WorldWideScience

Sample records for model 3-d structure

  1. Modeling 3-D solar wind structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Odstrčil, Dušan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 4 (2003), s. 497-506 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003003; GA AV ČR IBS1003006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : solar wind * modeling Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.483, year: 2003

  2. 3D-DART: a DNA structure modelling server

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing interest in structural studies of DNA by both experimental and computational approaches. Often, 3D-structural models of DNA are required, for instance, to serve as templates for homology modeling, as starting structures for macro-molecular docking or as scaffold for NMR structure

  3. Modelling reinforced concrete structures in DYNA3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhouse, B.J.; Neilson, A.J.

    1987-10-01

    A material model for reinforced concrete has been implemented in the transient structural dynamics code DYNA3D. This paper outlines the constitutive material model, and presents comparisons of DYNA3D calculations and experiments on impulsively loaded panels, covering the full range of panel damage states from light cracking through to panel collapse or perforation. The results are presented using the post-processor code TAURUS, which has also been modified to provide mesh diagrams with superimposed crack patterns from the DYNA3D predictions. (author)

  4. Tangible 3D modeling of coherent and themed structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jeppe Ullè; Bærentzen, J. Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We present CubeBuilder, a system for interactive, tangible 3D shape modeling. CubeBuilder allows the user to create a digital 3D model by placing physical, non-interlocking cubic blocks. These blocks may be placed in a completely arbitrary fashion and combined with other objects. In effect......, this turns the task of 3D modeling into a playful activity that hardly requires any learning on the part of the user. The blocks are registered using a depth camera and entered into the cube graph where each block is a node and adjacent blocks are connected by edges. From the cube graph, we transform......, allows the user to tangibly build structures of greater details than the blocks provide in and of themselves. We show a number of shapes that have been modeled by users and are indicative of the expressive power of the system. Furthermore, we demonstrate the scalability of the tangible interface which...

  5. Lower bound plane stress element for modelling 3D structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herfelt, Morten Andersen; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    In-plane action is often the primary load-carrying mechanism of reinforced concrete structures. The plate bending action will be secondary, and the behaviour of the structure can be modelled with a reasonable accuracy using a generalised three-dimensional plane stress element. In this paper...

  6. 3D Digital Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper

    wave of new building information modelling tools demands further investigation, not least because of industry representatives' somewhat coarse parlance: Now the word is spreading -3D digital modelling is nothing less than a revolution, a shift of paradigm, a new alphabet... Research qeustions. Based...... on empirical probes (interviews, observations, written inscriptions) within the Danish construction industry this paper explores the organizational and managerial dynamics of 3D Digital Modelling. The paper intends to - Illustrate how the network of (non-)human actors engaged in the promotion (and arrest) of 3...... important to appreciate the analysis. Before turning to the presentation of preliminary findings and a discussion of 3D digital modelling, it begins, however, with an outline of industry specific ICT strategic issues. Paper type. Multi-site field study...

  7. Estimating the complexity of 3D structural models using machine learning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Herrera, Pablo; Kakurina, Maria; Royer, Jean-Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the complexity of 3D geological structural models can play a major role in natural resources exploration surveys, for predicting environmental hazards or for forecasting fossil resources. This paper proposes a structural complexity index which can be used to help in defining the degree of effort necessary to build a 3D model for a given degree of confidence, and also to identify locations where addition efforts are required to meet a given acceptable risk of uncertainty. In this work, it is considered that the structural complexity index can be estimated using machine learning methods on raw geo-data. More precisely, the metrics for measuring the complexity can be approximated as the difficulty degree associated to the prediction of the geological objects distribution calculated based on partial information on the actual structural distribution of materials. The proposed methodology is tested on a set of 3D synthetic structural models for which the degree of effort during their building is assessed using various parameters (such as number of faults, number of part in a surface object, number of borders, ...), the rank of geological elements contained in each model, and, finally, their level of deformation (folding and faulting). The results show how the estimated complexity in a 3D model can be approximated by the quantity of partial data necessaries to simulated at a given precision the actual 3D model without error using machine learning algorithms.

  8. SEGMENTATION OF 3D MODELS FOR CULTURAL HERITAGE STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS – SOME CRITICAL ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gonizzi Barsanti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cultural Heritage documentation and preservation has become a fundamental concern in this historical period. 3D modelling offers a perfect aid to record ancient buildings and artefacts and can be used as a valid starting point for restoration, conservation and structural analysis, which can be performed by using Finite Element Methods (FEA. The models derived from reality-based techniques, made up of the exterior surfaces of the objects captured at high resolution, are - for this reason - made of millions of polygons. Such meshes are not directly usable in structural analysis packages and need to be properly pre-processed in order to be transformed in volumetric meshes suitable for FEA. In addition, dealing with ancient objects, a proper segmentation of 3D volumetric models is needed to analyse the behaviour of the structure with the most suitable level of detail for the different sections of the structure under analysis. Segmentation of 3D models is still an open issue, especially when dealing with ancient, complicated and geometrically complex objects that imply the presence of anomalies and gaps, due to environmental agents such as earthquakes, pollution, wind and rain, or human factors. The aims of this paper is to critically analyse some of the different methodologies and algorithms available to segment a 3D point cloud or a mesh, identifying difficulties and problems by showing examples on different structures.

  9. Segmentation of 3d Models for Cultural Heritage Structural Analysis - Some Critical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonizzi Barsanti, S.; Guidi, G.; De Luca, L.

    2017-08-01

    Cultural Heritage documentation and preservation has become a fundamental concern in this historical period. 3D modelling offers a perfect aid to record ancient buildings and artefacts and can be used as a valid starting point for restoration, conservation and structural analysis, which can be performed by using Finite Element Methods (FEA). The models derived from reality-based techniques, made up of the exterior surfaces of the objects captured at high resolution, are - for this reason - made of millions of polygons. Such meshes are not directly usable in structural analysis packages and need to be properly pre-processed in order to be transformed in volumetric meshes suitable for FEA. In addition, dealing with ancient objects, a proper segmentation of 3D volumetric models is needed to analyse the behaviour of the structure with the most suitable level of detail for the different sections of the structure under analysis. Segmentation of 3D models is still an open issue, especially when dealing with ancient, complicated and geometrically complex objects that imply the presence of anomalies and gaps, due to environmental agents such as earthquakes, pollution, wind and rain, or human factors. The aims of this paper is to critically analyse some of the different methodologies and algorithms available to segment a 3D point cloud or a mesh, identifying difficulties and problems by showing examples on different structures.

  10. Large-scale Comparative Study of Hi-C-based Chromatin 3D Structure Modeling Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Cheng

    2018-05-17

    Chromatin is a complex polymer molecule in eukaryotic cells, primarily consisting of DNA and histones. Many works have shown that the 3D folding of chromatin structure plays an important role in DNA expression. The recently proposed Chro- mosome Conformation Capture technologies, especially the Hi-C assays, provide us an opportunity to study how the 3D structures of the chromatin are organized. Based on the data from Hi-C experiments, many chromatin 3D structure modeling methods have been proposed. However, there is limited ground truth to validate these methods and no robust chromatin structure alignment algorithms to evaluate the performance of these methods. In our work, we first made a thorough literature review of 25 publicly available population Hi-C-based chromatin 3D structure modeling methods. Furthermore, to evaluate and to compare the performance of these methods, we proposed a novel data simulation method, which combined the population Hi-C data and single-cell Hi-C data without ad hoc parameters. Also, we designed a global and a local alignment algorithms to measure the similarity between the templates and the chromatin struc- tures predicted by different modeling methods. Finally, the results from large-scale comparative tests indicated that our alignment algorithms significantly outperform the algorithms in literature.

  11. Computational methods for constructing protein structure models from 3D electron microscopy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke

    2013-10-01

    Protein structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) has made significant progress in the past decades. Resolutions of EM maps have been improving as evidenced by recently reported structures that are solved at high resolutions close to 3Å. Computational methods play a key role in interpreting EM data. Among many computational procedures applied to an EM map to obtain protein structure information, in this article we focus on reviewing computational methods that model protein three-dimensional (3D) structures from a 3D EM density map that is constructed from two-dimensional (2D) maps. The computational methods we discuss range from de novo methods, which identify structural elements in an EM map, to structure fitting methods, where known high resolution structures are fit into a low-resolution EM map. A list of available computational tools is also provided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tangible 3D Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlesen, Aske K.; Ovesen, Nis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental approach to teaching 3D modelling techniques in an Industrial Design programme. The approach includes the use of tangible free form models as tools for improving the overall learning. The paper is based on lecturer and student experiences obtained through...... facilitated discussions during the course as well as through a survey distributed to the participating students. The analysis of the experiences shows a mixed picture consisting of both benefits and limits to the experimental technique. A discussion about the applicability of the technique and about...

  13. Digital 3D Modeling of Whole Garment Based on Structure Illumination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jun

    2006-01-01

    With the coming of information age and the development of computer science, digitalization of whole garment is becoming more and more important. The surface of whole garment is sequent and glossy so that it is lack of the texture characteristic which is the key of digital 3D modeling.According to this reason, the structure illumination is steered into a method of this paper. The paper proposes the method by which 3D model of whole garment is created from 2D image sequences directly but not by the common techniques using general CAD model. In the paper the structure illumination is generated by the slide projector and the modeling of whole garment is based on the strict theory of the digital photogrammetry, computer vision and image processing pattern recognition. Because whole garment is lack of the applicable texture for matching, the characteristic texture generated by the structure illumination is added onto the surface of whole garment. After the characteristic texture is extracted from images and is matched well, 3D coordinates of the characteristic texture can be calculated out by the space forward intersection.Then the whole garment model is acquired by connecting all neighbour space points in the TIN and rendering the real texture of whole garment automatically. The 3D modeling method is untouched so that it is nondestructive which is just suitable for the messaline and the clothing. The method of whole garment 3D modeling proposed in the paper is flexible, effective and practical, which is confirmed by the results of the reconstructing experiments.

  14. CAD-Based Modeling of Advanced Rotary Wing Structures for Integrated 3-D Aeromechanics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staruk, William

    This dissertation describes the first comprehensive use of integrated 3-D aeromechanics modeling, defined as the coupling of 3-D solid finite element method (FEM) structural dynamics with 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD), for the analysis of a real helicopter rotor. The development of this new methodology (a departure from how rotor aeroelastic analysis has been performed for 40 years), its execution on a real rotor, and the fundamental understanding of aeromechanics gained from it, are the key contributions of this dissertation. This work also presents the first CFD/CSD analysis of a tiltrotor in edgewise flight, revealing many of its unique loading mechanisms. The use of 3-D FEM, integrated with a trim solver and aerodynamics modeling, has the potential to enhance the design of advanced rotors by overcoming fundamental limitations of current generation beam-based analysis tools and offering integrated internal dynamic stress and strain predictions for design. Two primary goals drove this research effort: 1) developing a methodology to create 3-D CAD-based brick finite element models of rotors including multibody joints, controls, and aerodynamic interfaces, and 2) refining X3D, the US Army's next generation rotor structural dynamics solver featuring 3-D FEM within a multibody formulation with integrated aerodynamics, to model a tiltrotor in the edgewise conversion flight regime, which drives critical proprotor structural loads. Prior tiltrotor analysis has primarily focused on hover aerodynamics with rigid blades or forward flight whirl-flutter stability with simplified aerodynamics. The first goal was met with the development of a detailed methodology for generating multibody 3-D structural models, starting from CAD geometry, continuing to higher-order hexahedral finite element meshing, to final assembly of the multibody model by creating joints, assigning material properties, and defining the aerodynamic interface. Several levels of verification and

  15. Point-Structured Human Body Modeling Based on 3D Scan Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-June Tsai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel point-structured geometrical modelling for realistic human body is introduced in this paper. This technique is based on the feature extraction from the 3D body scan data. Anatomic feature such as the neck, the arm pits, the crotch points, and other major feature points are recognized. The body data is then segmented into 6 major parts. A body model is then constructed by re-sampling the scanned data to create a point-structured mesh. The body model contains body geodetic landmarks in latitudinal and longitudinal curves passing through those feature points. The body model preserves the perfect body shape and all the body dimensions but requires little space. Therefore, the body model can be used as a mannequin in garment industry, or as a manikin in various human factor designs, but the most important application is to use as a virtue character to animate the body motion in mocap (motion capture systems. By adding suitable joint freedoms between the segmented body links, kinematic and dynamic properties of the motion theories can be applied to the body model. As a result, a 3D virtual character that is fully resembled the original scanned individual is vividly animating the body motions. The gaps between the body segments due to motion can be filled up by skin blending technique using the characteristic of the point-structured model. The model has the potential to serve as a standardized datatype to archive body information for all custom-made products.

  16. 3D Printing of Fluid Flow Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Taira, Kunihiko; Sun, Yiyang; Canuto, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the use of 3D printing to physically visualize (materialize) fluid flow structures. Such 3D models can serve as a refreshing hands-on means to gain deeper physical insights into the formation of complex coherent structures in fluid flows. In this short paper, we present a general procedure for taking 3D flow field data and producing a file format that can be supplied to a 3D printer, with two examples of 3D printed flow structures. A sample code to perform this process is also prov...

  17. TLS-Based Feature Extraction and 3D Modeling for Arch Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS technology is one of the most efficient and accurate tools for 3D measurement which can reveal surface-based characteristics of objects with the aid of computer vision and programming. Thus, it plays an increasingly important role in deformation monitoring and analysis. Automatic data extraction and high efficiency and accuracy modeling from scattered point clouds are challenging issues during the TLS data processing. This paper presents a data extraction method considering the partial and statistical distribution of the point clouds scanned, called the window-neighborhood method. Based on the point clouds extracted, 3D modeling of the boundary of an arched structure was carried out. The ideal modeling strategy should be fast, accurate, and less complex regarding its application to large amounts of data. The paper discusses the accuracy of fittings in four cases between whole curve, segmentation, polynomial, and B-spline. A similar number of parameters was set for polynomial and B-spline because the number of unknown parameters is essential for the accuracy of the fittings. The uncertainties of the scanned raw point clouds and the modeling are discussed. This process is considered a prerequisite step for 3D deformation analysis with TLS.

  18. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhlili W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wiame Lakhlili,1 Gwénaël Chevé,2 Abdelaziz Yasri,2 Azeddine Ibrahimi1 1Laboratoire de Biotechnologie (MedBiotech, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie de Rabat, Université Mohammed V de Rabat, Rabat, Morroco; 2OriBase Pharma, Cap Gamma, Parc Euromédecine, Montpellier, France Abstract: The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site.Keywords: mTOR, homology modeling, mTOR kinase-domain, docking

  19. Methods and uncertainty estimations of 3-D structural modelling in crystalline rocks: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schneeberger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exhumed basement rocks are often dissected by faults, the latter controlling physical parameters such as rock strength, porosity, or permeability. Knowledge on the three-dimensional (3-D geometry of the fault pattern and its continuation with depth is therefore of paramount importance for applied geology projects (e.g. tunnelling, nuclear waste disposal in crystalline bedrock. The central Aar massif (Central Switzerland serves as a study area where we investigate the 3-D geometry of the Alpine fault pattern by means of both surface (fieldwork and remote sensing and underground ground (mapping of the Grimsel Test Site information. The fault zone pattern consists of planar steep major faults (kilometre scale interconnected with secondary relay faults (hectometre scale. Starting with surface data, we present a workflow for structural 3-D modelling of the primary faults based on a comparison of three extrapolation approaches based on (a field data, (b Delaunay triangulation, and (c a best-fitting moment of inertia analysis. The quality of these surface-data-based 3-D models is then tested with respect to the fit of the predictions with the underground appearance of faults. All three extrapolation approaches result in a close fit (> 10 % when compared with underground rock laboratory mapping. Subsequently, we performed a statistical interpolation based on Bayesian inference in order to validate and further constrain the uncertainty of the extrapolation approaches. This comparison indicates that fieldwork at the surface is key for accurately constraining the geometry of the fault pattern and enabling a proper extrapolation of major faults towards depth. Considerable uncertainties, however, persist with respect to smaller-sized secondary structures because of their limited spatial extensions and unknown reoccurrence intervals.

  20. Methods and uncertainty estimations of 3-D structural modelling in crystalline rocks: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Raphael; de La Varga, Miguel; Egli, Daniel; Berger, Alfons; Kober, Florian; Wellmann, Florian; Herwegh, Marco

    2017-09-01

    Exhumed basement rocks are often dissected by faults, the latter controlling physical parameters such as rock strength, porosity, or permeability. Knowledge on the three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the fault pattern and its continuation with depth is therefore of paramount importance for applied geology projects (e.g. tunnelling, nuclear waste disposal) in crystalline bedrock. The central Aar massif (Central Switzerland) serves as a study area where we investigate the 3-D geometry of the Alpine fault pattern by means of both surface (fieldwork and remote sensing) and underground ground (mapping of the Grimsel Test Site) information. The fault zone pattern consists of planar steep major faults (kilometre scale) interconnected with secondary relay faults (hectometre scale). Starting with surface data, we present a workflow for structural 3-D modelling of the primary faults based on a comparison of three extrapolation approaches based on (a) field data, (b) Delaunay triangulation, and (c) a best-fitting moment of inertia analysis. The quality of these surface-data-based 3-D models is then tested with respect to the fit of the predictions with the underground appearance of faults. All three extrapolation approaches result in a close fit ( > 10 %) when compared with underground rock laboratory mapping. Subsequently, we performed a statistical interpolation based on Bayesian inference in order to validate and further constrain the uncertainty of the extrapolation approaches. This comparison indicates that fieldwork at the surface is key for accurately constraining the geometry of the fault pattern and enabling a proper extrapolation of major faults towards depth. Considerable uncertainties, however, persist with respect to smaller-sized secondary structures because of their limited spatial extensions and unknown reoccurrence intervals.

  1. Static/dynamic fluid-structure interaction analysis for 3-D rotary blade model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Yu Sung; Kim, Dong Man; Park, Kang Kyun

    2009-01-01

    In this study, static/dynamic fluid-structure interaction analyses have been conducted for a 3D rotary blade model like a turbo-machinery or wind turbine blade. Advanced computational analysis system based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) has been developed in order to investigate detailed dynamic responses of rotary type models. Fluid domains are modeled using the computational grid system with local grid deforming techniques. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with various turbulence model are solved for unsteady flow problems of the rotating blade model. Detailed static/dynamic responses and instantaneous pressure contours on the blade surfaces considering flow-separation effects are presented to show the multi-physical phenomenon of the rotating blades.

  2. Application of Characterization, Modeling, and Analytics Towards Understanding Process Structure Linkages in Metallic 3D Printing (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    METALLIC 3D PRINTING (POSTPRINT) M.A. Groeber, E. Schwalbach, S. Donegan, K. Chaput, T. Butler, and J. Miller AFRL/RX 27 JULY...MODELING, AND ANALYTICS TOWARDS UNDERSTANDING PROCESS- STRUCTURE LINKAGES IN METALLIC 3D PRINTING (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b...characterization, modelling, and analytics towards understanding process-structure linkages in metallic 3D printing M A Groeber, E Schwalbach, S Donegan, K

  3. Using Openstreetmap Data to Generate Building Models with Their Inner Structures for 3d Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Zipf, A.

    2017-09-01

    With the development of Web 2.0, more and more data related to indoor environments has been collected within the volunteered geographic information (VGI) framework, which creates a need for construction of indoor environments from VGI. In this study, we focus on generating 3D building models from OpenStreetMap (OSM) data, and provide an approach to support construction and visualization of indoor environments on 3D maps. In this paper, we present an algorithm which can extract building information from OSM data, and can construct building structures as well as inner building components (e.g., doors, rooms, and windows). A web application is built to support the processing and visualization of the building models on a 3D map. We test our approach with an indoor dataset collected from the field. The results show the feasibility of our approach and its potentials to provide support for a wide range of applications, such as indoor and outdoor navigation, urban planning, and incident management.

  4. USING OPENSTREETMAP DATA TO GENERATE BUILDING MODELS WITH THEIR INNER STRUCTURES FOR 3D MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the development of Web 2.0, more and more data related to indoor environments has been collected within the volunteered geographic information (VGI framework, which creates a need for construction of indoor environments from VGI. In this study, we focus on generating 3D building models from OpenStreetMap (OSM data, and provide an approach to support construction and visualization of indoor environments on 3D maps. In this paper, we present an algorithm which can extract building information from OSM data, and can construct building structures as well as inner building components (e.g., doors, rooms, and windows. A web application is built to support the processing and visualization of the building models on a 3D map. We test our approach with an indoor dataset collected from the field. The results show the feasibility of our approach and its potentials to provide support for a wide range of applications, such as indoor and outdoor navigation, urban planning, and incident management.

  5. Digital structural interpretation of mountain-scale photogrammetric 3D models (Kamnik Alps, Slovenia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolžan, Erazem; Vrabec, Marko

    2015-04-01

    From the earliest days of geological science, mountainous terrains with their extreme topographic relief and sparse to non-existent vegetation were utilized to a great advantage for gaining 3D insight into geological structure. But whereas Alpine vistas may offer perfect panoramic views of geology, the steep mountain slopes and vertical cliffs make it very time-consuming and difficult (if not impossible) to acquire quantitative mapping data such as precisely georeferenced traces of geological boundaries and attitudes of structural planes. We faced this problem in mapping the central Kamnik Alps of northern Slovenia, which are built up from Mid to Late Triassic succession of carbonate rocks. Polyphase brittle tectonic evolution, monotonous lithology and the presence of temporally and spatially irregular facies boundary between bedded platform carbonates and massive reef limestones considerably complicate the structural interpretation of otherwise perfectly exposed, but hardly accessible massif. We used Agisoft Photoscan Structure-from-Motion photogrammetric software to process a series of overlapping high-resolution (~0.25 m ground resolution) vertical aerial photographs originally acquired by the Geodetic Authority of the Republic of Slovenia for surveying purposes, to derive very detailed 3D triangular mesh models of terrain and associated photographic textures. Phototextures are crucial for geological interpretation of the models as they provide additional levels of detail and lithological information which is not resolvable from geometrical mesh models alone. We then exported the models to Paradigm Gocad software to refine and optimize the meshing. Structural interpretation of the models, including mapping of traces and surfaces of faults and stratigraphic boundaries and determining dips of structural planes, was performed in MVE Move suite which offers a range of useful tools for digital mapping and interpretation. Photogrammetric model was complemented by

  6. Large-scale Comparative Study of Hi-C-based Chromatin 3D Structure Modeling Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex polymer molecule in eukaryotic cells, primarily consisting of DNA and histones. Many works have shown that the 3D folding of chromatin structure plays an important role in DNA expression. The recently proposed Chro- mosome

  7. Direct ink writing of 3D conductive polyaniline structures and rheological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holness, F. Benjamin; Price, Aaron D.

    2018-01-01

    The intractable nature of conjugated polymers (CP) leads to practical limitations in the fabrication of CP-based transducers having complex three-dimensional geometries. Conventional CP device fabrication processes have focused primarily on thin-film deposition techniques; this study explores novel additive manufacturing processes specifically developed for CP with the ultimate goal of increasing the functionality of CP sensors and actuators. Herein we employ automated polymer paste extrusion processes for the direct ink writing of 3D conductive polyaniline (PANI) structures. Realization of these structures was enabled through a modified fused filament fabrication delta robot equipped with an integrated polymer paste extruder to fabricate high-resolution 3D conductive PANI structures. The required processability of PANI was achieved by means of a counterion-induced thermal doping method. The effect of thermal doping on the PANI-DBSA paste by means of a constitutive relationship to describe the paste flow as a function of the thermal doping time is explored. This relationship is incorporated within a flow model to predict the extruded track width as a function of various process parameters including: print speed, gauge pressure, nozzle diameter, and pre-extrusion thermal doping time.

  8. Numerical modeling of 3D halo current path in ITER structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettini, Paolo; Marconato, Nicolò; Furno Palumbo, Maurizio; Peruzzo, Simone [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, C.so Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Specogna, Ruben, E-mail: ruben.specogna@uniud.it [DIEGM, Università di Udine, Via delle Scienze, 208, 33100 Udine (Italy); Albanese, Raffaele; Rubinacci, Guglielmo; Ventre, Salvatore; Villone, Fabio [Consorzio CREATE, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Two numerical codes for the evaluation of halo currents in 3D structures are presented. ► A simplified plasma model is adopted to provide the input (halo current injected into the FW). ► Two representative test cases of ITER symmetric and asymmetric VDEs have been analyzed. ► The proposed approaches provide results in excellent agreement for both cases. -- Abstract: Disruptions represent one of the main concerns for Tokamak operation, especially in view of fusion reactors, or experimental test reactors, due to the electro-mechanical loads induced by halo and eddy currents. The development of a predictive tool which allows to estimate the magnitude and spatial distribution of the halo current forces is of paramount importance in order to ensure robust vessel and in-vessel component design. With this aim, two numerical codes (CARIDDI, CAFE) have been developed, which allow to calculate the halo current path (resistive distribution) in the passive structures surrounding the plasma. The former is based on an integral formulation for the eddy currents problem particularized to the static case; the latter implements a pair of 3D FEM complementary formulations for the solution of the steady-state current conduction problem. A simplified plasma model is adopted to provide the inputs (halo current injected into the first wall). Two representative test cases (ITER symmetric and asymmetric VDEs) have been selected to cross check the results of the proposed approaches.

  9. Computerized modeling techniques predict the 3D structure of H₄R: facts and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Hilal; Ismael-Shanak, Siba; Michaeli, Amit; Rayan, Anwar

    2012-01-01

    The functional characterization of proteins presents a daily challenge r biochemical, medical and computational sciences, especially when the structures are undetermined empirically, as in the case of the Histamine H4 Receptor (H₄R). H₄R is a member of the GPCR superfamily that plays a vital role in immune and inflammatory responses. To date, the concept of GPCRs modeling is highlighted in textbooks and pharmaceutical pamphlets, and this group of proteins has been the subject of almost 3500 publications in the scientific literature. The dynamic nature of determining the GPCRs structure was elucidated through elegant and creative modeling methodologies, implemented by many groups around the world. H₄R which belongs to the GPCR family was cloned in 2000; understandably, its biological activity was reported only 65 times in pubmed. Here we attempt to cover the fundamental concepts of H₄R structure modeling and its implementation in drug discovery, especially those that have been experimentally tested and to highlight some ideas that are currently being discussed on the dynamic nature of H₄R and GPCRs computerized techniques for 3D structure modeling.

  10. The lithospheric-scale 3D structural configuration of the North Alpine Foreland Basin constrained by gravity modelling and the calculation of the 3D load distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schneider, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The North Alpine Foreland Basin is situated in the northern front of the European Alps and extends over parts of France, Switzerland, Germany and Austria. It formed as a wedge shaped depression since the Tertiary in consequence of the Euro - Adriatic continental collision and the Alpine orogeny. The basin is filled with clastic sediments, the Molasse, originating from erosional processes of the Alps and underlain by Mesozoic sedimentary successions and a Paleozoic crystalline crust. For our study we have focused on the German part of the basin. To investigate the deep structure, the isostatic state and the load distribution of this region we have constructed a 3D structural model of the basin and the Alpine area using available depth and thickness maps, regional scale 3D structural models as well as seismic and well data for the sedimentary part. The crust (from the top Paleozoic down to the Moho (Grad et al. 2008)) has been considered as two-parted with a lighter upper crust and a denser lower crust; the partition has been calculated following the approach of isostatic equilibrium of Pratt (1855). By implementing a seismic Lithosphere-Asthenosphere-Boundary (LAB) (Tesauro 2009) the crustal scale model has been extended to the lithospheric-scale. The layer geometry and the assigned bulk densities of this starting model have been constrained by means of 3D gravity modelling (BGI, 2012). Afterwards the 3D load distribution has been calculated using a 3D finite element method. Our results show that the North Alpine Foreland Basin is not isostatically balanced and that the configuration of the crystalline crust strongly controls the gravity field in this area. Furthermore, our results show that the basin area is influenced by varying lateral load differences down to a depth of more than 150 km what allows a first order statement of the required compensating horizontal stress needed to prevent gravitational collapse of the system. BGI (2012). The International

  11. 3D QSAR models built on structure-based alignments of Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Federico; Manetti, Fabrizio; Carraro, Fabio; Naldini, Antonella; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele; Schenone, Silvia; Bruno, Olga; Brullo, Chiara; Botta, Maurizio

    2009-06-01

    Quality QSAR: A combination of docking calculations and a statistical approach toward Abl inhibitors resulted in a 3D QSAR model, the analysis of which led to the identification of ligand portions important for affinity. New compounds designed on the basis of the model were found to have very good affinity for the target, providing further validation of the model itself.The X-ray crystallographic coordinates of the Abl tyrosine kinase domain in its active, inactive, and Src-like inactive conformations were used as targets to simulate the binding mode of a large series of pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (known Abl inhibitors) by means of GOLD software. Receptor-based alignments provided by molecular docking calculations were submitted to a GRID-GOLPE protocol to generate 3D QSAR models. Analysis of the results showed that the models based on the inactive and Src-like inactive conformations had very poor statistical parameters, whereas the sole model based on the active conformation of Abl was characterized by significant internal and external predictive ability. Subsequent analysis of GOLPE PLS pseudo-coefficient contour plots of this model gave us a better understanding of the relationships between structure and affinity, providing suggestions for the next optimization process. On the basis of these results, new compounds were designed according to the hydrophobic and hydrogen bond donor and acceptor contours, and were found to have improved enzymatic and cellular activity with respect to parent compounds. Additional biological assays confirmed the important role of the selected compounds as inhibitors of cell proliferation in leukemia cells.

  12. Quantifying Multiscale Habitat Structural Complexity: A Cost-Effective Framework for Underwater 3D Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ferrari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Coral reef habitat structural complexity influences key ecological processes, ecosystem biodiversity, and resilience. Measuring structural complexity underwater is not trivial and researchers have been searching for accurate and cost-effective methods that can be applied across spatial extents for over 50 years. This study integrated a set of existing multi-view, image-processing algorithms, to accurately compute metrics of structural complexity (e.g., ratio of surface to planar area underwater solely from images. This framework resulted in accurate, high-speed 3D habitat reconstructions at scales ranging from small corals to reef-scapes (10s km2. Structural complexity was accurately quantified from both contemporary and historical image datasets across three spatial scales: (i branching coral colony (Acropora spp.; (ii reef area (400 m2; and (iii reef transect (2 km. At small scales, our method delivered models with <1 mm error over 90% of the surface area, while the accuracy at transect scale was 85.3% ± 6% (CI. Advantages are: no need for an a priori requirement for image size or resolution, no invasive techniques, cost-effectiveness, and utilization of existing imagery taken from off-the-shelf cameras (both monocular or stereo. This remote sensing method can be integrated to reef monitoring and improve our knowledge of key aspects of coral reef dynamics, from reef accretion to habitat provisioning and productivity, by measuring and up-scaling estimates of structural complexity.

  13. 3D Modelling of Inaccessible Areas using UAV-based Aerial Photography and Structure from Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obanawa, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Yuichi; Gomez, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    In hardly accessible areas, the collection of 3D point-clouds using TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner) can be very challenging, while airborne equivalent would not give a correct account of subvertical features and concave geometries like caves. To solve such problem, the authors have experimented an aerial photography based SfM (Structure from Motion) technique on a 'peninsular-rock' surrounded on three sides by the sea at a Pacific coast in eastern Japan. The research was carried out using UAS (Unmanned Aerial System) combined with a commercial small UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) carrying a compact camera. The UAV is a DJI PHANTOM: the UAV has four rotors (quadcopter), it has a weight of 1000 g, a payload of 400 g and a maximum flight time of 15 minutes. The camera is a GoPro 'HERO3 Black Edition': resolution 12 million pixels; weight 74 g; and 0.5 sec. interval-shot. The 3D model has been constructed by digital photogrammetry using a commercial SfM software, Agisoft PhotoScan Professional®, which can generate sparse and dense point-clouds, from which polygonal models and orthophotographs can be calculated. Using the 'flight-log' and/or GCPs (Ground Control Points), the software can generate digital surface model. As a result, high-resolution aerial orthophotographs and a 3D model were obtained. The results have shown that it was possible to survey the sea cliff and the wave cut-bench, which are unobservable from land side. In details, we could observe the complexity of the sea cliff that is nearly vertical as a whole while slightly overhanging over the thinner base. The wave cut bench is nearly flat and develops extensively at the base of the cliff. Although there are some evidences of small rockfalls at the upper part of the cliff, there is no evidence of very recent activity, because no fallen rock exists on the wave cut bench. This system has several merits: firstly lower cost than the existing measuring methods such as manned-flight survey and aerial laser

  14. Fluid-structure interaction and structural analyses using a comprehensive mitral valve model with 3D chordal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Milan; Einstein, Daniel R; Bloodworth, Charles H; Cochran, Richard P; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2017-04-01

    Over the years, three-dimensional models of the mitral valve have generally been organized around a simplified anatomy. Leaflets have been typically modeled as membranes, tethered to discrete chordae typically modeled as one-dimensional, non-linear cables. Yet, recent, high-resolution medical images have revealed that there is no clear boundary between the chordae and the leaflets. In fact, the mitral valve has been revealed to be more of a webbed structure whose architecture is continuous with the chordae and their extensions into the leaflets. Such detailed images can serve as the basis of anatomically accurate, subject-specific models, wherein the entire valve is modeled with solid elements that more faithfully represent the chordae, the leaflets, and the transition between the two. These models have the potential to enhance our understanding of mitral valve mechanics and to re-examine the role of the mitral valve chordae, which heretofore have been considered to be 'invisible' to the fluid and to be of secondary importance to the leaflets. However, these new models also require a rethinking of modeling assumptions. In this study, we examine the conventional practice of loading the leaflets only and not the chordae in order to study the structural response of the mitral valve apparatus. Specifically, we demonstrate that fully resolved 3D models of the mitral valve require a fluid-structure interaction analysis to correctly load the valve even in the case of quasi-static mechanics. While a fluid-structure interaction mode is still more computationally expensive than a structural-only model, we also show that advances in GPU computing have made such models tractable. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding and quantitative (for predicting mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA; all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy-methyl]-6-(phenylthiothymine congeners’ (HEPT ligands antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1 and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis, respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions.

  16. Modeling the blockage of Lg waves from 3-D variations in crustal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Christopher J.; Cormier, Vernon F.

    2018-05-01

    Comprised of S waves trapped in Earth's crust, the high frequency (2-10 Hz) Lg wave is important to discriminating earthquakes from explosions by comparing its amplitude and waveform to those of Pg and Pn waves. Lateral variations in crustal structure, including variations in crustal thickness, intrinsic attenuation, and scattering, affect the efficiency of Lg propagation and its consistency as a source discriminant at regional (200-1500 km) distances. To investigate the effects of laterally varying Earth structure on the efficiency of propagation of Lg and Pg, we apply a radiative transport algorithm to model complete, high-frequency (2-4 Hz), regional coda envelopes. The algorithm propagates packets of energy with ray theory through large-scale 3-D structure, and includes stochastic effects of multiple-scattering by small-scale heterogeneities within the large-scale structure. Source-radiation patterns are described by moment tensors. Seismograms of explosion and earthquake sources are synthesized in canonical models to predict effects on waveforms of paths crossing regions of crustal thinning (pull-apart basins and ocean/continent transitions) and thickening (collisional mountain belts), For paths crossing crustal thinning regions, Lg is amplified at receivers within the thinned region but strongly disrupted and attenuated at receivers beyond the thinned region. For paths crossing regions of crustal thickening, Lg amplitude is attenuated at receivers within the thickened region, but experiences little or no reduction in amplitude at receivers beyond the thickened region. The length of the Lg propagation within a thickened region and the complexity of over- and under-thrust crustal layers, can produce localized zones of Lg amplification or attenuation. Regions of intense scattering within laterally homogeneous models of the crust increase Lg attenuation but do not disrupt its coda shape.

  17. 3D Models of Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This collaborative grant is developing 3D models of both mouse and human biology to investigate aspects of therapeutic vaccination in order to answer key questions relevant to human cancer immunotherapy.

  18. 3D Face Apperance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Astrom, K

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations......We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations...

  19. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  20. Vascular stents: Coupling full 3-D with reduced-order structural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdeev, I; Shams, M

    2010-01-01

    Self-expanding nitinol stents are used to treat peripheral arterial disease. The peripheral arteries are subjected to a combination of mechanical forces such as compression, torsion, bending, and contraction. Most commercially available peripheral self-expanding stents are composed of a series of sub-millimeter V-shaped struts, which are laser-cut from a nitinol tube and surface-treated for better fatigue performance. The numerical stent models must accurately predict location and distribution of local stresses and strains caused by large arterial deformations. Full 3-D finite element non-linear analysis of an entire stent is computationally expensive to the point of being prohibitive, especially for longer stents. Reduced-order models based on beam or shell elements are fairly accurate in capturing global deformations, but are not very helpful in predicting stent failure. We propose a mixed approach that combines the full 3-D model and reduced-order models. Several global-local, full 3-D/reduced-order finite element models of a peripheral self-expanding stent were validated and compared with experimental data. The kinematic constraint method used to couple various elements together was found to be very efficient and easily applicable to commercial FEA codes. The proposed mixed models can be used to accurately predict stent failure based on realistic (patient-specific), non-linear kinematic behavior of peripheral arteries.

  1. 3D printing the pterygopalatine fossa: a negative space model of a complex structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Ross; Parihar, Shivani; Skarparis, Yiannis; Varsou, Ourania; Cezayirli, Enis

    2018-02-01

    The pterygopalatine fossa is one of the most complex anatomical regions to understand. It is poorly visualized in cadaveric dissection and most textbooks rely on schematic depictions. We describe our approach to creating a low-cost, 3D model of the pterygopalatine fossa, including its associated canals and foramina, using an affordable "desktop" 3D printer. We used open source software to create a volume render of the pterygopalatine fossa from axial slices of a head computerised tomography scan. These data were then exported to a 3D printer to produce an anatomically accurate model. The resulting 'negative space' model of the pterygopalatine fossa provides a useful and innovative aid for understanding the complex anatomical relationships of the pterygopalatine fossa. This model was designed primarily for medical students; however, it will also be of interest to postgraduates in ENT, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and radiology. The technical process described may be replicated by other departments wishing to develop their own anatomical models whilst incurring minimal costs.

  2. 3D Crustal Velocity Structure Model of the Middle-eastern North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Y.; Wang, F.; Lin, J.; Wei, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Lithosphere thinning and destruction in the middle-eastern North China Craton (NCC), a region susceptible to strong earthquakes, is one of the research hotspots in solid earth science. Up to 42 wide-angle reflection/refraction deep seismic sounding (DSS) profiles have been completed in the middle-eastern NCC, we collect all the 2D profiling results and perform gridding of the velocity and interface depth data, and build a 3D crustal velocity structure model for the middle-eastern NCC, named HBCrust1.0, using the Kriging interpolation method. In this model, four layers are divided by three interfaces: G is the interface between the sedimentary cover and crystalline crust, with velocities of 5.0-5.5 km/s above and 5.8-6.0 km/s below. C is the interface of the upper and lower crust, with velocity jump from 6.2-6.4 km/s to 6.5-6.6 km/s. M is the interface between the crust and upper mantle, with velocity 6.7-7.0 km/s at the crust bottom and 7.9-8.0 km/s on mantle top. Our results show that the first arrival time calculated from HBCust1.0 fit well with the observation. It also demonstrates that the upper crust is the main seismogenic layer, and the brittle-ductile transition occurs at depths near interface C. The depth of interface Moho varies beneath the source area of the Tangshan earth-quake, and a low-velocity structure is found to extend from the source area to the lower crust. Based on these observations, it can be inferred that stress accumulation responsible for the Tangshan earthquake may have been closely related to the migration and deformation of the mantle materials. Comparisons of the average velocities of the whole crust, the upper and the lower crust show that the average velocity of the lower crust under the central part of the North China Basin (NCB) in the east of the craton is obviously higher than the regional average, this high-velocity probably results from longterm underplating of the mantle magma. This research is founded by the Natural Science

  3. 3D Modeling of Lacus Mortis Pit Crater with Presumed Interior Tube Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ik-Seon Hong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When humans explore the Moon, lunar caves will be an ideal base to provide a shelter from the hazards of radiation, meteorite impact, and extreme diurnal temperature differences. In order to ascertain the existence of caves on the Moon, it is best to visit the Moon in person. The Google Lunar X Prize(GLXP competition started recently to attempt lunar exploration missions. Ones of those groups competing, plan to land on a pit of Lacus Mortis and determine the existence of a cave inside this pit. In this pit, there is a ramp from the entrance down to the inside of the pit, which enables a rover to approach the inner region of the pit. In this study, under the assumption of the existence of a cave in this pit, a 3D model was developed based on the optical image data. Since this model simulates the actual terrain, the rendering of the model agrees well with the image data. Furthermore, the 3D printing of this model will enable more rigorous investigations and also could be used to publicize lunar exploration missions with ease.

  4. 3D Modeling of Lacus Mortis Pit Crater with Presumed Interior Tube Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ik-Seon; Yi, Yu; Yu, Jaehyung; Haruyama, Junichi

    2015-06-01

    When humans explore the Moon, lunar caves will be an ideal base to provide a shelter from the hazards of radiation, meteorite impact, and extreme diurnal temperature differences. In order to ascertain the existence of caves on the Moon, it is best to visit the Moon in person. The Google Lunar X Prize(GLXP) competition started recently to attempt lunar exploration missions. Ones of those groups competing, plan to land on a pit of Lacus Mortis and determine the existence of a cave inside this pit. In this pit, there is a ramp from the entrance down to the inside of the pit, which enables a rover to approach the inner region of the pit. In this study, under the assumption of the existence of a cave in this pit, a 3D model was developed based on the optical image data. Since this model simulates the actual terrain, the rendering of the model agrees well with the image data. Furthermore, the 3D printing of this model will enable more rigorous investigations and also could be used to publicize lunar exploration missions with ease.

  5. Investigating the Importance of 3D Structure & Topography in Seismic Deformation Modeling: Case Study of the April 2015 Nepal Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, L.; Gharti, H. N.; Tromp, J.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, observations of deformation at plate boundaries have been greatly improved by the development of techniques in space geodesy. However, models of seismic deformation remain limited and are unable to account for realistic 3D structure in topography and material properties. We demonstrate the importance of 3D structure using a spectral-element method that incorporates fault geometry, topography, and heterogeneous material properties in a (non)linear viscoelastic domain. Our method is benchmarked against Okada's analytical technique and the PyLith software package. The April 2015 Nepal earthquake is used as a case study to examine whether 3D structure can affect the predictions of seismic deformation models. We find that the inclusion of topography has a significant effect on our results.

  6. Influence of Young's moduli in 3D fluid-structure coupled models of the human cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnke, Frank; Semmelbauer, Sebastian; Marquardt, Torsten

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic wave propagation in the human cochlea was studied using a tapered box-model with linear assumptions respective to all mechanical parameters. The discretisation and evaluation is conducted by a commercial finite element package (ANSYS). The main difference to former models of the cochlea was the representation of the basilar membrane by a 3D elastic solid. The Young's moduli of this solid were modified to study their influence on the travelling wave. The lymph in the scala vestibuli and scala tympani was represented by a viscous and nearly incompressible fluid finite element approach. Our results show the maximum displacement for f = 2kHz at half of the length of the cochlea in accordance with former experiments. For low frequencies f <200 Hz nearly zero phase shifts were found, whereas for f =1 kHz it reaches values up to -12 cycles depending on the degree of orthotropy.

  7. GENERATING ACCURATE 3D MODELS OF ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE STRUCTURES USING LOW-COST CAMERA AND OPEN SOURCE ALGORITHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zacharek

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available These studies have been conductedusing non-metric digital camera and dense image matching algorithms, as non-contact methods of creating monuments documentation.In order toprocess the imagery, few open-source software and algorithms of generating adense point cloud from images have been executed. In the research, the OSM Bundler, VisualSFM software, and web application ARC3D were used. Images obtained for each of the investigated objects were processed using those applications, and then dense point clouds and textured 3D models were created. As a result of post-processing, obtained models were filtered and scaled.The research showedthat even using the open-source software it is possible toobtain accurate 3D models of structures (with an accuracy of a few centimeters, but for the purpose of documentation and conservation of cultural and historical heritage, such accuracy can be insufficient.

  8. 3D MRI Modeling of Thin and Spatially Complex Soft Tissue Structures without Shrinkage: Lamprey Myosepta as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bradley M; Jia, Guang; Carmichael, Owen; McKlveen, Kevin; Homberger, Dominique G

    2018-05-12

    3D imaging techniques enable the non-destructive analysis and modeling of complex structures. Among these, MRI exhibits good soft tissue contrast, but is currently less commonly used for non-clinical research than x-ray CT, even though the latter requires contrast-staining that shrinks and distorts soft tissues. When the objective is the creation of a realistic and complete 3D model of soft tissue structures, MRI data are more demanding to acquire and visualize and require extensive post-processing because they comprise non-cubic voxels with dimensions that represent a trade-off between tissue contrast and image resolution. Therefore, thin soft tissue structures with complex spatial configurations are not always visible in a single MRI dataset, so that standard segmentation techniques are not sufficient for their complete visualization. By using the example of the thin and spatially complex connective tissue myosepta in lampreys, we developed a workflow protocol for the selection of the appropriate parameters for the acquisition of MRI data and for the visualization and 3D modeling of soft tissue structures. This protocol includes a novel recursive segmentation technique for supplementing missing data in one dataset with data from another dataset to produce realistic and complete 3D models. Such 3D models are needed for the modeling of dynamic processes, such as the biomechanics of fish locomotion. However, our methodology is applicable to the visualization of any thin soft tissue structures with complex spatial configurations, such as fasciae, aponeuroses, and small blood vessels and nerves, for clinical research and the further exploration of tensegrity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. RealityConvert: a tool for preparing 3D models of biochemical structures for augmented and virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrel, Alexandre; Fourches, Denis

    2017-12-01

    There is a growing interest for the broad use of Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) in the fields of bioinformatics and cheminformatics to visualize complex biological and chemical structures. AR and VR technologies allow for stunning and immersive experiences, offering untapped opportunities for both research and education purposes. However, preparing 3D models ready to use for AR and VR is time-consuming and requires a technical expertise that severely limits the development of new contents of potential interest for structural biologists, medicinal chemists, molecular modellers and teachers. Herein we present the RealityConvert software tool and associated website, which allow users to easily convert molecular objects to high quality 3D models directly compatible for AR and VR applications. For chemical structures, in addition to the 3D model generation, RealityConvert also generates image trackers, useful to universally call and anchor that particular 3D model when used in AR applications. The ultimate goal of RealityConvert is to facilitate and boost the development and accessibility of AR and VR contents for bioinformatics and cheminformatics applications. http://www.realityconvert.com. dfourch@ncsu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. 3D object-oriented image analysis in 3D geophysical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.

    2015-01-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has traditionally been reduced by using a priori information from seismic tomography models. This reduction in the non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation of the 3D subsurface structures (objects......) based on the seismic tomography models and then forward modelling these objects. However, this form of object-based approach has been done without a standardized methodology on how to extract the subsurface structures from the 3D models. In this research, a 3D object-oriented image analysis (3D OOA......) approach was implemented to extract the 3D subsurface structures from geophysical data. The approach was applied on a 3D shear wave seismic tomography model of the central part of the East African Rift System. Subsequently, the extracted 3D objects from the tomography model were reconstructed in the 3D...

  11. Comparison Between 2-D and 3-D Stiffness Matrix Model Simulation of Sasw Inversion for Pavement Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Atmaja P. Rosidi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave (SASW method is a non-destructive in situ seismic technique used to assess and evaluate the material stiffness (dynamic elastic modulus and thickness of pavement layers at low strains. These values can be used analytically to calculate load capacities in order to predict the performance of pavement system. The SASW method is based on the dispersion phenomena of Rayleigh waves in layered media. In order to get the actual shear wave velocities, 2-D and 3-D models are used in the simulation of the inversion process for best fitting between theoretical and empirical dispersion curves. The objective of this study is to simulate and compare the 2-D and 3-D model of SASW analysis in the construction of the theoretical dispersion curve for pavement structure evaluation. The result showed that the dispersion curve from the 3-D model was similar with the dispersion curve of the actual pavement profile compared to the 2-D model. The wave velocity profiles also showed that the 3-D model used in the SASW analysis is able to detect all the distinct layers of flexible pavement units.

  12. Validation of a numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction model for a prosthetic valve based on experimental PIV measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guivier-Curien, Carine; Deplano, Valérie; Bertrand, Eric

    2009-10-01

    A numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of a prosthetic aortic valve was developed, based on a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program using an Arbitrary Eulerian Lagrangian (ALE) formulation. To make sure of the validity of this numerical model, an equivalent experimental model accounting for both the geometrical features and the hydrodynamic conditions was also developed. The leaflet and the flow behaviours around the bileaflet valve were investigated numerically and experimentally by performing particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Through quantitative and qualitative comparisons, it was shown that the leaflet behaviour and the velocity fields were similar in both models. The present study allows the validation of a fully coupled 3-D FSI numerical model. The promising numerical tool could be therefore used to investigate clinical issues involving the aortic valve.

  13. A linear programming approach to reconstructing subcellular structures from confocal images for automated generation of representative 3D cellular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott T; Dean, Brian C; Dean, Delphine

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel computer vision algorithm to analyze 3D stacks of confocal images of fluorescently stained single cells. The goal of the algorithm is to create representative in silico model structures that can be imported into finite element analysis software for mechanical characterization. Segmentation of cell and nucleus boundaries is accomplished via standard thresholding methods. Using novel linear programming methods, a representative actin stress fiber network is generated by computing a linear superposition of fibers having minimum discrepancy compared with an experimental 3D confocal image. Qualitative validation is performed through analysis of seven 3D confocal image stacks of adherent vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) grown in 2D culture. The presented method is able to automatically generate 3D geometries of the cell's boundary, nucleus, and representative F-actin network based on standard cell microscopy data. These geometries can be used for direct importation and implementation in structural finite element models for analysis of the mechanics of a single cell to potentially speed discoveries in the fields of regenerative medicine, mechanobiology, and drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Crustal structure along the DESERT 2000 Transect inferred from 3-D gravity modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kelani, R.; Goetze, H.; Rybakov, M.; Hassouneh, M.; Schmidt, S.

    2003-12-01

    A three-dimensional interpretation of the newly compiled Bouguer anomaly map is part of the DESERT 2000 Transect. That is multi-disciplinary and multinational project studying for first time the Dead Sea Transform (DST) fault system (DST) from the Mediterranean Sea to Saudi Arabia across the international border in the NW-SE direction. The negative Bouguer anomalies (with magnitude reached "C130 mGal), located into transform valley, are caused by the internal sedimentary basins filled by the light density young sediments (­Y10 km). A high-resolution 3-D model constrained with the seismic results reveals a possible crustal thickness and density distribution beneath the DST valley. The inferred zone of intrusion coincides with the maximum gravity anomaly over the eastern flank of the DST. The intrusion is displaced at different sectors along the NW-SE direction. The zone of the maximum crustal thinning (­30 km) is attained in the western sector at the Mediterranean. The southeastern plateau, on the other hand, shows by far the largest crustal thickness in the region (38-42 km). Linked to the left lateral movement of ~ 105 km at the boundary between the African and Arabian plate, and constrained with the DESERT 2000 seismic data, a small asymmetric topography of the Moho beneath the DST was modelled. The thickness and density of the crust suggest that a continental crust underlies the DST. The deep basins, the relatively large nature of the intrusion and the asymmetric topography of the Moho lead to the conclusion that a small-scale asthenospheric upwelling(?) might be responsible for the thinning of the crust and subsequent rifting of the Dead Sea graben during the left lateral movement.

  15. Precision structural engineering of self-rolled-up 3D nanomembranes guided by transient quasi-static FEM modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Koric, Seid; Yu, Xin; Hsia, K Jimmy; Li, Xiuling

    2014-11-12

    Micro- and nanoscale tubular structures can be formed by strain-induced self-rolled-up nanomembranes. Precision engineering of the shape and dimension determines the performance of devices based on this platform for electronic, optical, and biological applications. A transient quasi-static finite element method (FEM) with moving boundary conditions is proposed as a general approach to design diverse types of three-dimensional (3D) rolled-up geometries. This method captures the dynamic release process of membranes through etching driven by mismatch strain and accurately predicts the final dimensions of rolled-up structures. Guided by the FEM modeling, experimental demonstration using silicon nitride membranes was achieved with unprecedented precision including controlling fractional turns of a rolled-up membrane, anisotropic rolling to form helical structures, and local stress control for 3D hierarchical architectures.

  16. Key Issues in Modeling of Complex 3D Structures from Video Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyong Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction of three-dimensional structures from video sequences has wide applications for intelligent video analysis. This paper summarizes the key issues of the theory and surveys the recent advances in the state of the art. Reconstruction of a scene object from video sequences often takes the basic principle of structure from motion with an uncalibrated camera. This paper lists the typical strategies and summarizes the typical solutions or algorithms for modeling of complex three-dimensional structures. Open difficult problems are also suggested for further study.

  17. 3D CAFE modeling of grain structures: application to primary dendritic and secondary eutectic solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carozzani, T; Digonnet, H; Gandin, Ch-A

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional model is presented for the prediction of grain structures formed in casting. It is based on direct tracking of grain boundaries using a cellular automaton (CA) method. The model is fully coupled with a solution of the heat flow computed with a finite element (FE) method. Several unique capabilities are implemented including (i) the possibility to track the development of several types of grain structures, e.g. dendritic and eutectic grains, (ii) a coupling scheme that permits iterations between the FE method and the CA method, and (iii) tabulated enthalpy curves for the solid and liquid phases that offer the possibility to work with multicomponent alloys. The present CAFE model is also fully parallelized and runs on a cluster of computers. Demonstration is provided by direct comparison between simulated and recorded cooling curves for a directionally solidified aluminum–7 wt% silicon alloy

  18. Measuring Visual Closeness of 3-D Models

    KAUST Repository

    Gollaz Morales, Jose Alejandro

    2012-09-01

    Measuring visual closeness of 3-D models is an important issue for different problems and there is still no standardized metric or algorithm to do it. The normal of a surface plays a vital role in the shading of a 3-D object. Motivated by this, we developed two applications to measure visualcloseness, introducing normal difference as a parameter in a weighted metric in Metro’s sampling approach to obtain the maximum and mean distance between 3-D models using 3-D and 6-D correspondence search structures. A visual closeness metric should provide accurate information on what the human observers would perceive as visually close objects. We performed a validation study with a group of people to evaluate the correlation of our metrics with subjective perception. The results were positive since the metrics predicted the subjective rankings more accurately than the Hausdorff distance.

  19. 3-D cohesive finite element model for application in structural analysis of heavy duty composite pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skar, Asmus; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2015-01-01

    The problem of stiffness degradation in composite pavement systems from localised fracture damage in the quasibrittle cement bound granular mixture are today taken into account only by empirical formulas. These formulas deals with a limited number of materials in a restricted range of design...... this paper presents a numerical analysis of the fracture behaviour of cement bound granular mixtures in composite concrete block pavement systems applying a cohesive model. The functionality of the proposed model is compared to experimental investigations of beam bending tests. The pavement is modelled......, it can be shown that adequately good prediction of the structural response of composite pavements is obtained for monotonic loading without significant computational cost, making the model applicable for engineering design purpose. It is envisaged that the methodology implemented in this study can...

