first time that the polymerization kinetics of model hydrophilic-rich phase of dental adhesive has been determined. Samples were prepared by adding varying water content to neat resins made from 95 and 99 wt.% hydroxyethylmethacrylate and 5 and 1 wt.% (2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl1]-propane prior to light curing. Viscosity of the formulations decreased with increased water content. The photopolymerization kinetics study was carried out with a time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. All of the samples exhibited two-stage polymerization behavior which has not been reported previously for dental resin formulation. The lowest secondary rate maxima were observed for water contents of 10-30 wt.%. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed two glass transition temperatures for the hydrophilic-rich phase of dental adhesive. The DSC results indicate that the heterogeneity within the final polymer structure decreased with increasing water content. The results suggest a reaction mechanism involving both polymerization-induced phase separation and solvent-induced phase separation for the model hydrophilic-rich phase of dental resin.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of unfilled resin after the use of self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the Shear Bond Strength of composite to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Ehsan Baradaran; Majidinia, Sara; Sharbaf, Davood Aghasizadeh

    2017-05-01

    Based on the frequent application of composite resins as tooth-colored fillings, this method is considered a viable alternative to dental amalgam. However, this method has the low bond strength of the composite to dentin. To solve this issue, various dental adhesive systems with different characteristics have been developed by dentistry experts. To assess the effect of an additional layer of unfilled resin in self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to dentin. Moreover, we assessed the effects of sample storage in artificial saliva on the SBS of composite to dentin. Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 160 freshly extracted human first or second premolar teeth, which were randomly divided into 16 groups. The teeth were prepared from Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran (2008-2009). Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP), single bond (SB), Clearfil SE Bond, and Clearfil S3 Bond were applied to dentin surface with or without the placement of hydrophobic resin (Margin Bond) in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturers. To expose the coronal dentin, the teeth were abraded with 600 grit SiC paper. Immediately after restoration, half of the samples were tested in terms of SBS, while the other samples were evaluated in terms of SBS after three months of storage in artificial saliva. SBS rates of dental composites evaluated by universal testing machine and samples were studied by optical stereomicroscopy to verify the failure type. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.16 using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and Duncan's logistic regression test. In this study, a significant reduction was observed in the SBS rates of SB and S3 bond adhesive systems after storage with and without hydrophobic resin (p>0.000). Without storage in normal saline, a significant increase was observed in the SBS rate of the SE bond (p=0.013). In addition, SBS rate of SBMP significantly

  17. Laboratory evaluation of the effect of unfilled resin after the use of self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the Shear Bond Strength of composite to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, Ehsan Baradaran; Majidinia, Sara; Sharbaf, Davood Aghasizadeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Based on the frequent application of composite resins as tooth-colored fillings, this method is considered a viable alternative to dental amalgam. However, this method has the low bond strength of the composite to dentin. To solve this issue, various dental adhesive systems with different characteristics have been developed by dentistry experts. Aim To assess the effect of an additional layer of unfilled resin in self-etch and total-etch dentin adhesives on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to dentin. Moreover, we assessed the effects of sample storage in artificial saliva on the SBS of composite to dentin. Methods Methods: This experimental study was conducted on 160 freshly extracted human first or second premolar teeth, which were randomly divided into 16 groups. The teeth were prepared from Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran (2008–2009). Scotchbond Multi-purpose (SBMP), single bond (SB), Clearfil SE Bond, and Clearfil S3 Bond were applied to dentin surface with or without the placement of hydrophobic resin (Margin Bond) in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturers. To expose the coronal dentin, the teeth were abraded with 600 grit SiC paper. Immediately after restoration, half of the samples were tested in terms of SBS, while the other samples were evaluated in terms of SBS after three months of storage in artificial saliva. SBS rates of dental composites evaluated by universal testing machine and samples were studied by optical stereomicroscopy to verify the failure type. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.16 using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and Duncan’s logistic regression test. Results In this study, a significant reduction was observed in the SBS rates of SB and S3 bond adhesive systems after storage with and without hydrophobic resin (p>0.000). Without storage in normal saline, a significant increase was observed in the SBS rate of the SE bond (p=0.013). In addition

  18. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive:Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Umer Daood; Chan Swee Heng; Jennifer Neo Chiew Lian; Amr S Fawzy

    2015-01-01

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5%and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37%phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite–resin, and sectioned into resin–dentin slabs and beams to be stored for 24 h or 9 months in artificial saliva. Micro-tensile bond testing was performed with scanning electron microscopy to analyse the failure of debonded beams. The degree of conversion was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at different time points along with micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis. Data was analyzed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s for pair-wise comparison. Modification with 1%and 3%riboflavin increased the micro-tensile bond strength compared to the control at 24 h and 9-month storage with no significant differences in degree of conversion (P,0.05). The most predominant failure mode was the mixed fracture among all specimens except 10%riboflavin-modified adhesive specimens where cohesive failure was predominant. Raman analysis revealed that 1%and 3%riboflavin adhesives specimens showed relatively higher resin infiltration. The incorporation of riboflavin in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 3%(m/m) improved the immediate bond strengths and bond durability after 9-month storage in artificial saliva without adversely affecting the degree of conversion of the adhesive monomers and resin infiltration.

  19. In vitro analysis of riboflavin-modified, experimental, two-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro-Raman studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daood, Umer; Swee Heng, Chan; Neo Chiew Lian, Jennifer; Fawzy, Amr S

    2015-01-01

    To modify two-step experimental etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive with different concentrations of riboflavin and to study its effect on the bond strength, degree of conversion, along with resin infiltration within the demineralized dentin substrate, an experimental adhesive-system was modified with different concentrations of riboflavin (m/m, 0, 1%, 3%, 5% and 10%). Dentin surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid, bonded with respective adhesives, restored with restorative composite–resin, and sectioned into resin–dentin slabs and beams to be stored for 24 h or 9 months in artificial saliva. Micro-tensile bond testing was performed with scanning electron microscopy to analyse the failure of debonded beams. The degree of conversion was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) at different time points along with micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis. Data was analyzed with one-way and two-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's for pair-wise comparison. Modification with 1% and 3% riboflavin increased the micro-tensile bond strength compared to the control at 24 h and 9-month storage with no significant differences in degree of conversion (P<0.05). The most predominant failure mode was the mixed fracture among all specimens except 10% riboflavin-modified adhesive specimens where cohesive failure was predominant. Raman analysis revealed that 1% and 3% riboflavin adhesives specimens showed relatively higher resin infiltration. The incorporation of riboflavin in the experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive at 3% (m/m) improved the immediate bond strengths and bond durability after 9-month storage in artificial saliva without adversely affecting the degree of conversion of the adhesive monomers and resin infiltration. PMID:25257880

  20. Imperfect hybrid layers created by an aggressive one-step self-etch adhesive in primary dentin are amendable to biomimetic remineralization in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongryul; Vaughn, Ryan M.; Gu, Lisha; Rockman, Roy A.; Arola, Dwayne D.; Schafer, Tara E.; Choi, Kyungkyu; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of hybrid layers created in primary dentin occurs as early as 6 months in vivo. Biomimetic remineralization utilizes “bottom-up” nanotechnology principles for interfibrillar and intrafibrillar remineralization of collagen matrices. This study examined whether imperfect hybrid layers created in primary dentin can be remineralized. Coronal dentin surfaces were prepared from extracted primary molars and bonded using Adper Prompt L-Pop and a composite. One millimeter-thick specimen slabs of the resin-dentin interface were immersed in a Portland cement-based remineralization medium that contained two biomimetic analogs to mimic the sequestration and templating functions of dentin noncollagenous proteins. Specimens were retrieved after 1–6 months. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was employed for evaluating the permeability of hybrid layers to Rhodamine B. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the status of remineralization within hybrid layers. Remineralization at different locations of the hybrid layers corresponded with quenching of fluorescence within similar locations of those hybrid layers. Remineralization was predominantly intrafibrillar in nature as interfibrillar spaces were filled with adhesive resin. Biomimetic remineralization of imperfect hybrid layers in primary human dentin is a potential means for preserving bond integrity. The success of the current proof-of-concept, laterally-diffusing remineralization protocol warrants development of a clinically-applicable biomimetic remineralization delivery system. PMID:19768792

  1. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy of fluoride adhesive tape (F-PVA) in reducing dentin hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Nan-Young; Lee, In-Hwa

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the in vivo effectiveness of an experimental 2.26% fluoride polyvinyl alcohol (F-PVA) tape in reducing dentin hypersensitivity. 30 healthy men and women (total of 79 teeth) in their third decade of life with dentin hypersensitivity were enrolled in this study. The subjects were divided into four groups: three experimental groups were treated with fluoride agents (F-PVA tape, Vanish varnish, and ClinPro XT varnish), and a control group was treated with gelatin as a placebo. Each fluoride agent was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions. Stimulation was applied to the subjects' teeth using compressed air and ice sticks before applying the agent, as well as at 3 days and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after applying the agent. The degree of pain was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The VAS scores were significantly (P Vanish varnish and ClinPro XT varnish at 4 and 8 weeks of the examination period.

  2. In vitro evaluation of the marginal microleakage of class II amalgam restoration associated with dentin adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVEIRA Fabiana Sodré de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The marginal microleakage of class II amalgam restorations (Dispersalloy associated with copal varnish (Copalite and with two dentin bonding agents (Scotchbond Multi-uso Plus and Multi Bond Alpha was evaluated in vitro and compared by two methods: scores and linear measurements. Forty-five sound premolars were used, on which two separated class II cavities were prepared on the M and D surfaces. After the restoration, the specimens were thermocycled and stored in a solution of 0.5% basic fuchsin during 24 hours. The analysis allowed to conclude that none of the three restorative systems were able to eliminate the marginal microleakage. Nevertheless, the leakage was significantly smaller on the restorations associated with dentin bonding agents when compared to copal varnish. The linear measurement method was more sensitive than the score criteria.

  3. The effect of formocresol on bond strength of adhesive materials to primary dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, S; Ozalp, N; Ozer, L

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of formalin cresol on bonding of two compomers (Prime & Bond and Dyract, Futurabond and Glasiosite to primary dentine. Eighteen non-carious primary mandibular molar teeth were used. The two materials were placed onto the tooth surfaces before being sheared with a knife-edged blade with a crosshead speed of 1 mm min(-1). Two randomly selected teeth from each group were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The statistical analysis (paired t-test and Student's t-test) revealed that shear bond strength was significantly higher in the formocresol-applied group than in the group that was not applied formocresol (P formocresol in primary teeth, dentinal bonding would not be decreased, but on the contrary, increase.

  4. Multivariate analysis of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopic data to confirm phase partitioning in methacrylate-based dentin adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qiang; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Abedin, Farhana; Laurence, Jennifer S; Misra, Anil; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-12-01

    Water is ubiquitous in the mouths of healthy individuals and is a major interfering factor in the development of a durable seal between the tooth and composite restoration. Water leads to the formation of a variety of defects in dentin adhesives; these defects undermine the tooth-composite bond. Our group recently analyzed phase partitioning of dentin adhesives using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The concentration measurements provided by HPLC offered a more thorough representation of current adhesive performance and elucidated directions to be taken for further improvement. The sample preparation and instrument analysis using HPLC are, however, time-consuming and labor-intensive. The objective of this work was to develop a methodology for rapid, reliable, and accurate quantitative analysis of near-equilibrium phase partitioning in adhesives exposed to conditions simulating the wet oral environment. Analysis by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate statistical methods, including partial least squares (PLS) regression and principal component regression (PCR), were used for multivariate calibration to quantify the compositions in separated phases. Excellent predictions were achieved when either the hydrophobic-rich phase or the hydrophilic-rich phase mixtures were analyzed. These results indicate that FT-IR spectroscopy has excellent potential as a rapid method of detection and quantification of dentin adhesives that experience phase separation under conditions that simulate the wet oral environment.

  5. Effect of thermal shock loadings on stability of dentin-composite polymer material adhesive interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Gribov, Andrey N.

    2015-03-01

    In the past several decades the problem of longevity and durability of adhesive interfaces between hard tooth tissues and composite resin-based materials are of great interest among dental researchers and clinicians. These parameters are partially determined by adhesive system mechanical properties. In the present research project nanoindentation has been examined to test hardness of dental adhesive systems. A series of laboratory experiments was performed to study the effect of light curing time and oxygen inhibition phenomenon on light-cured adhesive material hardness. An adhesive system AdperTM Single Bond (3M ESPE) was selected as a material for testing. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the maximum values of hardness were observed after the material had been light-cured for 20 seconds, as outlined in guidelines for polymerization time of the adhesive system. The experimental studies of oxygen inhibition influence on adhesive system hardness pointed out to the fact that the dispersive layer removal led to increase in adhesive system hardness. A long - time exposure of polymerized material of adhesive system at open air at room temperature resulted in no changes in its hardness, which was likely to be determined by the mutual effect of rival processes of air oxygen inhibition and directed light curing.

  6. Microtensile bond strength analysis of adhesive systems to Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Thaysa Monteiro; Ramos-Oliveira, Thayanne Monteiro; Moretto, Simone Gonçalves; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments (control, diamond bur, erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser, and erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser) on sound dentin surface morphology and on microtensile bond strength (μTBS). Sixteen dentin fragments were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4), and different surface treatments were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Ninety-six third molars were randomly divided into eight groups (n = 12) according to type of surface treatment and adhesive system: G1 = Control + Clearfil SE Bond (SE); G2 = Control + Single Bond (SB); G3 = diamond bur (DB) + SE; G4 = DB + SB, G5 = Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm, 60 mJ, 2 Hz, 0.12 W, 19.3 J/cm(2)) + SE; G6 = Er:YAG + SB, G7 = Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2.78 μm, 50 mJ, 30 Hz, 1.5 W, 4.5 J/cm(2)) + SE; and G8 = Er,Cr:YSGG + SB. Composite blocks were bonded to the samples, and after 24-h storage in distilled/deionized water (37 °C), stick-shaped samples were obtained and submitted to μTBS test. Bond strength values (in megapascal) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). G1 (54.69 ± 7.8 MPa) showed the highest mean, which was statistically significantly higher than all the other groups (p systems did not differ statistically from each other. Based on the irradiation parameters considered in this study, it can be concluded that Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG irradiation presented lower values than the control group; however, their association with self-etching adhesive does not have a significantly negative effect on sound dentin (μTBS values of >20 MPa).

  7. THEORETICAL-MODEL FOR THE SCATTERING OF LIGHT BY DENTIN AND COMPARISON WITH MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJP, [No Value; TENBOSCH, JJ

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model of the scattering of light by dentin is presented. The model that results is a superposition of several scattering contributions, i.e., scattering by mineral crystals, collagen fibrils, and dentinal tubules. These tubules are oriented so that they cause an asymmetrical scattering

  8. Modeling of Sylgard Adhesive Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-03

    Sylgard is the name of a silicone elastomeric potting material manufactured by Dow Corning Corporation.1 Although the manufacturer cites its low adhesive strength as a feature of this product, thin layers of Sylgard do in fact have a non-negligible strength, which has been measured in recent tensile and shear debonding tests. The adhesive strength of thin layers of Sylgard potting material can be important in applications in which components having signi cantly di erent thermal expansion properties are potted together, and the potted assembly is subjected to temperature changes. The tensile and shear tractions developed on the potted surfaces of the components can cause signi cant internal stresses, particularly for components made of low-strength materials with a high area-to-volume ratio. This report is organized as follows: recent Sylgard debonding tests are rst brie y summarized, with particular attention to the adhesion between Sylgard and PBX 9501, and also between Sylgard and aluminum. Next, the type of numerical model that will be used to simulate the debonding behavior exhibited in these tests is described. Then the calibration of the debonding model will be illustrated. Finally, the method by which the model parameters are adjusted (scaled) to be applicable to other, non- tested bond thicknesses is summarized, and all parameters of the model (scaled and unscaled) are presented so that other investigators can reproduce all of the simulations described in this report as well as simulations of the application of interest.

  9. Adhesion of composite to enamel and dentin surfaces irradiated by IR laser pulses of 0.5-35 micros duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staninec, Michal; Gardner, Andrew K; Le, Charles Q; Sarma, Anupama V; Fried, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    The characteristics of laser-treated tooth surfaces depend on the laser wavelength, pulse duration, spatial and temporal laser beam quality, incident fluence, surface roughness, and the presence of water during irradiation. Ablated surfaces are most commonly restored with adhesive dental materials and the characteristics of the ablated surfaces influence adhesion of restorative materials. Previous studies suggest that high bond strengths can be achieved using shorter laser pulses that minimize peripheral thermal damage. In this study, Er:YSGG, Er:YAG, and CO(2) lasers were used at irradiation intensities sufficient to simulate efficient clinical caries removal to uniformly irradiate bovine enamel and human dentin surfaces using a motion control system with a microprocessor-controlled water spray. The degree of spatial overlap of adjacent pulses was varied so as to investigate the influence of irradiation uniformity and surface roughness on the bond strength. Composite resin was bonded to the irradiated surfaces and shear bond tests were used to obtain bond strengths in MPa. The highest results were obtained using the Er:YAG pulses with pulse durations less than 35 mus without the necessity for postirradiation acid etching. Some of these groups were not significantly different from nonirradiated, acid-etch-only positive control groups.

  10. Bond strength of a total-etch and two self-etch adhesives to dentin with and without intermediate flowable liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ali I

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of flowable resin composite application on the microtensile bond strength of a total-etch and two self-etch adhesive systems to dentin. Occlusal surfaces of 30 human third molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces. One of the following adhesive systems was applied to the dentin surface following manufacturers' instructions: Admira Bond, Futurabond DC and Clearfil SE Bond. For each adhesive, half of the specimens received a layer of flowable composite (Amaris Flow) applied into dentin and light-cured (experimental groups). The other teeth received no liner and served as control group. For all teeth, resin composite (Amaris) was applied in 2 mm thickness to form a crown segment 5-6 mm height and each increment was light-cured. The restored teeth were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Each tooth was serially sectioned in a longitudinal direction in order to obtain several bonded slabs (1.0 mm2 in cross-section). Each slab was attached to the set-up by their lateral sides and placed in a universal testing machine. Tensile load was applied at cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute until failure. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. Placement of a low-viscosity resin after adhesive application increased the microtensile bond strength for all tested adhesive systems. However, such increase was not significant (P > 0.05). The percentage of cohesive failure was increased in specimens with flowable resin liner.

  11. Tensile Bond Strengths of Two Adhesives on Irradiated and Nonirradiated Human Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Cécile Bernard; Cyril Villat; Hazem Abouelleil; Marie-Paule Gustin; Brigitte Grosgogeat

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of radiotherapy on bond efficiency of two different adhesive systems using tensile bond strength test. Twenty extracted teeth after radiotherapy and twenty nonirradiated extracted teeth were used. The irradiation was applied in vivo to a minimal dose of 50 Gy. The specimens of each group were randomly assigned to two subgroups to test two different adhesive systems. A three-step/etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Optibond FL) and a two-steps/self-et...

  12. Effect of green tea extract on bonding durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina CARVALHO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective Green tea extract has been advocated as a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP inhibitor; however, its effect on bond durability to caries-affected dentin has never been reported. Thus, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two MMP inhibitors (2% chlorhexidine and 2% green tea extract, applied after acid etching, on bond durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel was removed from third molars to expose the dentin surface, and the molars were submitted to a caries induction protocol for 15 days. After removal of infected dentin, specimens were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid (15 seconds and randomly divided into three groups, according to the type of dentin pretreatment (n=10: NT: no treatment; GT: 2% green tea extract; CLX: 2% chlorhexidine. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions, and composite resin restorations were built on the dentin. After 24 hours, at 37°C, the resin-tooth blocks were sectioned perpendicularly to the adhesive interface in the form of sticks (0.8 mm2 of adhesive area and randomly subdivided into two groups according to when they were to be submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing: immediately or 6 months after storage in distilled water. Data were reported in MPa and submitted to two-way ANOVA for completely randomized blocks, followed by Tukey’s test (α=0.05. Results After 24 hours, there was no significant difference in the μTBS of the groups. After 6 months, the GT group had significantly higher μTBS values. Conclusion It was concluded that the application of 2% green tea extract was able to increase bond durability of the etch-and-rinse system to dentin. Neither the application of chlorhexidine nor non-treatment (NT - control had any effect on bond strength after water storage.

  13. Micromorphology of resin/dentin interfaces using 4th and 5th generation dual-curing adhesive/cement systems: a confocal laser scanning microscope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrais, Cesar A G; Miyake, Katsuia; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Pashley, David H; Giannini, Marcelo

    2009-02-01

    This study evaluated the differential composition of resin/dentin interfaces of indirect restorations created by the application of 4th and 5th generation dual-curing luting systems (bonding agents/resin cements), when each material was either light cured or allowed to self-cure. Occlusal flat dentin surfaces of 60 human third molars were assigned into 12 groups (n = 5) according to curing mode and dual-curing cementing system: 4th generation All Bond2 (AB2)/Duolink (Bisco) and 5th generation (B1) Bond1/Lute-it (Pentron). Fluorescein-labeled dextran (FDx) was mixed with the bonding agents, while rhodamine-labeled dextran (RhDx) was incorporated into resin cements and Pre-Bond resin from AB2. Resin cements were applied to 2-mm-thick, precured resin composite disks (Z250, 3M ESPE), which were fixed to dentin surfaces containing adhesive resin in either cured (light cured; LC) or uncured (self-cured; SC) states. The restored teeth were light activated (XL3000, 3M ESPE) according to the manufacturers' instructions (LRC) or allowed to self-cure (SRC), were stored for 24 h, and then vertically, serially sectioned into l-mm-thick slabs, which were analyzed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescent additives indicated where individual components of the bonding/cement systems were located. Additional specimens were prepared and analyzed using a conventional scanning electron microscope. AB2/LC and B1/LC exhibited nonuniform primer/adhesive layer thickness. AB2/SC showed adhesive resin penetration within the primed dentin, and resin cement penetration at the entrance of the dentin tubules. B1/SC/LRC demonstrated resin cement penetration within the hybrid layer and into the dentin tubules. More resin cement penetration was observed in B1/SC/SRC groups than in its LRC equivalent. The morphological features and component interactions among materials at resin/dentin interfaces are related to the activation modes of the primer/adhesive layer and of the resin cement

  14. Effect of green tea extract on bonding durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARVALHO, Carolina; FERNANDES, Fernando Pelegrim; FREITAS, Valeria da Penha; FRANÇA, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; BASTING, Roberta Tarkany; TURSSI, Cecilia Pedroso; AMARAL, Flávia Lucisano Botelho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Green tea extract has been advocated as a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor; however, its effect on bond durability to caries-affected dentin has never been reported. Thus, the aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two MMP inhibitors (2% chlorhexidine and 2% green tea extract), applied after acid etching, on bond durability of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to caries-affected dentin. Material and Methods Occlusal enamel was removed from third molars to expose the dentin surface, and the molars were submitted to a caries induction protocol for 15 days. After removal of infected dentin, specimens were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid (15 seconds) and randomly divided into three groups, according to the type of dentin pretreatment (n=10): NT: no treatment; GT: 2% green tea extract; CLX: 2% chlorhexidine. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions, and composite resin restorations were built on the dentin. After 24 hours, at 37°C, the resin-tooth blocks were sectioned perpendicularly to the adhesive interface in the form of sticks (0.8 mm2 of adhesive area) and randomly subdivided into two groups according to when they were to be submitted to microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing: immediately or 6 months after storage in distilled water. Data were reported in MPa and submitted to two-way ANOVA for completely randomized blocks, followed by Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results After 24 hours, there was no significant difference in the μTBS of the groups. After 6 months, the GT group had significantly higher μTBS values. Conclusion It was concluded that the application of 2% green tea extract was able to increase bond durability of the etch-and-rinse system to dentin. Neither the application of chlorhexidine nor non-treatment (NT - control) had any effect on bond strength after water storage. PMID:27383701

  15. Effect of salivary contamination during different bonding stages on shear dentin bond strength of one-step self-etch and total etch adhesive

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    H. Kermanshah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of saliva contamination during bonding procedures without removing saliva on shear dentin bond strength of three adhesive generations when rubber dam isolation is not feasible.Materials and Methods: Flat superficial dentin surfaces of seventy-two extracted human molars were randomly divided into three groups (A: Scotch Bond MP Plus (SBMP, B: Single Bond (SB, C: Prompt L-Pop according to the applied adhesives and twelve subgroups (n=6according to the following saliva contamination applied in different bonding steps. The specimens were contaminated with saliva after etching (A1 and B1, after primer application (A2, after adhesive application before polymerization (A3, B2 and C1, and after adhesivepolymerization (A4, B3 and C2. Three subgroups were not contaminated as controls (A5, B4 and C3. Resin composite was placed on dentin subsequently followed by thermocycling.Shear test was performed by Universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The collected data were statically analyzed using one and two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD.Results: In contrast to SBMP and SB, the mean shear bond strength of Promote L-Pop was not significantly different between contaminated and uncontaminated subgroups. Mean shear bond strengths of SBMP subgroups contaminated after adhesive polymerization or uncontaminated were significantly higher compared to the other two groups (p<0.05.Conclusion: Unlike Promote L-Pop, saliva contamination could reduce shear bond strength of the total-etch adhesives. Furthermore, the step of bonding procedures and the type of adhesive seems to be effective on the bond strength of adhesive contaminated with saliva.

