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Sample records for mode-of-action based approach

  1. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: a cross-disciplinary mode-of-action based approach to examining dose-response and thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Elizabeth; Boobis, Alan R; Olin, Stephen S

    2009-09-01

    The ILSI Research Foundation convened a cross-disciplinary working group to examine current approaches for assessing dose-response and identifying safe levels of intake or exposure for four categories of bioactive agents-food allergens, nutrients, pathogenic microorganisms, and environmental chemicals. This effort generated a common analytical framework-the Key Events Dose-Response Framework (KEDRF)-for systematically examining key events that occur between the initial dose of a bioactive agent and the effect of concern. Individual key events are considered with regard to factors that influence the dose-response relationship and factors that underlie variability in that relationship. This approach illuminates the connection between the processes occurring at the level of fundamental biology and the outcomes observed at the individual and population levels. Thus, it promotes an evidence-based approach for using mechanistic data to reduce reliance on default assumptions, to quantify variability, and to better characterize biological thresholds. This paper provides an overview of the KEDRF and introduces a series of four companion papers that illustrate initial application of the approach to a range of bioactive agents.

  2. Multi-class Mode of Action Classification of Toxic Compounds Using Logic Based Kernel Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Huma; Muggleton, Stephen; Sternberg, Mike J E

    2010-09-17

    Toxicity prediction is essential for drug design and development of effective therapeutics. In this paper we present an in silico strategy, to identify the mode of action of toxic compounds, that is based on the use of a novel logic based kernel method. The technique uses support vector machines in conjunction with the kernels constructed from first order rules induced by an Inductive Logic Programming system. It constructs multi-class models by using a divide and conquer reduction strategy that splits multi-classes into binary groups and solves each individual problem recursively hence generating an underlying decision list structure. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach for chemoinformatics problems like predictive toxicology, we apply it to toxicity classification in aquatic systems. The method is used to identify and classify 442 compounds with respect to the mode of action. The experimental results show that the technique successfully classifies toxic compounds and can be useful in assessing environmental risks. Experimental comparison of the performance of the proposed multi-class scheme with the standard multi-class Inductive Logic Programming algorithm and multi-class Support Vector Machine yields statistically significant results and demonstrates the potential power and benefits of the approach in identifying compounds of various toxic mechanisms. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Exploring the Modes of Action of Phosphorus-Based Flame Retardants in Polymeric Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Rabe

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus-based flame retardants were incorporated into different, easily preparable matrices, such as polymeric thermoset resins and paraffin as a proposed model for polyolefins and investigated for their flame retardancy performance. The favored mode of action of each flame retardant was identified in each respective system and at each respective concentration. Thermogravimetric analysis was used in combination with infrared spectroscopy of the evolved gas to determine the pyrolysis behavior, residue formation and the release of phosphorus species. Forced flaming tests in the cone calorimeter provided insight into burning behavior and macroscopic residue effects. The results were put into relation to the phosphorus content to reveal correlations between phosphorus concentration in the gas phase and flame inhibition performance, as well as phosphorus concentration in the residue and condensed phase activity. Total heat evolved (fire load and peak heat release rate were calculated based on changes in the effective heat of combustion and residue, and then compared with the measured values to address the modes of action of the flame retardants quantitatively. The quantification of flame inhibition, charring, and the protective layer effect measure the non-linear flame retardancy effects as functions of the phosphorus concentration. Overall, this screening approach using easily preparable polymer systems provides great insight into the effect of phosphorus in different flame retarded polymers, with regard to polymer structure, phosphorus concentration, and phosphorus species.

  4. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: A cross-Disciplinary Mode-of-Action Based Approach to Examining Does-Response and Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ILSI Research Foundation conveded a cross-disciplinary working group to examine current approaches for assessing dose-response and identifying safe levels of intake or exposure for four categoreis of bioactive agents: food allergens, nutrients, pathogenic microorganisms, and ...

  5. Innovative mode of action based in vitro assays for detection of marine neurotoxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolas, J.A.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Innovative mode of action based in vitro assays for detection of marine neurotoxins

    J. Nicolas, P.J.M. Hendriksen, T.F.H. Bovee, I.M.C.M. Rietjens

    Marine biotoxins are naturally occurring compounds produced by particular phytoplankton species. These toxins often accumulate in

  6. A redox proteomics approach to investigate the mode of action of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riebeling, Christian [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemicals and Product Safety, Berlin (Germany); Wiemann, Martin [IBE R& D gGmbH, Institute for Lung Health, Münster (Germany); Schnekenburger, Jürgen [Biomedical Technology Center, Westfälische Wilhelms-University, Münster (Germany); Kuhlbusch, Thomas A.J. [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA) e.V., Air Quality & Sustainable Nanotechnology, Duisburg (Germany); Center for Nanointegration CENIDE, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany, (Germany); Wohlleben, Wendel [BASF SE, Material Physics, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Luch, Andreas [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemicals and Product Safety, Berlin (Germany); Haase, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.haase@bfr.bund.de [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemicals and Product Safety, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Numbers of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are steadily increasing. Therefore, alternative testing approaches with reduced costs and high predictivity suitable for high throughput screening and prioritization are urgently needed to ensure a fast and effective development of safe products. In parallel, extensive research efforts are targeted to understanding modes of action of ENMs, which may also support the development of new predictive assays. Oxidative stress is a widely accepted paradigm associated with different adverse outcomes of ENMs. It has frequently been identified in in vitro and in vivo studies and different assays have been developed for this purpose. Fluorescent dye based read-outs are most frequently used for cell testing in vitro but may be limited due to possible interference of the ENMs. Recently, other assays have been put forward such as acellular determination of ROS production potential using methods like electron spin resonance, antioxidant quantification or the use of specific sensors. In addition, Omics based approaches have gained increasing attention. In particular, redox proteomics can combine the assessment of oxidative stress with the advantage of getting more detailed mechanistic information. Here we propose a comprehensive testing strategy for assessing the oxidative stress potential of ENMs, which combines acellular methods and fast in vitro screening approaches, as well as a more involved detailed redox proteomics approach. This allows for screening and prioritization in a first tier and, if required, also for unraveling mechanistic details down to compromised signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress is a general paradigm for nanomaterial hazard mechanism of action. • Reactive oxygen species generation can be predicted using acellular assays. • Cellular assays based on fluorescence suffer from interference by nanomaterials. • Protein carbonylation is an irreversible and predictive mark of oxidative stress.

  7. A tripartite mode of action approach for investigating the impact of aneugens on tubulin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Valerie; Sutter, Andreas; Raschke, Marian; Queisser, Nina

    2018-04-01

    Chemical-induced disruption of the cellular microtubule network is one key mechanism of aneugenicity. Since recent data indicate that genotoxic effects of aneugens show nonlinear dose-response relationships, margins of safety can be derived with the ultimate goal to perform a risk assessment for the support of drug development. Furthermore, microtubule-interacting compounds are widely used for cancer treatment. While there is a need to support the risk assessment of tubulin-interacting chemicals using reliable mechanistic assays, no standard assays exist to date in regulatory genotoxicity testing for the distinction of aneugenic mechanisms. Recently reported methods exclusively rely on either biochemical, morphological, or cytometric endpoints. Since data requirements for the diverse fields of application of those assays differ strongly, the use of multiple assays for a correct classification of aneugens is ideal. We here report a tripartite mode of action approach comprising a cell-free biochemical polymerization assay and the cell-based methods cellular imaging and flow cytometry. The biochemical assay measures tubulin polymerization over time whereas the two cell-based assays quantify tubulin polymer mass. We herein show that the flow cytometric method yielded IC 50 values for tubulin destabilizers and EC 50 values for tubulin stabilizers as well as cell cycle information. In contrast, cellular imaging complemented these findings with characteristic morphological patterns. Biochemical analysis yielded kinetic information on tubulin polymerization. This multiplex approach is able to create holistic effect profiles which can be individually customized to the research question with regard to quality, quantity, usability, and economy. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 59:188-201, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A mode-of-action approach for the identification of genotoxic carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lya G Hernández

    Full Text Available Distinguishing between clastogens and aneugens is vital in cancer risk assessment because the default assumption is that clastogens and aneugens have linear and non-linear dose-response curves, respectively. Any observed non-linearity must be supported by mode of action (MOA analyses where biological mechanisms are linked with dose-response evaluations. For aneugens, the MOA has been well characterised as disruptors of mitotic machinery where chromosome loss via micronuclei (MN formation is an accepted endpoint used in risk assessment. In this study we performed the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and immunofluorescence mitotic machinery visualisation in human lymphoblastoid (AHH-1 and Chinese Hamster fibroblast (V79 cell lines after treatment with the aneugen 17-β-oestradiol (E₂. Results were compared to previously published data on bisphenol-A (BPA and Rotenone data. Two concentration-response approaches (the threshold-[Td] and benchmark-dose [BMD] approaches were applied to derive a point of departure (POD for in vitro MN induction. BMDs were also derived from the most sensitive carcinogenic endpoint. Ranking comparisons of the PODs from the in vitro MN and the carcinogenicity studies demonstrated a link between these two endpoints for BPA, E₂ and Rotenone. This analysis was extended to include 5 additional aneugens, 5 clastogens and 3 mutagens and further concentration and dose-response correlations were observed between PODs from the in vitro MN and carcinogenicity. This approach is promising and may be further extended to other genotoxic carcinogens, where MOA and quantitative information from the in vitro MN studies could be used in a quantitative manner to further inform cancer risk assessment.

  9. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBaron, Matthew J.; Geter, David R.; Rasoulpour, Reza J.; Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar; Thomas, Johnson; Murray, Jennifer; Kan, H. Lynn; Wood, Amanda J.; Elcombe, Cliff; Vardy, Audrey; McEwan, Jillian; Terry, Claire; Billington, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen. - Highlights: • We prospectively generated MoA data into standard guideline toxicity studies. • A proactive MoA approach

  10. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBaron, Matthew J., E-mail: MJLeBaron@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Geter, David R., E-mail: dave.geter@gmail.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Rasoulpour, Reza J. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar, E-mail: BBGollapudi@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Thomas, Johnson, E-mail: JThomas4@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Murray, Jennifer, E-mail: AMurray@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Kan, H. Lynn, E-mail: HLKan@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Wood, Amanda J., E-mail: AJWood@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Elcombe, Cliff, E-mail: CliffElcombe@cxrbiosciences.com [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Vardy, Audrey, E-mail: audrey_vardy@europe.bd.com [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); McEwan, Jillian, E-mail: jillian.mcewan@rtmcewan.co.uk [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Terry, Claire, E-mail: CTerry@dow.com [Dow AgroSciences, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Billington, Richard, E-mail: RBillington@dow.com [Dow AgroSciences, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen. - Highlights: • We prospectively generated MoA data into standard guideline toxicity studies. • A proactive MoA approach

  11. Evolved pesticide tolerance in amphibians: Predicting mechanisms based on pesticide novelty and mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Jessica; Jones, Devin K.; Mattes, Brian M.; Cothran, Rickey D.; Relyea, Rick A.; Hoverman, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    We examined 10 wood frog populations distributed along an agricultural gradient for their tolerance to six pesticides (carbaryl, malathion, cypermethrin, permethrin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam) that differed in date of first registration (pesticide novelty) and mode-of-action (MOA). Our goals were to assess whether: 1) tolerance was correlated with distance to agriculture for each pesticide, 2) pesticide novelty predicted the likelihood of evolved tolerance, and 3) populations display cross-tolerance between pesticides that share and differ in MOA. Wood frog populations located close to agriculture were more tolerant to carbaryl and malathion than populations far from agriculture. Moreover, the strength of the relationship between distance to agriculture and tolerance was stronger for older pesticides compared to newer pesticides. Finally, we found evidence for cross-tolerance between carbaryl and malathion (two pesticides that share MOA). This study provides one of the most comprehensive approaches for understanding patterns of evolved tolerance in non-pest species. - Highlights: • We explored patterns of tolerance to six insecticides across 10 wood frog populations. • We found evidence that wood frogs have evolved tolerance to carbaryl and malathion. • The likelihood of evolved tolerance was stronger for older compared to newer pesticides. • We found evidence for cross-tolerance between carbaryl and malathion. • This is one of the most comprehensive approaches studying evolved tolerance in a non-pest species. - Using 10 wood frog populations, we detected evidence for evolved tolerance, found that the evolved tolerance depends on insecticide novelty, and found evidence for cross-tolerance.

  12. Low dose evaluation of the antiandrogen flutamide following a Mode of Action approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarrabay, A.; Hilmi, C.; Tinwell, H.; Schorsch, F.; Pallardy, M.; Bars, R.; Rouquié, D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The dose–response characterization of endocrine mediated toxicity is an on-going debate which is controversial when exploring the nature of the dose–response curve and the effect at the low-end of the curve. To contribute to this debate we have assessed the effects of a wide range of dose levels of the antiandrogen flutamide (FLU) on 7-week male Wistar rats. FLU was administered by oral gavage at doses of 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg/day for 28 days. To evaluate the reproducibility, the study was performed 3 times. The molecular initiating event (MIE; AR antagonism), the key events (LH increase, Leydig cell proliferation and hyperplasia increases) and associated events involved in the mode of action (MOA) of FLU induced testicular toxicity were characterized to address the dose response concordance. Results showed no effects at low doses (< 0.1 mg/kg/day) for the different key events studied. The histopathological changes (Leydig cell hyperplasia) observed at 1 and 10 mg/kg/day were associated with an increase in steroidogenesis gene expression in the testis from 1 mg/kg/day, as well as an increase in testosterone blood level at 10 mg/kg/day. Each key event dose–response was in good concordance with the MOA of FLU on the testis. From the available results, only monotonic dose–response curves were observed for the MIE, the key events, associated events and in effects observed in other sex related tissues. All the results, so far, show that the reference endocrine disruptor FLU induces threshold effects in a standard 28-day toxicity study on adult male rats. - Highlights: • Dose–response characterization of endocrine mediated toxicity is an on-going debate. • A wide range of dose levels of flutamide was evaluated on young adult male rats. • Flutamide induces threshold effects using on standard and molecular tools.

  13. Low dose evaluation of the antiandrogen flutamide following a Mode of Action approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrabay, A. [INSERM, Université Paris-Sud, Faculté de Pharmacie, Châtenay-Malabry (France); UniverSud, INSERM, UMR-996 “Inflammation, Chemokines and Immunopathology”, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Bayer SAS, 16, rue Jean Marie Leclair, 69009 Lyon (France); Hilmi, C.; Tinwell, H.; Schorsch, F. [Bayer SAS, 16, rue Jean Marie Leclair, 69009 Lyon (France); Pallardy, M. [INSERM, Université Paris-Sud, Faculté de Pharmacie, Châtenay-Malabry (France); UniverSud, INSERM, UMR-996 “Inflammation, Chemokines and Immunopathology”, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Bars, R. [Bayer SAS, 16, rue Jean Marie Leclair, 69009 Lyon (France); Rouquié, D., E-mail: david.rouquie@bayer.com [Bayer SAS, 16, rue Jean Marie Leclair, 69009 Lyon (France)

    2015-12-15

    ABSTRACT: The dose–response characterization of endocrine mediated toxicity is an on-going debate which is controversial when exploring the nature of the dose–response curve and the effect at the low-end of the curve. To contribute to this debate we have assessed the effects of a wide range of dose levels of the antiandrogen flutamide (FLU) on 7-week male Wistar rats. FLU was administered by oral gavage at doses of 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg/day for 28 days. To evaluate the reproducibility, the study was performed 3 times. The molecular initiating event (MIE; AR antagonism), the key events (LH increase, Leydig cell proliferation and hyperplasia increases) and associated events involved in the mode of action (MOA) of FLU induced testicular toxicity were characterized to address the dose response concordance. Results showed no effects at low doses (< 0.1 mg/kg/day) for the different key events studied. The histopathological changes (Leydig cell hyperplasia) observed at 1 and 10 mg/kg/day were associated with an increase in steroidogenesis gene expression in the testis from 1 mg/kg/day, as well as an increase in testosterone blood level at 10 mg/kg/day. Each key event dose–response was in good concordance with the MOA of FLU on the testis. From the available results, only monotonic dose–response curves were observed for the MIE, the key events, associated events and in effects observed in other sex related tissues. All the results, so far, show that the reference endocrine disruptor FLU induces threshold effects in a standard 28-day toxicity study on adult male rats. - Highlights: • Dose–response characterization of endocrine mediated toxicity is an on-going debate. • A wide range of dose levels of flutamide was evaluated on young adult male rats. • Flutamide induces threshold effects using on standard and molecular tools.

  14. Implications of dibenzyl trisulphide for disease treatment based on its mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, L A D; Barton, E N; Kraus, W; Rösner, H

    2009-11-01

    Studies conducted on the secondary metabolite (natural product), dibenzyl trisulphide (DTS), which was isolated from the sub-tropical shrub Petiveria alliacea (guinea hen weed, anamu) [Phytolaccaceae] have shown tremendous pharmaceutical promise as a drug prototype. This is now reflected in the development of the broad spectrum anti-cancer molecule, fluorapacin (bis(4-fluorobenzyl) trisulphide) which has an excellent safety profile. The mode of action elucidated for DTS is the mitogen activated protein extracellular regulated kinases 1 and 2 (MAPKinases ERK 1 and ERK 2). The MAPKinase signal transduction biochemical pathways are important in the regulation of a wide range of cellular processes which are important in disease establishment. These processes include: cancer cell proliferation, nerve repair, memory enhancement, autoimmune diseases, which are linked to thymic cell involution and bone marrow functions, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. In addition to the MAPkinase signal transduction mode of action, DTS also prevents the denaturation of serum albumin which is a feature of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, thus supporting the molecule's possible role in the treatment of inflammatory ageing diseases.

  15. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes on Ready-to-Eat Meats Using Bacteriocin Mixtures Based on Mode-of-Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Priyesh Vijayakumar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocin-producing (Bac+ lactic acid bacteria (LAB comprising selected strains of Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactococcus lactis, Pediococcus acidilactici, and Enterococcus faecium and thailandicus were examined for inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes during hotdog challenge studies. The Bac+ strains, or their cell-free supernatants (CFS, were grouped according to mode-of-action (MOA as determined from prior studies. Making a mixture of as many MOAs as possible is a practical way to obtain a potent natural antimicrobial mixture to address L. monocytogenes contamination of RTE meat products (i.e., hotdogs. The heat resistance of the bacteriocins allowed the use of pasteurization to eliminate residual producer cells for use as post-process surface application or their inclusion into hotdog meat emulsion during cooking. The use of Bac+ LAB comprising 3× MOAs directly as co-inoculants on hotdogs was not effective at inhibiting L. monocytogenes. However, the use of multiple MOA Bac+ CFS mixtures in a variety of trials demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach by showing a >2-log decrease of L. monocytogenes in treatment samples and 6–7 log difference vs. controls. These data suggest that surface application of multiple mode-of-action bacteriocin mixtures can provide for an Alternative 2, and possibly Alternative 1, process category as specified by USDA-FSIS for control of L. monocytogenes on RTE meat products.

  16. Marine neurotoxins: state of the art, bottlenecks, and perspectives for mode of action based methods of detection in seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Jonathan; Hendriksen, Peter J M; Gerssen, Arjen; Bovee, Toine F H; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2014-01-01

    Marine biotoxins can accumulate in fish and shellfish, representing a possible threat for consumers. Many marine biotoxins affect neuronal function essentially through their interaction with ion channels or receptors, leading to different symptoms including paralysis and even death. The detection of marine biotoxins in seafood products is therefore a priority. Official methods for control are often still using in vivo assays, such as the mouse bioassay. This test is considered unethical and the development of alternative assays is urgently required. Chemical analyses as well as in vitro assays have been developed to detect marine biotoxins in seafood. However, most of the current in vitro alternatives to animal testing present disadvantages: low throughput and lack of sensitivity resulting in a high number of false-negative results. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of new in vitro tests that would allow the detection of marine biotoxins in seafood products at a low cost, with high throughput combined with high sensitivity, reproducibility, and predictivity. Mode of action based in vitro bioassays may provide tools that fulfil these requirements. This review covers the current state of the art of such mode of action based alternative assays to detect neurotoxic marine biotoxins in seafood. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A novel transcriptomics based in vitro method to compare and predict hepatotoxicity based on mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Abrew, K. Nadira; Overmann, Gary J.; Adams, Rachel L.; Tiesman, Jay P.; Dunavent, John; Shan, Yuqing K.; Carr, Gregory J.; Daston, George P.; Naciff, Jorge M.

    2015-01-01

    High-content data have the potential to inform mechanism of action for toxicants. However, most data to support this notion have been generated in vivo. Because many cell lines and primary cells maintain a differentiated cell phenotype, it is possible that cells grown in culture may also be useful in predictive toxicology via high-content approaches such as whole-genome microarray. We evaluated global changes in gene expression in primary rat hepatocytes exposed to two concentrations of ten hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen (APAP), β-naphthoflavone (BNF), chlorpromazine (CPZ), clofibrate (CLO), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), methapyrilene (MP), valproic acid (VPA), phenobarbital (PB) and WY14643 at two separate time points. These compounds were selected to cover a range of mechanisms of toxicity, with some overlap in expected mechanism to address the question of how predictive gene expression analysis is, for a given mode of action. Gene expression microarray analysis was performed on cells after 24 h and 48 h of exposure to each chemical using Affymetrix microarrays. Cluster analysis suggests that the primary hepatocyte model was capable of responding to these hepatotoxicants, with changes in gene expression that appear to be mode of action-specific. Among the different methods used for analysis of the data, a combination method that used pathways (MOAs) to filter total probesets provided the most robust analysis. The analysis resulted in the phthalates clustering closely together, with the two other peroxisome proliferators, CLO and WY14643, eliciting similar responses at the whole-genome and pathway levels. The Cyp inducers PB, MP, CPZ and BNF also clustered together. VPA and APAP had profiles that were unique. A similar analysis was performed on externally available (TG-GATES) in vivo data for 6 of the chemicals (APAP, CLO, CPZ, MP, MP and WY14643) and compared to the in vitro result. These results indicate that transcription

  18. Evaluating Aquatic invertebrate vulnerability to insecticides based on intrinsic sensitivuty, biological traits, and toxic mode of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, A.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the authors evaluated the vulnerability of aquatic invertebrates to insecticides based on their intrinsic sensitivity and their population-level recovery potential. The relative sensitivity of invertebrates to 5 different classes of insecticides was calculated at the genus,

  19. Case study: an evaluation of the human relevance of the synthetic pyrethroid metofluthrin-induced liver tumors in rats based on mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomoya; Uwagawa, Satoshi; Okuno, Yasuyoshi; Cohen, Samuel M; Kaneko, Hideo

    2009-03-01

    In recent years, mode of action (MOA) frameworks have been developed through the International Life Sciences Institute Risk Science Institute and the International Programme on Chemical Safety, including an evaluation of the human relevance of the animal MOA data. In the present paper, the MOA for rat liver tumors induced by Metofluthrin is first analyzed through this framework based on data from studies on Metofluthrin and information on related chemicals from the literature. The human relevance of the rat liver carcinogenic response is then discussed based upon the human relevance framework. Two-year treatment with high dose of Metofluthrin produced hepatocellular tumors in both sexes of the Wistar rats. Metofluthrin induced CYP2B (increased smooth endoplasmic reticulum), resulted in increased liver weights which were associated with centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy, and induction of increased hepatocellular DNA replications. The above parameters related to the key events in Metofluthrin-induced liver tumors were observed at or below tumorigenic dose levels. Furthermore, CYP2B induction by Metofluthrin was shown to involve activation of the constitutive androstane receptor in rat hepatocytes. Based on the evidence, including a comparison with the results with another chemical, phenobarbital, acting by a similar MOA, it is reasonable to conclude that Metofluthrin will not have any hepatocarcinogenic activity in humans.

  20. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of LI-F type peptides produced by Paenibacillus polymyxa JSa-9 mode of action against Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jinzhi; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Shengming; Bie, Xiaomei; Lu, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Chong; Lv, Fengxia

    2017-01-06

    ) indirect effects on the same pathways through the accumulation of ROS and the consequent impairment of cellular functions, resulting from downregulation of antioxidant proteins, especially CAT and SOD. The mode of action of LI-F type antimicrobial peptides (AMP-jsa9) against B. cereus was elucidated at the proteomic level. Two pathways of AMP-jsa9 action upon B. cereus cells were identified and the mechanism of bleb formation on the surfaces of bacterial cells was predicted based on the results of ultrastructural observation and proteomic analysis. These results are helpful in understanding the mechanism of LI-F type peptides and in providing the theoretical base for applying AMP-jsa9 or its analogs to combat Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria in the food and feed industries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Omics Methods for Probing the Mode of Action of Natural and Synthetic Phytotoxins

    OpenAIRE

    Duke, Stephen O.; Bajsa, Joanna; Pan, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    For a little over a decade, omics methods (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and physionomics) have been used to discover and probe the mode of action of both synthetic and natural phytotoxins. For mode of action discovery, the strategy for each of these approaches is to generate an omics profile for phytotoxins with known molecular targets and to compare this library of responses to the responses of compounds with unknown modes of action. Using more than one omics approach enhances ...

  2. Omics methods for probing the mode of action of natural phytotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    For a little over a decade, omics methods (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and physionomics) have been used to discover and probe the mode of action of both synthetic and natural phytotoxins. For mode of action discovery, the strategy for each of these approaches is to generate an omics...