  20. 3D active shape models of human brain structures: application to patient-specific mesh generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Nishant; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Taylor, Zeike A.

    2015-03-01

    The use of biomechanics-based numerical simulations has attracted growing interest in recent years for computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning. With this in mind, a method for automatic mesh generation of brain structures of interest, using statistical models of shape (SSM) and appearance (SAM), for personalised computational modelling is presented. SSMs are constructed as point distribution models (PDMs) while SAMs are trained using intensity profiles sampled from a training set of T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. The brain structures of interest are, the cortical surface (cerebrum, cerebellum & brainstem), lateral ventricles and falx-cerebri membrane. Two methods for establishing correspondences across the training set of shapes are investigated and compared (based on SSM quality): the Coherent Point Drift (CPD) point-set registration method and B-spline mesh-to-mesh registration method. The MNI-305 (Montreal Neurological Institute) average brain atlas is used to generate the template mesh, which is deformed and registered to each training case, to establish correspondence over the training set of shapes. 18 healthy patients' T1-weightedMRimages form the training set used to generate the SSM and SAM. Both model-training and model-fitting are performed over multiple brain structures simultaneously. Compactness and generalisation errors of the BSpline-SSM and CPD-SSM are evaluated and used to quantitatively compare the SSMs. Leave-one-out cross validation is used to evaluate SSM quality in terms of these measures. The mesh-based SSM is found to generalise better and is more compact, relative to the CPD-based SSM. Quality of the best-fit model instance from the trained SSMs, to test cases are evaluated using the Hausdorff distance (HD) and mean absolute surface distance (MASD) metrics.

  1. Fine reservoir structure modeling based upon 3D visualized stratigraphic correlation between horizontal wells: methodology and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenghua, Ou; Chaochun, Li; Siyuan, Huang; Sheng, James J.; Yuan, Xu

    2017-12-01

    As the platform-based horizontal well production mode has been widely applied in petroleum industry, building a reliable fine reservoir structure model by using horizontal well stratigraphic correlation has become very important. Horizontal wells usually extend between the upper and bottom boundaries of the target formation, with limited penetration points. Using these limited penetration points to conduct well deviation correction means the formation depth information obtained is not accurate, which makes it hard to build a fine structure model. In order to solve this problem, a method of fine reservoir structure modeling, based on 3D visualized stratigraphic correlation among horizontal wells, is proposed. This method can increase the accuracy when estimating the depth of the penetration points, and can also effectively predict the top and bottom interfaces in the horizontal penetrating section. Moreover, this method will greatly increase not only the number of points of depth data available, but also the accuracy of these data, which achieves the goal of building a reliable fine reservoir structure model by using the stratigraphic correlation among horizontal wells. Using this method, four 3D fine structure layer models have been successfully built of a specimen shale gas field with platform-based horizontal well production mode. The shale gas field is located to the east of Sichuan Basin, China; the successful application of the method has proven its feasibility and reliability.

  2. Development of a 3-D model for eddy current testing: application for fastened structures in aeronautics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paillard, S.

    2007-12-01

    One of the Eddy Current Testing issues in aeronautics is the inspection of fastened structures to detect flaws nearby rivets which can grow because of mechanical stress. EADS and the CEA LIST have started a collaborative work with the support of the Ile-de-France Region to develop a simulation tool of EC fastened structures testing, integrated to the CIVA platform, aimed at conceiving testing methods, optimizing and qualifying it. The volume integral method using the Green dyadics formalism has been chosen in order to get a fast resolution of Maxwell equations. A first milestone was to build a simulation model of multilayer structures testing, thanks to the use of the multilayer Green dyads. Because of the rivet volume, 60 times bigger than the one of a typical flaw, a large number of discretization cells are needed. Therefore an iterative method has been developed in order to numerically solve large calculation zones. Finally, the flaw response simulation mostly has to cope with a scale issue between the size of the rivet and the one of the flaw, the latter being much smaller in a direction than the former. The whole model has been experimentally validated and compared to other simulation models at the important development steps: multilayer configuration, iteration resolution, and flaw signature. (author)

  3. Exploring structures of the Rochefort Cave (Belgium) with 3D models from LIDAR scans and UAV photoscans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watlet, A.; Triantafyllou, A.; Kaufmann, O.; Le Mouelic, S.

    2016-12-01

    Amongst today's techniques that are able to produce 3D point clouds, LIDAR and UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetry are probably the most commonly used. Both methods have their own advantages and limitations. LIDAR scans create high resolution and high precision 3D point clouds, but such methods are generally costly, especially for sporadic surveys. Compared to LIDAR, UAV (e.g. drones) are cheap and flexible to use in different types of environments. Moreover, the photogrammetric processing workflow of digital images taken with UAV becomes easier with the rise of many affordable software packages (e.g., Agisoft PhotoScan, MicMac, VisualSFM). In this canvas, we present a challenging study made at the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (South Belgium) comprising surface and underground surveys. The main chamber of the cave ( 10000 m³) was the principal target of the study. A LIDAR scan and an UAV photoscan were acquired underground, producing respective 3D models. An additional 3D photoscan was performed at the surface, in the sinkhole in direct connection with the main chamber. The main goal of the project is to combine this different datasets for quantifying the orientation of inaccessible geological structures (e.g. faults, tectonic and gravitational joints, and sediments bedding), and for comparing them to structural data surveyed on the field. To go through structural interpretations, we used a subsampling method merging neighboured model polygons that have similar orientations, allowing statistical analyses of polygons spatial distribution. The benefit of this method is to verify the spatial continuity of in-situ structural measurements to larger scale. Roughness and colorimetric/spectral analyses may also be of great interest for several geosciences purposes by discriminating different facies among the geological beddings. Amongst others, this study was helpful to precise the local petrophysical properties associated with particular geological layers, what

  4. Microfabricating 3D Structures by Laser Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    10.1117/2.1201111.003952 Microfabricating 3D structures by laser origami Alberto Piqué, Scott Mathews, Andrew Birnbaum, and Nicholas Charipar A new...folding known as origami allows the transformation of flat patterns into 3D shapes. A similar approach can be used to generate 3D structures com... geometries . The overarching challenge is to move away from traditional planar semiconductor photolitho- graphic techniques, which severely limit the type of

  5. Experimental vibration analysis for a 3D scaled model of a three-floor steel structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto F. Castillo

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an experimental study of a three dimensional physical model of a three-floor structure subjected to forced vibrations by imposing displacements in its support. The aim of this work is to analyze the behavior of the building when a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA is acting. An analytic simplified analysis and a numerical study are developed to obtain the natural frequencies of the structure. Experiments are carried out in a vibrating table. The frequency range to be experimentally analyzed is determined by the first natural frequency of the structure for which the DVA damping effects are verified. The equipment capabilities, i.e. the frequencies, amplitudes and admissible load, limit the analyses. Nevertheless, satisfactory results are obtained for the study of the first mode of vibration. The effect of different amplitudes of the imposed support motion is also analyzed. In addition, the damping effect of the DVA device is evaluated upon varying its mass and its location in the structure. The characteristic curves in the frequency domain are obtained computing the Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT of the acceleration history registered with piezoelectric accelerometers at different checkpoints for the cases analyzed.

  6. QUIESCENT PROMINENCES IN THE ERA OF ALMA: SIMULATED OBSERVATIONS USING THE 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunár, Stanislav; Heinzel, Petr [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Mackay, Duncan H. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Anzer, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85740 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-12-20

    We use the detailed 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to produce the first simulated high-resolution ALMA observations of a modeled quiescent solar prominence. The maps of synthetic brightness temperature and optical thickness shown in the present paper are produced using a visualization method for synthesis of the submillimeter/millimeter radio continua. We have obtained the simulated observations of both the prominence at the limb and the filament on the disk at wavelengths covering a broad range that encompasses the full potential of ALMA. We demonstrate here extent to which the small-scale and large-scale prominence and filament structures will be visible in the ALMA observations spanning both the optically thin and thick regimes. We analyze the relationship between the brightness and kinetic temperature of the prominence plasma. We also illustrate the opportunities ALMA will provide for studying the thermal structure of the prominence plasma from the cores of the cool prominence fine structure to the prominence–corona transition region. In addition, we show that detailed 3D modeling of entire prominences with their numerous fine structures will be important for the correct interpretation of future ALMA observations of prominences.

  7. Modelling a 3D structure for EgDf1 from shape Echinococcus granulosus: putative epitopes, phosphorylation motifs and ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, M.; Esteves, A.; Vega, M.; Tabares, G.; Ehrlich, R.; Tapia, O.

    1998-07-01

    EgDf1 is a developmentally regulated protein from the parasite Echinococcus granulosus related to a family of hydrophobic ligand binding proteins. This protein could play a crucial role during the parasite life cycle development since this organism is unable to synthetize most of their own lipids de novo. Furthermore, it has been shown that two related protein from other parasitic platyhelminths (Fh15 from Fasciola hepatica and Sm14 from Schistosoma mansoni) are able to confer protective inmunity against experimental infection in animal models. A three-dimensional structure would help establishing structure/function relationships on a knowledge based manner. 3D structures for EgDf1 protein were modelled by using myelin P2 (mP2) and intestine fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) as templates. Molecular dynamics techniques were used to validate the models. Template mP2 yielded the best 3D structure for EgDf1. Palmitic and oleic acids were docked inside EgDf1. The present theoretical results suggest definite location in the secondary structure of the epitopic regions, consensus phosphorylation motifs and oleic acid as a good ligand candidate to EgDf1. This protein might well be involved in the process of supplying hydrophobic metabolites for membrane biosynthesis and for signaling pathways.

  8. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  9. CROWDSOURCING BASED 3D MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Somogyi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users’ images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  10. Improvement of quality of 3D printed objects by elimination of microscopic structural defects in fused deposition modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy G Gordeev

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing with fused deposition modeling (FDM is currently optimized for a wide range of research and commercial applications. The major disadvantage of FDM-created products is their low quality and structural defects (porosity, which impose an obstacle to utilizing them in functional prototyping and direct digital manufacturing of objects intended to contact with gases and liquids. This article describes a simple and efficient approach for assessing the quality of 3D printed objects. Using this approach it was shown that the wall permeability of a printed object depends on its geometric shape and is gradually reduced in a following series: cylinder > cube > pyramid > sphere > cone. Filament feed rate, wall geometry and G-code-defined wall structure were found as primary parameters that influence the quality of 3D-printed products. Optimization of these parameters led to an overall increase in quality and improvement of sealing properties. It was demonstrated that high quality of 3D printed objects can be achieved using routinely available printers and standard filaments.

  11. 3D Hilbert Space Filling Curves in 3D City Modeling for Faster Spatial Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ujang, Uznir; Antón Castro, Francesc/François; Azri, Suhaibah

    2014-01-01

    The advantages of three dimensional (3D) city models can be seen in various applications including photogrammetry, urban and regional planning, computer games, etc. They expand the visualization and analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems on cities, and they can be developed using...... method, retrieving portions of and especially searching these 3D city models, will not be done optimally. Even though current developments are based on an open data model allotted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) called CityGML, its XML-based structure makes it challenging to cluster the 3D urban...... objects. In this research, the authors propose an opponent data constellation technique of space-filling curves (3D Hilbert curves) for 3D city model data representation. Unlike previous methods, that try to project 3D or n-dimensional data down to 2D or 3D using Principal Component Analysis (PCA...

  12. 3D modeling of genome macroorganization on the basis of its structural changes after action of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, I.D.; Aleksandrova, M.V.; Zaikin, N.S.; Koren'kov, V.V.; Pervushova, O.V.; Stepanenko, V.A.

    2006-01-01

    At present, after 120 years of the theoretical and experimental works, the issue of the genome macroarchitecture as the highest level of interphase chromosome organization in somatic cell nuclei remains still unresolved. The problem of the spatial arrangement of interphase chromosomes in haploid germ cells has never even been studied. A 3D simulation of packaging of the entire second chromosome in Drosophila mature sperms has been performed by using mathematical approaches and visualization methods to present macromolecular structure data. As genetic markers for simulation, frequency and location of the second inversion breakpoints for 72 structural υg mutants induced by ionizing radiation were used supposing that both ends of each inversion are topologically brought together forming loop of appropriate size. For the account of a degree of spatial affinity and visualization of chromosomal loops modern 3D-modeling methods with application of splines, libraries OpenGL, language Delphi, program Gmax were used. According to the model proposed, the entire second chromosome within mature sperm nuclei seems to be packaged in the form of a megarosette-loop structure which may be a basic principle of organization of the genome macro-architecture in animal haploid germ cells

  13. An asymptotic homogenization model for smart 3D grid-reinforced composite structures with generally orthotropic constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, E M; Kalamkarov, A L; Georgiades, A V; Challagulla, K S

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive micromechanical model for smart 3D composite structures reinforced with a periodic grid of generally orthotropic cylindrical reinforcements that also exhibit piezoelectric behavior is developed. The original boundary value problem characterizing the piezothermoelastic behavior of these structures is decoupled into a set of three simpler unit cell problems dealing, separately, with the elastic, piezoelectric and thermal expansion characteristics of the smart composite. The technique used is that of asymptotic homogenization and the solution of the unit cell problems permits determination of the effective elastic, piezoelectric and thermal expansion coefficients. The general orthotropy of the constituent materials is very important from the practical viewpoint and makes the analysis much more complicated. Several examples of practical interest are used to illustrate the work including smart 3D composites with cubic and conical embedded grids as well as diagonally reinforced smart structures. It is also shown in this work that in the limiting particular case of 2D grid-reinforced structures with isotropic reinforcements our results converge to earlier published results

  14. Anisotropic 3D delay-damage model to simulate concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gatuingt , Fabrice; Desmorat , Rodrigue; Chambart , Marion; Combescure , Didier; Guilbaud , Daniel

    2008-01-01

    International audience; High dynamic loadings lead to material degradation and structural failure. This is even more the case for concrete structures where the parts initially in compression break in ten- sion due to waves propagation and reflection. The dissymmetry of the material behavior plays a major role in such cases, dissymmetry mainly due to damage induced anisotropy. Loading induced damage is most often anisotropic and one proposes here to take advantage of such a feature to build a ...

  15. The Learner Characteristics, Features of Desktop 3D Virtual Reality Environments, and College Chemistry Instruction: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Zahira; Goetz, Ernest T.; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy; Kwok, Oi-man; Cifuentes, Lauren; Davis, Trina J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined a model of the impact of a 3D desktop virtual reality environment on the learner characteristics (i.e. perceptual and psychological variables) that can enhance chemistry-related learning achievements in an introductory college chemistry class. The relationships between the 3D virtual reality features and the chemistry learning test as…

  16. Adapting Active Shape Models for 3D segmentation of tubular structures in medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; van Ginneken, Bram; Viergever, Max A; Niessen, Wiro J

    2003-07-01

    Active Shape Models (ASM) have proven to be an effective approach for image segmentation. In some applications, however, the linear model of gray level appearance around a contour that is used in ASM is not sufficient for accurate boundary localization. Furthermore, the statistical shape model may be too restricted if the training set is limited. This paper describes modifications to both the shape and the appearance model of the original ASM formulation. Shape model flexibility is increased, for tubular objects, by modeling the axis deformation independent of the cross-sectional deformation, and by adding supplementary cylindrical deformation modes. Furthermore, a novel appearance modeling scheme that effectively deals with a highly varying background is developed. In contrast with the conventional ASM approach, the new appearance model is trained on both boundary and non-boundary points, and the probability that a given point belongs to the boundary is estimated non-parametrically. The methods are evaluated on the complex task of segmenting thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Shape approximation errors were successfully reduced using the two shape model extensions. Segmentation using the new appearance model significantly outperformed the original ASM scheme; average volume errors are 5.1% and 45% respectively.

  17. Electromagnetic modelling of large complex 3-D structures with LEGO and the eigencurrent expansion method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancellotti, V.; Hon, de B.P.; Tijhuis, A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Linear embedding via Green's operators (LEGO) is a computational method in which the multiple scattering between adjacent objects - forming a large composite structure - is determined through the interaction of simple-shaped building domains, whose electromagnetic (EM) behavior is accounted for by

  18. Shallow Crustal Structure in the Northern Salton Trough, California: Insights from a Detailed 3-D Velocity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajala, R.; Persaud, P.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Hole, J. A.; Goldman, M.; Scheirer, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Coachella Valley is the northern extent of the Gulf of California-Salton Trough. It contains the southernmost segment of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) for which a magnitude 7.8 earthquake rupture was modeled to help produce earthquake planning scenarios. However, discrepancies in ground motion and travel-time estimates from the current Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) velocity model of the Salton Trough highlight inaccuracies in its shallow velocity structure. An improved 3-D velocity model that better defines the shallow basin structure and enables the more accurate location of earthquakes and identification of faults is therefore essential for seismic hazard studies in this area. We used recordings of 126 explosive shots from the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) to SSIP receivers and Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) stations. A set of 48,105 P-wave travel time picks constituted the highest-quality input to a 3-D tomographic velocity inversion. To improve the ray coverage, we added network-determined first arrivals at SCSN stations from 39,998 recently relocated local earthquakes, selected to a maximum focal depth of 10 km, to develop a detailed 3-D P-wave velocity model for the Coachella Valley with 1-km grid spacing. Our velocity model shows good resolution ( 50 rays/cubic km) down to a minimum depth of 7 km. Depth slices from the velocity model reveal several interesting features. At shallow depths ( 3 km), we observe an elongated trough of low velocity, attributed to sediments, located subparallel to and a few km SW of the SAF, and a general velocity structure that mimics the surface geology of the area. The persistence of the low-velocity sediments to 5-km depth just north of the Salton Sea suggests that the underlying basement surface, shallower to the NW, dips SE, consistent with interpretation from gravity studies (Langenheim et al., 2005). On the western side of the Coachella Valley, we detect depth-restricted regions of

  19. Towards a 3D structural tomato model for calculating light interception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarlikioti, V.; Marcelis, L.F.M.; Visser, de P.H.B.

    2011-01-01

    A number of physiological tomato models have been proposed the last decades, their main challenge being the correct simulation of fruit yield. For this, an accurate simulation of light interception, and thus photosynthesis, is of primary importance. Light interception is highly dependent of the

  20. 3D neutron transport modelization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warin, X.

    1996-12-01

    Some nodal methods to solve the transport equation in 3D are presented. Two nodal methods presented at an OCDE congress are described: a first one is a low degree one called RTN0; a second one is a high degree one called BDM1. The two methods can be made faster with a totally consistent DSA. Some results of parallelization show that: 98% of the time is spent in sweeps; transport sweeps are easily parallelized. (K.A.)

  1. 3D neutron transport modelization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warin, X.

    1996-12-01

    Some nodal methods to solve the transport equation in 3D are presented. Two nodal methods presented at an OCDE congress are described: a first one is a low degree one called RTN0; a second one is a high degree one called BDM1. The two methods can be made faster with a totally consistent DSA. Some results of parallelization show that: 98% of the time is spent in sweeps; transport sweeps are easily parallelized. (K.A.). 10 refs.

  2. Modeling and Reconstruction of Micro-structured 3D Chitosan/Gelatin Porous Scaffolds Using Micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haibo; Li, Dichen; He, Jiankang; Liu, Yaxiong; Lian, Qin; Zhao, Jinna

    2008-09-01

    Three dimensional (3D) channel networks are the key to promise the uniform distribution of nutrients inside 3D hepatic tissue engineering scaffolds and prompt elimination of metabolic products out of the scaffolds. 3D chitosan/gelatin porous scaffolds with predefined internal channels were fabricated and a combination of light microscope, laser confocal microscopy and micro-CT were employed to characterize the structure of porous scaffolds. In order to evaluate the flow field distribution inside the micro-structured 3D scaffolds, a computer reconstructing method based on Micro-CT was proposed. According to this evaluating method, a contrast between 3D porous scaffolds with and without predefined internal channels was also performed to assess scaffolds' fluid characters. Results showed that the internal channel of the 3D scaffolds formed the 3D fluid channel network; the uniformity of flow field distribution of the scaffolds fabricated in this paper was better than the simple porous scaffold without micro-fluid channels.

  3. 3D modelling for multipurpose cadastre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abduhl Rahman, A.; Van Oosterom, P.J.M.; Hua, T.C.; Sharkawi, K.H.; Duncan, E.E.; Azri, N.; Hassan, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling of cadastral objects (such as legal spaces around buildings, around utility networks and other spaces) is one of the important aspects for a multipurpose cadastre (MPC). This paper describes the 3D modelling of the objects for MPC and its usage to the knowledge of 3D

  4. Soil-Structure Interaction Effect on Fragility Curve of 3D Models of Concrete Moment-Resisting Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Anvarsamarin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the probabilistic generation of collapse fragility curves for evaluating the performance of 3D, reinforced concrete (RC moment-resisting building models, considering soil-structure interaction (SSI by concentration on seismic uncertainties. It considers collapse as the loss of lateral load-resisting capacity of the building structures due to severe ground shaking and consequent large interstory drifts intensified by P-Δ effects as well as the strength and stiffness deterioration of their lateral load carrying systems. The estimation of the collapse performance of structures requires the relation between the intensity measure (IM and the probability of collapse that is determined using the generated collapse fragility curves. Considering a number of 6-, 12-, and 18-story, 3D, RC moment-resisting buildings, two scalar IMs are employed to estimate their collapse fragility curve. On the other hand, the effect of the site soil type on the collapse fragility curves was taken into account by considering the soil-structure interaction. According to the obtained results, adopting the average of spectral acceleration (Saavg intensity measure is more efficient in capturing the effect of the inherent uncertainties of the strong ground motions on the structural response parameters. In addition, considering the SSI for soil type D with shear-wave velocity of 180 m/s to 360 m/s reduces the median of intensity measure (IM = Sa(T1 of fragility curve in 6-, 12-, and 18-story buildings by 4.92%, 22.26%, and 23.03%, respectively.

  5. A 3D model of the membrane protein complex formed by the white spot syndrome virus structural proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shiang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of white spot disease have had a large negative economic impact on cultured shrimp worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of the causative virus, WSSV (whit spot syndrome virus, is not yet well understood. WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV virion has three structural layers surrounding its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. In this study, we investigated the protein-protein interactions of the major WSSV structural proteins, including several envelope and tegument proteins that are known to be involved in the infection process. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we used coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays to elucidate and/or confirm all the interactions that occur among the WSSV structural (envelope and tegument proteins VP51A, VP19, VP24, VP26 and VP28. We found that VP51A interacted directly not only with VP26 but also with VP19 and VP24. VP51A, VP19 and VP24 were also shown to have an affinity for self-interaction. Chemical cross-linking assays showed that these three self-interacting proteins could occur as dimers. CONCLUSIONS: From our present results in conjunction with other previously established interactions we construct a 3D model in which VP24 acts as a core protein that directly associates with VP26, VP28, VP38A, VP51A and WSV010 to form a membrane-associated protein complex. VP19 and VP37 are attached to this complex via association with VP51A and VP28, respectively. Through the VP26-VP51C interaction this envelope complex is anchored to the nucleocapsid, which is made of layers of rings formed by VP664. A 3D model of the nucleocapsid and the surrounding outer membrane is presented.

  6. Unit cell geometry of 3-D braided structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guang-Wu; Ko, Frank K.

    1993-01-01

    The traditional approach used in modeling of composites reinforced by three-dimensional (3-D) braids is to assume a simple unit cell geometry of a 3-D braided structure with known fiber volume fraction and orientation. In this article, we first examine 3-D braiding methods in the light of braid structures, followed by the development of geometric models for 3-D braids using a unit cell approach. The unit cell geometry of 3-D braids is identified and the relationship of structural parameters such as yarn orientation angle and fiber volume fraction with the key processing parameters established. The limiting geometry has been computed by establishing the point at which yarns jam against each other. Using this factor makes it possible to identify the complete range of allowable geometric arrangements for 3-D braided preforms. This identified unit cell geometry can be translated to mechanical models which relate the geometrical properties of fabric preforms to the mechanical responses of composite systems.

  7. Mapping tropical biodiversity using spectroscopic imagery : characterization of structural and chemical diversity with 3-D radiative transfer modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feret, J. B.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.; Lefèvre-Fonollosa, M. J.; Proisy, C.; Asner, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    The accelerating loss of biodiversity is a major environmental trend. Tropical ecosystems are particularly threatened due to climate change, invasive species, farming and natural resources exploitation. Recent advances in remote sensing of biodiversity confirmed the potential of high spatial resolution spectroscopic imagery for species identification and biodiversity mapping. Such information bridges the scale-gap between small-scale, highly detailed field studies and large-scale, low-resolution satellite observations. In order to produce fine-scale resolution maps of canopy alpha-diversity and beta-diversity of the Peruvian Amazonian forest, we designed, applied and validated a method based on spectral variation hypothesis to CAO AToMS (Carnegie Airborne Observatory Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System) images, acquired from 2011 to 2013. There is a need to understand on a quantitative basis the physical processes leading to this spectral variability. This spectral variability mainly depends on canopy chemistry, structure, and sensor's characteristics. 3D radiative transfer modeling provides a powerful framework for the study of the relative influence of each of these factors in dense and complex canopies. We simulated series of spectroscopic images with the 3D radiative model DART, with variability gradients in terms of leaf chemistry, individual tree structure, spatial and spectral resolution, and applied methods for biodiversity mapping. This sensitivity study allowed us to determine the relative influence of these factors on the radiometric signal acquired by different types of sensors. Such study is particularly important to define the domain of validity of our approach, to refine requirements for the instrumental specifications, and to help preparing hyperspectral spatial missions to be launched at the horizon 2015-2025 (EnMAP, PRISMA, HISUI, SHALOM, HYSPIRI, HYPXIM). Simulations in preparation include topographic variations in order to estimate the robustness

  8. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C.; Max, Nelson; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces) and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud regi...

  9. The Esri 3D city information model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, T; Schubiger-Banz, S

    2014-01-01

    With residential and commercial space becoming increasingly scarce, cities are going vertical. Managing the urban environments in 3D is an increasingly important and complex undertaking. To help solving this problem, Esri has released the ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution. The ArcGIS for 3D Cities solution provides the information model, tools and apps for creating, analyzing and maintaining a 3D city using the ArcGIS platform. This paper presents an overview of the 3D City Information Model and some sample use cases

  10. FDM simulation of earthquakes off western Kyushu, Japan, using a land-ocean unified 3D structure model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Taro; Takenaka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takeshi; Hara, Tatsuhiko

    2017-07-01

    Seismic activity occurred off western Kyushu, Japan, at the northern end of the Okinawa Trough on May 6, 2016 (14:11 JST), 22 days after the onset of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence. The area is adjacent to the Beppu-Shimabara graben where the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence occurred. In the area off western Kyushu, a M7.1 earthquake also occurred on November 14, 2015 (5:51 JST), and a tsunami with a height of 0.3 m was observed. In order to better understand these seismic activity and tsunamis, it is necessary to study the sources of, and strong motions due to, earthquakes in the area off western Kyushu. For such studies, validation of synthetic waveforms is important because of the presence of the oceanic water layer and thick sediments in the source area. We show the validation results for synthetic waveforms through nonlinear inversion analyses of small earthquakes ( M5). We use a land-ocean unified 3D structure model, 3D HOT finite-difference method ("HOT" stands for Heterogeneity, Ocean layer and Topography) and a multi-graphic processing unit (GPU) acceleration to simulate the wave propagations. We estimate the first-motion augmented moment tensor (FAMT) solution based on both the long-period surface waves and short-period body waves. The FAMT solutions systematically shift landward by about 13 km, on average, from the epicenters determined by the Japan Meteorological Agency. The synthetics provide good reproductions of the observed full waveforms with periods of 10 s or longer. On the other hand, for waveforms with shorter periods (down to 4 s), the later surface waves are not reproduced well, while the first parts of the waveforms (comprising P- and S-waves) are reproduced to some extent. These results indicate that the current 3D structure model around Kyushu is effective for generating full waveforms, including surface waves with periods of about 10 s or longer. Based on these findings, we analyze the 2015 M7.1 event using the cross

  11. The 3D-city model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgren, Steen; Rüdiger, Bjarne; Tournay, Bruno

    2001-01-01

    We have worked with the construction and use of 3D city models for about ten years. This work has given us valuable experience concerning model methodology. In addition to this collection of knowledge, our perception of the concept of city models has changed radically. In order to explain...... of 3D city models....

  12. Integrated Biogeomorphological Modeling Using Delft3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Q.; Jagers, B.

    2011-12-01

    The skill of numerical morphological models has improved significantly from the early 2D uniform, total load sediment models (with steady state or infrequent wave updates) to recent 3D hydrodynamic models with multiple suspended and bed load sediment fractions and bed stratigraphy (online coupled with waves). Although there remain many open questions within this combined field of hydro- and morphodynamics, we observe an increasing need to include biological processes in the overall dynamics. In riverine and inter-tidal environments, there is often an important influence by riparian vegetation and macrobenthos. Over the past decade more and more researchers have started to extend the simulation environment with wrapper scripts and other quick code hacks to estimate their influence on morphological development in coastal, estuarine and riverine environments. Although one can in this way quickly analyze different approaches, these research tools have generally not been designed with reuse, performance and portability in mind. We have now implemented a reusable, flexible, and efficient two-way link between the Delft3D open source framework for hydrodynamics, waves and morphology, and the water quality and ecology modules. The same link will be used for 1D, 2D and 3D modeling on networks and both structured and unstructured grids. We will describe the concepts of the overall system, and illustrate it with some first results.

  13. 3D printing of textile-based structures by Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) with different polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikova, R; Ehrmann, A; Finsterbusch, K

    2014-01-01

    3D printing is a form of additive manufacturing, i.e. creating objects by sequential layering, for pre-production or production. After creating a 3D model with a CAD program, a printable file is used to create a layer design which is printed afterwards. While often more expensive than traditional techniques like injection moulding, 3D printing can significantly enhance production times of small parts produced in small numbers, additionally allowing for large flexibility and the possibility to create parts that would be impossible to produce with conventional techniques. The Fused Deposition Modelling technique uses a plastic filament which is pushed through a heated extrusion nozzle melting the material. Depending on the material, different challenges occur in the production process, and the produced part shows different mechanical properties. The article describes some standard and novel materials and their influence on the resulting parts

  14. A probabilistic approach using deformable organ models for automatic definition of normal anatomical structures for 3D treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, Daniel; Yu Liyun; Johnson, Valen; McAuliffe, Matthew; Pizer, Stephen; Chaney, Edward

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective : Current clinical methods for defining normal anatomical structures on tomographic images are time consuming and subject to intra- and inter-user variability. With the widespread implementation of 3D RTP, conformal radiotherapy, and dose escalation the implications of imprecise object definition have assumed a much higher level of importance. Object definition and volume-weighted metrics for normal anatomy, such as DVHs and NTCPs, play critical roles in aiming, shaping, and weighting beams. Improvements in object definition, including computer automation, are essential to yield reliable volume-weighted metrics and gains in human efficiency. The purpose of this study was to investigate a probabilistic approach using deformable models to automatically recognize and extract normal anatomy in tomographic images. Materials and Methods: Object models were created from normal organs that were segmented by an interactive method which involved placing a cursor near the center of the object on a slice and clicking a mouse button to initiate computation of structures called cores. Cores describe the skeletal and boundary shape of image objects in a manner that, in 2D, associates a location on the skeleton with the width of the object at that location. A significant advantage of cores is stability against image disturbances such as noise and blur. The model was composed of a relatively small set of extracted points on the skeleton and boundary. The points were carefully chosen to summarize the shape information captured by the cores. Neighborhood relationships between points were represented mathematically by energy functions that penalize, due to warping of the model, the ''goodness'' of match between the model and the image data at any stage during the segmentation process. The model was matched against the image data using a probabilistic approach based on Bayes theorem, which provides a means for computing a posteriori (posterior) probability from 1) a

  15. Global 3D radiation-hydrodynamics models of AGB stars. Effects of convection and radial pulsations on atmospheric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, B.; Liljegren, S.; Höfner, S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Observations of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with increasing spatial resolution reveal new layers of complexity of atmospheric processes on a variety of scales. Aims: To analyze the physical mechanisms that cause asymmetries and surface structures in observed images, we use detailed 3D dynamical simulations of AGB stars; these simulations self-consistently describe convection and pulsations. Methods: We used the CO5BOLD radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce an exploratory grid of global "star-in-a-box" models of the outer convective envelope and the inner atmosphere of AGB stars to study convection, pulsations, and shock waves and their dependence on stellar and numerical parameters. Results: The model dynamics are governed by the interaction of long-lasting giant convection cells, short-lived surface granules, and strong, radial, fundamental-mode pulsations. Radial pulsations and shorter wavelength, traveling, acoustic waves induce shocks on various scales in the atmosphere. Convection, waves, and shocks all contribute to the dynamical pressure and, thus, to an increase of the stellar radius and to a levitation of material into layers where dust can form. Consequently, the resulting relation of pulsation period and stellar radius is shifted toward larger radii compared to that of non-linear 1D models. The dependence of pulsation period on luminosity agrees well with observed relations. The interaction of the pulsation mode with the non-stationary convective flow causes occasional amplitude changes and phase shifts. The regularity of the pulsations decreases with decreasing gravity as the relative size of convection cells increases. The model stars do not have a well-defined surface. Instead, the light is emitted from a very extended inhomogeneous atmosphere with a complex dynamic pattern of high-contrast features. Conclusions: Our models self-consistently describe convection, convectively generated acoustic noise, fundamental-mode radial

  16. 3D structure of muscle dihydropyridine receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Samsó

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excitation contraction coupling, the rapid and massive Ca2+ release under control of an action potential that triggers muscle contraction, takes places at specialized regions of the cell called triad junctions. There, a highly ordered supramolecular complex between the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR and the ryanodine receptor (RyR1 mediates the quasi‐instantaneous conversion from T‐tubule depolarization into Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. The DHPR has several key modules required for EC coupling: the voltage sensors and II‐III loop in the alpha1s subunit, and the beta subunit. To gain insight into their molecular organization, this review examines the most updated 3D structure of the DHPR as obtained by transmission electron microscopy and image reconstruction. Although structure determination of a heteromeric membrane protein such as the DHPR is challenging, novel technical advances in protein expression and 3D labeling facilitated this task. The 3D structure of the DHPR complex consists of a main body with five irregular corners around its perimeter encompassing the transmembrane alpha 1s subunit besides the intracellular beta subunit, an extended extracellular alpha 2 subunit, and a bulky intracellular II‐III loop. The structural definition attained at 19 Å resolution enabled docking of the atomic coordinates of structural homologs of the alpha1s and beta subunits. These structural features, together with their relative location with respect to the RyR1, are discussed in the context of the functional data.

  17. A 3D QSAR pharmacophore model and quantum chemical structure--activity analysis of chloroquine(CQ)-resistance reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Kyle, Dennis E; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L; Milhous, Wilbur K

    2002-01-01

    Using CATALYST, a three-dimensional QSAR pharmacophore model for chloroquine(CQ)-resistance reversal was developed from a training set of 17 compounds. These included imipramine (1), desipramine (2), and 15 of their analogues (3-17), some of which fully reversed CQ-resistance, while others were without effect. The generated pharmacophore model indicates that two aromatic hydrophobic interaction sites on the tricyclic ring and a hydrogen bond acceptor (lipid) site at the side chain, preferably on a nitrogen atom, are necessary for potent activity. Stereoelectronic properties calculated by using AM1 semiempirical calculations were consistent with the model, particularly the electrostatic potential profiles characterized by a localized negative potential region by the side chain nitrogen atom and a large region covering the aromatic ring. The calculated data further revealed that aminoalkyl substitution at the N5-position of the heterocycle and a secondary or tertiary aliphatic aminoalkyl nitrogen atom with a two or three carbon bridge to the heteroaromatic nitrogen (N5) are required for potent "resistance reversal activity". Lowest energy conformers for 1-17 were determined and optimized to afford stereoelectronic properties such as molecular orbital energies, electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, proton affinities, octanol-water partition coefficients (log P), and structural parameters. For 1-17, fairly good correlation exists between resistance reversal activity and intrinsic basicity of the nitrogen atom at the tricyclic ring system, frontier orbital energies, and lipophilicity. Significantly, nine out of 11 of a group of structurally diverse CQ-resistance reversal agents mapped very well on the 3D QSAR pharmacophore model.

  18. Illustrating the disassembly of 3D models

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Jianwei; Yan, Dongming; Li, Er; Dong, Weiming; Wonka, Peter; Zhang, Xiaopeng

    2013-01-01

    We present a framework for the automatic disassembly of 3D man-made models and the illustration of the disassembly process. Given an assembled 3D model, we first analyze the individual parts using sharp edge loops and extract the contact faces

  19. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Papillary Muscle Forces Using a Comprehensive Mitral Valve Model with 3D Chordal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Milan; Jensen, Morten Ø; Einstein, Daniel R; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Cochran, Richard P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models of native heart valves are being used to study valve biomechanics to aid design and development of repair procedures and replacement devices. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional, fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems. Such simulations are useful for predicting the mechanical and hemodynamic loading on implanted valve devices. A current challenge for improving the accuracy of these predictions is choosing and implementing modeling boundary conditions. In order to address this challenge, we are utilizing an advanced in vitro system to validate FSI conditions for the mitral valve system. Explanted ovine mitral valves were mounted in an in vitro setup, and structural data for the mitral valve was acquired with [Formula: see text]CT. Experimental data from the in vitro ovine mitral valve system were used to validate the computational model. As the valve closes, the hemodynamic data, high speed leaflet dynamics, and force vectors from the in vitro system were compared to the results of the FSI simulation computational model. The total force of 2.6 N per papillary muscle is matched by the computational model. In vitro and in vivo force measurements enable validating and adjusting material parameters to improve the accuracy of computational models. The simulations can then be used to answer questions that are otherwise not possible to investigate experimentally. This work is important to maximize the validity of computational models of not just the mitral valve, but any biomechanical aspect using computational simulation in designing medical devices.

  20. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  1. Cell-bound lipases from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002: gene sequence analysis, expression, enzymatic characterization, and 3D structural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhengyu; Lin, Hong; Shi, Shaolei; Mu, Xiangduo; Liu, Yanru; Huang, Jianzhong

    2016-05-03

    The whole-cell lipase from Burkholderia cepacia has been used as a biocatalyst in organic synthesis. However, there is no report in the literature on the component or the gene sequence of the cell-bound lipase from this species. Qualitative analysis of the cell-bound lipase would help to illuminate the regulation mechanism of gene expression and further improve the yield of the cell-bound lipase by gene engineering. Three predictive cell-bound lipases, lipA, lipC21 and lipC24, from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 were cloned and expressed in E. coli. Both LipA and LipC24 displayed the lipase activity. LipC24 was a novel mesophilic enzyme and displayed preference for medium-chain-length acyl groups (C10-C14). The 3D structural model of LipC24 revealed the open Y-type active site. LipA displayed 96 % amino acid sequence identity with the known extracellular lipase. lipA-inactivation and lipC24-inactivation decreased the total cell-bound lipase activity of Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 by 42 % and 14 %, respectively. The cell-bound lipase activity from Burkholderia sp. ZYB002 originated from a multi-enzyme mixture with LipA as the main component. LipC24 was a novel lipase and displayed different enzymatic characteristics and structural model with LipA. Besides LipA and LipC24, other type of the cell-bound lipases (or esterases) should exist.

  2. Multifractal modelling and 3D lacunarity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanen, Akkari; Imen, Bhouri; Asma, Ben Abdallah; Patrick, Dubois; Hedi, Bedoui Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a comparative evaluation of lacunarity of 3D grey level models with different types of inhomogeneity. A new method based on the 'Relative Differential Box Counting' was developed to estimate the lacunarity features of grey level volumes. To validate our method, we generated a set of 3D grey level multifractal models with random, anisotropic and hierarchical properties. Our method gives a lacunarity measurement correlated with the theoretical one and allows a better model classification compared with a classical approach.

  3. Radiosity diffusion model in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jason D.; Arridge, Simon R.; Chrysanthou, Yiorgos; Dehghani, Hamid; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Schweiger, Martin

    2001-11-01

    We present the Radiosity-Diffusion model in three dimensions(3D), as an extension to previous work in 2D. It is a method for handling non-scattering spaces in optically participating media. We present the extension of the model to 3D including an extension to the model to cope with increased complexity of the 3D domain. We show that in 3D more careful consideration must be given to the issues of meshing and visibility to model the transport of light within reasonable computational bounds. We demonstrate the model to be comparable to Monte-Carlo simulations for selected geometries, and show preliminary results of comparisons to measured time-resolved data acquired on resin phantoms.

  4. A Hybrid 3D Indoor Space Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jamali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available GIS integrates spatial information and spatial analysis. An important example of such integration is for emergency response which requires route planning inside and outside of a building. Route planning requires detailed information related to indoor and outdoor environment. Indoor navigation network models including Geometric Network Model (GNM, Navigable Space Model, sub-division model and regular-grid model lack indoor data sources and abstraction methods. In this paper, a hybrid indoor space model is proposed. In the proposed method, 3D modeling of indoor navigation network is based on surveying control points and it is less dependent on the 3D geometrical building model. This research proposes a method of indoor space modeling for the buildings which do not have proper 2D/3D geometrical models or they lack semantic or topological information. The proposed hybrid model consists of topological, geometrical and semantical space.

  5. In vitro biological characterization of macroporous 3D Bonelike structures prepared through a 3D machining technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laranjeira, M.S.; Dias, A.G.; Santos, J.D.; Fernandes, M.H.

    2009-01-01

    3D bioactive macroporous structures were prepared using a 3D machining technique. A virtual 3D structure model was created and a computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling device machined Bonelike samples. The resulting structures showed a reproducible macroporosity and interconnective structure. Macropores size after sintering was approximately 2000 μm. In vitro testing using human bone marrow stroma showed that cells were able to adhere and proliferate on 3D structures surface and migrate into all macropore channels. In addition, these cells were able to differentiate, since mineralized globular structures associated with cell layer were identified. Results obtained showed that 3D structures of Bonelike successfully allow cell migration into all macropores, and allow human bone marrow stromal cells to proliferate and differentiate. This innovative technique may be considered as a step-forward preparation for 3D interconnective macroporous structures that allow bone ingrowth while maintaining mechanical integrity.

  6. AxiSEM3D: broadband seismic wavefields in 3-D aspherical Earth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, K.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Zad, K. H.; van Driel, M.; Al-Attar, D.

    2017-12-01

    Seismology is the primary tool for data-informed inference of Earth structure and dynamics. Simulating seismic wave propagation at a global scale is fundamental to seismology, but remains as one of most challenging problems in scientific computing, because of both the multiscale nature of Earth's interior and the observable frequency band of seismic data. We present a novel numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models. Our method, named AxiSEM3D, is a hybrid of spectral element method and pseudospectral method. It reduces the azimuthal dimension of wavefields by means of a global Fourier series parameterization, of which the number of terms can be locally adapted to the inherent azimuthal smoothness of the wavefields. AxiSEM3D allows not only for material heterogeneities, such as velocity, density, anisotropy and attenuation, but also for finite undulations on radial discontinuities, both solid-solid and solid-fluid, and thereby a variety of aspherical Earth features such as ellipticity, topography, variable crustal thickness, and core-mantle boundary topography. Such interface undulations are equivalently interpreted as material perturbations of the contiguous media, based on the "particle relabelling transformation". Efficiency comparisons show that AxiSEM3D can be 1 to 3 orders of magnitude faster than conventional 3-D methods, with the speedup increasing with simulation frequency and decreasing with model complexity, but for all realistic structures the speedup remains at least one order of magnitude. The observable frequency range of global seismic data (up to 1 Hz) has been covered for wavefield modelling upon a 3-D Earth model with reasonable computing resources. We show an application of surface wave modelling within a state-of-the-art global crustal model (Crust1.0), with the synthetics compared to real data. The high-performance C++ code is released at github.com/AxiSEM3D/AxiSEM3D.

  7. Combining 3D structure of real video and synthetic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man-Bae; Song, Mun-Sup; Kim, Do-Kyoon

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a new approach of combining real video and synthetic objects. The purpose of this work is to use the proposed technology in the fields of advanced animation, virtual reality, games, and so forth. Computer graphics has been used in the fields previously mentioned. Recently, some applications have added real video to graphic scenes for the purpose of augmenting the realism that the computer graphics lacks in. This approach called augmented or mixed reality can produce more realistic environment that the entire use of computer graphics. Our approach differs from the virtual reality and augmented reality in the manner that computer- generated graphic objects are combined to 3D structure extracted from monocular image sequences. The extraction of the 3D structure requires the estimation of 3D depth followed by the construction of a height map. Graphic objects are then combined to the height map. The realization of our proposed approach is carried out in the following steps: (1) We derive 3D structure from test image sequences. The extraction of the 3D structure requires the estimation of depth and the construction of a height map. Due to the contents of the test sequence, the height map represents the 3D structure. (2) The height map is modeled by Delaunay triangulation or Bezier surface and each planar surface is texture-mapped. (3) Finally, graphic objects are combined to the height map. Because 3D structure of the height map is already known, Step (3) is easily manipulated. Following this procedure, we produced an animation video demonstrating the combination of the 3D structure and graphic models. Users can navigate the realistic 3D world whose associated image is rendered on the display monitor.

  8. Modelling 3D spatial objects in a geo-DBMS using a 3D primitive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Călin; Stoter, Jantien; van Oosterom, Peter

    2005-03-01

    There is a growing interest in modelling the world in three dimensions, both in applications and in science. At the same time, geographical information systems are changing into integrated architecture in which administrative and spatial data are maintained in one environment. It is for this reason that mainstream Data Base Management Systems (DBMSs) have implemented spatial data types according to the 'Simple Feature Specifications for SQL', described by the OpenGeospatial Consortium. However, these specifications are 2D, as indeed are the implementations in DBMSs. At the Section GIS Technology of TU Delft, research has been carried out in which a 3D primitive was implemented in a DBMS (Oracle Spatial). To explore the possibilities and complications, a fairly simple 3D primitive was chosen to start with: a polyhedron. In the future the study will be extended with more complex primitives, the ultimate aim being to build 3D models with features closer to the real world. Besides the data structure, a validation function was developed to check the geometric accuracy of the data. Rules for validation were established and translated into prototype implementations with the aid of literature. In order to manipulate the data, a list of useful 3D functions was specified. Most of these were translated into algorithms, which were implemented in the DBMS. The algorithms for these functions were obtained from the relevant literature. The research also comprised a comparative performance test on spatial indexing in 2D and 3D, using an R-tree. Finally, existing software was used to visualize 3D objects structured with the implemented 3D primitive. This research is a first attempt to implement a true 3D primitive in a DBMS. Future research will focus on extending and improving the implementations and on optimizing maintenance and query of 3D objects in DBMSs.

  9. 3D Printed Shock Mitigating Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrand, Amanda; Elston, Edwin; Dennis, Mitzi; Metroke, Tammy; Chen, Chenggang; Patton, Steven; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit

    Here we explore the durability, and shock mitigating potential, of solid and cellular 3D printed polymers and conductive inks under high strain rate, compressive shock wave and high g acceleration conditions. Our initial designs include a simple circuit with 4 resistors embedded into circular discs and a complex cylindrical gyroid shape. A novel ink consisting of silver-coated carbon black nanoparticles in a thermoplastic polyurethane was used as the trace material. One version of the disc structural design has the advantage of allowing disassembly after testing for direct failure analysis. After increasing impacts, printed and traditionally potted circuits were examined for functionality. Additionally, in the open disc design, trace cracking and delamination of resistors were able to be observed. In a parallel study, we examined the shock mitigating behavior of 3D printed cellular gyroid structures on a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB). We explored alterations to the classic SHPB setup for testing the low impedance, cellular samples to most accurately reflect the stress state inside the sample (strain rates from 700 to 1750 s-1). We discovered that the gyroid can effectively absorb the impact of the test resulting in crushing the structure. Future studies aim to tailor the unit cell dimensions for certain frequencies, increase print accuracy and optimize material compositions for conductivity and adhesion to manufacture more durable devices.

  10. 3D face modeling, analysis and recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Daoudi, Mohamed; Veltkamp, Remco

    2013-01-01

    3D Face Modeling, Analysis and Recognition presents methodologies for analyzing shapes of facial surfaces, develops computational tools for analyzing 3D face data, and illustrates them using state-of-the-art applications. The methodologies chosen are based on efficient representations, metrics, comparisons, and classifications of features that are especially relevant in the context of 3D measurements of human faces. These frameworks have a long-term utility in face analysis, taking into account the anticipated improvements in data collection, data storage, processing speeds, and application s

  11. Comparative Study on Cushion Performance Between 3D Printed Kelvin Structure and 3D Printed Lattice Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Lakshmi

    Frequently transported packaging goods are more prone to damage due to impact, jolting or vibration in transit. Fragile goods, for example, glass, ceramics, porcelain are susceptible to mechanical stresses. Hence ancillary materials like cushions play an important role when utilized within package. In this work, an analytical model of a 3D cellular structure is established based on Kelvin model and lattice structure. The research will provide a comparative study between the 3D printed Kelvin unit structure and 3D printed lattice structure. The comparative investigation is based on parameters defining cushion performance such as cushion creep, indentation, and cushion curve analysis. The applications of 3D printing is in rapid prototyping where the study will provide information of which model delivers better form of energy absorption. 3D printed foam will be shown as a cost-effective approach as prototype. The research also investigates about the selection of material for 3D printing process. As cushion development demands flexible material, three-dimensional printing with material having elastomeric properties is required. Further, the concept of cushion design is based on Kelvin model structure and lattice structure. The analytical solution provides the cushion curve analysis with respect to the results observed when load is applied over the cushion. The results are reported on basis of attenuation and amplification curves.

  12. Three barium diphosphonates with 3-D structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuikka, Matti; Haukka, Matti; Ahlgrén, Markku

    2007-06-01

    The gel crystallization method was exploited in this work in order to study the 3-D solid state structures of barium diphosphonates. This technique proved to be an effective tool for the growth of single crystals of diphosphonates for structure analysis. By using this approach, three barium diphosphonates, Ba[HO 3P(CH 2) 2PO 3H] ( 1), Ba 2[O 3P(CH 2) 3PO 3]·3H 2O ( 2) and Ba[HO 3P(CH 2) 4PO 3H] ( 3), with different three dimensional structures, were synthesized and characterized. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and the structure of 3 by the powder diffraction method. In the structure of 1, the diphosphonate ligand is completely surrounded by the Ba atoms, which is an unusual arrangement in a diphosphonate system. The structures of 2 and 3 are more conventional. They are organized in typical pillared layers in which the separation of the layers can be adjusted by varying the length of the hydrocarbon chain.

  13. 3D-Printed Millimeter Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    demonstrates the resolution of the printer with a 10 micron nozzle. Figure 2: Measured loss tangent of SEBS and SBS samples. 3D - Printed Millimeter... 3D printing of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) and styrene ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) is used to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D - printed ...Additionally, a dielectric lens is printed which improves the antenna gain of an open-ended WR-28 waveguide from 7 to 8.5 dBi. Keywords: 3D printing

  14. Multifractal modelling and 3D lacunarity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanen, Akkari, E-mail: bettaieb.hanen@topnet.t [Laboratoire de biophysique, TIM, Faculte de Medecine (Tunisia); Imen, Bhouri, E-mail: bhouri_imen@yahoo.f [Unite de recherche ondelettes et multifractals, Faculte des sciences (Tunisia); Asma, Ben Abdallah, E-mail: asma.babdallah@cristal.rnu.t [Laboratoire de biophysique, TIM, Faculte de Medecine (Tunisia); Patrick, Dubois, E-mail: pdubois@chru-lille.f [INSERM, U 703, Lille (France); Hedi, Bedoui Mohamed, E-mail: medhedi.bedoui@fmm.rnu.t [Laboratoire de biophysique, TIM, Faculte de Medecine (Tunisia)

    2009-09-28

    This study presents a comparative evaluation of lacunarity of 3D grey level models with different types of inhomogeneity. A new method based on the 'Relative Differential Box Counting' was developed to estimate the lacunarity features of grey level volumes. To validate our method, we generated a set of 3D grey level multifractal models with random, anisotropic and hierarchical properties. Our method gives a lacunarity measurement correlated with the theoretical one and allows a better model classification compared with a classical approach.

  15. MSX-3D: a tool to validate 3D protein models using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Michaël; Paramelle, David; Subra, Gilles; Forest, Eric; Martinez, Jean; Geourjon, Christophe; Deléage, Gilbert

    2008-12-01

    The technique of chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry has proven to bring valuable information about the protein structure and interactions between proteic subunits. It is an effective and efficient way to experimentally investigate some aspects of a protein structure when NMR and X-ray crystallography data are lacking. We introduce MSX-3D, a tool specifically geared to validate protein models using mass spectrometry. In addition to classical peptides identifications, it allows an interactive 3D visualization of the distance constraints derived from a cross-linking experiment. Freely available at http://proteomics-pbil.ibcp.fr

  16. Automatic balancing of 3D models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman; Schmidt, Ryan; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2014-01-01

    3D printing technologies allow for more diverse shapes than are possible with molds and the cost of making just one single object is negligible compared to traditional production methods. However, not all shapes are suitable for 3D print. One of the remaining costs is therefore human time spent......, in these cases, we will apply a rotation of the object which only deforms the shape a little near the base. No user input is required but it is possible to specify manufacturing constraints related to specific 3D print technologies. Several models have successfully been balanced and printed using both polyjet...... is solved by creating cavities of air and distributing dense materials inside the model. Consequently, the surface is not deformed. However, printing materials with significantly different densities is often not possible and adding cavities of air is often not enough to make the model balance. Consequently...