  16. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Moslemi; Faezeh Fotouhi Ardakani; Fatemeh Javadi; Zahra Khalili Sadrabad; Zahra Shadkar; Mohammad Saeid Shadkar

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third m...

  17. Effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Abed-Kahnamoui, Mehdi; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Gharouni, Mahya

    2017-01-01

    Background Considering the probability of chemical and enzymatic reactions between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the dentin structure and their specific inhibitors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of specific inhibitor of MMPs (galardin) on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. Material and Methods Forty-eight sound human premolars were mounted in self-cured acrylic resin after removal of the enamel on the buccal and lingual surfaces. The dentin surfaces achieved were polished and prepared with 600-grit silicon carbide paper. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=16) based on the concentration of galardin used (with no galardin, galardin at a high concentration and galardin at a low concentration). In addition, 96 composite resin blocks, measuring 3 mm in height and diameter, were prepared. The composite resin blocks were bonded to the buccal and lingual surface dentin with Rely-X Unicem (RXC) and Speed CEM (SPC) self-adhesive resin cements, respectively, according to manufacturers’ instructions. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the shear bond strength values were determined in MPa and fracture modes were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni test (α=0.05). Results The shear bond strength of galardin at high concentration was significantly higher than that in the control group and galardin at a low concentrations (PDental Bonding.

  18. Adhesión a dentina afectada por caries y dentina esclerótica Adhesion to caries affected and sclerotic dentin

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    L. Ceballos García

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de formas de dentina alterada que son los substratos adhesivos más importantes clínicamente y menos receptivos a los tratamientos adhesivos que la dentina normal. Se describen la características histopatológicas y fisiológicas de: (1 dentina afectada por caries (ya sea en su capa superficial o en su capa profunda y (2 dentina esclerótica. Se realiza una revisión de la literatura estudiando la adhesión a estos tipos de dentina.These are two kinds of dentin which are less receptive to adhesion and clinically more important than sound dentino Their histopathological and physiological characteristics were described and a literature review was performed evaluating adhesion to these two kinds of altered dentin.

  19. Effect of Smear Layers Created by Different Burs on Durability of Self-Etching Adhesive Bond to Dentin of Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, P; Senawongse, P; Harnirattisal, C; Wunsiw, W

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a smear layer generated by a high-speed diamond or carbide bur on the durability of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of a self-etching adhesive to primary dentin. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces of 105 human primary molars were exposed using 600 grit silicon carbide paper before being divided into 2 groups for further grinding with either a highspeed diamond or carbide bur. Ten prepared dentin surfaces treated by each bur were evaluated for the characteristics of the smear layer using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Seventy-five specimens from each bur-prepared group were applied with a 2-step self-etching adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond(®)) then built up with a resin composite. Each bonded specimen was sectioned into a 1-mm thick slab and trimmed to a dumbbell shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm(2). All slabs were divided into 3 groups (n=25) according to 3 storage times of 24 hrs, 3 months, and 6 months, in distilled water at 37°C. After storage, the μTBS was determined using a universal testing machine. All fracture specimens were prepared for observation of failure modes. Ten bonded specimens of each bur group were prepared for observation of the resin-dentin interface using an SEM. Smear-layer thickness, μTBS, and failure mode distributions were statistically analyzed. The high speed carbide bur created a significantly thinner smear layer than the diamond bur (p composite to primary dentin.

  20. Effect of different adhesive strategies on microtensile bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing blocks bonded to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roperto, Renato; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Teich, Sorin; Porto, Thiago Soares

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of ceramic and composite computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) blocks bonded to dentin using different adhesive strategies. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 crowns of sound freshly extracted human molars were sectioned horizontally 3 mm above the cementoenamel junction to produce flat dentin surfaces. Ceramic and composite CAD/CAM blocks, size 14, were sectioned into slices of 3 mm thick. Before bonding, CAD/CAM block surfaces were treated according to the manufacturer's instructions. Groups were created based on the adhesive strategy used: Group 1 (GI) - conventional resin cement + total-etch adhesive system, Group 2 (GII) - conventional resin cement + self-etch adhesive system, and Group 3 (GIII) - self-adhesive resin cement with no adhesive. Bonded specimens were stored in 100% humidity for 24h at 37΀C, and then sectioned with a slow-speed diamond saw to obtain 1 mm × 1 mm × 6 mm microsticks. Microtensile testing was then conducted using a microtensile tester. μTBS values were expressed in MPa and analyzed by one-way ANOVA with post hoc (Tukey) test at the 5% significance level. Results: Mean values and standard deviations of μTBS (MPa) were 17.68 (±2.71) for GI/ceramic; 17.62 (±3.99) for GI/composite; 13.61 (±6.92) for GII/composite; 12.22 (±4.24) for GII/ceramic; 7.47 (±2.29) for GIII/composite; and 6.48 (±3.10) for GIII/ceramic; ANOVA indicated significant differences among the adhesive modality and block interaction (P ceramic. Bond strength of GIII was consistently lower (P ceramic, can be significantly affected by different adhesive strategies used. PMID:27076825

  1. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

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    Saad Liaqat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  2. [Bond strength evaluation of four adhesive systems to dentin in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ximei; Xing, Lu; Xu, Haiping; Jiang, Zhe; Su, Qin

    2012-08-01

    To compare the adhesive strength and observe the bonding interface. According to statistic analysis and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, the resistance capacity of four adhesive systems is evaluated. Prime & Bond NT (PBNT), Tetric N-Bond (TNB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB), G Bond (GB) were bonded to the occlusal surfaces and mesial surfaces of third molars respectively. The mesial resins received shear force experiment and the fracture load were recorded. The tensile bond strength (TBS) of the remaining parts were tested. The interfacial configuration were observed under SEM. In the shear bond strength (SBS) experiment, PBNT and TNB showed the best result, but there was no significant difference between them (P>0.05). The SBS of PBNT was stronger than that of CSEB and GB (P0.05). In accordance with the shear force result, the TBS of PBNT and TNB was larger than CSEB and GB (Psystem, total-etching system could reach better bonding strength. There is some connection between the interfacial configuration of adhesives and bond strength of them.

  3. Evaluation of bond strength of silorane and methacrylate based restorative systems to dentin using different cavity models

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    Stephano Zerlottini Isaac

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS to dentin of two different restorative systems: silorane-based (P90, and methacrylate-based (P60, using two cavity models. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Occlusal enamel of 40 human third molars was removed to expose flat dentin surface. Class I cavities with 4 mm mesial-distal width, 3 mm buccal-lingual width and 3 mm depth (C-factor=4.5 were prepared in 20 teeth, which were divided into two groups (n=10 restored with P60 and P90, bulk-filled after dentin treatment according to manufacturer's instructions. Flat buccal dentin surfaces were prepared in the 20 remaining teeth (C-factor=0.2 and restored with resin blocks measuring 4x3x3 mm using the two restorative systems (n=10. The teeth were sectioned into samples with area between 0.85 and 1.25 mm2 that were submitted to µTBS testing, using a universal testing machine (EMIC at speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fractured specimens were analyzed under stereomicroscope and categorized according to fracture pattern. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey Kramer tests. RESULTS: For flat surfaces, P60 obtained higher bond strength values compared with P90. However, for Class I cavities, P60 showed significant reduction in bond strength (p0.05, or between Class I Cavity and Flat Surface group, considering P90 restorative system (p>0.05. Regarding fracture pattern, there was no statistical difference among groups (p=0.0713 and 56.3% of the fractures were adhesive. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that methacrylate-based composite µTBS was influenced by cavity models, and the use of silorane-based composite led to similar bond strength values compared to the methacrylate-based composite in cavities with high C-factor.

  4. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of two self-etching adhesives (sixth and seventh generation on dentin of primary and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

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    Yaseen S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate shear bond strength of two self-etching adhesives (sixth and seventh generation on dentin of primary and permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface of 64 human anterior teeth (32 primary and 32 permanent divided into four groups of 16 each. Groups A and C were treated with Contax (sixth generation, while groups B and D were treated with Clearfil S3 (seventh generation. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-350 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA for multiple group comparison, followed by student′s unpaired ′t′ test for group-wise comparison. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength among the study groups except that primary teeth bonded with Contax exhibited significantly lesser shear bond strength than permanent teeth bonded with Clearfil S3. Conclusion: This study revealed that Clearfil S3 could be of greater advantage in pediatric dentistry than Contax because of its fewer steps and better shear bond strength in dentin of both primary and permanent teeth.

  5. Micromorphology and bond strength evaluation of adhesive interface of a self-adhering flowable composite resin-dentin: Effect of surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Saadat, Maryam

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin surface treatment on the micromorphology and shear bond strength (SBS) of a self-adhering flowable composite, Vertis Flow (VF). Flat dentin surfaces obtained from sixty extracted human molars were divided into six groups (n = 10) according to the following surface treatments: (G1) control, no treatment; (G2) self-etching adhesive, Optibond All-in-One; (G3) phosphoric acid etching for 15 s; (G4) polyacrylic acid for 10 s; (G5) EDTA for 60 s; and G6) sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 15 s. After restoration using VF, SBS was measured in MPa. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane test (α = 0.05). Six additional specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis. SBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (P < 0.001). SBS of six groups from the highest to the lowest were as follows: (G3) 13.5(A); (G5) 8.98(AB); (G2) 8.85(AB); (G4) 8.21(AB); (G1) 7.53(BC); and (G6) 4.49(C) (groups with the same superscript letter were statistically similar). Morphological analysis revealed numerous long resin tags at the adhesive interface for acid-etched group, with a few short resin tags for the control group and small gap formation for NaOCl-treated group. In conclusion, dentin surface treatments tested differently affected bonding performance of VF; only acid-etching effectively improved this.

  6. Comparison of shear bond strength and microleakage of Scotchbond multi-purpose (MP adhesive system and an experimental dentin bonding agent based on standard of ISOTR 11405

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    Jafarzadeh Kashi T.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Evaluation of shear bond strength and microleakage of bonding agents is important as these properties play main roles in adhesion of composite to dental tissues. Microleakage results in bacterial penetration into dentin tubules and enamel surfaces and causes sensitivity and recurrent caries followed by destruction of composite filling. Insufficient shear bond strength results in early failure of filling in low masticatory forces. The main goal of this study was to compare the microleakage and shear bond strength of an experimental adhesive and Scotchbond multi-purpose (MP adhesive system."nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, sixty extracted caries free human molar teeth were randomly assigned into 4 groups of 15 each for shear bond strength. Variables were bonding agents, enamel and dentin. Twenty teeth assigned into 2 groups of 10 each were used for valuation of the microleakage. Microleakage and shear bond strength were performed according to ISO TR 11405. All data were analyzed with parametric and non-parametric tests according to their normality distribution. Also, Weibull distribution performed on data."nResults: Data obtained from both microleakage and shear bond strength tests showed no significant difference between the experimental bonding and Scotchbond MP bonding (P>0.05. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the microleakage of occlusal and gingival parts of both bondings (P>0.05."nConclusion: Experimental adhesive bonding showed acceptable results regarding microleakage and shear bond strength. It may be concluded that the experimental dentin bonding had a comparable performance quality with that of commercial system.

  7. Evaluation of Effects on the Adhesion of Various Root Canal Sealers after Er:YAG Laser and Irrigants Are Used on the Dentin Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkocak, Ismail; Sonat, Bade

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of various root canal sealers after various irrigation solutions and Er:YAG laser irradiation were used on root canal dentin. One hundred fifty freshly extracted human maxillary single-rooted teeth were used in this study. Teeth were sectioned transversally 4 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root canal of each specimen was prepared using a tapered bur. Teeth were divided into 3 main groups by sealer (AH Plus Jet [Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany], EndoSequence BC Sealer [Brasseler, Savannah, GA], and Real Seal [SybronEndo, Orange, CA]) and then divided into 5 subgroups by dentin treatment (distilled water, calcium hydroxide, sodium hypochlorite, EDTA, and Er:YAG laser). The specimens were placed immediately at 37°C and 100% humidity for 1 week. Then, the push-out test was applied. The maximum failure load was recorded in newtons and was used to calculate the push-out bond strength in MPa. Then, 3 random specimens from each group were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The resin root canal sealers had higher push-out bond strength than the bioceramic sealer, and the differences were statistically significant (P < .05) except in the sodium hypochlorite groups. The EDTA and Er:YAG laser applications removed the smear layer and increased the bond strength. The highest adhesion was observed in EDTA groups when each sealer was evaluated in itself. The bonding strength of root canal sealers is influenced by their properties and various dentin surface treatments. The scanning electron microscopic study showed that although the dentinal tubules were open, at the profile examination the sealers did not penetrate into the dentin canals in all specimens. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulpal responses to bacterial contamination following dentin bridging beneath hard-setting calcium hydroxide and self-etching adhesive resin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasako, Yuichi; Ikeda, Masaomi; Tagami, Junji

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the pulp healing to bacterial contamination beneath a hard-setting calcium hydroxide (DY: Dycal, L.D. Caulk Co.) and a self-etching adhesive resin (2V: Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, Kuraray Medical Inc.) following dentin bridge formation. Class V cavities were prepared on 30 monkey teeth, and the pulps were exposed with a carbide bur through the cavity floor. Each exposed pulp was capped with either DY or 2V. The cavities were restored with a hybrid resin composite. The resin composite was removed at 180 days after capping, and then cavities were left open to the oral environment for 2 weeks to obtain bacteria contamination DY (BDY) and 2V (B2V; n = 10). A non-bacterial-contaminated group capped with DY was used as control. After bacterial challenges, inflammatory cell infiltration, incidence and differentiation of dentin bridges were evaluated histologically. There were significant differences in the presence of inflammatory cell infiltration among all groups (P < 0.05). No moderate or severe inflammatory reaction was found in Group DY. Group BDY showed moderate or severe inflammatory cell infiltration in 50%, and showed four necrotic specimens. Although no statistically significant difference was found in the formation and differentiation of dentin bridges among all groups, tunnel defects in dentin bridges were detected in 70% (DY), 80% (BDY), and 50% (B2V). Group B2V showed a significantly lower presence of inflammatory cell infiltration than Group BDY (P < 0.05). Bonding agent is supposed to seal the exposure site, and the remaining bonding agent on the cavities was effective as the barrier in the dentin bridges after bacterial challenges.

  9. The effect of direct and indirect water storage on the microtensile dentin bond strength of a total-etch and two self-etching adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Ali I; El Eraki, Magda; Feilzer, Albert J

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of direct and indirect water storage on the microtensile dentin bond strength of one total-etch and two self-etching adhesives. The adhesive materials were: one total-etch adhesive; Admira Bond and two self-etch adhesives; Clearfil SE Bond and Hybrid Bond. Freshly extracted human third molar teeth were used. In each tooth, a Class I cavity (4 x 4 mm) was prepared in the occlusal surface with the pulpal floor extending approximately 1 mm into dentin. The teeth were divided into three groups (n = 12). Each group was restored with the resin composite Clearfil APX using one of the tested adhesives. For each experimental group three test procedures (n = 10) were carried out: Procedure A: the teeth were stored in water for 24 hours, then sectioned longitudinally, buccolingually and mesiodistally to get rectangular slabs of 1.0 - 1.2 mm thickness on which a microtensile test was carried out; Procedure B: the teeth were also sectioned, however the slabs were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 1 year before microtensile testing; Procedure C: the teeth were kept in water at 37 degrees C for 1 year before sectioning and microtensile testing. During microtensile testing the slabs were placed in a universal testing machine and load was applied at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. For the 24-hour water storage groups there was no significant difference in bond strength between the three adhesives. After 1 year of indirect water storage, the bond strength decreased but the reduction was not significantly different from those of 24 hours. After 1 year of direct water storage, the mean bond strengths of Admira Bond and Hybrid Bond were significantly reduced compared to their 24-hour results. In contrast the average value of Clearfil SE Bond was not significantly affected.

  10. Effect of Water Storage on the Micro-shear Bond Strength of Two Self-etch Adhesives to Enamel and Dentin

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    Z. Jaberi Ansari

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the influence of storage time on micro-shear bond strength of two self-etching materials to enamel and dentin.Materials and Methods: Human third molar teeth were sectioned to 1.5 mm thick beams and randomly divided into 2 groups. In group I, SE Bond and in group II, Tri-S Bond was used to bond a composite rod (AP-X to each treated surface. Specimens were prepared according to manufacturer instructions. Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to water storage time; 1 day, 6 and 12 months. Microshear bond strengths were determined under a crosshead speed of 1mm/min using a universal testing machine and expressed in MPa. Data was statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Dunnett post hoc test.Results: Micro-shear bond strength of two adhesives to enamel and dentin showed a slight but not significant decrease over time (P>0.5. After one day, the mean bond strength of enamel in groups I and II were 39.47 and 34.65 MPa and in dentin were 45.20 and 36.0 MPa respectively. There was no statistically significant differencebetween two materials (P=0.190, P=0.082. After six months the bond strength in group I and II was 35.93 and 35.18 MPa for enamel, and 38.27and 35.19 MPa for dentin respectively, these differences was not statistically significant (P=0.520, P=0.179.After one year, the bond strength of enamel in groups I and II, were 34.47and 29.91MPa, and in dentin were 33.86 and 32.53 MPa respectively which was not statistically significant (P=0.609, P=0.991.Conclusion: The micro-shear bond strength of both adhesives to enamel and dentin decreased slightly over time; however these decreases were not statistically significant.

  11. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  12. One-bottle self-etching adhesives applied to dentine air-abraded using bioactive glasses containing polyacrylic acid: an in vitro microtensile bond strength and confocal microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Watson, Timothy F; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of two "simplified" self-etching adhesives bonded to air-abraded dentine using experimental bioactive glass powders containing polyacrylic acid. Sound dentine specimens were air-abraded using a pure Bioglass 45S5 (Bioglass) powder or two Bioglass powders containing different concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAA: 15 wt% or 40 wt%). The bonding procedures were accomplished by the application of two self-etching adhesives (CS3: Clearfil S3 Bond; Kuraray, Osaka, Japan or GB: G Bond; GC Ltd. Tokyo, Japan). The resin-bonded specimens were cut in beams (0.9 mm(2)) and the μTBS testing was performed after 24h or 6months of phosphate buffer solution (PBS) storage. The results were statistically analysed by three-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls test used (α=0.05). Further bonded-dentine specimens were used for the confocal microscopy interfacial characterisation and micropermeability analysis. The CS3 adhesive system achieved higher μTBS than those attained in the specimens bonded with GB both after 24h and 6 months of PBS storage. The CLSM analysis performed after 6months of PBS storage indicated severe micropermeability within the bonded-dentine interfaces created using GB applied onto dentine air-abraded with Bioglass/PAA-15 and Bioglass/PAA-40. Conversely, CS3 exhibited no dye penetration (micropermeability) at the resin-dentine interface. It is possible to affirm that air-abrasion procedures performed using pure Bioglass or Bioglass containing 15 wt% PAA do not interfere with the immediate bonding performance of self-etching adhesives. However, the durability of the bonded-dentine interfaces created subsequent air-abrasion procedures using bioactive glasses will depend also upon the chemical composition of the self-etch adhesive systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The adhesive potential of dentin bonding systems assessed using cuspal deflection measurements and cervical microleakage scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Ahmed; Moorthy, Advan; Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-10-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection and cervical microleakage of standardized mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities restored with a dimethacrylate resin-based-composite (RBC) placed with one 3-step, one 2-step and three 1-step bonding systems and compared with the unbound condition. Forty-eight sound maxillary premolar teeth with standardized MOD cavities were randomly allocated to six groups. Restoration was performed in eight oblique increments using a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) light curing unit (LCU) with the bonding condition as the dependent variable. Buccal and palatal cuspal deflections were recorded post-irradiation using a twin channel deflection measuring gauge at 0, 30, 60 and 180s. Following restoration, the teeth were thermocycled, immersed in a 0.2% basic fuchsin dye for 24h, sectioned and examined for cervical microleakage assessment. The mean total cuspal deflection measurements with the one 3-step, one 2-step and three 1-step bonding systems were 11.26 (2.56), 10.95 (2.16), 10.03 (2.05) (Futurabond(®) DC SingleDose), 6.37 (1.37) (Adper™ Prompt™ L-Pop™), 8.98 (1.34) μm (All-Bond SE(®)), respectively when compared with the unbound condition (6.46 (1.88) μm) The one-way ANOVA of the total cuspal deflection measurements identified statistical differences (pbonding system although differences between the bonding systems were evident (pbonding technologies available to practitioners for RBCs. Poorly performing adhesives can be identified which indicated the technique may be useful as a screening tool for assessing existing and new bonding technologies which offers the potential to limit complications routinely encountered with Class II RBC restorations. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Andreza Talaveira da Silva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. OBJECTIVE: this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C, medium (M and apical (A thirds of the root. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group: group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37°C for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. RESULTS: Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05. Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3% than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%, ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0% and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3% (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity.