  3. Mode of action based risk assessment of the botanical food-borne alkenylbenzene apiol from parsley using physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling and read-across from safrole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alajlouni, A.M.; Al-Malahmeh, A.J.; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Wesseling, Sebastiaan; Soffers, A.E.M.F.; Al-Subeihi, A.A.A.; Vervoort, Jacques; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study developed physiologically-based kinetic (PBK) models for the alkenylbenzene apiol in order to facilitate risk assessment based on read-across from the related alkenylbenzene safrole. Model predictions indicate that in rat liver the formation of the 1'-sulfoxy metabolite is about

  4. Mode of action based risk assessment of the botanical food-borne alkenylbenzene apiol from parsley using physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling and read-across from safrole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alajlouni, Abdalmajeed M; Al Malahmeh, Amer J; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Wesseling, Sebastiaan; Soffers, Ans E M F; Al-Subeihi, Ala A A; Vervoort, Jacques; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2016-03-01

    The present study developed physiologically-based kinetic (PBK) models for the alkenylbenzene apiol in order to facilitate risk assessment based on read-across from the related alkenylbenzene safrole. Model predictions indicate that in rat liver the formation of the 1'-sulfoxy metabolite is about 3 times lower for apiol than for safrole. These data support that the lower confidence limit of the benchmark dose resulting in a 10% extra cancer incidence (BMDL10) that would be obtained in a rodent carcinogenicity study with apiol may be 3-fold higher for apiol than for safrole. These results enable a preliminary risk assessment for apiol, for which tumor data are not available, using a BMDL10 value of 3 times the BMDL10 for safrole. Based on an estimated BMDL10 for apiol of 5.7-15.3 mg/kg body wt per day and an estimated daily intake of 4 × 10(-5) mg/kg body wt per day, the margin of exposure (MOE) would amount to 140,000-385,000. This indicates a low priority for risk management. The present study shows how PBK modelling can contribute to the development of alternatives for animal testing, facilitating read-across from compounds for which in vivo toxicity studies on tumor formation are available to compounds for which these data are unavailable. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Omics methods for probing the mode of action of natural and synthetic phytotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O; Bajsa, Joanna; Pan, Zhiqiang

    2013-02-01

    For a little over a decade, omics methods (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and physionomics) have been used to discover and probe the mode of action of both synthetic and natural phytotoxins. For mode of action discovery, the strategy for each of these approaches is to generate an omics profile for phytotoxins with known molecular targets and to compare this library of responses to the responses of compounds with unknown modes of action. Using more than one omics approach enhances the probability of success. Generally, compounds with the same mode of action generate similar responses with a particular omics method. Stress and detoxification responses to phytotoxins can be much clearer than effects directly related to the target site. Clues to new modes of action must be validated with in vitro enzyme effects or genetic approaches. Thus far, the only new phytotoxin target site discovered with omics approaches (metabolomics and physionomics) is that of cinmethylin and structurally related 5-benzyloxymethyl-1,2-isoxazolines. These omics approaches pointed to tyrosine amino-transferase as the target, which was verified by enzyme assays and genetic methods. In addition to being a useful tool of mode of action discovery, omics methods provide detailed information on genetic and biochemical impacts of phytotoxins. Such information can be useful in understanding the full impact of natural phytotoxins in both agricultural and natural ecosystems.

  6. Understanding of the mode of action of Fe(III)-EDDHA as iron chlorosis corrector based on its photochemical and redox behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Pellico, Daniel; Ramírez-López, Pedro; Mancheño, María J; Romano, Santiago; de la Torre, María C; Sierra, Miguel A

    2005-10-07

    The very low reduction potential of the chelate Fe(III)-EDDHA (EDDHA = ethylenediamine N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy)phenylacetic acid) makes it unreactive in photochemically or chemically induced electron transfer processes. The lack of reactivity of this complex toward light invalidates photodegradation as an alternative mechanism for environmental elimination. However, in spite of its low reduction potential, the biological reduction of Fe(III)-EDDHA is very effective. Based on electrochemical measurements, it is proposed that Fe(III)-EDDHA itself is not the substrate of the enzyme ferric chelate reductase. Likely, at the more acidic pH in the vicinity of the roots, the ferric chelate in a closed form (FeL-) could generate a vacant coordination site that leads to an open hexacoordinate species (FeHL) where the reduction of the metal by the enzyme takes place.

  7. Understanding the cellular mode of action of vernakalant using a computational model: answers and new questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loewe Axel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vernakalant is a new antiarrhythmic agent for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. While it has proven to be effective in a large share of patients in clinical studies, its underlying mode of action is not fully understood. In this work, we aim to link experimental data from the subcellular, tissue, and system level using an in-silico approach. A Hill’s equation-based drug model was extended to cover the frequency dependence of sodium channel block. Two model variants were investigated: M1 based on subcellular data and M2 based on tissue level data. 6 action potential (AP markers were evaluated regarding their dose, frequency and substrate dependence. M1 comprising potassium, sodium, and calcium channel block reproduced the reported prolongation of the refractory period. M2 not including the effects on potassium channels reproduced reported AP morphology changes on the other hand. The experimentally observed increase of ERP accompanied by a shortening of APD90 was not reproduced. Thus, explanations for the drug-induced changes are provided while none of the models can explain the effects in their entirety. These results foster the understanding of vernakalant’s cellular mode of action and point out relevant gaps in our current knowledge to be addressed in future in-silico and experimental research on this aspiring antiarrhythmic agent.

  8. Kyleo ® - mode of action under examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heibertshausen, Dagmar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Kyleo® with two known active substances (ai is an innovative, modern herbicide for resistance management. Kyleo® contains 160 g/l 2,4-D and 240 g/l glyphosate. With an application rate of 5,0 l/ha, it shows a far better, faster effect on weeds such as field horsetail (Equisetum arvense, volunteer oilseed rape (Brassica napus and couch grass (Agropyron repens compared to a tank mix or the reference products (RP. This is explained by an unique new formulation technology that for the first time combines 2,4-D as acid and glyphosate as MIPA salt together with FHS. The new form of 2,4-D is lipophilic with better leaf absorption and greater photolytic degradation in the upper layers of soil. Tests with radioactive marked substances have verified the systemic properties of both ai compared to RP. The displacement of 2,4-D into the plant roots was demonstrated 48 h after application (hpt. 98% glyphosate absorption was observed in rape and couch grass – 10% (rape respectively 25% (couch grass greater than with RP. Higher absorption of the ai is characterised by a swifter effect, with stronger, visible symptoms after 24 h in rape and 96 h in couch grass. The rainfastness of Kyleo® was tested in greenhouse (GH trials with rape. Comparability of the test objects was simulated with a uniform glyphosate quantity of 360 g/ha and 10 l/m² simulated precipitation. 24% improved effect compared to RP was verified for 1 hpt rainfall, while 4% improved effect was recorded for rain simulation after 6 hpt. GH trials with wheat and a comparable glyphosate application quantity of 290 g/ha revealed differences of 23% and 22% compared to RP for rain simulation of 1 hpt and 6 hpt. Kyleo® stands out with a swift effect and better rainfastness. The results presented here prove a systemic mode of action, good rainfastness and swift effect of Kyleo.

  9. Mode of action of Buddleja cordata verbascoside against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, J G; de Liverant, J G; Martínez, A; Martínez, G; Muñoz, J L; Arciniegas, A; Romo de Vivar, A

    1999-07-01

    We evaluate the mode of action of verbascoside obtained from Buddleja cordata against Staphylococcus aureus by killing kinetics and incorporation of precursors methods. Verbascoside induced lethal effect on S. aureus, by affecting protein synthesis and inhibiting leucine incorporation.

  10. Adjuvanted vaccines: Aspects of immunosafety and modes of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, Susan van

    2017-01-01

    New developments in vaccine design shift towards safe, though sometimes less immunogenic, subunit and synthetic antigens. Therefore, the majority of current vaccines require adjuvants to increase immunogenicity. Most adjuvants available were developed empirically and their mode of action is only

  11. Spontaneous bacteriocin resistance in Listeria monocytogenes as a susceptibility screen for identifying different mechanisms of resistance and modes of action by bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macwana, Sunita; Muriana, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    A practical system was devised for grouping bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) based on mode of action as determined by changes in inhibitory activity to spontaneously-acquired bacteriocin resistance (Bac(R)). Wild type Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 was sensitive to five bacteriocins produced by 3 genera of LAB: pediocin PA-1 and pediocin Bac3 (Pediococcus), lacticin FS97 and lacticin FS56 (Lactococcus), and curvaticin FS47 (Lactobacillus). A spontaneous Bac(R) derivative of L. monocytogenes 39-2 obtained by selective recovery against lacticin FS56 provided complete resistance to the bacteriocin made by Lactococcus lactis FS56. The lacticin FS56-resistant strain of L. monocyotgenes 39-2 was also cross-resistant to curvaticin FS47 and pediocin PA-1, but not to lacticin FS97 or pediocin Bac3. The same pattern of cross-resistance was also observed with Bac(R) isolates obtained with L. monocytogenes Scott A-2. A spontaneous mutation that renders a strain cross-resistant to different bacteriocins indicates that they share a common mechanism of resistance due to similar modes of action of the bacteriocins. Spontaneous resistance was acquired to other bacteriocins (in aggregate) by following the same procedure against which the Bac(R) strain was still sensitive. In subsequent challenge assays, mixtures of bacteriocins of different modes of action provided greater inhibition than mixtures of bacteriocins of the same mode of action (as determined by our screening method). This study identifies a methodical approach to classify bacteriocins into functional groups based on mechanism of resistance (i.e., mode of action) that could be used for identifying the best mixture of bacteriocins for use as biopreservatives. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Modes of Action of Microbially-Produced Phytotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O.; Dayan, Franck E.

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most potent phytotoxins are synthesized by microbes. A few of these share molecular target sites with some synthetic herbicides, but many microbial toxins have unique target sites with potential for exploitation by the herbicide industry. Compounds from both non-pathogenic and pathogenic microbes are discussed. Microbial phytotoxins with modes of action the same as those of commercial herbicides and those with novel modes of action of action are covered. Examples of the compounds discussed are tentoxin, AAL-toxin, auscaulitoxin aglycone, hydantocidin, thaxtomin, and tabtoxin. PMID:22069756

  13. Antibacterial Activity and Mode of Action of Mentha arvensis Ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibacterial Activity and Mode of Action of Mentha arvensis Ethanol Extract against ... the antibacterial effect of ethanol extract of Mentha arvensis against multi-drug ... Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and protein leakage from the ... A. baumannii and acts by inducing lethal cellular damage to the bacterium.

  14. Discovery of new herbicide modes of action with natural phytotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    About 20 modes of action (MOAs) are utilized by commercial herbicides, and almost 30 years have passed since the last new MOA was introduced. Rapidly increasing evolution of resistance to herbicides with these MOAs has greatly increased the need for herbicides with new MOAs. Combinatorial chemistry ...

  15. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbusser, George G; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Chris J; Haley, Brian A; Schrader, Paul; Brunner, Elizabeth L; Gray, Matthew W; Miller, Cale A; Gimenez, Iria; Hutchinson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4) with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material affected only by

  16. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George G Waldbusser

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4 with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material

  17. Minimum datasets to establish a CAR-mediated mode of action for rodent liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffer, Richard C; LeBaron, Matthew J; Battalora, Michael; Bomann, Werner H; Werner, Christoph; Aggarwal, Manoj; Rowe, Rocky R; Tinwell, Helen

    2018-07-01

    Methods for investigating the Mode of Action (MoA) for rodent liver tumors via constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation are outlined here, based on current scientific knowledge about CAR and feedback from regulatory agencies globally. The key events (i.e., CAR activation, altered gene expression, cell proliferation, altered foci and increased adenomas/carcinomas) can be demonstrated by measuring a combination of key events and associative events that are markers for the key events. For crop protection products, a primary dataset typically should include a short-term study in the species/strain that showed the tumor response at dose levels that bracket the tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic dose levels. The dataset may vary depending on the species and the test compound. As examples, Case Studies with nitrapyrin (in mice) and metofluthrin (in rats) are described. Based on qualitative differences between the species, the key events leading to tumors in mice or rats by this MoA are not operative in humans. In the future, newer approaches such as a CAR biomarker signature approach and/or in vitro CAR3 reporter assays for mouse, rat and human CAR may eventually be used to demonstrate a CAR MoA is operative, without the need for extensive additional studies in laboratory animals. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Accelerating early anti-tuberculosis drug discovery by creating mycobacterial indicator strains that predict mode of action

    KAUST Repository

    Boot, Maikel

    2018-04-13

    Due to the rise of drug resistant forms of tuberculosis there is an urgent need for novel antibiotics to effectively combat these cases and shorten treatment regimens. Recently, drug screens using whole cell analyses have been shown to be successful. However, current high-throughput screens focus mostly on stricto sensu life-death screening that give little qualitative information. In doing so, promising compound scaffolds or non-optimized compounds that fail to reach inhibitory concentrations are missed. To accelerate early TB drug discovery, we performed RNA sequencing on Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium marinum to map the stress responses that follow upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics with known targets: ciprofloxacin, ethambutol, isoniazid, streptomycin and rifampicin. The resulting dataset comprises the first overview of transcriptional stress responses of mycobacteria to different antibiotics. We show that antibiotics can be distinguished based on their specific transcriptional stress fingerprint. Notably, this fingerprint was more distinctive in M. marinum. We decided to use this to our advantage and continue with this model organism. A selection of diverse antibiotic stress genes was used to construct stress reporters. In total, three functional reporters were constructed to respond to DNA damage, cell wall damage and ribosomal inhibition. Subsequently, these reporter strains were used to screen a small anti-TB compound library to predict the mode of action. In doing so, we could identify the putative mode of action for three novel compounds, which confirms our approach.

  19. Predicting the aquatic toxicity mode of action using logistic regression and linear discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y Y; Zhou, L C; Yang, L; Liu, P Y; Zhao, B W; Liu, H X

    2016-09-01

    The paper highlights the use of the logistic regression (LR) method in the construction of acceptable statistically significant, robust and predictive models for the classification of chemicals according to their aquatic toxic modes of action. Essentials accounting for a reliable model were all considered carefully. The model predictors were selected by stepwise forward discriminant analysis (LDA) from a combined pool of experimental data and chemical structure-based descriptors calculated by the CODESSA and DRAGON software packages. Model predictive ability was validated both internally and externally. The applicability domain was checked by the leverage approach to verify prediction reliability. The obtained models are simple and easy to interpret. In general, LR performs much better than LDA and seems to be more attractive for the prediction of the more toxic compounds, i.e. compounds that exhibit excess toxicity versus non-polar narcotic compounds and more reactive compounds versus less reactive compounds. In addition, model fit and regression diagnostics was done through the influence plot which reflects the hat-values, studentized residuals, and Cook's distance statistics of each sample. Overdispersion was also checked for the LR model. The relationships between the descriptors and the aquatic toxic behaviour of compounds are also discussed.

  20. Metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after sub-lethal exposure to organic contaminants with different toxic modes of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Wolfe, David M.; Celejewski, Magda A.; Alaee, Mehran; Simpson, Andre J.; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - based metabolomics has the potential to identify toxic responses of contaminants within a mixture in contaminated soil. This study evaluated the metabolic response of Eisenia fetida after exposure to an array of organic compounds to determine whether contaminant-specific responses could be identified. The compounds investigated in contact tests included: two pesticides (carbaryl and chlorpyrifos), three pharmaceuticals (carbamazephine, estrone and caffeine), two persistent organohalogens (Aroclor 1254 and PBDE 209) and two industrial compounds (nonylphenol and dimethyl phthalate). Control and contaminant-exposed metabolic profiles were distinguished using principal component analysis and potential contaminant-specific biomarkers of exposure were found for several contaminants. These results suggest that NMR-based metabolomics offers considerable promise for differentiating between the different toxic modes of action (MOA) associated with sub-lethal toxicity to earthworms. - Highlights: → NMR-based earthworm metabolomic analysis of the toxic mode of action of various environmental contaminants. → Organic chemicals with different toxic modes of action resulted in varied metabolomic responses for E. fetida. → NMR-based metabolomics differentiates between the different modes of action associated with sub-lethal toxicity. - 1 H NMR metabolomics was used to identify potential biomarkers of organic contaminant exposure in Eisenia fetida earthworms.

  1. Metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after sub-lethal exposure to organic contaminants with different toxic modes of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Wolfe, David M.; Celejewski, Magda A. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Alaee, Mehran [Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.ca [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - based metabolomics has the potential to identify toxic responses of contaminants within a mixture in contaminated soil. This study evaluated the metabolic response of Eisenia fetida after exposure to an array of organic compounds to determine whether contaminant-specific responses could be identified. The compounds investigated in contact tests included: two pesticides (carbaryl and chlorpyrifos), three pharmaceuticals (carbamazephine, estrone and caffeine), two persistent organohalogens (Aroclor 1254 and PBDE 209) and two industrial compounds (nonylphenol and dimethyl phthalate). Control and contaminant-exposed metabolic profiles were distinguished using principal component analysis and potential contaminant-specific biomarkers of exposure were found for several contaminants. These results suggest that NMR-based metabolomics offers considerable promise for differentiating between the different toxic modes of action (MOA) associated with sub-lethal toxicity to earthworms. - Highlights: > NMR-based earthworm metabolomic analysis of the toxic mode of action of various environmental contaminants. > Organic chemicals with different toxic modes of action resulted in varied metabolomic responses for E. fetida. > NMR-based metabolomics differentiates between the different modes of action associated with sub-lethal toxicity. - {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics was used to identify potential biomarkers of organic contaminant exposure in Eisenia fetida earthworms.

  2. Machine learning algorithms for mode-of-action classification in toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yile; Wong, Yau Shu; Deng, Jian; Anton, Cristina; Gabos, Stephan; Zhang, Weiping; Huang, Dorothy Yu; Jin, Can

    2016-01-01

    Real Time Cell Analysis (RTCA) technology is used to monitor cellular changes continuously over the entire exposure period. Combining with different testing concentrations, the profiles have potential in probing the mode of action (MOA) of the testing substances. In this paper, we present machine learning approaches for MOA assessment. Computational tools based on artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) are developed to analyze the time-concentration response curves (TCRCs) of human cell lines responding to tested chemicals. The techniques are capable of learning data from given TCRCs with known MOA information and then making MOA classification for the unknown toxicity. A novel data processing step based on wavelet transform is introduced to extract important features from the original TCRC data. From the dose response curves, time interval leading to higher classification success rate can be selected as input to enhance the performance of the machine learning algorithm. This is particularly helpful when handling cases with limited and imbalanced data. The validation of the proposed method is demonstrated by the supervised learning algorithm applied to the exposure data of HepG2 cell line to 63 chemicals with 11 concentrations in each test case. Classification success rate in the range of 85 to 95 % are obtained using SVM for MOA classification with two clusters to cases up to four clusters. Wavelet transform is capable of capturing important features of TCRCs for MOA classification. The proposed SVM scheme incorporated with wavelet transform has a great potential for large scale MOA classification and high-through output chemical screening.

  3. Probiotics as beneficial microbes in aquaculture: an update on their multiple modes of action: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorriehzahra, Mohammad Jalil; Delshad, Somayeh Torabi; Adel, Milad; Tiwari, Ruchi; Karthik, K; Dhama, Kuldeep; Lazado, Carlo C

    2016-12-01

    Wide and discriminate use of antibiotics has resulted in serious biological and ecological concerns, especially the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Probiotics, known as beneficial microbes, are being proposed as an effective and eco-friendly alternative to antibiotics. They were first applied in aquaculture species more than three decades ago, but considerable attention had been given only in the early 2000s. Probiotics are defined as live or dead, or even a component of the microorganisms that act under different modes of action in conferring beneficial effects to the host or to its environment. Several probiotics have been characterized and applied in fish and a number of them are of host origin. Unlike some disease control alternatives being adapted and proposed in aquaculture where actions are unilateral, the immense potential of probiotics lies on their multiple mechanisms in conferring benefits to the host fish and the rearing environment. The staggering number of probiotics papers in aquaculture highlights the multitude of advantages from these microorganisms and conspicuously position them in the dynamic search for health-promoting alternatives for cultured fish. This paper provides an update on the use of probiotics in finfish aquaculture, particularly focusing on their modes of action. It explores the contemporary understanding of their spatial and nutritional competitiveness, inhibitory metabolites, environmental modification capability, immunomodulatory potential and stress-alleviating mechanism. This timely update affirms the importance of probiotics in fostering sustainable approaches in aquaculture and provides avenues in furthering its research and development.

  4. Minireview: Mode of action of meta-diamide insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Banba, Shinichi

    2015-06-01

    Meta-diamides [3-benzamido-N-(4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)phenyl)benzamides] are a distinct class of RDL GABA receptor noncompetitive antagonists showing high insecticidal activity against Spodoptera litura. The mode of action of the meta-diamides was demonstrated to be distinct from that of conventional noncompetitive antagonists (NCAs) such as fipronil, picrotoxin, lindane, dieldrin, and α-endosulfan. It was suggested that meta-diamides act at or near G336 in the M3 region of the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor. Although the site of action of the meta-diamides appears to overlap with that of macrocyclic lactones including avermectins and milbemycins, differential effects of mutations on the actions of the meta-diamides and the macrocyclic lactones were observed. Molecular modeling studies revealed that the meta-diamides may bind to an inter-subunit pocket near G336 in the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor better when in the closed state, which is distinct from the NCA-binding site, which is in a channel formed by M2s. In contrast, the macrocyclic lactones were suggested to bind to an inter-subunit pocket near G336 in the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor when in the open state. Furthermore, mechanisms underlying the high selectivity of meta-diamides are discussed. This minireview highlights the unique features of novel meta-diamide insecticides and demonstrates why meta-diamides are anticipated to become prominent insecticides that are effective against pests resistant to cyclodienes and fipronil. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Life cycle responses of the midge Chironomus riparius to compounds with different modes of action.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinkovic, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Nummerdor, G.A.; Jonker, M.J.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    Compounds with different modes of action may affect life cycles of biota differently. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the impact of four chemicals with different modes of action, including the essential metal copper, the nonessential metal cadmium, the organometal

  6. Life cycle responses of the midge Chironomus riparius to compounds with different modes of action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinkovic, M.; Verweij, R.A.; Nummerdor, G.A.; Jonker, M.J.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.

    2011-01-01

    Compounds with different modes of action may affect life cycles of biota differently. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the impact of four chemicals with different modes of action, including the essential metal copper, the nonessential metal cadmium, the organometal

  7. Assessment of the mode of action for hexavalent chromium-induced lung cancer following inhalation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Campleman, Sharan L.; Thompson, Chad M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • No published or well recognized MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. • MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer was conducted to inform risk assessment. • Cr(VI) epidemiologic, toxicokinetic, toxicological, mechanistic data were evaluated. • Weight of evidence does not support a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer. • Non-linear approaches should be considered for evaluating Cr(VI) lung cancer risk. - Abstract: Inhalation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is associated with increased lung cancer risk among workers in several industries, most notably chromate production workers exposed to high concentrations of Cr(VI) (≥100 μg/m 3 ), for which clear exposure–response relationships and respiratory irritation and tissue damage have been reported. Data from this industry are used to assess lung cancer risk associated with environmental and current occupational exposures, occurring at concentrations that are significantly lower. There is considerable uncertainty in the low dose extrapolation of historical occupational epidemiology data to assess risk at current exposures because no published or well recognized mode of action (MOA) for Cr(VI)-induced lung tumors exists. We conducted a MOA analysis for Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer evaluating toxicokinetic and toxicological data in humans and rodents and mechanistic data to assess plausibility, dose–response, and temporal concordance for potential MOAs. Toxicokinetic data support that extracellular reduction of Cr(VI), which limits intracellular absorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(VI)-induced toxicity, can be overwhelmed at high exposure levels. In vivo genotoxicity and mutagenicity data are mostly negative and do not support a mutagenic MOA. Further, both chronic bioassays and the epidemiologic literature support that lung cancer occurs at exposures that cause tissue damage. Based on this MOA analysis, the overall weight of evidence supports a MOA involving deposition and accumulation

  8. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  9. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens. PMID:27625608

  10. Enhancing pressure ulcer prevention using wound dressings: what are the modes of action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Evan; Pedersen, Justin; Bill, Brian; Black, Joyce; Alves, Paulo; Brindle, C Tod; Dealey, Carol; Santamaria, Nick; Clark, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Recent clinical research has generated interest in the use of sacral wound dressings as preventive devices for patients at risk of ulceration. This study was conducted to identify the modes of action through which dressings can add to pressure ulcer prevention, for example, shear and friction force redistribution and pressure distribution. Bench testing was performed using nine commercially available dressings. The use of dressings can reduce the amplitude of shear stress and friction reaching the skin of patients at risk. They can also effectively redirect these forces to wider areas which minimises the mechanical loads upon skeletal prominences. Dressings can redistribute pressure based upon their effective Poisson ratio and larger deflection areas, providing greater load redistribution. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A Mini HIP HOP Assay Uncovers a Central Role for Copper and Zinc in the Antifungal Mode of Action of Allicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Thomas A K; Panaretou, Barry

    2017-05-10

    Garlic contains the organosulfur compound allicin which exhibits potent antifungal activity. Here we demonstrate the use of a highly simplified yeast chemical genetic screen to characterize its mode of action. By screening 24 validated yeast gene deletion "signature" strains for which hypersensitivity is characteristic for common antifungal modes of action, yeast lacking the high affinity Cu 2+ transporter Ctr1 was found to be hypersensitive to allicin. Focusing on transition metal related genes identified two more hypersensitive strains lacking the Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ transcription factors Mac1 and Zap1. Hypersensitivity in these strains was reversed by the addition of Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ ions, respectively. The results suggest the antifungal activity of allicin is mediated through restricted Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ uptake or inhibition of Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ metalloproteins. As certain antimicrobial modes of action are much more common than others, the approach taken here provides a useful way to identify them early on.