  17. 3D bioprinting of structural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk-Biegun, Małgorzata K; Del Campo, Aránzazu

    2017-07-01

    3D bioprinting is a booming method to obtain scaffolds of different materials with predesigned and customized morphologies and geometries. In this review we focus on the experimental strategies and recent achievements in the bioprinting of major structural proteins (collagen, silk, fibrin), as a particularly interesting technology to reconstruct the biochemical and biophysical composition and hierarchical morphology of natural scaffolds. The flexibility in molecular design offered by structural proteins, combined with the flexibility in mixing, deposition, and mechanical processing inherent to bioprinting technologies, enables the fabrication of highly functional scaffolds and tissue mimics with a degree of complexity and organization which has only just started to be explored. Here we describe the printing parameters and physical (mechanical) properties of bioinks based on structural proteins, including the biological function of the printed scaffolds. We describe applied printing techniques and cross-linking methods, highlighting the modifications implemented to improve scaffold properties. The used cell types, cell viability, and possible construct applications are also reported. We envision that the application of printing technologies to structural proteins will enable unprecedented control over their supramolecular organization, conferring printed scaffolds biological properties and functions close to natural systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D Modelling and Printing Technology to Produce Patient-Specific 3D Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbara, Nicolette S; Otton, James M; Pather, Nalini

    2017-11-10

    A comprehensive knowledge of mitral valve (MV) anatomy is crucial in the assessment of MV disease. While the use of three-dimensional (3D) modelling and printing in MV assessment has undergone early clinical evaluation, the precision and usefulness of this technology requires further investigation. This study aimed to assess and validate 3D modelling and printing technology to produce patient-specific 3D MV models. A prototype method for MV 3D modelling and printing was developed from computed tomography (CT) scans of a plastinated human heart. Mitral valve models were printed using four 3D printing methods and validated to assess precision. Cardiac CT and 3D echocardiography imaging data of four MV disease patients was used to produce patient-specific 3D printed models, and 40 cardiac health professionals (CHPs) were surveyed on the perceived value and potential uses of 3D models in a clinical setting. The prototype method demonstrated submillimetre precision for all four 3D printing methods used, and statistical analysis showed a significant difference (p3D printed models, particularly using multiple print materials, were considered useful by CHPs for preoperative planning, as well as other applications such as teaching and training. This study suggests that, with further advances in 3D modelling and printing technology, patient-specific 3D MV models could serve as a useful clinical tool. The findings also highlight the potential of this technology to be applied in a variety of medical areas within both clinical and educational settings. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D Structure of Tillage Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Torre, Iván; Losada, Juan Carlos; Falconer, Ruth; Hapca, Simona; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2015-04-01

    Soil structure may be defined as the spatial arrangement of soil particles, aggregates and pores. The geometry of each one of these elements, as well as their spatial arrangement, has a great influence on the transport of fluids and solutes through the soil. Fractal/Multifractal methods have been increasingly applied to quantify soil structure thanks to the advances in computer technology (Tarquis et al., 2003). There is no doubt that computed tomography (CT) has provided an alternative for observing intact soil structure. These CT techniques reduce the physical impact to sampling, providing three-dimensional (3D) information and allowing rapid scanning to study sample dynamics in near real-time (Houston et al., 2013a). However, several authors have dedicated attention to the appropriate pore-solid CT threshold (Elliot and Heck, 2007; Houston et al., 2013b) and the better method to estimate the multifractal parameters (Grau et al., 2006; Tarquis et al., 2009). The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of the algorithm applied in the multifractal method (box counting and box gliding) and the cube size on the calculation of generalized fractal dimensions (Dq) in grey images without applying any threshold. To this end, soil samples were extracted from different areas plowed with three tools (moldboard, chissel and plow). Soil samples for each of the tillage treatment were packed into polypropylene cylinders of 8 cm diameter and 10 cm high. These were imaged using an mSIMCT at 155keV and 25 mA. An aluminium filter (0.25 mm) was applied to reduce beam hardening and later several corrections where applied during reconstruction. References Elliot, T.R. and Heck, R.J. 2007. A comparison of 2D and 3D thresholding of CT imagery. Can. J. Soil Sci., 87(4), 405-412. Grau, J, Médez, V.; Tarquis, A.M., Saa, A. and Díaz, M.C.. 2006. Comparison of gliding box and box-counting methods in soil image analysis. Geoderma, 134, 349-359. González-Torres, Iván. Theory and

  20. 3D printing of functional structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    The technology colloquial known as ‘3D printing’ has developed in such diversity in printing technologies and application fields that meanwhile it seems anything is possible. However, clearly the ideal 3D Printer, with high resolution, multi-material capability, fast printing, etc. is yet to be

  1. Monte Carlo simulation for uncertainty estimation on structural data in implicit 3-D geological modeling, a guide for disturbance distribution selection and parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakyuz-Charrier, Evren; Lindsay, Mark; Ogarko, Vitaliy; Giraud, Jeremie; Jessell, Mark

    2018-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) geological structural modeling aims to determine geological information in a 3-D space using structural data (foliations and interfaces) and topological rules as inputs. This is necessary in any project in which the properties of the subsurface matters; they express our understanding of geometries in depth. For that reason, 3-D geological models have a wide range of practical applications including but not restricted to civil engineering, the oil and gas industry, the mining industry, and water management. These models, however, are fraught with uncertainties originating from the inherent flaws of the modeling engines (working hypotheses, interpolator's parameterization) and the inherent lack of knowledge in areas where there are no observations combined with input uncertainty (observational, conceptual and technical errors). Because 3-D geological models are often used for impactful decision-making it is critical that all 3-D geological models provide accurate estimates of uncertainty. This paper's focus is set on the effect of structural input data measurement uncertainty propagation in implicit 3-D geological modeling. This aim is achieved using Monte Carlo simulation for uncertainty estimation (MCUE), a stochastic method which samples from predefined disturbance probability distributions that represent the uncertainty of the original input data set. MCUE is used to produce hundreds to thousands of altered unique data sets. The altered data sets are used as inputs to produce a range of plausible 3-D models. The plausible models are then combined into a single probabilistic model as a means to propagate uncertainty from the input data to the final model. In this paper, several improved methods for MCUE are proposed. The methods pertain to distribution selection for input uncertainty, sample analysis and statistical consistency of the sampled distribution. Pole vector sampling is proposed as a more rigorous alternative than dip vector

  2. Monte Carlo simulation for uncertainty estimation on structural data in implicit 3-D geological modeling, a guide for disturbance distribution selection and parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pakyuz-Charrier

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3-D geological structural modeling aims to determine geological information in a 3-D space using structural data (foliations and interfaces and topological rules as inputs. This is necessary in any project in which the properties of the subsurface matters; they express our understanding of geometries in depth. For that reason, 3-D geological models have a wide range of practical applications including but not restricted to civil engineering, the oil and gas industry, the mining industry, and water management. These models, however, are fraught with uncertainties originating from the inherent flaws of the modeling engines (working hypotheses, interpolator's parameterization and the inherent lack of knowledge in areas where there are no observations combined with input uncertainty (observational, conceptual and technical errors. Because 3-D geological models are often used for impactful decision-making it is critical that all 3-D geological models provide accurate estimates of uncertainty. This paper's focus is set on the effect of structural input data measurement uncertainty propagation in implicit 3-D geological modeling. This aim is achieved using Monte Carlo simulation for uncertainty estimation (MCUE, a stochastic method which samples from predefined disturbance probability distributions that represent the uncertainty of the original input data set. MCUE is used to produce hundreds to thousands of altered unique data sets. The altered data sets are used as inputs to produce a range of plausible 3-D models. The plausible models are then combined into a single probabilistic model as a means to propagate uncertainty from the input data to the final model. In this paper, several improved methods for MCUE are proposed. The methods pertain to distribution selection for input uncertainty, sample analysis and statistical consistency of the sampled distribution. Pole vector sampling is proposed as a more rigorous alternative than

  3. Crustal and mantle structure of the greater Jan Mayen-East Greenland region (NE Atlantic) from combined 3D structural, S-wave velocity, and gravity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P.; Sippel, J.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Meeßen, C.; Breivik, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    The study area is located between the Jan Mayen Ridge and the east coast of Greenland. It has a complex geological setting with the ultraslow Kolbeinsey and Mohn's spreading ridges, the anomalously shallow Eggvin Bank, the Jan Mayen Microcontinent (JMMC), and the tectonically active West Jan Mayen Fracture Zone (WJMFZ). In this study, we present the results of forward 3D structural, S-wave velocity, and gravity modeling which provide new insights into the deep crust and mantle structure and the wide-ranging influence of the Iceland Plume. The crustal parts of the presented 3D structural model are mainly constrained by local seismic refraction and reflection data. Accordingly, greatest crustal thicknesses (24 km) are observed on the northern boundary of the JMMC, while the average crustal thickness is 8.5 km and 4 km in the Kolbeinsey and Mohn's Ridge, respectively. The densities of the crustal parts are from previous studies. Additionally, the mantle density is derived from S-wave velocity data (between 50 and 250 km depth), while densities of the lithospheric mantle between the Moho and 50 km are calculated assuming isostatic equilibrium at 250 km depth. This is used as a starting density model which is further developed to obtain a reasonable fit between the calculated and measured (free-air) gravity fields. The observed S-wave tomographic data and the gravity modeling prove that the Iceland plume anomaly in the asthenosphere affects the lithospheric thickness and temperature, from the strongly influenced Middle Kolbeinsey Ridge, to the less affected North Kolbeinsey Ridge (Eggvin Bank), and to the little impacted Mohn's Ridge. Thus, the age-temperature relations of the different mid-ocean ridges of the study area are perturbed to different degrees controlled by the distance from the Iceland Plume. Furthermore, we find that the upper 50 km of lithospheric mantle are thermally affected by the plume only in the southwestern parts of the study area.

  4. R3D Align web server for global nucleotide to nucleotide alignments of RNA 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahrig, Ryan R; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles B; Zirbel, Craig L

    2013-07-01

    The R3D Align web server provides online access to 'RNA 3D Align' (R3D Align), a method for producing accurate nucleotide-level structural alignments of RNA 3D structures. The web server provides a streamlined and intuitive interface, input data validation and output that is more extensive and easier to read and interpret than related servers. The R3D Align web server offers a unique Gallery of Featured Alignments, providing immediate access to pre-computed alignments of large RNA 3D structures, including all ribosomal RNAs, as well as guidance on effective use of the server and interpretation of the output. By accessing the non-redundant lists of RNA 3D structures provided by the Bowling Green State University RNA group, R3D Align connects users to structure files in the same equivalence class and the best-modeled representative structure from each group. The R3D Align web server is freely accessible at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3dalign/.

  5. Illustrating the disassembly of 3D models

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Jianwei

    2013-06-11

    We present a framework for the automatic disassembly of 3D man-made models and the illustration of the disassembly process. Given an assembled 3D model, we first analyze the individual parts using sharp edge loops and extract the contact faces between each pair of neighboring parts. The contact faces are then used to compute the possible moving directions of each part. We then present a simple algorithm for clustering the sets of the individual parts into meaningful sub-assemblies, which can be used for a hierarchical decomposition. We take the stability of sub-assemblies into account during the decomposition process by considering the upright orientation of the input models. Our framework also provides a user-friendly interface to enable the superimposition of the constraints for the decomposition. Finally, we visualize the disassembly process by generating an animated sequence. The experiments demonstrate that our framework works well for a variety of complex models. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Debris Dispersion Model Using Java 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar; Bardina, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes web based simulation of Shuttle launch operations and debris dispersion. Java 3D graphics provides geometric and visual content with suitable mathematical model and behaviors of Shuttle launch. Because the model is so heterogeneous and interrelated with various factors, 3D graphics combined with physical models provides mechanisms to understand the complexity of launch and range operations. The main focus in the modeling and simulation covers orbital dynamics and range safety. Range safety areas include destruct limit lines, telemetry and tracking and population risk near range. If there is an explosion of Shuttle during launch, debris dispersion is explained. The shuttle launch and range operations in this paper are discussed based on the operations from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA.

  7. Combretastatin A-4 based thiophene derivatives as antitumor agent: Development of structure activity correlation model using 3D-QSAR, pharmacophore and docking studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K. Patel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure and ligand based synergistic approach is being applied to design ligands more correctly. The present report discloses the combination of structure and ligand based tactics i.e., molecular docking, energetic based pharmacophore, pharmacophore and atom based 3D-QSAR modeling for the analysis of thiophene derivatives as anticancer agent. The main purpose of using structure and ligand based synergistic approach is to ascertain a correlation between structure and its biological activity. Thiophene derivatives have been found to possess cytotoxic activity in several cancer cell lines and its mechanism of action basically involves the binding to the colchicine site on β-tubulin. The structure based approach (molecular docking was performed on a series of thiophene derivatives. All the structures were docked to colchicine binding site of β tubulin for examining the binding affinity of compounds for antitumor activity. The pharmacophore and atom based 3D-QSAR modeling was accomplished on a series of thiophene (32 compounds analogues. Five-point common pharmacophore hypotheses (AAAAR.38 were selected for alignment of all compounds. The atom based 3D-QSAR models were developed by selection of 23 compounds as training set and 9 compounds as test set, demonstrated good partial least squares statistical results. The generated common pharmacophore hypothesis and 3D-QSAR models were validated further externally by measuring the activity of database compounds and assessing it with actual activity. The common pharmacophore hypothesis AAAAR.38 resulted in a 3D-QSAR model with excellent PLSs data for factor two characterized by the best predication coefficient Q2 (cross validated r2 (0.7213, regression R2 (0.8311, SD (0.3672, F (49.2, P (1.89E-08, RMSE (0.3864, Stability (0.8702, Pearson-r (0.8722. The results of these molecular modeling studies i.e., molecular docking, energetic based pharmacophore, pharmacophore and atom based 3D-QSAR modeling

  8. Do-It-Yourself: 3D Models of Hydrogenic Orbitals through 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Kaitlyn M.; de Cataldo, Riccardo; Fogarty, Keir H.

    2016-01-01

    Introductory chemistry students often have difficulty visualizing the 3-dimensional shapes of the hydrogenic electron orbitals without the aid of physical 3D models. Unfortunately, commercially available models can be quite expensive. 3D printing offers a solution for producing models of hydrogenic orbitals. 3D printing technology is widely…

  9. 3dRPC: a web server for 3D RNA-protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangyu; Li, Haotian; Xiao, Yi

    2018-04-01

    RNA-protein interactions occur in many biological processes. To understand the mechanism of these interactions one needs to know three-dimensional (3D) structures of RNA-protein complexes. 3dRPC is an algorithm for prediction of 3D RNA-protein complex structures and consists of a docking algorithm RPDOCK and a scoring function 3dRPC-Score. RPDOCK is used to sample possible complex conformations of an RNA and a protein by calculating the geometric and electrostatic complementarities and stacking interactions at the RNA-protein interface according to the features of atom packing of the interface. 3dRPC-Score is a knowledge-based potential that uses the conformations of nucleotide-amino-acid pairs as statistical variables and that is used to choose the near-native complex-conformations obtained from the docking method above. Recently, we built a web server for 3dRPC. The users can easily use 3dRPC without installing it locally. RNA and protein structures in PDB (Protein Data Bank) format are the only needed input files. It can also incorporate the information of interface residues or residue-pairs obtained from experiments or theoretical predictions to improve the prediction. The address of 3dRPC web server is http://biophy.hust.edu.cn/3dRPC. yxiao@hust.edu.cn.

  10. Efficient 3D scene modeling and mosaicing

    CERN Document Server

    Nicosevici, Tudor

    2013-01-01

    This book proposes a complete pipeline for monocular (single camera) based 3D mapping of terrestrial and underwater environments. The aim is to provide a solution to large-scale scene modeling that is both accurate and efficient. To this end, we have developed a novel Structure from Motion algorithm that increases mapping accuracy by registering camera views directly with the maps. The camera registration uses a dual approach that adapts to the type of environment being mapped.   In order to further increase the accuracy of the resulting maps, a new method is presented, allowing detection of images corresponding to the same scene region (crossovers). Crossovers then used in conjunction with global alignment methods in order to highly reduce estimation errors, especially when mapping large areas. Our method is based on Visual Bag of Words paradigm (BoW), offering a more efficient and simpler solution by eliminating the training stage, generally required by state of the art BoW algorithms.   Also, towards dev...

  11. Illustrative visualization of 3D city models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doellner, Juergen; Buchholz, Henrik; Nienhaus, Marc; Kirsch, Florian

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents an illustrative visualization technique that provides expressive representations of large-scale 3D city models, inspired by the tradition of artistic and cartographic visualizations typically found in bird"s-eye view and panoramic maps. We define a collection of city model components and a real-time multi-pass rendering algorithm that achieves comprehensible, abstract 3D city model depictions based on edge enhancement, color-based and shadow-based depth cues, and procedural facade texturing. Illustrative visualization provides an effective visual interface to urban spatial information and associated thematic information complementing visual interfaces based on the Virtual Reality paradigm, offering a huge potential for graphics design. Primary application areas include city and landscape planning, cartoon worlds in computer games, and tourist information systems.

  12. Hanging drop: an in vitro air toxic exposure model using human lung cells in 2D and 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Faye F; Peng, Cheng; Escher, Beate I; Fantino, Emmanuelle; Giles, Cindy; Were, Stephen; Duffy, Lesley; Ng, Jack C

    2013-10-15

    Using benzene as a candidate air toxicant and A549 cells as an in vitro cell model, we have developed and validated a hanging drop (HD) air exposure system that mimics an air liquid interface exposure to the lung for periods of 1h to over 20 days. Dose response curves were highly reproducible for 2D cultures but more variable for 3D cultures. By comparing the HD exposure method with other classically used air exposure systems, we found that the HD exposure method is more sensitive, more reliable and cheaper to run than medium diffusion methods and the CULTEX(®) system. The concentration causing 50% of reduction of cell viability (EC50) for benzene, toluene, p-xylene, m-xylene and o-xylene to A549 cells for 1h exposure in the HD system were similar to previous in vitro static air exposure. Not only cell viability could be assessed but also sub lethal biological endpoints such as DNA damage and interleukin expressions. An advantage of the HD exposure system is that bioavailability and cell concentrations can be derived from published physicochemical properties using a four compartment mass balance model. The modelled cellular effect concentrations EC50cell for 1h exposure were very similar for benzene, toluene and three xylenes and ranged from 5 to 15 mmol/kgdry weight, which corresponds to the intracellular concentration of narcotic chemicals in many aquatic species, confirming the high sensitivity of this exposure method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 3-D model-based vehicle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jianguang; Tan, Tieniu; Hu, Weiming; Yang, Hao; Maybank, Steven J

    2005-10-01

    This paper aims at tracking vehicles from monocular intensity image sequences and presents an efficient and robust approach to three-dimensional (3-D) model-based vehicle tracking. Under the weak perspective assumption and the ground-plane constraint, the movements of model projection in the two-dimensional image plane can be decomposed into two motions: translation and rotation. They are the results of the corresponding movements of 3-D translation on the ground plane (GP) and rotation around the normal of the GP, which can be determined separately. A new metric based on point-to-line segment distance is proposed to evaluate the similarity between an image region and an instantiation of a 3-D vehicle model under a given pose. Based on this, we provide an efficient pose refinement method to refine the vehicle's pose parameters. An improved EKF is also proposed to track and to predict vehicle motion with a precise kinematics model. Experimental results with both indoor and outdoor data show that the algorithm obtains desirable performance even under severe occlusion and clutter.

  14. A novel use of 3D printing model demonstrates the effects of deteriorated trabecular bone structure on bone stiffness and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Meir Max; Black, Margaret Arielle

    2018-02-01

    Trabecular bone structure is crucial to normal mechanical behavior of bones. Studies have shown that osteoporosis negatively affects trabecular bone structure, mainly by reducing bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and thus increasing fracture risk. One major limitation in assessing and quantifying the effect of this structural deterioration is that no two trabecular structures are identical. Thus, when we compare a group of healthy bones against a different group of bones that experienced resorption (i.e. decreased BV/TV) we only discover an "average" mechanical effect. It is impossible to quantify the mechanical effect of individual structural deterioration for each sample, simply because we never have the same sample in both states (intact and deteriorated structure). 3D printing is a new technology that can assist in overcoming this issue. Here we report a preliminary study that compares a healthy 3D printed trabecular bone model with the same model after bone resorption was simulated. Since the deteriorated structural bone model is derived from the healthy one, it is possible to directly estimate (percentage wise) the decrease of tissue stiffness and strength as a result of bone resorption for this specific structure. Our results demonstrate that a relatively small decrease in BV/TV (about 8%) leads to a dramatic decrease in structural strength (24%) and structural stiffness (17%), (P printing is a novel and valuable tool for quantifying the effect of structural deterioration on the mechanical properties of trabecular bone. In the future, this approach may help us attain better personal fracture risk assessments by CT scanning, 3D printing and mechanically testing individual bone replicas from patients suffering excessive bone resorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Robust hashing for 3D models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Waldemar; Schäfer, Marcel; Rettig, Michael; Steinebach, Martin

    2014-02-01

    3D models and applications are of utmost interest in both science and industry. With the increment of their usage, their number and thereby the challenge to correctly identify them increases. Content identification is commonly done by cryptographic hashes. However, they fail as a solution in application scenarios such as computer aided design (CAD), scientific visualization or video games, because even the smallest alteration of the 3D model, e.g. conversion or compression operations, massively changes the cryptographic hash as well. Therefore, this work presents a robust hashing algorithm for 3D mesh data. The algorithm applies several different bit extraction methods. They are built to resist desired alterations of the model as well as malicious attacks intending to prevent correct allocation. The different bit extraction methods are tested against each other and, as far as possible, the hashing algorithm is compared to the state of the art. The parameters tested are robustness, security and runtime performance as well as False Acceptance Rate (FAR) and False Rejection Rate (FRR), also the probability calculation of hash collision is included. The introduced hashing algorithm is kept adaptive e.g. in hash length, to serve as a proper tool for all applications in practice.

  16. A large 3D physical model: a tool to investigate the consequences of ground movements on the surface structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hor B.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil subsidence of various extend and amplitude can result from the failure of underground cavities, whether natural (for example caused by the dissolution of rocks by underground water flow or man-made (such as mines. The impact of the ground movements on existing structures (houses, buildings, bridges, etc… is generally dramatic. A large small-scale physical model is developed in order to improve our understanding of the behaviour of the building subjected to ground subsidence or the collapse of cavities. We focus on the soil-structure interaction and on the mitigation techniques allowing reducing the vulnerability of the buildings (structures.

  17. Application of characterization, modelling, and analytics towards understanding process-structure linkages in metallic 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeber, M. A.; Schwalbach, E.; Donegan, S.; Chaput, K.; Butler, T.; Miller, J.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents methods for combining process monitoring, thermal modelling and microstructure characterization together to draw process-to-structure relationships in metal additive manufacturing. The paper discusses heterogeneities in the local processing conditions within additively manufactured components and how they affect the resulting material structure. Methods for registering and fusing disparate data sources are presented, and some effort is made to discuss the utility of different data sources for specific microstructural features of interest. It is the intent that this paper will highlight the need for improved understanding of metallic additive manufacturing processes and show that combining experimental data with modelling and advanced data processing and analytics methods will accelerate that understanding.

  18. NoSQL Based 3D City Model Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, B.; Harrie, L.; Cao, J.; Wu, Z.; Shen, J.

    2014-04-01

    To manage increasingly complicated 3D city models, a framework based on NoSQL database is proposed in this paper. The framework supports import and export of 3D city model according to international standards such as CityGML, KML/COLLADA and X3D. We also suggest and implement 3D model analysis and visualization in the framework. For city model analysis, 3D geometry data and semantic information (such as name, height, area, price and so on) are stored and processed separately. We use a Map-Reduce method to deal with the 3D geometry data since it is more complex, while the semantic analysis is mainly based on database query operation. For visualization, a multiple 3D city representation structure CityTree is implemented within the framework to support dynamic LODs based on user viewpoint. Also, the proposed framework is easily extensible and supports geoindexes to speed up the querying. Our experimental results show that the proposed 3D city management system can efficiently fulfil the analysis and visualization requirements.

  19. A 3D-structural model of unsulfated chondroitin from high-field NMR: 4-sulfation has little effect on backbone conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattelle, Benedict M.; Shakeri, Javad; Roberts, Ian S.; Almond, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate is essential in human health and disease but exactly how sulfation dictates its 3D-strucutre at the atomic level is unclear. To address this, we have purified homogenous oligosaccharides of unsulfated chondroitin (with and without 15N-enrichment) and analysed them by high-field NMR to make a comparison published chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan 3D-structures. The result is the first full assignment of the tetrasaccharide and an experimental 3D-model of the hexasaccharide (PDB code 2KQO). In common with hyaluronan, we confirm that the amide proton is not involved in strong, persistent inter-residue hydrogen bonds. However, in contrast to hyaluronan, a hydrogen bond is not inferred between the hexosamine OH-4 and the glucuronic acid O5 atoms across the β(1→3) glycosidic linkage. The unsulfated chondroitin bond geometry differs slightly from hyaluronan by rotation about the β(1→3) ψ dihedral (as previously predicted by simulation), while the β(1→4) linkage is unaffected. Furthermore, comparison shows that this glycosidic linkage geometry is similar in chondroitin-4-sulfate. We therefore hypothesise that both hexosamine OH-4 and OH-6 atoms are solvent exposed in chondroitin, explaining why it is amenable to sulfation and hyaluronan is not, and also that 4-sulfation has little effect on backbone conformation. Our conclusions exemplify the value of the 3D-model presented here and progress our understanding of glycosaminoglycan molecular properties. PMID:20022001

  20. 3D-modeling and 3D-printing explorations on Japanese tea ceremony utensils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levy, P.D.; Yamada, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we inquire aesthetical aspects of the Japanese tea ceremony, described as the aesthetics in the imperfection, based on novel fabrication technologies: 3D-modeling and 3D-printing. To do so, 3D-printed utensils (chashaku and chasen) were iteratively designed for the ceremony and were

  1. Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and ROMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Kevin A.; Warner, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of nearshore and surf zone processes are important for determining coastal circulation, impacts of storms, navigation, and recreational safety. Numerical modeling of these systems facilitates advancements in our understanding of coastal changes and can provide predictive capabilities for resource managers. There exists many nearshore coastal circulation models, however they are mostly limited or typically only applied as depth integrated models. SHORECIRC is an established surf zone circulation model that is quasi-3D to allow the effect of the variability in the vertical structure of the currents while maintaining the computational advantage of a 2DH model. Here we compare SHORECIRC to ROMS, a fully 3D ocean circulation model which now includes a three dimensional formulation for the wave-driven flows. We compare the models with three different test applications for: (i) spectral waves approaching a plane beach with an oblique angle of incidence; (ii) monochromatic waves driving longshore currents in a laboratory basin; and (iii) monochromatic waves on a barred beach with rip channels in a laboratory basin. Results identify that the models are very similar for the depth integrated flows and qualitatively consistent for the vertically varying components. The differences are primarily the result of the vertically varying radiation stress utilized by ROMS and the utilization of long wave theory for the radiation stress formulation in vertical varying momentum balance by SHORECIRC. The quasi-3D model is faster, however the applicability of the fully 3D model allows it to extend over a broader range of processes, temporal, and spatial scales.

  2. Gis-Based Smart Cartography Using 3d Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, E. S.; Tassetti, A. N.

    2013-08-01

    3D City Models have evolved to be important tools for urban decision processes and information systems, especially in planning, simulation, analysis, documentation and heritage management. On the other hand existing and in use numerical cartography is often not suitable to be used in GIS because not geometrically and topologically correctly structured. The research aim is to 3D structure and organize a numeric cartography for GIS and turn it into CityGML standardized features. The work is framed around a first phase of methodological analysis aimed to underline which existing standard (like ISO and OGC rules) can be used to improve the quality requirement of a cartographic structure. Subsequently, from this technical specifics, it has been investigated the translation in formal contents, using an owner interchange software (SketchUp), to support some guide lines implementations to generate a GIS3D structured in GML3. It has been therefore predisposed a test three-dimensional numerical cartography (scale 1:500, generated from range data captured by 3D laser scanner), tested on its quality according to the previous standard and edited when and where necessary. Cad files and shapefiles are converted into a final 3D model (Google SketchUp model) and then exported into a 3D city model (CityGML LoD1/LoD2). The GIS3D structure has been managed in a GIS environment to run further spatial analysis and energy performance estimate, not achievable in a 2D environment. In particular geometrical building parameters (footprint, volume etc.) are computed and building envelop thermal characteristics are derived from. Lastly, a simulation is carried out to deal with asbestos and home renovating charges and show how the built 3D city model can support municipal managers with risk diagnosis of the present situation and development of strategies for a sustainable redevelop.

  3. 3D modeling of buildings outstanding sites

    CERN Document Server

    Héno, Rapha?le

    2014-01-01

    Conventional topographic databases, obtained by capture on aerial or spatial images provide a simplified 3D modeling of our urban environment, answering the needs of numerous applications (development, risk prevention, mobility management, etc.). However, when we have to represent and analyze more complex sites (monuments, civil engineering works, archeological sites, etc.), these models no longer suffice and other acquisition and processing means have to be implemented. This book focuses on the study of adapted lifting means for "notable buildings". The methods tackled in this book cover las

  4. 3D space analysis of dental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Joon H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Kondo, Toshiaki; Foong, Kelvin W. C.; Yong, Than F.

    2001-05-01

    Space analysis is an important procedure by orthodontists to determine the amount of space available and required for teeth alignment during treatment planning. Traditional manual methods of space analysis are tedious and often inaccurate. Computer-based space analysis methods that work on 2D images have been reported. However, as the space problems in the dental arch exist in all three planes of space, a full 3D analysis of the problems is necessary. This paper describes a visualization and measurement system that analyses 3D images of dental plaster models. Algorithms were developed to determine dental arches. The system is able to record the depths of the Curve of Spee, and quantify space liabilities arising from a non-planar Curve of Spee, malalignment and overjet. Furthermore, the difference between total arch space available and the space required to arrange the teeth in ideal occlusion can be accurately computed. The system for 3D space analysis of the dental arch is an accurate, comprehensive, rapid and repeatable method of space analysis to facilitate proper orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

  5. Integrated geophysical and geological modelling: insights in the 3D structure and kinematics of the Hercynian Suture Zone in the Champtoceaux area (Brittany, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelet, G.; Calcagno, Ph.; Gumiaux, C.; Truffert, C.; Bitri, A.; Gapais, D.; Brun, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    Using the Editeur Géologique, a software specifically developed for the purpose of 3D geological modelling by the French Geological Survey (BRGM), we model a segment of the Hercynian suture zone of western Europe, in Champtoceaux area (Brittany, western France). The area shows exposures of strongly deformed eclogite-bearing gneisses and micaschists. These units were stacked during collision and exhumed during late Devonian to early Carboniferous times. Regional-scale dextral simple shear accompanied strike-slip movements along the SASZ (South Armorican Shear Zone). It produced a km-scale antiformal structure in the Champtoceaux metamorphic units with a steeply-dipping axial plane and a steeply eastward-plunging axis. Interpretation of the recent Armor2 seismic profile shows that the well-recognized north-dipping early lithological structuration is cross-cut by Carboniferous south-dipping inverse tectonics of crustal extension. In order to precise and extend in 3D the structures interpreted in the seismic profile, we model seven radial gravity profiles throughout Champtoceaux periclinal termination, based on data from the French gravity database. Direct 2D modelling is performed at a crustal scale, based on seismic constraints and geological field observations, as well as density measurements on samples or in drill holes. Input in the Editeur Géologique, the consistency of cross-sections, digitized geological map and structural information (foliation dips) is first checked. From the surface to the Moho, available spatialised 2D information is then interpolated in the whole 3D space using adapted geostatistical analysis. Finally, taking into account densities associated to each modelled geological body, the computation of the 3D gravity effect of the model is compared to the measured Bouguer anomaly, which insures that all complex 3D gravity effects are well taken into account. Results emphasise the usefulness of integrated geological and geophysical 3D modelling

  6. Gravity Survey at the Ceboruco Volcano Area (Nayarit, Mexico): a 3-D Model of the Subsurface Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Cordoba, Jhonattan; Zamora-Camacho, Araceli; Espindola, Juan Manuel

    2017-10-01

    Ceboruco volcano (-104°30', 21°7', 2150 m asl) is located in the western portion of the trans-Mexican volcanic belt and NW extreme of the Tepic-Zacoalco rift zone, a structure composed of a series of NNW-trending en echelon fault-bounded basins constituting the NE boundary between the north-American plate and the Jalisco block (JB). Ceboruco experimented a Plinian eruption about 1000 years ago and several more of different styles afterward; the last one in 1870 CE. This volcano poses a significant risk because of the relatively large population in its surroundings. Ceboruco has been studied by mostly from the point of view of petrology, geochemistry, and physical volcanology; however, no geophysical studies about its internal structure have been published. In this paper, we present the results of a gravimetric survey carried out in its surroundings and a model of the internal structure obtained from inversion of the data. The Ceboruco area is characterized by a negative Bouguer anomaly spanning the volcanic structure. The probable causative body modeled with the data of the survey is located about 1 km below mean sea level and has a volume of 163 km3. We propose that this body is the magma chamber from where the products of its eruptions in the last 1000 years ensued.

  7. 3D Model of Surfactant Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James; Tai, Cheng-Feng; Filoche, Marcel

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT) involves instillation of a liquid-surfactant mixture directly into the lung airway tree. Though successful in neonatal applications, its use in adults had early success followed by failure. We present the first mathematical model of 3D SRT where a liquid plug propagates through the tree from forced inspiration. In two separate modeling steps, the plug first deposits a coating film on the airway wall which subtracts from its volume, a ``coating cost''. Then the plug splits unevenly at the airway bifurcation due to gravity. The steps are repeated until a plug ruptures or reaches the tree endpoint alveoli/acinus. The model generates 3D images of the resulting acinar distribution and calculates two global indexes, efficiency and homogeneity. Simulating published literature, the earlier successful adult SRT studies show comparatively good index values, while the later failed studies do not. Those unsuccessful studies used smaller dose volumes with higher concentration mixtures, apparently assuming a well mixed compartment. The model shows that adult lungs are not well mixed in SRT due to the coating cost and gravity effects. Returning to the higher dose volume protocols could save many thousands of lives annually in the US. Supported by NIH Grants HL85156, HL84370 and Agence Nationale de la Recherche, ANR no. 2010-BLAN-1119-05.

  8. 3D Models of Female Pelvis Structures Reconstructed and Represented in Combination with Anatomical and Radiological Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Romero, L; Asensio Gómez, M; Prats-Galino, A; Juanes Méndez, J A

    2018-01-15

    We present a computer program designed to visualize and interact with three-dimensional models of the main anatomical structures of the female pelvis. They are reconstructed from serial sections of corpse, from the Visible Human project of the Medical Library of the United States and from serial sections of high-resolution magnetic resonance. It is possible to represent these three-dimensional structures in any spatial orientation, together with sectional images of corpse and magnetic resonance imaging, in the three planes of space (axial, coronal and sagittal) that facilitates the anatomical understanding and the identification of the set of visceral structures of this body region. Actually, there are few studies that analysze in detail the radiological anatomy of the female pelvis using three-dimensional models together with sectional images, making use of open applications for the representation of virtual scenes on low cost Windows® platforms. Our technological development allows the observation of the main female pelvis viscera in three dimensions with a very intuitive graphic interface. This computer application represents an important training tool for both medical students and specialists in gynecology and as a preliminary step in the planning of pelvic floor surgery.

  9. 3D gender recognition using cognitive modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Andersen, Tobias; Hansen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We use 3D scans of human faces and cognitive modeling to estimate the “gender strength”. The “gender strength” is a continuous class variable of the gender, superseding the traditional binary class labeling. To visualize some of the visual trends humans use when performing gender classification, we...... use linear regression. In addition, we use the gender strength to construct a smaller but refined training set, by identifying and removing ill-defined training examples. We use this refined training set to improve the performance of known classification algorithms. Results are presented using a 5...

  10. A 3-D functional-structural grapevine model that couples the dynamics of water transport with leaf gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junqi; Dai, Zhanwu; Vivin, Philippe; Gambetta, Gregory A; Henke, Michael; Peccoux, Anthony; Ollat, Nathalie; Delrot, Serge

    2017-12-23

    Predicting both plant water status and leaf gas exchange under various environmental conditions is essential for anticipating the effects of climate change on plant growth and productivity. This study developed a functional-structural grapevine model which combines a mechanistic understanding of stomatal function and photosynthesis at the leaf level (i.e. extended Farqhuhar-von Caemmerer-Berry model) and the dynamics of water transport from soil to individual leaves (i.e. Tardieu-Davies model). The model included novel features that account for the effects of xylem embolism (fPLC) on leaf hydraulic conductance and residual stomatal conductance (g0), variable root and leaf hydraulic conductance, and the microclimate of individual organs. The model was calibrated with detailed datasets of leaf photosynthesis, leaf water potential, xylem sap abscisic acid (ABA) concentration and hourly whole-plant transpiration observed within a soil drying period, and validated with independent datasets of whole-plant transpiration under both well-watered and water-stressed conditions. The model well captured the effects of radiation, temperature, CO2 and vapour pressure deficit on leaf photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance and leaf water potential, and correctly reproduced the diurnal pattern and decline of water flux within the soil drying period. In silico analyses revealed that decreases in g0 with increasing fPLC were essential to avoid unrealistic drops in leaf water potential under severe water stress. Additionally, by varying the hydraulic conductance along the pathway (e.g. root and leaves) and changing the sensitivity of stomatal conductance to ABA and leaf water potential, the model can produce different water use behaviours (i.e. iso- and anisohydric). The robust performance of this model allows for modelling climate effects from individual plants to fields, and for modelling plants with complex, non-homogenous canopies. In addition, the model provides a

  11. Creating physical 3D stereolithograph models of brain and skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The human brain and skull are three dimensional (3D anatomical structures with complex surfaces. However, medical images are often two dimensional (2D and provide incomplete visualization of structural morphology. To overcome this loss in dimension, we developed and validated a freely available, semi-automated pathway to build 3D virtual reality (VR and hand-held, stereolithograph models. To evaluate whether surface visualization in 3D was more informative than in 2D, undergraduate students (n = 50 used the Gillespie scale to rate 3D VR and physical models of both a living patient-volunteer's brain and the skull of Phineas Gage, a historically famous railroad worker whose misfortune with a projectile tamping iron provided the first evidence of a structure-function relationship in brain. Using our processing pathway, we successfully fabricated human brain and skull replicas and validated that the stereolithograph model preserved the scale of the VR model. Based on the Gillespie ratings, students indicated that the biological utility and quality of visual information at the surface of VR and stereolithograph models were greater than the 2D images from which they were derived. The method we developed is useful to create VR and stereolithograph 3D models from medical images and can be used to model hard or soft tissue in living or preserved specimens. Compared to 2D images, VR and stereolithograph models provide an extra dimension that enhances both the quality of visual information and utility of surface visualization in neuroscience and medicine.

  12. MolPrint3D: Enhanced 3D Printing of Ball-and-Stick Molecular Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukstelis, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    The increased availability of noncommercial 3D printers has provided instructors and students improved access to printing technology. However, printing complex ball-and-stick molecular structures faces distinct challenges, including the need for support structures that increase with molecular complexity. MolPrint3D is a software add-on for the…

  13. 3D Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Aortic Valves Using a Unified Continuum ALE FEM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette H. Spühler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to advances in medical imaging, computational fluid dynamics algorithms and high performance computing, computer simulation is developing into an important tool for understanding the relationship between cardiovascular diseases and intraventricular blood flow. The field of cardiac flow simulation is challenging and highly interdisciplinary. We apply a computational framework for automated solutions of partial differential equations using Finite Element Methods where any mathematical description directly can be translated to code. This allows us to develop a cardiac model where specific properties of the heart such as fluid-structure interaction of the aortic valve can be added in a modular way without extensive efforts. In previous work, we simulated the blood flow in the left ventricle of the heart. In this paper, we extend this model by placing prototypes of both a native and a mechanical aortic valve in the outflow region of the left ventricle. Numerical simulation of the blood flow in the vicinity of the valve offers the possibility to improve the treatment of aortic valve diseases as aortic stenosis (narrowing of the valve opening or regurgitation (leaking and to optimize the design of prosthetic heart valves in a controlled and specific way. The fluid-structure interaction and contact problem are formulated in a unified continuum model using the conservation laws for mass and momentum and a phase function. The discretization is based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian space-time finite element method with streamline diffusion stabilization, and it is implemented in the open source software Unicorn which shows near optimal scaling up to thousands of cores. Computational results are presented to demonstrate the capability of our framework.

  14. 3D Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Aortic Valves Using a Unified Continuum ALE FEM Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spühler, Jeannette H; Jansson, Johan; Jansson, Niclas; Hoffman, Johan

    2018-01-01

    Due to advances in medical imaging, computational fluid dynamics algorithms and high performance computing, computer simulation is developing into an important tool for understanding the relationship between cardiovascular diseases and intraventricular blood flow. The field of cardiac flow simulation is challenging and highly interdisciplinary. We apply a computational framework for automated solutions of partial differential equations using Finite Element Methods where any mathematical description directly can be translated to code. This allows us to develop a cardiac model where specific properties of the heart such as fluid-structure interaction of the aortic valve can be added in a modular way without extensive efforts. In previous work, we simulated the blood flow in the left ventricle of the heart. In this paper, we extend this model by placing prototypes of both a native and a mechanical aortic valve in the outflow region of the left ventricle. Numerical simulation of the blood flow in the vicinity of the valve offers the possibility to improve the treatment of aortic valve diseases as aortic stenosis (narrowing of the valve opening) or regurgitation (leaking) and to optimize the design of prosthetic heart valves in a controlled and specific way. The fluid-structure interaction and contact problem are formulated in a unified continuum model using the conservation laws for mass and momentum and a phase function. The discretization is based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian space-time finite element method with streamline diffusion stabilization, and it is implemented in the open source software Unicorn which shows near optimal scaling up to thousands of cores. Computational results are presented to demonstrate the capability of our framework.

  15. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C; Max, Nelson; Maloof, Julin N; Sinha, Neelima

    2015-07-29

    Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces) and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement). This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance.

  16. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Tuong Nguyen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement. This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance.

  17. Modelling of MOCVD reactor: new 3D approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, E; Lisik, Z; Niedzielski, P; Ruta, L; Turczynski, M; Wang, X; Waag, A

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents comparison of two different 3D models of vertical, rotating disc MOCVD reactor used for 3D GaN structure growth. The first one is based on the reactor symmetry, while the second, novel one incorporates only single line of showerhead nozzles. It is shown that both of them can be applied interchangeably regarding the phenomena taking place within the processing area. Moreover, the importance of boundary conditions regarding proper modelling of showerhead cooling and the significance of thermal radiation on temperature field within the modelled structure are presented and analysed. The last phenomenon is erroneously neglected in most of the hitherto studies.

  18. Modelling of MOCVD Reactor: New 3D Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, E.; Lisik, Z.; Niedzielski, P.; Ruta, L.; Turczynski, M.; Wang, X.; Waag, A.

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents comparison of two different 3D models of vertical, rotating disc MOCVD reactor used for 3D GaN structure growth. The first one is based on the reactor symmetry, while the second, novel one incorporates only single line of showerhead nozzles. It is shown that both of them can be applied interchangeably regarding the phenomena taking place within the processing area. Moreover, the importance of boundary conditions regarding proper modelling of showerhead cooling and the significance of thermal radiation on temperature field within the modelled structure are presented and analysed. The last phenomenon is erroneously neglected in most of the hitherto studies.

  19. Combined shape and topology optimization of 3D structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Nobel-Jørgensen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for automatic generation of 3D models based on shape and topology optimization. The optimization procedure, or model generation process, is initialized by a set of boundary conditions, an objective function, constraints and an initial structure. Using this input, the method...... will automatically deform and change the topology of the initial structure such that the objective function is optimized subject to the specified constraints and boundary conditions. For example, this tool can be used to improve the stiffness of a structure before printing, reduce the amount of material needed...

  20. 3D Model Optimization of Four-Facet Drill for 3D Drilling Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buranský Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on optimization of four-facet drill for 3D drilling numerical modelling. For optimization, the process of reverse engineering by PowerShape software was used. The design of four-facet drill was created in NumrotoPlus software. The modified 3D model of the drill was used in the numerical analysis of cutting forces. Verification of the accuracy of 3D models for reverse engineering was implemented using the colour deviation maps. The CAD model was in the STEP format. For simulation software, 3D model in the STEP format is ideal. STEP is a solid model. Simulation software automatically splits the 3D model into finite elements. The STEP model was therefore more suitable than the STL model.

  1. Deep structure of the Mid-Norwegian continental margin (the Vøring and Møre basins) according to 3-D density and magnetic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maystrenko, Yuriy Petrovich; Gernigon, Laurent; Nasuti, Aziz; Olesen, Odleiv

    2018-03-01

    A lithosphere-scale 3-D density/magnetic structural model of the Møre and Vøring segments of the Mid-Norwegian continental margin and the adjacent areas of the Norwegian mainland has been constructed by using both published, publically available data sets and confidential data, validated by the 3-D density and magnetic modelling. The obtained Moho topography clearly correlates with the major tectonic units of the study area where a deep Moho corresponds to the base of the Precambrian continental crust and the shallower one is located in close proximity to the younger oceanic lithospheric domain. The 3-D density modelling agrees with previous studies which indicate the presence of a high-density/high-velocity lower-crustal layer beneath the Mid-Norwegian continental margin. The broad Jan Mayen Corridor gravity low is partially related to the decreasing density of the sedimentary layers within the Jan Mayen Corridor and also has to be considered in relation to a possible low-density composition- and/or temperature-related zone in the lithospheric mantle. According to the results of the 3-D magnetic modelling, the absence of a strong magnetic anomaly over the Utgard High indicates that the uplifted crystalline rocks are not so magnetic there, supporting a suggestion that the entire crystalline crust has a low magnetization beneath the greater part of the Vøring Basin and the northern part of the Møre Basin. On the contrary, the crystalline crust is much more magnetic beneath the Trøndelag Platform, the southern part of the Møre Basin and within the mainland, reaching a culmination at the Frøya High where the most intensive magnetic anomaly is observed within the study area.

  2. 3D Printed Molecules and Extended Solid Models for Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Vaid, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Tangible models help students and researchers visualize chemical structures in three dimensions (3D). 3D printing offers a unique and straightforward approach to fabricate plastic 3D models of molecules and extended solids. In this article, we prepared a series of digital 3D design files of molecular structures that will be useful for teaching…

  3. MC3D modelling of stratified explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picchi, S.; Berthoud, G.

    1999-01-01

    It is known that a steam explosion can occur in a stratified geometry and that the observed yields are lower than in the case of explosion in a premixture configuration. However, very few models are available to quantify the amount of melt which can be involved and the pressure peak that can be developed. In the stratified application of the MC3D code, mixing and fragmentation of the melt are explained by the growth of Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities due to the shear flow of the two phase coolant above the melt. Such a model is then used to recalculate the Frost-Ciccarelli tin-water experiment. Pressure peak, speed of propagation, bubble shape and erosion height are well reproduced as well as the influence of the inertial constraint (height of the water pool). (author)

  4. MC3D modelling of stratified explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picchi, S.; Berthoud, G. [DTP/SMTH/LM2, CEA, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1999-07-01

    It is known that a steam explosion can occur in a stratified geometry and that the observed yields are lower than in the case of explosion in a premixture configuration. However, very few models are available to quantify the amount of melt which can be involved and the pressure peak that can be developed. In the stratified application of the MC3D code, mixing and fragmentation of the melt are explained by the growth of Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities due to the shear flow of the two phase coolant above the melt. Such a model is then used to recalculate the Frost-Ciccarelli tin-water experiment. Pressure peak, speed of propagation, bubble shape and erosion height are well reproduced as well as the influence of the inertial constraint (height of the water pool). (author)

  5. 3D Modelling and monitoring of denervated muscle under Functional Electrical Stimulation treatment and associated bone structural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gargiulo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel clinical rehabilitation method for patients who have permanent and non recoverable muscle denervation in the legs was developed in the frame of the European Project RISE. The technique is based on FES and the project results shows, in these severely disabled patients, restoration of muscle tissue and function. This study propose novel methods based on image processing technique and medical modelling to monitor growth in denervated muscle treated with FES. Geometrical and structural changes in muscle and bone are studied and modelled. Secondary effects on the bone mineral density produced by the stimulation treatment and due the elicited muscle contraction are also investigated. The restoration process in DDM is an important object of discussion since there isn’t yet a complete understanding of the mechanisms regulating growth in denervated muscle. This study approaches the problem from a macroscopic point of view, developing 3-dimensional models of the whole stimulated muscles and following changes in volume, geometry and density very accurately. The method is based on the acquisition of high resolution Spiral CT scans from patients who have long-term flaccid paraplegia and the use of special image processing tools allowing tissue discriminations and muscle segmentation. Three patients were measured at different points of time during 4 years of electrical stimulation treatment. In this study is quantitatively demonstrated the influences of FES treatment on the different quadriceps bellies. The rectus femoris muscle is positioned in the middle of the quadriceps and responds (in general better to stimulation. In a patient with abundant adipose tissue surrounding the quadriceps, rectus femoris almost doubled the volume during the FES treatment while in the other bellies the changes measured were minimal. The analysis of the density shows clearly a restoration of the muscular structure in the growing muscle. The remarkable increase of

  6. Improving 3d Spatial Queries Search: Newfangled Technique of Space Filling Curves in 3d City Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uznir, U.; Anton, F.; Suhaibah, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Mioc, D.

    2013-09-01

    The advantages of three dimensional (3D) city models can be seen in various applications including photogrammetry, urban and regional planning, computer games, etc.. They expand the visualization and analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems on cities, and they can be developed using web standards. However, these 3D city models consume much more storage compared to two dimensional (2D) spatial data. They involve extra geometrical and topological information together with semantic data. Without a proper spatial data clustering method and its corresponding spatial data access method, retrieving portions of and especially searching these 3D city models, will not be done optimally. Even though current developments are based on an open data model allotted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) called CityGML, its XML-based structure makes it challenging to cluster the 3D urban objects. In this research, we propose an opponent data constellation technique of space-filling curves (3D Hilbert curves) for 3D city model data representation. Unlike previous methods, that try to project 3D or n-dimensional data down to 2D or 3D using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) or Hilbert mappings, in this research, we extend the Hilbert space-filling curve to one higher dimension for 3D city model data implementations. The query performance was tested using a CityGML dataset of 1,000 building blocks and the results are presented in this paper. The advantages of implementing space-filling curves in 3D city modeling will improve data retrieval time by means of optimized 3D adjacency, nearest neighbor information and 3D indexing. The Hilbert mapping, which maps a subinterval of the [0, 1] interval to the corresponding portion of the d-dimensional Hilbert's curve, preserves the Lebesgue measure and is Lipschitz continuous. Depending on the applications, several alternatives are possible in order to cluster spatial data together in the third dimension compared to its

  7. The 3D Reference Earth Model: Status and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulik, P.; Lekic, V.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    In the 20th century, seismologists constructed models of how average physical properties (e.g. density, rigidity, compressibility, anisotropy) vary with depth in the Earth's interior. These one-dimensional (1D) reference Earth models (e.g. PREM) have proven indispensable in earthquake location, imaging of interior structure, understanding material properties under extreme conditions, and as a reference in other fields, such as particle physics and astronomy. Over the past three decades, new datasets motivated more sophisticated efforts that yielded models of how properties vary both laterally and with depth in the Earth's interior. Though these three-dimensional (3D) models exhibit compelling similarities at large scales, differences in the methodology, representation of structure, and dataset upon which they are based, have prevented the creation of 3D community reference models. As part of the REM-3D project, we are compiling and reconciling reference seismic datasets of body wave travel-time measurements, fundamental mode and overtone surface wave dispersion measurements, and normal mode frequencies and splitting functions. These reference datasets are being inverted for a long-wavelength, 3D reference Earth model that describes the robust long-wavelength features of mantle heterogeneity. As a community reference model with fully quantified uncertainties and tradeoffs and an associated publically available dataset, REM-3D will facilitate Earth imaging studies, earthquake characterization, inferences on temperature and composition in the deep interior, and be of improved utility to emerging scientific endeavors, such as neutrino geoscience. Here, we summarize progress made in the construction of the reference long period dataset and present a preliminary version of REM-3D in the upper-mantle. In order to determine the level of detail warranted for inclusion in REM-3D, we analyze the spectrum of discrepancies between models inverted with different subsets of the

  8. Shape: A 3D Modeling Tool for Astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Wolfgang; Koning, Nicholas; Wenger, Stephan; Morisset, Christophe; Magnor, Marcus

    2011-04-01

    We present a flexible interactive 3D morpho-kinematical modeling application for astrophysics. Compared to other systems, our application reduces the restrictions on the physical assumptions, data type, and amount that is required for a reconstruction of an object's morphology. It is one of the first publicly available tools to apply interactive graphics to astrophysical modeling. The tool allows astrophysicists to provide a priori knowledge about the object by interactively defining 3D structural elements. By direct comparison of model prediction with observational data, model parameters can then be automatically optimized to fit the observation. The tool has already been successfully used in a number of astrophysical research projects.

  9. Beyond Textbook Illustrations: Hand-Held Models of Ordered DNA and Protein Structures as 3D Supplements to Enhance Student Learning of Helical Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2010-01-01

    Textbook illustrations of 3D biopolymers on printed paper, regardless of how detailed and colorful, suffer from its two-dimensionality. For beginners, computer screen display of skeletal models of biopolymers and their animation usually does not provide the at-a-glance 3D perception and details, which can be done by good hand-held models. Here, we…

  10. FE-ANN based modeling of 3D simple reinforced concrete girders for objective structural health evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The structural deterioration of aging infrastructure systems and the costs of repairing these systems is an increasingly important issue worldwide. Structural health monitoring (SHM), most commonly visual inspection and condition rating, has proven t...

  11. Improving Semantic Updating Method on 3d City Models Using Hybrid Semantic-Geometric 3d Segmentation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkawi, K.-H.; Abdul-Rahman, A.

    2013-09-01

    Cities and urban areas entities such as building structures are becoming more complex as the modern human civilizations continue to evolve. The ability to plan and manage every territory especially the urban areas is very important to every government in the world. Planning and managing cities and urban areas based on printed maps and 2D data are getting insufficient and inefficient to cope with the complexity of the new developments in big cities. The emergence of 3D city models have boosted the efficiency in analysing and managing urban areas as the 3D data are proven to represent the real world object more accurately. It has since been adopted as the new trend in buildings and urban management and planning applications. Nowadays, many countries around the world have been generating virtual 3D representation of their major cities. The growing interest in improving the usability of 3D city models has resulted in the development of various tools for analysis based on the 3D city models. Today, 3D city models are generated for various purposes such as for tourism, location-based services, disaster management and urban planning. Meanwhile, modelling 3D objects are getting easier with the emergence of the user-friendly tools for 3D modelling available in the market. Generating 3D buildings with high accuracy also has become easier with the availability of airborne Lidar and terrestrial laser scanning equipments. The availability and accessibility to this technology makes it more sensible to analyse buildings in urban areas using 3D data as it accurately represent the real world objects. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has accepted CityGML specifications as one of the international standards for representing and exchanging spatial data, making it easier to visualize, store and manage 3D city models data efficiently. CityGML able to represents the semantics, geometry, topology and appearance of 3D city models in five well-defined Level-of-Details (LoD), namely LoD0

  12. Numerical simulations of a 3D fluid-structure interaction model for blood flow in an atherosclerotic artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafi, Oualid; Khatib, Nader El; Tiago, Jorge; Sequeira, Adelia

    2017-02-01

    The inflammatory process of atherosclerosis leads to the formation of an atheromatous plaque in the intima of the blood vessel. The plaque rupture may result from the interaction between the blood and the plaque. In each cardiac cycle, blood interacts with the vessel, considered as a compliant nonlinear hyperelastic. A three dimensional idealized fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is constructed to perform the blood-plaque and blood-vessel wall interaction studies. An absorbing boundary condition (BC) is imposed directly on the outflow in order to cope with the spurious reflexions due to the truncation of the computational domain. The difference between the Newtonian and non-Newtonian effects is highlighted. It is shown that the von Mises and wall shear stresses are significantly affected according to the rigidity of the wall. The numerical results have shown that the risk of plaque rupture is higher in the case of a moving wall, while in the case of a fixed wall the risk of progression of the atheromatous plaque is higher.