  15. An investigation of potential desensitizing agents in the dentine disc model: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, T Y; Gillam, D G; Barber, P M; Mordan, N J; Critchell, J

    1997-03-01

    Cervical dentine sensitivity (CDS) may be defined as pain arising from exposed dentine. The prefix cervical indicates the location of the sensitivity and/or its subsequent treatment. Currently the most accepted mechanism of intradental nerve activation associated with dentine sensitivity appears to be hydrodynamic in nature. The concept of tubule occlusion as a method of dentine desensitization is a logical conclusion of the hydrodynamic theory. The authors employed the dentine disc model, qualitative scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray microanalysis to investigate whether selected desensitizing agents occlude dentinal tubule orifices. Strict control procedures have been used together with various methods of application to apply these agents to human dentine discs. SEM was used to examine the degree of deposit left by the various agents on disc surfaces and X-ray microanalysis was employed to characterize the elemental composition of the deposit. Analysis of selected agents, both prior to and after application on dentine discs was performed for comparative purposes. The degree of retention of the surface deposit upon rotation with saliva supernatant for 6 h was also studied. The results of this study indicated that ferric oxalate, the active ingredient of Sensodyne Sealant, which produced initial crystal-like structures, occluding almost all the tubule orifices was superior to potassium oxalate (Butler Protect). Of the over-the-counter (OTC) desensitizing products tested, both silica- and calcium-based abrasive components were observed both on the surface and within the tubules, indicating a certain degree of therapeutic potential for these two components. These findings suggest that certain desensitizing agents have tubule occluding properties as observed in this in vitro system which, in turn, may indicate a therapeutic potential in vivo.

  16. Hydroxyapatite induces spontaneous polymerization of model self-etch dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wu, Ningjing; Bai, Xinyan; Xu, Changqi; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yong

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study is to report for the first time the spontaneous polymerization phenomenon of self-etch dental adhesives induced by hydroxylapatite (HAp). Model self-etch adhesives were prepared by using a monomer mixture of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The initiator system consisted of camphorquinone (CQ, 0.022 mmol/g) and ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (4E, 0.022-0.088 mmol/g). HAp (2-8 wt.%) was added to the neat model adhesive. In a dark environment, the polymerization was monitored in-situ using ATR/FT-IR, and the mechanical properties of the polymerized adhesives were evaluated using nanoindentation technique. Results indicated that spontaneous polymerization was not observed in the absence of HAp. However, as different amounts of HAp were incorporated into the adhesives, spontaneous polymerization was induced. Higher HAp content led to higher degree of conversion (DC), higher rate of polymerization (RP) and shorter induction period (IP). In addition, higher 4E content also elevated DC and RP and reduced IP of the adhesives. Nanoindentation result suggested that the Young's modulus of the polymerized adhesives showed similar dependence on HAp and 4E contents. In summary, interaction with HAp could induce spontaneous polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. This result provides important information for understanding the initiation mechanism of the self-etch adhesives, and may be of clinical significance to strengthen the adhesive/dentin interface based on the finding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Thin and thick layers of resin-based sealer cement bonded to root dentine compared: Adhesive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Epita S; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate tensile and shear bond strengths of one epoxy (AH) and two methacrylate resin-based sealers (EZ and RS) in thin and thick layers bonded to root dentine. An alignment device was prepared for accurate positioning of 20 root dentine cylinders in a predefined gap of 0.1 or 1 mm. Sealer was placed in the interface. Bond strength tests were conducted. Mode of failures and representative surfaces were evaluated. Data were analysed using anova and post-hoc tests, with P layer of sealer produced higher bond strength, except for the shear bond strength of EZ. Significant differences between thin and thick layers were found only in tensile bond strengths of AH and RS. Mixed type of failure was constantly found with all sealers. Bond strengths of thick layers of resin-based sealers to root dentine tended to be higher than with thin layers.

  18. Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dental restoration: improved resin adhesive penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the influence of non-thermal plasma treatment on the penetration of a model dental adhesive into the demineralized dentine. Prepared dentine surfaces were conditioned with Scotchbond Universal etchant for 15s and sectioned equally perpendicular to the etched surfaces. The separated halves were randomly selected for treatment with an argon plasma brush (input current 6mA, treatment time 30s) or gentle argon air blowing (treatment time 30s, as control). The plasma-treated specimens and control specimens were applied with a model adhesive containing 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (mass ratio of 30/70), gently air-dried for 5s, and light-cured for 20s. Cross-sectional specimens were characterized using micro-Raman spectral mapping across the dentine, adhesive/dentine interface, and adhesive layer at 1-μm spatial resolution. SEM was also employed to examine the adhesive/dentine interfacial morphology. The micro-Raman result disclosed that plasma treatment significantly improved the penetration of the adhesive, evidenced by the apparently higher content of the adhesive at the adhesive/dentine interface as compared to the control. Specifically, the improvement of the adhesive penetration using plasma technique was achieved by dramatically enhancing the penetration of hydrophilic monomer (HEMA), while maintaining the penetration of hydrophobic monomer (BisGMA). Morphological observation at the adhesive/dentine interface using SEM also confirmed the improved adhesive penetration. The results further suggested that plasma treatment could benefit polymerization of the adhesive, especially in the interface region. The significant role of the non-thermal plasma brush in improving the adhesive penetration into demineralized dentine has been demonstrated. The results obtained may offer a better prospect of using plasma in dental restoration to optimize adhesion between tooth substrate and

  19. Development of an acid challenge-based in vitro dentin disc occlusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Charles R; Butler, Andrew; Willson, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the utility of a novel acid challenge-based dentin disc occlusion model, and to compare the occluding effect and acid resistance exhibited by currently marketed occlusion dentifrices in vitro. Ninety-six bovine dentin discs were polished and etched in citric acid (6% w/w) for two minutes to provide a smooth dentin surface with patent tubules. The discs were divided into three treatment groups. Each treatment group was brushed (Oral-B Vitality Precision Clean/EB 17 FlexiSoft head) twice a day, for up to four days, with either a strontium acetate dentifrice (Sensodyne Rapid Relief), an arginine-based dentifrice (Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief), or water. Prior to and between treatments, the dentin samples were stored in human saliva. On days 3 and 4, following dentifrice treatment and incubation in saliva (60 minutes), the samples were subjected to a grapefruit juice challenge. Eight samples from each treatment group were removed from the study on each day and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images were graded according to a categorical occlusion scale, and the data were analyzed by ANOVA. The strontium acetate dentifrice occluded dentin tubules significantly better than the negative control (water) on days 1 through 4 (day 4 p analysis reveals that the occluding deposits vary according to product, and that some are more susceptible to acid mediated dissolution.

  20. Influence of the LED curing source and selective enamel etching on dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo José; Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the LED curing unit and selective enamel etching on dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS) for self-etch adhesives in class I composite restorations. On 96 human molars, box-shaped class I cavities were made maintaining enamel margins. Self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE - CSE and Clearfil S(3) - S3) were used to bond a microhybrid composite. Before adhesive application, half of the teeth were enamel acid-etched and the other half was not. Adhesives and composites were cured with the following light curing units (LCUs): one polywave (UltraLume 5 - UL) and two single-peak (FlashLite 1401 - FL and Radii Cal - RD) LEDs. The specimens were then submitted to thermomechanical aging and longitudinally sectioned to obtain bonded sticks (0.9 mm(2)) to be tested in tension at 0.5 mm/min. The failure mode was then recorded. The μTBS data were submitted to a three-way ANOVA and Tukey's (α = 0.05). For S3, the selective enamel-etching provided lower μTBS values (20.7 ± 2.7) compared to the non-etched specimens (26.7 ± 2.2). UL yielded higher μTBS values (24.1 ± 3.2) in comparison to the photoactivation approach with FL (18.8 ±3.9) and RD (19.9 ±1.8) for CSE. The two-step CSE was not influenced by the enamel etching (p ≥ 0.05). Enamel acid etching in class I composite restorations affects the dentin μTBS of the one-step self-etch adhesive Clearfil S(3), with no alterations for Clearfil SE bond strength. The polywave LED promoted better bond strength for the two-step adhesive compared to the single-peak ones.

  1. Two Models of Adhesive Debonding of Sylgard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Ralph Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-14

    This report begins with a brief summary of the range of modeling methods used to simulate adhesive debonding. Then the mechanical simulation of the blister debonding test, and the thermomechanical simulation of the potted hemisphere problem are described. For both simulations, details of the chosen modeling techniques, and the reasons for choosing them (and rejecting alternate modeling approaches) will be discussed.

  2. Sodium hypochlorite as dentin pretreatment for etch-and-rinse single-bottle and two-step self-etching adhesives: atomic force microscope and tensile bond strength evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Amr S; Amer, Mohamed A; El-Askary, Farid S

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of using 5.25% commercial sodium hypochlorite treatment prior to the application of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives on dentin surface microtopography and tensile bond strength. Thirty-two noncarious, nonrestored human third molars were collected. The occlusal enamel of all teeth was removed using diamond disks to expose flat dentin surfaces. The exposed dentin surfaces were abraded using 600-grit SiC disks, to create a uniform dentin smear layer. For AFM characterization, 12 teeth were equally divided into 4 groups according to the proposed dentin surface treatment. Three dentin disks, 2 mm thick, were evaluated per group using tapping mode assessment. Twenty teeth were used for TBS and SEM evaluation and were equally divided into 4 groups, according to the proposed dentin surface treatment. For TBS, 8 dentin/composite slabs, 2 mm thick, were used in each group, while for SEM evaluation 2 slabs were used. Each slab was tested in tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred. The samples were examined using SEM operated at 30 kv to evaluate the hybrid layer photographically at 1500X. Statistical analysis was carried out using StatsDirect 2.5.7. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer multiple-comparison post-hoc tests were performed to test the difference between roughness parameters and TBS between groups. Sodium hypochlorite followed by the application of 37% phosphoric acid significantly increased the arithmetic average of the absolute values of surface height deviations (Sa), the surface area ratio which expresses the ratio between the surface area (taking the z height into account) and the area of the flat x,y plane (Sdr), and the surface bearing index (Sbi) parameters, while the application of sodium hypochlorite prior to the application of the self-etching primer significantly increased the valley fluid retention index (Svi) parameter. Self-etching primer without sodium hypochlorite

  3. Comparing the effect of a desensitizing material and a self-etch adhesive on dentin sensitivity after periodontal surgery: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Hila; Nemati-Karimooy, Atefeh; Majidinia, Sara; Moeintaghavi, Amir; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh

    2017-08-01

    This double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluated the ability of a desensitizing agent and a self-etch adhesive on cervical dentin sensitivity (CDS) after periodontal surgery. Ninety hypersensitive teeth of 13 subjects were included in the study. After periodontal surgery, the teeth of each posterior sextant treated with one of the following materials: G1: Clearfil S(3) Bond (Kuraray Dental), G2: Gluma Desensitizer (Heraeus Kulzer), and G3: placebo (water). The sensitivity was assessed using evaporative stimuli before treatment (baseline, T0), 1 day after treatment (T1), after 1 week (T2), and after 1 month (T3) according to visual analog scale (VAS). Following the treatment, all the 3 groups showed significant reduction of CDS in T1 compared to T0. Reduction of CDS between T1 and T2 was observed only in G1 but there was no significant difference between T2 and T3 in this group. Although we observed a significant difference in T3 compared to T1 and T2 in G2 and G3, comparison of treatment groups in each assessment time showed a significant difference only in T3. According to paired comparison, this was due to the difference between G2 and G3. Dentin sensitivity following periodontal surgery will decrease spontaneously over time, but treating the sensitive teeth with Gluma Desensitizer and Clearfil S(3) Bond can have some benefits.

  4. Water interaction and bond strength to dentin of dye-labelled adhesive as a function of the addition of rhodamine B

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, Linda; BIM, Odair; LOPES, Adolfo Coelho de Oliveira; FRANCISCONI-DOS-RIOS, Luciana Fávaro; MAENOSONO, Rafael Massunari; D’ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study investigated the effect of the fluorescent dye rhodamine B (RB) for interfacial micromorphology analysis of dental composite restorations on water sorption/solubility (WS/WSL) and microtensile bond strength to dentin (µTBS) of a 3-step total etch and a 2-step self-etch adhesive system. Material and Methods The adhesives Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE) were mixed with 0.1 mg/mL of RB. For the WS/WSL tests, cured resin disks (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm thick) were prepared and assigned into four groups (n=10): MP, MP-RB, SE, and SE-RB. For µTBS assessment, extracted human third molars (n=40) had the flat occlusal dentin prepared and assigned into the same experimental groups (n=10). After the bonding and restoration procedures, specimens were sectioned in rectangular beams, stored in water and tested after seven days or after 12 months. The failure mode of fractured specimens was qualitatively evaluated under optical microscope (x40). Data from WS/WSL and µTBS were assessed by one-way and three-way ANOVA, respectively, and Tukey’s test (α=5%). Results RB increased the WSL of MP and SE. On the other hand, WS of both MP and SE was not affected by the addition of RB. No significance in µTBS between MP and MP-RB for seven days or one year was observed, whereas for SE a decrease in the µTBS means occurred in both storage times. Conclusions RB should be incorporated into non-simplified DBSs with caution, as it can interfere with their physical-mechanical properties, leading to a possible misinterpretation of bonded interface. PMID:27556201

  5. Adhesive joint and composites modeling in SIERRA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yuki; Brown, Arthur A.; Hammerand, Daniel Carl; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Chambers, Robert S.; Foulk, James W., III (.,; )

    2005-11-01

    Polymers and fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites play an important role in many Defense Program applications. Recently an advanced nonlinear viscoelastic model for polymers has been developed and incorporated into ADAGIO, Sandia's SIERRA-based quasi-static analysis code. Standard linear elastic shell and continuum models for fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix composites have also been added to ADAGIO. This report details the use of these models for advanced adhesive joint and composites simulations carried out as part of an Advanced Simulation and Computing Advanced Deployment (ASC AD) project. More specifically, the thermo-mechanical response of an adhesive joint when loaded during repeated thermal cycling is simulated, the response of some composite rings under internal pressurization is calculated, and the performance of a composite container subjected to internal pressurization, thermal loading, and distributed mechanical loading is determined. Finally, general comparisons between the continuum and shell element approaches for modeling composites using ADAGIO are given.

  6. Resistência de união à dentina de quatro sistemas adesivos Bond strength of four adhesive systems to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Rocha de Oliveira Carrilho

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a resistência adesiva de quatro sistemas adesivos, composicionalmente diferentes, aplicados à dentina humana. Doze dentes terceiros molares humanos tiveram o esmalte oclusal removido para exposição de uma superfície plana de dentina, na qual foram realizados os procedimentos de adesão. Os dentes foram aleatoriamente divididos em quatro grupos, considerando-se o sistema adesivo e a resina composta a serem empregados: Grupo 1 - Single Bond + P60 (SB; Grupo 2 - Bond 1 + Surefil (B1; Grupo 3 - Prime & Bond NT + Alert (NT e Grupo 4 - Prime & Bond 2.1 + TPH (2.1. Após 24 h de armazenagem em água destilada a 37ºC, os dentes foram seccionados, longitudinalmente, em cortes perpendiculares entre si, para que fossem obtidos espécimes em formato de um paralelogramo com secção transversal retangular de 0,8 mm² de área e 10 mm de comprimento, em média. Os espécimes foram submetidos ao teste de microtração. A análise de variância (alfa = 0,05 demonstrou não haver diferença significante entre os valores médios de resistência obtidos pelos quatro adesivos, embora a análise dos espécimes que sofreram fratura precoce tenha evidenciado menor sensibilidade para o sistema SB.The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the bond strength of four adhesive systems to dentin. Twelve human third molars had their occlusal enamel removed in order to expose a flat dentinal surface, on which the adhesive procedures were carried out. The teeth were divided into four groups, according to the employed adhesive system and composite resin: Group 1 - Single Bond + P60 (SB; Group 2 - Bond 1 + Surefil (B1; Group 3 - Prime & Bond NT + Alert (NT; and Group 4 - Prime & Bond 2.1 + TPH (2.1. After 24 h in distilled water at 37ºC, the teeth were longitudinally sectioned in two perpendicular directions in order to obtain parallelogram-shaped specimens with a cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm² and 10 mm of length, on the

  7. The effects of dentin bonding agents on micro-tensile dentin bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements and RMGIC%粘接处理剂对自粘接树脂水门汀和RMGIC的牙本质粘接强度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣桂红; 傅柏平

    2012-01-01

    目的:实验评价牙本质粘接处理剂对自粘接树脂水门汀和树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀(RMGIC)的牙本质微拉伸粘接强度的影响.方法:选用离体人无龋第三恒磨牙24颗,用低速切片机垂直于牙体长轴方向将磨牙冠(牙合)中1/3交界线处切开待用.实验组牙本质表面涂布牙本质粘接处理剂,对照组不涂粘接处理剂.后将试样分别用自粘接树脂水门汀(Unicem,3M ESPE;seT PP,SDI)或树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀(Fuji CEM,GC)原位对位粘接.水浴中储存24h后,用低速切片机把样本切割成约1mm×1mm×8mm条状,随后进行微拉伸测试.用扫描电镜观察粘接界面形貌.结果:无论是否使用粘接处理剂,Unicem的牙本质粘接强度显著高于seT PP 和Fuji CEM(P <0.01).与对照组相比,实验组的粘接强度显著提高(P <0.05).结论:粘接处理剂表面处理增强自粘接树脂水门汀及树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀的牙本质粘接强度.%Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dentin bonding agents on the micro-tensile dentin bond strengths (mTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). Methods: Twenty-four non-carious humane third molars were used for the study. The crowns were cut into two with a low-speed saw (Isomet) along the line between occlusal one third and middle one third of crowns, perpendicularly to tooth long axis in order to expose the dentin surfaces of both sectioned sides. The sectioned dentin surfaces were treated with or without dentin primer (control). Subsequently, the sectioned dentin surfaces were glued together in situ either with one of two resin cements (Unicem, 3M ESPE; seT PP, SDI) or with RMGIC (Fuji CEM; GC). After 24h water storage, all specimens were sectioned into beams about 1 × 1 × 8mm consistently with the axis of the teeth, followed by μTBS tests with micro-tensile tester. The micro-morphologies of the debonded cement-dentin

  8. Effect of dentin roughness on the adhesive performance in non-carious cervical lesions: a double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, Alessandro D; Luque-Martinez, Issis Virginia; Fuentes, S; Reis, Alessandra; Muñoz, Miguel Angel

    2017-09-26

    This double-blind randomized clinical trial evaluates the influence of dentin roughening (RO) on the clinical behavior of a new universal multi-mode adhesive (Tetric N-Bond Universal; Ivoclar-Vivadent) applied as self-etch and as etch-and-rinse in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). A total of 192 restorations were randomly placed in 48 patients according to the following groups: ER - Etch-and-rinse (no preparation); SE - self-etch (no preparation); ER+RO and; SE+RO. The resin composite Empress Direct (Ivoclar-Vivadent) was placed incrementally. The restorations were evaluated after one week (baseline), 6 and 18 months, using the FDI and USPHS criteria. Statistical analyses were performed using appropriate tests (α=0.05). Fifteen restorations were lost at 18 months (3 for SE, 2 for ER, 5 for SE+RO and 5 for ER+RO) (p >0.05 between groups). Post-operative sensitivity wasn't observed in any of the recall periods. Eighty-four restorations were considered to have minor discrepancies in marginal adaptation at the 18-month recall using the FDI criteria (24 for SE, 18 for ER, 22 for SE+RO and 20 for ER+RO; p >0.05 between groups). Nineteen restorations were considered to have minor discrepancies in marginal discoloration at the 18-month recall (10 for SE, 03 for ER, 05 for SE+RO and 01 for ER+RO; p >0.05 between groups). The dentin roughening before application of Tetric N-Bond Universal as self-etch and etch-and-rinse didn't affect the clinical behavior of composite restorations placed in NCCLs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of a re‑wetting agent on bond strength of an adhesive to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-29

    Nov 29, 2014 ... adhesive to primary and permanent teeth dentin after different etching ... be dried without drying dentin to regulate the ideal amount of moisture ..... Swift EJ Jr. Dentin/enamel adhesives: Review of the literature. Pediatr Dent.

  10. Characterization of hydrophilic-rich phase mimic in dentin adhesive and computer-aided molecular design of water compatible visible light initiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, Farhana

    The clinical lifetime of moderate-to-large dental composite restorations is lower than dental amalgam restorations. With the imminent and significant reduction in the use and availability of dental amalgam, the application of composite for the restoration of teeth will increase. Since composite has a higher failure rate, the increased use of composite will translate to an increase in the frequency of dental restoration replacement, overall cost for dental health and discomfort for patients. The composite is too viscous to bond directly to the tooth and thus, a low viscosity adhesive is used to form the bond between the composite and tooth. The bond at the adhesive/tooth is intended to form an impervious seal that protects the restored tooth from acids, oral fluids and bacteria that will undermine the composite restoration. The integrity of the adhesive/tooth bond (the exposed tooth structure is largely composed of enamel and dentin) plays an important role in preventing secondary caries which undermine the composite restoration. This study focuses on the durability of etch-and-rinse dental adhesives. As the adhesive infiltrates the demineralized dentin matrix, it undergoes phase separation into hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases. The hydrophilic-rich phase contains the conventional hydrophobic photo-initiator system (camphorquinone/ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate) and cross-linker both in inadequate concentrations. This may compromise the polymerization reaction and the cross-linking density of this phase, making it vulnerable to failure. The goal of this study is to characterize the hydrophilic-rich phase of the dental adhesive by monitoring its polymerization kinetics and glass transition temperature under the presence of an iodonium salt (reaction accelerator), and varying water concentration, photo-initiator concentration and light intensity. The final goal is to develop a computational framework for designing water compatible visible light

  11. Adhesive contact:from atomistic model to continuum model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Kang-Qi; Jia Jian-Yuan; Zhu Ying-Min; Zhang Xiu-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Two types of Lennard-Jones potential are widely used in modeling adhesive contacts. However, the relationships between the parameters of the two types of Lennard-Jones potential are not well defined. This paper employs a selfconsistent method to derive the Lennard-Jones surface force law from the interatomic Lennard-Jones potential with emphasis on the relationships between the parameters. The effect of using correct parameters in the adhesion models is demonstrated in single sphere-flat contact via continuum models and an atomistic model. Furthermore, the adhesion hysteresis behaviour is investigated, and the S-shaped force-distance relation is revealed by the atomistic model. It shows that the adhesion hysteresis loop is generated by the jump-to-contact and jump-off-contact, which are illustrated by the S-shaped force-distance curve.