  12. Counselling and knowledge about contraceptive mode of action among married women; a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciğerli Özlem

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family planning counselling which covers knowledge transfer about contraceptive mode of action, by enabling informed choice, improves compliance to and efficiency of contraceptive methods. The objective of this study was to investigate associations between family planning counselling, counsellor and correct knowledge about mode of action of modern contraceptive methods among married women. Methods For this cross-sectional study, stratified (according to current modern contraceptive method in use random sampling was performed from the registries of two primary health care centres. Main outcomes were; prevalence of family planning counselling, professional background of the counsellor and correct knowledge about mode of action. A semi-structured questionnaire developed by the researchers was applied via face-to-face interview. The answers about mode of action were categorized as correct vs. incorrect by consensus rating. Results Prevalence of counselling and correct knowledge about mode of action was 49.0% and 39.3%, respectively. Higher educated women were significantly more likely to know the mode of action (p p = 0.79. Non-barrier method users were less educated (p = 0.001, more often counselled (60.8% vs. 8.0% and less knowledgeable (p p = 0.021 than counselled condom users. Conclusion The beneficial effect of counselling on knowledge about mode of action of the more complicated, medical (non-barrier contraceptive methods suggests that the use of family planning counselling services in primary health care should be promoted; furthermore, counselling strategies and content should be re-structured for better efficacy.

  13. Characterization of the mode of action of a potent dengue virus capsid inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaturro, Pietro; Trist, Iuni Margaret Laura; Paul, David; Kumar, Anil; Acosta, Eliana G; Byrd, Chelsea M; Jordan, Robert; Brancale, Andrea; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    Dengue viruses (DV) represent a significant global health burden, with up to 400 million infections every year and around 500,000 infected individuals developing life-threatening disease. In spite of attempts to develop vaccine candidates and antiviral drugs, there is a lack of approved therapeutics for the treatment of DV infection. We have previously reported the identification of ST-148, a small-molecule inhibitor exhibiting broad and potent antiviral activity against DV in vitro and in vivo (C. M. Byrd et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 57:15-25, 2013, doi:10 .1128/AAC.01429-12). In the present study, we investigated the mode of action of this promising compound by using a combination of biochemical, virological, and imaging-based techniques. We confirmed that ST-148 targets the capsid protein and obtained evidence of bimodal antiviral activity affecting both assembly/release and entry of infectious DV particles. Importantly, by using a robust bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay, we observed an ST-148-dependent increase of capsid self-interaction. These results were corroborated by molecular modeling studies that also revealed a plausible model for compound binding to capsid protein and inhibition by a distinct resistance mutation. These results suggest that ST-148-enhanced capsid protein self-interaction perturbs assembly and disassembly of DV nucleocapsids, probably by inducing structural rigidity. Thus, as previously reported for other enveloped viruses, stabilization of capsid protein structure is an attractive therapeutic concept that also is applicable to flaviviruses. Dengue viruses are arthropod-borne viruses representing a significant global health burden. They infect up to 400 million people and are endemic to subtropical and tropical areas of the world. Currently, there are neither vaccines nor approved therapeutics for the prophylaxis or treatment of DV infections, respectively. This study reports the characterization of the

  14. Proteomics analysis suggests broad functional changes in potato leaves triggered by phosphites and a complex indirect mode of action against Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sanghyun; Borza, Tudor; Peters, Rick D; Coffin, Robert H; Al-Mughrabi, Khalil I; Pinto, Devanand M; Wang-Pruski, Gefu

    2013-11-20

    Phosphite (salts of phosphorous acid; Phi)-based fungicides are increasingly used in controlling oomycete pathogens, such as the late blight agent Phytophthora infestans. In plants, low amounts of Phi induce pathogen resistance through an indirect mode of action. We used iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to investigate the effects of phosphite on potato plants before and after infection with P. infestans. Ninety-three (62 up-regulated and 31 down-regulated) differentially regulated proteins, from a total of 1172 reproducibly identified proteins, were identified in the leaf proteome of Phi-treated potato plants. Four days post-inoculation with P. infestans, 16 of the 31 down-regulated proteins remained down-regulated and 42 of the 62 up-regulated proteins remained up-regulated, including 90% of the defense proteins. This group includes pathogenesis-related, stress-responsive, and detoxification-related proteins. Callose deposition and ultrastructural analyses of leaf tissues after infection were used to complement the proteomics approach. This study represents the first comprehensive proteomics analysis of the indirect mode of action of Phi, demonstrating broad effects on plant defense and plant metabolism. The proteomics data and the microscopy study suggest that Phi triggers a hypersensitive response that is responsible for induced resistance of potato leaves against P. infestans. Phosphie triggers complex functional changes in potato leaves that are responsible for the induced resistance against Phytophthora infestans. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Plant Proteomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mode of action of new organic ammonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miko, M.; Gulasova, A.; Devinsky, F.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper was primary biochemical screening of cytotoxic activity. The measure of the cytotoxic effect was the degree of inhibition of 14 C-adenine and 14 C-valine incorporation into TCA-insoluble fraction of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells. The primary biochemical screening was carried out with the 12 new organic ammonium salts (OAS), from a homologous series of N-alkyl-(N 2 -dodekanoylethyl)-dimethylammonium bromide. In a first approach to determine the model of action of the cytotoxic active compounds, the kinetics of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis inhibition were examined using isotope incorporation. On the basis of primary screening, one of the most active compounds, namely N-octyl-N 2 -dodekanoylethyl)-dimethylammonium bromide was chosen for further biochemical studies. Selected OAS inhibited biosynthesis of nucleic acids indicated by incorporation of 14 C-adenine and biosynthesis of protein indicated by incorporation of 14 C-valine. From the results, it is obvious, that the biosynthesis of DNA, indicated by the incorporation of 14 -thymidine, was more sensitive than biosynthesis of RNA indicated by the incorporation of 14 C-uridine. OAS at the lower concentrations stimulated aerobic glycolysis of tumor cells. Such a stimulation of glycolysis at lower concentrations of OAS indicated a potential interference with respiratory processes in tumor cells, or in isolated mitochondria. We assumed that the cytotoxic effect of OAS could be consequence of cytolytic activity of OAS. (authors)

  16. Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Pain: Mode of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Bradley, Kerry; Kapural, Leonardo

    2017-07-15

    Literature review. A review of the literature that presents a perspective on mechanisms of actions behind spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy for chronic pain. SCS is an effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of intractable chronic pain. Its application has been mostly based on the gate control theory of pain. Computational models have been fundamental on the understanding of clinical observations and the design of therapies that provide optimal neuromodulation. Research has provided insight into the involvement of specific neurotransmitters that support segmental and supraspinal mechanisms of action. A literature review was performed with emphasis on mechanisms of action for SCS including the effects of electrical fields on spinal cord structures based on computational models and preclinical and clinical explorations. This review provides background on the development of SCS, which has been driven around a paresthesia-based paradigm as a result of the gate control theory. A review of computational models emphasizes their importance on our current understanding of the mechanism of action and clinical optimization of therapy. Electrophysiology and molecular biology have provided a closer, yet narrow, view of the effect of SCS on neurotransmitters and their receptors, which have led to the formulation of segmental and supraspinal mechanisms. Literature supporting the involvement of glial cells in chronic pain and their characteristic response to electrical fields should motivate further investigation of mechanisms involving neuroglia. Finally, a review of recent results paresthesia-free strategies should encourage research on mechanisms of action. The mechanisms of SCS have been extensively studied and several consistent phenomena have emerged. The activation of A-beta fibers to induce paresthesia also involve neurotransmitter release via segmental and supraspinal pathways. Despite advancements, much remains to be understood, particularly as new

  17. Furocoumarins, biophysical investigations on their modes of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittler, L.; Loeber, G.

    1983-01-01

    Investigation of the combined effect of furocoumarins and ultraviolet light of 365 nm wavelength (UV light) on cellular constituents are important for they have clearly increased the knowledge on basic processes involved in PUVA therapy. Studies of the action on nucleic acids both in isolated state and in situ led to the following conclusions, when 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and angelicin were used as sensitizers: Crosslinking between the drug and the nucleic acid bases is preferred in A-T rich or A-U rich sites with the nucleic acid being in B conformation. In situ crosslinked DNA does not influence the adsorption of phage lambda on the surface of E. coli. There are probably three types of furocoumarins mediated crosslinks inside the phage: Type I, corresponding to crosslinking between complementary strands of the DNA duplex, type II, corresponding to crosslinks between adjacent sites in the folded DNA structure (hair pin crosslinks) and DNA protein crosslinks. Type I does not prevent the DNA from getting into the host cell, while the two latter do. PUVA treatment of human lymphocyte cultures is manifested by chromosomal aberrations such as premature centromere division and major coiling. However, treatment with 8-MOP or UV light alone do produce the same kind of aberrations. Under the action of UV light, 8-MOP or trimethylpsoralen become covalently bound to unsaturated fatty acids. The photoreaction preceeds without essential contribution of singlet oxygen and hydroperoxides. (author)

  18. Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase; Mode of Action and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltahla, Auda A; Luciani, Fabio; White, Peter A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Bull, Rowena A

    2015-09-29

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a pandemic human pathogen posing a substantial health and economic burden in both developing and developed countries. Controlling the spread of HCV through behavioural prevention strategies has met with limited success and vaccine development remains slow. The development of antiviral therapeutic agents has also been challenging, primarily due to the lack of efficient cell culture and animal models for all HCV genotypes, as well as the large genetic diversity between HCV strains. On the other hand, the use of interferon-α-based treatments in combination with the guanosine analogue, ribavirin, achieved limited success, and widespread use of these therapies has been hampered by prevalent side effects. For more than a decade, the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) has been targeted for antiviral development, and direct-acting antivirals (DAA) have been identified which bind to one of at least six RdRp inhibitor-binding sites, and are now becoming a mainstay of highly effective and well tolerated antiviral treatment for HCV infection. Here we review the different classes of RdRp inhibitors and their mode of action against HCV. Furthermore, the mechanism of antiviral resistance to each class is described, including naturally occurring resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in different viral strains and genotypes. Finally, we review the impact of these RAVs on treatment outcomes with the newly developed regimens.

  19. Proteomic and metallomic strategies for understanding the mode of action of anticancer metallodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbiani, Chiara; Magherini, Francesca; Modesti, Alessandra; Messori, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin and its introduction in the clinics, metal compounds have been intensely investigated in view of their possible application in cancer therapy. In this frame, a deeper understanding of their mode of action, still rather obscure, might turn crucial for the design and the obtainment of new and better anticancer agents. Due to the extreme complexity of the biological systems, it is now widely accepted that innovative and information-rich methods are absolutely needed to afford such a goal. Recently, both proteomic and metallomic strategies were successfully implemented for the elucidation of specific mechanistic features of anticancer metallodrugs within an innovative "Systems Biology" perspective. Particular attention was paid to the following issues: i) proteomic studies of the molecular basis of platinum resistance; ii) proteomic analysis of cellular responses to cytotoxic metallodrugs; iii) metallomic studies of the transformation and fate of metallodrugs in cellular systems. Notably, those pioneering studies, that are reviewed here, allowed a significant progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of metal based drugs at the cellular level. A further extension of those studies and a closer integration of proteomic and metallomic strategies and technologies might realistically lead to rapid and significant advancements in the mechanistic knowledge of anticancer metallodrugs.

  20. Elucidating antimalarial drug targets/mode-of-action by application of system biology technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Becker, J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available targets/mode-of-action by application of systems biology technologies J BECKER, L MTWISHA, B CRAMPTON AND D MANCAMA CSIR Biosciences, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa Email: JBecker@csir.co.za – www.csir.co.za INTRODUCTION Malaria is one... The objective of this study was to use systems biology tools to unravel the drug target/mode-of-action (MoA) of an antimalarial drug (cyclohexylamine) with a known drug target/MoA, by analysing differential expression profiles of drug treated vs untreated...

  1. Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE Evaluation of Naphthoimidazoles Mode of Action: A Study in Trypanosoma cruzi Bloodstream Trypomastigotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Villa Flor Brunoro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, a neglected illness affecting millions of people in Latin America that recently entered non-endemic countries through immigration, as a consequence of globalization. The chemotherapy for this disease is based mainly on benznidazole and nifurtimox, which are very efficient nitroderivatives against the acute stage but present limited efficacy during the chronic phase. Our group has been studying the trypanocidal effects of naturally occurring quinones and their derivatives, and naphthoimidazoles derived from β-lapachone N1, N2 and N3 were the most active. To assess the molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds, we applied proteomic techniques to analyze treated bloodstream trypomastigotes, which are the clinically relevant stage of the parasite.The approach consisted of quantification by 2D-DIGE followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF protein identification. A total of 61 differentially abundant protein spots were detected when comparing the control with each N1, N2 or N3 treatment, for 34 identified spots. Among the differentially abundant proteins were activated protein kinase C receptor, tubulin isoforms, asparagine synthetase, arginine kinase, elongation factor 2, enolase, guanine deaminase, heat shock proteins, hypothetical proteins, paraflagellar rod components, RAB GDP dissociation inhibitor, succinyl-CoA ligase, ATP synthase subunit B and methionine sulfoxide reductase.Our results point to different modes of action for N1, N2 and N3, which indicate a great variety of metabolic pathways involved and allow for novel perspectives on the development of trypanocidal agents.

  2. Mode of action of the phenylpyrrole fungicide fenpiclonil in Fusarium sulphureum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jespers, A.B.K.

    1994-01-01

    In the last few decades, plant disease control has become heavily dependent on fungicides. Most modem fungicides were discovered by random synthesis and empirical optimization of lead structures. In general, these fungicides have specific modes of action and meet modem enviromnental

  3. An evaluation of the mode of action framework for mutagenic carcinogens: Chromium (VI): SOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to the 2005 revised U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Cancer Guidelines, a strategy is being developed to determine whether a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic mode of action (MOA). This information is necessary for EPA to decide whether age-dependent ...

  4. An evaluation of the mode of action framework for mutagenic carcinogens: chromium (VI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to the 2005 revised U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Cancer Guidelines, a strategy is being developed to determine whether a carcinogen operates through a mutagenic mode of action (MOA). This information is necessary for EPA to decide whether age-dependent ...

  5. Mode of action of pectin lyase A of Aspergillus niger on differently C6-substituted oligogalacturonides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alebeek, van G.J.W.M.; Christensen, T.M.I.E.; Schols, H.A.; Mikkelsen, J.D.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    A thorough investigation of the mode of action of Aspergillus niger (4M-147) pectin lyase A (PLA) on differently C6-substituted oligogalacturonides is described. PLA appeared to be very specific for fully methyl-esterified oligogalacturonides: removal of the methyl-ester or changing the type of

  6. Macromolecule biosynthesis assay and fluorescence spectroscopy methods to explore antimicrobial peptide mode(s) of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jana, Bimal; Baker, Kristin Renee; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    the biosynthesis rate of macromolecules (e.g., DNA, RNA, protein, and cell wall) and the cytoplasmic membrane proton motive force (PMF) energy can help to unravel the diverse modes of action of AMPs. Here, we present an overview of macromolecule biosynthesis rate measurement and fluorescence spectroscopy methods...

  7. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of Aspergillus niger pectin methylesterase: mode of action on fully methylesterified oligogalacturonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, H.C.M.; Esteban Warren, M.; Orlando, R.; Benen, J.A.E.; Bergmann, C.; Visser, J.

    2000-01-01

    The substrate specificity and the mode of action of Aspergillus niger pectin methylesterase (PME) was determined using both fully methyl-esterified oligogalacturonates with degrees of polymerization (DP) 2–6 and chemically synthesized monomethyl trigalacturonates. The enzymic activity on the

  8. Application of mass spectrometric techniques to delineate the modes-of-action of anticancer metallodrugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartinger, Christian G.; Groessl, Michael; Meier, Samuel M.; Casini, Angela; Dyson, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as an important tool for studying anticancer metallodrugs in complex biological samples and for characterising their interactions with biomolecules and potential targets on a molecular level. The exact modes-of-action of these coordination compounds and especially

  9. Evaluation of genotoxic effects of surface waters using a battery of bioassays indicating different mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingnan; Li, Na; Oda, Yoshimitsu; Ma, Mei; Rao, Kaifeng; Wang, Zijian; Jin, Wei; Hong, Gang; Li, Zhiguo; Luo, Yi

    2016-11-01

    With the burgeoning contamination of surface waters threatening human health, the genotoxic effects of surface waters have received much attention. Because mutagenic and carcinogenic compounds in water cause tumors by different mechanisms, a battery of bioassays that each indicate a different mode of action (MOA) is required to evaluate the genotoxic effects of contaminants in water samples. In this study, 15 water samples from two source water reservoirs and surrounding rivers in Shijiazhuang city of China were evaluated for genotoxic effects. Target chemical analyses of 14 genotoxic pollutants were performed according to the Environmental quality standards for surface water of China. Then, the in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay, based on a high-content screening technique, was used to detect the effect of chromosome damage. The SOS/umu test using strain TA1535/pSK1002 was used to detect effects on SOS repair of gene expression. Additionally, two other strains, NM2009 and NM3009, which are highly sensitive to aromatic amines and nitroarenes, respectively, were used in the SOS/umu test to avoid false negative results. In the water samples, only two of the genotoxic chemicals listed in the water standards were detected in a few samples, with concentrations that were below water quality standards. However, positive results for the CBMN assay were observed in two river samples, and positive results for the induction of umuC gene expression in TA1535/pSK1002 were observed in seven river samples. Moreover, positive results were observed for NM2009 with S9 and NM3009 without S9 in some samples that had negative results using the strain TA1535/pSK1002. Based on the results with NM2009 and NM3009, some unknown or undetected aromatic amines and nitroarenes were likely in the source water reservoirs and the surrounding rivers. Furthermore, these compounds were most likely the causative pollutants for the genotoxic effect of these water samples. Therefore

  10. Evaluation of acute toxicity, antibacterial activity, and mode of action of the hydroethanolic extract of Piper umbellatum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Iberê Ferreira; de Oliveira, Ruberlei Godinho; Mendes Soares, Ilsamar; da Costa Alvim, Tarso; Donizeti Ascêncio, Sérgio; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos Tabajara

    2014-01-01

    Piper umbellatum L., Piperaceae, is a shrub that grows up to 3m high. It is commonly known as "capeba" or "pariparoba" in Brazil. Tea prepared using the leaves of this plant is employed in the treatment of infections and inflammatory processes in different countries. Approximately 50 compounds, notably from the flavonoid, alkaloid, terpene, and sterol classes, have been isolated from the leaves of Piper umbellatum. To evaluate the acute toxicity, antibacterial activity, and mode of action of the hydroethanolic extract of Piper umbellatum leaves (HEPu). Acute toxicity of HEPu against CHO-K1 cells was evaluated using a cytotoxicity assay with Alamar Blue and that against mice was assessed by the Hippocratic test. Antibacterial activity of HEPu was tested using the broth microdilution method using a panel of clinically relevant bacteria, and the effects of HEPu on the bacterial membrane were analyzed in detail. A preliminary phytochemical analysis based on coloration/precipitation was performed according to procedure described in the literature. Secondary metabolites detected were analyzed and confirmed by thin layer chromatography (TLC), spectrophotometry, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Piper umbellatum did not appear to be toxic in the in vitro (IC50>200 µg/mL) cytotoxicity test. When administered in vivo at doses up to 2000 mg/kg p.o., HEPu did not cause any signs or symptoms of toxicity in mice. It demonstrated a good spectrum of antibacterial activity and its mode of action appeared to be associated with changes in the permeability of bacterial membranes; it led to increased entry of hydrophobic antibiotics, efflux of K(+), and nucleotide leakage. Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenes, and sterols in the extract. Spectrophotometric and HPLC analysis revealed the presence of the flavonoids rutin and quercetin. In summary, HEPu has antibacterial activity and low acute toxicity in vitro and

  11. “Weak direct” and “Strong indirect” interactions are the mode of action of food factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Konishi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Age-dependent and lifestyle related diseases such as metabolic syndromes have become a social problem worldwide. Since these disorders are closely related to dietary lifestyle, the old saying “foods are medicine” is now being re-evaluated. Thus, dietary protection against these diseases is attracting much attention. As research into functional foods advances, a book of knowledge is being accumulated on the active ingredients, termed “food factors”, present in food resources. Identifying such molecules usually follows the conventional methodology used for finding drug candidates from natural resources. The question has arisen as to whether the mode of action of food factors as molecules is the same as that of drugs. In this article, the functional properties of food factors and drugs are comparatively reviewed and the characteristic features of food factor function is discussed, based on the idea of “weak direct” and “strong indirect” actions of food factors to their receptors

  12. Mode of action of pectin lyase A of Aspergillus niger on differently C(6)-substituted oligogalacturonides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Alebeek, Gert-Jan W M; Christensen, Tove M I E; Schols, Henk A; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Voragen, Alphons G J

    2002-07-19

    A thorough investigation of the mode of action of Aspergillus niger (4M-147) pectin lyase A (PLA) on differently C(6)-substituted oligogalacturonides is described. PLA appeared to be very specific for fully methyl-esterified oligogalacturonides: removal of the methyl-ester or changing the type of ester (ethyl esterification) or transamidation resulted in (almost) complete loss of conversion. The PLA activity increased with increasing length of the substrate up to a degree of polymerization (DP) of 8 indicating the presence of at least eight subsites on the enzyme. Product analysis demonstrated the formation of several Delta 4,5 unsaturated products and their saturated counterparts. The Delta 4,5 unsaturated trimer was the main product up to DP 8. For DP 9 and 10 Delta 4,5 unsaturated tetramer was the major product. Based upon the bond cleavage frequencies, a provisional subsite map was calculated, which supports the presence of eight subsites. By limited alkaline de-esterification of fully methyl-esterified pentamer and hexamer two sets of partially methyl-esterified pentamers (x and y methyl groups) and hexamers (a and b methyl groups) were prepared. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis demonstrated that the methyl-ester distribution was fully random. Using these partially methyl-esterified oligogalacturonides as substrates for PLA a 10-fold decrease in reaction rate was recorded compared with the fully methyl-esterified counterparts. Analysis of the methyl-ester distribution of the products showed that PLA tolerates carboxyl groups in the substrate binding cleft. At either subsite +2, +4, or -1 to -4 a free carboxyl group could be tolerated, whereas methyl-esters were obligatory at subsite +1 and +3. So PLA is capable to cleave the bond between a methyl-esterified and a non-esterified galacturonic acid residue, where the newly formed Delta 4,5 unsaturated non-reducing end residue always contains a

  13. Raman spectroscopy, electronic microscopy and SPME-GC-MS to elucidate the mode of action of a new antimicrobial food packaging material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Isabel; Aznar, Margarita; Salafranca, Jesús; Nerín, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    One critical challenge when developing a new antimicrobial packaging material is to demonstrate the mode of action of the antimicrobials incorporated into the packaging. For this task, several analytical techniques as well as microbiology are required. In this work, the antimicrobial properties of benzyl isothiocyanate, allyl isothiocyanate and essential oils of cinnamon and oregano against several moulds and bacteria have been evaluated. Benzyl isothiocyanate showed the highest antimicrobial activity and it was selected for developing the new active packaging material. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were successfully used to demonstrate the mode of action of benzyl isothiocyanate on Escherichia coli. Bacteria exhibited external modifications such as oval shape and the presence of septum surface, but they did not show any disruption or membrane damage. To provide data on the in vitro action of benzyl isothiocyanate and the presence of inhibition halos, the transfer mechanism to the cells was assessed using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Based on the transfer system, action mechanism and its stronger antimicrobial activity, benzyl isothiocyanate was incorporated to two kinds of antimicrobial labels. The labels were stable and active for 140 days against two mould producers of ochratoxin A; Penicillium verrucosum is more sensitive than Aspergillus ochraceus. Details about the analytical techniques and the results obtained are shown and discussed. Graphical Abstract Antimicrobial evaluation of pure compounds, incorporation in the packaging and study for mode of action on S. coli by Raman, SEM and SPME-GC-MS.

  14. The Mode of Action of Isocyanide in Three Aquatic Organisms, Balanus amphitrite, Bugula neritina and Danio rerio

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Kitano, Yoshikazu; Nogata, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Isocyanide is a potential antifouling compound in marine environments. In this study, we investigated its mode of action in three aquatic organisms. Two of them, the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, are major marine

  15. Elucidating Duramycin’s Bacterial Selectivity and Mode of Action on the Bacterial Cell Envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Hasim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides provides a promising route to selectively target pathogenic agents and to shape microbiome structure. Lantibiotics, such as duramycin, are one class of bacterially produced peptidic natural products that can selectively inhibit the growth of other bacteria. However, despite longstanding characterization efforts, the microbial selectivity and mode of action of duramycin are still obscure. We describe here a suite of biological, chemical, and physical characterizations that shed new light on the selective and mechanistic aspects of duramycin activity. Bacterial screening assays have been performed using duramycin and Populus-derived bacterial isolates to determine species selectivity. Lipidomic profiles of selected resistant and sensitive strains show that the sensitivity of Gram-positive bacteria depends on the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE in the cell membrane. Further the surface and interface morphology were studied by high resolution atomic force microscopy and showed a progression of cellular changes in the cell envelope after treatment with duramycin for the susceptible bacterial strains. Together, these molecular and cellular level analyses provide insight into duramycin’s mode of action and a better understanding of its selectivity.

  16. Mode of Action of the Natural Insecticide, Decaleside Involves Sodium Pump Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yallappa Rajashekar

    Full Text Available Decalesides are a new class of natural insecticides which are toxic to insects by contact via the tarsal gustatory chemosensilla. The symptoms of their toxicity to insects and the rapid knockdown effect suggest neurotoxic action, but the precise mode of action and the molecular targets for decaleside action are not known. We have presented experimental evidence for the involvement of sodium pump inhibition in the insecticidal action of decaleside in the cockroach and housefly. The knockdown effect of decaleside is concomitant with the in vivo inhibition of Na+, K+ -ATPase in the head and thorax. The lack of insecticidal action by experimental ablation of tarsi or blocking the tarsal sites with paraffin correlated with lack of inhibition of Na+- K+ ATPase in vivo. Maltotriose, a trisaccharide, partially rescued the toxic action of decaleside as well as inhibition of the enzyme, suggesting the possible involvement of gustatory sugar receptors. In vitro studies with crude insect enzyme preparation and purified porcine Na+, K+ -ATPase showed that decaleside competitively inhibited the enzyme involving the ATP binding site. Our study shows that the insecticidal action of decaleside via the tarsal gustatory sites is causally linked to the inhibition of sodium pump which represents a unique mode of action. The precise target(s for decaleside in the tarsal chemosensilla and the pathway linked to inhibition of sodium pump and the insecticidal action remain to be understood.