  13. Characterization of macropore structure of Malan loess in NW China based on 3D pipe models constructed by using computed tomography technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanrong; He, Shengdi; Deng, Xiaohong; Xu, Yongxin

    2018-04-01

    Malan loess is a grayish yellow or brownish yellow, clastic, highly porous and brittle late Quaternary sediment formed by the accumulation of windblown dust. The present-day pore structure of Malan loess is crucial for understanding the loessification process in history, loess strengths and mechanical behavior. This study employed a modern computed tomography (CT) device to scan Malan loess samples, which were obtained from the east part of the Loess Plateau of China. A sophisticated and efficient workflow for processing the CT images and constructing 3D pore models was established by selecting and programming relevant mathematical algorithms in MATLAB, such as the maximum entropy method, medial axis method, and node recognition algorithm. Individual pipes within the Malan loess were identified and constructed by partitioning and recombining links in the 3D pore model. The macropore structure of Malan loess was then depicted using quantitative parameters. The parameters derived from 2D images of CT scanning included equivalent radius, length and aspect ratio of pores, porosity, and pore distribution entropy, whereas those derived from the constructed 3D structure models included porosity, coordination number, node density, pipe radius, length, length density, dip angle, and dip direction. The analysis of these parameters revealed that Malan loess is a strongly anisotropic geomaterial with a dense and complex network of pores and pipes. The pores discovered on horizontal images, perpendicular to the vertical direction, were round and relatively uniform in shape and size and evenly distributed, whereas the pores discovered on vertical images varied in shape and size and were distributed in clusters. The pores showed good connectivity in vertical direction and formed vertically aligned pipes but displayed weak connectivity in horizontal directions. The pipes in vertical direction were thick, long, and straight compared with those in horizontal directions. These

  14. Real-Time 3D Profile Measurement Using Structured Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L; Zhang, Z J; Ma, H; Yu, Y J

    2006-01-01

    The paper builds a real-time system of 3D profile measurement using structured-light imaging. It allows a hand-held object to rotate free in the space-time coded light field, which is projected by the projector. The surface of measured objects with projected coded light is imaged; the system shows surface reconstruction results of objects online. This feedback helps user to adjust object's pose in the light field according to the dismissed or error data, which would achieve the integrality of data used in reconstruction. This method can acquire denser data cloud and have higher reconstruction accuracy and efficiency. According to the real-time requirements, the paper presents the non-restricted light plane modelling which suits stripe structured light system, designs the three-frame stripes space-time coded pattern, and uses the advance ICP algorithms to acquire 3D data alignment from multiple view

  15. Improving 3D spatial queries search: newfangled technique of space filling curves in 3D city modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uznir, U.; Anton, François; Suhaibah, A.

    2013-01-01

    , retrieving portions of and especially searching these 3D city models, will not be done optimally. Even though current developments are based on an open data model allotted by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) called CityGML, its XML-based structure makes it challenging to cluster the 3D urban objects......The advantages of three dimensional (3D) city models can be seen in various applications including photogrammetry, urban and regional planning, computer games, etc.. They expand the visualization and analysis capabilities of Geographic Information Systems on cities, and they can be developed using...... modeling will improve data retrieval time by means of optimized 3D adjacency, nearest neighbor information and 3D indexing. The Hilbert mapping, which maps a subinterval of the [0, 1] interval to the corresponding portion of the d-dimensional Hilbert’s curve, preserves the Lebesgue measure and is Lipschitz...

  16. Modeling real conditions of 'Ukrytie' object in 3D measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podbereznyj, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    The article covers a technology of creation on soft products basis for designing: AutoCad, and computer graphics and animation 3D Studio, 3DS MAX, of 3D model of geometrical parameters of current conditions of building structures, technological equipment, fuel-containing materials, concrete, water of ruined Unit 4, 'Ukryttia' object, of Chernobyl NPP. The model built using the above technology will be applied in the future as a basis when automating the design and computer modeling of processes at the 'Ukryttia' object

  17. The Benefit of 3D Laser Scanning Technology in the Generation and Calibration of FEM Models for Health Assessment of Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial laser scanning technology (TLS is a new technique for quickly getting three-dimensional information. In this paper we research the health assessment of concrete structures with a Finite Element Method (FEM model based on TLS. The goal focuses on the benefits of 3D TLS in the generation and calibration of FEM models, in order to build a convenient, efficient and intelligent model which can be widely used for the detection and assessment of bridges, buildings, subways and other objects. After comparing the finite element simulation with surface-based measurement data from TLS, the FEM model is determined to be acceptable with an error of less than 5%. The benefit of TLS lies mainly in the possibility of a surface-based validation of results predicted by the FEM model.

  18. The benefit of 3D laser scanning technology in the generation and calibration of FEM models for health assessment of concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Xu, Xiangyang; Neumann, Ingo

    2014-11-19

    Terrestrial laser scanning technology (TLS) is a new technique for quickly getting three-dimensional information. In this paper we research the health assessment of concrete structures with a Finite Element Method (FEM) model based on TLS. The goal focuses on the benefits of 3D TLS in the generation and calibration of FEM models, in order to build a convenient, efficient and intelligent model which can be widely used for the detection and assessment of bridges, buildings, subways and other objects. After comparing the finite element simulation with surface-based measurement data from TLS, the FEM model is determined to be acceptable with an error of less than 5%. The benefit of TLS lies mainly in the possibility of a surface-based validation of results predicted by the FEM model.

  19. Embedded sensing: integrating sensors in 3-D printed structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dijkshoorn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Current additive manufacturing allows for the implementation of electrically interrogated 3-D printed sensors. In this contribution various technologies, sensing principles and applications are discussed. We will give both an overview of some of the sensors presented in literature as well as some of our own recent work on 3-D printed sensors. The 3-D printing methods discussed include fused deposition modelling (FDM, using multi-material printing and poly-jetting. Materials discussed are mainly thermoplastics and include thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU, both un-doped as well as doped with carbon black, polylactic acid (PLA and conductive inks. The sensors discussed are based on biopotential sensing, capacitive sensing and resistive sensing with applications in surface electromyography (sEMG and mechanical and tactile sensing. As these sensors are based on plastics they are in general flexible and therefore open new possibilities for sensing in soft structures, e.g. as used in soft robotics. At the same time they show many of the characteristics of plastics like hysteresis, drift and non-linearity. We will argue that 3-D printing of embedded sensors opens up exciting new possibilities but also that these sensors require us to rethink how to exploit non-ideal sensors.

  20. 3D Modelling of Kizildag Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karauguz, Güngör; Kalayci, İbrahim; Öğütcü, Sermet

    2016-10-01

    The most important cultural property that the nations possess is their historical accumulation, and bringing these to light, taking measures to preserve them or at least maintain the continuity of transferring them to next generations by means of recent technic and technology, ought to be the business of present generations. Although, nowadays, intensive documentation and archiving studies are done by means of classical techniques, besides studies towards preserving historical objects, modelling one-to-one or scaled modelling were not possible until recently. Computing devices and the on-going reflection of this, which is acknowledged as digital technology, is widely used in many areas and makes it possible to document and archive historical works. Even virtual forms in quantitative environments can be transferred to next generations in a scaled and one-to-one modelled way. Within this scope, every single artefact categorization belonging to any era or civilization present in our country can be considered in separate study areas. Furthermore, any work or likewise can be evaluated in separate categories. Also, it is possible to construct travelable virtual 3D museums that make it possible to visit these artefacts. Under the auspices of these technologies, it is quite possible to construct single virtual indoor museums or also, at the final stage, a 3D travelable open-air museum, a platform or more precisely, to establish a data system that spreads all over the country on a broad spectrum. With a long-termed, significant and extensive study and a substantial organization, such a data system can be established, which also serves as a serious infrastructure for alternative tourism possibilities. Located beside a stepped altar and right above the Kizildag IV inscription, the offering pot is destructed and rolled away a few meters to the south slope of the mould. Every time visiting these artefacts with our undergraduate students, unfortunately, we observe more

  1. A 3D Printing Model Watermarking Algorithm Based on 3D Slicing and Feature Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giao N. Pham

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the increase of three-dimensional (3D printing applications in many areas of life, a large amount of 3D printing data is copied, shared, and used several times without any permission from the original providers. Therefore, copyright protection and ownership identification for 3D printing data in communications or commercial transactions are practical issues. This paper presents a novel watermarking algorithm for 3D printing models based on embedding watermark data into the feature points of a 3D printing model. Feature points are determined and computed by the 3D slicing process along the Z axis of a 3D printing model. The watermark data is embedded into a feature point of a 3D printing model by changing the vector length of the feature point in OXY space based on the reference length. The x and y coordinates of the feature point will be then changed according to the changed vector length that has been embedded with a watermark. Experimental results verified that the proposed algorithm is invisible and robust to geometric attacks, such as rotation, scaling, and translation. The proposed algorithm provides a better method than the conventional works, and the accuracy of the proposed algorithm is much higher than previous methods.

  2. A method for enabling real-time structural deformation in remote handling control system by utilizing offline simulation results and 3D model morphing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiviranta, Sauli; Saarinen, Hannu; Maekinen, Harri; Krassi, Boris

    2011-01-01

    A full scale physical test facility, DTP2 (Divertor Test Platform 2) has been established in Finland for demonstrating and refining the Remote Handling (RH) equipment designs for ITER. The first prototype RH equipment at DTP2 is the Cassette Multifunctional Mover (CMM) equipped with Second Cassette End Effector (SCEE) delivered to DTP2 in October 2008. The purpose is to prove that CMM/SCEE prototype can be used successfully for the 2nd cassette RH operations. At the end of F4E grant 'DTP2 test facility operation and upgrade preparation', the RH operations of the 2nd cassette were successfully demonstrated to the representatives of Fusion For Energy (F4E). Due to its design, the CMM/SCEE robot has relatively large mechanical flexibilities when the robot carries the nine-ton-weighting 2nd Cassette on the 3.6-m long lever. This leads into a poor absolute accuracy and into the situation where the 3D model, which is used in the control system, does not reflect the actual deformed state of the CMM/SCEE robot. To improve the accuracy, the new method has been developed in order to handle the flexibilities within the control system's virtual environment. The effect of the load on the CMM/SCEE has been measured and minimized in the load compensation model, which is implemented in the control system software. The proposed method accounts for the structural deformations of the robot in the control system through the 3D model morphing by utilizing the finite element method (FEM) analysis for morph targets. This resulted in a considerable improvement of the CMM/SCEE absolute accuracy and the adequacy of the 3D model, which is crucially important in the RH applications, where the visual information of the controlled device in the surrounding environment is limited.

  3. Solving a 3D structural puzzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeck, Casper

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a versatile tool in analytical chemistry, highly suitable for structural elucidation of organic molecules – as well as multiple other areas of research. The subjects covered within this thesis all concern methods which allow a shift from covalent t...

  4. 3D monitoring of active tectonic structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stemberk, Josef; Košťák, Blahoslav; Vilímek, V.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 36, 1-2 (2003), s. 103-112 ISSN 0264-3707 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 625.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : tectonics * monitoring * active structures Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.754, year: 2003

  5. Identification of the Structural Features of Guanine Derivatives as MGMT Inhibitors Using 3D-QSAR Modeling Combined with Molecular Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohui Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, which plays an important role in inducing drug resistance against alkylating agents that modify the O6 position of guanine in DNA, is an attractive target for anti-tumor chemotherapy. A series of MGMT inhibitors have been synthesized over the past decades to improve the chemotherapeutic effects of O6-alkylating agents. In the present study, we performed a three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR study on 97 guanine derivatives as MGMT inhibitors using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA methods. Three different alignment methods (ligand-based, DFT optimization-based and docking-based alignment were employed to develop reliable 3D-QSAR models. Statistical parameters derived from the models using the above three alignment methods showed that the ligand-based CoMFA (Qcv2 = 0.672 and Rncv2 = 0.997 and CoMSIA (Qcv2 = 0.703 and Rncv2 = 0.946 models were better than the other two alignment methods-based CoMFA and CoMSIA models. The two ligand-based models were further confirmed by an external test-set validation and a Y-randomization examination. The ligand-based CoMFA model (Qext2 = 0.691, Rpred2 = 0.738 and slope k = 0.91 was observed with acceptable external test-set validation values rather than the CoMSIA model (Qext2 = 0.307, Rpred2 = 0.4 and slope k = 0.719. Docking studies were carried out to predict the binding modes of the inhibitors with MGMT. The results indicated that the obtained binding interactions were consistent with the 3D contour maps. Overall, the combined results of the 3D-QSAR and the docking obtained in this study provide an insight into the understanding of the interactions between guanine derivatives and MGMT protein, which will assist in designing novel MGMT inhibitors with desired activity.

  6. Development of the Improving Process for the 3D Printed Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Kensuke Takagishi; Shinjiro Umezu

    2017-01-01

    The authors focus on the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printer because the FDM 3D printer can print the utility resin material. It can print with low cost and therefore it is the most suitable for home 3D printer. The FDM 3D printer has the problem that it produces layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure. Therefore the authors developed the 3D-Chemical Melting Finishing (3D-CMF) for removing layer grooves. In this method, a pen-style device is filled with a chemical able...

  7. Spatial variation of ground motion in a regional crystal structure using 3-d propagator matrix method and Haskell source model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaekwan Kim; Jhinwung Kim; Koh, H.M.; Kwon, K.

    1993-01-01

    Variation of seismic wave field in a multi-layered attenuating elastic half space is studied by the propagator matrix method and a point source model with the fault slip function of Haskell type. Accelerations, displacements and their frequency contents due to a vertical dip-slip point source buried in the underlain half space are presented. Also included are responses of the same layered half space model to the plane wave obliquely incident from the half space for the purpose of comparison with those due to a dip-slip point source. (author)

  8. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  9. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Lazaro, J.; Enriquez, L.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.; Jaraiz, M.

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided

  10. 3D modeling of the marine relief

    OpenAIRE

    Mànuel-González, Bernat; Garcia Benadí, Albert; Río Fernandez, Joaquín del; Cadena Muñoz, Francisco Javier; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article detail the systematic process for transformation the 2D representation to 3D representation, likewise the systematic process for gather up of data, and the considerations and instrumentation necessary for this action. Peer Reviewed

  11. Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of Jwaneng Mine: Insights into deformation of the Transvaal Supergroup in SE Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creus, P. K.; Basson, I. J.; Stoch, B.; Mogorosi, O.; Gabanakgosi, K.; Ramsden, F.; Gaegopolwe, P.

    2018-01-01

    Country rock at Jwaneng Diamond Mine provides a rare insight into the deformational history of the Transvaal Supergroup in southern Botswana. The ca. 235 Ma kimberlite diatremes intruded into late Archaean to Early Proterozoic, mixed, siliciclastic-carbonate sediments, that were subjected to at least three deformational events. The first deformational event (D1), caused by NW-SE directed compression, is responsible for NE-trending, open folds (F1) with associated diverging, fanning, axial planar cleavage. The second deformational event (D2) is probably progressive, involving a clockwise rotation of the principal stress to NE-SW trends. Early D2, which was N-S directed, involved left-lateral, oblique shearing along cleavage planes that developed around F1 folds, along with the development of antithetic structures. Progressive clockwise rotation of far-field forces saw the development of NW-trending folds (F2) and its associated, weak, axial planar cleavage. D3 is an extensional event in which normal faulting, along pre-existing cleavage planes, created a series of rhomboid-shaped, fault-bounded blocks. Normal faults, which bound these blocks, are the dominant structures at Jwaneng Mine. Combined with block rotation and NW-dipping bedding, a horst-like structure on the northwestern limb of a broad, gentle, NE-trending anticline is indicated. The early compressional and subsequent extensional events are consistent throughout the Jwaneng-Ramotswa-Lobatse-Thabazimbi area, suggesting that a large area records the same fault geometry and, consequently, deformational history. It is proposed that Jwaneng Mine is at or near the northernmost limit of the initial, northwards-directed compressional event.

  12. An Automated Approach to the Generation of Structured Building Information Models from Unstructured 3d Point Cloud Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Evers, Henrik Leander; Wessel, Raoul

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present and evaluate an approach for the automatic generation of building models in IFC BIM format from unstructured Point Cloud scans, as they result from 3dlaser scans of buildings. While the actual measurement process is relatively fast, 85% of the overall time are spend on th...

  13. An Automated Approach to the Generation of Structured Building Information Models from Unstructured 3d Point Cloud Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Evers, Henrik Leander; Wessel, Raoul

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present and evaluate an approach for the automatic generation of building models in IFC BIM format from unstructured Point Cloud scans, as they result from 3dlaser scans of buildings. While the actual measurement process is relatively fast, 85% of the overall time are spend...

  14. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hume, W.R. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Douglass, G.D. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  15. An Automated Approach to the Generation of Structured Building Information Models from Unstructured 3d Point Cloud Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Evers, Henrik Leander; Wessel, Raoul

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present and evaluate an approach for the automatic generation of building models in IFC BIM format from unstructured Point Cloud scans, as they result from 3dlaser scans of buildings. While the actual measurement process is relatively fast, 85% of the overall time are spend...... on the interpretation and transformation of the resulting Point Cloud data into information, which can be used in architectural and engineering design workflows. Our approach to tackle this problem, is in contrast to existing ones which work on the levels of points, based on the detection of building elements...

  16. 3D Animations for Exploring Nucleon Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Waverly; Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Over the last few years many intuitive pictures have been developed for the interpretation of electron hadron scattering experiments, such as a mechanism for transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering experiments. While Dr. Burkardt's pictures have been helpful for many researchers in the field, they are still difficult to visualize for broader audiences since they rely mostly on 2-dimensional static images. In order to make more accessible for a broader audience what can be learned from Jefferson Lab experiments, we have started to work on developing 3-dimensional animations for these processes. The goal is to enable the viewer to repeatedly look at the same microscopic mechanism for a specific reaction, with the viewpoint of the observer changing. This should help an audience that is not so familiar with these reactions to better understand what can be learned from various experiments at Jefferson Lab aimed at exploring the nucleon structure. Jefferson Lab Minority/Female Undergraduate Research Assistantship.

  17. Potential of 3D City Models to assess flood vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Kai; Bochow, Mathias; Schüttig, Martin; Nagel, Claus; Ross, Lutz; Kreibich, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    Vulnerability, as the product of exposure and susceptibility, is a key factor of the flood risk equation. Furthermore, the estimation of flood loss is very sensitive to the choice of the vulnerability model. Still, in contrast to elaborate hazard simulations, vulnerability is often considered in a simplified manner concerning the spatial resolution and geo-location of exposed objects as well as the susceptibility of these objects at risk. Usually, area specific potential flood loss is quantified on the level of aggregated land-use classes, and both hazard intensity and resistance characteristics of affected objects are represented in highly simplified terms. We investigate the potential of 3D City Models and spatial features derived from remote sensing data to improve the differentiation of vulnerability in flood risk assessment. 3D City Models are based on CityGML, an application scheme of the Geography Markup Language (GML), which represents the 3D geometry, 3D topology, semantics and appearance of objects on different levels of detail. As such, 3D City Models offer detailed spatial information which is useful to describe the exposure and to characterize the susceptibility of residential buildings at risk. This information is further consolidated with spatial features of the building stock derived from remote sensing data. Using this database a spatially detailed flood vulnerability model is developed by means of data-mining. Empirical flood damage data are used to derive and to validate flood susceptibility models for individual objects. We present first results from a prototype application in the city of Dresden, Germany. The vulnerability modeling based on 3D City Models and remote sensing data is compared i) to the generally accepted good engineering practice based on area specific loss potential and ii) to a highly detailed representation of flood vulnerability based on a building typology using urban structure types. Comparisons are drawn in terms of

  18. Multiscale modeling of large deformations in 3-D polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jing; Maniatty, Antoinette; Misiolek, Wojciech; Bandar, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    An approach for modeling 3-D polycrystals, linking to the macroscale, is presented. A Potts type model is used to generate a statistically representative grain structures with periodicity to allow scale-linking. The grain structures are compared to experimentally observed grain structures to validate that they are representative. A macroscale model of a compression test is compared against an experimental compression test for an Al-Mg-Si alloy to determine various deformation paths at different locations in the samples. These deformation paths are then applied to the experimental grain structure using a scale-bridging technique. Preliminary results from this work will be presented and discussed

  19. Using 3D Morphable Models for face recognition in video

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootseler, R.T.A.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    The 3D Morphable Face Model (3DMM) has been used for over a decade for creating 3D models from single images of faces. This model is based on a PCA model of the 3D shape and texture generated from a limited number of 3D scans. The goal of fitting a 3DMM to an image is to find the model coefficients,

  20. Coarsening in 3D nonconserved Ising model at zero temperature: Anomaly in structure and slow relaxation of order-parameter autocorrelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Das, Subir K.

    2017-09-01

    Via Monte Carlo simulations we study pattern and aging during coarsening in a nonconserved nearest-neighbor Ising model, following quenches from infinite to zero temperature, in space dimension d = 3. The decay of the order-parameter autocorrelation function appears to obey a power-law behavior, as a function of the ratio between the observation and waiting times, in the large ratio limit. However, the exponent of the power law, estimated accurately via a state-of-the-art method, violates a well-known lower bound. This surprising fact has been discussed in connection with a quantitative picture of the structural anomaly that the 3D Ising model exhibits during coarsening at zero temperature. These results are compared with those for quenches to a temperature above that of the roughening transition.

  1. Building 3D models with modo 701

    CERN Document Server

    García, Juan Jiménez

    2013-01-01

    The book will focus on creating a sample application throughout the book, building gradually from chapter to chapter.If you are new to the 3D world, this is the key to getting started with a modern software in the modern visualization industry. Only minimal previous knowledge is needed.If you have some previous knowledge about 3D content creation, you will find useful tricks that will differentiate the learning experience from a typical user manual from this, a practical guide concerning the most common problems and situations and how to solve them.

  2. Multi-view and 3D deformable part models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepik, Bojan; Stark, Michael; Gehler, Peter; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-11-01

    As objects are inherently 3D, they have been modeled in 3D in the early days of computer vision. Due to the ambiguities arising from mapping 2D features to 3D models, 3D object representations have been neglected and 2D feature-based models are the predominant paradigm in object detection nowadays. While such models have achieved outstanding bounding box detection performance, they come with limited expressiveness, as they are clearly limited in their capability of reasoning about 3D shape or viewpoints. In this work, we bring the worlds of 3D and 2D object representations closer, by building an object detector which leverages the expressive power of 3D object representations while at the same time can be robustly matched to image evidence. To that end, we gradually extend the successful deformable part model [1] to include viewpoint information and part-level 3D geometry information, resulting in several different models with different level of expressiveness. We end up with a 3D object model, consisting of multiple object parts represented in 3D and a continuous appearance model. We experimentally verify that our models, while providing richer object hypotheses than the 2D object models, provide consistently better joint object localization and viewpoint estimation than the state-of-the-art multi-view and 3D object detectors on various benchmarks (KITTI [2] , 3D object classes [3] , Pascal3D+ [4] , Pascal VOC 2007 [5] , EPFL multi-view cars[6] ).

  3. Geomatic 3d Modeling of a Statue (also) for Structural Analysis and Risk Evaluation: the Example of San Giovannino Martelli in Florence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangher, A.; Visintini, D.; Tucci, G.; Bonora, V.

    2017-05-01

    This work has been developed among the researches of a PhD thesis in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture of the University of Udine in cooperation with the GECO Laboratory of the University of Florence. It focuses on the interaction between Geomatics and Structural Analysis, both applied to cultural heritage, and expressly to artefacts and structures in stone materials, like the case study of this paper, the marble statue called "San Giovannino Martelli" (Saint John the Baptist) conserved in Florence. At the beginning, some interesting examples of surveying and structural analyses on statues are reported, in order to remind the complementary tasks and requirements of geomatics and structural analysis. Current laser scanning systems can accurately survey the geometry of a statue or any cultural heritage artefact, essential to understand their structural behaviour and resilience capability. Afterwards, following the few Italian regulations in this field, the possible risks of museum goods are described: topics of this part are more familiar for structural engineers as object classification, seismic reactions, damage mechanisms, possible movements (adherent, slipping and oscillation), dynamic domains, anyway necessary steps to evaluate the risk and so to define eventual interventions. The artistic description of the statue, its debated attribution to Donatello or/and to Desiderio da Settignano and its history is later recalled, remembering that the surveying has been done for the idea to 3D print a replica and to place it in the original place. Having used a close range laser scanner, the obtained 3D model has an impressive geometrical Level of Detail (LoD), whose geometric features are explained in the paper, underlying that such extremely detailed mesh is directly given as output from the laser scanner software. The model simplifications by four decimation are therefore explained and also changes to geometry, like shifts on centre of the mass or

  4. GEOMATIC 3D MODELING OF A STATUE (ALSO FOR STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AND RISK EVALUATION: THE EXAMPLE OF SAN GIOVANNINO MARTELLI IN FLORENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Spangher

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This work has been developed among the researches of a PhD thesis in Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture of the University of Udine in cooperation with the GECO Laboratory of the University of Florence. It focuses on the interaction between Geomatics and Structural Analysis, both applied to cultural heritage, and expressly to artefacts and structures in stone materials, like the case study of this paper, the marble statue called “San Giovannino Martelli” (Saint John the Baptist conserved in Florence. At the beginning, some interesting examples of surveying and structural analyses on statues are reported, in order to remind the complementary tasks and requirements of geomatics and structural analysis. Current laser scanning systems can accurately survey the geometry of a statue or any cultural heritage artefact, essential to understand their structural behaviour and resilience capability. Afterwards, following the few Italian regulations in this field, the possible risks of museum goods are described: topics of this part are more familiar for structural engineers as object classification, seismic reactions, damage mechanisms, possible movements (adherent, slipping and oscillation, dynamic domains, anyway necessary steps to evaluate the risk and so to define eventual interventions. The artistic description of the statue, its debated attribution to Donatello or/and to Desiderio da Settignano and its history is later recalled, remembering that the surveying has been done for the idea to 3D print a replica and to place it in the original place. Having used a close range laser scanner, the obtained 3D model has an impressive geometrical Level of Detail (LoD, whose geometric features are explained in the paper, underlying that such extremely detailed mesh is directly given as output from the laser scanner software. The model simplifications by four decimation are therefore explained and also changes to geometry, like shifts on

  5. Proposal of custom made wrist orthoses based on 3D modelling and 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu de Souza, Mauren; Schmitz, Cristiane; Marega Pinhel, Marcelo; Palma Setti, Joao A; Nohama, Percy

    2017-07-01

    Accessibility to three-dimensional (3D) technologies, such as 3D scanning systems and additive manufacturing (like 3D printers), allows a variety of 3D applications. For medical applications in particular, these modalities are gaining a lot of attention enabling several opportunities for healthcare applications. The literature brings several cases applying both technologies, but none of them focus on the spreading of how this technology could benefit the health segment. This paper proposes a new methodology, which employs both 3D modelling and 3D printing for building orthoses, which could better fit the demands of different patients. Additionally, there is an opportunity for sharing expertise, as it represents a trendy in terms of the maker-movement. Therefore, as a result of the proposed approach, we present a case study based on a volunteer who needs an immobilization orthosis, which was built for exemplification of the whole process. This proposal also employs freely available 3D models and software, having a strong social impact. As a result, it enables the implementation and effective usability for a variety of built to fit solutions, hitching useful and smarter technologies for the healthcare sector.

  6. 3D-finite element impact simulation on concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heider, N.

    1989-12-15

    The analysis of impact processes is an interesting application of full 3D Finite Element calculations. This work presents a simulation of the penetration process of a Kinetic Energy projectile into a concrete target. Such a calculation requires an adequate FE model, especially a proper description of the crack opening process in front of the projectile. The aim is the prediction of the structural survival of the penetrator case with the help of an appropriate failure criterion. Also, the computer simulation allows a detailed analysis of the physical phenomena during impact. (orig.) With 4 refs., 14 figs.

  7. 3D Geological Model for "LUSI" - a Deep Geothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Reza; Jansen, Gunnar; Mazzini, Adriano; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal applications require the correct simulation of flow and heat transport processes in porous media, and many of these media, like deep volcanic hydrothermal systems, host a certain degree of fracturing. This work aims to understand the heat and fluid transport within a new-born sedimentary hosted geothermal system, termed Lusi, that began erupting in 2006 in East Java, Indonesia. Our goal is to develop conceptual and numerical models capable of simulating multiphase flow within large-scale fractured reservoirs such as the Lusi region, with fractures of arbitrary size, orientation and shape. Additionally, these models can also address a number of other applications, including Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), CO2 sequestration (Carbon Capture and Storage CCS), and nuclear waste isolation. Fractured systems are ubiquitous, with a wide-range of lengths and scales, making difficult the development of a general model that can easily handle this complexity. We are developing a flexible continuum approach with an efficient, accurate numerical simulator based on an appropriate 3D geological model representing the structure of the deep geothermal reservoir. Using previous studies, borehole information and seismic data obtained in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n°308126), we present here the first 3D geological model of Lusi. This model is calculated using implicit 3D potential field or multi-potential fields, depending on the geological context and complexity. This method is based on geological pile containing the geological history of the area and relationship between geological bodies allowing automatic computation of intersections and volume reconstruction. Based on the 3D geological model, we developed a new mesh algorithm to create hexahedral octree meshes to transfer the structural geological information for 3D numerical simulations to quantify Thermal-Hydraulic-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) physical processes.

  8. Formalizing Implementable Constraints in the INTERLIS Language for Modelling Legal 3D RRR Spaces and 3D Physical Objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalogianni, Eftychia; Dimopoulou, Efi; Quak, C.W.; van Oosterom, P.J.M.; van Oosterom, P.J.M.; Dimopoulou, Efi; Fendel, Elfriede M.

    2016-01-01

    Building Information Models (e.g. BIM, IFC) and virtual 3D city models (e.g. CityGML) are revolutionising the way we manage information about cities. The main focus of such models is on the physical and functional characteristics of urban structures (Aien et al, 2015). On the other hand cadastral

  9. 3D for Geosciences: Interactive Tangibles and Virtual Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, J. E.; Matheney, M.; Kitsch, N.; Rosado, G.; Thompson, Z.; Pierce, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Point cloud processing provides a method of studying and modelling geologic features relevant to geoscience systems and processes. Here, software including Skanect, MeshLab, Blender, PDAL, and PCL are used in conjunction with 3D scanning hardware, including a Structure scanner and a Kinect camera, to create and analyze point cloud images of small scale topography, karst features, tunnels, and structures at high resolution. This project successfully scanned internal karst features ranging from small stalactites to large rooms, as well as an external waterfall feature. For comparison purposes, multiple scans of the same object were merged into single object files both automatically, using commercial software, and manually using open source libraries and code. Files with format .ply were manually converted into numeric data sets to be analyzed for similar regions between files in order to match them together. We can assume a numeric process would be more powerful and efficient than the manual method, however it could lack other useful features that GUI's may have. The digital models have applications in mining as efficient means of replacing topography functions such as measuring distances and areas. Additionally, it is possible to make simulation models such as drilling templates and calculations related to 3D spaces. Advantages of using methods described here for these procedures include the relatively quick time to obtain data and the easy transport of the equipment. With regard to openpit mining, obtaining 3D images of large surfaces and with precision would be a high value tool by georeferencing scan data to interactive maps. The digital 3D images obtained from scans may be saved as printable files to create physical 3D-printable models to create tangible objects based on scientific information, as well as digital "worlds" able to be navigated virtually. The data, models, and algorithms explored here can be used to convey complex scientific ideas to a range of

  10. Complete Tem-Tomography: 3D Structure of Gems Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuno, J.; Miyake, A.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.

    2015-01-01

    GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide) grains in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are considered to be one of the ubiquitous and fundamental building blocks of solids in the Solar System. They have been considered to be interstellar silicate dust that survived various metamorphism or alteration processes in the protoplanetary disk but the elemental and isotopic composition measurements suggest that most of them have been formed in the protoplanetary disk as condensates from high temperature gas. This formation model is also supported by the formation of GEMS-like grains with respect to the size, mineral assemblage, texture and infrared spectrum by condensation experiments from mean GEMS composition materials. Previous GEMS studies were performed only with 2D observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM). However, the 3D shape and structure of GEMS grains and the spatial distribution of Fe/FeS's has critical information about their formation and origin. Recently, the 3D structure of GEMS grains in ultrathin sections of cluster IDPs was revealed by electron tomography using a TEM/STEM (JEM-2100F, JEOL). However, CT images of thin sections mounted on Cu grids acquired by conventional TEM-tomography are limited to low tilt angles (e. g., less than absolute value of 75 deg. In fact, previous 3D TEM observations of GEMS were affected by some artifacts related to the limited tilt range in the TEM used. Complete tomographic images should be acquired by rotating the sample tilt angle over a range of more than absolute value of 80 deg otherwise the CT images lose their correct structures. In order to constrain the origin and formation process of GEMS grains more clearly, we performed complete electron tomography for GEMS grains. Here we report the sample preparation method we have developed for this study, and the preliminary results.

  11. Evaluation of 3D Printer Accuracy in Producing Fractal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikegawa, Kana; Takamatsu, Kyuuichirou; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical structures, also known as fractal structures, exhibit advantageous material properties, such as water- and oil-repellency as well as other useful optical characteristics, owing to its self-similarity. Various methods have been developed for producing hierarchical geometrical structures. Recently, fractal structures have been manufactured using a 3D printing technique that involves computer-aided design data. In this study, we confirmed the accuracy of geometrical structures when Koch curve-like fractal structures with zero to three generations were printed using a 3D printer. The fractal dimension was analyzed using a box-counting method. This analysis indicated that the fractal dimension of the third generation hierarchical structure was approximately the same as that of the ideal Koch curve. These findings demonstrate that the design and production of fractal structures can be controlled using a 3D printer. Although the interior angle deviated from the ideal value, the side length could be precisely controlled.

  12. Research study concerning the 3D printing adittion (FDM-fused deposition modeling) to design UAV (UAV-unconventional aerial vehicle) structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, Nicoleta Elisabeta; CǎruÅ£aşu, Nicoleta LuminiÅ£a.; Geambaşu, Gabriel George; Adîr, Victor Gabriel; Arion, Aurel Florin; Ivaşcu, Laura

    2018-02-01

    Aerial vehicles have become indispensable. There are in this field UAV (Unconventional Aerial vehicle) and transportation airplanes and other aerospace vehicles for spatial tourism. Today, the research and development activity in aerospace industry is focused to obtain a good and efficient design for airplanes, to solve the problem of high pollution and to reduce the noise. For these goals are necessary to realize light and resistant components. The aerospace industry products are, generally, very complex concerning geometric shapes and the costs are high, usually. Due to the progress in this field (products obtained using FDM) was possible to reduce the number of used tools, welding belts, and, of course, to eliminate a lot of machine tools. In addition, the complex shapes are easier product using this high technology, the cost is more attractive and the time is lower. This paper allows to present a few aspects about FDM technology and the obtained structures using it, as follows: computer geometric modeling (different designing softs) to design and redesign complex structures using 3D printing, for this kind of vehicles; finite element analysis to identify what is the influence of design for different structures; testing the structures.

  13. Modeling of 3D Aluminum Polycrystals during Large Deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniatty, Antoinette M.; Littlewood, David J.; Lu Jing; Pyle, Devin

    2007-01-01

    An approach for generating, meshing, and modeling 3D polycrystals, with a focus on aluminum alloys, subjected to large deformation processes is presented. A Potts type model is used to generate statistically representative grain structures with periodicity to allow scale-linking. The grain structures are compared to experimentally observed grain structures to validate that they are representative. A procedure for generating a geometric model from the voxel data is developed allowing for adaptive meshing of the generated grain structure. Material behavior is governed by an appropriate crystal, elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model. The elastic-viscoplastic model is implemented in a three-dimensional, finite deformation, mixed, finite element program. In order to handle the large-scale problems of interest, a parallel implementation is utilized. A multiscale procedure is used to link larger scale models of deformation processes to the polycrystal model, where periodic boundary conditions on the fluctuation field are enforced. Finite-element models, of 3D polycrystal grain structures will be presented along with observations made from these simulations

  14. Combining Synchronous and Asynchronous Collaboration within 3D City Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimke, Jan; Döllner, Jürgen

    This paper presents an approach for combining spatially distributed synchronous and asynchronous collaboration within 3D city models. Software applications use these models as additional communication medium to facilitate communication of georeferenced and geospatial information. Collaboration tools should support both the communication with other collaborators and their awareness of the current collaboration context. To support collaborative knowledge construction and gathering, we have designed a collaboration system to facilitate (a) creation of annotations that have 3D references to the virtual 3D city model and (b) collection information about the context in which these annotations are created. Our approach supports synchronous collaboration in connection with the creation of non volatile, precisely georeferenced units of information allow for a comprehensible form of cooperation in spatially distributed settings. Storage and retrieval of this information is provided through a Web Feature Service, which eases integration of collaboration data into existing applications. We further introduce a visualization technique that integrates annotations as complex structured data into the 3D visualization. This avoids media breaks and disruptions in working processes and creates a spatial coherence between annotation and annotated feature or geometry.

  15. New boundary conditions for 3D RF modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, K.; Nelson, E.; Fitze, H.

    1990-01-01

    The new capabilities are being implemented into the 3D particle-in-cell code, ARGUS, which will reduce substantially both problem size and computing time when modeling realistic geometries with high accuracies. In the time domain, a cylindrical radiative boundary condition will enable traveling wave propagation to be simulated in accelerator structures. An application of interest is the input coupler in the SLAC x-band high-gradient structure where local field gradients and impedance matching are important issues. In the frequency domain, a quasi-periodic boundary condition will facilitate the cold-test analysis of 3D periodic structures where many calculations are required to generate an ω β diagram. Present applications include the crossed-field amplifier cavity and the cluster klystron cavity

  16. Integrating 3D modeling, photogrammetry and design

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Shaun

    2014-01-01

    This book looks at the convergent nature of technology and its relationship to the field of photogrammetry and 3D design. This is a facet of a broader discussion of the nature of technology itself and the relationship of technology to art, as well as an examination of the educational process. In the field of technology-influenced design-based education it is natural to push for advanced technology, yet within a larger institution the constraints of budget and adherence to tradition must be accepted. These opposing forces create a natural balance; in some cases constraints lead to greater creat

  17. Simulating the 3-D Structure of Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. M.; Waite, H.; Westlake, J.; Magee, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present results from the 3-D Titan Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (Bell et al [2009], PSS, in review). We show comparisons between simulated N2, CH4, and H2 density fields and the in-situ data from the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS). We describe the temperature and wind fields consistent with these density calculations. Variations with local time, longitude, and latitude will be addressed. Potential plasma heating sources can be estimated using the 1-D model of De La Haye et al [2007, 2008] and the impacts on the thermosphere of Titan can be assessed in a global sense in Titan-GITM. Lastly, we will place these findings within the context of recent work in modeling the 2-D structure of Titan's upper atmosphere (Mueller-Wodarg et al [2008]).

  18. 3D Modeling Techniques for Print and Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Megan Ashley

    In developing my thesis, I looked to gain skills using ZBrush to create 3D models, 3D scanning, and 3D printing. The models created compared the hearts of several vertebrates and were intended for students attending Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. I used several resources to create a model of the human heart and was able to work from life while creating heart models from other vertebrates. I successfully learned ZBrush and 3D scanning, and successfully printed 3D heart models. ZBrush allowed me to create several intricate models for use in both animation and print media. The 3D scanning technique did not fit my needs for the project, but may be of use for later projects. I was able to 3D print using two different techniques as well.

  19. Protein 3D structure computed from evolutionary sequence variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora S Marks

    Full Text Available The evolutionary trajectory of a protein through sequence space is constrained by its function. Collections of sequence homologs record the outcomes of millions of evolutionary experiments in which the protein evolves according to these constraints. Deciphering the evolutionary record held in these sequences and exploiting it for predictive and engineering purposes presents a formidable challenge. The potential benefit of solving this challenge is amplified by the advent of inexpensive high-throughput genomic sequencing.In this paper we ask whether we can infer evolutionary constraints from a set of sequence homologs of a protein. The challenge is to distinguish true co-evolution couplings from the noisy set of observed correlations. We address this challenge using a maximum entropy model of the protein sequence, constrained by the statistics of the multiple sequence alignment, to infer residue pair couplings. Surprisingly, we find that the strength of these inferred couplings is an excellent predictor of residue-residue proximity in folded structures. Indeed, the top-scoring residue couplings are sufficiently accurate and well-distributed to define the 3D protein fold with remarkable accuracy.We quantify this observation by computing, from sequence alone, all-atom 3D structures of fifteen test proteins from different fold classes, ranging in size from 50 to 260 residues, including a G-protein coupled receptor. These blinded inferences are de novo, i.e., they do not use homology modeling or sequence-similar fragments from known structures. The co-evolution signals provide sufficient information to determine accurate 3D protein structure to 2.7-4.8 Å C(α-RMSD error relative to the observed structure, over at least two-thirds of the protein (method called EVfold, details at http://EVfold.org. This discovery provides insight into essential interactions constraining protein evolution and will facilitate a comprehensive survey of the universe of

  20. Development of a 3D bone marrow adipose tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Heather; Falank, Carolyne; Farrell, Mariah; Vary, Calvin; Boucher, Joshua M; Driscoll, Heather; Liaw, Lucy; Rosen, Clifford J; Reagan, Michaela R

    2018-01-26

    Over the past twenty years, evidence has accumulated that biochemically and spatially defined networks of extracellular matrix, cellular components, and interactions dictate cellular differentiation, proliferation, and function in a variety of tissue and diseases. Modeling in vivo systems in vitro has been undeniably necessary, but when simplified 2D conditions rather than 3D in vitro models are used, the reliability and usefulness of the data derived from these models decreases. Thus, there is a pressing need to develop and validate reliable in vitro models to reproduce specific tissue-like structures and mimic functions and responses of cells in a more realistic manner for both drug screening/disease modeling and tissue regeneration applications. In adipose biology and cancer research, these models serve as physiologically relevant 3D platforms to bridge the divide between 2D cultures and in vivo models, bringing about more reliable and translationally useful data to accelerate benchtop to bedside research. Currently, no model has been developed for bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT), a novel adipose depot that has previously been overlooked as "filler tissue" but has more recently been recognized as endocrine-signaling and systemically relevant. Herein we describe the development of the first 3D, BMAT model derived from either human or mouse bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We found that BMAT models can be stably cultured for at least 3 months in vitro, and that myeloma cells (5TGM1, OPM2 and MM1S cells) can be cultured on these for at least 2 weeks. Upon tumor cell co-culture, delipidation occurred in BMAT adipocytes, suggesting a bidirectional relationship between these two important cell types in the malignant BM niche. Overall, our studies suggest that 3D BMAT represents a "healthier," more realistic tissue model that may be useful for elucidating the effects of MAT on tumor cells, and tumor cells on MAT, to identify novel therapeutic

  1. Modelling Polymer Deformation during 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    Three-dimensional printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The fused deposition modelling technique involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion to fabricate an object. The key to ensuring strength at the weld between layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, prior to welding, both the extrusion process and the cooling temperature profile can significantly deform the polymer micro-structure and, consequently, how well the polymers are able to ``re-entangle'' across the weld. In particular, polymer alignment in the flow can cause de-bonding of the layers and create defects. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal extrusion process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and material rheology have on the conformation of a polymer melt. In particular, we incorporate both stretch and orientation using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine the melt structure as it flows through the nozzle, the subsequent alignment with the build plate and the resulting deformation due to the fixed nozzle height, which is typically less than the nozzle radius.

  2. Influence of pre-existing basement faults on the structural evolution of the Zagros Simply Folded belt: 3D numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    The Simply Folded Belt of the Zagros orogen is characterized by elongated fold trains symptomatically defining the geomorphology along this mountain range. The Zagros orogen results from the collision of the Arabian and the Eurasian plates. The Simply Folded Belt is located southwest of the Zagros suture zone. An up to 2 km thick salt horizon below the sedimentary sequence enables mechanical and structural detachment from the underlying Arabian basement. Nevertheless, deformation within the basement influences the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt. It has been shown that thrusts in form of reactivated normal faults can trigger out-of-sequence deformation within the sedimentary stratigraphy. Furthermore, deeply rooted strike-slip faults, such as the Kazerun faults between the Fars zone in the southeast and the Dezful embayment and the Izeh zone, are largely dispersing into the overlying stratigraphy, strongly influencing the tectonic evolution and mechanical behaviour. The aim of this study is to reveal the influence of basement thrusts and strike-slip faults on the structural evolution of the Simply Folded Belt depending on the occurrence of intercrustal weak horizons (Hormuz salt) and the rheology and thermal structure of the basement. Therefore, we present high-resolution 3D thermo-mechnical models with pre-existing, inversively reactivated normal faults or strike-slip faults within the basement. Numerical models are based on finite difference, marker-in-cell technique with (power-law) visco-plastic rheology accounting for brittle deformation. Preliminary results show that deep tectonic structures present in the basement may have crucial effects on the morphology and evolution of a fold-and-thrust belt above a major detachment horizon.

  3. 3-D numerical modelling of flow around a groin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, R.; Roulund, A.; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D flow code, EllipSys3D, has been implemented to simulate the 3-D flow around a groin in steady current. The k  turbulence model has been used for closure. Two kinds of groins are considered: (1) A vertical-wall groin, and (2) A groin with a side slope. Steady-flow simulations were conducted...

  4. APPLICATION OF 3D MODELING IN 3D PRINTING FOR THE LOWER JAW RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Yu. Dikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: improvement of functional and aesthetic results of microsurgery reconstructions of the lower jaw due to the use of the methodology of 3D modeling and 3D printing. Application of this methodology has been demonstrated on the example of treatment of 4 patients with locally distributed tumors of the mouth cavity, who underwent excision of the tumor with simultaneous reconstruction of the lower jaw with revascularized fibular graft.Before, one patient has already undergo segmental resection of the lower jaw with the defect replacement with the avascular ileac graft and a reconstruction plate. Then, a relapse of the disease and lysis of the graft has developed with him. Modeling of the graft according to the shape of the lower jaw was performed by making osteotomies of the bone part of the graft using three-dimensional virtual models created by computed tomography data. Then these 3D models were printed with a 3D printer of plastic with the scale of 1:1 with the fused deposition modeling (FDM technology and were used during the surgery in the course of modeling of the graft. Sterilizing of the plastic model was performed in the formalin chamber.This methodology allowed more specific reconstruction of the resected fragment of the lower jaw and get better functional and aesthetic results and prepare patients to further dental rehabilitation. Advantages of this methodology are the possibility of simultaneous performance of stages of reconstruction and resection and shortening of the time of surgery.

  5. 3D modeling based on CityEngine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guangyin; Liao, Kaiju

    2017-03-01

    Currently, there are many 3D modeling softwares, like 3DMAX, AUTOCAD, and more populous BIM softwares represented by REVIT. CityEngine modeling software introduced in this paper can fully utilize the existing GIS data and combine other built models to make 3D modeling on internal and external part of buildings in a rapid and batch manner, so as to improve the 3D modeling efficiency.

  6. a Proposal for Generalization of 3d Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyar, A.; Ulugtekin, N. N.

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, 3D models have been created of many cities around the world. Most of the 3D city models have been introduced as completely graphic or geometric models, and the semantic and topographic aspects of the models have been neglected. In order to use 3D city models beyond the task, a generalization is necessary. CityGML is an open data model and XML-based format for the storage and exchange of virtual 3D city models. Level of Details (LoD) which is an important concept for 3D modelling, can be defined as outlined degree or prior representation of real-world objects. The paper aim is first describes some requirements of 3D model generalization, then presents problems and approaches that have been developed in recent years. In conclude the paper will be a summary and outlook on problems and future work.

  7. Topology optimization of 3D shell structures with porous infill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Andreassen, Erik; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D topology optimization approach for designing shell structures with a porous or void interior. It is shown that the resulting structures are significantly more robust towards load perturbations than completely solid structures optimized under the same conditions. The study...... indicates that the potential benefit of using porous structures is higher for lower total volume fractions. Compared to earlier work dealing with 2D topology optimization, we found several new effects in 3D problems. Most notably, the opportunity for designing closed shells significantly improves...

  8. Development of the Improving Process for the 3D Printed Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagishi, Kensuke; Umezu, Shinjiro

    2017-01-05

    The authors focus on the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printer because the FDM 3D printer can print the utility resin material. It can print with low cost and therefore it is the most suitable for home 3D printer. The FDM 3D printer has the problem that it produces layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure. Therefore the authors developed the 3D-Chemical Melting Finishing (3D-CMF) for removing layer grooves. In this method, a pen-style device is filled with a chemical able to dissolve the materials used for building 3D printed structures. By controlling the behavior of this pen-style device, the convex parts of layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure are dissolved, which, in turn, fills the concave parts. In this study it proves the superiority of the 3D-CMF than conventional processing for the 3D printed structure. It proves utilizing the evaluation of the safety, selectively and stability. It confirms the improving of the 3D-CMF and it is confirmed utilizing the data of the surface roughness precision and the observation of the internal state and the evaluation of the mechanical characteristics.

  9. Development of the Improving Process for the 3D Printed Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagishi, Kensuke; Umezu, Shinjiro

    2017-01-01

    The authors focus on the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) 3D printer because the FDM 3D printer can print the utility resin material. It can print with low cost and therefore it is the most suitable for home 3D printer. The FDM 3D printer has the problem that it produces layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure. Therefore the authors developed the 3D-Chemical Melting Finishing (3D-CMF) for removing layer grooves. In this method, a pen-style device is filled with a chemical able to dissolve the materials used for building 3D printed structures. By controlling the behavior of this pen-style device, the convex parts of layer grooves on the surface of the 3D printed structure are dissolved, which, in turn, fills the concave parts. In this study it proves the superiority of the 3D-CMF than conventional processing for the 3D printed structure. It proves utilizing the evaluation of the safety, selectively and stability. It confirms the improving of the 3D-CMF and it is confirmed utilizing the data of the surface roughness precision and the observation of the internal state and the evaluation of the mechanical characteristics.

  10. Progress Toward an Integration of Process-Structure-Property-Performance Models for "Three-Dimensional (3-D) Printing" of Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P. C.; Haden, C. V.; Ghamarian, I.; Hayes, B. J.; Ales, T.; Penso, G.; Dixit, V.; Harlow, G.

    2014-07-01

    Electron beam direct manufacturing, synonymously known as electron beam additive manufacturing, along with other additive "3-D printing" manufacturing processes, are receiving widespread attention as a means of producing net-shape (or near-net-shape) components, owing to potential manufacturing benefits. Yet, materials scientists know that differences in manufacturing processes often significantly influence the microstructure of even widely accepted materials and, thus, impact the properties and performance of a material in service. It is important to accelerate the understanding of the processing-structure-property relationship of materials being produced via these novel approaches in a framework that considers the performance in a statistically rigorous way. This article describes the development of a process model, the assessment of key microstructural features to be incorporated into a microstructure simulation model, a novel approach to extract a constitutive equation to predict tensile properties in Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64), and a probabilistic approach to measure the fidelity of the property model against real data. This integrated approach will provide designers a tool to vary process parameters and understand the influence on performance, enabling design and optimization for these highly visible manufacturing approaches.

  11. Visualization of Hyperconjugation and Subsequent Structural Distortions through 3D Printing of Crystal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithila, Farha J; Oyola-Reynoso, Stephanie; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza Bj

    2016-01-01

    Structural distortions due to hyperconjugation in organic molecules, like norbornenes, are well captured through X-ray crystallographic data, but are sometimes difficult to visualize especially for those applying chemical knowledge and are not chemists. Crystal structure from the Cambridge database were downloaded and converted to .stl format. The structures were then printed at the desired scale using a 3D printer. Replicas of the crystal structures were accurately reproduced in scale and any resulting distortions were clearly visible from the macroscale models. Through space interactions or effect of through space hyperconjugation was illustrated through loss of symmetry or distortions thereof. The norbornene structures exhibits distortion that cannot be observed through conventional ball and stick modelling kits. We show that 3D printed models derived from crystallographic data capture even subtle distortions in molecules. We translate such crystallographic data into scaled-up models through 3D printing.

  12. SAFE-3D, Stress Analysis of 3-D Composite Structure by Finite Elements Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornell, D.C.; Jadhav, K.; Crowell, J.S.

    1969-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SAFE-3D is a finite-element program for the three-dimensional elastic analysis of heterogeneous composite structures. The program uses the following types of finite elements - (1) tetrahedral elements to represent the continuum, (2) triangular plane stress membrane elements to represent inner liner or outer case, and (3) uniaxial tension-compression elements to represent internal reinforcement. The structure can be of arbitrary geometry and have any distribution of material properties, temperatures, surface loadings, and boundary conditions. 2 - Method of solution: The finite-element variational method is used. Equilibrium equations are solved by the alternating component iterative method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 5000 nodes; 16000 elements. The program cannot be applied to incompressible solids and is not recommended for Poisson's ratio in the range of nu between 0.495 and 0.5

  13. Method for modeling post-mortem biometric 3D fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, Srijith; Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite the advancements of fingerprint recognition in 2-D and 3-D domain, authenticating deformed/post-mortem fingerprints continue to be an important challenge. Prior cleansing and reconditioning of the deceased finger is required before acquisition of the fingerprint. The victim's finger needs to be precisely and carefully operated by a medium to record the fingerprint impression. This process may damage the structure of the finger, which subsequently leads to higher false rejection rates. This paper proposes a non-invasive method to perform 3-D deformed/post-mortem finger modeling, which produces a 2-D rolled equivalent fingerprint for automated verification. The presented novel modeling method involves masking, filtering, and unrolling. Computer simulations were conducted on finger models with different depth variations obtained from Flashscan3D LLC. Results illustrate that the modeling scheme provides a viable 2-D fingerprint of deformed models for automated verification. The quality and adaptability of the obtained unrolled 2-D fingerprints were analyzed using NIST fingerprint software. Eventually, the presented method could be extended to other biometric traits such as palm, foot, tongue etc. for security and administrative applications.

  14. 3D printed, bio-inspired prototypes and analytical models for structured suture interfaces with geometrically-tuned deformation and failure behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Erica; Li, Yaning; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-12-01

    Geometrically structured interfaces in nature possess enhanced, and often surprising, mechanical properties, and provide inspiration for materials design. This paper investigates the mechanics of deformation and failure mechanisms of suture interface designs through analytical models and experiments on 3D printed polymer physical prototypes. Suture waveforms with generalized trapezoidal geometries (trapezoidal, rectangular, anti-trapezoidal, and triangular) are studied and characterized by several important geometric parameters: the presence or absence of a bonded tip region, the tip angle, and the geometry. It is shown that a wide range (in some cases as great as an order of magnitude) in stiffness, strength, and toughness is achievable dependent on tip bonding, tip angle, and geometry. Suture interfaces with a bonded tip region exhibit a higher initial stiffness due to the greater load bearing by the skeletal teeth, a double peak in the stress-strain curve corresponding to the failure of the bonded tip and the failure of the slanted interface region or tooth, respectively, and an additional failure and toughening mechanism due to the failure of the bonded tip. Anti-trapezoidal geometries promote the greatest amplification of properties for suture interfaces with a bonded tip due the large tip interface area. The tip angle and geometry govern the stress distributions in the teeth and the ratio of normal to shear stresses in the interfacial layers, which together determine the failure mechanism of the interface and/or the teeth. Rectangular suture interfaces fail by simple shearing of the interfaces. Trapezoidal and triangular suture interfaces fail by a combination of shear and tensile normal stresses in the interface, leading to plastic deformation, cavitation events, and subsequent stretching of interface ligaments with mostly elastic deformation in the teeth. Anti-trapezoidal suture interfaces with small tip angles have high stress concentrations in the teeth

  15. Development of 3D statistical mandible models for cephalometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Goo; Yi, Won Jin; Hwang, Soon Jung; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun; Heo, Min Suk; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Kim, Tae Il; Hong, Helen; Yoo, Ji Hyun

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide sex-matched three-dimensional (3D) statistical shape models of the mandible, which would provide cephalometric parameters for 3D treatment planning and cephalometric measurements in orthognathic surgery. The subjects used to create the 3D shape models of the mandible included 23 males and 23 females. The mandibles were segmented semi-automatically from 3D facial CT images. Each individual mandible shape was reconstructed as a 3D surface model, which was parameterized to establish correspondence between different individual surfaces. The principal component analysis (PCA) applied to all mandible shapes produced a mean model and characteristic models of variation. The cephalometric parameters were measured directly from the mean models to evaluate the 3D shape models. The means of the measured parameters were compared with those from other conventional studies. The male and female 3D statistical mean models were developed from 23 individual mandibles, respectively. The male and female characteristic shapes of variation produced by PCA showed a large variability included in the individual mandibles. The cephalometric measurements from the developed models were very close to those from some conventional studies. We described the construction of 3D mandibular shape models and presented the application of the 3D mandibular template in cephalometric measurements. Optimal reference models determined from variations produced by PCA could be used for craniofacial patients with various types of skeletal shape.