  12. 渗透树脂与牙本质直接粘接的体外研究%Adhesive performance of infiltrating resin bonded on dentin in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐仁韬; 冯琳; 高学军

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the adhesive interface and micro-tensile bond strength(μTBS) of infiltrating resin directly bonded to normal dentin.Methods Twenty extracted human molars were collected and ground to expose fresh dentin surface.An infiltrating resin(ICON,DMG,Germany) was served as experimental group and Clearfil SE Bond adhesive(Kuraray,Japan) as control group.Following the application of primer(Kuraray,Japan),the specimens were applied infiltrating resin or adhesive respectively and blocks of composite resin were built up.The adhesive interfaces were observed using scanning electron microscope(SEM) and the μTBS was measured by micro-tensile test before and after thermal cycling.Results The infiltrating resin could penetrate into micro-structure of dentin created by SE Bond primer.A layer of about 180 μm-long and dense resin tags was observed under SEM in infiltrating resin group.The μTBSs were (35± 10) MPa before and (35±9) MPa after thermal cycling respectively in infiltrating resin group,and the difference was not statistically significant(P>0.05).The μTBSs were (38±8) MPa before and (24±7) MPa after thermal cycling respectively in control group,and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).After thermal cycling,the μTBS of infiltrating resin group was significant higher than that of control group.Conclusions The infiltrating resin could penetrate into the micro-structure of dentin created by SE Bond primer.The bond strength and the bonding durability of infiltrating resin were similar to that of SE Bond adhesive.%目的 研究渗透树脂与牙本质直接粘接的微观形态及微拉伸强度,为临床应用提供参考.方法 选取20颗新鲜离体牙,磨除表面釉质和部分牙本质,将渗透树脂(ICON infiltrate,DMG,德国)与牙本质和复合树脂直接粘接制备树脂-牙块(渗透树脂组),对照组粘接剂为自酸蚀粘接剂(Clearfil SE Bond adhesive,Kuraray,日本),每组10个树脂-牙块.

  13. Aspectos prácticos de la adhesión a dentina Practical aspects in dentinal adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Martín Hernández

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Aunque los sistemas adhesivos han mejorado notablemente, los objetivos que persiguen los nuevos adhesivos son los mismos que perseguían en tiempos de Buonocore. La adhesión debe ser duradera y conseguir siempre que sea posible una interfase cerrada con un sellado perfecto. Se analizan los cuatro aspectos principales que describen una correcta adhesión: Acondicionamiento del substrato, el desarrollo de nuevos adhesivos y técnicas, mecanismos de unión (capa híbrida y tags de resina, resina y su polimerización, sobre todo teniendo en cuenta la contracción de polimerización.Although, adhesive systems have improve, objectives of new adhesives continue being the same that Buonocore described. Adhesion must be long-Iasting and get a c10sed interface with perfect sealing. We analyse four main principies that describe adhesion: Substrate conditioning, the development of new adhesive systems and techniques, union mechanisms (hybrid layer and resin tags, resin and it's polymerisation, taking special attention to resin shrinkage.

  14. Dental adhesion: mechanism, techniques and durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuja, N; Nagpal, R; Pandit, I K

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary dental adhesives show favorable immediate results in terms of bonding effectiveness. However, the durability of resin-dentin bonds is their major problem. It appears that simplification of adhesive techniques is rather detrimental to the long-term stability of resin-tooth interface. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure, the dentinal fluid flow and the increased dentinal wetness in vital dentin can affect the intimate interaction of certain dentin adhesives with dentinal tissue. Bond degradation occurs via water sorption, hydrolysis of ester linkages of methacrylate resins, and activation of endogenous dentin matrix metalloproteinases. The three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives still remain the gold standard in terms of durability. This review discusses the fundamental process of adhesion to enamel and dentin with different adhesive techniques, factors affecting the long-term bonding performance of modern adhesives and addresses the current perspectives for improving bond durability.

  15. Evaluation of Osteoconductive and Osteogenic Potential of a Dentin-Based Bone Substitute Using a Calvarial Defect Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the osteoconductive and osteogenic properties of processed bovine dentin using a robust rabbit calvarial defect model. In total, 16 New Zealand White rabbits were operated to create three circular defects in the calvaria. One defect was left unfilled, one filled with collected autogenous bone, and the third defect was filled with the dentin-based bone substitute. Following surgery and after a healing period of either 1 or 6 weeks, a CT scan was obtained. Following sacrificing, the tissues were processed for histological examination. The CT data showed the density in the area grafted with the dentin-based material was higher than the surrounding bone and the areas grafted with autologous bone after 1 week and 6 weeks of healing. The area left unfilled remained an empty defect after 1 week and 6 weeks. Histological examination of the defects filled with the dentin product after 6 weeks showed soft tissue encapsulation around the dentin particles. It can be concluded that the rabbit calvarial model used in this study is a robust model for the assessment of bone materials. Bovine dentin is a biostable material; however, it may not be suitable for repairing large 4-wall defects.

  16. Effectiveness of simplified dentin bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T; Itoh, K; Tani, C; Manabe, A; Yamashita, T; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S

    1998-03-01

    The effectiveness of newly developed commercial dentin bonding systems (SB, MB II and KB) was evaluated by measuring the contraction gap width of a resin composite restored into a cylindrical dentin cavity prepared in an extracted human molar and by measuring the tensile bond strength to the flat dentin surface. In addition, calcium loss during dentin conditioning was analyzed using electron microanalyses. An experimental dentin bonding system composed of EDTA conditioning, GM solution priming and a bonding agent containing 10-MDP was employed as a control in which it was presumed that contraction gap formation was prevented completely. However, gap formation was observed using the three commercial simplified dentin bonding systems. SEM observation showed that the gap was formed between the resin composite and the top surface of the dentin cavity wall indicating that the fracture occurred at the adhesive interface, but never inside the dentin nor inside the resin composite.

  17. Adaptation of adhesive post and cores to dentin after in vitro occlusal loading: evaluation of post material influence

    OpenAIRE

    Dietschi, Didier; Ardu, Stefano; Rossier-Gerber, Anne; Krejci, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Fatigue resistance of post and cores is critical to the long term behavior of restored nonvital teeth. The purpose of this in vitro trial was to evaluate the influence of the post material's physical properties on the adaptation of adhesive post and core restorations after cyclic mechanical loading.

  18. Evaluation of the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system self-etching in dentin irradiated with Er:YAG laser; Avaliacao da resistencia a tracao de um sistema adesivo self-etching em dentina irradiada com Er:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Andrea Malluf Dabul de

    2000-07-01

    Since Buonocore (1955), several researchers have been seeking for the best adhesive system and treatment for the enamel and dentin surfaces. The use of the acid has been presented as one of the best techniques of dentin conditioning , because this promotes the removal of the 'smear layer and exhibition of dentinal structure, for a best penetration and micro- retention of the adhesive system. However, some conditioning methods have been appearing in the literature, for the substitution or interaction with the acid substances, as the laser. The objective of this work is to evaluate the tensile bond strength of the adhesive system self-etching' associated to a composed resin, in dentin surfaces conditioned with the Er:YAG laser. For this study, freshly extracted human teeth were used and in each one the dentinal surfaces , which were treated with three sandpapers of different granulations (120,400,600), to obtain a standard of the smear layer, before the irradiation of the laser and of the restoring procedure. After these procedures the specimens were storage in distilled water at 37 deg C for 24 hours. Soon after, they were submitted to the tensile strength test .After analyzing the results, we can concluded that the use of the Er:YAG laser can substitute the drill without the need of conditioning, when using the adhesive system 'self-etching' in the dentinal surfaces because there was a decline in the strength of adhesion in the groups conditioned with the laser. (author)

  19. Direct pulp capping effect with experimentally developed adhesive resin systems containing reparative dentin-promoting agents on rat pulp: mixed amounts of additives and their effect on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yoshihisa; Shinkai, Koichi; Suzuki, Masaya; Kato, Chikage; Katoh, Yoshiroh

    2011-07-01

    This study examined the wound-healing process of exposed rat pulp when treated with experimental adhesive resin systems. The experimental direct pulp capping adhesive resin systems were composed of primer-I, primer-II and an experimental bonding agent. Primer-I was Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) primer containing 1.0 or 5.0 wt% CaCl(2), and primer-II was CSE primer containing 0.1, 1.0 or 5.0 wt% compound of equal mole of pA and pB with synthetic peptides derived from dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1). Primer-I containing 1.0 and 5.0 wt% CaCl(2) was assigned to the experimental groups 1-3 and 4-6, respectively. Primer-II containing 0.1, 1.0 or 5.0 wt% compound of pA and pB was assigned to the experimental groups 1 and 4, 2 and 5, and 3 and 6, respectively. In all experimental groups, CSE bond containing 10 wt% hydroxyapatite powder was used as the experimental bonding agent. The positive control teeth were capped with calcium hydroxide preparation (Dycal), and the negative control teeth were capped with CSE. The specimens were alternately stained with Mayer's H&E and the enhanced polymer one-step staining methods. Experimental groups 1, 4, 5 and 6 showed a higher level of reparative dentin formation compared to the negative control 14 days postoperatively. At 28 days postoperatively, all experimental groups showed the formation of extensive reparative dentin, and experimental groups 4, 5 and 6 demonstrated similar dentin bridge formation as that of the positive control. How quickly reparative dentin formation occurs may depend on the concentration of CaCl(2) and the compound of pA and pB in the experimental primer.

  20. 评价新型粘接剂在不同粘接模式下的牙本质粘接性能%Evaluation of the dentin bonding property of a novel universal adhesive under different adhesive modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俐; 王朝阳

    2016-01-01

    目的:评价1种新型单瓶型多模式粘接剂在不同粘接模式下与牙本质的粘接强度和粘接耐久性。方法制作3组牙本质/复合树脂粘接试件,其中每组牙本质在粘接前接受不同的表面调节。包括不处理(空白对照),Singlebond Universal粘接剂自酸蚀模式下调节牙本质,Singlebond Universal粘接剂在酸蚀冲洗模式下调节牙本质。测量各组粘接试件水储24 h和180 d的微拉伸粘接强度值并进行统计分析。以扫描电子显微镜观察各组试件的粘接界面。结果不论老化前还是老化后,3组间的粘接强度均存在显著性差异,其中空白组的粘接强度值最低,另两组间则无显著性差异。人工老化使空白组的粘接强度值显著下降,而对另两组则并无显著影响。结论 Singlebond Universal粘接剂在自酸蚀粘接模式和酸蚀冲洗粘接模式下均能够形成与牙本质良好的粘接。%s: Objective To evaluate the dentin bonding strength and durability of a novel universal adhesive used in self⁃etch mode and etching⁃rinsing mode. Methods Three groups of dentin/composite resin bonding specimens were prepared, which received three kinds of dentin conditioning, including no treatment (control), Singlebond Universal in self⁃etch mode and in etching⁃rinsing mode. Micro tensile bond strength ( MTBS) after 24 hours’ and 180 days’ water storage was tested. The three different dentin/composite resin bonding interfaces were observed by a scanning electron microscope. Results Statistical differences existed in the bonding strength a⁃mong three groups both before and after aging, and the control group demonstrated the lowest bonding strength, while the other groups showed no significant differences. Artificial aging significantly decreased the bonding strength of the control group, while it exerted no effect on the other two groups. Conclusion Application of Singlebond Universal can demonstrate

  1. Impact of Dilution and Polymerization on Cytotoxicity of Dentin Adhesives to Human Gingival Fibroblasts: Early Exposure Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banava, Sepideh; Najibfard, Kaveh; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dilution and curing methods of an etch-and-rinse adhesive and a self-etching primer from the same manufacturer at early exposure time on cytotoxicity of primary human gingival fibroblasts. Materials and methods. Primary human gingival fibroblasts were exposed to different dilutions of Adper Single Bond (ASB) and Adper Prompt L-Pop (APL) (3M ESPE, USA). They were evaluated in unpolymerized mode for 20 s, 5 min and 24 h and in polymerized mode for 24 h and 48 h. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using three cytotoxic tests (MTT, cell counting and DNA condensation). Data was analyzed by a one-way ANOVA and Post Hoc Tukey HSD test. Results. Cytotoxicity tests revealed that unpolymerized APL was more cytotoxic compared to ASB after 20 s (Pcytotoxic than APL with lower dilutions. Polymerized ASB was more toxic than APL. Conclusion. Both adhesives were cytotoxic in different dilutions, times and curing modes. Cytotoxicity of the unpolymerized self-etching primer (APL) was more than etch-and-rinse adhesive (ASB) in 20 s, which is important clinically and dentists should be aware of the harmful effects and try to minimize it by curing and rinsing soon after composite resin insertion. ASB was more cytotoxic at 5 min and 24h.

  2. Validation of a Cariogenic Biofilm Model to Evaluate the Effect of Fluoride on Enamel and Root Dentine Demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Constanza E; Tenuta, Livia M A; Cury, Jaime A

    2016-01-01

    Due to gingival recession both enamel and root dentine are at risk of developing caries. Both tissues are exposed to a similar environment, however there is not a validated model to evaluate the effect of fluoride on these dental substrates simultaneously. Hence, this study aimed to validate a caries model to evaluate the effect of fluoride to prevent demineralization on enamel and root-dentine. Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms were formed on saliva-coated bovine enamel and root dentine slabs (n = 12 per group) mounted in the same well of culture plates. The biofilms were exposed 8×/day to 10% sucrose and treated 2×/day with fluoridated solutions containing 0, 150, 450, or 1,350 ppm F; thus, simulating the use of low to high fluoride concentration toothpastes. The pH values of the culture medium was monitored 2×/day as a biofilm acidogenicity indicator. After 96 h, biofilms were collected for fluoride concentration analysis. The percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL) was calculated for slabs. The fluoride uptake by the enamel and dentine was also determined. The model showed a dose-response because the biofilm and fluoride uptake increased and %SHL decreased at increasing fluoride concentrations (p enamel. With the same fluoride concentration treatment, the percentage of reduction of demineralization was lower for dentine than for enamel. In conclusion, the model was validated in terms of a dose-response effect of fluoride on enamel and root dentine. Furthermore, the findings support the clinical data, suggesting that higher fluoride concentrations are necessary to control caries of root dentine than of enamel.

  3. Effect of EDTA Pretreatment on Bond Strength of the Adhesives to Sclerotic Dentin%EDTA预处理硬化牙本质对树脂粘结强度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康钧棠; 李婷婷; 夏文薇

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the micro-tensile bond strength(μTBS) of adhesives to sclerotic dentin in non - carious cervical lesions pretreated with EDTA(Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetie Acid). Methods: The anterior teeth and premolars with non-carious typical cervical lesions which extracted for periodontitis were collected. The cervical lesions of 12 teeth were sound dentin, and the other 12 were of scale Ⅲ sclerotic dentin. All the teeth were cut into two parts longitudinal to the cervical lesions and then were randomized into 4 groups respectively; Group A (control group of sclerotic dentin), Group B(test group of sclerotic dentin). Group C(control group of sound dentin) and Group D(test group of sound dentin). The surfaces of cervical lesions in Group B and D were pretreated by EDTA. Then the cervical lesions were resin-restored with a self-etching adhesive.μTBS of four groups were measured. Rusolte: μTBS of group A, B, C, D was 9. 49±2. 23Mpa, 0. 50±2. 16Mpa, 0. 89±4. 76Mpa and 10. 99 ±5.21Mpa. The mean bond strength of group B was significantly higher than group A. There were no statistics differences between group C and D. Conclusion; The bond strength of sclerotic dentin is effectively enhanced by pretreated with EDTA before self-etching adhesive, but it doesn't work in sound dentin.%目的:采用微拉伸试验比较EDTA(Ethylene Diamine Tetraacetie Acid,乙二胺四乙酸)预处理硬化牙本质前后的离体牙树脂粘结强度.方法:选择24颗具有典型楔状缺损的离体牙,12颗离体牙的楔状缺损处为Ⅲ级以上硬化牙本质,其余12颗为正常牙本质.以平分楔状缺损为标准对离体牙进行纵剖,随机分为硬化牙本质对照组A与实验组B;正常牙本质对照组C与实验组D.实验组均使用EDTA(Glyde File Prep EDTA)预处理牙本质表面,再行自酸蚀树脂牯结.测定4组样本的微拉伸粘结强度.结果:微拉伸实验显示测得A、B、C、D,4组样本的微拉伸强度分别为(9,49±2,23)MPa

  4. Shear bond strength of dentin and deproteinized enamel of AI mouse incisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, M.K.; Ozer, F.; Mulmadgi, R.; Li, Y.; Suggs, C.; Wright, J.T.; Bartlett, J.D.; Gibson, C.W.; Lindemeyer, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the adhesion through shear bond strength (SBS) testing of a resin composite bonded with a self-etching bonding system (SEB) to amelogenesis imperfecta (AI)-affected deproteinized mouse enamel or dentin; and to compare wild-type (WT), amelogenin null (AmelxKO) and matrix metalloproteinase-20 null (Mmp20KO) enamel and dentin phenotypes using microCT and nanoindentation. Methods Enamel incisor surfaces of WT, AmelxKO and Mmp20KO mice were treated with SEB with and without NaOCl and tested for SBS. Incisor dentin was also treated with SEB and tested for SBS. These surfaces were further examined by SEM. MicroCT and nanoindentation analyses were performed on mouse dentin and enamel. Data were analyzed for significance by ANOVA. Results Deproteinization did not improve SBS of SEB to these AI-affected enamel surfaces. SBS of AmelxKO teeth was similar in dentin and enamel; however, it was higher in Mmp20KO dentin. The nanohardness of knockout enamel was significantly lower than WT, while knockout dentin nanohardness was not different from WT. Conclusions Using animal AI models, it was demonstrated that enamel NaOCl deproteinization of hypoplastic and hypoplastic-hypomaturation enamel did not increase shear bond strength while removal of the defective enamel allowed optimal dentin bonding. PMID:25303500

  5. Shear bond strength of dentin and deproteinized enamel of amelogenesis imperfecta mouse incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, Megan K; Ozer, Fusun; Mulmadgi, Raj; Li, Yong; Suggs, Cynthia; Wright, J Timothy; Bartlett, John D; Gibson, Carolyn W; Lindemeyer, Rochelle G

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate adhesion through shear bond strength (SBS) testing of a resin composite bonded with a self-etching bonding system (SEB) to amelogenesis imperfecta (AI)-affected deproteinized mouse enamel or dentin; and (2) compare wild-type (WT), amelogenin null (AmelxKO), and matrix metalloproteinase-20 null (Mmp20KO) enamel and dentin phenotypes using micro-CT and nanoindentation. Enamel incisor surfaces of WT, AmelxKO, and Mmp20KO mice were treated with SEB with and without sodium hypochlorite and tested for SBS. Incisor dentin was also treated with SEB and tested for SBS. These surfaces were further examined by scanning electron miscroscopy. Micro-CT and nanoindentation analyses were performed on mouse dentin and enamel. Data were analyzed for significance by analysis of variance. Deproteinization did not improve SBS of SEB to these AI-affected enamel surfaces. SBS of AmelxKO teeth was similar in dentin and enamel; however, it was higher in Mmp20KO dentin. The nanohardness of knockout enamel was significantly lower than WT, while knockout dentin nanohardness was not different from WT. Using animal amelogenesis imperfecta models, enamel sodium hypochlorite deproteinization of hypoplastic and hypoplastic-hypomaturation enamel did not increase shear bond strength, while removal of the defective enamel allowed optimal dentin bonding.

  6. Influence of irrigation sequence on the adhesion of root canal sealers to dentin: a fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and push-out bond strength analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Neelakantan; S. Sharma; H. Shemesh; P.R. Wesselink

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is a lack of evidence on the chemical interaction between sealers and dentin. The influence of irrigation on the chemical interaction between root canal sealers and dentin was analyzed by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) and measurement of dislocation resistan

  7. Effects of tooth quality, tooth structure, and cement mixing ratios on dental adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Hamandi, Rola Riad

    1995-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a number of bovine dentin specimens with the intent of understanding the effects of dentin quality and preparation on dentinal adhesion. Dentin quality was evaluated by measuring its wetting characteristics and hardness properties. The effects of chemical treatment, thermal dehydration and rehydration on dentin quality were examined. The contribution of enamel to adhesion was evaluated by comparing the adhesion of dentin samples that had the enamel...

  8. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  9. Microleakage of two self-adhesive cements in the enamel and dentin after 24 hours and two months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi Ansari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microleakage is a main cause of restorative treatment failure. In this study, we compared occlusal and cervical microleakage of two self-adhesive cements after 24 hours and two months.In this in-vitro experimental study, class II inlay cavities were prepared on 60 sound human third molars. Composite inlays were fabricated with Z100 composite resin. The teeth were randomly assigned to six groups. RelyX-Arc (control, RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem were used for the first three groups and specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The same cements were used for the remaining three groups, but the specimens were stored for 2 months. The teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles (5°C and 55°C and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours and then sectioned mesiodistally and dye penetration was evaluated in a class II cavity with occlusal and cervical margins using X20 magnification stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests.After 24 hours, cements had significant differences only in cervical margin microleakage (P=0.0001 and microleakage of RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem was significantly more than that of RelyX-Arc (both P=0.0001. Cervical microleakage in RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem was greater than occlusal (P=0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively. Microleakage was not significantly different between the occlusal and cervical margins after 2 months.Cervical microleakage was greater than occlusal in RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem after 24h. The greatest microleakage was reported for the cervical margin of RelyX-Unicem after 24 hours.

  10. Tensile bond strength of self-etching versus total-etching adhesive systems under different dentinal substrate conditions Resistência de união à tração de sistemas adesivos autocondicionantes versus de condicionamento total, em diferentes condições de substrato dentinário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Henrique Susin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of acid etchants to produce surface demineralization and collagen network exposure, allowing adhesive monomers interdiffusion and consequently the formation of a hybrid layer, has been considered the most efficient mechanism of dentin bonding. The aim of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength to dentin of three adhesive systems, two self-etching ones (Clearfil SE Bond - CSEB and One Up Bond F - OUBF and one total-etching one (Single Bond - SB, under three dentinal substrate conditions (wet, dry and re-wet. Ninety human, freshly extracted third molars were sectioned at the occlusal surface to remove enamel and to form a flat dentin wall. The specimens were restored with composite resin (Filtek Z250 and submitted to tensile bond strength testing (TBS in an MTS 810. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05. Wet dentin presented the highest TBS values for SB and CSEB. Dry dentin and re-wet produced significantly lower TBS values when using SB. OUBF was not affected by the different conditions of the dentin substrate, producing similar TBS values regardless of the surface pretreatments.O uso de condicionadores ácidos para desmineralizar a superfície dental e expor a rede de fibras colágenas para interdifusão dos monômeros adesivos e conseqüente formação da camada híbrida tem sido considerado o mais eficiente mecanismo de adesão dos agentes de união. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a resistência de união à dentina de três sistemas adesivos, dois autocondicionantes (Clearfil SE Bond - CSEB e One Up Bond F - OUBF e um de condicionamento total (Single Bond - SB, sob três diferentes condições de substrato dentinário (úmido, seco e reidratado. Noventa terceiros molares humanos recém-extraídos foram cortados na superfície oclusal, para se remover o esmalte e formar uma parede plana de dentina. Os espécimes foram restaurados com resina composta (Filtek Z250 e submetidos ao teste de

  11. Tough and tunable adhesion of hydrogels: experiments and models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Yuk, Hyunwoo; Lin, Shaoting; Parada, German A.; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2017-06-01

    As polymer networks infiltrated with water, hydrogels are major constituents of animal and plant bodies and have diverse engineering applications. While natural hydrogels can robustly adhere to other biological materials, such as bonding of tendons and cartilage on bones and adhesive plaques of mussels, it is challenging to achieve such tough adhesions between synthetic hydrogels and engineering materials. Recent experiments show that chemically anchoring long-chain polymer networks of tough synthetic hydrogels on solid surfaces create adhesions tougher than their natural counterparts, but the underlying mechanism has not been well understood. It is also challenging to tune systematically the adhesion of hydrogels on solids. Here, we provide a quantitative understanding of the mechanism for tough adhesions of hydrogels on solid materials via a combination of experiments, theory, and numerical simulations. Using a coupled cohesive-zone and Mullins-effect model validated by experiments, we reveal the interplays of intrinsic work of adhesion, interfacial strength, and energy dissipation in bulk hydrogels in order to achieve tough adhesions. We further show that hydrogel adhesion can be systematically tuned by tailoring the hydrogel geometry and silanization time of solid substrates, corresponding to the control of energy dissipation zone and intrinsic work of adhesion, respectively. The current work further provides a theoretical foundation for rational design of future biocompatible and underwater adhesives.