  17. Anti-dengue virus serotype 2 activity and mode of action of a novel peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, M-F; Tham, H-W; Rajik, M; Sharifah, S H

    2015-10-01

    To identify a novel antiviral peptide against dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) by screening a phage display peptide library and to evaluate its in vitro antiviral activity and mode of action. A phage display peptide library was biopanned against purified DENV-2 and resulted in the identification and selection of a peptide (peptide gg-ww) for further investigation. ELISA was performed, and peptide gg-ww was shown to possess the highest binding affinity against DENV-2. Thus, peptide gg-ww was synthesized for cytotoxicity and antiviral assays. Virus plaque reduction assay, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assay were used to investigate the inhibitory effect of peptide gg-ww on DENV-2 infection in Vero cells. Three different assays (pre-, simultaneous and post-treatments assays) were performed to investigate the peptide's mode of action. Results indicated that peptide gg-ww possessed strong antiviral activity with a ~96% inhibition rate, which was achieved at 250 μmol l(-1) . Viral replication was inhibited during a simultaneous treatment assay, indicating that the entry of the virus was impeded by this peptide. Peptide gg-ww displayed antiviral action against DENV-2 by targeting an early stage of viral replication (i.e. during viral entry). Peptide gg-ww may represent a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of DENV infections and is a potential candidate to be developed as a peptide drug. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Mode of Action of the Natural Insecticide, Decaleside Involves Sodium Pump Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajashekar, Yallappa; Shivanandappa, Thimmappa

    2017-01-01

    Decalesides are a new class of natural insecticides which are toxic to insects by contact via the tarsal gustatory chemosensilla. The symptoms of their toxicity to insects and the rapid knockdown effect suggest neurotoxic action, but the precise mode of action and the molecular targets for decaleside action are not known. We have presented experimental evidence for the involvement of sodium pump inhibition in the insecticidal action of decaleside in the cockroach and housefly. The knockdown effect of decaleside is concomitant with the in vivo inhibition of Na+, K+ -ATPase in the head and thorax. The lack of insecticidal action by experimental ablation of tarsi or blocking the tarsal sites with paraffin correlated with lack of inhibition of Na+- K+ ATPase in vivo. Maltotriose, a trisaccharide, partially rescued the toxic action of decaleside as well as inhibition of the enzyme, suggesting the possible involvement of gustatory sugar receptors. In vitro studies with crude insect enzyme preparation and purified porcine Na+, K+ -ATPase showed that decaleside competitively inhibited the enzyme involving the ATP binding site. Our study shows that the insecticidal action of decaleside via the tarsal gustatory sites is causally linked to the inhibition of sodium pump which represents a unique mode of action. The precise target(s) for decaleside in the tarsal chemosensilla and the pathway linked to inhibition of sodium pump and the insecticidal action remain to be understood.

  19. Acetylcholinesterase in Biofouling Species: Characterization and Mode of Action of Cyanobacteria-Derived Antifouling Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Joana R; Freitas, Micaela; Cruz, Susana; Leão, Pedro N; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Cunha, Isabel

    2015-07-24

    Effective and ecofriendly antifouling (AF) compounds have been arising from naturally produced chemicals. The objective of this study is to use cyanobacteria-derived agents to investigate the role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as an effect and/or mode of action of promising AF compounds, since AChE inhibitors were found to inhibit invertebrate larval settlement. To pursue this objective, in vitro quantification of AChE activity under the effect of several cyanobacterial strain extracts as potential AF agents was performed along with in vivo AF (anti-settlement) screening tests. Pre-characterization of different cholinesterases (ChEs) forms present in selected tissues of important biofouling species was performed to confirm the predominance of AChE, and an in vitro AF test using pure AChE activity was developed. Eighteen cyanobacteria strains were tested as source of potential AF and AChE inhibitor agents. Results showed effectiveness in selecting promising eco-friendly AF agents, allowing the understanding of the AF biochemical mode of action induced by different compounds. This study also highlights the potential of cyanobacteria as source of AF agents towards invertebrate macrofouling species.

  20. Acetylcholinesterase in Biofouling Species: Characterization and Mode of Action of Cyanobacteria-Derived Antifouling Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana R. Almeida

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective and ecofriendly antifouling (AF compounds have been arising from naturally produced chemicals. The objective of this study is to use cyanobacteria-derived agents to investigate the role of acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity as an effect and/or mode of action of promising AF compounds, since AChE inhibitors were found to inhibit invertebrate larval settlement. To pursue this objective, in vitro quantification of AChE activity under the effect of several cyanobacterial strain extracts as potential AF agents was performed along with in vivo AF (anti-settlement screening tests. Pre-characterization of different cholinesterases (ChEs forms present in selected tissues of important biofouling species was performed to confirm the predominance of AChE, and an in vitro AF test using pure AChE activity was developed. Eighteen cyanobacteria strains were tested as source of potential AF and AChE inhibitor agents. Results showed effectiveness in selecting promising eco-friendly AF agents, allowing the understanding of the AF biochemical mode of action induced by different compounds. This study also highlights the potential of cyanobacteria as source of AF agents towards invertebrate macrofouling species.

  1. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with OnabotulinumtoxinA: Mode of Action, Efficacy and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Délia Szok

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic migraine is a common, highly disabling, underdiagnosed and undertreated entity of migraine. It affects 0.9%–2.2% of the general adult population. The present paper overviews the preclinical and clinical data regarding the therapeutic effect of onabotulinumtoxinA in chronic migraineurs. Methods: A literature search was conducted in the database of PubMed up to 20 May 2015 for articles related to the pathomechanism of chronic migraine, the mode of action, and the efficacy, safety and tolerability of onabotulinumtoxinA for the preventive treatment of chronic migraine. Results: The pathomechanism of chronic migraine has not been fully elucidated. The mode of action of onabotulinumtoxinA in the treatment of chronic migraine is suggested to be related to the inhibition of the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in the trigeminovascular system. Randomized clinical trials demonstrated that long-term onabotulinumtoxinA fixed-site and fixed-dose (155–195 U intramuscular injection therapy was effective and well tolerated for the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine. Conclusions: Chronic migraine is a highly devastating entity of migraine. Its exact pathomechanism is unrevealed. Two-third of chronic migraineurs do not receive proper preventive medication. Recent clinical studies revealed that onabotulinumtoxinA was an efficacious and safe treatment for chronic migraine.

  2. Mode of Action of Lactoperoxidase as Related to Its Antimicrobial Activity: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bafort

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactoperoxidase is a member of the family of the mammalian heme peroxidases which have a broad spectrum of activity. Their best known effect is their antimicrobial activity that arouses much interest in in vivo and in vitro applications. In this context, the proper use of lactoperoxidase needs a good understanding of its mode of action, of the factors that favor or limit its activity, and of the features and properties of the active molecules. The first part of this review describes briefly the classification of mammalian peroxidases and their role in the human immune system and in host cell damage. The second part summarizes present knowledge on the mode of action of lactoperoxidase, with special focus on the characteristics to be taken into account for in vitro or in vivo antimicrobial use. The last part looks upon the characteristics of the active molecule produced by lactoperoxidase in the presence of thiocyanate and/or iodide with implication(s on its antimicrobial activity.

  3. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos reveals two modes of action in the springtail Folsomia candida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Tjalling; Crommentuijn, Trudie; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M

    2007-01-01

    Organophosphates are popular insecticides, but relatively little is known about their chronic effects on ecologically relevant endpoints. In this paper, we examine a life-cycle experiment with the springtail Folsomia candida, exposed via food to chlorpyrifos (CPF). The results for all endpoints (survival, growth and reproduction) were analyzed using the DEBtox model. Growth was unaffected by CPF, even at concentrations causing severe effects on survival and reproduction. Model analysis suggests that CPF directly affects the process of egg production. For the short-term response (45 days), this single mode of action accurately agreed with the data. However, the full data set (120 days) revealed a dose-related decrease in reproduction at low concentrations after prolonged exposure, not covered by the same mechanism. It appears that CPF interacts with senescence by increasing oxidative damage. This assumption fits the data well, but has little consequences for the predicted response at the population level.

  4. Antiviral activity and specific modes of action of bacterial prodigiosin against Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Zeng, Cheng; Liu, RenHua; Chen, Jie; Li, Ru; Wang, XinYan; Bai, WenWen; Liu, XiaoYuan; Xiang, TingTing; Zhang, Lin; Wan, YongJi

    2016-05-01

    Prodigiosin, the tripyrrole red pigment, is a bacterial secondary metabolite with multiple bioactivities; however, the antiviral activity has not been reported yet. In the present study, we found the antiviral activity of bacterial prodigiosin on Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV)-infected cells in vitro, with specific modes of action. Prodigiosin at nontoxic concentrations selectively killed virus-infected cells, inhibited viral gene transcription, especially viral early gene ie-1, and prevented virus-mediated membrane fusion. Under prodigiosin treatment, both progeny virus production and viral DNA replication were significantly inhibited. Fluorescent assays showed that prodigiosin predominantly located in cytoplasm which suggested it might interact with cytoplasm factors to inhibit virus replication. In conclusion, the present study clearly indicates that prodigiosin possesses significant antiviral activity against BmNPV.

  5. Reconsidering the nature and mode of action of metabolite retrograde signals from the chloroplast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Martín Estavillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant organelles produce retrograde signals to alter nuclear gene expression in order to coordinate their biogenesis, maintain homeostasis or optimize their performance under adverse conditions. Many signals of different chemical nature have been described in the past decades, including chlorophyll intermediates, reactive oxygen species and adenosine derivatives. While the effects of retrograde signalling on gene expression are well understood, the initiation and transport of the signals and their mode of action have either not been resolved, or are a matter of speculation. Moreover, retrograde signalling should be consider as part of a broader cellular network, instead of as separate pathways, required to adjust to changing physiologically relevant conditions. Here we summarize current plastid retrograde signalling models in plants, with a focus on new signalling pathways, SAL1-PAP, MEcPP and β- cyclocitral, and outline missing links or future areas of research that we believe need to be addressed to have a better understanding of plant intracellular signalling networks.

  6. Verapamil for cluster headache. Clinical pharmacology and possible mode of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    is therefore limited. The clinical use of verapamil in cluster headache is reviewed and several relevant drug interactions are mentioned. Finally, its possible mode of action in cluster headache is discussed. The effect of verapamil in cluster headache most likely takes place in the hypothalamus......Verapamil is used mainly in cardiovascular diseases. High-dose verapamil (360-720 mg) is, however, currently the mainstay in the prophylactic treatment of cluster headache. The oral pharmacokinetics are variable. The pharmacodynamic effect of verapamil, the effect on blood pressure, also varies.......Verapamil is an L-type calcium channel blocker but it is also a blocker of other calcium channels (T-, P-, and possibly N- and Q-type Ca(2+) channels) and the human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channel. With so many different actions of verapamil, it is impossible at the present time to single out a certain...

  7. Probiotics as beneficial microbes in aquaculture: an update on their multiple modes of action: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zorriehzahra, Mohammad Jalil; Delshad, Somayeh Torabi; Adel, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Wide and discriminate use of antibiotics has resulted in serious biological and ecological concerns, especially the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Probiotics, known as beneficial microbes, are being proposed as an effective and eco-friendly alternative to antibiotics. They were first applied...... in aquaculture species more than three decades ago, but considerable attention had been given only in the early 2000s. Probiotics are defined as live or dead, or even a component of the microorganisms that act under different modes of action in conferring beneficial effects to the host or to its environment....... Several probiotics have been characterized and applied in fish and a number of them are of host origin. Unlike some disease control alternatives being adapted and proposed in aquaculture where actions are unilateral, the immense potential of probiotics lies on their multiple mechanisms in conferring...

  8. Development and implementation of the IPCS conceptual framework for evaluating mode of action of chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybing, E.

    2002-01-01

    The framework developed by the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) for assessing the mode of action of tumour induction of chemicals in experimental animals has been illustrated with d-limonene, sodium saccharin, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and sulfamethazine as examples. d-Limonene causes renal tumours only in male rats through a response associated with α 2u -globulin. Sodium saccharin induces urinary bladder tumours only in male rats through formation of a urinary precipitate causing erosion of the bladder surface and extensive regenerative hyperplasia. DEHP causes liver tumours in rats and mice through activation of the receptor PPARα leading to peroxisome proliferation and hepatocellular proliferation. Sulfamethazine induces thyroid follicular cell tumours in rats and mice through a mechanism involving altered thyroid hormone homeostasis

  9. Synergistic interaction and mode of action of Citrus hystrix essential oil against bacteria causing periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsariya, Karn; Phanthong, Phanida; Bunyapraphatsara, Nuntavan; Srisukh, Vimol; Chomnawang, Mullika Traidej

    2014-03-01

    Citrus hystrix de Candolle (Rutaceae), an edible plant regularly used as a food ingredient, possesses antibacterial activity, but there is no current data on the activity against bacteria causing periodontal diseases. C. hystrix essential oil from leaves and peel were investigated for antibiofilm formation and mode of action against bacteria causing periodontal diseases. In vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm formation activities were determined by broth microdilution and time kill assay. Mode of action of essential oil was observed by SEM and the active component was identified by bioautography and GC/MS. C. hystrix leaves oil exhibited antibacterial activity at the MICs of 1.06 mg/mL for P. gingivalis and S. mutans and 2.12 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. Leaf oil at 4.25 mg/mL showed antibiofilm formation activity with 99% inhibition. The lethal effects on P. gingivalis were observed within 2 and 4 h after treated with 4 × MIC and 2 × MIC, respectively. S. sanguinis and S. mutans were completely killed within 4 and 8 h after exposed to 4 × MIC and 2 × MIC of oil. MICs of tested strains showed 4 times reduction suggesting synergistic interaction of oil and chlorhexidine. Bacterial outer membrane was disrupted after treatment with leaves oil. Additionally, citronellal was identified as the major active compound of C. hystrix oil. C. hystrix leaf oil could be used as a natural active compound or in combination with chlorhexidine in mouthwash preparations to prevent the growth of bacteria associated with periodontal diseases and biofilm formation.

  10. EEG alpha activity reflects motor preparation rather than the mode of action selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre eDeiber

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-band activity (8-13 Hz is suppressed by sensory stimulation and movements, modulated by attention, working memory and mental tasks and may be sensitive to higher motor control functions. The aim of the present study was to examine alpha oscillatory activity during the preparation of simple left or right finger movements, contrasting the external and internal mode of action selection. Three preparation conditions were examined using a precueing paradigm with S1 as the preparatory and S2 as the imperative cue: Full, laterality instructed by S1; Free, laterality freely selected and None, laterality instructed by S2. Time-frequency analysis was performed in the alpha frequency range during the S1-S2 interval, and alpha motor-related amplitude asymmetries (MRAA were also calculated. The significant MRAA during the Full and Free conditions indicated effective external and internal motor response preparation. In the absence of specific motor preparation (None, a posterior alpha power decrease (event-related desynchronization, ERD dominated, reflecting the main engagement of attentional resources. In Full and Free motor preparation, posterior alpha ERD was accompanied by a midparietal alpha power increase (event-related synchronization, ERS, suggesting a concomitant inhibition of task-irrelevant visual activity. In both Full and Free motor preparation, analysis of alpha power according to MRAA amplitude revealed two types of functional activation patterns: 1 a motor alpha pattern, with predominantly midparietal alpha ERS and large MRAA corresponding to lateralized motor activation/visual inhibition and 2 an attentional alpha pattern, with dominating right posterior alpha ERD and small MRAA reflecting visuospatial attention. The present results suggest that alpha oscillatory patterns do not resolve the selection mode of action, but rather distinguish separate functional strategies of motor preparation. 

  11. Nanovesicle encapsulation of antimicrobial peptide P34: physicochemical characterization and mode of action on Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Malheiros, Patrícia; Sant'Anna, Voltaire; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; da Silveira, Nadya Pesce; Brandelli, Adriano

    2011-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptide P34, a substance showing antibacterial activity against pathogenic and food spoilage bacteria, was encapsulated in liposomes prepared from partially purified soybean phosphatidylcholine, and their physicochemical characteristics were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by agar diffusion assay using Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 as indicator strain. A concentration of 3,200 AU/mL of P34 was encapsulated in nanovesicles and stocked at 4 °C. No significant difference ( p > 0.05) in the biological activity of free and encapsulated P34 was observed through 24 days. Size and PDI of liposomes, investigated by light scattering analysis, were on average 150 nm and 0.22 respectively. Zeta potential was -27.42 mV. There was no significant change ( p > 0.05) in the physicochemical properties of liposomes during the time of evaluation. The liposomes presented closed spherical morphology as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mode of action of liposome-encapsulated P34 under L. monocytogenes cells was investigated by TEM. Liposomes appeared to adhere but not fuse with the bacterial cell wall, suggesting that the antimicrobial is released from nanovesicles to act against the microorganism. The effect of free and encapsulated P34 was tested against L. monocytogenes, showing that free bacteriocin inhibited the pathogen more quickly than the encapsulated P34. Liposomes prepared with low-cost lipid showed high encapsulation efficiency for a new antimicrobial peptide and were stable during storage. The mode of action against the pathogen L. monocytogenes was characterized.

  12. An exploratory investigation of various modes of action and potential adverse outcomes of fluoxetine in marine mussels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzellitti, Silvia; Buratti, Sara; Capolupo, Marco; Du, Bowen; Haddad, Samuel P.; Chambliss, C. Kevin; Brooks, Bryan W.; Fabbri, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mode of action (MOA) related endpoints and biomarkers of toxicity were assessed in mussels exposed to fluoxetine (FX). • Significant FX bioaccumulation was observed in tissues of mussels exposed to 30 and 300 ng/L FX. • Alterations of cAMP-related cell signaling were observed in exposed mussels as part of the MOA of FX. • FX reduced the health status of mussels inducing lysosomal effects in digestive gland and antioxidant responses in gills. • The importance of considering additional MOAs and adverse outcome pathways for FX impacts on mussels is highlighted. - Abstract: The present study investigated possible adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) of the antidepressant fluoxetine (FX) in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. An evaluation of molecular endpoints involved in modes of action (MOAs) of FX and biomarkers for sub-lethal toxicity were explored in mussels after a 7-day administration of nominal FX concentrations encompassing a range of environmentally relevant values (0.03–300 ng/L). FX bioaccumulated in mussel tissues after treatment with 30 and 300 ng/L FX, resulting in bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 200 to 800, which were higher than expected based solely on hydrophobic partitioning models. Because FX acts as a selective serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake inhibitor increasing serotonergic neurotransmission at mammalian synapses, cell signaling alterations triggered by 5-HT receptor occupations were assessed. cAMP levels and PKA activities were decreased in digestive gland and mantle/gonads of FX-treated mussels, consistent with an increased occupation of 5-HT1 receptors negatively coupled to the cAMP/PKA pathway. mRNA levels of a ABCB gene encoding the P-glycoprotein were also significantly down-regulated. This membrane transporter acts in detoxification towards xenobiotics and in altering pharmacokinetics of antidepressants; moreover, it is under a cAMP/PKA transcriptional regulation in mussels. Potential stress

  13. An exploratory investigation of various modes of action and potential adverse outcomes of fluoxetine in marine mussels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzellitti, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.franzellitti@unibo.it [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, via Selmi 3, 40100 Bologna (Italy); Buratti, Sara; Capolupo, Marco [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); Du, Bowen; Haddad, Samuel P. [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Chambliss, C. Kevin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Brooks, Bryan W. [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Fabbri, Elena [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, via Selmi 3, 40100 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Mode of action (MOA) related endpoints and biomarkers of toxicity were assessed in mussels exposed to fluoxetine (FX). • Significant FX bioaccumulation was observed in tissues of mussels exposed to 30 and 300 ng/L FX. • Alterations of cAMP-related cell signaling were observed in exposed mussels as part of the MOA of FX. • FX reduced the health status of mussels inducing lysosomal effects in digestive gland and antioxidant responses in gills. • The importance of considering additional MOAs and adverse outcome pathways for FX impacts on mussels is highlighted. - Abstract: The present study investigated possible adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) of the antidepressant fluoxetine (FX) in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. An evaluation of molecular endpoints involved in modes of action (MOAs) of FX and biomarkers for sub-lethal toxicity were explored in mussels after a 7-day administration of nominal FX concentrations encompassing a range of environmentally relevant values (0.03–300 ng/L). FX bioaccumulated in mussel tissues after treatment with 30 and 300 ng/L FX, resulting in bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 200 to 800, which were higher than expected based solely on hydrophobic partitioning models. Because FX acts as a selective serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake inhibitor increasing serotonergic neurotransmission at mammalian synapses, cell signaling alterations triggered by 5-HT receptor occupations were assessed. cAMP levels and PKA activities were decreased in digestive gland and mantle/gonads of FX-treated mussels, consistent with an increased occupation of 5-HT1 receptors negatively coupled to the cAMP/PKA pathway. mRNA levels of a ABCB gene encoding the P-glycoprotein were also significantly down-regulated. This membrane transporter acts in detoxification towards xenobiotics and in altering pharmacokinetics of antidepressants; moreover, it is under a cAMP/PKA transcriptional regulation in mussels. Potential stress

  14. Transcriptional profile of diuron-induced toxicity on the urinary bladder of male Wistar rats to inform mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlaseh, Shadia M; Bailey, Kathryn A; Hester, Susan D; Jones, Carlton; Ren, Hongzu; Cardoso, Ana Paula F; Oliveira, Maria Luiza C S; Wolf, Douglas C; de Camargo, João Lauro V

    2011-08-01

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea) is a substituted urea herbicide that induces rat urinary bladder urothelial tumors at high dietary levels (2500 ppm). The specific mode of action and molecular alterations triggered by diuron, however, have not been clarified. The present study evaluated the dose-dependent effects of mucosal alterations and transcriptional changes in the urinary bladder of rats exposed to diuron. Six-week-old male Wistar rats were treated with 0, 60, 125, 1250, and 2500 ppm of diuron in the diet for 20 weeks. Histologic examination showed urothelial hyperplasia present in rats treated with either 1250 or 2500 ppm of diuron but not 60 or 125 ppm. Comprehensive gene expression analyses of urothelial cell RNA were conducted using Affymetrix microarrays. The numbers of differentially expressed transcripts between each treatment group and control increased with diuron dose. Based on similar histology and gene expression responses, the treatment groups were regrouped into a high-dose (1250 and 2500 ppm) and low-dose group (60 and 125 ppm). These data suggest that persistent exposure to high dietary concentrations of diuron induces oxidative stress, increases cellular metabolism, and enhances cell death that is associated with sustained urothelial hyperplasia.

  15. Evaluation of the efficacy and mode of action of biological control for suppression of ganoderma boninense in oil palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A.; Abdullah, S.; Rossall, S.; Chong, K.P.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of potential antagonists, a commercial product containing combinations of microorganisms (TR1) to control Ganoderma boninense growth was investigated in this research. TR1 contained multiple strains of Bacillus spp. and Trichoderma spp. The results from field experiments showed that TR1 was all able to reduce the colonization of G. boninense, based on re-isolation of the pathogen onto a selective medium and the reduction of ergosterol content compared to untreated controls. Effectiveness of TR1 was therefore further investigated for mode of action studies. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations of Ganoderma mycelium, recovered from bioassay plates on which TR1 had inhibited fungal growth, showed that the mycelium was highly disrupted and lysed after exposure to the treatment. The production of potentially antifungal components produced by TR1 microbes in broth cultures was further investigated using Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LCMS). Several antimicrobial compounds, which could inhibit G. boninense were detected, including pyrene-1,6-dione, 12-deoxyaklanonic acid, N-methyl-a-aminoisobutyric acid, 4-O-8',5"-5'-dehydrotriferulic acid, halstoctacosanolide A, N-acetyl-leu-leu-tyr-amide, 12-oxo-10Z-dodecenoic acid, Gly-Met-OH and lovastatin. These metabolites probably contribute to the antagonistic effect against G. boninense. The use of TR1 could offer an alternative to the use of fungicides and is worthy of further investigation for the control of Ganoderma infection of oil palm. (author)

  16. Efficacy and mode of action of an immunomodulator herbal preparation containing Echinacea, wild indigo, and white cedar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstenberg, P; Henneicke-von Zepelin, H H; Köhler, G; Stammwitz, U

    1999-01-01

    Using the example of an allopathic herbal combined preparation containing Echinacea root, wild indigo root, and white cedar leaf tips (Echinaceae radix + Baptisiae tinctoriae radix + Thujae occidentalis herba = Esberitox N), the efficacy and mode of action of a phytoimmunomodulator, or immune system enhancer, is described. Efficacy of the immunomodulator has been demonstrated in studies of acute viral respiratory tract infections and infections requiring antibiotic therapy. In a recent study compliant to GCP, the therapeutic superiority of the herbal immunomodulator over placebo was confirmed as statistically significant and clinically relevant. The present overview describes a model of the antigen-independent mode of action of phytoimmunomodulation ("immunobalancing").