  16. Development of 3D statistical mandible models for cephalometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Goo; Yi, Won Jin; Hwang, Soon Jung; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun; Heo, Min Suk; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Kim, Tae Il [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Helen; Yoo, Ji Hyun [Division of Multimedia Engineering, Seoul Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this study was to provide sex-matched three-dimensional (3D) statistical shape models of the mandible, which would provide cephalometric parameters for 3D treatment planning and cephalometric measurements in orthognathic surgery. The subjects used to create the 3D shape models of the mandible included 23 males and 23 females. The mandibles were segmented semi-automatically from 3D facial CT images. Each individual mandible shape was reconstructed as a 3D surface model, which was parameterized to establish correspondence between different individual surfaces. The principal component analysis (PCA) applied to all mandible shapes produced a mean model and characteristic models of variation. The cephalometric parameters were measured directly from the mean models to evaluate the 3D shape models. The means of the measured parameters were compared with those from other conventional studies. The male and female 3D statistical mean models were developed from 23 individual mandibles, respectively. The male and female characteristic shapes of variation produced by PCA showed a large variability included in the individual mandibles. The cephalometric measurements from the developed models were very close to those from some conventional studies. We described the construction of 3D mandibular shape models and presented the application of the 3D mandibular template in cephalometric measurements. Optimal reference models determined from variations produced by PCA could be used for craniofacial patients with various types of skeletal shape.

  17. Probabilistic reasoning for assembly-based 3D modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Chaudhuri, Siddhartha; Kalogerakis, Evangelos; Guibas, Leonidas; Koltun, Vladlen

    2011-01-01

    Assembly-based modeling is a promising approach to broadening the accessibility of 3D modeling. In assembly-based modeling, new models are assembled from shape components extracted from a database. A key challenge in assembly-based modeling

  18. CityGML - Interoperable semantic 3D city models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröger, Gerhard; Plümer, Lutz

    2012-07-01

    CityGML is the international standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) for the representation and exchange of 3D city models. It defines the three-dimensional geometry, topology, semantics and appearance of the most relevant topographic objects in urban or regional contexts. These definitions are provided in different, well-defined Levels-of-Detail (multiresolution model). The focus of CityGML is on the semantical aspects of 3D city models, its structures, taxonomies and aggregations, allowing users to employ virtual 3D city models for advanced analysis and visualization tasks in a variety of application domains such as urban planning, indoor/outdoor pedestrian navigation, environmental simulations, cultural heritage, or facility management. This is in contrast to purely geometrical/graphical models such as KML, VRML, or X3D, which do not provide sufficient semantics. CityGML is based on the Geography Markup Language (GML), which provides a standardized geometry model. Due to this model and its well-defined semantics and structures, CityGML facilitates interoperable data exchange in the context of geo web services and spatial data infrastructures. Since its standardization in 2008, CityGML has become used on a worldwide scale: tools from notable companies in the geospatial field provide CityGML interfaces. Many applications and projects use this standard. CityGML is also having a strong impact on science: numerous approaches use CityGML, particularly its semantics, for disaster management, emergency responses, or energy-related applications as well as for visualizations, or they contribute to CityGML, improving its consistency and validity, or use CityGML, particularly its different Levels-of-Detail, as a source or target for generalizations. This paper gives an overview of CityGML, its underlying concepts, its Levels-of-Detail, how to extend it, its applications, its likely future development, and the role it plays in scientific research. Furthermore, its

  19. 3D Face modeling using the multi-deformable method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-09-25

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper.

  20. AUTOMATIC MESH GENERATION OF 3-D GEOMETRIC MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘剑飞

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the presentation of the ball-packing method is reviewed,and a scheme to generate mesh for complex 3-D geometric models is given,which consists of 4 steps:(1)create nodes in 3-D models by ball-packing method,(2)connect nodes to generate mesh by 3-D Delaunay triangulation,(3)retrieve the boundary of the model after Delaunay triangulation,(4)improve the mesh.

  1. The role of crown architecture for light harvesting and carbon gain in extreme light environments assessed with a structurally realistic 3-D model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valladares, Fernando

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Main results from different studies of crown architecture adaptation to extreme light environments are presented. Light capture and carbon gain by plants from low (forest understory and high (open Mediterranean-type ecosystems light environments were simulated with a 3-D model (YPLANT, which was developed specifically to analyse the structural features that determine light interception and photosynthesis at the whole plant level. Distantly related taxa with contrasting architectures exhibited similar efficiencies of light interception (functional convergence. Between habitats large differences in architecture existed depending on whether light capture must be maximised or whether excess photon flux density must be avoided. These differences are realised both at the species level and within a species because of plastic adjustments of crown architecture to the external light environment. Realistic, 3-D architectural models are indispensable tools in this kind of comparative studies due to the intrinsic complexity of plant architecture. Their efficient development requires a fluid exchange of ideas between botanists, ecologists and plant modellers.Se presentan los resultados principales de varios estudios sobre las adaptaciones del follaje a ambientes lumínicos extremos. Plantas de ambientes oscuros (sotobosques de bosques templados y tropicales y de ambientes muy luminosos (ecosistemas abiertos de tipo Mediterráneo han sido estudiadas mediante un modelo (YPLANT que permite la reconstrucción tridimensional de la parte aérea de las plantas e identificar los rasgos estructurales que determinan la interceptación de luz y la fotosíntesis y transpiraci6n potencial a nivel de toda la copa. Taxones no relacionados y con arquitecturas muy diferentes mostraron una eficiencia en la interceptaci6n de luz similar (convergencia funcional. La comparación entre hábitat revelo grandes diferencias arquitecturales dependiendo de si la absorción de luz deb

  2. Towards a 3d Spatial Urban Energy Modelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahu, J.-M.; Koch, A.; Kremers, E.; Murshed, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Today's needs to reduce the environmental impact of energy use impose dramatic changes for energy infrastructure and existing demand patterns (e.g. buildings) corresponding to their specific context. In addition, future energy systems are expected to integrate a considerable share of fluctuating power sources and equally a high share of distributed generation of electricity. Energy system models capable of describing such future systems and allowing the simulation of the impact of these developments thus require a spatial representation in order to reflect the local context and the boundary conditions. This paper describes two recent research approaches developed at EIFER in the fields of (a) geo-localised simulation of heat energy demand in cities based on 3D morphological data and (b) spatially explicit Agent-Based Models (ABM) for the simulation of smart grids. 3D city models were used to assess solar potential and heat energy demand of residential buildings which enable cities to target the building refurbishment potentials. Distributed energy systems require innovative modelling techniques where individual components are represented and can interact. With this approach, several smart grid demonstrators were simulated, where heterogeneous models are spatially represented. Coupling 3D geodata with energy system ABMs holds different advantages for both approaches. On one hand, energy system models can be enhanced with high resolution data from 3D city models and their semantic relations. Furthermore, they allow for spatial analysis and visualisation of the results, with emphasis on spatially and structurally correlations among the different layers (e.g. infrastructure, buildings, administrative zones) to provide an integrated approach. On the other hand, 3D models can benefit from more detailed system description of energy infrastructure, representing dynamic phenomena and high resolution models for energy use at component level. The proposed modelling strategies

  3. Extracting 3D layout from a single image using global image structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Zhongyu; Gevers, Theo; Hu, Ninghang

    2015-10-01

    Extracting the pixel-level 3D layout from a single image is important for different applications, such as object localization, image, and video categorization. Traditionally, the 3D layout is derived by solving a pixel-level classification problem. However, the image-level 3D structure can be very beneficial for extracting pixel-level 3D layout since it implies the way how pixels in the image are organized. In this paper, we propose an approach that first predicts the global image structure, and then we use the global structure for fine-grained pixel-level 3D layout extraction. In particular, image features are extracted based on multiple layout templates. We then learn a discriminative model for classifying the global layout at the image-level. Using latent variables, we implicitly model the sublevel semantics of the image, which enrich the expressiveness of our model. After the image-level structure is obtained, it is used as the prior knowledge to infer pixel-wise 3D layout. Experiments show that the results of our model outperform the state-of-the-art methods by 11.7% for 3D structure classification. Moreover, we show that employing the 3D structure prior information yields accurate 3D scene layout segmentation.

  4. A FAST METHOD FOR MEASURING THE SIMILARITY BETWEEN 3D MODEL AND 3D POINT CLOUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a fast method for measuring the partial Similarity between 3D Model and 3D point Cloud (SimMC. It is crucial to measure SimMC for many point cloud-related applications such as 3D object retrieval and inverse procedural modelling. In our proposed method, the surface area of model and the Distance from Model to point Cloud (DistMC are exploited as measurements to calculate SimMC. Here, DistMC is defined as the weighted distance of the distances between points sampled from model and point cloud. Similarly, Distance from point Cloud to Model (DistCM is defined as the average distance of the distances between points in point cloud and model. In order to reduce huge computational burdens brought by calculation of DistCM in some traditional methods, we define SimMC as the ratio of weighted surface area of model to DistMC. Compared to those traditional SimMC measuring methods that are only able to measure global similarity, our method is capable of measuring partial similarity by employing distance-weighted strategy. Moreover, our method is able to be faster than other partial similarity assessment methods. We demonstrate the superiority of our method both on synthetic data and laser scanning data.

  5. Numerical 3-D Modelling of Overflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Nielsen, L.; Jensen, B.

    2008-01-01

    -dimensional so-called Volume of Fluid Models (VOF-models) based on the full Navier-Stokes equations (named NS3 and developed by DHI Water & Environment) As a general conclusion, the two numerical models show excellent results when compared with measurements. However, considerable errors occur when...

  6. Analysis of structural correlations in a model binary 3D liquid through the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levashov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    It is possible to associate with every atom or molecule in a liquid its own atomic stress tensor. These atomic stress tensors can be used to describe liquids’ structures and to investigate the connection between structural and dynamic properties. In particular, atomic stresses allow to address atomic scale correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity. Previously correlations between the atomic stresses of different atoms were studied using the Cartesian representation of the stress tensors or the representation based on spherical harmonics. In this paper we address structural correlations in a 3D model binary liquid using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. This approach allows to interpret correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity in a simple geometric way. On decrease of temperature the changes in the relevant stress correlation function between different atoms are significantly more pronounced than the changes in the pair density function. We demonstrate that this behaviour originates from the orientational correlations between the eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. We also found correlations between the eigenvalues of the same atomic stress tensor. For the studied system, with purely repulsive interactions between the particles, the eigenvalues of every atomic stress tensor are positive and they can be ordered: λ 1 ≥ λ 2 ≥ λ 3 ≥ 0. We found that, for the particles of a given type, the probability distributions of the ratios (λ 2 /λ 1 ) and (λ 3 /λ 2 ) are essentially identical to each other in the liquids state. We also found that λ 2 tends to be equal to the geometric average of λ 1 and λ 3 . In our view, correlations between the eigenvalues may represent “the Poisson ratio effect” at the atomic scale.

  7. Analysis of structural correlations in a model binary 3D liquid through the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levashov, V. A. [Technological Design Institute of Scientific Instrument Engineering, Novosibirsk 630058 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-07

    It is possible to associate with every atom or molecule in a liquid its own atomic stress tensor. These atomic stress tensors can be used to describe liquids’ structures and to investigate the connection between structural and dynamic properties. In particular, atomic stresses allow to address atomic scale correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity. Previously correlations between the atomic stresses of different atoms were studied using the Cartesian representation of the stress tensors or the representation based on spherical harmonics. In this paper we address structural correlations in a 3D model binary liquid using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. This approach allows to interpret correlations relevant to the Green-Kubo expression for viscosity in a simple geometric way. On decrease of temperature the changes in the relevant stress correlation function between different atoms are significantly more pronounced than the changes in the pair density function. We demonstrate that this behaviour originates from the orientational correlations between the eigenvectors of the atomic stress tensors. We also found correlations between the eigenvalues of the same atomic stress tensor. For the studied system, with purely repulsive interactions between the particles, the eigenvalues of every atomic stress tensor are positive and they can be ordered: λ{sub 1} ≥ λ{sub 2} ≥ λ{sub 3} ≥ 0. We found that, for the particles of a given type, the probability distributions of the ratios (λ{sub 2}/λ{sub 1}) and (λ{sub 3}/λ{sub 2}) are essentially identical to each other in the liquids state. We also found that λ{sub 2} tends to be equal to the geometric average of λ{sub 1} and λ{sub 3}. In our view, correlations between the eigenvalues may represent “the Poisson ratio effect” at the atomic scale.

  8. From 2D to 3D: Using Illumination Cones to Build 3d Face Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, S S; Jin, M

    2006-01-01

    To solve the problem derivate by lighting condition and position of the camera, a new method using illumination cones to build 3d face model has been proposed. Due to illumination variability, the same object can show dramatic difference even as being viewed in fixed pose. To handle this variability, an object recognition system must employ a representation that is either invariant to, or can model this variability. The proposed technique presents an appearance-based method for modeling the variability due to illumination in the images of objects. The method differs from past appearance-based methods. Evenmore, a small set of training images is used to generate a representation that the illumination cone models the complete set of images of an object with Lambertian reflectance surface under a combination of arbitrary point light sources at infinity. After building up the illumination cones, researches focus on how to present the 3d model of the face. Combining illumination and texture feature to build up 3d model of the face make it easy solving the problem in recognition of face under different pose

  9. A 3D Geometry Model Search Engine to Support Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gary K. L.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of 3D graphics in animation and games, usage of 3D geometry deformable models increases dramatically. Despite their growing importance, these models are difficult and time consuming to build. A distance learning system for the construction of these models could greatly facilitate students to learn and practice at different…

  10. Improved hybrid optimization algorithm for 3D protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changjun; Hou, Caixia; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    A new improved hybrid optimization algorithm - PGATS algorithm, which is based on toy off-lattice model, is presented for dealing with three-dimensional protein structure prediction problems. The algorithm combines the particle swarm optimization (PSO), genetic algorithm (GA), and tabu search (TS) algorithms. Otherwise, we also take some different improved strategies. The factor of stochastic disturbance is joined in the particle swarm optimization to improve the search ability; the operations of crossover and mutation that are in the genetic algorithm are changed to a kind of random liner method; at last tabu search algorithm is improved by appending a mutation operator. Through the combination of a variety of strategies and algorithms, the protein structure prediction (PSP) in a 3D off-lattice model is achieved. The PSP problem is an NP-hard problem, but the problem can be attributed to a global optimization problem of multi-extremum and multi-parameters. This is the theoretical principle of the hybrid optimization algorithm that is proposed in this paper. The algorithm combines local search and global search, which overcomes the shortcoming of a single algorithm, giving full play to the advantage of each algorithm. In the current universal standard sequences, Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences are certified. Experiments show that the proposed new method outperforms single algorithms on the accuracy of calculating the protein sequence energy value, which is proved to be an effective way to predict the structure of proteins.

  11. Modelling of 3D fractured geological systems - technique and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Cherubini, Y.; Kaiser, B. O.; Bloecher, G.

    2011-12-01

    All rocks in the earth's crust are fractured to some extent. Faults and fractures are important in different scientific and industry fields comprising engineering, geotechnical and hydrogeological applications. Many petroleum, gas and geothermal and water supply reservoirs form in faulted and fractured geological systems. Additionally, faults and fractures may control the transport of chemical contaminants into and through the subsurface. Depending on their origin and orientation with respect to the recent and palaeo stress field as well as on the overall kinematics of chemical processes occurring within them, faults and fractures can act either as hydraulic conductors providing preferential pathways for fluid to flow or as barriers preventing flow across them. The main challenge in modelling processes occurring in fractured rocks is related to the way of describing the heterogeneities of such geological systems. Flow paths are controlled by the geometry of faults and their open void space. To correctly simulate these processes an adequate 3D mesh is a basic requirement. Unfortunately, the representation of realistic 3D geological environments is limited by the complexity of embedded fracture networks often resulting in oversimplified models of the natural system. A technical description of an improved method to integrate generic dipping structures (representing faults and fractures) into a 3D porous medium is out forward. The automated mesh generation algorithm is composed of various existing routines from computational geometry (e.g. 2D-3D projection, interpolation, intersection, convex hull calculation) and meshing (e.g. triangulation in 2D and tetrahedralization in 3D). All routines have been combined in an automated software framework and the robustness of the approach has been tested and verified. These techniques and methods can be applied for fractured porous media including fault systems and therefore found wide applications in different geo-energy related

  12. 3D printing of nano- and micro-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing or 3D printing techniques are being vigorously investigated as a replacement to the traditional and conventional methods in fabrication to bring forth cost and time effective approaches. Introduction of 3D printing has led to printing micro and nanoscale structures including tissues and organelles, bioelectric sensors and devices, artificial bones and transplants, microfluidic devices, batteries and various other biomaterials. Various microfabrication processes have been developed to fabricate micro components and assemblies at lab scale. 3D Fabrication processes that can accommodate the functional and geometrical requirements to realize complicated structures are becoming feasible through advances in additive manufacturing. This advancement could lead to simpler development mechanisms of novel components and devices exhibiting complex features. For instance, development of microstructure electrodes that can penetrate the epidermis of the skin to collect the bio potential signal may prove very effective than the electrodes that measure signal from the skin's surface. The micro and nanostructures will have to possess extraordinary material and mechanical properties for its dexterity in the applications. A substantial amount of research being pursued on stretchable and flexible devices based on PDMA, textiles, and organic electronics. Despite the numerous advantages these substrates and techniques could solely offer, 3D printing enables a multi-dimensional approach towards finer and complex applications. This review emphasizes the use of 3D printing to fabricate micro and nanostructures for that can be applied for human healthcare.

  13. Modeling 2D and 3D diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Modeling obstructed diffusion is essential to the understanding of diffusion-mediated processes in the crowded cellular environment. Simple Monte Carlo techniques for modeling obstructed random walks are explained and related to Brownian dynamics and more complicated Monte Carlo methods. Random number generation is reviewed in the context of random walk simulations. Programming techniques and event-driven algorithms are discussed as ways to speed simulations.

  14. A novel alternative method for 3D visualisation in Parasitology: the construction of a 3D model of a parasite from 2D illustrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, B G; Sarinder, K K S; Lim, L H S

    2010-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) models of the marginal hooks, dorsal and ventral anchors, bars and haptoral reservoirs of a parasite, Sundatrema langkawiense Lim & Gibson, 2009 (Monogenea) were developed using the polygonal modelling method in Autodesk 3ds Max (Version 9) based on two-dimensional (2D) illustrations. Maxscripts were written to rotate the modelled 3D structures. Appropriately orientated 3D haptoral hard-parts were then selected and positioned within the transparent 3D outline of the haptor and grouped together to form a complete 3D haptoral entity. This technique is an inexpensive tool for constructing 3D models from 2D illustrations for 3D visualisation of the spatial relationships between the different structural parts within organisms.

  15. 3D-printing soft sEMG sensing structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, Gerjan; Sanders, Remco; Muijzer, Frodo; van Beijnum, Bert-Jan; Krijnen, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of soft and flexible 3D-printed sEMG electrodes. The electrodes are printed in one go on a low cost consumer multi-material FDM printer. The printed structures do not need any further production steps to give them conductive properties.

  16. I-TASSER server for protein 3D structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of 3-dimensional protein structures from amino acid sequences represents one of the most important problems in computational structural biology. The community-wide Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP experiments have been designed to obtain an objective assessment of the state-of-the-art of the field, where I-TASSER was ranked as the best method in the server section of the recent 7th CASP experiment. Our laboratory has since then received numerous requests about the public availability of the I-TASSER algorithm and the usage of the I-TASSER predictions. Results An on-line version of I-TASSER is developed at the KU Center for Bioinformatics which has generated protein structure predictions for thousands of modeling requests from more than 35 countries. A scoring function (C-score based on the relative clustering structural density and the consensus significance score of multiple threading templates is introduced to estimate the accuracy of the I-TASSER predictions. A large-scale benchmark test demonstrates a strong correlation between the C-score and the TM-score (a structural similarity measurement with values in [0, 1] of the first models with a correlation coefficient of 0.91. Using a C-score cutoff > -1.5 for the models of correct topology, both false positive and false negative rates are below 0.1. Combining C-score and protein length, the accuracy of the I-TASSER models can be predicted with an average error of 0.08 for TM-score and 2 Å for RMSD. Conclusion The I-TASSER server has been developed to generate automated full-length 3D protein structural predictions where the benchmarked scoring system helps users to obtain quantitative assessments of the I-TASSER models. The output of the I-TASSER server for each query includes up to five full-length models, the confidence score, the estimated TM-score and RMSD, and the standard deviation of the estimations. The I-TASSER server is freely available

  17. Global Compilation of InSAR Earthquake Source Models: Comparisons with Seismic Catalogues and the Effects of 3D Earth Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, J. M.; Ferreira, A. M.; Funning, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    should map epicentral locations accurately, this allows us to obtain a first independent estimate of epicentral location errors in the seismic catalogues. InSAR depths are systematically shallower than those in the EHB catalogue with differences of 5-10km; we discuss the possible reasons for these differences, which allow us to place constraints on the accuracy of both ICMT and EHB depth determinations. Finally, we carry out long-period surface-wave CMT inversions using four different 3D global tomographic models and two different forward modelling techniques to assess the effect of inaccurate wave propagation formulations and/or 3D Earth structure on the source parameter comparisons. We find that comparing InSAR source models with the range of seismic solutions that we obtain is a useful way to assess limitations in the earthquake models, notably in identifying inaccuracies in the retrieved earthquake slip distribution using InSAR. Moreover, we find that using more accurate formulations, together with the best fitting Earth models, further reduces differences between the seismic moment determined using InSAR and seismic data.

  18. 3D Printers Can Provide an Added Dimension for Teaching Structure-Energy Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauch, David N.; Carroll, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D printer is used to prepare a variety of models representing potential energy as a function of two geometric coordinates. These models facilitate the teaching of structure-energy relationships in molecular conformations and in chemical reactions.

  19. Turning limited experimental information into 3D models of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Samuel Coulbourn; Altman, Russ B

    2010-09-01

    Our understanding of RNA functions in the cell is evolving rapidly. As for proteins, the detailed three-dimensional (3D) structure of RNA is often key to understanding its function. Although crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can determine the atomic coordinates of some RNA structures, many 3D structures present technical challenges that make these methods difficult to apply. The great flexibility of RNA, its charged backbone, dearth of specific surface features, and propensity for kinetic traps all conspire with its long folding time, to challenge in silico methods for physics-based folding. On the other hand, base-pairing interactions (either in runs to form helices or isolated tertiary contacts) and motifs are often available from relatively low-cost experiments or informatics analyses. We present RNABuilder, a novel code that uses internal coordinate mechanics to satisfy user-specified base pairing and steric forces under chemical constraints. The code recapitulates the topology and characteristic L-shape of tRNA and obtains an accurate noncrystallographic structure of the Tetrahymena ribozyme P4/P6 domain. The algorithm scales nearly linearly with molecule size, opening the door to the modeling of significantly larger structures.

  20. The application of 3D Zernike moments for the description of "model-free" molecular structure, functional motion, and structural reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandison, Scott; Roberts, Carl; Morris, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    Protein structures are not static entities consisting of equally well-determined atomic coordinates. Proteins undergo continuous motion, and as catalytic machines, these movements can be of high relevance for understanding function. In addition to this strong biological motivation for considering shape changes is the necessity to correctly capture different levels of detail and error in protein structures. Some parts of a structural model are often poorly defined, and the atomic displacement parameters provide an excellent means to characterize the confidence in an atom's spatial coordinates. A mathematical framework for studying these shape changes, and handling positional variance is therefore of high importance. We present an approach for capturing various protein structure properties in a concise mathematical framework that allows us to compare features in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate how three-dimensional Zernike moments can be employed to describe functions, not only on the surface of a protein but throughout the entire molecule. A number of proof-of-principle examples are given which demonstrate how this approach may be used in practice for the representation of movement and uncertainty.

  1. Virtual 3d City Modeling: Techniques and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2013-08-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as Building, Tree, Vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. There are various terms used for 3D city models such as "Cybertown", "Cybercity", "Virtual City", or "Digital City". 3D city models are basically a computerized or digital model of a city contains the graphic representation of buildings and other objects in 2.5 or 3D. Generally three main Geomatics approach are using for Virtual 3-D City models generation, in first approach, researcher are using Conventional techniques such as Vector Map data, DEM, Aerial images, second approach are based on High resolution satellite images with LASER scanning, In third method, many researcher are using Terrestrial images by using Close Range Photogrammetry with DSM & Texture mapping. We start this paper from the introduction of various Geomatics techniques for 3D City modeling. These techniques divided in to two main categories: one is based on Automation (Automatic, Semi-automatic and Manual methods), and another is Based on Data input techniques (one is Photogrammetry, another is Laser Techniques). After details study of this, finally in short, we are trying to give the conclusions of this study. In the last, we are trying to give the conclusions of this research paper and also giving a short view for justification and analysis, and present trend for 3D City modeling. This paper gives an overview about the Techniques related with "Generation of Virtual 3-D City models using Geomatics Techniques" and the Applications of Virtual 3D City models. Photogrammetry, (Close range, Aerial, Satellite), Lasergrammetry, GPS, or combination of these modern Geomatics techniques play a major role to create a virtual 3-D City model. Each and every techniques and method has some advantages and some drawbacks. Point cloud model is a modern trend for virtual 3-D city model. Photo-realistic, Scalable, Geo-referenced virtual 3

  2. p3d--Python module for structural bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fufezan, Christian; Specht, Michael

    2009-08-21

    High-throughput bioinformatic analysis tools are needed to mine the large amount of structural data via knowledge based approaches. The development of such tools requires a robust interface to access the structural data in an easy way. For this the Python scripting language is the optimal choice since its philosophy is to write an understandable source code. p3d is an object oriented Python module that adds a simple yet powerful interface to the Python interpreter to process and analyse three dimensional protein structure files (PDB files). p3d's strength arises from the combination of a) very fast spatial access to the structural data due to the implementation of a binary space partitioning (BSP) tree, b) set theory and c) functions that allow to combine a and b and that use human readable language in the search queries rather than complex computer language. All these factors combined facilitate the rapid development of bioinformatic tools that can perform quick and complex analyses of protein structures. p3d is the perfect tool to quickly develop tools for structural bioinformatics using the Python scripting language.

  3. p3d – Python module for structural bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fufezan Christian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput bioinformatic analysis tools are needed to mine the large amount of structural data via knowledge based approaches. The development of such tools requires a robust interface to access the structural data in an easy way. For this the Python scripting language is the optimal choice since its philosophy is to write an understandable source code. Results p3d is an object oriented Python module that adds a simple yet powerful interface to the Python interpreter to process and analyse three dimensional protein structure files (PDB files. p3d's strength arises from the combination of a very fast spatial access to the structural data due to the implementation of a binary space partitioning (BSP tree, b set theory and c functions that allow to combine a and b and that use human readable language in the search queries rather than complex computer language. All these factors combined facilitate the rapid development of bioinformatic tools that can perform quick and complex analyses of protein structures. Conclusion p3d is the perfect tool to quickly develop tools for structural bioinformatics using the Python scripting language.

  4. Genome3D: a UK collaborative project to annotate genomic sequences with predicted 3D structures based on SCOP and CATH domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tony E; Sillitoe, Ian; Andreeva, Antonina; Blundell, Tom L; Buchan, Daniel W A; Chothia, Cyrus; Cuff, Alison; Dana, Jose M; Filippis, Ioannis; Gough, Julian; Hunter, Sarah; Jones, David T; Kelley, Lawrence A; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Minneci, Federico; Mitchell, Alex; Murzin, Alexey G; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Rackham, Owen J L; Smith, James; Sternberg, Michael J E; Velankar, Sameer; Yeats, Corin; Orengo, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Genome3D, available at http://www.genome3d.eu, is a new collaborative project that integrates UK-based structural resources to provide a unique perspective on sequence-structure-function relationships. Leading structure prediction resources (DomSerf, FUGUE, Gene3D, pDomTHREADER, Phyre and SUPERFAMILY) provide annotations for UniProt sequences to indicate the locations of structural domains (structural annotations) and their 3D structures (structural models). Structural annotations and 3D model predictions are currently available for three model genomes (Homo sapiens, E. coli and baker's yeast), and the project will extend to other genomes in the near future. As these resources exploit different strategies for predicting structures, the main aim of Genome3D is to enable comparisons between all the resources so that biologists can see where predictions agree and are therefore more trusted. Furthermore, as these methods differ in whether they build their predictions using CATH or SCOP, Genome3D also contains the first official mapping between these two databases. This has identified pairs of similar superfamilies from the two resources at various degrees of consensus (532 bronze pairs, 527 silver pairs and 370 gold pairs).

  5. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth’s surface and it’s related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India. This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can’t do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good

  6. 3D Massive MIMO Systems: Modeling and Performance Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain; Kammoun, Abla; Debbah, Merouane; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2015-01-01

    necessitates the characterization of 3D channels. We present an information-theoretic channel model for MIMO systems that supports the elevation dimension. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy, which enables us to determine the distribution

  7. Automated Clustering Analysis of Immunoglobulin Sequences in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Based on 3D Structural Descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcatili, Paolo; Mochament, Konstantinos; Agathangelidis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    study, we used the structure prediction tools PIGS and I-TASSER for creating the 3D models and the TM-align algorithm to superpose them. The innovation of the current methodology resides in the usage of methods adapted from 3D content-based search methodologies to determine the local structural...... determine it are extremely laborious and demanding. Hence, the ability to gain insight into the structure of Igs at large relies on the availability of tools and algorithms for producing accurate Ig structural models based on their primary sequence alone. These models can then be used to determine...... to achieve an optimal solution to this task yet their results were hindered mainly due to the lack of efficient clustering methods based on the similarity of 3D structure descriptors. Here, we present a novel workflow for robust Ig 3D modeling and automated clustering. We validated our protocol in chronic...

  8. The 3D model: explaining densification and deformation mechanisms by using 3D parameter plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker, Katharina M

    2004-04-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze very differently deforming materials using 3D parameter plots and consequently to gain deeper insights into the densification and deformation process described with the 3D model in order to define an ideal tableting excipient. The excipients used were dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), sodium chloride (NaCl), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), xylitol, mannitol, alpha-lactose monohydrate, maltose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC), cellulose acetate (CAC), maize starch, potato starch, pregelatinized starch, and maltodextrine. All of the materials were tableted to graded maximum relative densities (rhorel, max) using an eccentric tableting machine. The data which resulted, namely force, displacement, and time, were analyzed by the application of 3D modeling. Different particle size fractions of DCPD, CAC, and MCC were analyzed in addition. Brittle deforming materials such as DCPD exhibited a completely different 3D parameter plot, with low time plasticity, d, and low pressure plasticity, e, and a strong decrease in omega values when densification increased, in contrast to the plastically deforming MCC, which had much higher d, e, and omega values. e and omega values changed only slightly when densification increased for MCC. NaCl showed less of a decrease in omega values than DCPD did, and the d and e values were between those of MCC and DCPD. The sugar alcohols, xylitol and mannitol, behaved in a similar fashion to sodium chloride. This is also valid for the crystalline sugars, alpha-lactose monohydrate, and maltose. However, the sugars are more brittle than the sugar alcohols. The cellulose derivatives, HPMC, NaCMC, and CAC, are as plastic as MCC, however, their elasticity depends on substitution indicated by lower (more elastic) or higher (less elastic) omega values. The native starches, maize starch and potato starch, are very elastic, and pregelatinized starch and maltodextrine are

  9. Exploiting Textured 3D Models for Developing Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kontogianni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Digital technologies have affected significantly many fields of computer graphics such as Games and especially the field of the Serious Games. These games are usually used for educational proposes in many fields such as Health Care, Military applications, Education, Government etc. Especially Digital Cultural Heritage is a scientific area that Serious Games are applied and lately many applications appear in the related literature. Realistic 3D textured models which have been produced using different photogrammetric methods could be a useful tool for the creation of Serious Game applications in order to make the final result more realistic and close to the reality. The basic goal of this paper is how 3D textured models which are produced by photogrammetric methods can be useful for developing a more realistic environment of a Serious Game. The application of this project aims at the creation of an educational game for the Ancient Agora of Athens. The 3D models used vary not only as far as their production methods (i.e. Time of Flight laser scanner, Structure from Motion, Virtual historical reconstruction etc. is concerned, but also as far as their era as some of them illustrated according to their existing situation and some others according to how these monuments looked like in the past. The Unity 3D® game developing environment was used for creating this application, in which all these models were inserted in the same file format. For the application two diachronic virtual tours of the Athenian Agora were produced. The first one illustrates the Agora as it is today and the second one at the 2nd century A.D. Finally the future perspective for the evolution of this game is presented which includes the addition of some questions that the user will be able to answer. Finally an evaluation is scheduled to be performed at the end of the project.

  10. Exploiting Textured 3D Models for Developing Serious Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontogianni, G.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2015-08-01

    Digital technologies have affected significantly many fields of computer graphics such as Games and especially the field of the Serious Games. These games are usually used for educational proposes in many fields such as Health Care, Military applications, Education, Government etc. Especially Digital Cultural Heritage is a scientific area that Serious Games are applied and lately many applications appear in the related literature. Realistic 3D textured models which have been produced using different photogrammetric methods could be a useful tool for the creation of Serious Game applications in order to make the final result more realistic and close to the reality. The basic goal of this paper is how 3D textured models which are produced by photogrammetric methods can be useful for developing a more realistic environment of a Serious Game. The application of this project aims at the creation of an educational game for the Ancient Agora of Athens. The 3D models used vary not only as far as their production methods (i.e. Time of Flight laser scanner, Structure from Motion, Virtual historical reconstruction etc.) is concerned, but also as far as their era as some of them illustrated according to their existing situation and some others according to how these monuments looked like in the past. The Unity 3D® game developing environment was used for creating this application, in which all these models were inserted in the same file format. For the application two diachronic virtual tours of the Athenian Agora were produced. The first one illustrates the Agora as it is today and the second one at the 2nd century A.D. Finally the future perspective for the evolution of this game is presented which includes the addition of some questions that the user will be able to answer. Finally an evaluation is scheduled to be performed at the end of the project.

  11. GPR17: Molecular modeling and dynamics studies of the 3-D structure and purinergic ligand binding features in comparison with P2Y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranghino Graziella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GPR17 is a G-protein-coupled receptor located at intermediate phylogenetic position between two distinct receptor families: the P2Y and CysLT receptors for extracellular nucleotides and cysteinyl-LTs, respectively. We previously showed that GPR17 can indeed respond to both classes of endogenous ligands and to synthetic compounds active at the above receptor families, thus representing the first fully characterized non-peptide "hybrid" GPCR. In a rat brain focal ischemia model, the selective in vivo knock down of GPR17 by anti-sense technology or P2Y/CysLT antagonists reduced progression of ischemic damage, thus highlighting GPR17 as a novel therapeutic target for stroke. Elucidation of the structure of GPR17 and of ligand binding mechanisms are the necessary steps to obtain selective and potent drugs for this new potential target. On this basis, a 3-D molecular model of GPR17 embedded in a solvated phospholipid bilayer and refined by molecular dynamics simulations has been the first aim of this study. To explore the binding mode of the "purinergic" component of the receptor, the endogenous agonist UDP and two P2Y receptor antagonists demonstrated to be active on GPR17 (MRS2179 and cangrelor were then modeled on the receptor. Results Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that GPR17 nucleotide binding pocket is similar to that described for the other P2Y receptors, although only one of the three basic residues that have been typically involved in ligand recognition is conserved (Arg255. The binding pocket is enclosed between the helical bundle and covered at the top by EL2. Driving interactions are H-bonds and salt bridges between the 6.55 and 6.52 residues and the phosphate moieties of the ligands. An "accessory" binding site in a region formed by the EL2, EL3 and the Nt was also found. Conclusion Nucleotide binding to GPR17 occurs on the same receptor regions identified for already known P2Y receptors. Agonist

  12. 3D printed components with ultrasonically arranged microscale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn-Jones, Thomas M.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.; Trask, Richard S.

    2016-02-01

    This paper shows the first application of in situ manipulation of discontinuous fibrous structure mid-print, within a 3D printed polymeric composite architecture. Currently, rapid prototyping methods (fused filament fabrication, stereolithography) are gaining increasing popularity within the engineering commnity to build structural components. Unfortunately, the full potential of these components is limited by the mechanical properties of the materials used. The aim of this study is to create and demonstrate a novel method to instantaneously orient micro-scale glass fibres within a selectively cured photocurable resin system, using ultrasonic forces to align the fibres in the desired 3D architecture. To achieve this we have mounted a switchable, focused laser module on the carriage of a three-axis 3D printing stage, above an in-house ultrasonic alignment rig containing a mixture of photocurable resin and discontinuous 14 μm diameter glass fibre reinforcement(50 μm length). In our study, a suitable print speed of 20 mm s-1 was used, which is comparable to conventional additive layer techniques. We show the ability to construct in-plane orthogonally aligned sections printed side by side, where the precise orientation of the configurations is controlled by switching the ultrasonic standing wave profile mid-print. This approach permits the realisation of complex fibrous architectures within a 3D printed landscape. The versatile nature of the ultrasonic manipulation technique also permits a wide range of particle types (diameters, aspect ratios and functions) and architectures (in-plane, and out-plane) to be patterned, leading to the creation of a new generation of fibrous reinforced composites for 3D printing.

  13. e-Drug3D: 3D structure collections dedicated to drug repurposing and fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihan, Emilie; Colliandre, Lionel; Guichou, Jean-François; Douguet, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    In the drug discovery field, new uses for old drugs, selective optimization of side activities and fragment-based drug design (FBDD) have proved to be successful alternatives to high-throughput screening. e-Drug3D is a database of 3D chemical structures of drugs that provides several collections of ready-to-screen SD files of drugs and commercial drug fragments. They are natural inputs in studies dedicated to drug repurposing and FBDD. e-Drug3D collections are freely available at http://chemoinfo.ipmc.cnrs.fr/e-drug3d.html either for download or for direct in silico web-based screenings.

  14. All dispenser printed flexible 3D structured thermoelectric generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Z.; Shi, J. J.; Torah, R. N.; Tudor, M. J.; Beeby, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a vertically fabricated 3D thermoelectric generator (TEG) by dispenser printing on flexible polyimide substrate. This direct-write technology only involves printing of electrodes, thermoelectric active materials and structure material, which needs no masks to transfer the patterns onto the substrate. The dimension for single thermoelectric element is 2 mm × 2 mm × 0.5 mm while the distance between adjacent cubes is 1.2 mm. The polymer structure layer was used to support the electrodes which are printed to connect the top ends of the thermoelectric material and ensure the flexibility as well. The advantages and the limitations of the dispenser printed 3D TEGs will also be evaluated in this paper. The proposed method is potential to be a low-cost and scalable fabrication solution for TEGs.

  15. Reassessing Geophysical Models of the Bushveld Complex in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J.; Webb, S. J.; Finn, C.

    2012-12-01

    Conceptual geophysical models of the Bushveld Igneous Complex show three possible geometries for its mafic component: 1) Separate intrusions with vertical feeders for the eastern and western lobes (Cousins, 1959) 2) Separate dipping sheets for the two lobes (Du Plessis and Kleywegt, 1987) 3) A single saucer-shaped unit connected at depth in the central part between the two lobes (Cawthorn et al, 1998) Model three incorporates isostatic adjustment of the crust in response to the weight of the dense mafic material. The model was corroborated by results of a broadband seismic array over southern Africa, known as the Southern African Seismic Experiment (SASE) (Nguuri, et al, 2001; Webb et al, 2004). This new information about the crustal thickness only became available in the last decade and could not be considered in the earlier models. Nevertheless, there is still on-going debate as to which model is correct. All of the models published up to now have been done in 2 or 2.5 dimensions. This is not well suited to modelling the complex geometry of the Bushveld intrusion. 3D modelling takes into account effects of variations in geometry and geophysical properties of lithologies in a full three dimensional sense and therefore affects the shape and amplitude of calculated fields. The main question is how the new knowledge of the increased crustal thickness, as well as the complexity of the Bushveld Complex, will impact on the gravity fields calculated for the existing conceptual models, when modelling in 3D. The three published geophysical models were remodelled using full 3Dl potential field modelling software, and including crustal thickness obtained from the SASE. The aim was not to construct very detailed models, but to test the existing conceptual models in an equally conceptual way. Firstly a specific 2D model was recreated in 3D, without crustal thickening, to establish the difference between 2D and 3D results. Then the thicker crust was added. Including the less

  16. Modeling 3D Objects for Navigation Purposes Using Laser Scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Specht

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the creation of 3d models and their applications in navigation. It contains a review of available methods and geometric data sources, focusing mostly on terrestrial laser scanning. It presents detailed description, from field survey to numerical elaboration, how to construct accurate model of a typical few storey building as a hypothetical reference in complex building navigation. Hence, the paper presents fields where 3d models are being used and their potential new applications.

  17. All part of the process[3D plant modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snieckus, D.

    2002-12-01

    The second coming of EPIC contracts, a renewed emphasis on life-of-field costs for offshore developments, and the deepwater FPSO market's fast approaching construction boom are together demanding fresh thinking - and software systems - from 3D plant modelling and information specialists. Based on its own calculations, Intergraph's Process, Power and Offshore (PPO) division states that it holds down some 35-40% of the market for 3D plant modelling and information management in the offshore oil and gas industry. This article reviews their success, how they have to preserve their hard won share of the market, due to the changeable nature of that market, marked recently by the fundamental shifts in EPIC contract structure, life-of-field costs focuses, and, not least, the rise of FPSO-driven production concepts. Intergraph PPO's integrated product portfolio, which brings together plant design modelling systems and plant information management systems, was founded on its SmartPlant Foundation data warehouse hub. It has maintained its project data integrity o some of the largest and most complex offshore developments, including Phillips Petroleum's Bayu-Undan and Statoil Asgard fields. Some 70% of Intergraph PPO's clients have been contractors, and while the company aims to continue to build on the strength of these relationships, it also recognises that growing its client base of owner-operators will create some 'real synergies' in the process.

  18. Cancer3D: understanding cancer mutations through protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Hrabe, Thomas; Godzik, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The new era of cancer genomics is providing us with extensive knowledge of mutations and other alterations in cancer. The Cancer3D database at http://www.cancer3d.org gives an open and user-friendly way to analyze cancer missense mutations in the context of structures of proteins in which they are found. The database also helps users analyze the distribution patterns of the mutations as well as their relationship to changes in drug activity through two algorithms: e-Driver and e-Drug. These algorithms use knowledge of modular structure of genes and proteins to separately study each region. This approach allows users to find novel candidate driver regions or drug biomarkers that cannot be found when similar analyses are done on the whole-gene level. The Cancer3D database provides access to the results of such analyses based on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). In addition, it displays mutations from over 14,700 proteins mapped to more than 24,300 structures from PDB. This helps users visualize the distribution of mutations and identify novel three-dimensional patterns in their distribution. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Advanced prior modeling for 3D bright field electron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreehari, Suhas; Venkatakrishnan, S. V.; Drummy, Lawrence F.; Simmons, Jeffrey P.; Bouman, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Many important imaging problems in material science involve reconstruction of images containing repetitive non-local structures. Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) could in principle exploit such redundancies through the selection of a log prior probability term. However, in practice, determining such a log prior term that accounts for the similarity between distant structures in the image is quite challenging. Much progress has been made in the development of denoising algorithms like non-local means and BM3D, and these are known to successfully capture non-local redundancies in images. But the fact that these denoising operations are not explicitly formulated as cost functions makes it unclear as to how to incorporate them in the MBIR framework. In this paper, we formulate a solution to bright field electron tomography by augmenting the existing bright field MBIR method to incorporate any non-local denoising operator as a prior model. We accomplish this using a framework we call plug-and-play priors that decouples the log likelihood and the log prior probability terms in the MBIR cost function. We specifically use 3D non-local means (NLM) as the prior model in the plug-and-play framework, and showcase high quality tomographic reconstructions of a simulated aluminum spheres dataset, and two real datasets of aluminum spheres and ferritin structures. We observe that streak and smear artifacts are visibly suppressed, and that edges are preserved. Also, we report lower RMSE values compared to the conventional MBIR reconstruction using qGGMRF as the prior model.

  20. 3-D Numerical Modelling of Oblique Continental Collisions with ASPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatun, L.; Pysklywec, R.

    2017-12-01

    Among the fundamental types of tectonic plate boundaries, continent-continent collision is least well understood. Deformation of the upper and middle crustal layers can be inferred from surface structures and geophysical imaging, but the fate of lower crustal rocks and mantle lithosphere is not well resolved. Previous research suggests that shortening of mantle lithosphere generally may be occurring by either: 1) a distributed thickening with a formation of a Raleigh-Tailor (RT) type instability (possibly accompanied with lithospheric folding); or 2) plate-like subduction, which can be one- or two-sided, with or without delamination and slab break-off; a combination of both could be taking place too. 3-D features of the orogens such as along-trench material transfer, bounding subduction zones can influence the evolution of the collision zone significantly. The current study was inspired by South Island of New Zealand - a young collision system where a block of continental crust is being shortened by the relative Australian-Pacific plate motion. The collision segment of the plate boundary is relatively small ( 800 km), and is bounded by oppositely verging subduction zones to the North and South. Here, we present results of 3-D forward numerical modelling of continental collision to investigate some of these processes. To conduct the simulations, we used ASPECT - a highly parallel community-developed code based on the Finite Element method. Model setup for three different sets of models featured 2-D vertical across strike, 3-D with periodic front and back walls, and 3-D with open front and back walls, with velocities prescribed on the left and right faces. We explored the importance of values of convergent velocity, strike-slip velocity and their ratio, which defines the resulting velocity direction relative to the plate boundary (obliquity). We found that higher strike-slip motion promotes strain localization, weakens the lithosphere close to the plate boundary and

  1. Assessment of Delft3D Morphodynamic Model During Duck94

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Welsch, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    ... over a wide range of conditions. The Delfi3D 2- DH model utilizes shallow water equations to phase resolve the mean and infragravity motions in combination with an advection diffusion equation for the sediment transport...

  2. Conceptual Development af a 3D Product Configuration Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skauge, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    in the development of IT-systems that support the procedures in companies and in the building industry. In other words, it is a knowledge-based system that helps companies in their daily work. The aim of the project has been to develop and examine conceptual ideas about 3D modelling configurator used in the company......’s production of steel fire sliding doors. The development of the 3D digital model is based on practical rather than theoretical research. The result of the research is a prototype digital 3D model to be presented live.......Paper. This project deals with 3D product configuration of a digital building element which has been developed as a prototype in cooperation between a product manufacturer and a research institution in Denmark. The project falls within the concept of product modelling which is more and more used...

  3. Animation of 3D Model of Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Michalcin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the new algorithm of animation of 3D model of the human head in combination with its global motion. The designed algorithm is very fast and with low calculation requirements, because it does not need the synthesis of the input videosequence for estimation of the animation parameters as well as the parameters of global motion. The used 3D model Candide generates different expressions using its animation units which are controlled by the animation parameters. These ones are estimated on the basis of optical flow without the need of extracting of the feature points in the frames of the input videosequence because they are given by the selected vertices of the animation units of the calibrated 3D model Candide. The established multiple iterations inside the designed animation algorithm of 3D model of the human head between two successive frames significantly improved its accuracy above all for the large motion.

  4. Summary on several key techniques in 3D geological modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Several key techniques in 3D geological modeling including planar mesh generation, spatial interpolation, and surface intersection are summarized in this paper. Note that these techniques are generic and widely used in various applications but play a key role in 3D geological modeling. There are two essential procedures in 3D geological modeling: the first is the simulation of geological interfaces using geometric surfaces and the second is the building of geological objects by means of various geometric computations such as the intersection of surfaces. Discrete geometric surfaces that represent geological interfaces can be generated by creating planar meshes first and then spatially interpolating; those surfaces intersect and then form volumes that represent three-dimensional geological objects such as rock bodies. In this paper, the most commonly used algorithms of the key techniques in 3D geological modeling are summarized.

  5. 3D vadose zone modeling using geostatistical inferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, C.F.; Lee, C.B.

    1991-01-01

    In developing a 3D model of the 600 ft thick interbedded basalt and sediment complex that constitutes the vadose zone at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) geostatistical data were captured for 12--15 parameters (e.g. permeability, porosity, saturation, etc. and flow height, flow width, flow internal zonation, etc.). This two scale data set was generated from studies of subsurface core and geophysical log suites at RWMC and from surface outcrop exposures located at the Box Canyon of the Big Lost River and from Hell's Half Acre lava field all located in the general RWMC area. Based on these currently available data, it is possible to build a 3D stochastic model that utilizes: cumulative distribution functions obtained from the geostatistical data; backstripping and rebuilding of stratigraphic units; an ''expert'' system that incorporates rules based on expert geologic analysis and experimentally derived geostatistics for providing: (a) a structural and isopach map of each layer, (b) a realization of the flow geometry of each basalt flow unit, and (c) a realization of the internal flow parameters (eg permeability, porosity, and saturation) for each flow. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Characteristics and structure of turbulent 3D offset jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agelin-Chaab, M.; Tachie, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We investigated three-dimensional turbulent offset jets using particle image velocimetry. → We examined the effects of offset height and Reynolds number on the structure of 3D offset jets. → Effects of Reynolds number and offset height on the decay and growth rates exist close to the exit. → This study provides additional insight and comprehensive data for validating numerical models. - Abstract: Three-dimensional turbulent offset jets were investigated using a particle image velocimetry technique. The measurements were performed at three different exit Reynolds numbers and for four offset heights. The results in the early region of flow development clearly show significant effects of Reynolds number and offset height on the decay of maximum mean velocity and growth of the shear layer. On the contrary, the decay and spread rates were found to be nearly independent of offset height at larger downstream distances. The decay rates of 1.18 ± 0.03 as well as the spread rates of 0.055 ± 0.001 and 0.250 ± 0.005 obtained, respectively, in the wall-normal and lateral directions fall in the range of values reported in previous studies. The locations of the maximum mean velocities increased nearly linearly with streamwise distance in the self-similar region. Analysis from two-point velocity correlations revealed substantially larger structures in the outer layer and self-similar region than in the inner layer and developing region. It was also observed that the hairpin vortices in the inner regions of the wall jets are inclined at angles of 11.2 o ± 0.6 o , which are in good agreement with reported values in boundary layer studies.

  7. Modeling tree crown dynamics with 3D partial differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Robert; Letort, Véronique; Cournède, Paul-Henry

    2014-01-01

    We characterize a tree's spatial foliage distribution by the local leaf area density. Considering this spatially continuous variable allows to describe the spatiotemporal evolution of the tree crown by means of 3D partial differential equations. These offer a framework to rigorously take locally and adaptively acting effects into account, notably the growth toward light. Biomass production through photosynthesis and the allocation to foliage and wood are readily included in this model framework. The system of equations stands out due to its inherent dynamic property of self-organization and spontaneous adaptation, generating complex behavior from even only a few parameters. The density-based approach yields spatially structured tree crowns without relying on detailed geometry. We present the methodological fundamentals of such a modeling approach and discuss further prospects and applications.

  8. From medical imaging data to 3D printed anatomical models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thore M Bücking

    Full Text Available Anatomical models are important training and teaching tools in the clinical environment and are routinely used in medical imaging research. Advances in segmentation algorithms and increased availability of three-dimensional (3D printers have made it possible to create cost-efficient patient-specific models without expert knowledge. We introduce a general workflow that can be used to convert volumetric medical imaging data (as generated by Computer Tomography (CT to 3D printed physical models. This process is broken up into three steps: image segmentation, mesh refinement and 3D printing. To lower the barrier to entry and provide the best options when aiming to 3D print an anatomical model from medical images, we provide an overview of relevant free and open-source image segmentation tools as well as 3D printing technologies. We demonstrate the utility of this streamlined workflow by creating models of ribs, liver, and lung using a Fused Deposition Modelling 3D printer.

  9. 3D GIS FOR FLOOD MODELLING IN RIVER VALLEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tymkow

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is implementation of system architecture for collecting and analysing data as well as visualizing results for hydrodynamic modelling of flood flows in river valleys using remote sensing methods, tree-dimensional geometry of spatial objects and GPU multithread processing. The proposed solution includes: spatial data acquisition segment, data processing and transformation, mathematical modelling of flow phenomena and results visualization. Data acquisition segment was based on aerial laser scanning supplemented by images in visible range. Vector data creation was based on automatic and semiautomatic algorithms of DTM and 3D spatial features modelling. Algorithms for buildings and vegetation geometry modelling were proposed or adopted from literature. The implementation of the framework was designed as modular software using open specifications and partially reusing open source projects. The database structure for gathering and sharing vector data, including flood modelling results, was created using PostgreSQL. For the internal structure of feature classes of spatial objects in a database, the CityGML standard was used. For the hydrodynamic modelling the solutions of Navier-Stokes equations in two-dimensional version was implemented. Visualization of geospatial data and flow model results was transferred to the client side application. This gave the independence from server hardware platform. A real-world case in Poland, which is a part of Widawa River valley near Wroclaw city, was selected to demonstrate the applicability of proposed system.

  10. Forward modelling of global gravity fields with 3D density structures and an application to the high-resolution ( 2 km) gravity fields of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šprlák, M.; Han, S.-C.; Featherstone, W. E.

    2017-12-01

    Rigorous modelling of the spherical gravitational potential spectra from the volumetric density and geometry of an attracting body is discussed. Firstly, we derive mathematical formulas for the spatial analysis of spherical harmonic coefficients. Secondly, we present a numerically efficient algorithm for rigorous forward modelling. We consider the finite-amplitude topographic modelling methods as special cases, with additional postulates on the volumetric density and geometry. Thirdly, we implement our algorithm in the form of computer programs and test their correctness with respect to the finite-amplitude topography routines. For this purpose, synthetic and realistic numerical experiments, applied to the gravitational field and geometry of the Moon, are performed. We also investigate the optimal choice of input parameters for the finite-amplitude modelling methods. Fourth, we exploit the rigorous forward modelling for the determination of the spherical gravitational potential spectra inferred by lunar crustal models with uniform, laterally variable, radially variable, and spatially (3D) variable bulk density. Also, we analyse these four different crustal models in terms of their spectral characteristics and band-limited radial gravitation. We demonstrate applicability of the rigorous forward modelling using currently available computational resources up to degree and order 2519 of the spherical harmonic expansion, which corresponds to a resolution of 2.2 km on the surface of the Moon. Computer codes, a user manual and scripts developed for the purposes of this study are publicly available to potential users.