  12. Effect of phytic acid etchant on the structural stability of demineralized dentine and dentine bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Kalyan; Islam, Md Sofiqul; Nassar, Mohannad; Hiraishi, Noriko; Otsuki, Masayuki; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Tagami, Junji

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effect of phytic acid (IP6) in stabilizing the morphology of dentine collagen network and resin-dentine bonding. Dentine beams were fully demineralized with 10% phosphoric acid (PA) or 1% IP6 (pH 1.2). PA-demineralized beams were divided into three groups: (a) no further treatment (control), (b) treatment with 5% glutaraldehyde (GA) for 1 h and (c) treatment with 1% IP6 (pH 7) for 1 h. IP6-demineralized beams received no further treatment. The beams were then subjected to ultimate tensile strength (UTS) testing. Dentine micromorphology evaluation was performed using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Dentine disks were etched with 35% PA for 15 s or 1% IP6 for 30s. PA-etched dentine disks were divided into three groups as (a), (b) and (c) as for UTS testing, but the treatment with GA or IP6 was done in 1min. For microtensile bond strength (µTBS) testing, flat dentine surfaces etched with PA or IP6 were blot-dried (wet dentine) or air-dried for 10s (dry dentine) and bonded with an etch-and-rinse adhesive followed by composite build-up. IP6-demineralized dentine showed significantly higher UTS, when compared to PA-demineralized dentine. GA and IP6 significantly improved UTS of PA-demineralized dentine. FE-SEM observation revealed that dentine collagen network was preserved by GA and IP6. No significant difference in µTBS was found between the wet and dry IP6-etched dentine groups. IP6 etching showed a structural stabilizing effect on demineralized dentine matrix and produced good resin-dentine bonding, regardless of dentine moistness or dryness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Model System for Predicting Drug Penetration thru Decayed Dentin into Inflamed Pulps

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-09

    FOGEL, H.; MARSHALL, F.; and PASHLEY , D.; (1988): Effects of Distance from the Pulp and Thickness on the Hydraulic Conductance of Human Radicular Dentin ...559. PASHLEY , D.; THOMPSON, S.; and STEWART, F. (19 8 3 b): Dentin Permeability: Effects of Temperature on Hydraulic Conductance , J Dent Res 62(9...WALTON, R.; LIVINGSTON, M.; and PASHLEY , D. (1978): Dentin Permeability: Determinants of Hydraulic Conductance , J Dent Res 57(2): 187-193. ROBBINS, S

  14. Mineral density, morphology and bond strength of natural versus artificial caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joves, Gerardo José; Inoue, Go; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate an artificial caries-affected dentin (ACAD) model for in vitro bonding studies in comparison to natural caries-affected dentin (NCAD) of human teeth. ACAD was created over 7 days in a demineralizing solution. Mineral density (MD) at different depth levels (0-150 µm) was compared between NCAD and ACAD by transverse microradiography. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBS) of two two-step self-etch adhesives to sound dentin, NCAD and ACAD were evaluated. Caries-affected dentin type was not a significant factor when comparing MD at different lesion levels (p>0.05). Under SEM, the dentinal tubules appeared occluded with crystal logs 1-2 µm in thickness in the NCAD; whereas they remained open in the ACAD. The µTBS to caries-affected dentin was lower than sound dentin, but was not affected by the type of caries (p>0.05). In spite of their different morphologies, the ACAD model showed similar MD and µTBS compared to NCAD.

  15. Bonding ability of adhesive resins to caries-affected and caries-infected dentin Capacidade de união de resinas adesivas à dentina afetada e infectada por cárie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yoshiyama

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybridized dentin permits dental treatments that were previously impossible with conventional techniques, opening new frontiers in modern adhesive dentistry. We have investigated the adhesive property of current bonding systems to caries-infected dentin by a microtensile bond strength test (µTBS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and suggested that bonding resin could infiltrate into caries-infected dentin partially to embed carious bacteria within hybrid layers. We have named this concept of caries control as modified sealed restoration (MSR. On the other hand, Kuraray Medical Inc. (Tokyo, Japan has developed an antibacterial adhesive system (ABF, now marketed in USA as Protect Bond. So as to evaluate the effectiveness of ABF on root caries control, we have examine the microtensile bond strengths (µTBS of ABF to normal versus carious root dentin and the interfacial morphology by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM. ABF could form the hybrid-like structures by infiltrating into the surfaces of the root carious dentin, and the mean value of µTBS of ABF to root carious dentin was 23.0 MPa. These results suggested that MSR combined with ABF might be an advantageous minimal invasive therapy for root caries.As técnicas adesivas permitiram inovações nos tratamentos restauradores da atualidade. Este estudo investigou a qualidade de união de diferentes sistemas adesivos ao substrato dentinário afetado e infectado por cárie, através de testes de microtração e microscopia eletrônica de transmissão e varredura (MET. Os resultados sugerem que a resina adesiva pôde infiltrar na dentina infectada e envolver as bactérias na camada híbrida. Esse conceito de controle da cárie foi denominado de "Restauração-Selante Modificada" (RSM. Por outro lado, a empresa Kuraray Med. Inc .(Japão desenvolveu um sistema adesivo com propriedades anti-bacterianas (ABF, o qual é comercializado nos EUA como Protect Bond. Para avaliar a efetividade do

  16. Monomer-to-polymer conversion and micro-tensile bond strength to dentine of experimental and commercial adhesives containing diphenyl(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phosphine oxide or a camphorquinone/amine photo-initiator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletic, Vesna; Pongprueksa, Pong; De Munck, Jan; Brooks, Neil R; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2013-10-01

    To compare the degree of conversion (DC) of adhesives initiated by diphenyl(2,4,6-trimethylbenzoyl)phosphine oxide (TPO) or a camphorquinone/tertiary amine system (CQ/Amine) as well as their 'immediate' micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) to bur-cut dentine. DC of Scotchbond Universal ('SBU'; 3M ESPE), its experimental counterpart containing TPO as photo-initiator system, an experimental G-aenial Bond ('Ga-B'; GC) adhesive formulation, and an experimental LUB-102 adhesive formulation ('LUB', Kuraray Noritake), containing as photo-initiatior system either 2wt% CQ along with 2wt% tertiary amine ('SBU_CQ/Amine'; 'Ga-B_CQ/Amine'; 'LUB_CQ/Amine'), or 2wt% TPO ('SBU_TPO'; 'Ga-B_TPO'; 'LUB_TPO'), was determined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), after being cured with a dual-wavelength light-curing unit (bluephase 20i, Ivoclar Vivadent). The same adhesive formulations were applied to bur-cut mid-coronal dentine of intact human molars, and subjected to a μTBS test after 1-week water storage. Besides being applied following a self-etch (SE) application mode, the adhesive formulations SBU_CQ/Amine and SBU_TPO were also applied following an etch-and-rinse (E&R) mode, this both for DS and μTBS measurement. No significant difference in DC was found for any of the adhesive formulations, except for SBU_CQ/Amine_SE and SBU_TPO_SE. For both SBU formulations, a significantly higher DC was reached for the E&R than the SE approach. Regarding μTBS, no significant differences were recorded, except for the significantly higher μTBS measured for SBU_CQ/Amine_E&R and SBU_TPO_E&R. In self-etch adhesives, the photo-initiator TPO may be used instead of CQ/Amine. The curing and 'immediate' bonding efficiency depended on the application protocol (E&R versus SE), but not on the photo-initiator system. The photo-initiator TPO may be used in self-etch adhesives instead of CQ/Amine with similar curing and 'immediate' bonding efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  17. Evaluation of the Morphological Characteristics of Laser-Irradiated Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilaj, Bledar; Franz, Alexander; Degendorfer, Daniela; Moritz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different energy settings of Er:YAG laser irradiation on dentin surface morphology with respect to the number of opened dentinal tubules. Background data: An ideally prepared dentin surface with opened dentinal tubules is a prerequisite for adhesive fixation. No study, however, has yet compared the numbers of opened dentinal tubules with regard to statistical differences. Methods: Conventional preparations using a bur with or without additional acid etching acted as control groups. Dentin specimens were prepared from human third molars and randomly divided into eight groups according to the energy settings of the laser (1, 1.5, 4, 6, 7.5, and 8 W) and two controls (bur and bur plus acid etching). After surface preparation, dentin surfaces were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope, and the number of opened dentinal tubules in a defined area was counted. Results: The control groups showed smooth surfaces with (bur plus acid etching) and without opened dentinal tubules (bur), whereas all laser-irradiated surfaces showed rough surfaces. Using the energy setting of 4 W resulted in significantly more opened dentinal tubules than the conventional preparation technique using the bur with additional acid etching. In contrast, the energy setting of 8 W showed significantly fewer opened dentinal tubules, and also exhibited signs of thermal damage. Conclusions: The Er:YAG laser with an energy setting of 4 W generates a dentin surface with opened dentinal tubules, a prerequisite for adhesive fixation. PMID:26389986

  18. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Masoumeh; Fotouhi Ardakani, Faezeh; Javadi, Fatemeh; Khalili Sadrabad, Zahra; Shadkar, Zahra; Shadkar, Mohammad Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad) and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding). Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa). The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa). The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038). The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427 ± 1/79) and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85 ± 1/90) were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01). Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength.

  19. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Moslemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding. Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey’s test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa. The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa. The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038. The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427±1/79 and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85±1/90 were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01. Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength.

  20. 三种牙本质黏结剂从涂布到光固化挥发时间对其微拉伸强度的影响%Effects of Volatilization Time of Three Dentin Adhesives before Light Curing on Micro-tensile Bond Strength to Dentin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗璇; 张晓晞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop quantitative indicators for evaluating the effects of volatilization time of three dentin adhesive systems before light curing on microtensile bond strengths, and to provide a reference for clinical treatment. Methods The microtensile bond strengths of three different dentine adhesives(Gluma One-Bond, Single Bond and Clearfil SE Bond) were determined by microtensile bond test at 10,20,30,40 and 50 seconds after the application of adhesive coating. The interface of fractured bond was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results Microtensile bond strength at 10 seconds after adhesive coating was significantly lower than that at 20,30,40 and 50 seconds after adhesive coating for all three adhesives. The peak values of microtensile bond strength were obtained after 20 seconds and differences were not significant a-mong values after 20,30,40 and 50 seconds. SEM showed that occluding situations of dentinal tubules at 20,30,40 and 50 seconds after adhesive coating were better than those at 10 seconds after adhesive coating and Clearfil SE Bond specimens had better occluding situations than Gluma One-Bond and Single Bond specimens. Conclusions The desired dentin bond strength can be achieved by volatilization time of at least 20 seconds.%目的 比较和评价Gluma One-Bond (OB)、Single Bond (SB)和Clearfil SE Bond (SE)3种黏结剂从涂布到光固化挥发暴露时间对其微拉伸强度的影响,得出时间量化指标,为临床操作提供参考.方法 采用微拉伸强度测试法比较3种牙本质黏结剂(OB,SB和SE)分别涂布10,20,30,40和50 s后的微拉伸强度,并在扫描电镜下观察断面微观形态.结果 OB、SB和SE 10 s组的微拉伸强度值明显低于20 s组、30 s组、40 s组与50 s组,差异有统计学意义,20 s后微拉伸强度达峰值,之后结果保持稳定,后4组的微拉伸强度均值间无统计学意义.扫描电镜下观察发现,3种黏结剂的20 s组、30 s组、40 s组和50 s组牙本

  1. Degradation in the dentin-composite interface subjected to multi-species biofilm challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Carrera, C; Chen, R; Li, J; Lenton, P; Rudney, J D; Jones, R S; Aparicio, C; Fok, A

    2014-01-01

    Oral biofilms can degrade the components in dental resin-based composite restorations, thus compromising marginal integrity and leading to secondary caries. This study investigates the mechanical integrity of the dentin-composite interface challenged with multi-species oral biofilms. While most studies used single-species biofilms, the present study used a more realistic, diverse biofilm model produced directly from plaques collected from donors with a history of early childhood caries. Dentin-composite disks were made using bovine incisor roots filled with Z100(TM) or Filtek(TM) LS (3M ESPE). The disks were incubated for 72 h in paired CDC biofilm reactors, using a previously published protocol. One reactor was pulsed with sucrose, and the other was not. A sterile saliva-only control group was run with sucrose pulsing. The disks were fractured under diametral compression to evaluate their interfacial bond strength. The surface deformation of the disks was mapped using digital image correlation to ascertain the fracture origin. Fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to assess demineralization and interfacial degradation. Dentin demineralization was greater under sucrose-pulsed biofilms, as the pH dropped Biofilm growth with sucrose pulsing also caused preferential degradation of the composite-dentin interface, depending on the composite/adhesive system used. Specifically, Z100 specimens showed greater bond strength reduction and more frequent cohesive failure in the adhesive layer. This was attributed to the inferior dentin coverage by Z100 adhesive, which possibly led to a higher level of chemical and enzymatic degradation. The results suggested that factors other than dentin demineralization were also responsible for interfacial degradation. A clinically relevant in vitro biofilm model was therefore developed, which would effectively allow assessment of the degradation of the dentin

  2. Modeling and characterization of interfacial adhesion and fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qizhou

    2000-09-01

    The loss of interfacial adhesion is mostly seen in the failure of polymer adhesive joints. In addition to the intrinsic physical attraction across the interface, the interfacial adhesion strength is believed to highly depend on a number of factors, such as adhesive chemistry/structure, surface topology, fracture pattern, thermal and elastic mismatch across the interface. The fracture failure of an adhesive joint involves basically three aspects, namely, the intrinsic interfacial strength, the driving force for fracture and other energy dissipation. One may define the intrinsic interfacial strength as the maximum value of the intrinsic interfacial adhesion. The total work done by external forces to the component that contains the interface is partitioned into two parts. The first part is consumed by all other energy dissipation mechanisms (plasticity, heat generation, viscosity, etc.). The second part is used to debond the interface. This amount should equal to the intrinsic adhesion of the interface according to the laws of conservation of energy. It is clear that in order to understand the fundamental physics of adhesive joint failure, one must be able to characterize the intrinsic interfacial adhesion and be able to identify all the major energy dissipation mechanisms involved in the debonding process. In this study, both physical and chemical adhesion mechanisms were investigated for an aluminum-epoxy interface. The physical bonding energy was estimated by computing the Van de Waals forces across the interface. A hydration model was proposed and the associated chemical bonding energy was calculated through molecular simulations. Other energy dissipation mechanisms such as plasticity and thermal residual stresses were also identified and investigated for several four-point bend specimens. In particular, a micromechanics based model was developed to estimate the adhesion enhancement due to surface roughness. It is found that for this Al-epoxy system the major

  3. Probe Tack of Model Acrylic Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakrout, Hamed; Creton, Costantino; Ahn, Dongchan; Shull, Kenneth R.

    1998-03-01

    In a probe tack test, a flat punch comes in contact with a thin layer of elastomer deposited on a substrate. The punch is then removed from the substrate at a constant crosshead velocity. In these conditions, the adhesive layer is highly constrained and extensive cavitation will occur when a negative hydrostatic pressure is applied. Commercial latexes of Poly2-EthylHexyl Acrylate (PEHA) and homemade Polyn-ButylAcrylate have been tested and characterized by dynamic mechanical measurements. Tests have been performed using several temperatures and debonding rates. Stress vs. strain curves have been related to debonding mechanisms through video observation. For both of these acrylic adhesives, temperature and debonding rate have opposite effects on adhesion energy and maximum stress of debonding, behavior which is typical for a viscoelastic system. In case of the PEHA, the addition of 2.5% of acrylic acid did not affect the rheological properties. However the type of the fracture changed from cohesive to adhesive. Moreover the growth of the cavities changed from viscous fingering of few cavities to circular growth of numerous small cavities.

  4. Adhesion of perfume-filled microcapsules to model fabric surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanping; Bowen, James; Andrews, James W; Liu, Min; Smets, Johan; Zhang, Zhibing

    2014-01-01

    The retention and adhesion of melamine formaldehyde (MF) microcapsules on a model fabric surface in aqueous solution were investigated using a customised flow chamber technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A cellulose film was employed as a model fabric surface. Modification of the cellulose with chitosan was found to increase the retention and adhesion of microcapsules on the model fabric surface. The AFM force-displacement data reveal that bridging forces resulting from the extension of cellulose chains dominate the adhesion between the microcapsule and the unmodified cellulose film, whereas electrostatic attraction helps the microcapsules adhere to the chitosan-modified cellulose film. The correlation between results obtained using these two complementary techniques suggests that the flow chamber device can be potentially used for rapid screening of the effect of chemical modification on the adhesion of microparticles to surfaces, reducing the time required to achieve an optimal formulation.

  5. Bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems to enamel and dentin irradiated with a novel CO2 9.3 μm short-pulsed laser for dental restorative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, Peter; Bartolome, N; Kinsel, R; Vaderhobli, R; Rechmann, B M T

    2017-08-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of CO2 9.3 μm short-pulsed laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel and dentin. Two hundred enamel and 210 dentin samples were irradiated with a 9.3 µm carbon dioxide laser (Solea, Convergent Dental, Inc., Natick, MA) with energies which either enhanced caries resistance or were effective for ablation. OptiBond Solo Plus [OptiBondTE] (Kerr Corporation, Orange, CA) and Peak Universal Bond light-cured adhesive [PeakTE] (Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT) were used. In addition, Scotchbond Universal [ScotchbondSE] (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN) and Peak SE self-etching primer with Peak Universal Bond light-cured adhesive [PeakSE] (Ultradent Products) were tested. Clearfil APX (Kuraray, New York, NY) was bonded to the samples. After 24 h, a single plane shear bond test was performed. Using the caries preventive setting on enamel resulted in increased shear bond strength for all bonding agents except for self-etch PeakSE. The highest overall bond strength was seen with PeakTE (41.29 ± 6.04 MPa). Etch-and-rinse systems achieved higher bond strength values to ablated enamel than the self-etch systems did. PeakTE showed the highest shear bond strength with 35.22 ± 4.40 MPa. OptiBondTE reached 93.8% of its control value. The self-etch system PeakSE presented significantly lower bond strength. The shear bond strength to dentin ranged between 19.15 ± 3.49 MPa for OptiBondTE and 43.94 ± 6.47 MPa for PeakSE. Etch-and-rinse systems had consistently higher bond strength to CO2 9.3 µm laser-ablated enamel. Using the maximum recommended energy for dentin ablation, the self-etch system PeakSE reached the highest bond strength (43.9 ± 6.5 MPa).

  6. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Boukpessi; S. Menashi; L. Camoin; J.M. ten Cate; M. Goldberg; C. Chaussain-Miller

    2008-01-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecule

  7. Resin diffusion through demineralized dentin matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVALHO Ricardo M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has focused on the factors that may affect the permeability of adhesive resins into the demineralized dentin matrix during the development of the bonding process. The effects of surface moisture are discussed respectively to the adhesive systems, and the problems related to incomplete hybrid layer formation presented.

  8. Adhesion to model surfaces in a flow through system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habeger, C.F.; Linhart, R.V.; Adair, J.H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A hydrodynamic method for measuring the adhesion of particles to a surface has been designed. By using hydrodynamic flow to remove particles from a model surface, the adhesive strength of particles to the surface can be measured using a flow-through cell. The hydrodynamic force required to displace a particle is calculated using the cell dimensions and the flow rate in Poiseuille`s equation.

  9. Bond strength of seventh generation adhesives to normal and caries-affected dentine%第7代黏接剂与正常和龋损牙本质黏接强度的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王清; 邓婧; 范春

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Researchers in China and abroad have done a lot of experiments to study the bond strength of dentine adhesives from generation one to six,which have received satisfied results. However,there are still no reports about the bond strength of the seventh generation adhesive (Adper EasyTM one). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the bond strength of the Adper EasyTM one to normal dentine and caries-affected dentine,and to compare the results with total-etching adhesives. METHODS: A total of 12 healthy posterior teeth were randomly divided into group A and B; 12 posterior teeth with chronic occlusal caries were divided into group C and D. Adper EasyTM one was applied for group A and C,while Single bond 2 for group B and D. The modes of group A,B,C,D were subjected to microtensile bond strength test. Interfacial morphologies were analyzed by Stereo-Microscopy. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The microtensile bond strength of group A and B was (21.84±3.98),(27.10±4.85) MPa,which was (16.44±3.46) and (21.48±4.85) MPa in the group C and D. The differences between group A and B,group C and D,group A and C,as well as group B and D were statistical significant (P < 0.05). Failures mostly occur along the resin-dentine interface. The total-etching adhesives performed more effectively to both normal dentine and caries-affected dentine than Adper EasyTM one. For the same adhesive,the healthy dentine yielded higher bond strength than the caries-affected dentine.%背景:对于第1~6代牙本质黏接剂的黏接强度,内外学者做了大量的研究并取得了满意的成果,尚未见对第7代黏接剂Adper EasyTM one黏接性能的相关报道.目的:比较3M第7代自酸蚀黏接剂对正常和龋损牙本质黏接强度的差异,与传统全酸蚀黏接剂进行对比.方法:取健康磨牙和牙合面慢性龋磨牙各12颗,为A、B(健康磨牙),、D(牙合面慢性龋磨牙)4组,中A、C组用Adper EasyTM one黏接剂,、D组用Single bond 2黏接剂.测试4组试件的微

  10. Effect of immediate and delayed dentin sealing on the fracture strength, failure type and Weilbull characteristics of lithiumdisilicate laminate veneers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M.M.; Cune, Marco S.; de Roos, Joanne G.; Özcan, Mutlu

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Adhesion on dentin is less reliable than on enamel, which could affect the durability of laminate veneers (LV). Immediate dentin sealing (IDS) is suggested instead of delayed dentin sealing (DDS) to overcome hypersensitivity and prevent debonding from dentin. This study evaluated the eff

  11. Effect of immediate and delayed dentin sealing on the fracture strength, failure type and Weilbull characteristics of lithiumdisilicate laminate veneers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M.M.; Cune, Marco S.; de Roos, Joanne G.; Özcan, Mutlu

    OBJECTIVES: Adhesion on dentin is less reliable than on enamel, which could affect the durability of laminate veneers (LV). Immediate dentin sealing (IDS) is suggested instead of delayed dentin sealing (DDS) to overcome hypersensitivity and prevent debonding from dentin. This study evaluated the

  12. A three-species biofilm model for the evaluation of enamel and dentin demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Bertolini, Martinna Mendonça; da Silva, Wander José; Del-Bel-Cury, Altair Antoninha; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2014-01-01

    Although Streptococcus mutans biofilms have been useful for evaluating the cariogenic potential of dietary carbohydrates and the effects of fluoride on dental demineralization, a more appropriate biofilm should be developed to demonstrate the influence of other oral bacteria on cariogenic biofilms. This study describes the development and validation of a three-species biofilm model comprising Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Streptococcus gordonii for the evaluation of enamel and dentin demineralization after cariogenic challenges and fluoride exposure. Single- or three-species biofilms were developed on dental substrata for 96 h, and biofilms were exposed to feast and famine episodes. The three-species biofilm model produced a large biomass, mostly comprising S. mutans (41%) and S. gordonii (44%), and produced significant demineralization in the dental substrata, although enamel demineralization was decreased by fluoride treatment. The findings indicate that the three-species biofilm model may be useful for evaluating the cariogenic potential of dietary carbohydrates other than sucrose and determining the effects of fluoride on dental substrata.