  17. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos reveals two modes of action in the springtail Folsomia candida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Tjalling [Department of Theoretical Biology, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1085, NL-1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: tjalling@bio.vu.nl; Crommentuijn, Trudie [Ministry of Spatial Planning, Housing and the Environment (VROM), Rijnstraat 8, P.O. Box 30945, 2500 GX, The Hague (Netherlands); Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van [Department of Animal Ecology, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1085, NL-1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kooijman, Sebastiaan A.L.M. [Department of Theoretical Biology, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1085, NL-1081 HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-01-15

    Organophosphates are popular insecticides, but relatively little is known about their chronic effects on ecologically relevant endpoints. In this paper, we examine a life-cycle experiment with the springtail Folsomia candida, exposed via food to chlorpyrifos (CPF). The results for all endpoints (survival, growth and reproduction) were analyzed using the DEBtox model. Growth was unaffected by CPF, even at concentrations causing severe effects on survival and reproduction. Model analysis suggests that CPF directly affects the process of egg production. For the short-term response (45 days), this single mode of action accurately agreed with the data. However, the full data set (120 days) revealed a dose-related decrease in reproduction at low concentrations after prolonged exposure, not covered by the same mechanism. It appears that CPF interacts with senescence by increasing oxidative damage. This assumption fits the data well, but has little consequences for the predicted response at the population level. - Exposure to chlorpyrifos in food affects reproduction in springtails according to two distinct toxic mechanisms.

  18. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos reveals two modes of action in the springtail Folsomia candida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, Tjalling; Crommentuijn, Trudie; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    Organophosphates are popular insecticides, but relatively little is known about their chronic effects on ecologically relevant endpoints. In this paper, we examine a life-cycle experiment with the springtail Folsomia candida, exposed via food to chlorpyrifos (CPF). The results for all endpoints (survival, growth and reproduction) were analyzed using the DEBtox model. Growth was unaffected by CPF, even at concentrations causing severe effects on survival and reproduction. Model analysis suggests that CPF directly affects the process of egg production. For the short-term response (45 days), this single mode of action accurately agreed with the data. However, the full data set (120 days) revealed a dose-related decrease in reproduction at low concentrations after prolonged exposure, not covered by the same mechanism. It appears that CPF interacts with senescence by increasing oxidative damage. This assumption fits the data well, but has little consequences for the predicted response at the population level. - Exposure to chlorpyrifos in food affects reproduction in springtails according to two distinct toxic mechanisms

  19. Mode of action of alginic acid compound in the reduction of gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.; Charkes, N.D.; Littlefield, J.; Reilley, J.; Stern, H.; Rosenberg, R.; Fisher, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate quantitatively the mode of action of alginic acid compound (AAC) in the treatment of patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroesophageal scintigraphy using an orally administered Tc-99m sulfur colloid solution was used to demonstrate that AAC decreased significantly the gastroesophageal reflux index from (9.9 +- 1.3)% to (6.5 +- 0.8)% (p < 0.05). No alteration of lower esophageal sphincter pressure was observed. After AAC was suitably labeled with Sr-87m, a dual-nuclide scintigraphic technique was used to show that most (< 75%) of the AAC was located in the upper half of the stomach in both normal subjects and patients with gastroesophageal reflux. In those subjects in whom reflux did occur after treatment with AAC, the Sr-87m-AAC refluxed into the esophagus preferentially compared with the liquid containing Tc-99m sulfur colloid. These findings suggest that AAC diminishes gastroesophageal reflux by means of its foaming, floating, and viscous properties

  20. Coral snake venoms: mode of action and pathophysiology of experimental envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswald Vital Brazil

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Coral snakes, the New World Elapidae, are included in the genera Micniroides and Micrurus. The genus Mlcrurus comprises nearly all coral snake species and those which are responsible for human snake-bite accidents. The following generalizations concerning the effects induced by their venoms, and their venom-properties can be made. Coral snake venoms are neurotoxic, producing loss of muscle strenght and death by respiratory paralysis. Local edema and necrosis are not induced nor blood coagulation or hemorrhages. Proteolysis activity is absent or of very low grade. They display phospholipase A2 activity. Nephrotoxic effects are not evoked. The main toxins from elapid venoms are postsynaptic and presynaptic neurotoxins and cardiotoxins. Phospholipases A2 endowed with myonecrotic or cardiotoxin-like properties are important toxic components from some elapid venoms. The mode of action of Micrurus frontalis, M. lemniscatus, M. corallinus and M. fulvius venoms has been investigated in isolated muscle preparations and is here discussed. It is shown that while M. frontalis and M. lemniscatus venoms must contain only neurotoxins that act at the cholinergic end-plate receptor (postsynaptic neurotoxins, M. corallinus venom also inhibits evoked acetylcholine release by the motor nerve endings (presynaptic neurotoxin-like effect and M. fulvius induces muscle fiber membrane depolarization (cardiotoxin-like effect. The effects produced by M. corallinus and M. fulvius venoms in vivo in dogs and M. frontalis venom in dogs and monkeys are also reported.

  1. Modes of action for biological control of Botrytis cinerea by antagonistic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana HAIDAR

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of beneficial bacteria in biocontrol of plant diseases, particularly those caused by the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, has been investigated by testing many bacteria under laboratory and field conditions. Bacteria may protect plants against B. cinerea by direct antagonistic interactions between biocontrol agents and this pathogen, as well as indirect effects through the induction of host resistance. This review focuses on various bacteria that act as biological control agents (BCAs of B. cinerea and their associated mechanisms. The modes of action (MoAs include: i synthesis of anti-fungal metabolites, such as antibiotics, cell wall-degrading enzymes and volatile organic compounds (VOCs; ii competition for nutrients and/or a niche; and iii induction of host resistance. The challenge for development of BCAs is to reduce the variability of efficiency and to prove persistence under a large range of conditions. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of MoA for future applications of bacteria in the field and in post-harvest storage, as well as combination of different MoAs as a strategy to achieve a more regular efficacy.

  2. Broflanilide: A meta-diamide insecticide with a novel mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Toshifumi; Banba, Shinichi

    2016-02-01

    Broflanilide is a meta-diamide [3-benzamido-N-(4-(perfluoropropan-2-yl)phenyl)benzamide] that exhibits high larvicidal activity against Spodoptera litura. It has been suggested that broflanilide is metabolized to desmethyl-broflanilide and that it acts as a noncompetitive resistant-to-dieldrin (RDL) γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor antagonist. The binding site of desmethyl-broflanilide was demonstrated to be distinct from that of conventional noncompetitive antagonists such as fipronil. It has been proposed that the site of action for desmethyl-broflanilide is close to G336 in the M3 region of the Drosophila RDL GABA receptor. However, although the site of action for desmethyl-broflanilide appears to overlap with that of macrocyclic lactones, different modes of actions have been demonstrated for desmethyl-broflanilide and the macrocyclic lactones. The mechanisms underlying the high selectivity of meta-diamides are also discussed in this review. Broflanilide is expected to become a prominent insecticide because it is effective against pests with resistance to cyclodienes and fipronil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterizing the structure-function relationship reveals the mode of action of a novel antimicrobial peptide, P1, from jumper ant Myrmecia pilosula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chen, Chinpan

    2017-06-01

    Microbial infections of antibiotic-resistant strains cause serious diseases and have a significant impact on public health worldwide, so novel antimicrobial drugs are urgently needed. Insect venoms, a rich source of bioactive components containing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are attractive candidates for new therapeutic agents against microbes. Recently, a novel peptide, P1, identified from the venom of the Australian jumper ant Myrmecia pilosula, showed potent antimicrobial activities against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, but its structure-function relationship is unknown. Here, we used biochemical and biophysical techniques coupled with computational simulations to explore the mode of action of P1 interaction with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles as a model membrane system. Our circular dichroism (CD) and NMR studies revealed an amphipathic α-helical structure for P1 upon interaction with DPC micelles. A paramagnetic relaxation enhancement approach revealed that P1 orients its α-helix segment (F6-G14) into DPC micelles. In addition, the α-helix segment could be essential for membrane permeabilization and antimicrobial activity. Moreover, the arginine residues R8, R11, and R15 significantly contribute to helix formation and membrane-binding affinity. The lysine residue K19 of the C-terminus functionally guides P1 to interact with DPC micelles in the early interaction stage. Our study provides insights into the mode of action of P1, which is valuable in modifying and developing potent AMPs as antibiotic drugs.

  4. Maggot therapy´s modes of action : effect of maggot secretions on microbiological, haematological and immunological processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, Maartje Jeriena Adriana van der

    2009-01-01

    The work described in this thesis focussed on the modes of action of maggot therapy in chronic wounds, especially related to the inflammatory phase of wound healing. For this purpose, the effect of maggot excretions and/or secretions on microbiological, haematological and immunological processes was

  5. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint.

  6. Resistance mutation conserved between insects and mites unravels the benzoylurea insecticide mode of action on chitin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douris, Vassilis; Steinbach, Denise; Panteleri, Rafaela; Livadaras, Ioannis; Pickett, John Anthony; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Nauen, Ralf; Vontas, John

    2016-12-20

    Despite the major role of chitin biosynthesis inhibitors such as benzoylureas (BPUs) in the control of pests in agricultural and public health for almost four decades, their molecular mode of action (MoA) has in most cases remained elusive. BPUs interfere with chitin biosynthesis and were thought to interact with sulfonylurea receptors that mediate chitin vesicle transport. Here, we uncover a mutation (I1042M) in the chitin synthase 1 (CHS1) gene of BPU-resistant Plutella xylostella at the same position as the I1017F mutation reported in spider mites that confers etoxazole resistance. Using a genome-editing CRISPR/Cas9 approach coupled with homology-directed repair (HDR) in Drosophila melanogaster, we introduced both substitutions (I1056M/F) in the corresponding fly CHS1 gene (kkv). Homozygous lines bearing either of these mutations were highly resistant to etoxazole and all tested BPUs, as well as buprofezin-an important hemipteran chitin biosynthesis inhibitor. This provides compelling evidence that BPUs, etoxazole, and buprofezin share in fact the same molecular MoA and directly interact with CHS. This finding has immediate effects on resistance management strategies of major agricultural pests but also on mosquito vectors of serious human diseases such as Dengue and Zika, as diflubenzuron, the standard BPU, is one of the few effective larvicides in use. The study elaborates on how genome editing can directly, rapidly, and convincingly elucidate the MoA of bioactive molecules, especially when target sites are complex and hard to reconstitute in vitro.

  7. Coexpression of nuclear receptors and histone methylation modifying genes in the testis: implications for endocrine disruptor modes of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Anderson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endocrine disruptor chemicals elicit adverse health effects by perturbing nuclear receptor signalling systems. It has been speculated that these compounds may also perturb epigenetic mechanisms and thus contribute to the early origin of adult onset disease. We hypothesised that histone methylation may be a component of the epigenome that is susceptible to perturbation. We used coexpression analysis of publicly available data to investigate the combinatorial actions of nuclear receptors and genes involved in histone methylation in normal testis and when faced with endocrine disruptor compounds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression patterns of a set of genes were profiled across testis tissue in human, rat and mouse, plus control and exposed samples from four toxicity experiments in the rat. Our results indicate that histone methylation events are a more general component of nuclear receptor mediated transcriptional regulation in the testis than previously appreciated. Coexpression patterns support the role of a gatekeeper mechanism involving the histone methylation modifiers Kdm1, Prdm2, and Ehmt1 and indicate that this mechanism is a common determinant of transcriptional integrity for genes critical to diverse physiological endpoints relevant to endocrine disruption. Coexpression patterns following exposure to vinclozolin and dibutyl phthalate suggest that coactivity of the demethylase Kdm1 in particular warrants further investigation in relation to endocrine disruptor mode of action. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides proof of concept that a bioinformatics approach that profiles genes related to a specific hypothesis across multiple biological settings can provide powerful insight into coregulatory activity that would be difficult to discern at an individual experiment level or by traditional differential expression analysis methods.

  8. Comparative mode of action of novel hybrid peptide CS-1a and its rearranged amphipathic analogue CS-2a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Seema; Bisht, Gopal S; Rawat, Diwan S; Maiti, Souvik; Pasha, Santosh

    2012-10-01

    Cell selective, naturally occurring, host defence cationic peptides present a good template for the design of novel peptides with the aim of achieving a short length with improved antimicrobial potency and selectivity. A novel, short peptide CS-1a (14 residues) was derived using a sequence hybridization approach on sarcotoxin I (39 residues) and cecropin B (35 residues). The sequence of CS-1a was rearranged to enhance amphipathicity with the help of a Schiffer-Edmundson diagram to obtain CS-2a. Both peptides showed good antibacterial activity in the concentration range 4-16 μg·mL(-1) against susceptible as well as drug-resistant bacterial strains, including the clinically relevant pathogens Acenatobacter sp. and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The major thrust of these peptides is their nonhaemolytic activity against human red blood cells up to a high concentration of 512 μg·mL(-1). Compared to CS-1a, amphipathic peptide CS-2a showed a more pronounced α-helical conformation, along with a better membrane insertion depth in bacterial mimic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) small unilamellar vesicles. With equivalent lipid-binding affinity, the two peptides assumed different pathways of membrane disruption, as demonstrated by calcein leakage and the results of transmission electron microscopy on model bacterial mimic large unilamellar vesicles. Extending the work from model membranes to intact Escherichia coli cells, differences in membrane perturbation were visible in microscopic images of peptide-treated E. coli. The present study describes two novel short peptides with potent activity, cell selectivity and divergent modes of action that will aid in the future design of peptides with better therapeutic potential. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  9. Design, synthesis, antiviral activity and mode of action of phenanthrene-containing N-heterocyclic compounds inspired by the phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid antofine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiuling; Wei, Peng; Wang, Ziwen; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Qingmin

    2016-02-01

    The phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid antofine and its analogues have excellent antiviral activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). To simplify the structure and the synthesis of the phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid, a series of phenanthrene-containing N-heterocyclic compounds (compounds 1 to 33) were designed and synthesised, based on the intermolecular interaction of antofine and TMV RNA, and systematically evaluated for their anti-TMV activity. Most of these compounds exhibited good to reasonable anti-TMV activity. The optimum compounds 5, 12 and 21 displayed higher activity than the lead compound antofine and commercial ribavirin. Compound 12 was chosen for field trials of antiviral efficacy against TMV, and was found to exhibit better activity than control plant virus inhibitors. Compounds 5 and 12 were chosen for mode of action studies. The changes in fluorescence intensity of compounds 5 and 12 on separated TMV RNA showed that these small molecules can also bind to TMV RNA, but the mode is very different from that of antofine. The compounds combining phenanthrene and an N-heterocyclic ring could maintain the anti-TMV activity of phenanthroindolizidines, but their modes of action are different from that of antofine. The present study lays a good foundation for us to find more efficient anti-plant virus reagents. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Mode of action of Cr(VI) in immunocytes of earthworms: Implications for animal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, Susanna; Moore, Michael N; Mou, Zhuofan; Boeri, Marta; Banni, Mohamed; Viarengo, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Chromium (Cr) is one of the major and most detrimental pollutant, widely present in the environment as a result of several anthropogenic activities. In mammalian cells, Cr(VI) is known to enhance reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and to cause toxic and genotoxic effects. Less commonly investigated are the effects and mode of action of this contaminant in invertebrates, particularly in soil organisms. In this work, earthworms of the species Eisenia andrei were exposed for 1 and 3 days to various sublethal concentrations of Cr(VI) (2, 15, 30µgmL -1 ) using the paper contact toxicity test. In amoeboid leukocytes we investigated intracellular ROS and lipoperoxide production, oxidative DNA damage, and the effects on different cell functions. The analysis of the results shows that Cr(VI) triggered severe adverse reactions; the first events were an increase of intracellular ROS levels, generating in the cells oxidative stress conditions leading to membrane lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage. Lysosomes showed relevant changes such as a strong membrane destabilization, which was accompanied by an increased catabolism of cytoplasmic proteins and accumulation of lipofuscin. With an increase in the dose and/or time of exposure, the physiological status of intracellular organelles (such as lysosomes, nucleus and mitochondria) showed further impairment and amoebocyte immune functions were adversely affected, as shown by the decrease of the phagocytic activity. By mapping the responses of the different parameters evaluated, diagnostic of (oxidative) stress events, against lysosomal membrane stability, a "health status" indicator (able to describe the stress syndrome from its early phase to pathology), we have shown that this biomarker is suitable as a prognostic test for health of earthworms. This is viewed as a crucial step toward the derivation of explanatory frameworks for prediction of pollutant impact on animal health. Copyright © 2017. Published by

  11. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria P Sülsen

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin

  12. Modes of Action, Resistance and Toxicity of Insecticides Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Makoto; Buckingham, Steven D; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of insects play a key role in fast excitatory neurotransmission. Several classes of insecticides target insect nAChRs, which are composed of subunit members of a family of multiple subunit encoding genes. Alternative splicing and RNA A-to-I editing can add further to receptor diversity. Native and recombinant receptors have been explored as sites of insecticide action using radioligands, electrophysiology and site-directed mutagenesis. We have reviewed the properties of native and recombinant insect nAChRs, the challenges of functional recombinant insect nAChR expression, nAChR interactions with ligands acting at orthosteric and allosteric sites and in particular their interactions with insecticides. Actions on insect nAChRs of cartap, neonicotinoids, spinosyns, sulfoxamines, butenolides and mesoionic insecticides are reviewed and current knowledge of their modes of action are addressed. Mutations that add to our understanding of insecticide action and those leading to resistance are discussed. Co-crystallisation of neonicotinoids with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a surrogate for the nAChR ligand binding domain, has proved instructive. Toxicity issues relating to insecticides targeting nAChRs are also considered. An overview of insecticide classes targeting insect nAChRs has enhanced our understanding of these important receptors and their insecticide binding sites. However, the subunit composition of native nAChRs remains poorly understood and functional expression still presents difficulties. These topics together with improved understanding of the precise sites of insecticide actions on insect nAChRs will be the subject of future research. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Mode of action human relevance (species concordance) framework: Evolution of the Bradford Hill considerations and comparative analysis of weight of evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, M E (Bette); Palermo, Christine M; Bachman, Ammie N; North, Colin M; Jeffrey Lewis, R

    2014-01-01

    The mode of action human relevance (MOA/HR) framework increases transparency in systematically considering data on MOA for end (adverse) effects and their relevance to humans. This framework continues to evolve as experience increases in its application. Though the MOA/HR framework is not designed to address the question of “how much information is enough” to support a hypothesized MOA in animals or its relevance to humans, its organizing construct has potential value in considering relative weight of evidence (WOE) among different cases and hypothesized MOA(s). This context is explored based on MOA analyses in published assessments to illustrate the relative extent of supporting data and their implications for dose–response analysis and involved comparisons for chemical assessments on trichloropropane, and carbon tetrachloride with several hypothesized MOA(s) for cancer. The WOE for each hypothesized MOA was summarized in narrative tables based on comparison and contrast of the extent and nature of the supporting database versus potentially inconsistent or missing information. The comparison was based on evolved Bradford Hill considerations rank ordered to reflect their relative contribution to WOE determinations of MOA taking into account increasing experience in their application internationally. This clarification of considerations for WOE determinations as a basis for comparative analysis is anticipated to contribute to increasing consistency in the application of MOA/HR analysis and potentially, transparency in separating science judgment from public policy considerations in regulatory risk assessment. Copyright © 2014. The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The potential value of the mode of action (MOA)/human relevance (species concordance) framework in considering relative weight of evidence (WOE) amongst different cases and hypothesized MOA(s) is explored based on the content of several published assessments

  14. Structure-based discovery of novel US28 small molecule ligands with different modes of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lückmann, Michael; Amarandi, Roxana-Maria; Papargyri, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    ligands in the ChEMBL database. Two compounds were confirmed as agonist and inverse agonist, respectively, in both IP accumulation and Ca2+ mobilization assays. The screening setup presented in this work is computationally inexpensive and therefore particularly useful in an academic setting as it enables-simultaneous...

  15. Mode of action based risk assessment of the botanical food-borne alkenylbenzenesapiol and myristicin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alajlouni, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Alkenylbenzenes including estragole, methyleugenol, safrole, elemicin, apiol, and myristicin are naturally occurring in many herbs such as parsley, dill, basil, tarragon, fennel and nutmeg (Kreydiyyeh and Usta, 2002, Smith et al., 2002, Semenov et al., 2007). Estragole, methyleugenol and safrole

  16. Structural modification of resveratrol leads to increased anti-tumor activity, but causes profound changes in the mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherzberg, Maria-Christina; Kiehl, Andreas; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Stark, Holger; Stein, Jürgen; Fürst, Robert; Steinhilber, Dieter; Ulrich-Rückert, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    (Z)-3,5,4′-Trimethoxystilbene (Z-TMS) is a resveratrol analog with increased antiproliferative activity towards a number of cancer cell lines compared to resveratrol, which has been shown to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate if Z-TMS still shows potential for the prevention of metabolic diseases as known for resveratrol. Cell growth inhibition was determined with IC 50 values for Z-TMS between 0.115 μM and 0.473 μM (resveratrol: 110.7 μM to 190.2 μM). Flow cytometric analysis revealed a G 2 /M arrest after Z-TMS treatment, whereas resveratrol caused S phase arrest. Furthermore, Z-TMS was shown to impair microtubule polymerization. Beneficial effects on lipid accumulation were observed for resveratrol, but not for Z-TMS in an in vitro steatosis model. (E)-Resveratrol was confirmed to elevate cAMP levels, and knockdown of AMPK attenuated the antiproliferative activity, while Z-TMS did not show significant effects in these experiments. SIRT1 and AMPK activities were further measured indirectly via induction of the target gene small heterodimer partner (SHP). Thereby, (E)-resveratrol, but not Z-TMS, showed potent induction of SHP mRNA levels in an AMPK- and SIRT1-dependent manner, as confirmed by knockdown experiments. We provide evidence that Z-TMS does not show beneficial metabolic effects, probably due to loss of activity towards resveratrol target genes. Moreover, our data support previous findings that Z-TMS acts as an inhibitor of tubulin polymerization. These findings confirm that the methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in the mode of action, which should be taken into consideration when conducting lead structure optimization approaches. - Highlights: • Methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in biologic activity. • Z-TMS does not prevent hepatic steatosis, but inhibits tubulin polymerization. • Resveratrol analog Z-TMS does not influence known targets like PDEs, SIRT1

  17. Structural modification of resveratrol leads to increased anti-tumor activity, but causes profound changes in the mode of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherzberg, Maria-Christina; Kiehl, Andreas; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Stark, Holger [Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Stein, Jürgen [Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Department of Internal Medicine, Sachsenhausen Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fürst, Robert [Institute of Pharmaceutical Biology, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Steinhilber, Dieter [Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ulrich-Rückert, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.ulrich@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    (Z)-3,5,4′-Trimethoxystilbene (Z-TMS) is a resveratrol analog with increased antiproliferative activity towards a number of cancer cell lines compared to resveratrol, which has been shown to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate if Z-TMS still shows potential for the prevention of metabolic diseases as known for resveratrol. Cell growth inhibition was determined with IC{sub 50} values for Z-TMS between 0.115 μM and 0.473 μM (resveratrol: 110.7 μM to 190.2 μM). Flow cytometric analysis revealed a G{sub 2}/M arrest after Z-TMS treatment, whereas resveratrol caused S phase arrest. Furthermore, Z-TMS was shown to impair microtubule polymerization. Beneficial effects on lipid accumulation were observed for resveratrol, but not for Z-TMS in an in vitro steatosis model. (E)-Resveratrol was confirmed to elevate cAMP levels, and knockdown of AMPK attenuated the antiproliferative activity, while Z-TMS did not show significant effects in these experiments. SIRT1 and AMPK activities were further measured indirectly via induction of the target gene small heterodimer partner (SHP). Thereby, (E)-resveratrol, but not Z-TMS, showed potent induction of SHP mRNA levels in an AMPK- and SIRT1-dependent manner, as confirmed by knockdown experiments. We provide evidence that Z-TMS does not show beneficial metabolic effects, probably due to loss of activity towards resveratrol target genes. Moreover, our data support previous findings that Z-TMS acts as an inhibitor of tubulin polymerization. These findings confirm that the methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in the mode of action, which should be taken into consideration when conducting lead structure optimization approaches. - Highlights: • Methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in biologic activity. • Z-TMS does not prevent hepatic steatosis, but inhibits tubulin polymerization. • Resveratrol analog Z-TMS does not influence known targets like

  18. Systemic insecticides (neonicotinoids and fipronil): trends, uses, mode of action and metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Delso, N; Amaral-Rogers, V; Belzunces, L P; Bonmatin, J M; Chagnon, M; Downs, C; Furlan, L; Gibbons, D W; Giorio, C; Girolami, V; Goulson, D; Kreutzweiser, D P; Krupke, C H; Liess, M; Long, E; McField, M; Mineau, P; Mitchell, E A D; Morrissey, C A; Noome, D A; Pisa, L; Settele, J; Stark, J D; Tapparo, A; Van Dyck, H; Van Praagh, J; Van der Sluijs, J P; Whitehorn, P R; Wiemers, M

    2015-01-01

    doing so, they continuously stimulate neurons leading ultimately to death of target invertebrates. Like virtually all insecticides, they can also have lethal and sublethal impacts on non-target organisms, including insect predators and vertebrates. Furthermore, a range of synergistic effects with other stressors have been documented. Here, we review extensively their metabolic pathways, showing how they form both compound-specific and common metabolites which can themselves be toxic. These may result in prolonged toxicity. Considering their wide commercial expansion, mode of action, the systemic properties in plants, persistence and environmental fate, coupled with limited information about the toxicity profiles of these compounds and their metabolites, neonicotinoids and fipronil may entail significant risks to the environment. A global evaluation of the potential collateral effects of their use is therefore timely. The present paper and subsequent chapters in this review of the global literature explore these risks and show a growing body of evidence that persistent, low concentrations of these insecticides pose serious risks of undesirable environmental impacts.