  11. AUTOMATIC TEXTURE MAPPING OF ARCHITECTURAL AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL 3D MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Kersten

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, detailed, complete and exact 3D models with photo-realistic textures are increasingly demanded for numerous applications in architecture and archaeology. Manual texture mapping of 3D models by digital photographs with software packages, such as Maxon Cinema 4D, Autodesk 3Ds Max or Maya, still requires a complex and time-consuming workflow. So, procedures for automatic texture mapping of 3D models are in demand. In this paper two automatic procedures are presented. The first procedure generates 3D surface models with textures by web services, while the second procedure textures already existing 3D models with the software tmapper. The program tmapper is based on the Multi Layer 3D image (ML3DImage algorithm and developed in the programming language C++. The studies showing that the visibility analysis using the ML3DImage algorithm is not sufficient to obtain acceptable results of automatic texture mapping. To overcome the visibility problem the Point Cloud Painter algorithm in combination with the Z-buffer-procedure will be applied in the future.

  12. Automatic Texture Mapping of Architectural and Archaeological 3d Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, T. P.; Stallmann, D.

    2012-07-01

    Today, detailed, complete and exact 3D models with photo-realistic textures are increasingly demanded for numerous applications in architecture and archaeology. Manual texture mapping of 3D models by digital photographs with software packages, such as Maxon Cinema 4D, Autodesk 3Ds Max or Maya, still requires a complex and time-consuming workflow. So, procedures for automatic texture mapping of 3D models are in demand. In this paper two automatic procedures are presented. The first procedure generates 3D surface models with textures by web services, while the second procedure textures already existing 3D models with the software tmapper. The program tmapper is based on the Multi Layer 3D image (ML3DImage) algorithm and developed in the programming language C++. The studies showing that the visibility analysis using the ML3DImage algorithm is not sufficient to obtain acceptable results of automatic texture mapping. To overcome the visibility problem the Point Cloud Painter algorithm in combination with the Z-buffer-procedure will be applied in the future.

  13. METRIC EVALUATION PIPELINE FOR 3D MODELING OF URBAN SCENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bosch

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Publicly available benchmark data and metric evaluation approaches have been instrumental in enabling research to advance state of the art methods for remote sensing applications in urban 3D modeling. Most publicly available benchmark datasets have consisted of high resolution airborne imagery and lidar suitable for 3D modeling on a relatively modest scale. To enable research in larger scale 3D mapping, we have recently released a public benchmark dataset with multi-view commercial satellite imagery and metrics to compare 3D point clouds with lidar ground truth. We now define a more complete metric evaluation pipeline developed as publicly available open source software to assess semantically labeled 3D models of complex urban scenes derived from multi-view commercial satellite imagery. Evaluation metrics in our pipeline include horizontal and vertical accuracy and completeness, volumetric completeness and correctness, perceptual quality, and model simplicity. Sources of ground truth include airborne lidar and overhead imagery, and we demonstrate a semi-automated process for producing accurate ground truth shape files to characterize building footprints. We validate our current metric evaluation pipeline using 3D models produced using open source multi-view stereo methods. Data and software is made publicly available to enable further research and planned benchmarking activities.

  14. Metric Evaluation Pipeline for 3d Modeling of Urban Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, M.; Leichtman, A.; Chilcott, D.; Goldberg, H.; Brown, M.

    2017-05-01

    Publicly available benchmark data and metric evaluation approaches have been instrumental in enabling research to advance state of the art methods for remote sensing applications in urban 3D modeling. Most publicly available benchmark datasets have consisted of high resolution airborne imagery and lidar suitable for 3D modeling on a relatively modest scale. To enable research in larger scale 3D mapping, we have recently released a public benchmark dataset with multi-view commercial satellite imagery and metrics to compare 3D point clouds with lidar ground truth. We now define a more complete metric evaluation pipeline developed as publicly available open source software to assess semantically labeled 3D models of complex urban scenes derived from multi-view commercial satellite imagery. Evaluation metrics in our pipeline include horizontal and vertical accuracy and completeness, volumetric completeness and correctness, perceptual quality, and model simplicity. Sources of ground truth include airborne lidar and overhead imagery, and we demonstrate a semi-automated process for producing accurate ground truth shape files to characterize building footprints. We validate our current metric evaluation pipeline using 3D models produced using open source multi-view stereo methods. Data and software is made publicly available to enable further research and planned benchmarking activities.

  15. GEMA3D - landscape modelling for dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, Richard

    2010-08-01

    Concerns have been raised about SKB's interpretation of landscape objects in their radiological assessment models, specifically in relation to the size of the objects represented - leading to excessive volumetric dilution - and to the interpretation of local hydrology - leading to non-conservative hydrologic dilution. Developed from the Generic Ecosystem Modelling Approach, GEMA3D is an attempt to address these issues in a simple radiological assessment landscape model. In GEMA3D landscape features are model led as landscape elements (lels) based on a three compartment structure which is able to represent both terrestrial and aquatic lels. The area of the lels can be chosen to coincide with the bedrock fracture from which radionuclides are assumed to be released and the dispersion of radionuclides through out the landscape can be traced. Result indicate that released contaminants remain localised close to the release location and follow the main flow axis of the surface drainage system. This is true even for relatively weakly sorbing species. An interpretation of the size of landscape elements suitable to represent dilution in the biosphere for radiological assessment purposes is suggested, though the concept remains flexible. For reference purposes an agricultural area of one hectare is the baseline. The Quaternary deposits (QD) at the Forsmark site are only a few metres thick above the crystalline bedrock in which the planned repository for spent fuel will be constructed. The biosphere model is assumed to be the upper one metre of the QD. A further model has been implemented for advective - dispersive transport in the deeper QD. The effects of chemical zonation have been briefly investigated. The results confirm the importance of retention close to the release point from the bedrock and clearly indicate that there is a need for a better description of the hydrology of the QD on the spatial scales relevant to the lels required for radiological assessments

  16. GEMA3D - landscape modelling for dose assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, Richard (Aleksandria Sciences (United Kingdom))

    2010-08-15

    Concerns have been raised about SKB's interpretation of landscape objects in their radiological assessment models, specifically in relation to the size of the objects represented - leading to excessive volumetric dilution - and to the interpretation of local hydrology - leading to non-conservative hydrologic dilution. Developed from the Generic Ecosystem Modelling Approach, GEMA3D is an attempt to address these issues in a simple radiological assessment landscape model. In GEMA3D landscape features are model led as landscape elements (lels) based on a three compartment structure which is able to represent both terrestrial and aquatic lels. The area of the lels can be chosen to coincide with the bedrock fracture from which radionuclides are assumed to be released and the dispersion of radionuclides through out the landscape can be traced. Result indicate that released contaminants remain localised close to the release location and follow the main flow axis of the surface drainage system. This is true even for relatively weakly sorbing species. An interpretation of the size of landscape elements suitable to represent dilution in the biosphere for radiological assessment purposes is suggested, though the concept remains flexible. For reference purposes an agricultural area of one hectare is the baseline. The Quaternary deposits (QD) at the Forsmark site are only a few metres thick above the crystalline bedrock in which the planned repository for spent fuel will be constructed. The biosphere model is assumed to be the upper one metre of the QD. A further model has been implemented for advective - dispersive transport in the deeper QD. The effects of chemical zonation have been briefly investigated. The results confirm the importance of retention close to the release point from the bedrock and clearly indicate that there is a need for a better description of the hydrology of the QD on the spatial scales relevant to the lels required for radiological assessments

  17. Development of ITER 3D neutronics model and nuclear analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Q.; Zheng, S.; Lu, L.; Li, Y.; Ding, A.; Hu, H.; Wu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    ITER nuclear analyses rely on the calculations with the three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo code e.g. the widely-used MCNP. However, continuous changes in the design of the components require the 3D neutronics model for nuclear analyses should be updated. Nevertheless, the modeling of a complex geometry with MCNP by hand is a very time-consuming task. It is an efficient way to develop CAD-based interface code for automatic conversion from CAD models to MCNP input files. Based on the latest CAD model and the available interface codes, the two approaches of updating 3D nuetronics model have been discussed by ITER IT (International Team): The first is to start with the existing MCNP model 'Brand' and update it through a combination of direct modification of the MCNP input file and generation of models for some components directly from the CAD data; The second is to start from the full CAD model, make the necessary simplifications, and generate the MCNP model by one of the interface codes. MCAM as an advanced CAD-based MCNP interface code developed by FDS Team in China has been successfully applied to update the ITER 3D neutronics model by adopting the above two approaches. The Brand model has been updated to generate portions of the geometry based on the newest CAD model by MCAM. MCAM has also successfully performed conversion to MCNP neutronics model from a full ITER CAD model which is simplified and issued by ITER IT to benchmark the above interface codes. Based on the two updated 3D neutronics models, the related nuclear analyses are performed. This paper presents the status of ITER 3D modeling by using MCAM and its nuclear analyses, as well as a brief introduction of advanced version of MCAM. (authors)

  18. Implementation of virtual models from sheet metal forming simulation into physical 3D colour models using 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junk, S.

    2016-08-01

    Today the methods of numerical simulation of sheet metal forming offer a great diversity of possibilities for optimization in product development and in process design. However, the results from simulation are only available as virtual models. Because there are any forming tools available during the early stages of product development, physical models that could serve to represent the virtual results are therefore lacking. Physical 3D-models can be created using 3D-printing and serve as an illustration and present a better understanding of the simulation results. In this way, the results from the simulation can be made more “comprehensible” within a development team. This paper presents the possibilities of 3D-colour printing with particular consideration of the requirements regarding the implementation of sheet metal forming simulation. Using concrete examples of sheet metal forming, the manufacturing of 3D colour models will be expounded upon on the basis of simulation results.

  19. View subspaces for indexing and retrieval of 3D models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutagaci, Helin; Godil, Afzal; Sankur, Bülent; Yemez, Yücel

    2010-02-01

    View-based indexing schemes for 3D object retrieval are gaining popularity since they provide good retrieval results. These schemes are coherent with the theory that humans recognize objects based on their 2D appearances. The viewbased techniques also allow users to search with various queries such as binary images, range images and even 2D sketches. The previous view-based techniques use classical 2D shape descriptors such as Fourier invariants, Zernike moments, Scale Invariant Feature Transform-based local features and 2D Digital Fourier Transform coefficients. These methods describe each object independent of others. In this work, we explore data driven subspace models, such as Principal Component Analysis, Independent Component Analysis and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization to describe the shape information of the views. We treat the depth images obtained from various points of the view sphere as 2D intensity images and train a subspace to extract the inherent structure of the views within a database. We also show the benefit of categorizing shapes according to their eigenvalue spread. Both the shape categorization and data-driven feature set conjectures are tested on the PSB database and compared with the competitor view-based 3D shape retrieval algorithms.

  20. Geographic Video 3d Data Model And Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z.; Cui, C.; Kong, Y.; Wu, H.

    2014-04-01

    Geographic video includes both spatial and temporal geographic features acquired through ground-based or non-ground-based cameras. With the popularity of video capture devices such as smartphones, the volume of user-generated geographic video clips has grown significantly and the trend of this growth is quickly accelerating. Such a massive and increasing volume poses a major challenge to efficient video management and query. Most of the today's video management and query techniques are based on signal level content extraction. They are not able to fully utilize the geographic information of the videos. This paper aimed to introduce a geographic video 3D data model based on spatial information. The main idea of the model is to utilize the location, trajectory and azimuth information acquired by sensors such as GPS receivers and 3D electronic compasses in conjunction with video contents. The raw spatial information is synthesized to point, line, polygon and solid according to the camcorder parameters such as focal length and angle of view. With the video segment and video frame, we defined the three categories geometry object using the geometry model of OGC Simple Features Specification for SQL. We can query video through computing the spatial relation between query objects and three categories geometry object such as VFLocation, VSTrajectory, VSFOView and VFFovCone etc. We designed the query methods using the structured query language (SQL) in detail. The experiment indicate that the model is a multiple objective, integration, loosely coupled, flexible and extensible data model for the management of geographic stereo video.

  1. Water linked 3D coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suryabhan; Bhim, Anupam

    2016-12-01

    Three new coordination polymers (CPs) based on Cd and Pb, [Cd(OBA)(μ-H2O)(H2O)]n1, [Pb(OBA)(μ-H2O)]n2 [where OBA=4,4'-Oxybis(benzoate)] and [Pb(SDBA)(H2O)]n.1/4DMF 3 (SDBA=4,4'-Sulfonyldibenzoate), have been synthesized and characterized. The single crystal structural studies reveal that CPs 1 and 2 have three dimensional structure. A water molecule bridges two metal centres which appears to the responsible for the dimensionality increase from 2D to 3D. Compound 3 has a supramolecular 3D structure involving water molecule and hydrogen bonds. A structural transformation is observed when 3 was heated at 100 °C or kept in methanol, forming [Pb(SDBA)]n4. Compound 4 is used as supporting matrix for palladium nanoparticles, PdNPs@4. The PdNPs@4 exhibits good catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of NaBH4 at room temperature. Luminescence studies revealed that all CPs could be an effective sensor for nitroaromatic explosives.

  2. 3D Bioprinting of Tissue/Organ Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Gantelius, Jesper; Svahn, Helene Andersson

    2016-04-04

    In vitro tissue/organ models are useful platforms that can facilitate systematic, repetitive, and quantitative investigations of drugs/chemicals. The primary objective when developing tissue/organ models is to reproduce physiologically relevant functions that typically require complex culture systems. Bioprinting offers exciting prospects for constructing 3D tissue/organ models, as it enables the reproducible, automated production of complex living tissues. Bioprinted tissues/organs may prove useful for screening novel compounds or predicting toxicity, as the spatial and chemical complexity inherent to native tissues/organs can be recreated. In this Review, we highlight the importance of developing 3D in vitro tissue/organ models by 3D bioprinting techniques, characterization of these models for evaluating their resemblance to native tissue, and their application in the prioritization of lead candidates, toxicity testing, and as disease/tumor models. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Inductance calculation of 3D superconducting structures with ground plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, C.H.; Kitagawa, M.; Okabe, Y.

    1999-01-01

    An inductance calculation method, which is based on calculating the current distribution of a fluxoid-trapped superconducting loop by using the expression of momentum and the Maxwell equations, is reconstructed to enable calculation of arbitrary 3D structures which have a ground plane (GP). Calculation of the mutual inductances of the superconductor system is also incorporated into the algorithm. The method of images is used to save computational resources, and the mirror plane is demonstrated to be just at the effective penetration depth below the upper boundary of the GP. The algorithm offers accurate results with reasonable calculation time. (author)

  4. Water linked 3D coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Suryabhan, E-mail: sbs.bhu@gmail.com; Bhim, Anupam

    2016-12-15

    Three new coordination polymers (CPs) based on Cd and Pb, [Cd(OBA)(μ-H{sub 2}O)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}1, [Pb(OBA)(μ-H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}2 [where OBA=4,4’-Oxybis(benzoate)] and [Pb(SDBA)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}.1/4DMF 3 (SDBA=4,4’-Sulfonyldibenzoate), have been synthesized and characterized. The single crystal structural studies reveal that CPs 1 and 2 have three dimensional structure. A water molecule bridges two metal centres which appears to the responsible for the dimensionality increase from 2D to 3D. Compound 3 has a supramolecular 3D structure involving water molecule and hydrogen bonds. A structural transformation is observed when 3 was heated at 100 °C or kept in methanol, forming [Pb(SDBA)]{sub n}4. Compound 4 is used as supporting matrix for palladium nanoparticles, PdNPs@4. The PdNPs@4 exhibits good catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of NaBH{sub 4} at room temperature. Luminescence studies revealed that all CPs could be an effective sensor for nitroaromatic explosives. - Graphical abstract: Three new CPs based on Cd and Pb, have been synthesized and characterized. A water molecule bridges two metal centres which appears to the responsible for the dimensionality increase from 2D to 3D. One of the CP is used as supporting matrix for palladium nanoparticles, PdNPs@4. The PdNPs@4 exhibits good catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. Luminescence studies shown that all CPs could be an effective sensor for nitroaromatic explosives. - Highlights: • Three new CPs based on Cd and Pb, have been synthesized and characterized. • A water molecule bridges two metal centres which appears to the responsible for the dimensionality increase from 2D to 3D. • One of the CP is used as supporting matrix for palladium nanoparticles, PdNPs@4. • Luminescence studies shown that all CPs could be an effective sensor for nitroaromatic explosives.

  5. Image fusion in craniofacial virtual reality modeling based on CT and 3dMD photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Pengfei; Yu, Hongbo; Cheng, Huanchong; Shen, Shunyao; Shen, Steve G F

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of building a craniofacial virtual reality model by image fusion of 3-dimensional (3D) CT models and 3 dMD stereophotogrammetric facial surface. A CT scan and stereophotography were performed. The 3D CT models were reconstructed by Materialise Mimics software, and the stereophotogrammetric facial surface was reconstructed by 3 dMD patient software. All 3D CT models were exported as Stereo Lithography file format, and the 3 dMD model was exported as Virtual Reality Modeling Language file format. Image registration and fusion were performed in Mimics software. Genetic algorithm was used for precise image fusion alignment with minimum error. The 3D CT models and the 3 dMD stereophotogrammetric facial surface were finally merged into a single file and displayed using Deep Exploration software. Errors between the CT soft tissue model and 3 dMD facial surface were also analyzed. Virtual model based on CT-3 dMD image fusion clearly showed the photorealistic face and bone structures. Image registration errors in virtual face are mainly located in bilateral cheeks and eyeballs, and the errors are more than 1.5 mm. However, the image fusion of whole point cloud sets of CT and 3 dMD is acceptable with a minimum error that is less than 1 mm. The ease of use and high reliability of CT-3 dMD image fusion allows the 3D virtual head to be an accurate, realistic, and widespread tool, and has a great benefit to virtual face model.

  6. Arbitrary modeling of TSVs for 3D integrated circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Salah, Khaled; El-Rouby, Alaa

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a wide-band and technology independent, SPICE-compatible RLC model for through-silicon vias (TSVs) in 3D integrated circuits. This model accounts for a variety of effects, including skin effect, depletion capacitance and nearby contact effects. Readers will benefit from in-depth coverage of concepts and technology such as 3D integration, Macro modeling, dimensional analysis and compact modeling, as well as closed form equations for the through silicon via parasitics. Concepts covered are demonstrated by using TSVs in applications such as a spiral inductor?and inductive-based

  7. Modeling And Position Control Of Scara Type 3D Printer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Saygamp305n Ogulmuamp351

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work a scara robot type 3D printer system is dynamically modeled and position control of the system is realized. For this aim computer aided design model of three degrees of freedom robotic system is created using SolidWorks program then obtained model is exported to MATLABSimMechanics software for position control. Also mathematical model of servo motors used in robotic 3D printer system is included in control methodology to design proportional controllers. Uncontrolled and controlled position results are simulated and given in the form of the graphics.

  8. 3D physical modeling for patterning process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Chandra; Abdo, Amr; Bailey, Todd; Conley, Will; Dunn, Derren; Marokkey, Sajan; Talbi, Mohamed

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we will demonstrate how a 3D physical patterning model can act as a forensic tool for OPC and ground-rule development. We discuss examples where the 2D modeling shows no issues in printing gate lines but 3D modeling shows severe resist loss in the middle. In absence of corrective measure, there is a high likelihood of line discontinuity post etch. Such early insight into process limitations of prospective ground rules can be invaluable for early technology development. We will also demonstrate how the root cause of broken poly-line after etch could be traced to resist necking in the region of STI step with the help of 3D models. We discuss different cases of metal and contact layouts where 3D modeling gives an early insight in to technology limitations. In addition such a 3D physical model could be used for early resist evaluation and selection for required ground-rule challenges, which can substantially reduce the cycle time for process development.

  9. 3D high-resolution two-photon crosslinked hydrogel structures for biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Laura; Urciuolo, Anna; Giulitti, Stefano; Della Giustina, Gioia; Tromayer, Maximilian; Liska, Robert; Elvassore, Nicola; Brusatin, Giovanna

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogels are widely used as matrices for cell growth due to the their tuneable chemical and physical properties, which mimic the extracellular matrix of natural tissue. The microfabrication of hydrogels into arbitrarily complex 3D structures is becoming essential for numerous biological applications, and in particular for investigating the correlation between cell shape and cell function in a 3D environment. Micrometric and sub-micrometric resolution hydrogel scaffolds are required to deeply investigate molecular mechanisms behind cell-matrix interaction and downstream cellular processes. We report the design and development of high resolution 3D gelatin hydrogel woodpile structures by two-photon crosslinking. Hydrated structures of lateral linewidth down to 0.5µm, lateral and axial resolution down to a few µm are demonstrated. According to the processing parameters, different degrees of polymerization are obtained, resulting in hydrated scaffolds of variable swelling and deformation. The 3D hydrogels are biocompatible and promote cell adhesion and migration. Interestingly, according to the polymerization degree, 3D hydrogel woodpile structures show variable extent of cell adhesion and invasion. Human BJ cell lines show capability of deforming 3D micrometric resolved hydrogel structures. The design and development of high resolution 3D gelatin hydrogel woodpile structures by two-photon crosslinking is reported. Significantly, topological and mechanical conditions of polymerized gelatin structures were suitable for cell accommodation in the volume of the woodpiles, leading to a cell density per unit area comparable to the bare substrate. The fabricated structures, presenting micrometric features of high resolution, are actively deformed by cells, both in terms of cell invasion within rods and of cell attachment in-between contiguous woodpiles. Possible biological targets for this 3D approach are customized 3D tissue models, or studies of cell adhesion

  10. Automatic paper sliceform design from 3D solid models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le-Nguyen, Tuong-Vu; Low, Kok-Lim; Ruiz, Conrado; Le, Sang N

    2013-11-01

    A paper sliceform or lattice-style pop-up is a form of papercraft that uses two sets of parallel paper patches slotted together to make a foldable structure. The structure can be folded flat, as well as fully opened (popped-up) to make the two sets of patches orthogonal to each other. Automatic design of paper sliceforms is still not supported by existing computational models and remains a challenge. We propose novel geometric formulations of valid paper sliceform designs that consider the stability, flat-foldability and physical realizability of the designs. Based on a set of sufficient construction conditions, we also present an automatic algorithm for generating valid sliceform designs that closely depict the given 3D solid models. By approximating the input models using a set of generalized cylinders, our method significantly reduces the search space for stable and flat-foldable sliceforms. To ensure the physical realizability of the designs, the algorithm automatically generates slots or slits on the patches such that no two cycles embedded in two different patches are interlocking each other. This guarantees local pairwise assembility between patches, which is empirically shown to lead to global assembility. Our method has been demonstrated on a number of example models, and the output designs have been successfully made into real paper sliceforms.

  11. 3D Printed Pediatric Temporal Bone: A Novel Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longfield, Evan A; Brickman, Todd M; Jeyakumar, Anita

    2015-06-01

    Temporal bone dissection is a fundamental element of otologic training. Cadaveric temporal bones (CTB) are the gold standard surgical training model; however, many institutions do not have ready access to them and their cost can be significant: $300 to $500. Furthermore, pediatric cadaveric temporal bones are not readily available. Our objective is to develop a pediatric temporal bone model. Temporal bone model. Tertiary Children's Hospital. Pediatric patient model. We describe the novel use of a 3D printer for the generation of a plaster training model from a pediatric high- resolution CT temporal bone scan of a normal pediatric temporal bone. Three models were produced and were evaluated. The models utilized multiple colors (white for bone, yellow for the facial nerve) and were of high quality. Two models were drilled as a proof of concept and found to be an acceptable facsimile of the patient's anatomy, rendering all necessary surgical landmarks accurately. The only negative comments pertaining to the 3D printed temporal bone as a training model were the lack of variation in hardness between cortical and cancellous bone, noting a tactile variation from cadaveric temporal bones. Our novel pediatric 3D temporal bone training model is a viable, low-cost training option for previously inaccessible pediatric temporal bone training. Our hope is that, as 3D printers become commonplace, these models could be rapidly reproduced, allowing for trainees to print models of patients before performing surgery on the living patient.

  12. A spherical harmonics intensity model for 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Simon; Wörz, Stefan; Müller-Ott, Katharina; Hahn, Matthias; Biesdorf, Andreas; Schotta, Gunnar; Rippe, Karsten; Rohr, Karl

    2016-08-01

    The genome is partitioned into regions of euchromatin and heterochromatin. The organization of heterochromatin is important for the regulation of cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene silencing, and their misregulation is linked to cancer and other diseases. We present a model-based approach for automatic 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci from 3D confocal light microscopy images. Our approach employs a novel 3D intensity model based on spherical harmonics, which analytically describes the shape and intensities of the foci. The model parameters are determined by fitting the model to the image intensities using least-squares minimization. To characterize the 3D shape of the foci, we exploit the computed spherical harmonics coefficients and determine a shape descriptor. We applied our approach to 3D synthetic image data as well as real 3D static and real 3D time-lapse microscopy images, and compared the performance with that of previous approaches. It turned out that our approach yields accurate 3D segmentation results and performs better than previous approaches. We also show that our approach can be used for quantifying 3D shape differences of heterochromatin foci. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 3D model generation using an airborne swarm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, R. A.; Punzo, G.; Macdonald, M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Dobie, G.; MacLeod, C. N.; Summan, R.; Pierce, G. [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Bolton, G. [National Nuclear Laboratory Limited, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-31

    Using an artificial kinematic field to provide co-ordination between multiple inspection UAVs, the authors herein demonstrate full 3D modelling capability based on a photogrammetric system. The operation of the system is demonstrated by generating a full 3D surface model of an intermediate level nuclear waste storage drum. Such drums require periodic inspection to ensure that drum distortion or corrosion is carefully monitored. Performing this inspection with multiple airborne platforms enables rapid inspection of structures that are inaccessible to on-surface remote vehicles and are in human-hazardous environments. A three-dimensional surface-meshed model of the target can then be constructed in post-processing through photogrammetry analysis of the visual inspection data. The inspection environment uses a tracking system to precisely monitor the position of each aerial vehicle within the enclosure. The vehicles used are commercially available Parrot AR. Drone quadcopters, controlled through a computer interface connected over an IEEE 802.11n (WiFi) network, implementing a distributed controller for each vehicle. This enables the autonomous and distributed elements of the control scheme to be retained, while alleviating the vehicles of the control algorithm’s computational load. The control scheme relies on a kinematic field defined with the target at its centre. This field defines the trajectory for all the drones in the volume relative to the central target, enabling the drones to circle the target at a set radius while avoiding drone collisions. This function enables complete coverage along the height of the object, which is assured by transitioning to another inspection band only after completing circumferential coverage. Using a swarm of vehicles, the time until complete coverage can be significantly reduced.

  14. 3D model generation using an airborne swarm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R. A.; Punzo, G.; Macdonald, M.; Dobie, G.; MacLeod, C. N.; Summan, R.; Pierce, G.; Bolton, G.

    2015-01-01

    Using an artificial kinematic field to provide co-ordination between multiple inspection UAVs, the authors herein demonstrate full 3D modelling capability based on a photogrammetric system. The operation of the system is demonstrated by generating a full 3D surface model of an intermediate level nuclear waste storage drum. Such drums require periodic inspection to ensure that drum distortion or corrosion is carefully monitored. Performing this inspection with multiple airborne platforms enables rapid inspection of structures that are inaccessible to on-surface remote vehicles and are in human-hazardous environments. A three-dimensional surface-meshed model of the target can then be constructed in post-processing through photogrammetry analysis of the visual inspection data. The inspection environment uses a tracking system to precisely monitor the position of each aerial vehicle within the enclosure. The vehicles used are commercially available Parrot AR. Drone quadcopters, controlled through a computer interface connected over an IEEE 802.11n (WiFi) network, implementing a distributed controller for each vehicle. This enables the autonomous and distributed elements of the control scheme to be retained, while alleviating the vehicles of the control algorithm’s computational load. The control scheme relies on a kinematic field defined with the target at its centre. This field defines the trajectory for all the drones in the volume relative to the central target, enabling the drones to circle the target at a set radius while avoiding drone collisions. This function enables complete coverage along the height of the object, which is assured by transitioning to another inspection band only after completing circumferential coverage. Using a swarm of vehicles, the time until complete coverage can be significantly reduced

  15. Automatic extraction of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images using model driven analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hao; Yamamoto, Shinji; Imao, Masanao.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic extraction system (called TOPS-3D : Top Down Parallel Pattern Recognition System for 3D Images) of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images by using model driven analysis algorithm. As the construction of system TOPS we developed, two concepts have been considered in the design of system TOPS-3D. One is the system having a hierarchical structure of reasoning using model information in higher level, and the other is a parallel image processing structure used to extract plural candidate regions for a destination entity. The new points of system TOPS-3D are as follows. (1) The TOPS-3D is a three-dimensional image analysis system including 3D model construction and 3D image processing techniques. (2) A technique is proposed to increase connectivity between knowledge processing in higher level and image processing in lower level. The technique is realized by applying opening operation of mathematical morphology, in which a structural model function defined in higher level by knowledge representation is immediately used to the filter function of opening operation as image processing in lower level. The system TOPS-3D applied to 3D MRI head images consists of three levels. First and second levels are reasoning part, and third level is image processing part. In experiments, we applied 5 samples of 3D MRI head images with size 128 x 128 x 128 pixels to the system TOPS-3D to extract the regions of soft tissues such as cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. From the experimental results, the system is robust for variation of input data by using model information, and the position and shape of soft tissues are extracted corresponding to anatomical structure. (author)

  16. Modelling Polymer Deformation and Welding Behaviour during 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Claire; Olmsted, Peter

    2016-11-01

    3D printing has the potential to transform manufacturing processes, yet improving the strength of printed parts, to equal that of traditionally-manufactured parts, remains an underlying issue. The most common method, fused deposition modelling, involves melting a thermoplastic, followed by layer-by-layer extrusion of the material to fabricate a three-dimensional object. The key to the ensuring strength at the weld between these layers is successful inter-diffusion. However, as the printed layer cools towards the glass transition temperature, the time available for diffusion is limited. In addition, the extrusion process significantly deforms the polymer micro-structure prior to welding and consequently affects how the polymers "re-entangle" across the weld. We have developed a simple model of the non-isothermal printing process to explore the effects that typical printing conditions and amorphous polymer rheology have on the ultimate weld structure. In particular, we incorporate both the stretch and orientation of the polymer using the Rolie-Poly constitutive equation to examine how the melt flows through the nozzle and is deposited onto the build plate. We then address how this deformation relaxes and contributes to the thickness and structure of the weld. National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and Georgetown University.

  17. The 3-dimensional core model DYN3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundmann, U.; Mittag, S.; Rohde, U.

    1999-01-01

    Analyzing the safety margins in transients and accidents of nuclear reactors 3-dimensional models of the core were used to avoid conservative assumptions needed for point kinetics or 1-dimensional models. Therefore, the 3D code DYN3D has been developed for the analysis of reactivity initiated accidents (RIA) in thermal nuclear reactors. The power distributions are calculated with the help of nodal expansion methods (NEM) for hexagonal and Cartesian geometry. The fuel rod model and the thermohydraulic part provide fuel temperatures, coolant temperatures and densities as well as boron concentrations for the calculation of feedback effects on the basis of cross section libraries generated by cell codes. Safety relevant parameters like maximum fuel and cladding temperatures, critical heat flux and degree of cladding oxidation are estimated. DYN3D can analyze RIA initiated by moved control rods and/or perturbations of the coolant flow. Stationary and transient boundary conditions for the coolant flow, the core inlet temperatures and boron concentrations at the core inlet have to be given. For analyzing more complex transients the code DYN3D is coupled with the plant model ATHLET of the GRS. The extensive validation work accomplished for DYN3D is presented in several examples. Some applications of the code are described. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Verwendung 3-dimensionaler Kernmodelle zur Untersuchung der Sicherheitsreserven bei Uebergangsprozessen und Stoerfaellen in Kernreaktoren vermeidet konservative Annahmen, die bei der Benutzung des Punktmodells oder 1-dimensionaler Modelle erforderlich sind. Aus diesen Gruenden wurde das 3-dimensionale Rechenprogramm DYN3D fuer die Untersuchung von Reaktivitaetsstoerfaellen in thermischen Reaktoren entwickelt. Die Leistungsverteilung wird mit nodalen Methoden fuer hexagonale oder kartesische Geometrie berechnet. Das Brennstabmodell und der thermohydraulische Teil von DYN3D liefert die Brennstofftemperaturen, Kuehlmitteltemperaturen

  18. Spontaneous Self-Formation of 3D Plasmonic Optical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Inhee; Shin, Yonghee; Song, Jihwan; Hong, SoonGweon; Park, Younggeun; Kim, Dongchoul; Kang, Taewook; Lee, Luke P

    2016-08-23

    Self-formation of colloidal oil droplets in water or water droplets in oil not only has been regarded as fascinating fundamental science but also has been utilized in an enormous number of applications in everyday life. However, the creation of three-dimensional (3D) architectures by a liquid droplet and an immiscible liquid interface has been less investigated than other applications. Here, we report interfacial energy-driven spontaneous self-formation of a 3D plasmonic optical structure at room temperature without an external force. Based on the densities and interfacial energies of two liquids, we simulated the spontaneous formation of a plasmonic optical structure when a water droplet containing metal ions meets an immiscible liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) interface. At the interface, the metal ions in the droplet are automatically reduced to form an interfacial plasmonic layer as the liquid PDMS cures. The self-formation of both an optical cavity and integrated plasmonic nanostructure significantly enhances the fluorescence by a magnitude of 1000. Our findings will have a huge impact on the development of various photonic and plasmonic materials as well as metamaterials and devices.

  19. Magnetic materials and 3D finite element modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Bastos, Joao Pedro A

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Materials and 3D Finite Element Modeling explores material characterization and finite element modeling (FEM) applications. This book relates to electromagnetic analysis based on Maxwell’s equations and application of the finite element (FE) method to low frequency devices. A great source for senior undergraduate and graduate students in electromagnetics, it also supports industry professionals working in magnetics, electromagnetics, ferromagnetic materials science and electrical engineering. The authors present current concepts on ferromagnetic material characterizations and losses. They provide introductory material; highlight basic electromagnetics, present experimental and numerical modeling related to losses and focus on FEM applied to 3D applications. They also explain various formulations, and discuss numerical codes.

  20. 3D MODEL GENERATION USING OBLIQUE IMAGES ACQUIRED BY UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lingua

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many studies revealed the advantages of using airborne oblique images for obtaining improved 3D city models (including façades and building footprints. Here the acquisition and use of oblique images from a low cost and open source Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV for the 3D high-level-of-detail reconstruction of historical architectures is evaluated. The critical issues of such acquisitions (flight planning strategies, ground control points distribution, etc. are described. Several problems should be considered in the flight planning: best approach to cover the whole object with the minimum time of flight; visibility of vertical structures; occlusions due to the context; acquisition of all the parts of the objects (the closest and the farthest with similar resolution; suitable camera inclination, and so on. In this paper a solution is proposed in order to acquire oblique images with one only flight. The data processing was realized using Structure-from-Motion-based approach for point cloud generation using dense image-matching algorithms implemented in an open source software. The achieved results are analysed considering some check points and some reference LiDAR data. The system was tested for surveying a historical architectonical complex: the “Sacro Mo nte di Varallo Sesia” in north-west of Italy. This study demonstrates that the use of oblique images acquired from a low cost UAV system and processed through an open source software is an effective methodology to survey cultural heritage, characterized by limited accessibility, need for detail and rapidity of the acquisition phase, and often reduced budgets.

  1. 3D MODELLING OF PROPHYLACTIC FOOTWEAR FOR A HIGH ARCHED FOOT

    OpenAIRE

    COSTEA Mariana; MIHAI Aura

    2016-01-01

    This article approaches the methodology of designing customized footwear for high arched foot. The authors propose to reconsider the classical structure of footwear bottom components for people with high arched foot and recommend incorporating custom components, with the role of compensation or adjustment. This study continues the authors’ research, starting from a foot’s 3D shape obtained by 3D scanning, the anthropometrical and biomechanical parameters, shoe lasts’ 3D modelling and continui...

  2. 3D model of amphioxus steroid receptor complexed with estradiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Michael E., E-mail: mbaker@ucsd.edu [Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0693 (United States); Chang, David J. [Department of Biology, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0693 (United States)

    2009-08-28

    The origins of signaling by vertebrate steroids are not fully understood. An important advance was the report that an estrogen-binding steroid receptor [SR] is present in amphioxus, a basal chordate with a similar body plan as vertebrates. To investigate the evolution of estrogen-binding to steroid receptors, we constructed a 3D model of amphioxus SR complexed with estradiol. This 3D model indicates that although the SR is activated by estradiol, some interactions between estradiol and human ER{alpha} are not conserved in the SR, which can explain the low affinity of estradiol for the SR. These differences between the SR and ER{alpha} in the steroid-binding domain are sufficient to suggest that another steroid is the physiological regulator of the SR. The 3D model predicts that mutation of Glu-346 to Gln will increase the affinity of testosterone for amphioxus SR and elucidate the evolution of steroid-binding to nuclear receptors.

  3. Use of a model for 3D image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delageniere, S.; Grangeat, P.

    1991-01-01

    We propose a software for 3D image reconstruction in transmission tomography. This software is based on the use of a model and of the RADON algorithm developed at LETI. The introduction of a markovian model helps us to enhance contrast and straitened the natural transitions existing in the objects studied, whereas standard transform methods smoothe them

  4. Diffusion approximation for modeling of 3-D radiation distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zardecki, A.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; De Kinder, R.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional transport code DIF3D, based on the diffusion approximation, is used to model the spatial distribution of radiation energy arising from volumetric isotropic sources. Future work will be concerned with the determination of irradiances and modeling of realistic scenarios, relevant to the battlefield conditions. 8 refs., 4 figs

  5. LIME: 3D visualisation and interpretation of virtual geoscience models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Simon; Ringdal, Kari; Dolva, Benjamin; Naumann, Nicole; Kurz, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Three-dimensional and photorealistic acquisition of surface topography, using methods such as laser scanning and photogrammetry, has become widespread across the geosciences over the last decade. With recent innovations in photogrammetric processing software, robust and automated data capture hardware, and novel sensor platforms, including unmanned aerial vehicles, obtaining 3D representations of exposed topography has never been easier. In addition to 3D datasets, fusion of surface geometry with imaging sensors, such as multi/hyperspectral, thermal and ground-based InSAR, and geophysical methods, create novel and highly visual datasets that provide a fundamental spatial framework to address open geoscience research questions. Although data capture and processing routines are becoming well-established and widely reported in the scientific literature, challenges remain related to the analysis, co-visualisation and presentation of 3D photorealistic models, especially for new users (e.g. students and scientists new to geomatics methods). Interpretation and measurement is essential for quantitative analysis of 3D datasets, and qualitative methods are valuable for presentation purposes, for planning and in education. Motivated by this background, the current contribution presents LIME, a lightweight and high performance 3D software for interpreting and co-visualising 3D models and related image data in geoscience applications. The software focuses on novel data integration and visualisation of 3D topography with image sources such as hyperspectral imagery, logs and interpretation panels, geophysical datasets and georeferenced maps and images. High quality visual output can be generated for dissemination purposes, to aid researchers with communication of their research results. The background of the software is described and case studies from outcrop geology, in hyperspectral mineral mapping and geophysical-geospatial data integration are used to showcase the novel

  6. Automatic Generation of 3D Building Models with Multiple Roofs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenichi Sugihara; Yoshitugu Hayashi

    2008-01-01

    Based on building footprints (building polygons) on digital maps, we are proposing the GIS and CG integrated system that automatically generates 3D building models with multiple roofs. Most building polygons' edges meet at right angles (orthogonal polygon). The integrated system partitions orthogonal building polygons into a set of rectangles and places rectangular roofs and box-shaped building bodies on these rectangles. In order to partition an orthogonal polygon, we proposed a useful polygon expression in deciding from which vertex a dividing line is drawn. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for partitioning building polygons and show the process of creating 3D roof models.

  7. The 3D model of debriefing: defusing, discovering, and deepening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigmont, Jason J; Kappus, Liana J; Sudikoff, Stephanie N

    2011-04-01

    The experiential learning process involves participation in key experiences and analysis of those experiences. In health care, these experiences can occur through high-fidelity simulation or in the actual clinical setting. The most important component of this process is the postexperience analysis or debriefing. During the debriefing, individuals must reflect upon the experience, identify the mental models that led to behaviors or cognitive processes, and then build or enhance new mental models to be used in future experiences. On the basis of adult learning theory, the Kolb Experiential Learning Cycle, and the Learning Outcomes Model, we structured a framework for facilitators of debriefings entitled "the 3D Model of Debriefing: Defusing, Discovering, and Deepening." It incorporates common phases prevalent in the debriefing literature, including description of and reactions to the experience, analysis of behaviors, and application or synthesis of new knowledge into clinical practice. It can be used to enhance learning after real or simulated events. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Probabilistic reasoning for assembly-based 3D modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Chaudhuri, Siddhartha

    2011-01-01

    Assembly-based modeling is a promising approach to broadening the accessibility of 3D modeling. In assembly-based modeling, new models are assembled from shape components extracted from a database. A key challenge in assembly-based modeling is the identification of relevant components to be presented to the user. In this paper, we introduce a probabilistic reasoning approach to this problem. Given a repository of shapes, our approach learns a probabilistic graphical model that encodes semantic and geometric relationships among shape components. The probabilistic model is used to present components that are semantically and stylistically compatible with the 3D model that is being assembled. Our experiments indicate that the probabilistic model increases the relevance of presented components. © 2011 ACM.

  9. Dual multispectral and 3D structured light laparoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Neil T.; Lin, Jianyu; Arya, Shobhit; Hanna, George B.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative feedback on tissue function, such as blood volume and oxygenation would be useful to the surgeon in cases where current clinical practice relies on subjective measures, such as identification of ischaemic bowel or tissue viability during anastomosis formation. Also, tissue surface profiling may be used to detect and identify certain pathologies, as well as diagnosing aspects of tissue health such as gut motility. In this paper a dual modality laparoscopic system is presented that combines multispectral reflectance and 3D surface imaging. White light illumination from a xenon source is detected by a laparoscope-mounted fast filter wheel camera to assemble a multispectral image (MSI) cube. Surface shape is then calculated using a spectrally-encoded structured light (SL) pattern detected by the same camera and triangulated using an active stereo technique. Images of porcine small bowel were acquired during open surgery. Tissue reflectance spectra were acquired and blood volume was calculated at each spatial pixel across the bowel wall and mesentery. SL features were segmented and identified using a `normalised cut' algoritm and the colour vector of each spot. Using the 3D geometry defined by the camera coordinate system the multispectral data could be overlaid onto the surface mesh. Dual MSI and SL imaging has the potential to provide augmented views to the surgeon supplying diagnostic information related to blood supply health and organ function. Future work on this system will include filter optimisation to reduce noise in tissue optical property measurement, and minimise spot identification errors in the SL pattern.

  10. Parallel Optimization of 3D Cardiac Electrophysiological Model Using GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale 3D virtual heart model simulations are highly demanding in computational resources. This imposes a big challenge to the traditional computation resources based on CPU environment, which already cannot meet the requirement of the whole computation demands or are not easily available due to expensive costs. GPU as a parallel computing environment therefore provides an alternative to solve the large-scale computational problems of whole heart modeling. In this study, using a 3D sheep atrial model as a test bed, we developed a GPU-based simulation algorithm to simulate the conduction of electrical excitation waves in the 3D atria. In the GPU algorithm, a multicellular tissue model was split into two components: one is the single cell model (ordinary differential equation and the other is the diffusion term of the monodomain model (partial differential equation. Such a decoupling enabled realization of the GPU parallel algorithm. Furthermore, several optimization strategies were proposed based on the features of the virtual heart model, which enabled a 200-fold speedup as compared to a CPU implementation. In conclusion, an optimized GPU algorithm has been developed that provides an economic and powerful platform for 3D whole heart simulations.

  11. Hamming Code Based Watermarking Scheme for 3D Model Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tse Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the explosive growth of the Internet and maturing of 3D hardware techniques, protecting 3D objects becomes a more and more important issue. In this paper, a public hamming code based fragile watermarking technique is proposed for 3D objects verification. An adaptive watermark is generated from each cover model by using the hamming code technique. A simple least significant bit (LSB substitution technique is employed for watermark embedding. In the extraction stage, the hamming code based watermark can be verified by using the hamming code checking without embedding any verification information. Experimental results shows that 100% vertices of the cover model can be watermarked, extracted, and verified. It also shows that the proposed method can improve security and achieve low distortion of stego object.

  12. 3D Model Generation From the Engineering Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaský, Jozef; Eliáš, Michal; Bezák, Pavol; Červeňanská, Zuzana; Izakovič, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    The contribution deals with the transformation of engineering drawings in a paper form into a 3D computer representation. A 3D computer model can be further processed in CAD/CAM system, it can be modified, archived, and a technical drawing can be then generated from it as well. The transformation process from paper form to the data one is a complex and difficult one, particularly owing to the different types of drawings, forms of displayed objects and encountered errors and deviations from technical standards. The algorithm for 3D model generating from an orthogonal vector input representing a simplified technical drawing of the rotational part is described in this contribution. The algorithm was experimentally implemented as ObjectARX application in the AutoCAD system and the test sample as the representation of the rotational part was used for verificaton.

  13. Automated assignment and 3D structure calculations using combinations of 2D homonuclear and 3D heteronuclear NOESY spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezguen, Numan; Adamian, Larisa; Xu Yuan; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Braun, Werner

    2002-01-01

    The NOAH/DIAMOD suite uses feedback filtering and self-correcting distance geometry to generate 3D structures from unassigned NOESY spectra. In this study we determined the minimum set of experiments needed to generate a high quality structure bundle. Different combinations of 3D 15 N-edited, 13 C-edited HSQC-NOESY and 2D homonuclear 1 H- 1 H NOESY spectra of the 77 amino acid protein, myeloid progenitor inhibitory factor-1 (MPIF-1) were used as input for NOAH/DIAMOD calculations. The quality of the assignments of NOESY cross peaks and the accuracy of the automatically generated 3D structures were compared to those obtained with a conventional manual procedure. Combining data from two types of experiments synergistically increased the number of peaks assigned unambiguously in both individual spectra. As a general trend for the accuracy of the structures we observed structural variations in the backbone fold of the final structures of about 2 A for single spectral data, of 1 A to 1.5 A for double spectral data, and of 0.6 A for triple spectral data sets. The quality of the assignments and 3D structures from the optimal data using all three spectra were similar to those obtained from traditional assignment methods with structural variations within the bundle of 0.6 A and 1.3 A for backbone and heavy atoms, respectively. Almost all constraints (97%) of the automatic NOESY cross peak assignments were cross compatible with the structures from the conventional manual assignment procedure, and an even larger proportion (99%) of the manually derived constraints were compatible with the automatically determined 3D structures. The two mean structures determined by both methods differed only by 1.3 A rmsd for the backbone atoms in the well-defined regions of the protein. Thus NOAD/DIAMOD analysis of spectra from labeled proteins provides a reliable method for high throughput analysis of genomic targets

  14. Developing and Testing a 3d Cadastral Data Model a Case Study in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aien, A.; Kalantari, M.; Rajabifard, A.; Williamson, I. P.; Shojaei, D.

    2012-07-01

    Population growth, urbanization and industrialization place more pressure on land use with the need for increased space. To extend the use and functionality of the land, complex infrastructures are being built, both vertically and horizontally, layered and stacked. These three-dimensional (3D) developments affect the interests (Rights, Restrictions, and Responsibilities (RRRs)) attached to the underlying land. A 3D cadastre will assist in managing the effects of 3D development on a particular extent of land. There are many elements that contribute to developing a 3D cadastre, such as existing of 3D property legislations, 3D DBMS, 3D visualization. However, data modelling is one of the most important elements of a successful 3D cadastre. As architectural models of houses and high rise buildings help their users visualize the final product, 3D cadastre data model supports 3D cadastre users to understand the structure or behavior of the system and has a template that guides them to construct and implement the 3D cadastre. Many jurisdictions, organizations and software developers have built their own cadastral data model. Land Administration Domain Model (DIS-ISO 19152, The Netherlands) and ePlan (Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping, Australia) are examples of existing data models. The variation between these data models is the result of different attitudes towards cadastres. However, there is a basic common thread among them all. Current cadastral data models use a 2D land-parcel concept and extend it to support 3D requirements. These data models cannot adequately manage and represent the spatial extent of 3D RRRs. Most of the current cadastral data models have been influenced by a very broad understanding of 3D cadastral concepts because better clarity in what needs to be represented and analysed in the cadastre needs to be established. This paper presents the first version of a 3D Cadastral Data Model (3DCDM_Version 1.0). 3DCDM models both the legal

  15. 3D modeling of dual-gate FinFET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mil'shtein, Samson; Devarakonda, Lalitha; Zanchi, Brian; Palma, John

    2012-11-13

    The tendency to have better control of the flow of electrons in a channel of field-effect transistors (FETs) did lead to the design of two gates in junction field-effect transistors, field plates in a variety of metal semiconductor field-effect transistors and high electron mobility transistors, and finally a gate wrapping around three sides of a narrow fin-shaped channel in a FinFET. With the enhanced control, performance trends of all FETs are still challenged by carrier mobility dependence on the strengths of the electrical field along the channel. However, in cases when the ratio of FinFET volume to its surface dramatically decreases, one should carefully consider the surface boundary conditions of the device. Moreover, the inherent non-planar nature of a FinFET demands 3D modeling for accurate analysis of the device performance. Using the Silvaco modeling tool with quantization effects, we modeled a physical FinFET described in the work of Hisamoto et al. (IEEE Tran. Elec. Devices 47:12, 2000) in 3D. We compared it with a 2D model of the same device. We demonstrated that 3D modeling produces more accurate results. As 3D modeling results came close to experimental measurements, we made the next step of the study by designing a dual-gate FinFET biased at Vg1 >Vg2. It is shown that the dual-gate FinFET carries higher transconductance than the single-gate device.

  16. 3D shape decomposition and comparison for gallbladder modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weimin; Zhou, Jiayin; Liu, Jiang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Su, Yi; Law, Gim Han; Chui, Chee Kong; Chang, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents an approach to gallbladder shape comparison by using 3D shape modeling and decomposition. The gallbladder models can be used for shape anomaly analysis and model comparison and selection in image guided robotic surgical training, especially for laparoscopic cholecystectomy simulation. The 3D shape of a gallbladder is first represented as a surface model, reconstructed from the contours segmented in CT data by a scheme of propagation based voxel learning and classification. To better extract the shape feature, the surface mesh is further down-sampled by a decimation filter and smoothed by a Taubin algorithm, followed by applying an advancing front algorithm to further enhance the regularity of the mesh. Multi-scale curvatures are then computed on the regularized mesh for the robust saliency landmark localization on the surface. The shape decomposition is proposed based on the saliency landmarks and the concavity, measured by the distance from the surface point to the convex hull. With a given tolerance the 3D shape can be decomposed and represented as 3D ellipsoids, which reveal the shape topology and anomaly of a gallbladder. The features based on the decomposed shape model are proposed for gallbladder shape comparison, which can be used for new model selection. We have collected 19 sets of abdominal CT scan data with gallbladders, some shown in normal shape and some in abnormal shapes. The experiments have shown that the decomposed shapes reveal important topology features.

  17. Geodiversity: Exploration of 3D geological model space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, M. D.; Jessell, M. W.; Ailleres, L.; Perrouty, S.; de Kemp, E.; Betts, P. G.

    2013-05-01

    The process of building a 3D model necessitates the reconciliation of field observations, geophysical interpretation, geological data uncertainty and the prevailing tectonic evolution hypotheses and interpretations. Uncertainty is compounded when clustered data points collected at local scales are statistically upscaled to one or two points for use in regional models. Interpretation is required to interpolate between sparse field data points using ambiguous geophysical data in covered terranes. It becomes clear that multiple interpretations are possible during model construction. The various interpretations are considered as potential natural representatives, but pragmatism typically dictates that just a single interpretation is offered by the modelling process. Uncertainties are introduced into the 3D model during construction from a variety of sources and through data set optimisation that produces a single model. Practices such as these are likely to result in a model that does not adequately represent the target geology. A set of geometrical ‘geodiversity’ metrics are used to analyse a 3D model of the Gippsland Basin, southeastern Australia after perturbing geological input data via uncertainty simulation. The resulting sets of perturbed geological observations are used to calculate a suite of geological 3D models that display a range of geological architectures. The concept of biodiversity has been adapted for the geosciences to quantify geometric variability, or geodiversity, between models in order to understand the effect uncertainty has models geometry. Various geometrical relationships (depth, volume, contact surface area, curvature and geological complexity) are used to describe the range of possibilities exhibited throughout the model suite. End-member models geodiversity metrics are classified in a similar manner to taxonomic descriptions. Further analysis of the model suite is performed using principal component analysis (PCA) to determine

  18. 3D Strain Modelling of Tear Fault Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, D.; Vietor, T.

    2005-12-01

    Tear faults can be described as vertical discontinuities, with near fault parallel displacements terminating on some sort of shallow detachment. As such, they are difficult to study in "cross section" i.e. 2 dimensions as is often the case for fold-thrust systems. Hence, little attempt has been made to model the evolution of strain around tear faults and the processes of strain localisation in such structures due to the necessity of describing these systems in 3 dimensions and the problems this poses for both numerical and analogue modelling. Field studies suggest that strain in such regions can be distributed across broad zones on minor tear systems, which are often not easily mappable. Such strain is probably assumed to be due to distributed strain and to displacement gradients which are themselves necessary for the initiation of the tear itself. We present a numerical study of the effects of a sharp, basal discontinutiy parallel to the transport direction in a shortening wedge of material. The discontinuity is represented by two adjacent basal surfaces with strongly contrasting (0.5 and 0.05) friction coefficient. The material is modelled using PFC3D distinct element software for simulating granular material, whose properties are chosen to simulate upper crustal, sedimentary rock. The model geometry is a rectangular bounding box, 2km x 1km, and 0.35-0.5km deep, with a single, driving wall of constant velocity. We show the evolution of strain in the model in horizontal and vertical sections, and interpret strain localization as showing the spontaneous development of tear fault like features. The strain field in the model is asymmetrical, rotated towards the strong side of the model. Strain increments seem to oscillate in time, suggesting achievement of a steady state. We also note that our model cannot be treated as a critical wedge, since the 3rd dimension and the lateral variations of strength rule out this type of 2D approximation.

  19. Tridimensional Regression for Comparing and Mapping 3D Anatomical Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra K. Schmid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shape analysis is useful for a wide variety of disciplines and has many applications. There are many approaches to shape analysis, one of which focuses on the analysis of shapes that are represented by the coordinates of predefined landmarks on the object. This paper discusses Tridimensional Regression, a technique that can be used for mapping images and shapes that are represented by sets of three-dimensional landmark coordinates, for comparing and mapping 3D anatomical structures. The degree of similarity between shapes can be quantified using the tridimensional coefficient of determination (2. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of this technique to correctly match the image of a face with another image of the same face. These results were compared to the 2 values obtained when only two dimensions are used and show that using three dimensions increases the ability to correctly match and discriminate between faces.