  13. Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel-concrete interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Raous, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The interface behaviour between steel and concrete, during pull-out tests, is numerically investigated using an interface model coupling adhesion and Coulomb friction. This model, first developed by Raous, Cang\\'emi, Cocou and Monerie (RCCM), is based on the adhesion intensity variable, introduced by Fr\\'emond, which is a surface damage variable. The RCCM model is here completed by taking a variable friction coefficient to simulate the slip weakening of the interface when sliding occurs. Identification of the parameters and validation of the model are carried on pull out experiments conducted at the INSA of Toulouse on steel-concrete interface of reinforced concrete.

  14. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  15. Adhesion and cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fraunhofer, J Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  16. Adhesion and Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Anthony von Fraunhofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomena of adhesion and cohesion are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to dentistry. This review considers the forces involved in cohesion and adhesion together with the mechanisms of adhesion and the underlying molecular processes involved in bonding of dissimilar materials. The forces involved in surface tension, surface wetting, chemical adhesion, dispersive adhesion, diffusive adhesion, and mechanical adhesion are reviewed in detail and examples relevant to adhesive dentistry and bonding are given. Substrate surface chemistry and its influence on adhesion, together with the properties of adhesive materials, are evaluated. The underlying mechanisms involved in adhesion failure are covered. The relevance of the adhesion zone and its importance with regard to adhesive dentistry and bonding to enamel and dentin is discussed.

  17. Standardised Models for Inducing Experimental Peritoneal Adhesions in Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Kraemer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models for adhesion induction are heterogeneous and often poorly described. We compare and discuss different models to induce peritoneal adhesions in a randomized, experimental in vivo animal study with 72 female Wistar rats. Six different standardized techniques for peritoneal trauma were used: brushing of peritoneal sidewall and uterine horns (group 1, brushing of parietal peritoneum only (group 2, sharp excision of parietal peritoneum closed with interrupted sutures (group 3, ischemic buttons by grasping the parietal peritoneum and ligating the base with Vicryl suture (group 4, bipolar electrocoagulation of the peritoneum (group 5, and traumatisation by electrocoagulation followed by closure of the resulting peritoneal defect using Vicryl sutures (group 6. Upon second look, there were significant differences in the adhesion incidence between the groups (P<0.01. Analysis of the fraction of adhesions showed that groups 2 (0% and 5 (4% were significantly less than the other groups (P<0.01. Furthermore, group 6 (69% was significantly higher than group 1 (48% (P<0.05 and group 4 (47% (P<0.05. There was no difference between group 3 (60% and group 6 (P=0.2. From a clinical viewpoint, comparison of different electrocoagulation modes and pharmaceutical adhesion barriers is possible with standardised models.

  18. Bio-reconstruction of root canal using dentin post

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the successful management of complicated crown fracture of left maxillary central incisor (#21 of 23-year-old male using dentin (biological post made from human tooth. Endodontic treatment was initiated and sectional obturation was done using ProTaper gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. The coronal space was modified to receive a human dentin post. A two-step procedure comprising direct and indirect technique of post fabrication was done to achieve the accuracy of biological post. A maxillary cuspid from an institutional tooth bank was taken, sectioned mesiodistally using a diamond disc simulating the length and thickness of mock post. Dentin post was first verified on the plaster model and then cemented in tooth #21. Core build up was done with composite and porcelain fused to metal (PFM crown was luted. On the follow-up visits, patient was asymptomatic and radiographic evaluation revealed normal periradicular architecture. Biological posts may be good alternatives to conventional post systems as they preserve internal dentin walls, provide excellent adhesion, and resilience similar to natural tooth structure.

  19. Morphological effects of MMPs inhibitors on the dentin bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Li, He; Li, Tianbo; LI, XIUYING; Zhang, Zhimin; Li, Penglian; Li, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been studied extensively, and MMP inhibitors have been used as dental pretreatment agents prior to dentin bonding because they reduce collagen fiber degradation and improve bonding strength. However, morphologic characteristics of the collagen network after etching and of the post-adhesive dentin hybrid layers (DHL) after MMP inhibitors pretreatment have not been evaluated. Thus, we investigated demineralized dentin pretreated with chlorhexidine (CHX) and...

  20. Comparative evaluation of the effect of chlorhexidine and Aloe barbadensis Miller (Aloe vera on dentin stabilization using shear bond testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakshita Joy Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: CHX and A. barbadensis Miller, as pretreatment agents of acid demineralized dentin collagen, has no adverse effect on the immediate shear bond strength of a two-step etch and rinse adhesive to dentin.

  1. Adhesión a dentina afectada por caries y dentina esclerótica Adhesion to caries affected and sclerotic dentin

    OpenAIRE

    L. Ceballos García

    2004-01-01

    Se trata de formas de dentina alterada que son los substratos adhesivos más importantes clínicamente y menos receptivos a los tratamientos adhesivos que la dentina normal. Se describen la características histopatológicas y fisiológicas de: (1) dentina afectada por caries (ya sea en su capa superficial o en su capa profunda) y (2) dentina esclerótica. Se realiza una revisión de la literatura estudiando la adhesión a estos tipos de dentina.These are two kinds of dentin which are less receptive ...

  2. Analysis of the dentin-resin interface by use of laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, M; Onose, H; Moore, B K

    2002-12-01

    Adhesion of resin-bonding agents to dentin is currently believed to result from impregnation of adhesive resin into superficially demineralized dentin. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition of the resin-impregnated dentin (hybrid) layer using a micro-Raman spectroscopy. Resin composites were bonded to bovine dentin with the two-step bonding systems, and specimens were sectioned parallel to dentinal tubules. These surfaces were then polished down to 1 microm diamond pastes. Raman spectra were successively recorded along a line perpendicular to the dentin-adhesive interface by steps of 0.2 microm on a computer controlled X-Y stage. The relative amounts of hydroxyapatite (960 cm(-1), P-O), adhesive resin (640 cm(-1), aromatic ring), and organic substrate (1450 cm(-1), C-H) in the dentin-adhesive bonding area were calculated. From the Raman spectroscopy results, the hybrid layer represents a gradual transition in the relative amount of adhesive from the resin side to dentin side. Evidence of poor saturation of the adhesive resin in the demineralized dentin with the one-bottle adhesive system was detected. From the results of this study, inhomogeneity of the hybrid layer composition was detected, and the degree of resin impregnation was found to be different between the bonding systems tested.

  3. Chlorhexidine Nanocapsule Drug Delivery Approach to the Resin-Dentin Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, B M; Selvan, S T; Lu, T B; Xie, H; Neo, J; Fawzy, A S

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we are introducing a new drug-delivery approach to demineralized dentin substrates through microsized dentinal tubules in the form of drug-loaded nanocapsules. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is widely used in adhesive dentistry due to its nonspecific matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory effect and antibacterial activities. Poly(ε-caprolactone) nanocapsules (nano-PCL) loaded with CHX were fabricated by interfacial polymer deposition at PCL/CHX ratios of 125:10, 125:25, and 125:50. Unloaded nanocapsules (blank) were fabricated as control. The fabricated nanocapsules were characterized in vitro in terms of particle size, surface charges, particle recovery, encapsulation efficiency, and drug loading. Nanocapsule morphology, drug inclusion, structural properties, and crystallinity were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM/TEM), energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Initial screening of the antibacterial activities and the cytotoxicity of the nanocapsules were also conducted. Nanocapsules, as carried on ethanol/water solution, were delivered to demineralized dentin specimens connected to an ex vivo model setup simulating the pulpal pressure to study their infiltration, penetration depth, and retention inside the dentinal tubules by SEM/TEM. Nanocapsules were Ag labeled and delivered to demineralized dentin, followed by the application of a 2-step etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive. CHX-release profiles were characterized in vitro and ex vivo up to 25 d. Spherical nanocapsules were fabricated with a CHX core coated with a thin PCL shell. The blank nanocapsules exhibited the largest z-average diameter with negatively charged ζ-potential. With CHX incorporation, the nanocapsule size was decreased with a positive shift in ζ-potential. Nano-PCL/CHX at 125:50 showed the highest drug loading, antibacterial effect, and CHX release both in vitro and ex vivo. SEM and TEM revealed the deep

  4. Growth Factor Liberation and DPSC Response Following Dentine Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghiani, L; Gleeson, H B; Youde, S; Waddington, R J; Lynch, C D; Sloan, A J

    2016-10-01

    Liberation of the sequestrated bioactive molecules from dentine by the action of applied dental materials has been proposed as an important mechanism in inducing a dentinogenic response in teeth with viable pulps. Although adhesive restorations and dentine-bonding procedures are routinely practiced, clinical protocols to improve pulp protection and dentine regeneration are not currently driven by biological knowledge. This study investigated the effect of dentine (powder and slice) conditioning by etchants/conditioners relevant to adhesive restorative systems on growth factor solubilization and odontoblast-like cell differentiation of human dental pulp progenitor cells (DPSCs). The agents included ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA; 10%, pH 7.2), phosphoric acid (37%, pH EDTA, phosphoric acid, and citric acid from powdered dentine. The dentine matrix extracts were shown to be bioactive, capable of stimulating odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation as observed by gene expression and phenotypic changes in DPSCs cultured in monolayer on plastic. Polyacrylic acid failed to solubilize proteins from powdered dentine and was therefore considered ineffective in triggering a growth factor-mediated response in cells. The study went on to investigate the effect of conditioning dentine slices on growth factor liberation and DPSC behavior. Conditioning by EDTA, phosphoric acid, and citric acid exposed growth factors on dentine and triggered an upregulation in genes associated with mineralized differentiation, osteopontin, and alkaline phosphatase in DPSCs cultured on dentine. The cells demonstrated odontoblast-like appearances with elongated bodies and long extracellular processes extending on dentine surface. However, phosphoric acid-treated dentine appeared strikingly less populated with cells, suggesting a detrimental impact on cell attachment and growth when conditioning by this agent. These findings take crucial steps in informing clinical practice on dentine

  5. Stability of bonds made to superficial vs. deep dentin, before and after thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Dan-yang; Fan, Jing; Li, Fang; Chen, Yu-jiang; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-11-01

    Bonding stability of resinous adhesives to dentin is still problematic and may involve regional variations in dentin composition. This study is to evaluate the effect of dentin depth on the stability of resin-dentin bonds under thermocycling challenge. Dentin slabs with two flat surfaces parallel to the tooth axis were obtained from extracted human third molars. The slabs were randomized into eight groups according to the location of dentin [deep dentin (DD) or superficial dentin (SD)], the adhesive treatment (Single Bond 2 or Clearfil S(3) Bond), and the storage treatment (thermocycling for 5000 times vs. no). After the adhesive treatment and composite buildup on the dentin slabs, the micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) of each group was detected. The concentrations of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) were also evaluated using an immunoassay to detect the degree of collagen degradation in each group. Dentin depth, adhesive treatment and storage treatment all showed significant effects on both the μSBSs and the ICTP values (P0.05). Deep dentin showed significantly more bond degradation after thermocycling than did superficial dentin. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Resistência de união à dentina de resinas compostas associadas a sistemas adesivos com e sem carga Bond strength of resin composites to dentin associated to filled and unfilled adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandyra A. YOUSSEF

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho analisou in vitro duas marcas de adesivos de quarta geração do sistema simplificado (Optisolo - Kerr, com carga, e Single Bond - 3M, sem carga e duas marcas de resinas compostas (Prodigy - Kerr e Z100 - 3M, com o objetivo de verificação da adesividade na dentina. Oitenta corpos-de-prova, confeccionados a partir de molares humanos extraídos, foram incluídos em resina acrílica e desgastados até exposição de dentina no sentido longitudinal, e divididos em 4 grupos. Cones de resina composta foram aderidos a estes corpos-de-prova precedidos dos sistemas adesivos, seguindo a orientação dos fabricantes. Os corpos-de-prova foram submetidos a teste de tração numa máquina de ensaios Universal Mini-Instron 4442, a uma velocidade de 0,5 mm/min. Os resultados obtidos foram transformados em MPa de acordo com a área de adesão e submetidos a análise estatística pela ANOVA. Pelos resultados obtidos, concluiu-se que houve diferença estatisticamente significante (p 0,05.This study analyzed in vitro two brands of one-step adhesive systems of fourth generation (Optisolo - Kerr, filled; and Single Bond - 3M, unfilled and two composite resins (Prodigy - Kerr and Z100 - 3M, aiming at evaluating their bond strength to dentin. Eighty human extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin and grounded until dentin was exposed in longitudinal direction. The specimens were divided in 4 groups. Composite resin cones were bonded to the specimens using the mentioned adhesive systems, following the instructions of the manufacturers. The test-specimens were submitted to tensile tests using a 4442 Universal Mini-Instron Machine with the speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were converted into MPa, according to the area of adhesion, and submitted to statistical analysis with ANOVA. There was significant statistical difference (p 0.05 between the composites (F = 0.43.

  7. Fluorine analysis of human dentin surrounding resin composite after fluoride application by μ-PIGE/PIXE analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Okuyama, Katsushi; Komatsu, Hisanori; YAMAMOTO, Hiroko; Pereira, Patricia N. R.; Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Sato, Takahiro; Sano, Hidehiko

    2011-01-01

    The use of fluoride for the prevention of caries is based on the transformation of hydroxylapatite to fluoroapatite in the presence of fluoride ions, thereby strengthening tooth structure. Adhesion of dentin and resin composite (tooth-colored restoration material) requires a dentin bonding system, since resin composite is not able to adhere to dentin directly. Demineralization of dentin by acid etching is an important step in the dentin bonding system; however, demineralization also introduce...

  8. "Micro-tensile bond strength to dentine of a self-etch and a universal adhesive system in self-etch mode"

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Ana Catarina Palmeirinha

    2014-01-01

    Tese de Mestrado, Medicina Dentária, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, 2014 The evolution of adhesive systems over the last years has had a strong influence in the actual restorative concepts. The growing need for less time consumer procedures and less sensitive techniques, led manufacturers to release a new type of dental adhesives known as „universal‟, „multi-mode‟ or „multi-purpose‟. This concept of adhesives gives dentists the possibility to choose which approach ...

  9. Effects of exogenous enzymes on the degradation of adhesive-dentin interfaces%两种外源性酶对牙本质粘接界面的老化作用初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓东来; 杨宏业; 郭景梅; 黄翠; 甘靖; 宋芳芳

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of exogenous enzymes on the degradation of adhesive-dentin interface.Methods Forty molars were sectioned to expose the middle-coronal dentin surface and randomly divided into two adhesive systems:an etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond 2 and a self-etching adhesive G-Bond.After composite building up,the specimens were then randomly assigned to four groups(n=5 for each group) as follows:group 1,24 h of water storage(the control group);group 2,six months of water storage;group 3,twelve weeks storage in artificial saliva containing clostridium histolyticum collagenase;group 4,twelve weeks storage in artificial saliva containing cholesterolesterase.The microtensile bond strengths(MTBS) were then tested.The failure modes and nanoleakage were analyzed.Results After aging treatments,the three aging groups showed significantly lower MTBS compared with the control group in both adhesive systems(P<0.05).For etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond 2,the MTBS of group 3([19.6±3.5] MPa) was lower than that of group 2([23.4±4.2] MPa) and group 4([24.2±4.2] MPa) (P<0.05).For self-etching adhesive G-Bond,there was no difference on MTBS among different aging groups (P>0.05).SEM observation showed that,compared with the control group,water storage(group 2) and the exogenous enzymes(group 3 and 4) increased the nanoleakage expression(silver deposition) of both adhesive systems.Adhesive failure was the predominant fracture modes in all groups.Conclusions Storage in artificial saliva containing clostridium histolyticum collagenase or cholesterol esterase could be used to accelerate the degradation process of adhesive-dentine interface.%目的 比较两种外源性酶对牙本质粘接界面的老化效果,探讨酶解作为牙本质粘接耐久性实验方法的可行性.方法 选取完整无龋离体第三磨牙40颗,用随机数字表法分为两组(每组20颗),去除冠部釉质,暴露中部牙本质,分别用全酸蚀粘接剂(A

  10. Effect of Green Or Desensitizer on Shear Bond Strength of Adhesive Agents to Dentin%极固宁对水门汀与牙本质间剪切强度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦玉杰; 程祥荣; 徐东选; 陈小冬

    2011-01-01

    目的:评价极固宁脱敏剂对5种水门汀剪切强度的影响.方法:收集双尖牙30颗.包埋牙齿,暴露牙本质面,用水砂纸打磨牙本质面.所有牙齿被分为实验组和对照组.实验组的牙本质面首先用极固宁脱敏处理,然后分别用5种水门汀将树脂小柱粘在牙本质表面.对照组的牙本质不涂脱敏剂,使用前述提到的水门汀粘固树脂小柱.所有试样放在37℃水浴中浸泡24 h后测量剪切强度.结果:极固宁脱敏剂没有显著降低聚羧酸锌水门汀和玻璃离子水门汀的剪切强度,但却会使磷酸锌水门汀的剪切强度大幅下降.极固宁也使树脂加强玻璃离子水门汀和树脂水门汀的粘接强度下降.结论:极固宁对磷酸锌水门汀、树脂加强玻璃离子水门汀、树脂水门汀与牙本质间粘接强度有不利影响,对聚羧酸锌水门汀和玻璃离子水门汀与牙本质间粘接强度无不利影响.%Objective: To investigate the effect of Green Or desensitizer on shear bond strength of five adhesive a-gents to dentin. Methods: Thirty human premolars were used. Dentin surfaces were ground with silicon carbide abrasive papers. Teeth were randomly divided into two groups: the tested group and the control group. For the tested group, dentin surfaces were treated with Green Or desensitizer, then Solidex cylinders were positioned over the dentin surface with five cements respectively. For the control group, no desensitizer was applied, resin cylinders were bonded with cements mentioned above. Shear bond strengths were detemined. Results: The results indicate that Green Or desensitizer-treated dentin did not affect the shear bond strength of glass ionomer or polycarboxylate cements, but produced a large decrease in the shear bond strength of zinc phosphate. For resin-forced glass ionomer and resin luting agents, the application of Green Or desensitizer significantly reduced the shear bond strength of both materials. Conclusion: Green Or

  11. The adhesive properties of two bonding systems to tetracycline stained dentin%两种粘接剂对四环素牙本质粘接性能的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘虹伶; 梁坤能; 程磊; 李继遥; 何利邦

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate and compare the bonding properties of Single Bond 2 and SE Bond to tetracycline stained dentin in vitro.Methods Ten extracted tetracycline stained human teeth and ten extracted normal human teeth were collected and the occlusal dentin surfaces of all extracted teeth were exposed.The tetracycline stained teeth and normal teeth were divided into two groups, respectively and randomly, based on the adhesives applied.Total-etch adhesive(Single Bond 2) and self-etch adhesive(SE Bond) were used.After application of the adhesives to the dentin surfaces, composite crowns were built up.After 24 h water storage, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally into sticks(0.9 mm×0.9 mm bonding area) for micro tensile testing or micro Raman spectroscopy detection.Bonding strength(μTBS) and resin conversion rate were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.Results The tetracycline Single Bond 2 group presented lower bonding strength[(16.17±3.16) MPa] than the tetracycline SE Bond group[(25.82± 2.62) MPa], and also demonstrated lower bonding strength than the normal Single Bond 2 group[(29.13± 2.44) MPa] and the normal SE Bond group[(24.29±2.83) MPa](P<0.05), while there was no statistical differences among the other three groups(P>0.05).The resin conversion rate of tetracycline Single Bond 2 group[(55±6)%] was significantly lower than the tetracycline SE Bond group[(66±3)%](P<0.05) and also lower than the normal Single Bond 2 group[(64±5)%] and the normal SE Bond group[(65±4)%](P<0.05).No statistically significant differences were observed among the other three groups(P>0.05).Conclusions The bonding strength of total-etch adhesive system to the tetracycline stained dentin was significantly lower than that to the normal dentin.%目的 比较两种粘接剂对四环素牙本质与正常牙本质的粘接性能,为临床四环素牙本质粘接剂的选择提供参考.方法 从四川大学华西口腔医学院口腔颌面外科门诊收集牙冠

  12. In vitro evaluation of marginal microleakage in class V restorations with composite resin in bovine teeth. Laser irradiation influences and the adhesive system in the dentin pre-treatment; Avaliacao in vitro da microinfiltracao marginal em restauracoes de classe V com resina composta em dentes bovinos. Influencia da irradiacao laser e sistema adesivo no pre-tratamento dentinario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Wendell Lima de

    2003-07-01

    Microleakage is one of the most important reasons to restorations failure, it is the responsible for marginal colors changing, new caries, hipersensibility and pulpar diseases. Several techniques and materials have been studied to eliminate or, at least, to decrease microleakage. The cavities preparation with Er:YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive are some of these techniques and materials. This research has the objective to compare, in vitro, microleakage in class V cavities, prepared with high rotation (conventional treatment), Er:YAG laser (Enamel-400 mj/2 Hz/128,38 J/Cm{sup 2}, Dentin 250 mJ/ 2 Hz/ 80,24 J/Cm{sup 2}) and the treatment made at dentin with autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) using Er:YAG laser (with water or not water) or not using Er:YAG laser. It was used 48 bovines teeth with cavities prepared in vestibular face and gingival wall on cement enamel junction and oclusal wall on enamel. The materials used were autoconditioning adhesive (Clerafil SE Bond) and composite resin Z250. Teeth were divided into four groups of twelve samples each one, according to dentin treatment. Group 1 - Conventional cavity and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 2- Cavity prepared with Er: YAG laser and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 3 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er:YAG laser associated to water and autoconditioning adhesive. Group 4 - Cavity prepared with Er:YAG laser and dentin conditioning with Er: YAG laser without water and associated to autoconditioning adhesive. Teeth were restored and stocked at 37 deg C, thermocycled and placed into a 50% silver nitrate solution. Right after, teeth were sliced and evaluated on a stereo microscopic magnifying glass in order to see microleakage degree trying to follow a score from 0 to 3. The findings were submitted to Fisher, Anderson-Darling tests and to the not parametric Sen and Puri test. The results indicated that in gingival edge, the Group 2 showed less microleakage than

  13. Carbodiimide inactivation of MMPs and effect on dentin bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, A; Apolonio, F M; Saboia, V P A; Santi, S; Angeloni, V; Checchi, V; Curci, R; Di Lenarda, R; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Breschi, L

    2014-03-01

    The use of protein cross-linking agents during bonding procedures has been recently proposed to improve bond durability. This study aimed to use zymography and in situ zymography techniques to evaluate the ability of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) cross-linker to inhibit matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The hypotheses tested were that: (1) bonding procedures increase dentin gelatinolytic activity and (2) EDC pre-treatment prevents this enzymatic activity. The zymographic assay was performed on protein extracts obtained from dentin powder treated with Optibond FL or Scotchbond 1XT with or without 0.3M EDC pre-treatment. For in situ zymography, adhesive/dentin interfaces were created with the same adhesives applied to acid-etched dentin slabs pre-treated or not with EDC conditioner. Zymograms revealed increased expression of dentin endogenous MMP-2 and -9 after adhesive application, while the use of EDC as a primer inactivated dentin gelatinases. Results of in situ zymograpy showed that hybrid layers of tested adhesives exhibited intense collagenolytic activity, while almost no fluorescence signal was detected when specimens were pre-treated with EDC. The correlative analysis used in this study demonstrated that EDC could contribute to inactivate endogenous dentin MMPs within the hybrid layer created by etch-and-rinse adhesives.