  19. A Bayesian network model for predicting aquatic toxicity mode of action using two dimensional theoretical molecular descriptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriger, John F. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Gulf Ecology Division, Gulf Breeze, FL, 32561 (United States); Martin, Todd M. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Sustainable Technology Division, Cincinnati, OH, 45220 (United States); Barron, Mace G., E-mail: barron.mace@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Gulf Ecology Division, Gulf Breeze, FL, 32561 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A Bayesian network was developed to classify chemical mode of action (MoA). • The network was based on the aquatic toxicity MoA for over 1000 chemicals. • A Markov blanket algorithm selected a subset of theoretical molecular descriptors. • Sensitivity analyses found influential descriptors for classifying the MoAs. • Overall precision of the Bayesian MoA classification model was 80%. - Abstract: The mode of toxic action (MoA) has been recognized as a key determinant of chemical toxicity, but development of predictive MoA classification models in aquatic toxicology has been limited. We developed a Bayesian network model to classify aquatic toxicity MoA using a recently published dataset containing over one thousand chemicals with MoA assignments for aquatic animal toxicity. Two dimensional theoretical chemical descriptors were generated for each chemical using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool. The model was developed through augmented Markov blanket discovery from the dataset of 1098 chemicals with the MoA broad classifications as a target node. From cross validation, the overall precision for the model was 80.2%. The best precision was for the AChEI MoA (93.5%) where 257 chemicals out of 275 were correctly classified. Model precision was poorest for the reactivity MoA (48.5%) where 48 out of 99 reactive chemicals were correctly classified. Narcosis represented the largest class within the MoA dataset and had a precision and reliability of 80.0%, reflecting the global precision across all of the MoAs. False negatives for narcosis most often fell into electron transport inhibition, neurotoxicity or reactivity MoAs. False negatives for all other MoAs were most often narcosis. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was undertaken for each MoA to examine the sensitivity to individual and multiple descriptor findings. The results show that the Markov blanket of a structurally complex dataset can simplify analysis and interpretation by

  20. Inhibitory effect and mode of action of chitosan solution against rice bacterial brown stripe pathogen Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae RS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunlan; Li, Bin; Ge, Mengyu; Zhou, Kaile; Wang, Yanli; Luo, Ju; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Xie, Guanlin; Sun, Guochang

    2014-06-04

    Inhibitory effect and mode of action of chitosan solution against rice bacterial brown stripe pathogen Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae (Aaa) strain RS-1 was examined in this study. Result from this study indicated that chitosan solutions at 0.10, 0.20, and 0.40mg/mL inhibited the in vitro growth of Aaa strain RS-1, and in general the inhibitory efficiency increased with the increase of both chitosan concentration and the incubation time. Antibacterial activity of chitosan in this study may be mainly due to the damage of cell membrane, which was evidenced by both the cell lysis observed by transmission electron microscopy, and the increased release of cell materials based on the measurement of cell membrane integrity. Furthermore, chitosan solutions at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4mg/mL markedly inhibited bacterial biofilm formation compared to the control, and the inhibitory effect increased with the increase of chitosan concentration. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR of the 10 secretion system related genes revealed the differential expression of genes in particular ompA/motB, emphasizing the importance of this gene in the response of Aaa strain RS-1 to chitosan stress. These results indicated that the antibacterial mode of action of chitosan may be mainly due to membrane disruption and lysis, reduction of biofilm formation, and gene expression change. Overall, the results clearly indicated that chitosan had the potential to control bacterial brown stripe of rice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxin-Based Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Benhar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein toxins confer a defense against predation/grazing or a superior pathogenic competence upon the producing organism. Such toxins have been perfected through evolution in poisonous animals/plants and pathogenic bacteria. Over the past five decades, a lot of effort has been invested in studying their mechanism of action, the way they contribute to pathogenicity and in the development of antidotes that neutralize their action. In parallel, many research groups turned to explore the pharmaceutical potential of such toxins when they are used to efficiently impair essential cellular processes and/or damage the integrity of their target cells. The following review summarizes major advances in the field of toxin based therapeutics and offers a comprehensive description of the mode of action of each applied toxin.

  2. Toxin-Based Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Assaf; Benhar, Itai

    2010-01-01

    Protein toxins confer a defense against predation/grazing or a superior pathogenic competence upon the producing organism. Such toxins have been perfected through evolution in poisonous animals/plants and pathogenic bacteria. Over the past five decades, a lot of effort has been invested in studying their mechanism of action, the way they contribute to pathogenicity and in the development of antidotes that neutralize their action. In parallel, many research groups turned to explore the pharmaceutical potential of such toxins when they are used to efficiently impair essential cellular processes and/or damage the integrity of their target cells. The following review summarizes major advances in the field of toxin based therapeutics and offers a comprehensive description of the mode of action of each applied toxin. PMID:22069564

  3. Hepatoprotective amide constituents from the fruit of Piper chaba: Structural requirements, mode of action, and new amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hisashi; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Morikawa, Toshio; Yasuda, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Itadaki; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2009-10-15

    The 80% aqueous acetone extract from the fruit of Piper chaba (Piperaceae) was found to have hepatoprotective effects on D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice. From the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction, three new amides, piperchabamides E, G, and H, 33 amides, and four aromatic constituents were isolated. Among the isolates, several amide constituents inhibited D-GalN/tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced death of hepatocytes, and the following structural requirements were suggested: (i) the amide moiety is essential for potent activity; and (ii) the 1,9-decadiene structure between the benzene ring and the amide moiety tended to enhance the activity. Moreover, a principal constituent, piperine, exhibited strong in vivo hepatoprotective effects at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg, po and its mode of action was suggested to depend on the reduced sensitivity of hepatocytes to TNF-alpha.

  4. Mode of action human relevance (species concordance) framework: Evolution of the Bradford Hill considerations and comparative analysis of weight of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, M E Bette; Palermo, Christine M; Bachman, Ammie N; North, Colin M; Jeffrey Lewis, R

    2014-06-01

    The mode of action human relevance (MOA/HR) framework increases transparency in systematically considering data on MOA for end (adverse) effects and their relevance to humans. This framework continues to evolve as experience increases in its application. Though the MOA/HR framework is not designed to address the question of "how much information is enough" to support a hypothesized MOA in animals or its relevance to humans, its organizing construct has potential value in considering relative weight of evidence (WOE) among different cases and hypothesized MOA(s). This context is explored based on MOA analyses in published assessments to illustrate the relative extent of supporting data and their implications for dose-response analysis and involved comparisons for chemical assessments on trichloropropane, and carbon tetrachloride with several hypothesized MOA(s) for cancer. The WOE for each hypothesized MOA was summarized in narrative tables based on comparison and contrast of the extent and nature of the supporting database versus potentially inconsistent or missing information. The comparison was based on evolved Bradford Hill considerations rank ordered to reflect their relative contribution to WOE determinations of MOA taking into account increasing experience in their application internationally. This clarification of considerations for WOE determinations as a basis for comparative analysis is anticipated to contribute to increasing consistency in the application of MOA/HR analysis and potentially, transparency in separating science judgment from public policy considerations in regulatory risk assessment. Copyright © 2014. The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Understanding the Effectiveness of Natural Compound Mixtures in Cancer through Their Molecular Mode of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thazin Nwe Aung

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Many approaches to cancer management are often ineffective due to adverse reactions, drug resistance, or inadequate target specificity of single anti-cancer agents. In contrast, a combinatorial approach with the application of two or more anti-cancer agents at their respective effective dosages can achieve a synergistic effect that boosts cytotoxicity to cancer cells. In cancer, aberrant apoptotic pathways allow cells that should be killed to survive with genetic abnormalities, leading to cancer progression. Mutations in apoptotic mechanism arising during the treatment of cancer through cancer progression can consequently lead to chemoresistance. Natural compound mixtures that are believed to have multiple specific targets with minimal acceptable side-effects are now of interest to many researchers due to their cytotoxic and chemosensitizing activities. Synergistic interactions within a drug mixture enhance the search for potential molecular targets in cancer cells. Nonetheless, biased/flawed scientific evidence from natural products can suggest false positive therapeutic benefits during drug screening. In this review, we have taken these factors into consideration when discussing the evidence for these compounds and their synergistic therapeutic benefits in cancer. While there is limited evidence for clinical efficacy for these mixtures, in vitro data suggest that these preparations merit further investigation, both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Application of benchmark dose modeling to protein expression data in the development and analysis of mode of action/adverse outcome pathways for testicular toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Meek, M E Bette; Yauk, Carole Lyn

    2014-11-01

    Reliable quantification of gene and protein expression has potential to contribute significantly to the characterization of hypothesized modes of action (MOA) or adverse outcome pathways for critical effects of toxicants. Quantitative analysis of gene expression by benchmark dose (BMD) modeling has been facilitated by the development of effective software tools. In contrast, protein expression is still generally quantified by a less robust effect level (no or lowest [adverse] effect levels) approach, which minimizes its potential utility in the consideration of dose-response and temporal concordance for key events in hypothesized MOAs. BMD modeling is applied here to toxicological data on testicular toxicity to investigate its potential utility in analyzing protein expression relevant to the proposed MOA to inform human health risk assessment. The results illustrate how the BMD analysis of protein expression in animal tissues in response to toxicant exposure: (1) complements other toxicity data, and (2) contributes to consideration of the empirical concordance of dose-response relationships, as part of the weight of evidence for hypothesized MOAs to facilitate consideration and application in regulatory risk assessment. Lack of BMD analysis in proteomics has likely limited its use for these purposes. This paper illustrates the added value of BMD modeling to support and strengthen hypothetical MOAs as a basis to facilitate the translation and uptake of the results of proteomic research into risk assessment. Copyright © 2014 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Journal of Applied Toxicology © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. IARC use of oxidative stress as key mode of action characteristic for facilitating cancer classification: Glyphosate case example illustrating a lack of robustness in interpretative implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, James S

    2017-06-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has formulated 10 key characteristics of human carcinogens to incorporate mechanistic data into cancer hazard classifications. The analysis used glyphosate as a case example to examine the robustness of IARC's determination of oxidative stress as "strong" evidence supporting a plausible cancer mechanism in humans. The IARC analysis primarily relied on 14 human/mammalian studies; 19 non-mammalian studies were uninformative of human cancer given the broad spectrum of test species and extensive use of formulations and aquatic testing. The mammalian studies had substantial experimental limitations for informing cancer mechanism including use of: single doses and time points; cytotoxic/toxic test doses; tissues not identified as potential cancer targets; glyphosate formulations or mixtures; technically limited oxidative stress biomarkers. The doses were many orders of magnitude higher than human exposures determined in human biomonitoring studies. The glyphosate case example reveals that the IARC evaluation fell substantially short of "strong" supporting evidence of oxidative stress as a plausible human cancer mechanism, and suggests that other IARC monographs relying on the 10 key characteristics approach should be similarly examined for a lack of robust data integration fundamental to reasonable mode of action evaluations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Discovery of the aryl heterocyclic amine insecticides: synthesis, insecticidal activity, field results, mode of action and bioavailability of a leading field candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, William H; Pobanz, Mark A; Geng, Chaoxian; Sparks, Thomas C; Watson, Gerald B; Letherer, Theodore J; Beavers, Kenneth W; Young, Cathy D; Adelfinskaya, Yelena A; Ross, Ronald R; Whiteker, Greg; Renga, James

    2017-04-01

    γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) antagonists are proven targets for control of lepidopteran and other pests. New heterocyclic compounds with high insecticidal activity were discovered using a competitive-intelligence-inspired scaffold-hopping approach to generate analogs of fipronil, a known GABA antagonist. These novel aryl heterocyclic amines (AHAs) displayed broad-spectrum activity on a number of chewing insect pests. Through >370 modifications of the core AHA structure, a 7-pyrazolopyridine lead molecule was found to exhibit much improved activity on a number of insect pests. In field trial studies, its performance was 2-4 times lower than commercial standards and also appeared to be species dependent, with good activity seen for larvae of Spodoptera exigua, but inactivity on larvae of Trichoplusia ni. An extensive investigational biology effort demonstrated that these AHA analogs appear to have multiple modes of action, including GABA receptor antagonism and mitopotential or uncoupler activity. The limited capability in larvae of T. ni to convert the lead molecule to its associated open form correlates with the low toxicity of the lead molecule in this species. This work has provided information that could aid investigations of novel GABA antagonists. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Catalytic Mechanism and Mode of Action of the Periplasmic Alginate Epimerase AlgG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfram, Francis; Kitova, Elena N.; Robinson, Howard; Walvoort, Marthe T. C.; Codee, Jeroen D. C.; Klassen, John S.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Background: The alginate epimerase AlgG converts mannuronate to its C5 epimer guluronate at the polymer level. Results: The structure of Pseudomonas syringae AlgG has been determined, and the protein has been functionally characterized. Conclusion: His(319) acts as the catalytic base, whereas

  10. Competitive exclusion as a mode of action of a novel Bacillus cereus aquaculture biological agent

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lalloo, R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available et al. 2001, Irianto and Austin, 2002, Hong et al. 2005). Many 12 of these mechanisms only apply to probiotics added to feed, but the latter three are relevant to 13 water borne additives such as B. cereus. 14 15 The bioremediation capability... its attractiveness as a probiotic 10 and biological agent for aquaculture. The siderophore producing capability of the B. cereus 11 isolate addresses the severe shortage of probiotics able to facilitate competitive exclusion based 12 on iron...

  11. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma and bacteria: understanding the mode of action using vibrational microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartaschew, Konstantin; Mischo, Meike; Bründermann, Erik; Havenith, Martina; Baldus, Sabrina; Awakowicz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma show promising antimicrobial effects, however the detailed biochemical mechanism of the bacterial inactivation is still unknown. We investigated, for the first time, plasma-treated Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria with Raman and infrared microspectroscopy. A dielectric barrier discharge was used as a plasma source. We were able to detect several plasma-induced chemical modifications, which suggest a pronounced oxidative effect on the cell envelope, cellular proteins and nucleotides as well as a generation of organic nitrates in the treated bacteria. Vibrational microspectroscopy is used as a comprehensive and a powerful tool for the analysis of plasma interactions with whole organisms such as bacteria. Analysis of reaction kinetics of chemical modifications allow a time-dependent insight into the plasma-mediated impact. Investigating possible synergistic effects between the plasma-produced components, our observations strongly indicate that the detected plasma-mediated chemical alterations can be mainly explained by the particle effect of the generated reactive species. By changing the polarity of the applied voltage pulse, and hence the propagation mechanisms of streamers, no significant effect on the spectral results could be detected. This method allows the analysis of the individual impact of each plasma constituent for particular chemical modifications. Our approach shows great potential to contribute to a better understanding of plasma-cell interactions. (paper)

  12. The Cyclic Antibacterial Peptide Enterocin AS-48: Isolation, Mode of Action, and Possible Food Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Grande Burgos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterocin AS-48 is a circular bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus. It contains a 70 amino acid-residue chain circularized by a head-to-tail peptide bond. The conformation of enterocin AS-48 is arranged into five alpha-helices with a compact globular structure. Enterocin AS-48 has a wide inhibitory spectrum on Gram-positive bacteria. Sensitivity of Gram-negative bacteria increases in combination with outer-membrane permeabilizing treatments. Eukaryotic cells are bacteriocin-resistant. This cationic peptide inserts into bacterial membranes and causes membrane permeabilization, leading ultimately to cell death. Microarray analysis revealed sets of up-regulated and down-regulated genes in Bacillus cereus cells treated with sublethal bacteriocin concentration. Enterocin AS-48 can be purified in two steps or prepared as lyophilized powder from cultures in whey-based substrates. The potential applications of enterocin AS-48 as a food biopreservative have been corroborated against foodborne pathogens and/or toxigenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and spoilage bacteria (Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Bacillus spp., Paenibacillus spp., Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Staphylococcus carnosus, Lactobacillus sakei and other spoilage lactic acid bacteria. The efficacy of enterocin AS-48 in food systems increases greatly in combination with chemical preservatives, essential oils, phenolic compounds, and physico-chemical treatments such as sublethal heat, high-intensity pulsed-electric fields or high hydrostatic pressure.

  13. The Cyclic Antibacterial Peptide Enterocin AS-48: Isolation, Mode of Action, and Possible Food Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande Burgos, María José; Pulido, Rubén Pérez; Del Carmen López Aguayo, María; Gálvez, Antonio; Lucas, Rosario

    2014-12-08

    Enterocin AS-48 is a circular bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus. It contains a 70 amino acid-residue chain circularized by a head-to-tail peptide bond. The conformation of enterocin AS-48 is arranged into five alpha-helices with a compact globular structure. Enterocin AS-48 has a wide inhibitory spectrum on Gram-positive bacteria. Sensitivity of Gram-negative bacteria increases in combination with outer-membrane permeabilizing treatments. Eukaryotic cells are bacteriocin-resistant. This cationic peptide inserts into bacterial membranes and causes membrane permeabilization, leading ultimately to cell death. Microarray analysis revealed sets of up-regulated and down-regulated genes in Bacillus cereus cells treated with sublethal bacteriocin concentration. Enterocin AS-48 can be purified in two steps or prepared as lyophilized powder from cultures in whey-based substrates. The potential applications of enterocin AS-48 as a food biopreservative have been corroborated against foodborne pathogens and/or toxigenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica) and spoilage bacteria (Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris, Bacillus spp., Paenibacillus spp., Geobacillus stearothermophilus, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Staphylococcus carnosus, Lactobacillus sakei and other spoilage lactic acid bacteria). The efficacy of enterocin AS-48 in food systems increases greatly in combination with chemical preservatives, essential oils, phenolic compounds, and physico-chemical treatments such as sublethal heat, high-intensity pulsed-electric fields or high hydrostatic pressure.

  14. Mode of action of dioxin-like versus non-dioxin-like PCBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeters, G. [VITO (Flemish Institute for Technological Research), Dept. of Environemental Toxicology (Belgium)]|[Antwerp Univ. (Belgium); Birnbaum, L. [United States Environmental Protection Agency, Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Exposure of humans to polychlorinated biphenyls has been associated with different adverse effects such as immune impairment, changes in hormone levels, reproductive and neuropsychological changes and cancer. It is difficult to attribute the observed effects to either dioxin-like, non-dioxin-like PCBs or to both. All known human exposures are mixed, comprising dioxin and non-dioxin like PCB congeners as well as dioxins and furans. The purpose of this work was to evaluate, based on mechanistic data available in the open literature, whether non-dioxin like PCBs (NDL-PCBs) themselves may pose specific health risks. It is clear that dioxin and NDL-PCBs differ in the spectrum of metabolizing enzymes they induce, but the mechanistic links to health of these biochemical changes remain unclear at the moment. NDL-PCBs also cause immunotoxicity and tumor promotion via different mechanisms than do dioxin-like PCBs. We focus on neurotoxicity which has been associated with developmental exposure to PCBs and which is considered as one of the most sensitive adverse health effects.

  15. Mode of action of sodium arsenate on laboratory colonies of the pharaoh's ant Monomorium pharaonis L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, K P

    1974-01-01

    Arsenate compounds for pest control have been displayed on large scale by modern insecticides. In the control of the pharaoh's ant the arsenates however still remain an important means for eradication. The present study points out, that the mortality of workers and queens, respectively, are not the decisive factors of action as assumed until now. The causes for the extinction of the ant colonies after application of sodium arsenate are based on a combination of larval mortality and the induction of sterility in the queens, the sterility being the most important factor. A number of other factors moreover are working advantageously. First, the poison bait is not repellent and is well accepted by the workers, and is either stored in the nest or distributed trophalactically. Whereas with the workers there occurs a strongly delayed mortality, the larvae are being inhibited in their development after a few hours, shortly before pupation, or they are being paralyzed, whereby the further pupation would by cut off. The younger larvae normally do not come to pupation, but are being stunted and would be eliminated from the nest. The reproducing females, being the last members in the social chain, are protected in the polygynous society from the lethal action of the poison, although otherwise susceptible in the same way as workers. After a certain time sub-lethal doses of sodium arsenate lead to a decrease in fecundity. Egg production is suppressed dependent on the duration of the poison application up to permanent sterility. On the basis of these investigations some suggestions for practical control of the pharaoh's ant have been derived.

  16. The toxicological mode of action and the safety of synthetic amorphous silica—A nanostructured material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruijtier-Pölloth, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), in the form of pyrogenic (fumed), precipitated, gel or colloidal SAS, has been used in a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications including food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products for many decades. Based on extensive physico-chemical, ecotoxicology, toxicology, safety and epidemiology data, no environmental or health risks have been associated with these materials if produced and used under current hygiene standards and use recommendations. With internal structures in the nanoscale size range, pyrogenic, precipitated and gel SAS are typical examples of nanostructured materials as recently defined by the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). The manufacturing process of these SAS materials leads to aggregates of strongly (covalently) bonded or fused primary particles. Weak interaction forces (van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding, physical adhesion) between aggregates lead to the formation of micrometre (μm)-sized agglomerates. Typically, isolated nanoparticles do not occur. In contrast, colloidal SAS dispersions may contain isolated primary particles in the nano-size range which can be considered nano-objects. The size of the primary particle resulted in the materials often being considered as “nanosilica” and in the inclusion of SAS in research programmes on nanomaterials. The biological activity of SAS can be related to the particle shape and surface characteristics interfacing with the biological milieu rather than to particle size. SAS adsorbs to cellular surfaces and can affect membrane structures and integrity. Toxicity is linked to mechanisms of interactions with outer and inner cell membranes, signalling responses, and vesicle trafficking pathways. Interaction with membranes may induce the release of endosomal substances, reactive oxygen species, cytokines and chemokines and thus induce inflammatory responses. None of the SAS forms, including colloidal nano-sized particles, were

  17. The toxicological mode of action and the safety of synthetic amorphous silica-a nanostructured material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruijtier-Pölloth, Claudia

    2012-04-11

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), in the form of pyrogenic (fumed), precipitated, gel or colloidal SAS, has been used in a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications including food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products for many decades. Based on extensive physico-chemical, ecotoxicology, toxicology, safety and epidemiology data, no environmental or health risks have been associated with these materials if produced and used under current hygiene standards and use recommendations. With internal structures in the nanoscale size range, pyrogenic, precipitated and gel SAS are typical examples of nanostructured materials as recently defined by the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). The manufacturing process of these SAS materials leads to aggregates of strongly (covalently) bonded or fused primary particles. Weak interaction forces (van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding, physical adhesion) between aggregates lead to the formation of micrometre (μm)-sized agglomerates. Typically, isolated nanoparticles do not occur. In contrast, colloidal SAS dispersions may contain isolated primary particles in the nano-size range which can be considered nano-objects. The size of the primary particle resulted in the materials often being considered as "nanosilica" and in the inclusion of SAS in research programmes on nanomaterials. The biological activity of SAS can be related to the particle shape and surface characteristics interfacing with the biological milieu rather than to particle size. SAS adsorbs to cellular surfaces and can affect membrane structures and integrity. Toxicity is linked to mechanisms of interactions with outer and inner cell membranes, signalling responses, and vesicle trafficking pathways. Interaction with membranes may induce the release of endosomal substances, reactive oxygen species, cytokines and chemokines and thus induce inflammatory responses. None of the SAS forms, including colloidal nano-sized particles, were shown

  18. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  19. Efficacy of Combined Formulations of Fungicides with Different Modes of Action in Controlling Botrytis Gray Mold Disease in Chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, M. H.; Hossain, M. Ashraf; Kashem, M. A.; Kumar, Shiv; Rafii, M. Y.; Latif, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis gray mold (BGM) caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. Ex. Fr. is an extremely devastating disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and has a regional as well as an international perspective. Unfortunately, nonchemical methods for its control are weak and ineffective. In order to identify an effective control measure, six fungicides with different modes of action were evaluated on a BGM susceptible chickpea variety BARIchhola-1 at a high BGM incidence location (Madaripur) in Bangladesh for three years (2008, 2009, and 2010). Among the six fungicides tested, one was protectant [Vondozeb 42SC, a.i. mancozeb (0.2%)], two systemic [Bavistin 50 WP, a.i. carbendazim (0.2%), and Protaf 250EC, propiconazole (0.05%)], and three combination formulations [Acrobat MZ690, dimethomorph 9% + mancozeb 60%, (0.2%); Secure 600 WG, phenomadone + mancozeb (0.2%); and Companion, mancozeb 63% + carbendazim 12% (0.2%)]. The results showed superiority of combination formulations involving both protectant and systemic fungicides over the sole application of either fungicide separately. Among the combination fungicides, Companion was most effective, resulting in the lowest disease severity (3.33 score on 1–9 scale) and the highest increase (38%) of grain yield in chickpea. Therefore, this product could be preferred over the sole application of either solo protectant or systemic fungicides to reduce yield losses and avoid fungicide resistance. PMID:24723819

  20. Mode of action of cupping--local metabolism and pain thresholds in neck pain patients and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerich, M; Braeunig, M; Clement, H W; Lüdtke, R; Huber, R

    2014-02-01

    Cupping worldwide has been part of traditional medicine systems and is in the western world used as CAM therapy mainly for treating pain syndromes. The mode of action is up to now unclear. In order to investigate its mechanism we measured in parallel metabolic changes in the tissue under the cupping glass and pressure pain thresholds. In 12 volunteers (6 healthy subjects and 6 patients with chronic neck pain) a microdialysis system was implanted subcutaneously on both sides (left and right) above the trapezius muscle. After baseline measures cupping was performed at one randomly selected side (left or right), the other side served as control. Every 20 min during baseline measures and for 280 min after cupping, microdialysis probes for detection of lactate, pyruvate, glucose and glycerin were taken. In addition, pain thresholds were measured before and after cupping with algometry. Cupping resulted in a strong increase of lactate (beginning 160 min after cupping until the end of the measurements) and the lactate/pyruvate ratio, indicating an anaerobe metabolism in the surrounding tissue. Baseline pain thresholds were non-significantly lower in neck pain patients compared to healthy controls and slightly increased immediately after cupping (pcupping in healthy subjects and on the foot in neck pain patients). After 280 min no more significant changes of pain thresholds were detected. Cupping induces >280 min lasting anaerobe metabolism in the subcutaneous tissue and increases immediate pressure pain thresholds in some areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Different Dose-Dependent Modes of Action of C-Type Natriuretic Peptide on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florie Desriac

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP, a peptide produced by lungs, is able to impact Pseudomonas aeruginosa physiology. In the present work, the effect of CNP at different concentrations on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation was studied and the mechanisms of action of this human hormone on P. aeruginosa were deciphered. CNP was shown to inhibit dynamic biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner without affecting the bacterial growth at any tested concentrations. The most effective concentrations were 1 and 0.1 µM. At 0.1 µM, the biofilm formation inhibition was fully dependent on the CNP sensor protein AmiC, whereas it was only partially AmiC-dependent at 1 µM, revealing the existence of a second AmiC-independent mode of action of CNP on P. aeruginosa. At 1 µM, CNP reduced both P. aeruginosa adhesion on glass and di-rhamnolipid production and also increased the bacterial membrane fluidity. The various effects of CNP at 1 µM and 0.1 µM on P. aeruginosa shown here should have major consequences to design drugs for biofilm treatment or prevention.