  20. Enhanced LOD Concepts for Virtual 3d City Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, J.; Geiger, A.; Gröger, G.; Häfele, K.-H.; Löwner, M.-O.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models contain digital three dimensional representations of city objects like buildings, streets or technical infrastructure. Because size and complexity of these models continuously grow, a Level of Detail (LoD) concept effectively supporting the partitioning of a complete model into alternative models of different complexity and providing metadata, addressing informational content, complexity and quality of each alternative model is indispensable. After a short overview on various LoD concepts, this paper discusses the existing LoD concept of the CityGML standard for 3D city models and identifies a number of deficits. Based on this analysis, an alternative concept is developed and illustrated with several examples. It differentiates between first, a Geometric Level of Detail (GLoD) and a Semantic Level of Detail (SLoD), and second between the interior building and its exterior shell. Finally, a possible implementation of the new concept is demonstrated by means of an UML model.

  1. 3D complex: a structural classification of protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel D Levy

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Most of the proteins in a cell assemble into complexes to carry out their function. It is therefore crucial to understand the physicochemical properties as well as the evolution of interactions between proteins. The Protein Data Bank represents an important source of information for such studies, because more than half of the structures are homo- or heteromeric protein complexes. Here we propose the first hierarchical classification of whole protein complexes of known 3-D structure, based on representing their fundamental structural features as a graph. This classification provides the first overview of all the complexes in the Protein Data Bank and allows nonredundant sets to be derived at different levels of detail. This reveals that between one-half and two-thirds of known structures are multimeric, depending on the level of redundancy accepted. We also analyse the structures in terms of the topological arrangement of their subunits and find that they form a small number of arrangements compared with all theoretically possible ones. This is because most complexes contain four subunits or less, and the large majority are homomeric. In addition, there is a strong tendency for symmetry in complexes, even for heteromeric complexes. Finally, through comparison of Biological Units in the Protein Data Bank with the Protein Quaternary Structure database, we identified many possible errors in quaternary structure assignments. Our classification, available as a database and Web server at http://www.3Dcomplex.org, will be a starting point for future work aimed at understanding the structure and evolution of protein complexes.

  2. Accurate, low-cost 3D-models of gullies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onnen, Nils; Gronz, Oliver; Ries, Johannes B.; Brings, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion is a widespread problem in arid and semi-arid areas. The most severe form is the gully erosion. They often cut into agricultural farmland and can make a certain area completely unproductive. To understand the development and processes inside and around gullies, we calculated detailed 3D-models of gullies in the Souss Valley in South Morocco. Near Taroudant, we had four study areas with five gullies different in size, volume and activity. By using a Canon HF G30 Camcorder, we made varying series of Full HD videos with 25fps. Afterwards, we used the method Structure from Motion (SfM) to create the models. To generate accurate models maintaining feasible runtimes, it is necessary to select around 1500-1700 images from the video, while the overlap of neighboring images should be at least 80%. In addition, it is very important to avoid selecting photos that are blurry or out of focus. Nearby pixels of a blurry image tend to have similar color values. That is why we used a MATLAB script to compare the derivatives of the images. The higher the sum of the derivative, the sharper an image of similar objects. MATLAB subdivides the video into image intervals. From each interval, the image with the highest sum is selected. E.g.: 20min. video at 25fps equals 30.000 single images. The program now inspects the first 20 images, saves the sharpest and moves on to the next 20 images etc. Using this algorithm, we selected 1500 images for our modeling. With VisualSFM, we calculated features and the matches between all images and produced a point cloud. Then, MeshLab has been used to build a surface out of it using the Poisson surface reconstruction approach. Afterwards we are able to calculate the size and the volume of the gullies. It is also possible to determine soil erosion rates, if we compare the data with old recordings. The final step would be the combination of the terrestrial data with the data from our aerial photography. So far, the method works well and we

  3. Illusions of perception of 3-D house models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Torsten Ingemann

    2008-01-01

    In five experiments some edgelines on different polyhedrons (house models in 3-D) were, from a certain vantage point, optically confluent, ie in optical prolongation of each other in 2-D on the retinal image and on photos. Other edgelines on the same polyhedrons were non-confluent, ie optically separate in 2-D. These conditions were found to lead to five different illusory shapes in 3-D. Five spatiofigural illusions were perceived. From these findings an edgeline principle is formulated that: "a straight edgeline in 2-D, whether confluent or separate, is perceived as a unitary and continuously straight edgeline in 3-D". To this is added a supplementary perceptual principle, an amodal completion principle. In the experiments reported here, the illusory perception of shapes in 3-D with confluent edgelines as well as the veridical perception of other shapes in 3-D with only separate or non-confluent edgelines could all be explained by the edgeline principle and the amodal completion principle. By applying the concepts of edgeline confluence and the edgeline principle, a new explanation of the Kopfermann (1930 Psychologische Forschung 13 293- 364) cube phenomena is proposed together with one example of how to test this explanation experimentally.

  4. APROS 3-D core models for simulators and plant analyzers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, E.K.

    1999-01-01

    The 3-D core models of APROS simulation environment can be used in simulator and plant analyzer applications, as well as in safety analysis. The key feature of APROS models is that the same physical models can be used in all applications. For three-dimensional reactor cores the APROS models cover both quadratic BWR and PWR cores and the hexagonal lattice VVER-type cores. In APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the core and either five- or six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the channel description have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the 3-D core model and thus just these selection make at present the major difference between a safety analysis model and a training simulator model. The paper presents examples of various types of 3-D LWR-type core descriptions for simulator and plant analyzer use and discusses the differences of calculation speed and physical results between a typical safety analysis model description and a real-time simulator model description in transients. (author)

  5. Automated robust generation of compact 3D statistical shape models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Likar, Bostjan; Tomazevic, Dejan; Pernus, Franjo

    2004-05-01

    Ascertaining the detailed shape and spatial arrangement of anatomical structures is important not only within diagnostic settings but also in the areas of planning, simulation, intraoperative navigation, and tracking of pathology. Robust, accurate and efficient automated segmentation of anatomical structures is difficult because of their complexity and inter-patient variability. Furthermore, the position of the patient during image acquisition, the imaging device and protocol, image resolution, and other factors induce additional variations in shape and appearance. Statistical shape models (SSMs) have proven quite successful in capturing structural variability. A possible approach to obtain a 3D SSM is to extract reference voxels by precisely segmenting the structure in one, reference image. The corresponding voxels in other images are determined by registering the reference image to each other image. The SSM obtained in this way describes statistically plausible shape variations over the given population as well as variations due to imperfect registration. In this paper, we present a completely automated method that significantly reduces shape variations induced by imperfect registration, thus allowing a more accurate description of variations. At each iteration, the derived SSM is used for coarse registration, which is further improved by describing finer variations of the structure. The method was tested on 64 lumbar spinal column CT scans, from which 23, 38, 45, 46 and 42 volumes of interest containing vertebra L1, L2, L3, L4 and L5, respectively, were extracted. Separate SSMs were generated for each vertebra. The results show that the method is capable of reducing the variations induced by registration errors.

  6. Improving 1D Stellar Models with 3D Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rørsted Mosumgaard, Jakob; Silva Aguirre, Víctor; Weiss, Achim; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Trampedach, Regner

    2017-10-01

    Stellar evolution codes play a major role in present-day astrophysics, yet they share common issues. In this work we seek to remedy some of those by the use of results from realistic and highly detailed 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar atmospheres. We have implemented a new temperature stratification extracted directly from the 3D simulations into the Garching Stellar Evolution Code to replace the simplified atmosphere normally used. Secondly, we have implemented the use of a variable mixing-length parameter, which changes as a function of the stellar surface gravity and temperature - also derived from the 3D simulations. Furthermore, to make our models consistent, we have calculated new opacity tables to match the atmospheric simulations. Here, we present the modified code and initial results on stellar evolution using it.

  7. 3D numerical modeling of YSO accretion shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsakos T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of YSO accretion shocks is determined by radiative processes as well as the strength and structure of the magnetic field. A quasi-periodic emission signature is theoretically expected to be observed, but observations do not confirm any such pattern. In this work, we assume a uniform background field, in the regime of optically thin energy losses, and we study the multi-dimensional shock evolution in the presence of perturbations, i.e. clumps in the stream and an acoustic energy flux flowing at the base of the chromosphere. We perform 3D MHD simulations using the PLUTO code, modelling locally the impact of the infalling gas onto the chromosphere. We find that the structure and dynamics of the post-shock region is strongly dependent on the plasma-beta (thermal over magnetic pressure, different values of which may give distinguishable emission signatures, relevant for observations. In particular, a strong magnetic field effectively confines the plasma inside its flux tubes and leads to the formation of quasi-independent fibrils. The fibrils may oscillate out of phase and hence the sum of their contributions in the emission results in a smooth overall profile. On the contrary, a weak magnetic field is not found to have any significant effect on the shocked plasma and the turbulent hot slab that forms is found to retain its periodic signature.

  8. A Sketching Interface for Freeform 3D Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Takeo

    This chapter introduces Teddy, a sketch-based modeling system to quickly and easily design freeform models such as stuffed animals and other rotund objects. The user draws several 2D freeform strokes interactively on the screen and the system automatically constructs plausible 3D polygonal surfaces. Our system supports several modeling operations, including the operation to construct a 3D polygonal surface from a 2D silhouette drawn by the user: it inflates the region surrounded by the silhouette making a wide area fat, and a narrow area thin. Teddy, our prototype system, is implemented as a Java program, and the mesh construction is done in real-time on a standard PC. Our informal user study showed that a first-time user masters the operations within 10 minutes, and can construct interesting 3D models within minutes. We also report the result of a case study where a high school teacher taught various 3D concepts in geography using the system.

  9. 3D engineered models for highway construction : the Iowa experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    3D engineered modeling is a relatively new and developing technology that can provide numerous bene ts to owners, engineers, : contractors, and the general public. This manual is for highway agencies that are considering or are in the process of s...

  10. 3-D Model of the Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the human respiratory system that allows for the simulation of particulate based contaminant deposition and clearance, while being adaptable for age, ethnicity,...

  11. Automatic 3D modeling of the urban landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteban, I.; Dijk, J.; Groen, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a fully automatic system for building 3D models of urban areas at the street level. We propose a novel approach for the accurate estimation of the scale consistent camera pose given two previous images. We employ a new method for global optimization and use a novel sampling

  12. Performance and Cognitive Assessment in 3-D Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrer, Nolan E.; Ernst, Jeremy V.; Branoff, Theodore J.; Clark, Aaron C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate identifiable differences between performance and cognitive assessment scores in a 3-D modeling unit of an engineering drafting course curriculum. The study aimed to provide further investigation of the need of skill-based assessments in engineering/technical graphics courses to potentially increase…

  13. Level of detail in 3D city models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biljecki, F.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of level of detail (LOD) describes the content of 3D city models and it plays an essential role during their life cycle. On one hand it comes akin to the concepts of scale in cartography and LOD in computer graphics, on the other hand it is a standalone concept that requires attention.

  14. Tracking people and cars using 3D modeling and CCTV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Gerda; Bijhold, Jurrien

    2010-10-10

    The aim of this study was to find a method for the reconstruction of movements of people and cars using CCTV footage and a 3D model of the environment. A procedure is proposed, in which video streams are synchronized and displayed in a 3D model, by using virtual cameras. People and cars are represented by cylinders and boxes, which are moved in the 3D model, according to their movements as shown in the video streams. The procedure was developed and tested in an experimental setup with test persons who logged their GPS coordinates as a recording of the ground truth. Results showed that it is possible to implement this procedure and to reconstruct movements of people and cars from video recordings. The procedure was also applied to a forensic case. In this work we experienced that more situational awareness was created by the 3D model, which made it easier to track people on multiple video streams. Based on all experiences from the experimental set up and the case, recommendations are formulated for use in practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Particle based 3D modeling of positive streamer inception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Teunissen (Jannis)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this report we present a particle based 3D model for the study of streamer inception near positive electrodes in air. The particle code is of the PIC-MCC type and an electrode is included using the charge simulation method. An algorithm for the adaptive creation of super-particles is

  16. Building a 3-D Appearance Model of the Human Face

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Larsen, Rasmus; Lading, Brian

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a method for building an appearance model from three-dimensional data of human faces. The data consists of 3-D vertices, polygons and a texture map. The method uses a set of nine manually placed landmarks to automatically form a dense correspondence of thousands of points...

  17. Towards Precise Metadata-set for Discovering 3D Geospatial Models in Geo-portals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamyadi, A.; Pouliot, J.; Bédard, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Accessing 3D geospatial models, eventually at no cost and for unrestricted use, is certainly an important issue as they become popular among participatory communities, consultants, and officials. Various geo-portals, mainly established for 2D resources, have tried to provide access to existing 3D resources such as digital elevation model, LIDAR or classic topographic data. Describing the content of data, metadata is a key component of data discovery in geo-portals. An inventory of seven online geo-portals and commercial catalogues shows that the metadata referring to 3D information is very different from one geo-portal to another as well as for similar 3D resources in the same geo-portal. The inventory considered 971 data resources affiliated with elevation. 51% of them were from three geo-portals running at Canadian federal and municipal levels whose metadata resources did not consider 3D model by any definition. Regarding the remaining 49% which refer to 3D models, different definition of terms and metadata were found, resulting in confusion and misinterpretation. The overall assessment of these geo-portals clearly shows that the provided metadata do not integrate specific and common information about 3D geospatial models. Accordingly, the main objective of this research is to improve 3D geospatial model discovery in geo-portals by adding a specific metadata-set. Based on the knowledge and current practices on 3D modeling, and 3D data acquisition and management, a set of metadata is proposed to increase its suitability for 3D geospatial models. This metadata-set enables the definition of genuine classes, fields, and code-lists for a 3D metadata profile. The main structure of the proposal contains 21 metadata classes. These classes are classified in three packages as General and Complementary on contextual and structural information, and Availability on the transition from storage to delivery format. The proposed metadata set is compared with Canadian Geospatial

  18. The ModFOLD4 server for the quality assessment of 3D protein models

    OpenAIRE

    McGuffin, Liam J.; Buenavista, Maria T.; Roche, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Once you have generated a 3D model of a protein,\\ud how do you know whether it bears any resemblance\\ud to the actual structure? To determine the usefulness\\ud of 3D models of proteins, they must be assessed in\\ud terms of their quality by methods that predict their\\ud similarity to the native structure. The ModFOLD4\\ud server is the latest version of our leading independent\\ud server for the estimation of both the global and\\ud local (per-residue) quality of 3D protein models. The\\ud server ...

  19. Combining 3d Volume and Mesh Models for Representing Complicated Heritage Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, F.; Chang, H.; Lin, Y.-W.

    2017-08-01

    This study developed a simple but effective strategy to combine 3D volume and mesh models for representing complicated heritage buildings and structures. The idea is to seamlessly integrate 3D parametric or polyhedral models and mesh-based digital surfaces to generate a hybrid 3D model that can take advantages of both modeling methods. The proposed hybrid model generation framework is separated into three phases. Firstly, after acquiring or generating 3D point clouds of the target, these 3D points are partitioned into different groups. Secondly, a parametric or polyhedral model of each group is generated based on plane and surface fitting algorithms to represent the basic structure of that region. A "bare-bones" model of the target can subsequently be constructed by connecting all 3D volume element models. In the third phase, the constructed bare-bones model is used as a mask to remove points enclosed by the bare-bones model from the original point clouds. The remaining points are then connected to form 3D surface mesh patches. The boundary points of each surface patch are identified and these boundary points are projected onto the surfaces of the bare-bones model. Finally, new meshes are created to connect the projected points and original mesh boundaries to integrate the mesh surfaces with the 3D volume model. The proposed method was applied to an open-source point cloud data set and point clouds of a local historical structure. Preliminary results indicated that the reconstructed hybrid models using the proposed method can retain both fundamental 3D volume characteristics and accurate geometric appearance with fine details. The reconstructed hybrid models can also be used to represent targets in different levels of detail according to user and system requirements in different applications.

  20. An Agent Based Collaborative Simplification of 3D Mesh Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Rong; Yu, Bo; Hagiwara, Ichiro

    Large-volume mesh model faces the challenge in fast rendering and transmission by Internet. The current mesh models obtained by using three-dimensional (3D) scanning technology are usually very large in data volume. This paper develops a mobile agent based collaborative environment on the development platform of mobile-C. Communication among distributed agents includes grasping image of visualized mesh model, annotation to grasped image and instant message. Remote and collaborative simplification can be efficiently conducted by Internet.

  1. A novel modeling method for manufacturing hearing aid using 3D medical images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeong Gyun [Dept of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to suggest a novel method of modeling a hearing aid ear shell based on Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) in the hearing aid ear shell manufacturing method using a 3D printer. In the experiment, a 3D external auditory meatus was extracted by using the critical values in the DICOM volume images, a nd t he modeling surface structures were compared in standard type STL (STereoLithography) files which could be recognized by a 3D printer. In this 3D modeling method, a conventional ear model was prepared, and the gaps between adjacent isograms produced by a 3D scanner were filled with 3D surface fragments to express the modeling structure. In this study, the same type of triangular surface structures were prepared by using the DICOM images. The result showed that the modeling surface structure based on the DICOM images provide the same environment that the conventional 3D printers may recognize, eventually enabling to print out the hearing aid ear shell shape.

  2. A novel modeling method for manufacturing hearing aid using 3D medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong Gyun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to suggest a novel method of modeling a hearing aid ear shell based on Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) in the hearing aid ear shell manufacturing method using a 3D printer. In the experiment, a 3D external auditory meatus was extracted by using the critical values in the DICOM volume images, a nd t he modeling surface structures were compared in standard type STL (STereoLithography) files which could be recognized by a 3D printer. In this 3D modeling method, a conventional ear model was prepared, and the gaps between adjacent isograms produced by a 3D scanner were filled with 3D surface fragments to express the modeling structure. In this study, the same type of triangular surface structures were prepared by using the DICOM images. The result showed that the modeling surface structure based on the DICOM images provide the same environment that the conventional 3D printers may recognize, eventually enabling to print out the hearing aid ear shell shape

  3. Citygml Modelling for Singapore 3d National Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, K. H.; Khoo, V. H. S.

    2017-10-01

    Since 2014, the Land Survey Division of Singapore Land Authority (SLA) has spearheaded a Whole-of-Government (WOG) 3D mapping project to create and maintain a 3D national map for Singapore. The implementation of the project is divided into two phases. The first phase of the project, which was based on airborne data collection, has produced 3D models for Relief, Building, Vegetation and Waterbody. This part of the work was completed in 2016. To complement the first phase, the second phase used mobile imaging and scanning technique. This phase is targeted to be completed by the mid of 2017 and is creating 3D models for Transportation, CityFurniture, Bridge and Tunnel. The project has extensively adopted the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)'s CityGML standard. Out of 10 currently supported thematic modules in CityGML 2.0, the project has implemented 8. The paper describes the adoption of CityGML in the project, and discusses challenges, data validations and management of the models.

  4. 3D Imaging with Structured Illumination for Advanced Security Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dagel, Amber Lynn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kast, Brian A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, Collin S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information in a physical security system is a highly useful dis- criminator. The two-dimensional data from an imaging systems fails to provide target dis- tance and three-dimensional motion vector, which can be used to reduce nuisance alarm rates and increase system effectiveness. However, 3D imaging devices designed primarily for use in physical security systems are uncommon. This report discusses an architecture favorable to physical security systems; an inexpensive snapshot 3D imaging system utilizing a simple illumination system. The method of acquiring 3D data, tests to understand illumination de- sign, and software modifications possible to maximize information gathering capability are discussed.

  5. 3D Urban Virtual Models generation methodology for smart cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Álvarez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently the use of Urban 3D Models goes beyond the mere support of three-dimensional image for the visualization of our urban surroundings. The three-dimensional Urban Models are in themselves fundamental tools to manage the different phenomena that occur in smart cities. It is therefore necessary to generate realistic models, in which BIM building design information can be integrated with GIS and other space technologies. The generation of 3D Urban Models benefit from the amount of data from sensors with the latest technologies such as airborne sensors and of the existence of international standards such as CityGML. This paper presents a methodology for the development of a three - dimensional Urban Model, based on LiDAR data and the CityGML standard, applied to the city of Lorca.

  6. Photonic bandgap structure of 3-D fcc silica nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Y. K.; Ha, N. Y.; Hwang, Ji Soo; Chang, H. J.; Wu, J. W. [Dept. of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Photonic crystal is an artificial optical material with a periodic dielectric potential, hence exhibiting a bandgap for a propagating electromagnetic wave. We fabricated crystal possessing 3-D fcc opal structure from silica nanospheres. The crystals are self-assembled on a flat glass by evaporating the solvent in the nanosphere suspension at the room temperature. The suspension consists of silica nanospheres with a diameter of 200 nm. The microscopic arrangement of nanospheres is identified by a scanning electron microscope, the resulting structure being fcc.Transmission spectrum of the fabricated photonic crystal in the visible and near-infrared regions is measured at different incident angles to find the distinct Bragg peaks, analysis of which further confirmed the fcc structure of the photonic crystal. From the optical microscopic image, we find that the opal domain varies from 30 μm to 125 μm in size. In order to relate the observed Bragg peaks with the microscopic arrangement of silica nanospheres, we introduced the scalar wave approximation, where the electric field in the medium is treated as a scalar rather than a vector quantity. It is found that the theoretical prediction of the position of bandgap is in a good agreement with the experimental measurement.

  7. Photonic bandgap structure of 3-D fcc silica nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Y. K.; Ha, N. Y.; Hwang, Ji Soo; Chang, H. J.; Wu, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Photonic crystal is an artificial optical material with a periodic dielectric potential, hence exhibiting a bandgap for a propagating electromagnetic wave. We fabricated crystal possessing 3-D fcc opal structure from silica nanospheres. The crystals are self-assembled on a flat glass by evaporating the solvent in the nanosphere suspension at the room temperature. The suspension consists of silica nanospheres with a diameter of 200 nm. The microscopic arrangement of nanospheres is identified by a scanning electron microscope, the resulting structure being fcc.Transmission spectrum of the fabricated photonic crystal in the visible and near-infrared regions is measured at different incident angles to find the distinct Bragg peaks, analysis of which further confirmed the fcc structure of the photonic crystal. From the optical microscopic image, we find that the opal domain varies from 30 μm to 125 μm in size. In order to relate the observed Bragg peaks with the microscopic arrangement of silica nanospheres, we introduced the scalar wave approximation, where the electric field in the medium is treated as a scalar rather than a vector quantity. It is found that the theoretical prediction of the position of bandgap is in a good agreement with the experimental measurement.

  8. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Syahputra, Ahmad [Geophyisical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat [Applied Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  9. 3D Seismic Imaging over a Potential Collapse Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritto, Roland; O'Connell, Daniel; Elobaid Elnaiem, Ali; Mohamed, Fathelrahman; Sadooni, Fadhil

    2016-04-01

    The Middle-East has seen a recent boom in construction including the planning and development of complete new sub-sections of metropolitan areas. Before planning and construction can commence, however, the development areas need to be investigated to determine their suitability for the planned project. Subsurface parameters such as the type of material (soil/rock), thickness of top soil or rock layers, depth and elastic parameters of basement, for example, comprise important information needed before a decision concerning the suitability of the site for construction can be made. A similar problem arises in environmental impact studies, when subsurface parameters are needed to assess the geological heterogeneity of the subsurface. Environmental impact studies are typically required for each construction project, particularly for the scale of the aforementioned building boom in the Middle East. The current study was conducted in Qatar at the location of a future highway interchange to evaluate a suite of 3D seismic techniques in their effectiveness to interrogate the subsurface for the presence of karst-like collapse structures. The survey comprised an area of approximately 10,000 m2 and consisted of 550 source- and 192 receiver locations. The seismic source was an accelerated weight drop while the geophones consisted of 3-component 10 Hz velocity sensors. At present, we analyzed over 100,000 P-wave phase arrivals and performed high-resolution 3-D tomographic imaging of the shallow subsurface. Furthermore, dispersion analysis of recorded surface waves will be performed to obtain S-wave velocity profiles of the subsurface. Both results, in conjunction with density estimates, will be utilized to determine the elastic moduli of the subsurface rock layers.

  10. The Traveling Optical Scanner – Case Study on 3D Shape Models of Ancient Brazilian Skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinderup, Camilla Himmelstrup; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen; Gregersen, Kristian Murphy

    2016-01-01

    , inoffensive and inexpensive 3D scanning modality based on structured light, suitable for capturing the morphology and the appearance of specimens. Benefits of having 3D models are manifold. The 3D models are easy to share among researchers and can be made available to the general public. Advanced...... morphological modelling is possible with accurate description of the specimens provided by the models. Furthermore, performing studies on models reduces the risk of damage to the original specimen. In our work we employ a high resolution structured light scanner for digitalizing a collection of 8500 year old...... human skulls from Brazil. To evaluate the precision of our setup we compare the structured light scan to micro-CT and achieve submillimetre difference. We analyse morphological features of the Brazilian skulls using manual landmarks, but a research goal is to automate this, fully utilize the dense 3D...

  11. 3D Printing of Plant Golgi Stacks from Their Electron Tomographic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Keith Ka Ki; Kang, Madison J; Kang, Byung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an effective tool for preparing tangible 3D models from computer visualizations to assist in scientific research and education. With the recent popularization of 3D printing processes, it is now possible for individual laboratories to convert their scientific data into a physical form suitable for presentation or teaching purposes. Electron tomography is an electron microscopy method by which 3D structures of subcellular organelles or macromolecular complexes are determined at nanometer-level resolutions. Electron tomography analyses have revealed the convoluted membrane architectures of Golgi stacks, chloroplasts, and mitochondria. But the intricacy of their 3D organizations is difficult to grasp from tomographic models illustrated on computer screens. Despite the rapid development of 3D printing technologies, production of organelle models based on experimental data with 3D printing has rarely been documented. In this chapter, we present a simple guide to creating 3D prints of electron tomographic models of plant Golgi stacks using the two most accessible 3D printing technologies.

  12. Metadata for 3D Models. How to search in 3D Model repositories?

    OpenAIRE

    Boeykens, Stefan; Bogani, Elena

    2008-01-01

    In architectural education and practice, students, teachers and architects increasingly rely on online repositories with architectural information. This includes product model data, exemplary architectural projects and technical documentation, in a wide variety of formats. Unfortunately, the major part of this architectural content exists in individual repositories and they are not accessible to geographically distributed professionals and students who require them. Some of them are freely ac...

  13. The Finite Element Numerical Modelling of 3D Magnetotelluric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal numerical simulation of 3D magnetotelluric was restricted by the methodology complexity and the time-consuming calculation. Boundary values, the variation of weighted residual equation, and the hexahedral mesh generation method of finite element are three major causes. A finite element method for 3D magnetotelluric numerical modeling is presented in this paper as a solution for the problem mentioned above. In this algorithm, a hexahedral element coefficient matrix for magnetoelluric finite method is developed, which solves large-scale equations using preconditioned conjugate gradient of the first-type boundary conditions. This algorithm is verified using the homogeneous model, and the positive landform model, as well as the low resistance anomaly model.

  14. Towards an Integrated Visualization Of Semantically Enriched 3D City Models: An Ontology of 3D Visualization Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Métral, Claudine; Ghoula, Nizar; Falquet, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    3D city models - which represent in 3 dimensions the geometric elements of a city - are increasingly used for an intended wide range of applications. Such uses are made possible by using semantically enriched 3D city models and by presenting such enriched 3D city models in a way that allows decision-making processes to be carried out from the best choices among sets of objectives, and across issues and scales. In order to help in such a decision-making process we have defined a framework to f...

  15. 3D silicon breast surface mapping via structured light profilometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairavan, R.; Ong, N. R.; Sauli, Z.; Kirtsaeng, S.; Sakuntasathien, S.; Shahimin, M. M.; Alcain, J. B.; Lai, S. L.; Paitong, P.; Retnasamy, V.

    2017-09-01

    Digital fringe projection technique is one of the promising optical methods for 3D surface imaging as it demonstrates non contact and non invasive characteristics. The potential of this technique matches the requirement for human body evaluation, as it is vital for disease diagnosis and for treatment option selection. Thus, the digital fringe projection has addressed this requirement with its wide clinical related application and studies. However, the application of this technique for 3D surface mapping of the breast is very minimal. Hence, in this work, the application of digital fringe projection for 3D breast surface mapping is reported. Phase shift fringe projection technique was utilized to perform the 3D breast surface mapping. Maiden results have confirmed the feasibility of using the digital fringe projection method for 3D surface mapping of the breast and it can be extended for breast cancer detection.

  16. Geometric and Colour Data Fusion for Outdoor 3D Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Chacón

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the generation of accurate, dense and coloured 3D models of outdoor scenarios from scanners. This is a challenging research field in which several problems still remain unsolved. In particular, the process of 3D model creation in outdoor scenes may be inefficient if the scene is digitalized under unsuitable technical (specific scanner on-board camera and environmental (rain, dampness, changing illumination conditions. We address our research towards the integration of images and range data to produce photorealistic models. Our proposal is based on decoupling the colour integration and geometry reconstruction stages, making them independent and controlled processes. This issue is approached from two different viewpoints. On the one hand, given a complete model (geometry plus texture, we propose a method to modify the original texture provided by the scanner on-board camera with the colour information extracted from external images taken at given moments and under specific environmental conditions. On the other hand, we propose an algorithm to directly assign external images onto the complete geometric model, thus avoiding tedious on-line calibration processes. We present the work conducted on two large Roman archaeological sites dating from the first century A.D., namely, the Theatre of Segobriga and the Fori Porticus of Emerita Augusta, both in Spain. The results obtained demonstrate that our approach could be useful in the digitalization and 3D modelling fields.

  17. Automatic Generation of Structural Building Descriptions from 3D Point Cloud Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ochmann, Sebastian; Vock, Richard; Wessel, Raoul

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for automatic semantic structuring of 3D point clouds representing buildings. In contrast to existing approaches which either target the outside appearance like the facade structure or rather low-level geometric structures, we focus on the building’s interior using indoor...... scans to derive high-level architectural entities like rooms and doors. Starting with a registered 3D point cloud, we probabilistically model the affiliation of each measured point to a certain room in the building. We solve the resulting clustering problem using an iterative algorithm that relies...

  18. 3D MODELING OF HISTORICAL DOGER CARAVANSARIES BY DIGITAL PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yakar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Caravansaries are sort of bigger khan that established on the busy trade roads to provide any kind of supplies but essentially all Caravansaries on Anatolia are established for caravans' accommodations which are passing through on caravan rout. After the Turks had chosen being Muslim, the land that Islam religion spread on it has expanded. As a result of this expansion it is required a safe route for trade caravans. During the ruling time of Seljuk's Empire, Caravansaries took the most advanced form. Sultans of the Seljuk's Empire were aware of importance of trade and economy. That's why they established Caravansaries near marines, between the important trade centers and on Anatolian lands which is a bridge between East and West. But these trade routes has changed at the time of Ottoman Empire. Many of the historical places in the world have been totally or partly destroyed by natural events and human activities such as earthquake, flood and fire until the present day and still going on. Documentation is essentially required for protection and restoration these historical places and photogrammetry is one of the most effective method for documentation of cultural heritages. In this study, it is aimed to get 3D models of Doger Caravansaries which is established in Afyonkarahisar for relief and advertising. Doger Caravansaries was built in 15. Century at Sultan II Murat eras but the exact date of building is not known. The structure has rectangular plan in width. The total length of it is 56.50 in meters. The Caravansaries is consisting of attached two parts. The first part has two floors. There are pointed arched niches in the two sides of the wall and there are windows (iron barred in the middle of the each niche. The door is fillet low arched. First floor rises on four elephant foot columns and ten other small columns. Short sides are covered by two each cross squinch and the other parts with barrel vault. There is a ladder with only ten remain

  19. Mechanical performance of wall structures in 3D printing processes: theory, design tools and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suiker, A.S.J.

    2018-01-01

    In the current contribution for the first time a mechanistic model is presented that can be used for analysing and optimising the mechanical performance of straight wall structures in 3D printing processes. The two failure mechanisms considered are elastic buckling and plastic collapse. The model

  20. High-order finite difference solution for 3D nonlinear wave-structure interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrozet, Guillaume; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2010-01-01

    This contribution presents our recent progress on developing an efficient fully-nonlinear potential flow model for simulating 3D wave-wave and wave-structure interaction over arbitrary depths (i.e. in coastal and offshore environment). The model is based on a high-order finite difference scheme O...

  1. Large-scale 3-D modeling by integration of resistivity models and borehole data through inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, N.; Marker, Pernille Aabye; Christiansen, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    resistivity and the clay fraction. Through inversion we use the lithological data and the resistivity data to determine the optimum spatially distributed translator function. Applying the translator function we get a 3-D clay fraction model, which holds information from the resistivity data set...... and the borehole data set in one variable. Finally, we use k-means clustering to generate a 3-D model of the subsurface structures. We apply the procedure to the Norsminde survey in Denmark, integrating approximately 700 boreholes and more than 100 000 resistivity models from an airborne survey...

  2. GPU-accelerated 3-D model-based tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J Anthony; Capson, David W

    2010-01-01

    Model-based approaches to tracking the pose of a 3-D object in video are effective but computationally demanding. While statistical estimation techniques, such as the particle filter, are often employed to minimize the search space, real-time performance remains unachievable on current generation CPUs. Recent advances in graphics processing units (GPUs) have brought massively parallel computational power to the desktop environment and powerful developer tools, such as NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), have provided programmers with a mechanism to exploit it. NVIDIA GPUs' single-instruction multiple-thread (SIMT) programming model is well-suited to many computer vision tasks, particularly model-based tracking, which requires several hundred 3-D model poses to be dynamically configured, rendered, and evaluated against each frame in the video sequence. Using 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) rigid hand tracking as an example application, this work harnesses consumer-grade GPUs to achieve real-time, 3-D model-based, markerless object tracking in monocular video.

  3. The Algorithm and Application of Automatic Generation of the 3D Modeling of the Member Structure%杆系结构三维模型图自动生成的算法与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓霞; 於时才; 邢静忠

    2001-01-01

    利用AutoCAD提供的DXF数据交换功能,提出了一种新的生成算法。将空间斜杆一次性生成,直接读取空间杆系结构的有限元分析数据或优化设计数据,自动生成其三维模型图。文末给出了该算法在空间塔式起重机和空间网架、网壳造型中的应用。%By utilizing the DXF exchange function of AutoCAD, a new algorithm for generating the 3D model of structure is presented. If can generate a space oblique pole at one time, and by using the finite element analysis original data and the data of optimum design of member structure, 3D modeling were automatically generated with this algorithm. The application of the algorithm in constructing the 3D modeling of the space tower crane and the framework was introduced in the end。

  4. 3D-printing and mechanics of bio-inspired articulated and multi-material structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Michael M; Ravikumar, Nakul; Barthelat, Francois; Martini, Roberto

    2017-09-01

    3D-printing technologies allow researchers to build simplified physical models of complex biological systems to more easily investigate their mechanics. In recent years, a number of 3D-printed structures inspired by the dermal armors of various fishes have been developed to study their multiple mechanical functionalities, including flexible protection, improved hydrodynamics, body support, or tail prehensility. Natural fish armors are generally classified according to their shape, material and structural properties as elasmoid scales, ganoid scales, placoid scales, carapace scutes, or bony plates. Each type of dermal armor forms distinct articulation patterns that facilitate different functional advantages. In this paper, we highlight recent studies that developed 3D-printed structures not only to inform the design and application of some articulated and multi-material structures, but also to explain the mechanics of the natural biological systems they mimic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. User interface using a 3D model for video surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Toshihiko; Boh, Satoru; Tsukada, Akihiro; Ozaki, Minoru

    1998-02-01

    These days fewer people, who must carry out their tasks quickly and precisely, are required in industrial surveillance and monitoring applications such as plant control or building security. Utilizing multimedia technology is a good approach to meet this need, and we previously developed Media Controller, which is designed for the applications and provides realtime recording and retrieval of digital video data in a distributed environment. In this paper, we propose a user interface for such a distributed video surveillance system in which 3D models of buildings and facilities are connected to the surveillance video. A novel method of synchronizing camera field data with each frame of a video stream is considered. This method records and reads the camera field data similarity to the video data and transmits it synchronously with the video stream. This enables the user interface to have such useful functions as comprehending the camera field immediately and providing clues when visibility is poor, for not only live video but also playback video. We have also implemented and evaluated the display function which makes surveillance video and 3D model work together using Media Controller with Java and Virtual Reality Modeling Language employed for multi-purpose and intranet use of 3D model.

  6. Interchain coupling and 3D modeling of trans-polyacetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronold, F.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    In spite of the success of the SSH model for trans-polyacetylene in interpreting many experimental results (e.g. optical and magnetic properties) there remain some aspects of the real material which are outside the scope of the simple 1D model. Especially ordering phenomena of doped and undoped trans-polyacetylene as well as transport properties (e.g. electronic and thermal conductivity) are beyond a 1D description. There are many attempts to construct a transport theory for this novel class of materials using solitons or polaxons as the basic ingredients. But so far it is not yet clear whether these typical 1D excitations still exist in crystalline transpolyacetylene. Therefore, to clarify the role which intrinsic self-localized nonlinear excitations characteristic of 1D models play in the bulk (3D) material, we study the stability of a polaronic excitation against interchain coupling. As a preliminary step we consider first two coupled t-(CH) x -chains where the π-electrons are allowed to hop from one chain to the other. Then we introduce a 3D generalization of the SSH model and study a polaron in a 3D crystalline environment

  7. 3D Modeling of Electric Fields in the LUX Detector

    OpenAIRE

    LUX Collaboration; Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.

    2017-01-01

    This work details the development of a three-dimensional (3D) electric field model for the LUX detector. The detector took data during two periods of searching for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) searches. After the first period completed, a time-varying non-uniform negative charge developed in the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) panels that define the radial boundary of the detector's active volume. This caused electric field variations in the detector in time, depth and azimuth, g...

  8. 3D modeling of electric fields in the LUX detector

    OpenAIRE

    Akerib, DS; Alsum, S; Araújo, HM; Bai, X; Bailey, AJ; Balajthy, J; Beltrame, P; Bernard, EP; Bernstein, A; Biesiadzinski, TP; Boulton, EM; Brás, P; Byram, D; Cahn, SB; Carmona-Benitez, MC

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd and Sissa Medialab. This work details the development of a three-dimensional (3D) electric field model for the LUX detector. The detector took data to search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) during two periods. After the first period completed, a time-varying non-uniform negative charge developed in the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) panels that define the radial boundary of the detector's active volume. This caused electric field variations in the de...

  9. 3D fluid-structure modelling and vibration analysis for fault diagnosis of Francis turbine using multiple ANN and multiple ANFIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, R. A.; Galybin, A. N.; Popov, V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses condition monitoring and fault diagnosis in Francis turbine based on integration of numerical modelling with several different artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. In this study, a numerical approach for fluid-structure (turbine runner) analysis is presented. The results of numerical analysis provide frequency response functions (FRFs) data sets along x-, y- and z-directions under different operating load and different position and size of faults in the structure. To extract features and reduce the dimensionality of the obtained FRF data, the principal component analysis (PCA) has been applied. Subsequently, the extracted features are formulated and fed into multiple artificial neural networks (ANN) and multiple adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) in order to identify the size and position of the damage in the runner and estimate the turbine operating conditions. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach and provide satisfactory accuracy even when the input data are corrupted with certain level of noise.

  10. PIXIE3D: An efficient, fully implicit, parallel, 3D extended MHD code for fusion plasma modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, L.

    2007-01-01

    PIXIE3D is a modern, parallel, state-of-the-art extended MHD code that employs fully implicit methods for efficiency and accuracy. It features a general geometry formulation, and is therefore suitable for the study of many magnetic fusion configurations of interest. PIXIE3D advances the state of the art in extended MHD modeling in two fundamental ways. Firstly, it employs a novel conservative finite volume scheme which is remarkably robust and stable, and demands very small physical and/or numerical dissipation. This is a fundamental requirement when one wants to study fusion plasmas with realistic conductivities. Secondly, PIXIE3D features fully-implicit time stepping, employing Newton-Krylov methods for inverting the associated nonlinear systems. These methods have been shown to be scalable and efficient when preconditioned properly. Novel preconditioned ideas (so-called physics based), which were prototypes in the context of reduced MHD, have been adapted for 3D primitive-variable resistive MHD in PIXIE3D, and are currently being extended to Hall MHD. PIXIE3D is fully parallel, employing PETSc for parallelism. PIXIE3D has been thoroughly benchmarked against linear theory and against other available extended MHD codes on nonlinear test problems (such as the GEM reconnection challenge). We are currently in the process of extending such comparisons to fusion-relevant problems in realistic geometries. In this talk, we will describe both the spatial discretization approach and the preconditioning strategy employed for extended MHD in PIXIE3D. We will report on recent benchmarking studies between PIXIE3D and other 3D extended MHD codes, and will demonstrate its usefulness in a variety of fusion-relevant configurations such as Tokamaks and Reversed Field Pinches. (Author)

  11. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-property relationship (3D-QSPR) models for prediction of thermodynamic properties of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): enthalpy of vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Swati; Chickos, James S; Welsh, William J

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) models have been derived using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) to correlate the vaporization enthalpies of a representative set of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at 298.15 K with their CoMFA-calculated physicochemical properties. Various alignment schemes, such as inertial, as is, and atom fit, were employed in this study. The CoMFA models were also developed using different partial charge formalisms, namely, electrostatic potential (ESP) charges and Gasteiger-Marsili (GM) charges. The most predictive model for vaporization enthalpy (Delta(vap)H(m)(298.15 K)), with atom fit alignment and Gasteiger-Marsili charges, yielded r2 values 0.852 (cross-validated) and 0.996 (conventional). The vaporization enthalpies of PCBs increased with the number of chlorine atoms and were found to be larger for the meta- and para-substituted isomers. This model was used to predict Delta(vap)H(m)(298.15 K) of the entire set of 209 PCB congeners.

  12. Computer simulations and modeling-assisted ToxR screening in deciphering 3D structures of transmembrane α-helical dimers: ephrin receptor A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volynsky, P E; Mineeva, E A; Goncharuk, M V; Ermolyuk, Ya S; Arseniev, A S; Efremov, R G

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-spanning segments of numerous proteins (e.g. receptor tyrosine kinases) represent a novel class of pharmacologically important targets, whose activity can be modulated by specially designed artificial peptides, the so-called interceptors. Rational construction of such peptides requires understanding of the main factors driving peptide–peptide association in lipid membranes. Here we present a new method for rapid prediction of the spatial structure of transmembrane (TM) helix–helix complexes. It is based on computer simulations in membrane-like media and subsequent refinement/validation of the results using experimental studies of TM helix dimerization in a bacterial membrane by means of the ToxR system. The approach was applied to TM fragments of the ephrin receptor A1 (EphA1). A set of spatial structures of the dimer was proposed based on Monte Carlo simulations in an implicit membrane followed by molecular dynamics relaxation in an explicit lipid bilayer. The resulting models were employed for rational design of wild-type and mutant genetic constructions for ToxR assays. The computational and the experimental data are self-consistent and provide an unambiguous spatial model of the TM dimer of EphA1. The results of this work can be further used to develop new biologically active 'peptide interceptors' specifically targeting membrane domains of proteins

  13. Influence of Nutrient Availability and Quorum Sensing on the Formation of Metabolically Inactive Microcolonies Within Structurally Heterogeneous Bacterial Biofilms: An Individual-Based 3D Cellular Automata Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machineni, Lakshmi; Rajapantul, Anil; Nandamuri, Vandana; Pawar, Parag D

    2017-03-01

    The resistance of bacterial biofilms to antibiotic treatment has been attributed to the emergence of structurally heterogeneous microenvironments containing metabolically inactive cell populations. In this study, we use a three-dimensional individual-based cellular automata model to investigate the influence of nutrient availability and quorum sensing on microbial heterogeneity in growing biofilms. Mature biofilms exhibited at least three structurally distinct strata: a high-volume, homogeneous region sandwiched between two compact sections of high heterogeneity. Cell death occurred preferentially in layers in close proximity to the substratum, resulting in increased heterogeneity in this section of the biofilm; the thickness and heterogeneity of this lowermost layer increased with time, ultimately leading to sloughing. The model predicted the formation of metabolically dormant cellular microniches embedded within faster-growing cell clusters. Biofilms utilizing quorum sensing were more heterogeneous compared to their non-quorum sensing counterparts, and resisted sloughing, featuring a cell-devoid layer of EPS atop the substratum upon which the remainder of the biofilm developed. Overall, our study provides a computational framework to analyze metabolic diversity and heterogeneity of biofilm-associated microorganisms and may pave the way toward gaining further insights into the biophysical mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

  14. Automated identification of RNA 3D modules with discriminative power in RNA structural alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theis, Corinna; Höner zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in predicting RNA structure is moving towards filling the 'gap' in 2D RNA structure prediction where, for example, predicted internal loops often form non-canonical base pairs. This is increasingly recognized with the steady increase of known RNA 3D modules. There is a general...... comparative evidence. Subsequently, the modules, initially represented by a graph, are turned into models for the RMDetect program, which allows to test their discriminative power using real and randomized Rfam alignments. An initial extraction of 22495 3D modules in all PDB files results in 977 internal loop...

  15. Streamlining the Process of 3D Printing a Brain From a Structural MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Peterson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the process of obtaining a 3D model from a structural MRI requires specialized knowlege and skills. This is not due to the fundamental difficulty and complexity of the process, but is a result of the fact that the neccessary tools were developed for and by neuroimaging researchers. This project describes a publically available utility implemented as a Docker image that takes a structural MRI as input, and gives files for 3D printing as output, along with a rendered image of the surface.

  16. 3D modeling and visualization software for complex geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guse, Guenter; Klotzbuecher, Michael; Mohr, Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    The reactor safety depends on reliable nondestructive testing of reactor components. For 100% detection probability of flaws and the determination of their size using ultrasonic methods the ultrasonic waves have to hit the flaws within a specific incidence and squint angle. For complex test geometries like testing of nozzle welds from the outside of the component these angular ranges can only be determined using elaborate mathematical calculations. The authors developed a 3D modeling and visualization software tool that allows to integrate and present ultrasonic measuring data into the 3D geometry. The software package was verified using 1:1 test samples (example: testing of the nozzle edge of the feedwater nozzle of a steam generator from the outside; testing of the reactor pressure vessel nozzle edge from the inside).

  17. 3D finite element modelling of sheet metal blanking process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohdal, Lukasz; Kukielka, Leon; Chodor, Jaroslaw; Kulakowska, Agnieszka; Patyk, Radoslaw; Kaldunski, Pawel

    2018-05-01

    The shearing process such as the blanking of sheet metals has been used often to prepare workpieces for subsequent forming operations. The use of FEM simulation is increasing for investigation and optimizing the blanking process. In the current literature a blanking FEM simulations for the limited capability and large computational cost of the three dimensional (3D) analysis has been largely limited to two dimensional (2D) plane axis-symmetry problems. However, a significant progress in modelling which takes into account the influence of real material (e.g. microstructure of the material), physical and technological conditions can be obtained by using 3D numerical analysis methods in this area. The objective of this paper is to present 3D finite element analysis of the ductile fracture, strain distribution and stress in blanking process with the assumption geometrical and physical nonlinearities. The physical, mathematical and computer model of the process are elaborated. Dynamic effects, mechanical coupling, constitutive damage law and contact friction are taken into account. The application in ANSYS/LS-DYNA program is elaborated. The effect of the main process parameter a blanking clearance on the deformation of 1018 steel and quality of the blank's sheared edge is analyzed. The results of computer simulations can be used to forecasting quality of the final parts optimization.

  18. Alternative face models for 3D face registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Albert Ali; Alyüz, Neşe; Akarun, Lale

    2007-01-01

    3D has become an important modality for face biometrics. The accuracy of a 3D face recognition system depends on a correct registration that aligns the facial surfaces and makes a comparison possible. The best results obtained so far use a one-to-all registration approach, which means each new facial surface is registered to all faces in the gallery, at a great computational cost. We explore the approach of registering the new facial surface to an average face model (AFM), which automatically establishes correspondence to the pre-registered gallery faces. Going one step further, we propose that using a couple of well-selected AFMs can trade-off computation time with accuracy. Drawing on cognitive justifications, we propose to employ category-specific alternative average face models for registration, which is shown to increase the accuracy of the subsequent recognition. We inspect thin-plate spline (TPS) and iterative closest point (ICP) based registration schemes under realistic assumptions on manual or automatic landmark detection prior to registration. We evaluate several approaches for the coarse initialization of ICP. We propose a new algorithm for constructing an AFM, and show that it works better than a recent approach. Finally, we perform simulations with multiple AFMs that correspond to different clusters in the face shape space and compare these with gender and morphology based groupings. We report our results on the FRGC 3D face database.

  19. Digital 3D Borobudur – Integration of 3D surveying and modeling techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Suwardhi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Borobudur temple (Indonesia is one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world, now listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site. The present state of the temple is the result of restorations after being exposed to natural disasters several times. Today there is still a growing rate of deterioration of the building stones whose causes need further researches. Monitoring programs, supported at institutional level, have been effectively executed to observe the problem. The paper presents the latest efforts to digitally document the Borobudur Temple and its surrounding area in 3D with photogrammetric techniques. UAV and terrestrial images were acquired to completely digitize the temple, produce DEM, orthoimages and maps at 1:100 and 1:1000 scale. The results of the project are now employed by the local government organizations to manage the heritage area and plan new policies for the conservation and preservation of the UNESCO site. In order to help data management and policy makers, a web-based information system of the heritage area was also built to visualize and easily access all the data and achieved 3D results.

  20. 3D computer model of the VINCY cyclotron magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorozhtsov, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    The VINCY Cyclotron magnetic field simulation was performed with the help of the three-dimensional (3D) software. The following aspects of the system were considered: 3D calculation of the magnetic field in the median plane, 3D calculation of the magnetic field in the extraction region, 3D calculation of the stray magnetic field. 8 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  1. 3D Massive MIMO Systems: Channel Modeling and Performance Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain

    2015-03-01

    Multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems of current LTE releases are capable of adaptation in the azimuth only. More recently, the trend is to enhance the system performance by exploiting the channel\\'s degrees of freedom in the elevation through the dynamic adaptation of the vertical antenna beam pattern. This necessitates the derivation and characterization of three-dimensional (3D) channels. Over the years, channel models have evolved to address the challenges of wireless communication technologies. In parallel to theoretical studies on channel modeling, many standardized channel models like COST-based models, 3GPP SCM, WINNER, ITU have emerged that act as references for industries and telecommunication companies to assess system-level and link-level performances of advanced signal processing techniques over real-like channels. Given the existing channels are only two dimensional (2D) in nature; a large effort in channel modeling is needed to study the impact of the channel component in the elevation direction. The first part of this work sheds light on the current 3GPP activity around 3D channel modeling and beamforming, an aspect that to our knowledge has not been extensively covered by a research publication. The standardized MIMO channel model is presented, that incorporates both the propagation effects of the environment and the radio effects of the antennas. In order to facilitate future studies on the use of 3D beamforming, the main features of the proposed 3D channel model are discussed. A brief overview of the future 3GPP 3D channel model being outlined for the next generation of wireless networks is also provided. In the subsequent part of this work, we present an information-theoretic channel model for MIMO systems that supports the elevation dimension. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy, which enables us to determine the distribution of the channel matrix consistent with the prior information on the angles of departure and

  2. VP-Nets : Efficient automatic localization of key brain structures in 3D fetal neurosonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruobing; Xie, Weidi; Alison Noble, J

    2018-04-23

    Three-dimensional (3D) fetal neurosonography is used clinically to detect cerebral abnormalities and to assess growth in the developing brain. However, manual identification of key brain structures in 3D ultrasound images requires expertise to perform and even then is tedious. Inspired by how sonographers view and interact with volumes during real-time clinical scanning, we propose an efficient automatic method to simultaneously localize multiple brain structures in 3D fetal neurosonography. The proposed View-based Projection Networks (VP-Nets), uses three view-based Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), to simplify 3D localizations by directly predicting 2D projections of the key structures onto three anatomical views. While designed for efficient use of data and GPU memory, the proposed VP-Nets allows for full-resolution 3D prediction. We investigated parameters that influence the performance of VP-Nets, e.g. depth and number of feature channels. Moreover, we demonstrate that the model can pinpoint the structure in 3D space by visualizing the trained VP-Nets, despite only 2D supervision being provided for a single stream during training. For comparison, we implemented two other baseline solutions based on Random Forest and 3D U-Nets. In the reported experiments, VP-Nets consistently outperformed other methods on localization. To test the importance of loss function, two identical models are trained with binary corss-entropy and dice coefficient loss respectively. Our best VP-Net model achieved prediction center deviation: 1.8 ± 1.4 mm, size difference: 1.9 ± 1.5 mm, and 3D Intersection Over Union (IOU): 63.2 ± 14.7% when compared to the ground truth. To make the whole pipeline intervention free, we also implement a skull-stripping tool using 3D CNN, which achieves high segmentation accuracy. As a result, the proposed processing pipeline takes a raw ultrasound brain image as input, and output a skull-stripped image with five detected key brain

  3. Image-Based 3D Face Modeling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vezhnevets

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an automatic system for 3D face modeling using frontal and profile images taken by an ordinary digital camera. The system consists of four subsystems including frontal feature detection, profile feature detection, shape deformation, and texture generation modules. The frontal and profile feature detection modules automatically extract the facial parts such as the eye, nose, mouth, and ear. The shape deformation module utilizes the detected features to deform the generic head mesh model such that the deformed model coincides with the detected features. A texture is created by combining the facial textures augmented from the input images and the synthesized texture and mapped onto the deformed generic head model. This paper provides a practical system for 3D face modeling, which is highly automated by aggregating, customizing, and optimizing a bunch of individual computer vision algorithms. The experimental results show a highly automated process of modeling, which is sufficiently robust to various imaging conditions. The whole model creation including all the optional manual corrections takes only 2∼3 minutes.

  4. Field applications of the channel network model, CHAN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khademi, B.; Gylling, B.; Moreno, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1998-01-01

    The Channel Network model and its computer implementation, CHAN3D, was developed to simulate fluid flow and transport of solutes in fractured media. The model has been used to interpret field experiments of flow and transport in small and in large scale. It may also be used for safety assessments of repositories for nuclear and other hazardous wastes. In this case, CHAN3D has been coupled to a compartment model, NUCTRAN, to describe the near field of the repository. The model is based on field observations, which indicate that the flow and solute transport take place in a three-dimensional network of connected channels. The channels have very different properties and they are generated in the model from observed stochastic distributions. This allows us to represent the large heterogeneity of the flow distribution commonly observed in fractured media. Solute transport is modelled considering advection and rock interactions such as matrix diffusion and sorption within the interior of the rock. Objects such as fracture zones, tunnels and release sources can be incorporated in the model

  5. 3D digital anatomy modelling - Practical or pretty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgitroyd, Ellen; Madurska, Marta; Gonzalez, Jasmina; Watson, Angus

    2015-06-01

    With an increasing move towards digitalisation of medical records and medical teaching, such as online exams and webinars, one of the questions that persists asks 'is there a place for digital anatomy teaching and can it effectively replace the traditional teaching methods such as cadaveric dissection?' Cadaveric dissection has a number of benefits as a teaching method but it also has its limitations. Although these can be partially addressed by prosections and new more "life-like" fixatives, it does not address the lack of resources and the increasing pressure to be able to study and learn at home. This paper reviews the literature with regards to the suitability of digital models for teaching and the wider uses a 3D digital anatomy model could have, such as postgraduate teaching, patient education and surgical planning. It also looks briefly at the learning model that anatomy as art contributes. The literature has scattered examples of digital models used for teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate level, which demonstrate a number of positive outcomes, mostly surrounding user satisfaction and convenience. 3D modelling for patient education and operation planning has less exploration, and these papers generate a number of discussion points, mostly surrounding the practicality of digital models, which can be more time consuming and require the technology to be widely available and reliable. 3D digital anatomy is a useful adjunct to teaching and its use in patient education and operation planning have interesting possibilities still to be fully explored. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D protein-structure-oriented discovery of clinical relation across chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mochament, Konstantinos; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Polychronidou, Eleftheria

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia with still unclear etiology. Indications of antigenic pressure have been hinted, using sequence and structure-based reasoning. The accuracy of such approaches, and in particular of the ones derived from 3D models obtained from t...