  14. Invasion of dentinal tubules by oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, R M; Jenkinson, H F

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of dentinal tubules commonly occurs when dentin is exposed following a breach in the integrity of the overlying enamel or cementum. Bacterial products diffuse through the dentinal tubule toward the pulp and evoke inflammatory changes in the pulpo-dentin complex. These may eliminate the bacterial insult and block the route of infection. Unchecked, invasion results in pulpitis and pulp necrosis, infection of the root canal system, and periapical disease. While several hundred bacterial species are known to inhabit the oral cavity, a relatively small and select group of bacteria is involved in the invasion of dentinal tubules and subsequent infection of the root canal space. Gram-positive organisms dominate the tubule microflora in both carious and non-carious dentin. The relatively high numbers of obligate anaerobes present-such as Eubacterium spp., Propionibacterium spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Peptostreptococcus micros, and Veillonella spp.-suggest that the environment favors growth of these bacteria. Gram-negative obligate anaerobic rods, e.g., Porphyromonas spp., are less frequently recovered. Streptococci are among the most commonly identified bacteria that invade dentin. Recent evidence suggests that streptococci may recognize components present within dentinal tubules, such as collagen type I, which stimulate bacterial adhesion and intra-tubular growth. Specific interactions of other oral bacteria with invading streptococci may then facilitate the invasion of dentin by select bacterial groupings. An understanding the mechanisms involved in dentinal tubule invasion by bacteria should allow for the development of new control strategies, such as inhibitory compounds incorporated into oral health care products or dental materials, which would assist in the practice of endodontics.

  15. Restoration of non-carious cervical lesions with ceramic inlays: A possible model for clinical testing of adhesive cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Staninec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are many luting cements coming to market which claim to be adhesive, but there is no clinical protocol currently for testing these claims. There is a standardized protocol for testing direct restorations bonded to dentin and it is used extensively. Case Report: We describe a clinical procedure for restoring a non-carious cervical lesion (NCCL with a ceramic inlay using Computer-Aided Design and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM technology and an adhesive resin cement.The procedure was straightforward and the result was good at one month. Discussion: NCCL′s can be restored with CAD-CAM technology in one appointment. This technique can be used to clinically test adhesion of luting cements to dentin, similarly to the current standard for direct restorations.

  16. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Lo Giudice; Giuseppina Cutroneo; Antonio Centofanti; Alessandro Artemisia; Ennio Bramanti; Angela Militi; Giuseppina Rizzo; Angelo Favaloro; Alessia Irrera; Roberto Lo Giudice; Marco Cicciù

    2015-01-01

    Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Ob...

  17. Spatial self-organization in hybrid models of multicellular adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforti, Adriano; Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Montañez, Raúl; Solé, Ricard

    2016-10-01

    Spatial self-organization emerges in distributed systems exhibiting local interactions when nonlinearities and the appropriate propagation of signals are at work. These kinds of phenomena can be modeled with different frameworks, typically cellular automata or reaction-diffusion systems. A different class of dynamical processes involves the correlated movement of agents over space, which can be mediated through chemotactic movement or minimization of cell-cell interaction energy. A classic example of the latter is given by the formation of spatially segregated assemblies when cells display differential adhesion. Here, we consider a new class of dynamical models, involving cell adhesion among two stochastically exchangeable cell states as a minimal model capable of exhibiting well-defined, ordered spatial patterns. Our results suggest that a whole space of pattern-forming rules is hosted by the combination of physical differential adhesion and the value of probabilities modulating cell phenotypic switching, showing that Turing-like patterns can be obtained without resorting to reaction-diffusion processes. If the model is expanded allowing cells to proliferate and die in an environment where diffusible nutrient and toxic waste are at play, different phases are observed, characterized by regularly spaced patterns. The analysis of the parameter space reveals that certain phases reach higher population levels than other modes of organization. A detailed exploration of the mean-field theory is also presented. Finally, we let populations of cells with different adhesion matrices compete for reproduction, showing that, in our model, structural organization can improve the fitness of a given cell population. The implications of these results for ecological and evolutionary models of pattern formation and the emergence of multicellularity are outlined.

  18. Use of dental adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Sedrez-Porto, José Augusto; Piva, Evandro; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Resin adhesives (RA) have been applied between resin composite (RC) increments, but there is no consensus on the impact of this technique on the properties of the final restoration. This study evaluated the effect of the presence of RA between RC layers on physical properties, translucency and long-term color stability of the restorative material. Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose (bond, 3M ESPE) and Adper™ Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) were used as RA, and Filtek™ Z350 (3M ESPE) as RC. Specimens containing RA were prepared by applying 3 layers of the adhesive between 4 increments of RC; adhesive-free specimens were also used (control). Tests of water sorption and solubility, mechanical performance (microtensile cohesive strength, flexural strength, and flexural modulus, after immediate and long-term water storage), and translucency and color stability (after immediate and 1, 7, 90, and 180 days of water or wine storage) were performed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were also taken from the fractured specimens (flexural strength test). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey test (padhesive resin (SBMP). This study is the first to show positive results from the use of resin adhesives as modeler liquid of resin composite, which is common in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. How to bond to root canal dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  20. Piecewise-Constant-Model-Based Interior Tomography Applied to Dentin Tubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentin is a hierarchically structured biomineralized composite material, and dentin’s tubules are difficult to study in situ. Nano-CT provides the requisite resolution, but the field of view typically contains only a few tubules. Using a plate-like specimen allows reconstruction of a volume containing specific tubules from a number of truncated projections typically collected over an angular range of about 140°, which is practically accessible. Classical computed tomography (CT theory cannot exactly reconstruct an object only from truncated projections, needless to say a limited angular range. Recently, interior tomography was developed to reconstruct a region-of-interest (ROI from truncated data in a theoretically exact fashion via the total variation (TV minimization under the condition that the ROI is piecewise constant. In this paper, we employ a TV minimization interior tomography algorithm to reconstruct interior microstructures in dentin from truncated projections over a limited angular range. Compared to the filtered backprojection (FBP reconstruction, our reconstruction method reduces noise and suppresses artifacts. Volume rendering confirms the merits of our method in terms of preserving the interior microstructure of the dentin specimen.

  1. Functional remineralization of carious dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, Megan Kardon

    A primary goal of dental tissue engineering is the biological reconstruction of tooth substrate destroyed by caries or other diseases affecting tooth mineralization. Traditionally, dentists treat caries by using invasive techniques to remove the diseased dental tissue and restore the lesion, ideally preventing further progression of decay. Success in strategies associated with remineralization of enamel and root caries have contributed to the less invasive prospect of remineralization of dentinal carious lesions. The central hypothesis of this dissertation is that carious dentin lesions can be remineralized if the lesions contain residual mineral. Caries Detector (CD) stained zones (pink, light pink, transparent and normal) of arrested carious dentin lesions were characterized according to microstructure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, mineral content by digital transverse microradiography, and nanomechanical properties by AFM-based nanoindentation. CD-stained and unstained zones had significantly different microstructure, mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Furthermore, the most demineralized carious zone contained residual mineral. To obtain reproducible, standardized dentin caries lesions, we characterized the lesions from an artificial carious dentin lesion model using a 0.05M acetate demineralization buffer. The artificial caries-like lesions produced by the buffer had similar mineral content and nanomechanical properties in the stained and unstained zones as natural dentin lesions. Both natural and artificial lesions had significant correlations between mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Mineral crystallite size and shape was examined by small angle x-ray scattering. Both natural and artificial carious dentin had different mineral sizes than normal dentin. Collagen in natural and artificial carious dentin lesions was examined by trichrome stain, AFM high-resolution imaging, and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy, to determine if

  2. Avaliação da interação entre resina composta e diferentes adesivos dentinários Evaluation of the interaction between composite resin and different dentin adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Lourenço RIBEIRO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a resistência à tração de quatro diferentes sistemas adesivos. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus, 3M (Grupo 1, Prime & Bond 2.0, Dentsply (Grupo 2 ProBOND, Dentsply (Grupo 3, PAAMA 2, (Grupo 4 foram usados com a resina composta Glacier (SDI. Um grupo sem a utilização de qualquer sistema adesivo serviu como controle (Grupo 5. Cinqüenta espécimes foram divididos em cinco grupos com dez espécimes cada. Uma matriz de aço inoxidável com 6,0 mm de diâmetro e 1,0 mm de profundidade foi usada para se obterem dois discos de resina composta. A resina composta foi inserida em uma metade da matriz em pequenas porções e fotopolimerizada por 40 segundos. Os adesivos foram então aplicados na superfície dos discos de resina, seguindo a instrução dos fabricantes. A segunda parte da matriz foi colocada em posição e preenchida com a resina composta. Após uma hora, a matriz foi adaptada em um dispositivo especial na máquina de ensaios Kratos para determinar a resistência de união, a uma velocidade de 0,05 mm/min. Os resultados, expressos em kgf, foram: Grupo 1 (3,99 ± 1,47, Grupo 2 (4,24 ± 2,00, Grupo 3 (3,84 ± 0,88, Grupo 4 (4,33 ± 1,23 e Grupo 5 (4,21 ± 1,38. Os resultados foram analisados pelo teste estatístico ANOVA a um critério. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante (p The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of four different adhesive systems. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M (Group 1, Prime & Bond 2.0, Dentsply (Group 2, ProBOND, Dentsply (Group 3, PAAMA 2, SDI (Group 4 were used with GLACIER (SDI composite resin. One group without any adhesive was used as control (Group 5. Fifty specimens were divided into 5 groups of 10 each. A stainless steel split matrix with 6.00 mm diameter and 1.00 mm depth was used to obtain two discs of composite resin. The composite resin was applied into one half of the matrix in small portions and light cured for 40 seconds

  3. The effect of light-curing source and mode on microtensile bond strength to bovine dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, CM; Peris, AR; Ambrosano, GMB; Swift, EJ; Pimenta, LAF

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing techniques on the microtensile bond strength of hybrid and packable resin composite to dentin. The null hypotheses were that different light-curing techniques do not affect the adhesion of resin composites to tooth structure and that different resin composites do not have a similar bond to dentin. Materials and Methods: One hundred four box-shaped buccal preparations were made and dentin/enamel adhesive w...

  4. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds...

  5. 丹酚酸B对人牙本质自酸蚀粘结强度的影响%Effect of Salvianolic Acid B on the Bond Strength of Self- etch Adhesive System to Human Dentin.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光; 袁柱炫

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨丹酚酸B对牙本质自酸蚀粘结即刻及长期粘结强度的影响.方法:将10颗新鲜拔除的人下颌第三磨牙去除牙 合面牙釉质,暴露中层牙本质,打磨后制备出标准粘结面,以硬组织切片机将每颗牙均分为近中及远中两部分,自凝塑料包埋牙根,随机选取每颗实验牙的近中或远中部分共10个牙体单位于牙本质粘结面涂布两层Adper Prompt自酸蚀粘结剂(3M ESPE),光固化10 s后以Filtek Z350通用型纳米树脂(3M ESPE)堆塑5 mm高的树脂核;其余10个牙体单位则先以丹酚酸B处理牙本质粘结面,再以相同方法与材料制作树脂核.以硬组织切片机将各牙体单位切为1 mm×1 mm×8 mm的微拉伸试件,每个牙体单位选出2个试件并随机分组,最终形成A1、A2、B1、B2四组(n=10),A1设为对照组.对A1、B1组试件进行即刻微拉伸强度测试,A2、B2组试件水储6个月后进行微拉伸强度测试,评估其粘结强度.实验所得结果采用SPSS18.0软件进行ANOVA两因素方差分析和LSD多重检验.结果:丹酚酸B处理与未处理组的即刻微拉伸强度分别为(40.05±2.24) MPa、(41.58±1.98) MPa,两组即刻粘结强度无统计学差异;6个月水储后丹酚酸B处理组微拉伸强度为(18.96±2.05) MPa,高于未处理组(13.14±2.17) MPa (P<0.05).结论:丹酚酸B对牙本质自酸蚀粘结的即刻粘结强度没有明显影响,但能有效减缓长期(6个月)粘结强度的降.%Objective: To evaluate the effect of salvianolic acid B (one kind of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor) on micro tensile bond strength (TBS) of self-etch adhesive system to human dentin.Methods: The occlusal enamal of 10 extracted lower third molars was removed to expose the flat middle coronal dentin and the dentin surfaces were grounded to standard adhesive surfaces.Each tooth was divided into mesial and distal parts equally and the roots were embedded in self-curing resin.One part of each tooth was randomly taken to be

  6. Tubular occlusion optimizes bonding of hydrophobic resins to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, F T; Pashley, D H; Ferrari, M; Tay, F R

    2007-06-01

    Although hydrophobic resins may be bonded to acid-etched dentin with an ethanol wet-bonding technique, the protocol is sensitive to moisture contamination when bonding is performed in deep dentin. This study tested the hypothesis that the use of oxalate or poly(glutamic) acid-modified, diluted ceramicrete (PADC) for dentinal tubule occlusion prevents fluid contamination and improves the bonding of an experimental hydrophobic adhesive to acid-etched, ethanol-dehydrated dentin. Mid-coronal and deep acid-etched moist dentin pre-treated with oxalate or PADC was dehydrated by ethanol wet-bonding and infiltrated with the experimental three-step etch-and-rinse hydrophobic adhesive under simulated pulpal pressure. Tensile bond strengths to deep dentin without pre-treatment were severely compromised. Conversely, oxalate and PADC pre-treatments reduced dentin permeability, prevented water contamination, and improved bond strengths. Minimal nanoleakage was identified within hybrid layers created in the oxalate- and PADC-pre-treated deep dentin. The use of tubular occluding agents optimized bonding of hydrophobic resins to dentin.

  7. Nanoleakage patterns of four dentin bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nanoleakage patterns of four dentin bonding systems. The dentin bonding systems used in this study were: Single Bond, One Coat Bond, Prime & Bond NT/Non Rinse Conditioner (NRC), and PermaQuik. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces from extracted human molars were finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper, and bonded with one of the dentin bonding systems. After 24 h storage at 37 degrees C in water, margins were finished with polishing discs and the surrounding tooth surfaces coated with nail varnish. The samples were immersed in a 50% (w/v) solution of silver nitrate for 24 h, and exposed to photodeveloping solution for 8 h. The samples were cut longitudinally, polished, and mounted on stubs, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using backscattered electron mode. Different nanoleakage patterns were observed with the different adhesive systems. However, accumulations of silver particles were often noted at the base of the hybrid layer for all materials. Single Bond and One Coat Bond demonstrated uptake of silver particles both within the hybrid layer and the adhesive resin. Prime & Bond NT/NRC showed silver staining throughout almost the entire thickness of the hybrid layer. The leakage pattern of PermaQuik revealed loose silver deposition within the hybrid layer. The composition of each adhesive system may play a role in forming the different leakage patterns. The current dentin bonding systems used in this study do not achieve perfect sealing at the restoration/dentin interface, which may influence the durability of the bond to dentin.

  8. The peritubular reinforcement effect of porous dentine microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Niu, Lin; Li, Qun; Liu, Qida; Zuo, Hong

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, we evaluate the equivalent stiffness of peritubular reinforcement effect (PRE) of porous dentine optimized by the thickness of peritubular dentine (PTD). Few studies to date have evaluated or quantitated the effect of PRE on composite dentine. The miscrostructure of porous dentine is captured by scanning electron microscope images, and then finite element modeling is used to quantitate the deformation and stiffness of the porous dentine structure. By optimizing the radius of PTD and dentine tubule (DT), the proposed FE model is able to demonstrate the effect of peritubular reinforcement on porous dentine stiffness. It is concluded that the dentinal equivalent stiffness is reduced and degraded with the increase of the radius of DT (i.e., porosity) in the certain ratio value of Ep/Ei and certain radius of PTD, where Ep is the PTD modulus and Ei is the intertubular dentine modulus. So in order to ensure the whole dentinal equivalent stiffness is not loss, the porosity should get some value while the Ep/Ei is certain. Thus, PTD prevents the stress concentration around DTs and reduces the risk of DTs failure. Mechanically, the overall role of PTD appears to enhance the stiffness of the dentine composite structure. These results provide some new and significant insights into the biological evolution of the optimal design for the porous dentine microstructure. These findings on the biological microstructure design of dentine materials are applicable to other engineering structural designs aimed at increasing the overall structural strength.

  9. Model of Cell Crawling Controlled by Mechanosensitive Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, M.; Sens, P.

    2017-06-01

    We study the motility of model cells and biomimetic soft objects crawling over a substrate covered with adhesive linkers. The cell exerts traction forces on the substrate through the active periodic motion of molecular complexes to which the linkers bind and unbind stochastically. We first show that the diffusion coefficient of a force dipole (unable by symmetry to perform directed motion) is maximal for a finite ratio of the unbinding to binding rates, highlighting the role of adhesion kinetics on cell translocation. We next show that cells exerting more complex traction force distributions may exhibit directed motion only if the linkers are mechanosensitive, i.e., if the bonds' lifetime decreases (slip bonds) or increases (catch bonds) under stress. The average migration speed is higher in the catch-bond regime but so are the fluctuations, yielding a biased diffusive motion characterized by a Peclet number smaller than in the slip-bond regime.

  10. Penetration of amalgam constituents into dentine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, Johannes D.; Ozcan, Mutlu; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Amalgam restorations are replaced by adhesively placed composite resin restorations at an increasing rate. After the removal of amalgam dentine often shows marked dark discoloration that is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from overlying amalgams. it is questioned whet

  11. Penetration of amalgam constituents into dentine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.; Ozcan, M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Amalgam restorations are replaced by adhesively placed composite resin restorations at an increasing rate. After the removal of amalgam dentine often shows marked dark discoloration that is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from overlying amalgams. It is questioned whet

  12. New perspectives about molecular arrangement of primary and permanent dentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanches Borges, Ana Flavia [Department of Dental Materials at Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Andrade Bitar, Renata [Biomedical Engineering, Valley of Paraiba University (UNIVAP) (Brazil); Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia [Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Bortollazo Correr, Americo [Department of Dental Materials at Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Martin, Airton Abrahao [Biomedical Engineering Post Graduation, Valley of Paraiba University (UNIVAP) (Brazil); Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria [Department of Pediatric Dentistry at Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: rmpuppin@fop.unicamp.br

    2007-12-30

    The dentin quality of primary and permanent teeth was inspected by Fourier transformed Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman); scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and hardness test. Middle dentin of crowns were reached by carbide bur abrading providing a uniform smear layer. Phosphoric acid was applied in order to simulate the etching of total etching adhesive systems. The groups were (n = 10): G1 (primary dentin smear layer); G2 (35% phosphoric acid etched primary dentin); G3 (permanent dentin smear layer); G4 (35% phosphoric acid etched permanent dentin). FT-Raman results were subjected to cluster analysis. SEM/EDS were made in order to add the data obtained by FT-Raman. The hardness data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey test. FT-Raman showed differences among groups, either to organic or inorganic content. For the organic content, primary and permanent dentin became similar after the etching; conversely, the inorganic content showed differences for the two substrates. Hardness test showed no significant differences between primary and permanent dentin, before or after etching, but the etching decreased these values. The mineral content arrangement of primary dentin is different from permanent dentin, independently of the etching. The substrate type did no influence the hardness, but the etching decreased it.

  13. Advances in modeling and design of adhesively bonded systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    The book comprehensively charts a way for industry to employ adhesively bonded joints to make systems more efficient and cost-effective Adhesively bonded systems have found applications in a wide spectrum of industries (e.g., aerospace, electronics, construction, ship building, biomedical, etc.) for a variety of purposes. Emerging adhesive materials with improved mechanical properties have allowed adhesion strength approaching that of the bonded materials themselves. Due to advances in adhesive materials and the many potential merits that adhesive bonding offers, adhesive bonding has replac

  14. SEM Micromorphology Study of Dentin-adhesive Bonding Interface after Salivary Contamination%唾液污染对牙本质粘结界面影响的微形态观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙景杨; 郭良微; 徐经伟; 刘宝峰

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究唾液污染后牙本质表面不同处理方法对牙本质粘结界面的扫描电子显微镜(SEM)观察.方法:10颗人无龋第三恒磨牙垂直于牙体长轴切除冠部釉质,暴露牙本质中层,随机分为5组,每组2颗牙齿.其中A组无唾液污染,B组经唾液污染后无处理,其余3组经唾液污染分别进行完全吹干(C组)、水冲洗(D组)、水冲洗后再酸蚀15 s(E组),37℃水浴24 h后进行界面及表面SEM观察.结果:D、E组均获得较明显的树脂突及混合层,B、C组树脂突渗透较少,并且B组出现微裂隙.结论:在牙本质修复过程中,唾液污染后,通过水冲洗,水冲洗后再酸蚀15 s,均可获得较好的粘结性能.%Objective:To observe dentin-adhesive bonding interface through different treatments after salivary contamination by scanning electron microscope(SEM).Methods:The enamel of occlusal surface of 10 third molars without caries extracted freshly was removed perpendicular to the long axis.The medial dentin was exposed to air.10 teeth were randomly divided into five groups,including the control group (A group:uncontaminated) and the other four groups (B group:salivary contamination,without treatment; C group:salivary contamination,completely dried ; D group:salivary contamination,washed and E group:salivary contamination,washed,re-etching for 15s).Then,all specimens were placed into 37℃ distilled water.After 24 hours,the surface and interface of the samples were observed with SEM.Results:D,E groups obtain numerous resin tags and uniform hybrid layer,B,C group show less resin tags and microleakage is found in B group.Conclusion:The washed group and Re-ecthed groups are therefore suggested after salivary contamination.