  2. Classifying chemical mode of action using gene networks and machine learning: a case study with the herbicide linuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornostay, Anna; Cowie, Andrew M; Hindle, Matthew; Baker, Christopher J O; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    The herbicide linuron (LIN) is an endocrine disruptor with an anti-androgenic mode of action. The objectives of this study were to (1) improve knowledge of androgen and anti-androgen signaling in the teleostean ovary and to (2) assess the ability of gene networks and machine learning to classify LIN as an anti-androgen using transcriptomic data. Ovarian explants from vitellogenic fathead minnows (FHMs) were exposed to three concentrations of either 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), flutamide (FLUT), or LIN for 12h. Ovaries exposed to DHT showed a significant increase in 17β-estradiol (E2) production while FLUT and LIN had no effect on E2. To improve understanding of androgen receptor signaling in the ovary, a reciprocal gene expression network was constructed for DHT and FLUT using pathway analysis and these data suggested that steroid metabolism, translation, and DNA replication are processes regulated through AR signaling in the ovary. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that FLUT and LIN shared more regulated gene networks in common compared to DHT. Using transcriptomic datasets from different fish species, machine learning algorithms classified LIN successfully with other anti-androgens. This study advances knowledge regarding molecular signaling cascades in the ovary that are responsive to androgens and anti-androgens and provides proof of concept that gene network analysis and machine learning can classify priority chemicals using experimental transcriptomic data collected from different fish species. © 2013.

  3. Identification of developmentally toxic drinking water disinfection byproducts and evaluation of data relevant to mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colman, Joan; Rice, Glenn E.; Wright, J. Michael; Hunter, E. Sidney; Teuschler, Linda K.; Lipscomb, John C.; Hertzberg, Richard C.; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Fransen, Margaret; Osier, Mark; Narotsky, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Reactions between chemicals used to disinfect drinking water and compounds present in source waters produce chemical mixtures containing hundreds of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although the results have been somewhat inconsistent, some epidemiological studies suggest associations may exist between DBP exposures and adverse developmental outcomes. The potencies of individual DBPs in rodent and rabbit developmental bioassays suggest that no individual DBP can account for the relative risk estimates reported in the positive epidemiologic studies, leading to the hypothesis that these outcomes could result from the toxicity of DBP mixtures. As a first step in a mixtures risk assessment for DBP developmental effects, this paper identifies developmentally toxic DBPs and examines data relevant to the mode of action (MOA) for DBP developmental toxicity. We identified 24 developmentally toxic DBPs and four adverse developmental outcomes associated with human DBP exposures: spontaneous abortion, cardiovascular defects, neural tube defects, and low birth weight infancy. A plausible MOA, involving hormonal disruption of pregnancy, is delineated for spontaneous abortion, which some epidemiologic studies associate with total trihalomethane and bromodichloromethane exposures. The DBP data for the other three outcomes were inadequate to define key MOA steps.

  4. Antibacterial Activities and Possible Modes of Action of Acacia nilotica (L. Del. against Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli and Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Bilal Sadiq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are frequently used for the treatment of various infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity and mode of action of Acacia nilotica and the antibiogram patterns of foodborne and clinical strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. The mechanism of action of acacia extracts against E. coli and Salmonella was elucidated by observing morphological damages including cell integrity and cell membrane permeability, as well as changes in cell structures and growth patterns in kill-time experiments. The clinical isolates of E. coli and Salmonella were found resistant to more of the tested antibiotics, compared to food isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of acacia leaf extracts were in the ranges of 1.56–3.12 mg/mL and 3.12–6.25 mg/mL, respectively, whereas pods and bark extracts showed somewhat higher values of 3.12–6.25 mg/mL and 6.25–12.5 mg/mL, respectively, against all tested pathogens. The release of electrolytes and essential cellular constituents (proteins and nucleic acids indicated that acacia extracts damaged the cellular membrane of the pathogens. These changes corresponded to simultaneous reduction in the growth of viable bacteria. This study indicates that A. nilotica can be a potential source of new antimicrobials, effective against antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogens.

  5. Combined effect of enterocin and lipase from Enterococcus faecium NCIM5363 against food borne pathogens: mode of action studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Vrinda; Narayan, Bhaskar; Halami, Prakash M

    2012-08-01

    Food borne diseases have a major impact on public health whose epidemiology is rapidly changing. The whole cells of pathogens involved or their toxins/metabolites affect the human health apart from spoiling sensory properties of the food products finally affecting the food industry as well as consumer health. With pathogens developing mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, there has been an increased need to replace antibiotics as well as chemical additives with naturally occurring bacteriocins. Bacteriocins are known to act mainly against Gram-positive pathogens and with little or no effect towards Gram-negative enteric bacteria. In the present study, combination effect of lipase and bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecium NCIM5363, a highly lipolytic lactic acid bacterium against various food pathogens was assessed. The lipase in combination with enterocin exhibited a lethal effect against Gram-negative pathogens. Scanning electron microscopy studies carried out to ascertain the constitutive mode of action of lipase and enterocin revealed that the lipase degrades the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria and creates a pore through which enterocin enters thereby resulting in cell death. The novelty of this work is the fact that this is the first report revealing the synergistic effect of lipase with enterocin against Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Antifungal modes of action of Saccharomyces and other biocontrol yeasts against fungi isolated from sour and grey rots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nally, M C; Pesce, V M; Maturano, Y P; Rodriguez Assaf, L A; Toro, M E; Castellanos de Figueroa, L I; Vazquez, F

    2015-07-02

    The aim of this study was to determine the putative modes of action of 59 viticultural yeasts (31 Saccharomyces and 28 non-Saccharomyces) that inhibited fungi isolated from sour and grey rot in grapes. Inhibition of fungal mycelial growth by metabolites, enzyme activities (laminarinases, chitinases), antifungal volatiles, competition for nutrients (siderophores, Niche Overlap Index (NOI)), inhibition of fungal spore germination and decreased germinal tube length and induction of resistance were assayed. Biofungicide yeasts were classified into "antifungal patterns", according to their mechanisms of action. Thirty isolates presented at least two of the mechanisms assayed. We propose that inhibition of fungal mycelial growth by metabolites, laminarinases, competition for nutrients, inhibition of fungal spore germination and decreased germinal tube length, and antifungal volatiles by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces viticultural yeasts is used as putative biocontrol mechanisms against phytopathogenic fungi. Twenty-four different antifungal patterns were identified. Siderophore production (N)and a combination of siderophore production and NOI>0.92 (M)were the most frequent antifungal patterns observed in the biofungicide yeasts assayed. Elucidation of these mechanisms could be useful for optimization of an inoculum formulation, resulting in a more consistent control of grey and sour rot with Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces biocontrol yeasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Meleagrin, a new FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chryosogenum with at least one additional mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ji Zheng

    Full Text Available Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI is a promising novel antibacterial target. We isolated a new class of FabI inhibitor from Penicillium chrysogenum, which produces various antibiotics, the mechanisms of some of them are unknown. The isolated FabI inhibitor was determined to be meleagrin by mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, and its more active and inactive derivatives were chemically prepared. Consistent with their selective inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus FabI, meleagrin and its more active derivatives directly bound to S. aureus FabI in a fluorescence quenching assay, inhibited intracellular fatty acid biosynthesis and growth of S. aureus, and increased the minimum inhibitory concentration for fabI-overexpressing S. aureus. The compounds that were not effective against the FabK isoform, however, inhibited the growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae that contained only the FabK isoform. Additionally no resistant mutant to the compounds was obtained. Importantly, fabK-overexpressing Escherichia coli was not resistant to these compounds, but was resistant to triclosan. These results demonstrate that the compounds inhibited another target in addition to FabI. Thus, meleagrin is a new class of FabI inhibitor with at least one additional mode of action that could have potential for treating multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  8. Purification, Characterization, and Mode of Action of Plantaricin GZ1-27, a Novel Bacteriocin against Bacillus cereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hechao; Yang, Jie; Lu, Xiaohong; Lu, Zhaoxin; Bie, Xiaomei; Zhao, Haizhen; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Fengxia

    2018-05-09

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic pathogen that causes foodborne diseases. We isolated a novel bacteriocin, designated plantaricin GZ1-27, and elucidated its mode of action against B. cereus. Plantaricin GZ1-27 was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel-filtration chromatography, and RP-HPLC. MALDI-TOF/MS revealed that its molecular mass was 975 Da, and Q-TOF-MS/MS analysis predicted the amino acid sequence as VSGPAGPPGTH. Plantaricin GZ1-27 showed thermostability and pH stability. The antibacterial mechanism was investigated using flow cytometry, confocal laser-scanning microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR, which revealed that GZ1-27 increased cell membrane permeability, triggered K + leakage and pore formation, damaged cell membrane integrity, altered cell morphology and intracellular organization, and reduced the expression of genes related to cytotoxin production, peptidoglycan synthesis, and cell division. These results suggest that plantaricin GZ1-27 effectively inhibits B. cereus at both the cellular and the molecular levels and is a potential natural food preservative targeting B. cereus.

  9. Cyanobacterial toxins: modes of actions, fate in aquatic and soil ecosystems, phytotoxicity and bioaccumulation in agricultural crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbel, Sylvain; Mougin, Christian; Bouaïcha, Noureddine

    2014-02-01

    The occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in surface waters is often accompanied by the production of a variety of cyanotoxins. These toxins are designed to target in humans and animals specific organs on which they act: hepatotoxins (liver), neurotoxins (nervous system), cytotoxic alkaloids, and dermatotoxins (skin), but they often have important side effects too. When introduced into the soil ecosystem by spray irrigation of crops they may affect the same molecular pathways in plants having identical or similar target organs, tissues, cells or biomolecules. There are also several indications that terrestrial plants, including food crop plants, can bioaccumulate cyanotoxins and present, therefore, potential health hazards for human and animals. The number of publications concerned with phytotoxic effects of cyanotoxins on agricultural plants has increased recently. In this review, we first examine different cyanotoxins and their modes of actions in humans and mammals and occurrence of target biomolecules in vegetable organisms. Then we present environmental concentrations of cyanotoxins in freshwaters and their fate in aquatic and soil ecosystems. Finally, we highlight bioaccumulation of cyanotoxins in plants used for feed and food and its consequences on animals and human health. Overall, our review shows that the information on the effects of cyanotoxins on non-target organisms in the terrestrial environment is particularly scarce, and that there are still serious gaps in the knowledge about the fate in the soil ecosystems and phytotoxicity of these toxins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of Combined Formulations of Fungicides with Different Modes of Action in Controlling Botrytis Gray Mold Disease in Chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis gray mold (BGM caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. Ex. Fr. is an extremely devastating disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and has a regional as well as an international perspective. Unfortunately, nonchemical methods for its control are weak and ineffective. In order to identify an effective control measure, six fungicides with different modes of action were evaluated on a BGM susceptible chickpea variety BARIchhola-1 at a high BGM incidence location (Madaripur in Bangladesh for three years (2008, 2009, and 2010. Among the six fungicides tested, one was protectant [Vondozeb 42SC, a.i. mancozeb (0.2%], two systemic [Bavistin 50 WP, a.i. carbendazim (0.2%, and Protaf 250EC, propiconazole (0.05%], and three combination formulations [Acrobat MZ690, dimethomorph 9% + mancozeb 60%, (0.2%; Secure 600 WG, phenomadone + mancozeb (0.2%; and Companion, mancozeb 63% + carbendazim 12% (0.2%]. The results showed superiority of combination formulations involving both protectant and systemic fungicides over the sole application of either fungicide separately. Among the combination fungicides, Companion was most effective, resulting in the lowest disease severity (3.33 score on 1–9 scale and the highest increase (38% of grain yield in chickpea. Therefore, this product could be preferred over the sole application of either solo protectant or systemic fungicides to reduce yield losses and avoid fungicide resistance.

  11. Mode of action and dose-response framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity : The aryl hydrocarbon receptor as a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budinsky, R. A.; Schrenk, D.; Simon, T.; Van Den Berg, M.; Reichard, J. F.; Silkworth, J. B.; Aylward, L. L.; Brix, A.; Gasiewicz, T.; Kaminski, N.; Perdew, G.; Starr, T. B.; Walker, N. J.; Rowlands, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Dioxins and dioxin-like compounds are tumor promoters that cause liver cancer in rats and mice. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) has been implicated as a key component in this tumor promotion response. Despite extensive knowledge of the toxicology of dioxins, no mode of action (MOA) hypothesis

  12. Use of Electroencephalography (EEG) to Assess CNS Changes Produced by Pesticides with different Modes of Action: Effects of Permethrin, Deltamethrin, Fipronil, Imidacloprid, Carbaryl, and Triadimefon

    Science.gov (United States)

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an apical measure, capable of detecting changes in brain neuronal activity produced by internal or external stimuli. We assessed whether pesticides with different modes of action produced different changes in the EEG of adult male Long-Evans rats...

  13. DOSE RESPONSE FROM HIGH THROUGHPUT GENE EXPRESSION STUDIES AND THE INFLUENCE OF TIME AND CELL LINE ON INFERRED MODE OF ACTION BY ONTOLOGIC ENRICHMENT (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene expression with ontologic enrichment and connectivity mapping tools is widely used to infer modes of action (MOA) for therapeutic drugs. Despite progress in high-throughput (HT) genomic systems, strategies suitable to identify industrial chemical MOA are needed. The L1000 is...

  14. DIFFICULTY OF MODE OF ACTION DETERMINATION FOR TRICHLOROETHYLENE: AN EXAMPLE OF COMPLEX INTERACTIONS OF METABOLITES AND OTHER CHEMICAL EXPOSURES (Journal Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode(s) of action (MOA) of a pollutant for adverse health effects may be dependent on the mixture of metabolites resulting from exposure to a single agent and may also be affected by co-exposure to pollutants that have similar targets or affected pathways. Trichloroethylene ...

  15. Meta-Analysis of Fish Early Life Stage Tests - Association of Toxic Ratios and Acute-To-Chronic Ratios with Modes of Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholz, Stefan; Schreiber, Rene; Armitage, James

    2018-01-01

    formation inhibition). Four modes of action (were also found to be associated with high ACRs: (1) lysyl oxidase inhibition leading to notochord distortion, (2) putative methemoglobin formation or haemolytic anemia, (3) endocrine disruption, and (4) compounds with neuromuscular toxicity. It was discussed...

  16. Nutrition and metabolism of parasitized and non-parasitized ruminants. Some approaches for studying the mode of action of parasites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of helminth infections on ruminant digestive function and metabolism are discussed against the background of current information on the mechanisms controlling feed intake and utilization in normal animals. Although parasites reduce productivity by impairing appetite and utilization of nutrients, few studies have been conducted on the function of the digestive tract and the metabolism of parasitized animals. Those areas which warrant further investigation are described, and the techniques which could be usefully applied are outlined. It is concluded that more emphasis should be given to the diet available to parasitized animals, and that by using diets of different digestibility and protein content, valuable information could be obtained as to the relative importance of reduced appetite and reduced efficiency of feed utilization. Central to all studies is a proper delineation of the fate of proteins in the small intestine of parasitized animals, and characterization of the types of bacteria in the gut and their effects on endogenous protein losses. The application of 15 N is mentioned. The potential usefulness of 14 C (eg. to measure the flow of digesta, to the lower digestive tract; clearance of 14 C-propionate from blood; etc.) is described

  17. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of potent natural antagonists of BACE-1 for checking Alzheimer’s plaque pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur [School of Biotechnology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Goyal, Sukriti [Apaji Institute of Mathematics and Applied Computer Technology, Banasthali University, Tonk 304022, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, Sudhanshu [Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, New Delhi 110042 (India); Hamid, Rabia [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006 (India); Grover, Abhinav, E-mail: abhinavgr@gmail.com [School of Biotechnology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Accumulation of Aβ plaques is one of the major pathology associated with Alzheimer’s disease. •Inhibition of β-Secretase or BACE-1 offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. •A large virtual dataset of natural compounds was screened against BACE-1. •Top two hits were analyzed for thermodynamic and structural stability using MD simulations. •Their detailed binding mode of actions were elucidated. -- Abstract: Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in memory loss and decline in cognitive abilities. Accumulation of extracellular beta amyloidal plaques is one of the major pathology associated with this disease. β-Secretase or BACE-1 performs the initial and rate limiting step of amyloidic pathway in which 37–43 amino acid long peptides are generated which aggregate to form plaques. Inhibition of this enzyme offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. Numerous efforts have been made in recent years for the generation of BACE-1 inhibitors but many of them failed during the preclinical or clinical trials due to drug related or drug induced toxicity. In the present work, we have used computational methods to screen a large dataset of natural compounds to search for small molecules having BACE-1 inhibitory activity with low toxicity to normal cells. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze molecular interactions between the screened compounds and the active residues of the enzyme. Herein, we report two natural compounds of inhibitory nature active against β-secretase enzyme of amyloidic pathway and are potent lead molecules against Alzheimer’s disease.

  18. Cytotoxicity and regenerative proliferation as the mode of action for diuron-induced urothelial carcinogenesis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Mitscheli S; Nascimento, Merielen G; Cardoso, Ana Paula F; de Lima, Patrícia L A; Zelandi, Edneia A; de Camargo, João Lauro V; de Oliveira, Maria Luiza C S

    2010-01-01

    Diuron, a substituted urea herbicide, is carcinogenic to the urinary bladder of rats at high dietary levels. Its proposed carcinogenic mode of action (MOA) includes urothelial cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative cell proliferation and sustained urothelial hyperplasia. Cytotoxicity could be induced either by urinary solids or by chemical toxicity by diuron and/or metabolites excreted in the urine. Diuron was not genotoxic in a previous single-cell gel (comet) assay, but possible cross-linking activity remained to be evaluated. The present study explored the MOA of diuron and the effect of urinary acidification on the development of urothelial lesions. Male Wistar rats were fed diuron (2500 ppm, about 130 mg/kg of body weight) either with or without NH(4)Cl 10,000 ppm to acidify the urine. Reversibility of urothelial changes was also examined. The animals were euthanized after 15, 25, or 30 weeks. Diuron-fed rats had urinary amorphous precipitate and magnesium ammonium phosphate crystals similar to control animals. Groups treated with diuron + NH(4)Cl showed decreased urinary pH and reduced amounts of urinary crystals and precipitate. Urothelial necrosis and simple hyperplasia were observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy both in diuron- and in diuron + NH(4)Cl-treated groups. Cytotoxicity and proliferative changes were mostly reversible. A modified comet assay developed in vitro with Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that diuron did not induce DNA cross-links. These data suggest that cytotoxicity with consequent regenerative cell proliferation is the predominant MOA for diuron rat urothelial carcinogenesis, the cytotoxicity being chemically induced and not due to urinary solids.

  19. Toward Understanding the Cold, Hot, and Neutral Nature of Chinese Medicines Using in Silico Mode-of-Action Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xianjun; Mervin, Lewis H; Li, Xuebo; Yu, Huayun; Li, Jiaoyang; Mohamad Zobir, Siti Zuraidah; Zoufir, Azedine; Zhou, Yang; Song, Yongmei; Wang, Zhenguo; Bender, Andreas

    2017-03-27

    One important, however, poorly understood, concept of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is that of hot, cold, and neutral nature of its bioactive principles. To advance the field, in this study, we analyzed compound-nature pairs from TCM on a large scale (>23 000 structures) via chemical space visualizations to understand its physicochemical domain and in silico target prediction to understand differences related to their modes-of-action (MoA) against proteins. We found that overall TCM natures spread into different subclusters with specific molecular patterns, as opposed to forming coherent global groups. Compounds associated with cold nature had a lower clogP and contain more aliphatic rings than the other groups and were found to control detoxification, heat-clearing, heart development processes, and have sedative function, associated with "Mental and behavioural disorders" diseases. While compounds associated with hot nature were on average of lower molecular weight, have more aromatic ring systems than other groups, frequently seemed to control body temperature, have cardio-protection function, improve fertility and sexual function, and represent excitatory or activating effects, associated with "endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases" and "diseases of the circulatory system". Compounds associated with neutral nature had a higher polar surface area and contain more cyclohexene moieties than other groups and seem to be related to memory function, suggesting that their nature may be a useful guide for their utility in neural degenerative diseases. We were hence able to elucidate the difference between different nature classes in TCM on the molecular level, and on a large data set, for the first time, thereby helping a better understanding of TCM nature theory and bridging the gap between traditional medicine and our current understanding of the human body.

  20. Anticancer drug mithramycin interacts with core histones: An additional mode of action of the DNA groove binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mithramycin (MTR is a clinically approved DNA-binding antitumor antibiotic currently in Phase 2 clinical trials at National Institutes of Health for treatment of osteosarcoma. In view of the resurgence in the studies of this generic antibiotic as a human medicine, we have examined the binding properties of MTR with the integral component of chromatin – histone proteins – as a part of our broad objective to classify DNA-binding molecules in terms of their ability to bind chromosomal DNA alone (single binding mode or both histones and chromosomal DNA (dual binding mode. The present report shows that besides DNA, MTR also binds to core histones present in chromatin and thus possesses the property of dual binding in the chromatin context. In contrast to the MTR–DNA interaction, association of MTR with histones does not require obligatory presence of bivalent metal ion like Mg2+. As a consequence of its ability to interact with core histones, MTR inhibits histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18, an important signature of active chromatin, in vitro and ex vivo. Reanalysis of microarray data of Ewing sarcoma cell lines shows that upon MTR treatment there is a significant down regulation of genes, possibly implicating a repression of H3K18Ac-enriched genes apart from DNA-binding transcription factors. Association of MTR with core histones and its ability to alter post-translational modification of histone H3 clearly indicates an additional mode of action of this anticancer drug that could be implicated in novel therapeutic strategies.

  1. The Mode of Action of Isocyanide in Three Aquatic Organisms, Balanus amphitrite, Bugula neritina and Danio rerio

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi-Fan

    2012-09-18

    Isocyanide is a potential antifouling compound in marine environments. In this study, we investigated its mode of action in three aquatic organisms. Two of them, the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, are major marine fouling invertebrates, and the other organism is the non-target species zebrafish Danio rerio. In the swimming larvae of B. neritina, isocyanide did not affect the total attachment rate (≤50 µg ml^(−1)), but it did change the attachment site by increasing the percentage of attachment on the bottom of the container rather than on the wall or air-water inter-surface. Isocyanide binds several proteins in B. neritina as identified via SDS-PAGE-LC-MS/MS: 1) a 30 kD protein band containing two proteins similar to voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC), which control the direct coupling of the mitochondrial matrix to the energy maintenance of the cytosol and the release of apoptogenic factors from mitochondria of mammalian cells; and 2) an unknown 39 kD protein. In B. amphitrite cyprids, the isocyanide binding protein were 1) a protein similar to NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase, which is the “entry enzyme” of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria; and 2) cytochrome P450. In Danio rerio embryos, isocyanide caused “wavy” notochords, hydrocephalus, pericardial edema, poor blood circulation, and defects in pigmentation and hematopoiesis, which phenocopied copper deficiency. This is the first report on isocyanide binding proteins in fouling organisms, as well as the first description of its phenotype and potential toxicology in zebrafish.

  2. A Microplate Growth Inhibition Assay for Screening Bacteriocins against Listeria monocytogenes to Differentiate Their Mode-of-Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Priyesh Vijayakumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB have historically been used in food fermentations to preserve foods and are generally-recognized-as-safe (GRAS by the FDA for use as food ingredients. In addition to lactic acid; some strains also produce bacteriocins that have been proposed for use as food preservatives. In this study we examined the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 by neutralized and non-neutralized bacteriocin preparations (Bac+ preps produced by Lactobacillus curvatus FS47; Lb. curvatus Beef3; Pediococcus acidilactici Bac3; Lactococcus lactis FLS1; Enterococcus faecium FS56-1; and Enterococcus thailandicus FS92. Activity differences between non-neutralized and neutralized Bac+ preps in agar spot assays could not readily be attributed to acid because a bacteriocin-negative control strain was not inhibitory to Listeria in these assays. When neutralized and non-neutralized Bac+ preps were used in microplate growth inhibition assays against L. monocytogenes 39-2 we observed some differences attributed to acid inhibition. A microplate growth inhibition assay was used to compare inhibitory reactions of wild-type and bacteriocin-resistant variants of L. monocytogenes to differentiate bacteriocins with different modes-of-action (MOA whereby curvaticins FS47 and Beef3, and pediocin Bac3 were categorized to be in MOA1; enterocins FS92 and FS56-1 in MOA2; and lacticin FLS1 in MOA3. The microplate bacteriocin MOA assay establishes a platform to evaluate the best combination of bacteriocin preparations for use in food applications as biopreservatives against L. monocytogenes.