  7. 3D statistical shape models incorporating 3D random forest regression voting for robust CT liver segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norajitra, Tobias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2015-03-01

    During image segmentation, 3D Statistical Shape Models (SSM) usually conduct a limited search for target landmarks within one-dimensional search profiles perpendicular to the model surface. In addition, landmark appearance is modeled only locally based on linear profiles and weak learners, altogether leading to segmentation errors from landmark ambiguities and limited search coverage. We present a new method for 3D SSM segmentation based on 3D Random Forest Regression Voting. For each surface landmark, a Random Regression Forest is trained that learns a 3D spatial displacement function between the according reference landmark and a set of surrounding sample points, based on an infinite set of non-local randomized 3D Haar-like features. Landmark search is then conducted omni-directionally within 3D search spaces, where voxelwise forest predictions on landmark position contribute to a common voting map which reflects the overall position estimate. Segmentation experiments were conducted on a set of 45 CT volumes of the human liver, of which 40 images were randomly chosen for training and 5 for testing. Without parameter optimization, using a simple candidate selection and a single resolution approach, excellent results were achieved, while faster convergence and better concavity segmentation were observed, altogether underlining the potential of our approach in terms of increased robustness from distinct landmark detection and from better search coverage.

  8. On Angular Sampling Methods for 3-D Spatial Channel Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Jämsä, Tommi; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses generating three dimensional (3D) spatial channel models with emphasis on the angular sampling methods. Three angular sampling methods, i.e. modified uniform power sampling, modified uniform angular sampling, and random pairing methods are proposed and investigated in detail....... The random pairing method, which uses only twenty sinusoids in the ray-based model for generating the channels, presents good results if the spatial channel cluster is with a small elevation angle spread. For spatial clusters with large elevation angle spreads, however, the random pairing method would fail...... and the other two methods should be considered....

  9. 3D Structures of the Sea-Breeze Front in Dual-Doppler Lidar Analysis and a State-of-the-Art Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Iwai, H.; Seko, H.; Saito, K. K.; Sha, W.; Iwasaki, T.

    2017-12-01

    Sea breeze occurs at coastal regions around the world, with great impacts on the weather and air quality. Observations and forecasts of the fine-scale structures and local impacts of sea-breeze front (SBF) are a challenge. Three-dimensional structures of a quasi-stationary SBF were observed by dual-Doppler lidar over Sendai Airport in June 2007. Using a state-of-the-art local prediction system in which a computational fluid dynamics model is nested to a mesoscale model with data assimilation, we perform a realistic simulation of the observed SBF structures at 10-m resolution. Numerical simulations reproduce the detailed features of the SBF, such as frontal lobes/clefts, intense updrafts, rear downdrafts, and Kelvin-Helmholtz billows, consistent with lidar observations. Several localized maxima of updrafts occur at the active SBF lobes with ascending marine air mass and adjacent windward sides, where the ambient warm flows encounter a steep front face and penetrate SBF aloft. Strong downdrafts of marine cool air dominate at the SBF rear where they trap a high concentration of air pollutants. These features are regularly activated by the arc-shaped gravity currents at a horizontal scale of several kilometers and a period of 30 minutes. They are also influenced by the coastal buildings and strongly regulate the spatio-temporal variations of local winds near surface. The findings suggest that a novel full-scale nested prediction system has potential for forecasting coastal weather and environment at high precision, which are valuable for aviation safety, marine activities, and air quality monitoring. AcknowledgmentsThis study was supported by the Strategic Programs for Innovative Research (SPIRE) funded by the Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). The numerical calculations were performed using the K computer at RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (Proposal numbers hp130012 and hp140220). The observational data were

  10. Simulation of current generation in a 3-D plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsung, F.S.; Dawson, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Two wires carrying current in the same direction will attract each other, and two wires carrying current in the opposite direction will repel each other. Now, consider a test charge in a plasma. If the test charge carries current parallel to the plasma, then it will be pulled toward the plasma core, and if the test charge carries current anti-parallel to the plasma, then it will be pushed to the edge. The electromagnetic coupling between the plasma and a test charge (i.e., the A parallel circ v parallel term in the test charge's Hamiltonian) breaks the symmetry in the parallel direction, and gives rise to a diffusion coefficient which is dependent on the particle's parallel velocity. This is the basis for the open-quotes preferential lossclose quotes mechanism described in the work by Nunan et al. In our previous 2+1/2 D work, in both cylindrical and toroidal geometries, showed that if the plasma column is centrally fueled, then an initial current increases steadily. The results in straight, cylindrical plasmas showed that self generated parallel current arises without trapped particle or neoclassical diffusion, as assumed by the bootstrap theory. It suggests that the fundamental mechanism seems to be the conservation of particles canonical momenta in the direction of the ignorable coordinate. We have extended the simulation to 3D to verify the model put forth. A scalable 3D EM-PIC code, with a localized field-solver, has been implemented to run on a large class of parallel computers. On the 512-node SP2 at Cornell Theory Center, we have benchmarked the 2+1/2 D calculations using 32 grids in the previously ignored direction, and a 100-fold increase in the number of particles. Our preliminary results show good agreements between the 2+1/2 D and the 3D calculations. We will present our 3D results at the meeting

  11. Improving 3D structure prediction from chemical shift data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schot, Gijs van der [Utrecht University, Computational Structural Biology, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands); Zhang, Zaiyong [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, Department Chemie (Germany); Vernon, Robert [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Shen, Yang [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Vranken, Wim F. [VIB, Department of Structural Biology (Belgium); Baker, David [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J., E-mail: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Computational Structural Biology, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands); Lange, Oliver F., E-mail: oliver.lange@tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Biomolecular NMR and Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, Department Chemie (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    We report advances in the calculation of protein structures from chemical shift nuclear magnetic resonance data alone. Our previously developed method, CS-Rosetta, assembles structures from a library of short protein fragments picked from a large library of protein structures using chemical shifts and sequence information. Here we demonstrate that combination of a new and improved fragment picker and the iterative sampling algorithm RASREC yield significant improvements in convergence and accuracy. Moreover, we introduce improved criteria for assessing the accuracy of the models produced by the method. The method was tested on 39 proteins in the 50-100 residue size range and yields reliable structures in 70 % of the cases. All structures that passed the reliability filter were accurate (<2 A RMSD from the reference)

  12. EM modeling for GPIR using 3D FDTD modeling codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.D.

    1994-10-01

    An analysis of the one-, two-, and three-dimensional electrical characteristics of structural cement and concrete is presented. This work connects experimental efforts in characterizing cement and concrete in the frequency and time domains with the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) modeling efforts of these substances. These efforts include Electromagnetic (EM) modeling of simple lossless homogeneous materials with aggregate and targets and the modeling dispersive and lossy materials with aggregate and complex target geometries for Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar (GPIR). Two- and three-dimensional FDTD codes (developed at LLNL) where used for the modeling efforts. Purpose of the experimental and modeling efforts is to gain knowledge about the electrical properties of concrete typically used in the construction industry for bridges and other load bearing structures. The goal is to optimize the performance of a high-sample-rate impulse radar and data acquisition system and to design an antenna system to match the characteristics of this material. Results show agreement to within 2 dB of the amplitudes of the experimental and modeled data while the frequency peaks correlate to within 10% the differences being due to the unknown exact nature of the aggregate placement.

  13. A Simplified Method for the 3D Printing of Molecular Models for Chemical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Oliver A. H.; Spencer, Michelle J. S.

    2018-01-01

    Using tangible models to help students visualize chemical structures in three dimensions has been a mainstay of chemistry education for many years. Conventional chemistry modeling kits are, however, limited in the types and accuracy of the molecules, bonds and structures they can be used to build. The recent development of 3D printing technology…

  14. A 3D multilevel model of damage and strength of wood: Analysis of microstructural effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2011-01-01

    A 3D hierarchical computational model of damage and strength of wood is developed. The model takes into account the four scale microstructures of wood, including the microfibril reinforced structure at nanoscale, multilayered cell walls at microscale, hexagon-shape-tube cellular structure...

  15. Modeling open nanophotonic systems using the Fourier modal method: Generalization to 3D Cartesian coordinates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häyrynen, Teppo; Østerkryger, Andreas Dyhl; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz

    2017-01-01

    Recently, an open geometry Fourier modal method based on a new combination ofan open boundary condition and a non-uniform $k$-space discretization wasintroduced for rotationally symmetric structures providing a more efficientapproach for modeling nanowires and micropillar cavities [J. Opt. Soc. A...... moreaccurate and efficient modeling of open 3D nanophotonic structures....

  16. Automated reconstruction of 3D models from real environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, V.; Ng, K.; Wolfart, E.; Gonçalves, J. G. M.; Hogg, D.

    This paper describes an integrated approach to the construction of textured 3D scene models of building interiors from laser range data and visual images. This approach has been implemented in a collection of algorithms and sensors within a prototype device for 3D reconstruction, known as the EST (Environmental Sensor for Telepresence). The EST can take the form of a push trolley or of an autonomous mobile platform. The Autonomous EST (AEST) has been designed to provide an integrated solution for automating the creation of complete models. Embedded software performs several functions, including triangulation of the range data, registration of video texture, registration and integration of data acquired from different capture points. Potential applications include facilities management for the construction industry and creating reality models to be used in general areas of virtual reality, for example, virtual studios, virtualised reality for content-related applications (e.g., CD-ROMs), social telepresence, architecture and others. The paper presents the main components of the EST/AEST, and presents some example results obtained from the prototypes. The reconstructed model is encoded in VRML format so that it is possible to access and view the model via the World Wide Web.

  17. 3D model tools for architecture and archaeology reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Ioan; Herban, Ioan Sorin; Stoian, Mircea; Vilceanu, Clara-Beatrice

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of architectural and patrimonial survey is to provide a precise documentation of the status quo of the surveyed objects (monuments, buildings, archaeological object and sites) for preservation and protection, for scientific studies and restoration purposes, for the presentation to the general public. Cultural heritage documentation includes an interdisciplinary approach having as purpose an overall understanding of the object itself and an integration of the information which characterize it. The accuracy and the precision of the model are directly influenced by the quality of the measurements realized on field and by the quality of the software. The software is in the process of continuous development, which brings many improvements. On the other side, compared to aerial photogrammetry, close range photogrammetry and particularly architectural photogrammetry is not limited to vertical photographs with special cameras. The methodology of terrestrial photogrammetry has changed significantly and various photographic acquisitions are widely in use. In this context, the present paper brings forward a comparative study of TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner) and digital photogrammetry for 3D modeling. The authors take into account the accuracy of the 3D models obtained, the overall costs involved for each technology and method and the 4th dimension - time. The paper proves its applicability as photogrammetric technologies are nowadays used at a large scale for obtaining the 3D model of cultural heritage objects, efficacious in their assessment and monitoring, thus contributing to historic conservation. Its importance also lies in highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each method used - very important issue for both the industrial and scientific segment when facing decisions such as in which technology to invest more research and funds.

  18. Geometric Structure of 3D Spinal Curves: Plane Regions and Connecting Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthonnaud, E.; Hilmi, R.; Dimnet, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new study of the geometric structure of 3D spinal curves. The spine is considered as an heterogeneous beam, compound of vertebrae and intervertebral discs. The spine is modeled as a deformable wire along which vertebrae are beads rotating about the wire. 3D spinal curves are compound of plane regions connected together by zones of transition. The 3D spinal curve is uniquely flexed along the plane regions. The angular offsets between adjacent regions are concentrated at level of the middle zones of transition, so illustrating the heterogeneity of the spinal geometric structure. The plane regions along the 3D spinal curve must satisfy two criteria: (i) a criterion of minimum distance between the curve and the regional plane and (ii) a criterion controlling that the curve is continuously plane at the level of the region. The geometric structure of each 3D spinal curve is characterized by the sizes and orientations of regional planes, by the parameters representing flexed regions and by the sizes and functions of zones of transition. Spinal curves of asymptomatic subjects show three plane regions corresponding to spinal curvatures: lumbar, thoracic and cervical curvatures. In some scoliotic spines, four plane regions may be detected. PMID:25031873

  19. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, Maxim [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Airapetian, Vladimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (United States); NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Lin, Haosheng, E-mail: vladimir.airapetian@nasa.gov [College of Natural Sciences, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Pukalani, HI (United States)

    2016-08-09

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from 1.5 to 4 R{sub ⊙} using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 Å band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below ~2.5 R{sub ⊙}. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  20. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Kramar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131 to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D coronal electron density in the range of heights from $1.5$ to $4 R_odot$ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 AA band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below $sim 2.5 R_odot$. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  1. Embedded sensing : Integrating sensors in 3-D printed structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkshoorn, Alexander; Werkman, Patrick; Welleweerd, Marcel; Wolterink, Gerhard Jan Willem; Eijking, Bram; Delamare, John; Sanders, Remco; Krijnen, Gijs J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Current additive manufacturing allows for the implementation of electrically interrogated 3-D printed sensors. In this contribution various technologies, sensing principles and applications are discussed. We will give both an overview of some of the sensors presented in literature as well as some of

  2. 3D, parallel fluid-structure interaction code

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oxtoby, Oliver F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the development of a 3D parallel Fluid–Structure–Interaction (FSI) solver and its application to benchmark problems. Fluid and solid domains are discretised using and edge-based finite-volume scheme for efficient parallel...

  3. 3D concrete printing – a structural engineering perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salet, T.A.M.; Bos, F.P.; Wolfs, R.J.M.; Ahmed, Z.Y.; Hordijk, D.A.; Luković, M.

    2017-01-01

    3D Concrete Printing (3DCP) is being developed in an increasing number of places around the globe. The focus is mainly on a trial-and-error based exploration of the possibilities. However, to obtain a viable manufacturing technology and realize the 3DCP potential, a higher level of process control

  4. Optimising 3D printed concrete structures using topology optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, P.; Mathot, M.; Bos, F.P.; Coenders, J.; Hordijk, D.A.; Luković, M.

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing and 3D printing are rapidly developing digital fabrication techniques (Lu et al. 2015). After the first steps in small scale printing of metals (Frazier 2014) and plastics (Gibson et al. 2014) have been made, research from various groups around the world is now also focusing

  5. A novel 3D skin explant model to study anaerobic bacterial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maboni, Grazieli; Davenport, Rebecca; Sessford, Kate

    2017-01-01

    of the tissue structure and the cell types present in the host environment. A 3D skin culture model can be set up using tissues acquired from surgical procedures or post slaughter, making it a cost effective and attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The majority of 3D culture models have been......Skin infection studies are often limited by financial and ethical constraints, and alternatives, such as monolayer cell culture, do not reflect many cellular processes limiting their application. For a more functional replacement, 3D skin culture models offer many advantages such as the maintenance...... bacterium and the causative agent of footrot. The mechanism of infection and host immune response to D. nodosus is poorly understood. Here we present a novel 3D skin ex vivo model to study anaerobic bacterial infections using ovine skin explants infected with D. nodosus. Our results demonstrate that D...

  6. Recent progress in modelling 3D lithospheric deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, B. J. P.; Popov, A.; May, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Modelling 3D lithospheric deformation remains a challenging task, predominantly because the variations in rock types, as well as nonlinearities due to for example plastic deformation result in sharp and very large jumps in effective viscosity contrast. As a result, there are only a limited number of 3D codes available, most of which are using direct solvers which are computationally and memory-wise very demanding. As a result, the resolutions for typical model runs are quite modest, despite the use of hundreds of processors (and using much larger computers is unlikely to bring much improvement in this situation). For this reason we recently developed a new 3D deformation code,called LaMEM: Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model. LaMEM is written on top of PETSc, and as a result it runs on massive parallel machines and we have a large number of iterative solvers available (including geometric and algebraic multigrid methods). As it remains unclear which solver combinations work best under which conditions, we have implemented most currently suggested methods (such as schur complement reduction or Fully coupled iterations). In addition, we can use either a finite element discretization (with Q1P0, stabilized Q1Q1 or Q2P-1 elements) or a staggered finite difference discretization for the same input geometry, which is based on a marker and cell technique). This gives us he flexibility to test various solver methodologies on the same model setup, in terms of accuracy, speed, memory usage etc. Here, we will report on some features of LaMEM, on recent code additions, as well as on some lessons we learned which are important for modelling 3D lithospheric deformation. Specifically we will discuss: 1) How we combine a particle-and-cell method to make it work with both a finite difference and a (lagrangian, eulerian or ALE) finite element formulation, with only minor code modifications code 2) How finite difference and finite element discretizations compare in terms of

  7. The Engelbourg's ruins: from 3D TLS point cloud acquisition to 3D virtual and historic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Mathieu; Berger, Solveig; Nobile, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    The Castle of Engelbourg was built at the beginning of the 13th century, at the top of the Schlossberg. It is situated on the territory of the municipality of Thann (France), at the crossroads of Alsace and Lorraine, and dominates the outlet of the valley of Thur. Its strategic position was one of the causes of its systematic destructions during the 17th century, and Louis XIV finished his fate by ordering his demolition in 1673. Today only few vestiges remain, of which a section of the main tower from about 7m of diameter and 4m of wide laying on its slice, unique characteristic in the regional castral landscape. It is visible since the valley, was named "the Eye of the witch", and became a key attraction of the region. The site, which extends over approximately one hectare, is for several years the object of numerous archaeological studies and is at the heart of a project of valuation of the vestiges today. It was indeed a key objective, among the numerous planned works, to realize a 3D model of the site in its current state, in other words, a virtual model "such as seized", exploitable as well from a cultural and tourist point of view as by scientists and in archaeological researches. The team of the ICube/INSA lab had in responsibility the realization of this model, the acquisition of the data until the delivery of the virtual model, thanks to 3D TLS and topographic surveying methods. It was also planned to integrate into this 3D model, data of 2D archives, stemming from series of former excavations. The objectives of this project were the following ones: • Acquisition of 3D digital data of the site and 3D modelling • Digitization of the 2D archaeological data and integration in the 3D model • Implementation of a database connected to the 3D model • Virtual Visit of the site The obtained results allowed us to visualize every 3D object individually, under several forms (point clouds, 3D meshed objects and models, etc.) and at several levels of detail

  8. Discussion of Source Reconstruction Models Using 3D MCG Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Massimo De; Uchikawa, Yoshinori

    In this study we performed the source reconstruction of magnetocardiographic signals generated by the human heart activity to localize the site of origin of the heart activation. The localizations were performed in a four compartment model of the human volume conductor. The analyses were conducted on normal subjects and on a subject affected by the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Different models of the source activation were used to evaluate whether a general model of the current source can be applied in the study of the cardiac inverse problem. The data analyses were repeated using normal and vector component data of the MCG. The results show that a distributed source model has the better accuracy in performing the source reconstructions, and that 3D MCG data allow finding smaller differences between the different source models.

  9. A Pseudo-3D Model for Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuliang Yin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous methods for modelling Rayleigh waves produced by a meander-line-coil electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT consisted mostly of two-dimensional (2D simulations that focussed on the vertical plane of the material. This paper presents a pseudo-three-dimensional (3D model that extends the simulation space to both vertical and horizontal planes. For the vertical plane, we combines analytical and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD methods to model Rayleigh waves’ propagation within an aluminium plate and their scattering behaviours by cracks. For the horizontal surface plane, we employ an analytical method to investigate the radiation pattern of Rayleigh waves at various depths. The experimental results suggest that the models and the modelling techniques are valid.

  10. Computational Modelling of Piston Ring Dynamics in 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dlugoš Jozef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced computational models of a piston assembly based on the level of virtual prototypes require a detailed description of piston ring behaviour. Considering these requirements, the piston rings operate in regimes that cannot, in general, be simplified into an axisymmetric model. The piston and the cylinder liner do not have a perfect round shape, mainly due to machining tolerances and external thermo-mechanical loads. If the ring cannot follow the liner deformations, a local loss of contact occurs resulting in blow-by and increased consumption of lubricant oil in the engine. Current computational models are unable to implement such effects. The paper focuses on the development of a flexible 3D piston ring model based on the Timoshenko beam theory using the multibody system (MBS. The MBS model is compared to the finite element method (FEM solution.

  11. 3D Shape Modeling Using High Level Descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vedrana

    features like thorns, bark and scales. Presented here is a simple method for easy modeling, transferring and editing that kind of texture. The method is an extension of the height-field texture, but incorporates an additional tilt of the height field. Related to modeling non-heightfield textures, a part...... of my work involved developing feature-aware resizing of models with complex surfaces consisting of underlying shape and a distinctive texture detail. The aim was to deform an object while preserving the shape and size of the features.......The goal of this Ph.D. project is to investigate and improve the methods for describing the surface of 3D objects, with focus on modeling geometric texture on surfaces. Surface modeling being a large field of research, the work done during this project concentrated around a few smaller areas...

  12. 3D CFD Modeling of the LMF System: Desulfurization Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Pitts, April; Zhang, Daojie; Nastac, Laurentiu; Williams, Robert

    A fully transient 3D CFD modeling approach capable of predicting the three phase (gas, slag and steel) fluid flow characteristics and behavior of the slag/steel interface in the argon gas bottom stirred ladle with two off-centered porous plugs (Ladle Metallurgical Furnace or LMF) has been recently developed. The model predicts reasonably well the fluid flow characteristics in the LMF system and the observed size of the slag eyes for both the high-stirring and low-stirring conditions. A desulfurization reaction kinetics model considering metal/slag interface characteristics is developed in conjunction with the CFD modeling approach. The model is applied in this study to determine the effects of processing time, and gas flow rate on the efficiency of desulfurization in the studied LMF system.

  13. Radiative transfer model for heterogeneous 3-D scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.; Kirchner, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A general mathematical framework for simulating processes in heterogeneous 3-D scenes is presented. Specifically, a model was designed and coded for application to radiative transfers in vegetative scenes. The model is unique in that it predicts (1) the directional spectral reflectance factors as a function of the sensor's azimuth and zenith angles and the sensor's position above the canopy, (2) the spectral absorption as a function of location within the scene, and (3) the directional spectral radiance as a function of the sensor's location within the scene. The model was shown to follow known physical principles of radiative transfer. Initial verification of the model as applied to a soybean row crop showed that the simulated directional reflectance data corresponded relatively well in gross trends to the measured data. However, the model can be greatly improved by incorporating more sophisticated and realistic anisotropic scattering algorithms

  14. 3D Geothermal Modelling of the Mount Amiata Hydrothermal System in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Fulignati

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we build a subsurface model that helps in visualizing and understanding the structural framework, geology and their interactions with the Mt. Amiata geothermal system. Modelling in 3D provides the possibility to interpolate the geometry of structures and is an effective way of understanding geological features. The 3D modelling approach appears to be crucial for further progress in the reconstruction of the assessment of the geothermal model of Mt. Amiata. Furthermore, this model is used as the basis of a 3D numerical thermo-fluid-dynamic model of the existing reservoir(s. The integration between borehole data and numerical modelling results allows reconstructing the temperature distribution in the subsoil of the Mt. Amiata area.

  15. 3D modeling of electric fields in the LUX detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D. S.; Alsum, S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Beltrame, P.; Bernard, E. P.; Bernstein, A.; Biesiadzinski, T. P.; Boulton, E. M.; Brás, P.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; Carmona-Benitez, M. C.; Chan, C.; Currie, A.; Cutter, J. E.; Davison, T. J. R.; Dobi, A.; Druszkiewicz, E.; Edwards, B. N.; Fallon, S. R.; Fan, A.; Fiorucci, S.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Genovesi, J.; Ghag, C.; Gilchriese, M. G. D.; Hall, C. R.; Hanhardt, M.; Haselschwardt, S. J.; Hertel, S. A.; Hogan, D. P.; Horn, M.; Huang, D. Q.; Ignarra, C. M.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Ji, W.; Kamdin, K.; Kazkaz, K.; Khaitan, D.; Knoche, R.; Larsen, N. A.; Lenardo, B. G.; Lesko, K. T.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M. I.; Manalaysay, A.; Mannino, R. L.; Marzioni, M. F.; McKinsey, D. N.; Mei, D.-M.; Mock, J.; Moongweluwan, M.; Morad, J. A.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Nehrkorn, C.; Nelson, H. N.; Neves, F.; O'Sullivan, K.; Oliver-Mallory, K. C.; Palladino, K. J.; Pease, E. K.; Rhyne, C.; Shaw, S.; Shutt, T. A.; Silva, C.; Solmaz, M.; Solovov, V. N.; Sorensen, P.; Sumner, T. J.; Szydagis, M.; Taylor, D. J.; Taylor, W. C.; Tennyson, B. P.; Terman, P. A.; Tiedt, D. R.; To, W. H.; Tripathi, M.; Tvrznikova, L.; Uvarov, S.; Velan, V.; Verbus, J. R.; Webb, R. C.; White, J. T.; Whitis, T. J.; Witherell, M. S.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Xu, J.; Yazdani, K.; Young, S. K.; Zhang, C.

    2017-11-01

    This work details the development of a three-dimensional (3D) electric field model for the LUX detector. The detector took data to search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) during two periods. After the first period completed, a time-varying non-uniform negative charge developed in the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) panels that define the radial boundary of the detector's active volume. This caused electric field variations in the detector in time, depth and azimuth, generating an electrostatic radially-inward force on electrons on their way upward to the liquid surface. To map this behavior, 3D electric field maps of the detector's active volume were generated on a monthly basis. This was done by fitting a model built in COMSOL Multiphysics to the uniformly distributed calibration data that were collected on a regular basis. The modeled average PTFE charge density increased over the course of the exposure from -3.6 to -5.5 μC/m2. From our studies, we deduce that the electric field magnitude varied locally while the mean value of the field of ~200 V/cm remained constant throughout the exposure. As a result of this work the varying electric fields and their impact on event reconstruction and discrimination were successfully modeled.

  16. 3D Marine MT Modeling for a Topographic Seafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B., Sr.; Yin, C.; Ren, X.; Liu, Y.; Huang, X.; Liu, L.

    2017-12-01

    As an effective geophysical tool, marine magnetotelluric (MMT) exploration has been widely used in offshore oil and gas exploration. Accordingly, the MMT forward modelling has made big progress. However, most of the researches are focused on a flat seafloor. In this paper, we present a 3D finite-element (FE) algorithm for marine MT forward modelling based on unstructured grids that can accurately model the MMT responses for a topographic seafloor. The boundary value problem for the forward modelling is described by an Helmholtz equation together with the boundary conditions derived by assuming the electrical polarizations respectively along the x- and y-direction on the top surface of the modelling domain. Applying the Galerkin method to the boundary value problem and substituting the unstructured finite-element vector shape function into the equation, we derive the final large linear system for the two polarizations, from which the EM fields is obtained for the calculation of impedance apparent resistivities and phases. To verify the effectiveness of our algorithm, we compare our modelling results with those by Key's (2013) 2D marine MT open source code of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Figure 1). From Figure 1, one sees that the two agree well, implying that our 3D modelling method based unstructured FE is an effective modelling tool for topographic seafloor. From the MMT modelling responses for other topographic seafloor models (not shown here), we further observe that 1) the apparent resistivities have a similar profile pattern to the topography at the seafloor; 2) at the edges of the topography, there exist sharp changes; 3) the seafloor topography may dominate the responses from the abnormal bodies under the seafloor. This paper is supported by Key Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (41530320), China Natural Science Foundation for Young Scientists (41404093), and Key National Research Project of China (2016YFC0303100, 2017YFC0601900)

  17. AxiSEM3D: a new fast method for global wave propagation in 3-D Earth models with undulating discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, K.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; van Driel, M.; Al-Attar, D.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, computationally efficient numerical method to simulate global seismic wave propagation in realistic 3-D Earth models with laterally heterogeneous media and finite boundary perturbations. Our method is a hybrid of pseudo-spectral and spectral element methods (SEM). We characterize the azimuthal dependence of 3-D wavefields in terms of Fourier series, such that the 3-D equations of motion reduce to an algebraic system of coupled 2-D meridional equations, which can be solved by a 2-D spectral element method (based on www.axisem.info). Computational efficiency of our method stems from lateral smoothness of global Earth models (with respect to wavelength) as well as axial singularity of seismic point sources, which jointly confine the Fourier modes of wavefields to a few lower orders. All boundary perturbations that violate geometric spherical symmetry, including Earth's ellipticity, topography and bathymetry, undulations of internal discontinuities such as Moho and CMB, are uniformly considered by means of a Particle Relabeling Transformation.The MPI-based high performance C++ code AxiSEM3D, is now available for forward simulations upon 3-D Earth models with fluid outer core, ellipticity, and both mantle and crustal structures. We show novel benchmarks for global wave solutions in 3-D mantle structures between our method and an independent, fully discretized 3-D SEM with remarkable agreement. Performance comparisons are carried out on three state-of-the-art tomography models, with seismic period going down to 5s. It is shown that our method runs up to two orders of magnitude faster than the 3-D SEM for such settings, and such computational advantage scales favourably with seismic frequency. By examining wavefields passing through hypothetical Gaussian plumes of varying sharpness, we identify in model-wavelength space the limits where our method may lose its advantage.

  18. Integration of 3D photogrammetric outcrop models in the reservoir modelling workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Remy; Joseph, Philippe; Lerat, Olivier; Schmitz, Julien; Doligez, Brigitte; Jardin, Anne

    2014-05-01

    3D technologies are now widely used in geosciences to reconstruct outcrops in 3D. The technology used for the 3D reconstruction is usually based on Lidar, which provides very precise models. Such datasets offer the possibility to build well-constrained outcrop analogue models for reservoir study purposes. The photogrammetry is an alternate methodology which principles are based in determining the geometric properties of an object from photographic pictures taken from different angles. Outcrop data acquisition is easy, and this methodology allows constructing 3D outcrop models with many advantages such as: - light and fast acquisition, - moderate processing time (depending on the size of the area of interest), - integration of field data and 3D outcrops into the reservoir modelling tools. Whatever the method, the advantages of digital outcrop model are numerous as already highlighted by Hodgetts (2013), McCaffrey et al. (2005) and Pringle et al. (2006): collection of data from otherwise inaccessible areas, access to different angles of view, increase of the possible measurements, attributes analysis, fast rate of data collection, and of course training and communication. This paper proposes a workflow where 3D geocellular models are built by integrating all sources of information from outcrops (surface picking, sedimentological sections, structural and sedimentary dips…). The 3D geomodels that are reconstructed can be used at the reservoir scale, in order to compare the outcrop information with subsurface models: the detailed facies models of the outcrops are transferred into petrophysical and acoustic models, which are used to test different scenarios of seismic and fluid flow modelling. The detailed 3D models are also used to test new techniques of static reservoir modelling, based either on geostatistical approaches or on deterministic (process-based) simulation techniques. A modelling workflow has been designed to model reservoir geometries and properties from

  19. 3D printing of CNT- and graphene-based conductive polymer nanocomposites by fused deposition modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanasekaran, K.; Heijmans, T.; van Bennekom, S.; Woldhuis, H.; Wijnia, S.; de With, G.; Friedrich, H.

    2017-01-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is limited by the availability of application specific functional materials. Here we illustrate printing of non-conventional polymer nanocomposites (CNT- and graphene-based polybutylene terephthalate (PBT)) on a commercially available desktop 3D printer leading toward printing of electrically conductive structures. The printability, electrical conductivity and mechanical stability of the polymer nanocomposites before and after 3D printing was evaluated. The res...

  20. A validation test for Adagio through replication of Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw JAS3D models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoung Yoon

    2013-06-01

    JAS3D, a three dimensional iterative solid mechanics code, has been used for structural analyses for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve system since the 1990s. JAS3D is no longer supported by Sandia National Laboratories, and has been replaced by Adagio. To validate the transition from JAS3D to Adagio, the existing JAS3D input decks and user subroutines for Bayou Choctaw and Big Hill models were converted for use with Adagio. The calculation results from the Adagio runs are compared to the JAS3D. Since the Adagio results are very similar to the JAS3D results, Adagio is judged to be performing satisfactorily.

  1. ALGE3D: A Three-Dimensional Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, G. M.

    2017-12-01

    Of the top 10 most populated US cities from a 2015 US Census Bureau estimate, 7 of the cities are situated near the ocean, a bay, or on one of the Great Lakes. A contamination of the water ways in the United States could be devastating to the economy (through tourism and industries such as fishing), public health (from direct contact, or contaminated drinking water), and in some cases even infrastructure (water treatment plants). Current national response models employed by emergency response agencies have well developed models to simulate the effects of hazardous contaminants in riverine systems that are primarily driven by one-dimensional flows; however in more complex systems, such as tidal estuaries, bays, or lakes, a more complex model is needed. While many models exist, none are capable of quick deployment in emergency situations that could contain a variety of release situations including a mixture of both particulate and dissolved chemicals in a complex flow area. ALGE3D, developed at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), is a three-dimensional hydrodynamic code which solves the momentum, mass, and energy conservation equations to predict the movement and dissipation of thermal or dissolved chemical plumes discharged into cooling lakes, rivers, and estuaries. ALGE3D is capable of modeling very complex flows, including areas with tidal flows which include wetting and drying of land. Recent upgrades have increased the capabilities including the transport of particulate tracers, allowing for more complete modeling of the transport of pollutants. In addition the model is capable of coupling with a one-dimension riverine transport model or a two-dimension atmospheric deposition model in the event that a contamination event occurs upstream or upwind of the water body.

  2. Anti-3D Weapon Model Detection for Safe 3D Printing Based on Convolutional Neural Networks and D2 Shape Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giao N. Pham

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of 3D printing, weapons are easily printed without any restriction from the production managers. Therefore, anti-3D weapon model detection is necessary issue in safe 3D printing to prevent the printing of 3D weapon models. In this paper, we would like to propose an anti-3D weapon model detection algorithm to prevent the printing of anti-3D weapon models for safe 3D printing based on the D2 shape distribution and an improved convolutional neural networks (CNNs. The purpose of the proposed algorithm is to detect anti-3D weapon models when they are used in 3D printing. The D2 shape distribution is computed from random points on the surface of a 3D weapon model and their geometric features in order to construct a D2 vector. The D2 vector is then trained by improved CNNs. The CNNs are used to detect anti-3D weapon models for safe 3D printing by training D2 vectors which have been constructed from the D2 shape distribution of 3D weapon models. Experiments with 3D weapon models proved that the D2 shape distribution of 3D weapon models in the same class is the same. Training and testing results also verified that the accuracy of the proposed algorithm is higher than the conventional works. The proposed algorithm is applied in a small application, and it could detect anti-3D weapon models for safe 3D printing.

  3. Velocity Structure and 3D Finite Element Modeling for Critical Instability of Gas Hydrate-related Slipstream Submarine Slide, offshore Vancouver Island, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    LONG, S.; He, T.; Lan, K.; Spence, G.; Yelisetti, S.

    2016-12-01

    The previous study indicated that Slipstream submarine landslide is one of a gas hydrate-related slope failures on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin, off Vancouver Island, Canada. The OBS data collected during SeaJade project were used to derive the subseafloor Vp & Vs structures. The anomalous high Vp of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 (± 10) mbsf closely matches the estimated depth of the glide plane. The modelled Vs above the BSR at a depth of 265-275 mbsf is about 100-150 m/s higher than a theoretical 100% water saturated background value, indicating that the hydrate acts as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment. Also, the Vp & Vs above BSR both indicate a consistent 40% saturation of gas hydrate. On the basis of high accurate submarine bathymetry obtained by multibeam sounding system, the submarine landform before slump is reconstructed by comparing the slump headwall geometry with surrounding ridges. Using the elastic moduli determined from Vp & Vs, the stress status was calculated by the finite element method for different conditions and confirmed that the undersea sliding process related with gas hydrate starts from the toe of the slope and then progressively retreats to the place of current headwall, in a series of triangular blocks or wedges. The shear stress are then compared with the frame shear strength of geological model, which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges The simulation results found that the ridge was stable under its own weight, but gas hydrate saturation decrease and pore-water pressure increase will greatly reduce shear strength of sediments and may cause a landslide. Since the study area is in the earthquake belt, the large seismic acceleration will greatly affect pore pressure distribution within the ridge. The simulation results indicated that the shallow high-velocity gas hydrate layer coincident with glide plane depth is more

  4. 3D Massive MIMO Systems: Modeling and Performance Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Qurrat-Ul-Ain

    2015-07-30

    Multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems of current LTE releases are capable of adaptation in the azimuth only. Recently, the trend is to enhance system performance by exploiting the channel’s degrees of freedom in the elevation, which necessitates the characterization of 3D channels. We present an information-theoretic channel model for MIMO systems that supports the elevation dimension. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy, which enables us to determine the distribution of the channel matrix consistent with the prior information on the angles. Based on this model, we provide analytical expression for the cumulative density function (CDF) of the mutual information (MI) for systems with a single receive and finite number of transmit antennas in the general signalto- interference-plus-noise-ratio (SINR) regime. The result is extended to systems with finite receive antennas in the low SINR regime. A Gaussian approximation to the asymptotic behavior of MI distribution is derived for the large number of transmit antennas and paths regime. We corroborate our analysis with simulations that study the performance gains realizable through meticulous selection of the transmit antenna downtilt angles, confirming the potential of elevation beamforming to enhance system performance. The results are directly applicable to the analysis of 5G 3D-Massive MIMO-systems.

  5. Methane Fluxes in West Siberia: 3-D Regional Model Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagovkina, S. V.; Karol, I. L.; Zubov, V. A.; Lagun, V. E.; Reshetnikov, A. I.; Rozanov, E. V.

    2001-01-01

    The West Siberian region is one of the main contributors of the atmospheric greenhouse gas methane due to the large areas of wetlands, rivers, lakes and numerous gas deposits situated there.But there are no reliable estimations of integral methane flux from this area into the atmosphere. For assessment of methane fluxes in West Siberia the specially constructed 3-D regional chemical transport model was applied. The 3-D distribution of methane is calculated on the basis of the current meteorological data fields(wind, temperature, geopotential) updated 4 times a day. The methane concentrations measured near the main gas fields of West Siberia in the summer season of 1999, were used for correction of methane flux intensity estimates obtained previously by comparison of measurements carried out in summer 1993 and 1996 with modelled methane mixing ratio distribution. This set of field and model experiments confirmed the preliminary conclusion about low leakage intensity: anthropogenic methane flux does not exceed 5-15% of total summer methane flux, estimated as 11-12 Mt CH 4 in summer from this region, in spite of the large areas of gas deposits located there

  6. 3D MODELING OF THE ARCHAIC AMPHORAS OF IONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Denker

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Few other regions offer such a rich collection of amphoras than the cities of Ionia. Throughout history amphoras of these cities had been spread all over the Mediterranean. Despite their common characteristics, amphora manufacturing cities of Ionia had their own distinctive styles that can be identified. They differed in details of shape and decoration. Each city produced an authentic type of amphora which served as a trademark of itself and enabled its attribution to where it originated from. That’s why, amphoras provide important insight into commerce of old ages and yield evidence into ancient sailing routes. Owing to this our knowledge of the ancient trade is profoundly enriched. The following is based on the finds of amphoras which originated from the Ionian cities of Chios, Clazomenai, Lesbos, Miletus, and Samos. Starting from city-specific forms which offer interpretative advantages in provenancing, this article surveys the salient features of the regional forms and styles of the those Ionian cities. 3D modeling is utilized with the aim of bringing fresh glimpses of the investigated amphoras by showing how they originally looked. Due to their virtual indestructibility these models offer interpretative advantages by enabling experimental testing of hypotheses upon the finds without risking them. The 3D models in the following sections were reconstructed from numerous fragments of necks, handles, body sherds and bases. They convey in color- unlike the monochrome drawings which we were accustomed to-the texture, decoration, tint and the vitality of the amphoras of Ionia.

  7. 3D Model Retrieval Based on Vector Quantisation Index Histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z M; Luo, H; Pan, J S

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique to retrieval 3D mesh models using vector quantisation index histograms. Firstly, points are sampled uniformly on mesh surface. Secondly, to a point five features representing global and local properties are extracted. Thus feature vectors of points are obtained. Third, we select several models from each class, and employ their feature vectors as a training set. After training using LBG algorithm, a public codebook is constructed. Next, codeword index histograms of the query model and those in database are computed. The last step is to compute the distance between histograms of the query and those of the models in database. Experimental results show the effectiveness of our method

  8. The virtual craniofacial patient: 3D jaw modeling and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, Reyes; Memon, Ahmed; Fidaleo, Douglas A; Neumann, Ulrich; Mah, James

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present new developments in the area of 3D human jaw modeling and animation. CT (Computed Tomography) scans have traditionally been used to evaluate patients with dental implants, assess tumors, cysts, fractures and surgical procedures. More recently this data has been utilized to generate models. Researchers have reported semi-automatic techniques to segment and model the human jaw from CT images and manually segment the jaw from MRI images. Recently opto-electronic and ultrasonic-based systems (JMA from Zebris) have been developed to record mandibular position and movement. In this research project we introduce: (1) automatic patient-specific three-dimensional jaw modeling from CT data and (2) three-dimensional jaw motion simulation using jaw tracking data from the JMA system (Zebris).

  9. The Implications of 3D Thermal Structure on 1D Atmospheric Retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian [NYU Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Greene, Thomas, E-mail: jasmina@nyu.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, Space Sciece and Astrobiology Division, M.S. 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2017-10-20

    Using the atmospheric structure from a 3D global radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of HD 189733b and the open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code, we investigate the difference between the secondary-eclipse temperature structure produced with a 3D simulation and the best-fit 1D retrieved model. Synthetic data are generated by integrating the 3D models over the Spitzer , the Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ), and the James Web Space Telescope ( JWST ) bandpasses, covering the wavelength range between 1 and 11 μ m where most spectroscopically active species have pronounced features. Using the data from different observing instruments, we present detailed comparisons between the temperature–pressure profiles recovered by BART and those from the 3D simulations. We calculate several averages of the 3D thermal structure and explore which particular thermal profile matches the retrieved temperature structure. We implement two temperature parameterizations that are commonly used in retrieval to investigate different thermal profile shapes. To assess which part of the thermal structure is best constrained by the data, we generate contribution functions for our theoretical model and each of our retrieved models. Our conclusions are strongly affected by the spectral resolution of the instruments included, their wavelength coverage, and the number of data points combined. We also see some limitations in each of the temperature parametrizations, as they are not able to fully match the complex curvatures that are usually produced in hydrodynamic simulations. The results show that our 1D retrieval is recovering a temperature and pressure profile that most closely matches the arithmetic average of the 3D thermal structure. When we use a higher resolution, more data points, and a parametrized temperature profile that allows more flexibility in the middle part of the atmosphere, we find a better match between the retrieved temperature and pressure profile and

  10. The Implications of 3D Thermal Structure on 1D Atmospheric Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Greene, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Using the atmospheric structure from a 3D global radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of HD 189733b and the open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code, we investigate the difference between the secondary-eclipse temperature structure produced with a 3D simulation and the best-fit 1D retrieved model. Synthetic data are generated by integrating the 3D models over the Spitzer, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the James Web Space Telescope (JWST) bandpasses, covering the wavelength range between 1 and 11 μm where most spectroscopically active species have pronounced features. Using the data from different observing instruments, we present detailed comparisons between the temperature-pressure profiles recovered by BART and those from the 3D simulations. We calculate several averages of the 3D thermal structure and explore which particular thermal profile matches the retrieved temperature structure. We implement two temperature parameterizations that are commonly used in retrieval to investigate different thermal profile shapes. To assess which part of the thermal structure is best constrained by the data, we generate contribution functions for our theoretical model and each of our retrieved models. Our conclusions are strongly affected by the spectral resolution of the instruments included, their wavelength coverage, and the number of data points combined. We also see some limitations in each of the temperature parametrizations, as they are not able to fully match the complex curvatures that are usually produced in hydrodynamic simulations. The results show that our 1D retrieval is recovering a temperature and pressure profile that most closely matches the arithmetic average of the 3D thermal structure. When we use a higher resolution, more data points, and a parametrized temperature profile that allows more flexibility in the middle part of the atmosphere, we find a better match between the retrieved temperature and pressure profile and the

  11. Electronic structure of the 3d metals. An investigation by L-shell-photoionisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, T.S.

    2007-12-03

    The 3d transition metal elements from Sc to Cu have been investigated by both photo electron emission and photo absorption. Experimental spectra in the 2p energy range are discussed based on atomic multiplet models and Hartree- Fock calculations. The samples have been evaporated from an electron bombardment crucible and excited/ionized by monochromatized synchrotron radiation. Fundamental effects and the main interactions which govern the electronic structure of the 3d metal atoms are covered. Common spectral features and trends in the series are discussed as well as the importance of many body electron correlation effects. (orig.)

  12. Novel Low Cost 3D Surface Model Reconstruction System for Plant Phenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suxing Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate high-resolution three-dimensional (3D models are essential for a non-invasive analysis of phenotypic characteristics of plants. Previous limitations in 3D computer vision algorithms have led to a reliance on volumetric methods or expensive hardware to record plant structure. We present an image-based 3D plant reconstruction system that can be achieved by using a single camera and a rotation stand. Our method is based on the structure from motion method, with a SIFT image feature descriptor. In order to improve the quality of the 3D models, we segmented the plant objects based on the PlantCV platform. We also deducted the optimal number of images needed for reconstructing a high-quality model. Experiments showed that an accurate 3D model of the plant was successfully could be reconstructed by our approach. This 3D surface model reconstruction system provides a simple and accurate computational platform for non-destructive, plant phenotyping.

  13. Biological modelling of fuzzy target volumes in 3D radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levegruen, S.; Kampen, M. van; Waschek, T.; Engenhart, R.; Schlegel, W.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The outcome of each radiotherapy depends critically on the optimal choice of the target volume. The goal of the radiotherapist is to include all tumor spread at the same time as saving as much healthy tissue as possible. Even when the information of all imaging modalities is combined, the diagnostic techniques are not sensitive and specific enough to visualize all microscopic tumor cell spread. Due to this lack of information there is room for different interpretations concerning the extend of the target volume, leading to a fuzzy target volume. The aim of this work is to develop a model to score different target volume boundaries within the region of diagnostic uncertainty in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Materials and Methods: In order to assess the region of diagnostic uncertainty, the radiotherapist defines interactively a minimal planning target volume that absolutely must be irradiated according to the diagnostic information available and a maximal planning target volume outside which no tumor cell spread is expected. For the NTCP calculation we use the Lyman 4 parameter model to estimate the response of an organ at risk to a uniform partial volume irradiation. The TCP calculation is based on the Poisson model of cell killing. The TCP estimation depends not only on volume, dose, clonogenic cell density and the α parameter of the linear quadratic model but also on the probability to find clonogenic cells in the considered volume. Inside the minimal PTV this probability is 1, outside the maximal PTV it is 0. Therefore all voxels inside the minimal PTV are assigned the value of 1 with respect to the target volume, all voxels outside the maximal PTV the value of 0. For voxels in the region of uncertainty in between, a 3D linear interpolation is performed. Here we assume the probability to follow the interpolated values. Starting with the minimal PTV, the expected gain in TCP and

  14. Untangling Slab Dynamics Using 3-D Numerical and Analytical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, A. F.; Royden, L.; Becker, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Increasingly sophisticated numerical models have enabled us to make significant strides in identifying the key controls on how subducting slabs deform. For example, 3-D models have demonstrated that subducting plate width, and the related strength of toroidal flow around the plate edge, exerts a strong control on both the curvature and the rate of migration of the trench. However, the results of numerical subduction models can be difficult to interpret, and many first order dynamics issues remain at least partially unresolved. Such issues include the dominant controls on trench migration, the interdependence of asthenospheric pressure and slab dynamics, and how nearby slabs influence each other's dynamics. We augment 3-D, dynamically evolving finite element models with simple, analytical force-balance models to distill the physics associated with subduction into more manageable parts. We demonstrate that for single, isolated subducting slabs much of the complexity of our fully numerical models can be encapsulated by simple analytical expressions. Rates of subduction and slab dip correlate strongly with the asthenospheric pressure difference across the subducting slab. For double subduction, an additional slab gives rise to more complex mantle pressure and flow fields, and significantly extends the range of plate kinematics (e.g., convergence rate, trench migration rate) beyond those present in single slab models. Despite these additional complexities, we show that much of the dynamics of such multi-slab systems can be understood using the physics illuminated by our single slab study, and that a force-balance method can be used to relate intra-plate stress to viscous pressure in the asthenosphere and coupling forces at plate boundaries. This method has promise for rapid modeling of large systems of subduction zones on a global scale.

  15. Generating Free-Form Grid Truss Structures from 3D Scanned Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction, according to physical shape, is a novel way to generate free-form grid truss structures. 3D scanning is an effective means of acquiring physical form information and it generates dense point clouds on surfaces of objects. However, generating grid truss structures from point clouds is still a challenge. Based on the advancing front technique (AFT which is widely used in Finite Element Method (FEM, a scheme for generating grid truss structures from 3D scanned point clouds is proposed in this paper. Based on the characteristics of point cloud data, the search box is adopted to reduce the search space in grid generating. A front advancing procedure suit for point clouds is established. Delaunay method and Laplacian method are used to improve the quality of the generated grids, and an adjustment strategy that locates grid nodes at appointed places is proposed. Several examples of generating grid truss structures from 3D scanned point clouds of seashells are carried out to verify the proposed scheme. Physical models of the grid truss structures generated in the examples are manufactured by 3D print, which solidifies the feasibility of the scheme.

  16. Automated 3D Damaged Cavity Model Builder for Lower Surface Acreage Tile on Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, Shannon; Zhang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The 3D Automated Thermal Tool for Damaged Acreage Tile Math Model builder was developed to perform quickly and accurately 3D thermal analyses on damaged lower surface acreage tiles and structures beneath the damaged locations on a Space Shuttle Orbiter. The 3D model builder created both TRASYS geometric math models (GMMs) and SINDA thermal math models (TMMs) to simulate an idealized damaged cavity in the damaged tile(s). The GMMs are processed in TRASYS to generate radiation conductors between the surfaces in the cavity. The radiation conductors are inserted into the TMMs, which are processed in SINDA to generate temperature histories for all of the nodes on each layer of the TMM. The invention allows a thermal analyst to create quickly and accurately a 3D model of a damaged lower surface tile on the orbiter. The 3D model builder can generate a GMM and the correspond ing TMM in one or two minutes, with the damaged cavity included in the tile material. A separate program creates a configuration file, which would take a couple of minutes to edit. This configuration file is read by the model builder program to determine the location of the damage, the correct tile type, tile thickness, structure thickness, and SIP thickness of the damage, so that the model builder program can build an accurate model at the specified location. Once the models are built, they are processed by the TRASYS and SINDA.

  17. Experimental validation of 3D printed material behaviors and their influence on the structural topology design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai Ke; Zhu, Ji Hong; Wang, Chuang; Jia, Dong Sheng; Song, Long Long; Zhang, Wei Hong

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the structures achieved by topology optimization and their fabrications by 3D printing considering the particular features of material microstructures and macro mechanical performances. Combining Digital Image Correlation and Optical Microscope, this paper experimentally explored the anisotropies of stiffness and strength existing in the 3D printed polymer material using Stereolithography (SLA) and titanium material using Selective Laser Melting (SLM). The standard specimens and typical structures obtained by topology optimization were fabricated along different building directions. On the one hand, the experimental results of these SLA produced structures showed stable properties and obviously anisotropic rules in stiffness, ultimate strengths and places of fractures. Further structural designs were performed using topology optimization when the particular mechanical behaviors of SLA printed materials were considered, which resulted in better structural performances compared to the optimized designs using `ideal' isotropic material model. On the other hand, this paper tested the mechanical behaviors of SLM printed multiscale lattice structures which were fabricated using the same metal powder and the same machine. The structural stiffness values are generally similar while the strength behaviors show a difference, which are mainly due to the irregular surface quality of the tiny structural branches of the lattice. The above evidences clearly show that the consideration of the particular behaviors of 3D printed materials is therefore indispensable for structural design and optimization in order to improve the structural performance and strengthen their practical significance.

  18. Experimental validation of 3D printed material behaviors and their influence on the structural topology design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai Ke; Zhu, Ji Hong; Wang, Chuang; Jia, Dong Sheng; Song, Long Long; Zhang, Wei Hong

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the structures achieved by topology optimization and their fabrications by 3D printing considering the particular features of material microstructures and macro mechanical performances. Combining Digital Image Correlation and Optical Microscope, this paper experimentally explored the anisotropies of stiffness and strength existing in the 3D printed polymer material using Stereolithography (SLA) and titanium material using Selective Laser Melting (SLM). The standard specimens and typical structures obtained by topology optimization were fabricated along different building directions. On the one hand, the experimental results of these SLA produced structures showed stable properties and obviously anisotropic rules in stiffness, ultimate strengths and places of fractures. Further structural designs were performed using topology optimization when the particular mechanical behaviors of SLA printed materials were considered, which resulted in better structural performances compared to the optimized designs using `ideal' isotropic material model. On the other hand, this paper tested the mechanical behaviors of SLM printed multiscale lattice structures which were fabricated using the same metal powder and the same machine. The structural stiffness values are generally similar while the strength behaviors show a difference, which are mainly due to the irregular surface quality of the tiny structural branches of the lattice. The above evidences clearly show that the consideration of the particular behaviors of 3D printed materials is therefore indispensable for structural design and optimization in order to improve the structural performance and strengthen their practical significance.

  19. Canada in 3D - Toward a Sustainable 3D Model for Canadian Geology from Diverse Data Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodaric, B.; Pilkington, M.; Snyder, D. B.; St-Onge, M. R.; Russell, H.

    2015-12-01

    Many big science issues span large areas and require data from multiple heterogeneous sources, for example climate change, resource management, and hazard mitigation. Solutions to these issues can significantly benefit from access to a consistent and integrated geological model that would serve as a framework. However, such a model is absent for most large countries including Canada, due to the size of the landmass and the fragmentation of the source data into institutional and disciplinary silos. To overcome these barriers, the "Canada in 3D" (C3D) pilot project was recently launched by the Geological Survey of Canada. C3D is designed to be evergreen, multi-resolution, and inter-disciplinary: (a) it is to be updated regularly upon acquisition of new data; (b) portions vary in resolution and will initially consist of four layers (surficial, sedimentary, crystalline, and mantle) with intermediary patches of higher-resolution fill; and (c) a variety of independently managed data sources are providing inputs, such as geophysical, 3D and 2D geological models, drill logs, and others. Notably, scalability concerns dictate a decentralized and interoperable approach, such that only key control objects, denoting anchors for the modeling process, are imported into the C3</