  15. The adhesion model as a field theory for cosmological clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigopoulos, Gerasimos, E-mail: rigopoulos@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 12, Heidelberg, 69120 Germany (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    The adhesion model has been proposed in the past as an improvement of the Zel'dovich approximation, providing a good description of the formation of the cosmic web. We recast the model as a field theory for cosmological large scale structure, adding a stochastic force to account for power generated from very short, highly non-linear scales that is uncorrelated with the initial power spectrum. The dynamics of this Stochastic Adhesion Model (SAM) is reminiscent of the well known Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation with the difference that the viscosity and the noise spectrum are time dependent. Choosing the viscosity proportional to the growth factor D restricts the form of noise spectrum through a 1-loop renormalization argument. For this choice, the SAM field theory is renormalizable to one loop. We comment on the suitability of this model for describing the non-linear regime of the CDM power spectrum and its utility as a relatively simple approach to cosmological clustering.

  16. Anti-proteolytic capacity and bonding durability of proanthocyanidin-biomodified demineralized dentin matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Rui Liu; Ming Fang; Ling Zhang; Cheng-Fang Tang; Qi Dou; Ji-Hua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that biomodification of demineralized dentin collagen with proanthocyanidin (PA) for a clinically practical duration improves the mechanical properties of the dentin matrix and the immediate resin-dentin bond strength. The present study sought to evaluate the ability of PA biomodification to reduce collagenase-induced biodegradation of demineralized dentin matrix and dentin/adhesive interfaces in a clinically relevant manner. The effects of collagenolytic and gelatinolytic activity on PA-biomodified demineralized dentin matrix were analysed by hydroxyproline assay and gelatin zymography. Then, resin-/dentin-bonded specimens were prepared and challenged with bacterial collagenases. Dentin treated with 2%chlorhexidine and untreated dentin were used as a positive and negative control, respectively. Collagen biodegradation, the microtensile bond strengths of bonded specimens and the micromorphologies of the fractured interfaces were assessed. The results revealed that both collagenolytic and gelatinolytic activity on demineralized dentin were notably inhibited in the PA-biomodified groups, irrespective of PA concentration and biomodification duration. When challenged with exogenous collagenases, PA-biomodified bonded specimens exhibited significantly less biodegradation and maintained higher bond strengths than the untreated control. These results suggest that PA biomodification was effective at inhibiting proteolytic activity on demineralized dentin matrix and at stabilizing the adhesive/dentin interface against enzymatic degradation, is a new concept that has the potential to improve bonding durability.

  17. Strengthening of dental adhesives via particle reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Kreppel, Stefan; Petschelt, Anselm; Hornberger, Helga; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    The bond between methacrylic polymer adhesives and dental restoratives is not perfect and may fail either in the short or in the long term. This study aims to evaluate the effects of particle incorporation in a self-etch model adhesive on mechanical and physical properties that are relevant during application and service. Filled adhesives containing 5, 10, 15 or 25wt% glass fillers were compared to their unfilled counterpart in terms of water sorption and solubility; viscosity and dynamic viscosity during polymerization were recorded using rheological measurements and compared to FTIR analysis of the real-time degree of cure. Elastic modulus and ultimate tensile strength measurements were performed in uniaxial tension; the energy to fracture was used to calculate the fracture toughness of the adhesives. Finally, the experimental adhesives were applied on dentin substrate to test the bond strength using the microtensile test. Results showed that the incorporation of 5-10wt% nanofiller to self-etching dental adhesives is efficient in accelerating the polymerization reaction and increasing the degree of cure without compromising the film viscosity for good wettability or water sorption and solubility. Fillers increased the elastic modulus, tensile strength and fracture toughness to a plateau between 5 and 15wt% filler concentration, and despite the tendency to form agglomerations, active crack pinning/deflection toughening mechanisms have been observed. The bond strength between resin composite and dentin was also improved when adhesives with up to 10wt% fillers were used, with no additional improvements with further packing. The use of fillers to reinforce dental adhesives may therefore be of great practical benefit by improving curing and mechanical properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dentin tubule occluding ability of dentin desensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Linlin; Okiji, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    To compare the dentin tubule-occluding ability of fluoroaluminocalciumsilicate-based (Nanoseal), calcium phosphate-based (Teethmate Desensitizer), resin-containing oxalate (MS Coat ONE) and diamine silver fluoride (Saforide) dentin desensitizers using artificially demineralized bovine dentin. Simulated hypersensitive dentin was created using cervical dentin sections derived from bovine incisors using phosphoric acid etching followed by polishing with a paste containing hydroxyapatite. The test desensitizers were applied in one, two, or three cycles, where each cycle involved desensitizer application, brushing, and immersion in artificial saliva (n= 5 each). The dentin surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy, and the dentin tubule occlusion rate was calculated. The elemental composition of the deposits was analyzed with electron probe microanalysis. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant different test. Marked deposit formation was observed on the specimens treated with Nanoseal or Teethmate Desensitizer, and tags were detected in the specimens' dentin tubules. These findings became more prominent as the number of application cycles increased. The major elemental components of the tags were Ca, F, and Al (Nanoseal) and Ca and P (Teethmate Desensitizer). The tubule occlusion rates of MS Coat ONE and Saforide were significantly lower than those of Nanoseal and Teethmate Desensitizer (P< 0.05).

  19. Morphological effects of MMPs inhibitors on the dentin bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Li, Tianbo; Li, Xiuying; Zhang, Zhimin; Li, Penglian; Li, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been studied extensively, and MMP inhibitors have been used as dental pretreatment agents prior to dentin bonding because they reduce collagen fiber degradation and improve bonding strength. However, morphologic characteristics of the collagen network after etching and of the post-adhesive dentin hybrid layers (DHL) after MMP inhibitors pretreatment have not been evaluated. Thus, we investigated demineralized dentin pretreated with chlorhexidine (CHX) and minocycline (MI) in an etch- and -rinse adhesive system with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and immuno-gold labeling markers to observe the collagen network and DHL. FESEM revealed after CHX and MI, a demineralized dentin surface and improved collagen network formation, reduced collagen degradation, and distinct gold-labeling signals. Applying adhesive after either MMP inhibitor created a better dentin interface as evidenced by immuno-gold staining, better adhesive penetration, and higher DHL quality. With microtensile bond strength tests (µTBS) we estimated bonding strength using µTBS data. Immediate µTBS was enhanced with MMP inhibitor application to the bonding surface, and the CHX group was significantly different than non-treated etched surfaces, but no significant change was detected in the MI group. Surface micromorphology of the fractured dentin resin restoration showed that the CHX group had a better resin and dentin tube combination. Both MMP inhibitors created uniform resin coverage. Thus, morphologic results and µTBS data suggest that CHX and MI can inhibit MMP activity, improve immediate bonding strength, and enhance dentin bonding stability with an etch- and -rinse adhesive system.

  20. Tensile bond srength between composite resin using different adhesive systems Avaliação da resistência à ruptura por tração entre resina composta e diversos adesivos dentinários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Dias

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS among nine adhesive systems and one composite resin. The groups were made as follows: Single Bond/3M (G1, Etch & Prime 3.0 /Degussa (G2, Bond 1/Jeneric/Pentron (G3, Prime & Bond 2.1/Dentsply (G4, OptiBond FL/Kerr (G5, Stae/SDI (G6, Snap Bond/ Copalite-Cooley & Cooley (G7, Prime & Bond NT/Dentsply (G8, Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus/3M (G9. The control group (G10 was made only with the composite resin (Z100/3M. One hundred specimens were made, 10 for each group. There were significant differences on TBS among groups. G3 showed the hightest TBS in comparison to other tested groups. G10 presented higher TBS than all groups. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi investigar in vitro a resistência de união entre uma resina composta e nove sistemas adesivos dentinários. Os adesivos estudados foram assim agrupados: Single Bond/3M (G1, Etch & Prime 3.0/ Degussa (G2, Bond 1/Jeneric/Pentron (G3, Prime & Bond 2.1/Dentsply (G4, OptiBond FL/Kerr (G5, Stae/SDI (G6, Snap Bond/Copalite (G7, Prime & Bond NT/Dentsply (G 8, Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus/3M (G9. O Grupo controle (G10. foi confeccionado somente com a resina composta (Z100/3M. Foram confeccionados 100 espécimes, 10 para cada grupo. Houve diferenças estatísticas significantes entre os grupos. O grupo 3 foi o que mostrou a mais alta resistência em comparação aos nove testados. O grupo controle (G10 apresentou a mais alta resistência entre todos os Grupos.  

  1. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Alonso-Pérez-Barquero, Jorge; Fons-Font, Antonio; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesive requiring acid etching, and Clearfil SE Bond® (Kuraray), two-bottle self-etching adhesive. The vestibular, lingual, distal and mesial surfaces of ten molars (n=10) were ground to remove all enamel and 40 ceramic samples were cemented with Variolink II® (Ivoclar Vivadent). Half the molar surfaces were treated to create round microretention (pits) to determine whether these could influence bond strength to dentin. The 40 molar surfaces were divided into four groups (n=10): Optibond FL (O); Clearfil SE (C); Optibond FL + microretention (OM); Clearfil SE + micro retention (CM). A shear bond test was performed and the bond failures provoked examined under an optical microscope. Results O=35.27±8.02 MPa; C=36.23±11.23 MPa; OM=28.61±6.27 MPa; CM=27.01±7.57 MPa. No statistically significant differences were found between the adhesives. Optibond FL showed less statistical dispersion than Clearfil SE. The presence of microretentions reduced bond strength values regardless of the adhesive used. Conclusions 1. Clearfil SE self-etching adhesive and Optibond FL acid-etch showed adequate bond strengths and can be recommended for bonding ceramic restorations to dentin. 2. The creation of round microretention pits compromises these adhesives’ bond strength to dentin. Key words:Adhesion to dentin, bonding agent, Optibond FL, Clearfil SE, microretention, shear bond test. PMID:26330937

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Microshear Bond Strength of 5th, 6th and 7th Generation Bonding Agents to Coronal Dentin Versus Dentin at Floor of Pulp Chamber: An In vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Velagala Lakshmi; Damaraju, Bhargavi; Priyadharsini, Bollu Indira; Subbarao, Vummidisetti V; Raju, K Rama Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lack of seal and adhesion between the final restoration and tooth structure adversely affects the results of root canal treatment. Lots of adhesive bonding agents are marketed to overcome this deficiency and achieve successful restoration. So the study compares and evaluates the micro shear bond strength of coronal dentin and pulp chamber dentin using three different generation dentin bonding systems and to know clinical efficiency for clinical use. Materials and Methods: Differen...

  3. Assembly and mechanosensory function of focal adhesions: experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershadsky, Alexander D; Ballestrem, Christoph; Carramusa, Letizia; Zilberman, Yuliya; Gilquin, Benoit; Khochbin, Saadi; Alexandrova, Antonina Y; Verkhovsky, Alexander B; Shemesh, Tom; Kozlov, Michael M

    2006-04-01

    Initial integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions (focal complexes) appear underneath the lamellipodia, in the regions of the "fast" centripetal flow driven by actin polymerization. Once formed, these adhesions convert the flow behind them into a "slow", myosin II-driven mode. Some focal complexes then turn into elongated focal adhesions (FAs) associated with contractile actomyosin bundles (stress fibers). Myosin II inhibition does not suppress formation of focal complexes but blocks their conversion into mature FAs and further FA growth. Application of external pulling force promotes FA growth even under conditions when myosin II activity is blocked. Thus, individual FAs behave as mechanosensors responding to the application of force by directional assembly. We proposed a thermodynamic model for the mechanosensitivity of FAs, taking into account that an elastic molecular aggregate subject to pulling forces tends to grow in the direction of force application by incorporating additional subunits. This simple model can explain a variety of processes typical of FA behavior. Assembly of FAs is triggered by the small G-protein Rho via activation of two major targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and the formin homology protein, Dia1. ROCK controls creation of myosin II-driven forces, while Dia1 is involved in the response of FAs to these forces. Expression of the active form of Dia1, allows the external force-induced assembly of mature FAs, even in conditions when Rho is inhibited. Conversely, downregulation of Dia1 by siRNA prevents FA maturation even if Rho is activated. Dia1 and other formins cap barbed (fast growing) ends of actin filaments, allowing insertion of the new actin monomers. We suggested a novel mechanism of such "leaky" capping based on an assumption of elasticity of the formin/barbed end complex. Our model predicts that formin-mediated actin polymerization should be greatly enhanced by application of external pulling force. Thus, the formin-actin complex

  4. The comparison between two irrigation regimens on the dentine wettability for an epoxy resin based sealer by measuring its contact angle formed to the irrigated dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayapudi Phani Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: An irrigation regimen consisting of NaOCl with either EDTA or EDTAC solution as a final irrigant influences the dentine wettability and contact angle of a sealer. EDTAC as a final irrigant facilitates better dentin wettability than EDTA for AH Plus to promote its better flow and adhesion.

  5. Nanolayering of phosphoric acid ester monomer on enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Kumiko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Irie, Masao; Ogawa, Tatsuyuki; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Osaka, Akiyoshi; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Minagi, Shogo; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2011-08-01

    Following the "adhesion-decalcification" concept, specific functional monomers possess the capacity to primary chemically interact with hydroxyapatite (HAp). Such ionic bonding with synthetic HAp has been demonstrated for 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP), manifest as self-assembled "nanolayering". In continuation of that basic research this study aimed to explore whether nanolayering also occurs on enamel and dentin when a 10-MDP primer is applied following a common clinical application protocol. Therefore, the interaction of an experimental 10-MDP primer and a control, commercially available, 10-MDP-based primer (Clearfil SE Bond primer (C-SE), Kuraray) with enamel and dentin was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), complemented with transmission electron microscopy interfacial ultrastructural data upon their reaction with enamel and dentin. In addition, XRD was used to study the effect of the concentration of 10-MDP on nanolayering on dentin. Finally, the stability of the nanolayers was determined by measuring the bond strength to enamel and dentin when a photoinitiator was added to the experimental primer or when interfacial polymerization depended solely on the photoinitiator supplied with the subsequently applied adhesive resin. XRD confirmed nanolayering on enamel and dentin, which was significantly greater on dentin than on enamel, and also when the surface was actively rubbed with the primer. Nanolayering was also proportional to the concentration of 10-MDP in the primer. Finally, the experimental primer needed the photoinitiator to obtain a tensile bond strength to dentin comparable with that of the control C-SE primer (which also contains a photoinitiator), but not when bonded to enamel. It is concluded that self-assembled nanolayering occurs on enamel and dentin, even when following a clinically used application protocol. The lower bonding effectiveness of mild self-etch adhesives to enamel should be ascribed in part to a lower

  6. Effect of mucoprotein on the bond strength of resin composite to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam Marie; Powers, John M; O'Keefe, Kathy L; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Marshall, Grayson W

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the bond strength and analyze the morphology of the dentin-adhesive interface of two etch and rinse and two self-etch adhesive systems with two kinds of artificial saliva (with and without 450 mg/L mucin) contamination under different conditions of decontaminating the interface. Bonded specimens were sectioned perpendicularly to the bonded surface in 1-mm thick slabs. These 1-mm thick slabs were remounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned in sticks perpendicular to the bonding interfaces with a 1-mm(2) area. Nine specimens from each condition were tested after 24 h on a testing machine (Instron) at a speed of 0.5 mm/min for a total of 360 specimens. Mean and standard deviations of bond strength (MPa) were calculated. ANOVA showed significant differences as well as Fisher's PLSD intervals (p < 0.05). The following values are the results for different groups: Control group 34-60 MPa, saliva without mucin 0-52 MPa, and saliva with mucin 0-57 MPa. Failure sites were mixed and adhesive failure was common for the low bond strength results. P&BNT with ideal conditions and following the manufacturer's instructions (control) had the highest bond strengths and the dentin-adhesive interface exhibited an ideal morphology of etch-and-rinse system. SEM gave complementary visual evidence of the effect in the dentin/adhesive interface structure with some contaminated conditions compared with their respective control groups. This in vitro artificial saliva model with and without mucin showed that an organic component of saliva could increase or decrease the bond strength depending on the specific bonding agent and decontamination procedure.

  7. Dental Stem Cell Migration on Pulp Ceiling Cavities Filled with MTA, Dentin Chips, or Bio-Oss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Lymperi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MTA, Bio-Oss, and dentin chips have been successfully used in endodontics. The aim of this study was to assess the adhesion and migration of dental stem cells on human pulp ceiling cavities filled with these endodontic materials in an experimental model, which mimics the clinical conditions of regenerative endodontics. Cavities were formed, by a homemade mold, on untouched third molars, filled with endodontic materials, and observed with electron microscopy. Cells were seeded on cavities’ surface and their morphology and number were analysed. The phenomenon of tropism was assessed in a migration assay. All three materials demonstrated appropriate microstructures for cell attachment. Cells grew on all reagents, but they showed a differential morphology. Moreover, variations were observed when comparing cells numbers on cavity’s filling versus the surrounding dentine disc. The highest number of cells was recorded on dentin chips whereas the opposite was true for Bio-Oss. This was confirmed in the migration assay where a statistically significant lower number of cells migrated towards Bio-Oss as compared to MTA and dentin chips. This study highlights that MTA and dentin chips have a greater potential compared to Bio-Oss regarding the attraction of dental stem cells and are good candidates for bioengineered pulp regeneration.

  8. Dental Stem Cell Migration on Pulp Ceiling Cavities Filled with MTA, Dentin Chips, or Bio-Oss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperi, Stefania; Taraslia, Vasiliki; Tsatsoulis, Ioannis N.; Samara, Athina; Agrafioti, Anastasia; Anastasiadou, Ema; Kontakiotis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    MTA, Bio-Oss, and dentin chips have been successfully used in endodontics. The aim of this study was to assess the adhesion and migration of dental stem cells on human pulp ceiling cavities filled with these endodontic materials in an experimental model, which mimics the clinical conditions of regenerative endodontics. Cavities were formed, by a homemade mold, on untouched third molars, filled with endodontic materials, and observed with electron microscopy. Cells were seeded on cavities' surface and their morphology and number were analysed. The phenomenon of tropism was assessed in a migration assay. All three materials demonstrated appropriate microstructures for cell attachment. Cells grew on all reagents, but they showed a differential morphology. Moreover, variations were observed when comparing cells numbers on cavity's filling versus the surrounding dentine disc. The highest number of cells was recorded on dentin chips whereas the opposite was true for Bio-Oss. This was confirmed in the migration assay where a statistically significant lower number of cells migrated towards Bio-Oss as compared to MTA and dentin chips. This study highlights that MTA and dentin chips have a greater potential compared to Bio-Oss regarding the attraction of dental stem cells and are good candidates for bioengineered pulp regeneration. PMID:26146613

  9. Human and Bovine Dentin Composition and Its Hybridization Mechanism Assessed by FT-Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    L. E. S. Soares; A. D. F. Campos; Martin, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the human and bovine dentin and their interactions with adhesive systems. Ten human (H) molars and ten bovine (B) teeth were prepared exposing the dentin and then each specimen was divided into two parts. The resulted forty dentin segments were treated either with the total-etch one bottle adhesive (Prime & Bond 2.1, PB) or with the single-step self-etching adhesive (Xeno III, X) and divided into four groups: HPB (control), HX, BPB, and BX. Each group w...

  10. Enamel and dentine demineralization by a combination of starch and sucrose in a biofilm – caries model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Nunes BOTELHO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sucrose is the most cariogenic dietary carbohydrate and starch is considered non-cariogenic for enamel and moderately cariogenic for dentine. However, the cariogenicity of the combination of starch and sucrose remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of this combination on Streptococcus mutans biofilm composition and enamel and dentine demineralization. Biofilms of S. mutans UA159 were grown on saliva-coated enamel and dentine slabs in culture medium containing 10% saliva. They were exposed (8 times/day to one of the following treatments: 0.9% NaCl (negative control, 1% starch, 10% sucrose, or 1% starch and 10% sucrose (starch + sucrose. To simulate the effect of human salivary amylase on the starch metabolization, the biofilms were pretreated with saliva before each treatment and saliva was also added to the culture medium. Acidogenicity of the biofilm was estimated by evaluating (2 times/day the culture medium pH. After 4 (dentine or 5 (enamel days of growth, biofilms (n = 9 were individually collected, and the biomass, viable microorganism count, and polysaccharide content were quantified. Dentine and enamel demineralization was assessed by determining the percentage of surface hardness loss. Biofilms exposed to starch + sucrose were more acidogenic and caused higher demineralization (p < 0.0001 on either enamel or dentine than those exposed to each carbohydrate alone. The findings suggest that starch increases the cariogenic potential of sucrose.

  11. Bond strength of adhesive resin cement with different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni e Silva, Fabrizio; Pamato, Saulo; Kuga, Milton-Carlos; Só, Marcus-Vinicius-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Background To assess the immediate bond strength of a dual-cure adhesive resin cement to the hybridized dentin with different bonding systems. Material and Methods Fifty-six healthy human molars were randomly divided into 7 groups (n=8). After 3 longitudinal sections, the central cuts were included in PVC matrix and were submitted to dentin hybridization according to the groups: G1 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Apder™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE), G2 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (Optibond™ FL, Kerr), G3 - etch & rinse system with 3-step (All-Bond 3®, Bisco), G4 - etch & rinse simplified system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE), G5 - self-etching system with one step (Bond Force, Tokuyama), G6 - universal system in moist dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE), G7 - universal system in dry dentin (Single Bond Universal, 3M ESPE). Then all groups received the cementing of a self-adhesive resin cement cylinder (Duo-link, Bisco) made from a polypropylene matrix. In the evaluation of bond strength, the samples were subjected to the microshear test and evaluated according to the fracture pattern by optical microscopy. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test suggests a statistically significant difference between groups (p=0,039), and Tukey for multiple comparisons, indicating a statistically significant difference between G3 and G4 (p<0.05). It was verified high prevalence of adhesive failures, followed by mixed failure and cohesive in dentin. Conclusions The technique and the system used to dentin hybridization are able to affect the immediate bond strength of resin cement dual adhesive. Key words:Adhesion,