  3. A Microplate Growth Inhibition Assay for Screening Bacteriocins against Listeria monocytogenes to Differentiate Their Mode-of-Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Paul Priyesh; Muriana, Peter M

    2015-06-11

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have historically been used in food fermentations to preserve foods and are generally-recognized-as-safe (GRAS) by the FDA for use as food ingredients. In addition to lactic acid; some strains also produce bacteriocins that have been proposed for use as food preservatives. In this study we examined the inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes 39-2 by neutralized and non-neutralized bacteriocin preparations (Bac+ preps) produced by Lactobacillus curvatus FS47; Lb. curvatus Beef3; Pediococcus acidilactici Bac3; Lactococcus lactis FLS1; Enterococcus faecium FS56-1; and Enterococcus thailandicus FS92. Activity differences between non-neutralized and neutralized Bac+ preps in agar spot assays could not readily be attributed to acid because a bacteriocin-negative control strain was not inhibitory to Listeria in these assays. When neutralized and non-neutralized Bac+ preps were used in microplate growth inhibition assays against L. monocytogenes 39-2 we observed some differences attributed to acid inhibition. A microplate growth inhibition assay was used to compare inhibitory reactions of wild-type and bacteriocin-resistant variants of L. monocytogenes to differentiate bacteriocins with different modes-of-action (MOA) whereby curvaticins FS47 and Beef3, and pediocin Bac3 were categorized to be in MOA1; enterocins FS92 and FS56-1 in MOA2; and lacticin FLS1 in MOA3. The microplate bacteriocin MOA assay establishes a platform to evaluate the best combination of bacteriocin preparations for use in food applications as biopreservatives against L. monocytogenes.

  4. Antifungal activity, mode of action and anti-biofilm effects of Laurus nobilis Linnaeus essential oil against Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Larissa Rangel; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Ferreira, Gabriela Lacet Silva; Freires, Irlan Almeida; de Carvalho, Fabíola Galbiatti; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto; de Castro, Ricardo Dias

    2017-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the antifungal potential of the chemically characterized essential oil (EO) of Laurus nobilis L. (bay laurel) against Candida spp. biofilm adhesion and formation, and further established its mode of action on C. albicans. L. nobilis EO was obtained and tested for its minimum inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations (MIC/MFC) against Candida spp., as well as for interaction with cell wall biosynthesis and membrane ionic permeability. Then we evaluated its effects on the adhesion, formation, and reduction of 48hC. albicans biofilms. The EO phytochemical profile was determined by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The MIC and MFC values of the EO ranged from (250 to 500) μg/mL. The MIC values increased in the presence of sorbitol (osmotic protector) and ergosterol, which indicates that the EO may affect cell wall biosynthesis and membrane ionic permeability, respectively. At 2 MIC the EO disrupted initial adhesion of C. albicans biofilms (p0.05). When applied for 1min, every 8h, for 24h and 48h, the EO reduced the amount of C. albicans mature biofilm with no difference in relation to nystatin (p>0.05). The phytochemical analysis identified isoeugenol as the major compound (53.49%) in the sample. L. nobilis EO has antifungal activity probably due to monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in its composition. This EO may affect cell wall biosynthesis and membrane permeability, and showed deleterious effects against C. albicans biofilms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Mode of action of nifurtimox and N-oxide-containing heterocycles against Trypanosoma cruzi: is oxidative stress involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiani, Mariana; Piacenza, Lucia; Hernández, Paola; Boiani, Lucia; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes; Denicola, Ana

    2010-06-15

    Chagas disease is caused by the trypanosomatid parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and threatens millions of lives in South America. As other neglected diseases there is almost no research and development effort by the pharmaceutical industry and the treatment relies on two drugs, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole, discovered empirically more than three decades ago. Nifurtimox, a nitrofurane derivative, is believed to exert its biological activity through the bioreduction of the nitro-group to a nitro-anion radical which undergoes redox-cycling with molecular oxygen. This hypothesis is generally accepted, although arguments against it have been presented. In the present work we studied the ability of Nifurtimox and five N-oxide-containing heterocycles to induce oxidative stress in T. cruzi. N-Oxide-containing heterocycles represent a promising group of new trypanosomicidal agents and their mode of action is not completely elucidated. The results here obtained argue against the oxidative stress hypothesis almost for all the studied compounds, including Nifurtimox. A significant reduction in the level of parasitic low-molecular-weight thiols was observed after Nifurtimox treatment; however, it was not linked to the production of reactive oxidant species. Besides, redox-cycling is only observed at high Nifurtimox concentrations (>400microM), two orders of magnitude higher than the concentration required for anti-proliferative activity (5microM). Our results indicate that an increase in oxidative stress is not the main mechanism of action of Nifurtimox. Among the studied N-oxide-containing heterocycles, benzofuroxan derivatives strongly inhibited parasite dehydrogenase activity and affected mitochondrial membrane potential. The indazole derivative raised intracellular oxidants production, but it was the least effective as anti-T. cruzi. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of potent natural antagonists of BACE-1 for checking Alzheimer’s plaque pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Goyal, Sukriti; Sharma, Sudhanshu; Hamid, Rabia; Grover, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Accumulation of Aβ plaques is one of the major pathology associated with Alzheimer’s disease. •Inhibition of β-Secretase or BACE-1 offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. •A large virtual dataset of natural compounds was screened against BACE-1. •Top two hits were analyzed for thermodynamic and structural stability using MD simulations. •Their detailed binding mode of actions were elucidated. -- Abstract: Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in memory loss and decline in cognitive abilities. Accumulation of extracellular beta amyloidal plaques is one of the major pathology associated with this disease. β-Secretase or BACE-1 performs the initial and rate limiting step of amyloidic pathway in which 37–43 amino acid long peptides are generated which aggregate to form plaques. Inhibition of this enzyme offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. Numerous efforts have been made in recent years for the generation of BACE-1 inhibitors but many of them failed during the preclinical or clinical trials due to drug related or drug induced toxicity. In the present work, we have used computational methods to screen a large dataset of natural compounds to search for small molecules having BACE-1 inhibitory activity with low toxicity to normal cells. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze molecular interactions between the screened compounds and the active residues of the enzyme. Herein, we report two natural compounds of inhibitory nature active against β-secretase enzyme of amyloidic pathway and are potent lead molecules against Alzheimer’s disease

  7. Assessment of possible carcinogenicity of oxyfluorfen to humans using mode of action analysis of rodent liver effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Nicola J; LeBaron, Matthew J; Eisenbrandt, David L; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Klaunig, James E

    2012-08-01

    Oxyfluorfen is a herbicide that is not genotoxic and produces liver toxicity in rodents, following repeated administration at high dose levels. Lifetime rodent feeding studies reported in 1977 with low-purity oxyfluorfen (85%) showed no increase in any tumor type in rats (800 ppm, high dose) and only a marginally increased incidence of hepatocellular tumors in male CD-1 mice at the highest dose (200 ppm). To evaluate the potential carcinogenicity of the currently registered oxyfluorfen (> 98% purity), we conducted a series of short-term liver mode of action (MOA) toxicology studies in male CD-1 mice administered dietary doses of 0, 40, 200, 800, and 1600 ppm for durations of 3, 7, 10, or 28 days. MOA endpoints examined included liver weight, histopathology, cell proliferation, nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression, and other peroxisome proliferator-specific endpoints and their reversibility. Minimal liver effects were observed in mice administered doses at or below 200 ppm for up to 28 days. Increased liver weight, single-cell necrosis, cell proliferation, and peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) were observed at 800 ppm after 28 days, but there was no increase in peroxisomes. Expression of Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10 transcripts, markers of constitutive androstane receptor and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α nuclear receptor activation, respectively, were increased at 800 and 1600 ppm after 3 or 10 days. Collectively, these data along with the negative genotoxicity demonstrate that oxyfluorfen (> 98% purity) has the potential to induce mouse liver tumors through a nongenotoxic, mitogenic MOA with a clear threshold and is not predicted to be carcinogenic in humans at relevant exposure levels.

  8. Toxicity ranking and toxic mode of action evaluation of commonly used agricultural adjuvants on the basis of bacterial gene expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Nobels

    used agricultural adjuvants based on toxicity and toxic mode of action data.

  9. New insights into the structure and mode of action of Mo-CBP3, an antifungal chitin-binding protein of Moringa oleifera seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina B Batista

    Full Text Available Mo-CBP3 is a chitin-binding protein purified from Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds that displays inhibitory activity against phytopathogenic fungi. This study investigated the structural properties and the antifungal mode of action of this protein. To this end, circular dichroism spectroscopy, antifungal assays, measurements of the production of reactive oxygen species and microscopic analyses were utilized. Mo-CBP3 is composed of 30.3% α-helices, 16.3% β-sheets, 22.3% turns and 30.4% unordered forms. The Mo-CBP3 structure is highly stable and retains its antifungal activity regardless of temperature and pH. Fusarium solani was used as a model organism for studying the mechanisms by which this protein acts as an antifungal agent. Mo-CBP3 significantly inhibited spore germination and mycelial growth at 0.05 mg.mL-1. Mo-CBP3 has both fungistatic and fungicidal effects, depending on the concentration used. Binding of Mo-CBP3 to the fungal cell surface is achieved, at least in part, via electrostatic interactions, as salt was able to reduce its inhibitory effect. Mo-CBP3 induced the production of ROS and caused disorganization of both the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane in F. solani cells. Based on its high stability and specific toxicity, with broad-spectrum efficacy against important phytopathogenic fungi at low inhibitory concentrations but not to human cells, Mo-CBP3 has great potential for the development of new antifungal drugs or transgenic crops with enhanced resistance to phytopathogens.

  10. Mode of action analysis for the synthetic pyrethroid metofluthrin-induced rat liver tumors: evidence for hepatic CYP2B induction and hepatocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Yoshihito; Yamada, Tomoya; Hirose, Yukihiro; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Kushida, Masahiko; Sumida, Kayo; Sukata, Tokuo; Tomigahara, Yoshitaka; Nishioka, Kazuhiko; Uwagawa, Satoshi; Kawamura, Satoshi; Okuno, Yasuyoshi

    2009-03-01

    Two-year treatment with high doses of Metofluthrin produced hepatocellular tumors in both sexes of Wistar rats. To understand the mode of action (MOA) by which the tumors are produced, a series of studies examined the effects of Metofluthrin on hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) content, hepatocellular proliferation, hepatic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC), oxidative stress and apoptosis was conducted after one or two weeks of treatment. The global gene expression profile indicated that most genes with upregulated expression with Metofluthrin were metabolic enzymes that were also upregulated with phenobarbital. Metofluthrin induced CYP2B and increased liver weights associated with centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy (increased smooth endoplasmic reticulum [SER]), and induction of increased hepatocellular DNA replication. CYP2B1 mRNA induction by Metofluthrin was not observed in CAR knockdown rat hepatocytes using the RNA interference technique, demonstrating that Metofluthrin induces CYP2B1 through CAR activation. Metofluthrin also suppressed hepatic GJIC and induced oxidative stress and increased antioxidant enzymes, but showed no alteration in apoptosis. The above parameters related to the key events in Metofluthrin-induced liver tumors were observed at or below tumorigenic dose levels. All of these effects were reversible upon cessation of treatment. Metofluthrin did not cause cytotoxicity or peroxisome proliferation. Thus, it is highly likely that the MOA for Metofluthrin-induced liver tumors in rats is through CYP induction and increased hepatocyte proliferation, similar to that seen for phenobarbital. Based on analysis with the International Life Sciences Institute/Risk Science Institute MOA framework, it is reasonable to conclude that Metofluthrin will not have any hepatocarcinogenic activity in humans, at least at expected levels of exposure.

  11. Effect and mode of action of the Texel muscling QTL (TM-QTL) on carcass traits in purebred Texel lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, J M; Lambe, N R; Matika, O; Johnson, P L; Wolf, B T; Haresign, W; Bishop, S C; Bünger, L

    2014-07-01

    different mode of action of the two main effects of TM-QTL (on growth and muscling).

  12. Sensitivity of species to chemicals: dose-response characteristics for various test types (LC(50), LR(50) and LD(50)) and modes of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, A Jan; Awkerman, Jill A; de Zwart, Dick; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2013-11-01

    While variable sensitivity of model species to common toxicants has been addressed in previous studies, a systematic analysis of inter-species variability for different test types, modes of action and species is as of yet lacking. Hence, the aim of the present study was to identify similarities and differences in contaminant levels affecting cold-blooded and warm-blooded species administered via different routes. To that end, data on lethal water concentrations LC50, tissue residues LR50 and oral doses LD50 were collected from databases, each representing the largest of its kind. LC50 data were multiplied by a bioconcentration factor (BCF) to convert them to internal concentrations that allow for comparison among species. For each endpoint data set, we calculated the mean and standard deviation of species' lethal level per compound. Next, the means and standard deviations were averaged by mode of action. Both the means and standard deviations calculated depended on the number of species tested, which is at odds with quality standard setting procedures. Means calculated from (BCF) LC50, LR50 and LD50 were largely similar, suggesting that different administration routes roughly yield similar internal levels. Levels for compounds interfering biochemically with elementary life processes were about one order of magnitude below that of narcotics disturbing membranes, and neurotoxic pesticides and dioxins induced death in even lower amounts. Standard deviations for LD50 data were similar across modes of action, while variability of LC50 values was lower for narcotics than for substances with a specific mode of action. The study indicates several directions to go for efficient use of available data in risk assessment and reduction of species testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure-activity relationships of the antimicrobial peptide arasin 1 - and mode of action studies of the N-terminal, proline-rich region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria S Paulsen

    Full Text Available Arasin 1 is a 37 amino acid long proline-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from the spider crab, Hyas araneus. In this work the active region of arasin 1 was identified through structure-activity studies using different peptide fragments derived from the arasin 1 sequence. The pharmacophore was found to be located in the proline/arginine-rich NH(2 terminus of the peptide and the fragment arasin 1(1-23 was almost equally active to the full length peptide. Arasin 1 and its active fragment arasin 1(1-23 were shown to be non-toxic to human red blood cells and arasin 1(1-23 was able to bind chitin, a component of fungal cell walls and the crustacean shell. The mode of action of the fully active N-terminal arasin 1(1-23 was explored through killing kinetic and membrane permeabilization studies. At the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC, arasin 1(1-23 was not bactericidal and had no membrane disruptive effect. In contrast, at concentrations of 5×MIC and above it was bactericidal and interfered with membrane integrity. We conclude that arasin 1(1-23 has a different mode of action than lytic peptides, like cecropin P1. Thus, we suggest a dual mode of action for arasin 1(1-23 involving membrane disruption at peptide concentrations above MIC, and an alternative mechanism of action, possibly involving intracellular targets, at MIC.

  14. Marine neurotoxins: State of the art, bottlenecks, and perspectives for mode of action based methods of detection in seafood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolas, J.; Hendriksen, P.J.M.; Gerssen, A.; Bovee, T.F.H.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Marine biotoxins can accumulate in fish and shellfish, representing a possible threat for consumers. Many marine biotoxins affect neuronal function essentially through their interaction with ion channels or receptors, leading to different symptoms including paralysis and even death. The detection of

  15. Use of electroencephalography (EEG) to assess CNS changes produced by pesticides with different modes of action: Effects of permethrin, deltamethrin, fipronil, imidacloprid, carbaryl, and triadimefon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeborn, Danielle L.; McDaniel, Katherine L.; Moser, Virginia C.; Herr, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an apical measure, capable of detecting changes in brain neuronal activity produced by internal or external stimuli. We assessed whether pesticides with different modes of action produced different changes in the EEG of adult male Long–Evans rats. The EEG was recorded using two montages (visual cortex referenced to the cerebellum and to the frontal cortex) in unrestrained rats at the time of peak behavioral effects. Pesticides included: permethrin and deltamethrin (Type I and Type II pyrethroids; 2 h), fipronil (single and repeated doses; phenylpyrazole; 6 h), imidacloprid (neonicotinoid; 2 h), carbaryl (carbamate; 0.5 h), and triadimefon (triazole; 1 h), using dosages that produced approximately an ED 30 or an ED 50 –ED 80 change in motor activity. Permethrin (43, 100 mg/kg) increased amplitudes or areas (delta, alpha, or gamma bands) in the EEG. Deltamethrin (2.5, 5.5 mg/kg) reduced the amplitudes or areas of the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands, but the changes were not dose-related. A single treatment with fipronil (25, 50 mg/kg, but not 5, 10 mg/kg) decreased gamma band area. Additional changes in the delta, theta, and gamma bands were observed when fipronil (5, 10 mg/kg) was administered for 14 days. Imidacloprid (50, 100 mg/kg) did not alter the EEG. Carbaryl (10, 50 mg/kg) decreased theta area, and decreased delta and increased beta frequency. Triadimefon (75, 150 mg/kg) produced minimal changes in the EEG. The results show that the EEG is affected differently by approximately equipotent doses of pesticides with different modes of action. - Highlights: • Pesticides with different modes of action have different effects on in vivo rodent EEG. • The EEG was also changed differently after single vs. repeated treatment with fipronil. • The data suggest that EEG may be used as an apical measure for detecting chemical effects on the central nervous system

  16. Partial purification and characterization of the mode of action of enterocin S37: a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecalis S37 isolated from poultry feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belguesmia, Y; Choiset, Y; Prévost, H; Dalgalarrondo, M; Chobert, J-M; Drider, D

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize the mode of action of enterocin S37, a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecalis S37, a strain recently isolated from the chicken feces. Enterocin S37 has a molecular weight comprised between 4 and 5 kDa. It remained active after 1 h at 80(o)C and at pH values ranging from 4.0 to 9.0. Furthermore, cell-free supernatant of Enterococcus faecalis S37 and purified enterocin S37 were active against Gram-positive bacteria including Listeria monocytogenes EGDe, L. innocua F, Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2, and Lactobacillus brevis F145. The purification of enterocin S37 was performed by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed up by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography procedures. Treatment of enterocin S37 with proteinase K, alpha-chymotrypsin, and papain confirmed its proteinaceous nature, while its treatment with lysozyme and lipase resulted in no alteration of activity. Enterocin S37 is hydrophobic, anti-Listeria and likely acting by depletion of intracellular K(+) ions upon action on K(ATP) channels. This study contributed to gain more insights into the mode of action of enterocins.

  17. Partial Purification and Characterization of the Mode of Action of Enterocin S37: A Bacteriocin Produced by Enterococcus faecalis S37 Isolated from Poultry Feces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Belguesmia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to purify and characterize the mode of action of enterocin S37, a bacteriocin produced by Enterococcus faecalis S37, a strain recently isolated from the chicken feces. Enterocin S37 has a molecular weight comprised between 4 and 5 kDa. It remained active after 1 h at 80oC and at pH values ranging from 4.0 to 9.0. Furthermore, cell-free supernatant of Enterococcus faecalis S37 and purified enterocin S37 were active against Gram-positive bacteria including Listeria monocytogenes EGDe, L. innocua F, Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2, and Lactobacillus brevis F145. The purification of enterocin S37 was performed by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed up by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography procedures. Treatment of enterocin S37 with proteinase K, -chymotrypsin, and papain confirmed its proteinaceous nature, while its treatment with lysozyme and lipase resulted in no alteration of activity. Enterocin S37 is hydrophobic, anti-Listeria and likely acting by depletion of intracellular K+ ions upon action on KATP channels. This study contributed to gain more insights into the mode of action of enterocins.

  18. Biological control of the cucurbit powdery mildew pathogen Podosphaera xanthii by means of the epiphytic fungus Pseudozyma aphidis and parasitism as a mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Aviva; Calderon, Claudia E; Harris, Raviv; Buxdorf, Kobi; Dafa-Berger, Avis; Zeilinger-Reichert, Einat; Levy, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Epiphytic yeasts, which colonize plant surfaces, may possess activity that can be harnessed to help plants defend themselves against various pathogens. Due to their unique characteristics, epiphytic yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma hold great potential for use as biocontrol agents. We identified a unique, biologically active isolate of the epiphytic yeast Pseudozyma aphidis that is capable of inhibiting Botrytis cinerea via a dual mode of action, namely induced resistance and antibiosis. Here, we show that strain L12 of P. aphidis can reduce the severity of powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera xanthii on cucumber plants with an efficacy of 75%. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy analyses demonstrated P. aphidis proliferation on infected tissue and its production of long hyphae that parasitize the powdery mildew hyphae and spores as an ectoparasite. We also show that crude extract of P. aphidis metabolites can inhibit P. xanthii spore germination in planta. Our results suggest that in addition to its antibiosis as mode of action, P. aphidis may also act as an ectoparasite on P. xanthii. These results indicate that P. aphidis strain L12 has the potential to control powdery mildew.

  19. Biological control of the cucurbit powdery mildew pathogen Podosphaera xanthii by means of the epiphytic fungus Pseudozyma aphidis and parasitism as a mode of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviva eGafni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytic yeasts, which colonize plant surfaces, may possess activity that can be harnessed to help plants defend themselves against various pathogens. Due to their unique characteristics, epiphytic yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma hold great potential for use as biocontrol agents. We identified a unique, biologically active isolate of the epiphytic yeast Pseudozyma aphidis that is capable of inhibiting Botrytis cinerea via a dual mode of action, namely induced resistance and antibiosis. Here, we show that strain L12 of P. aphidis can reduce the severity of powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera xanthii on cucumber plants with an efficacy of 75%. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy analyses demonstrated P. aphidis proliferation on infected tissue and its production of long hyphae that parasitize the powdery mildew hyphae and spores as an ectoparasite. We also show that crude extract of P. aphidis metabolites can inhibit P. xanthii spore germination in planta. Our results suggest that in addition to its antibiosis mode of action, P. aphidis may also act as an ectoparasite on P. xanthii. These results indicate that P. aphidis strain L12 has the potential to control powdery mildew.

  20. The first toxicological study of the antiozonant and research tool ethylene diurea (EDU) using a Lemna minor L. bioassay: Hints to its mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agathokleous, Eugenios; Mouzaki-Paxinou, Akrivi-Chara; Saitanis, Costas J; Paoletti, Elena; Manning, William J

    2016-06-01

    The antiozonant and research tool ethylene diurea (EDU) is widely studied as a phytoprotectant against the widespread pollutant ground-surface ozone. Although it has been extensively used, its potential toxicity in the absence of ozone is unknown and its mode of action is unclear. The purpose of this research was to toxicologically assess EDU and to further investigate its mode of action using Lemna minor L. as a model organism. Application of EDU concentrations greater than 593 mg L(-1) (practically 600 mg L(-1)) resulted in adverse inhibition of colony growth. As no-observed-toxic-effects concentration (NOEL) we recommend a concentration of 296 mg L(-1) (practically 300 mg L(-1)). A hormetic response was detected, i.e. stimulatory effects of low EDU concentrations, which may indicate overcompensation in response to disruption in homeostasis. Growth inhibition and suppressed biomass were associated with impacted chlorophyll a fluorescence (ΦPSII, qP and ETR). Furthermore, EDU increased mesophyll thickness, as indicated by frond succulence index. Applications of concentrations ≥593 mg L(-1) to uncontrolled environments should be avoided due to potential toxicity to sensitive organisms and the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The economic importance of acaricides in the control of phytophagous mites and an update on recent acaricide mode of action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Tirry, Luc; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Nauen, Ralf; Dermauw, Wannes

    2015-06-01

    Acaricides are one of the cornerstones of an efficient control program for phytophagous mites. An analysis of the global acaricide market reveals that spider mites such as Tetranychus urticae, Panonychus citri and Panonychus ulmi are by far the most economically important species, representing more than 80% of the market. Other relevant mite groups are false spider mites (mainly Brevipalpus), rust and gall mites and tarsonemid mites. Acaricides are most frequently used in vegetables and fruits (74% of the market), including grape vines and citrus. However, their use is increasing in major crops where spider mites are becoming more important, such as soybean, cotton and corn. As revealed by a detailed case study of the Japanese market, major shifts in acaricide use are partially driven by resistance development and the commercial availability of compounds with novel mode of action. The importance of the latter cannot be underestimated, although some compounds are successfully used for more than 30 years. A review of recent developments in mode of action research is presented, as such knowledge is important for devising resistance management programs. This includes spirocyclic keto-enols as inhibitors of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the carbazate bifenazate as a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, a novel class of complex II inhibitors, and the mite growth inhibitors hexythiazox, clofentezine and etoxazole that interact with chitin synthase I. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of electroencephalography (EEG) to assess CNS changes produced by pesticides with different modes of action: Effects of permethrin, deltamethrin, fipronil, imidacloprid, carbaryl, and triadimefon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeborn, Danielle L., E-mail: Freeborn.danielle@epa.gov; McDaniel, Katherine L., E-mail: McDaniel.kathy@epa.gov; Moser, Virginia C., E-mail: Moser.ginger@epa.gov; Herr, David W., E-mail: Herr.david@epa.gov

    2015-01-15

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an apical measure, capable of detecting changes in brain neuronal activity produced by internal or external stimuli. We assessed whether pesticides with different modes of action produced different changes in the EEG of adult male Long–Evans rats. The EEG was recorded using two montages (visual cortex referenced to the cerebellum and to the frontal cortex) in unrestrained rats at the time of peak behavioral effects. Pesticides included: permethrin and deltamethrin (Type I and Type II pyrethroids; 2 h), fipronil (single and repeated doses; phenylpyrazole; 6 h), imidacloprid (neonicotinoid; 2 h), carbaryl (carbamate; 0.5 h), and triadimefon (triazole; 1 h), using dosages that produced approximately an ED{sub 30} or an ED{sub 50}–ED{sub 80} change in motor activity. Permethrin (43, 100 mg/kg) increased amplitudes or areas (delta, alpha, or gamma bands) in the EEG. Deltamethrin (2.5, 5.5 mg/kg) reduced the amplitudes or areas of the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands, but the changes were not dose-related. A single treatment with fipronil (25, 50 mg/kg, but not 5, 10 mg/kg) decreased gamma band area. Additional changes in the delta, theta, and gamma bands were observed when fipronil (5, 10 mg/kg) was administered for 14 days. Imidacloprid (50, 100 mg/kg) did not alter the EEG. Carbaryl (10, 50 mg/kg) decreased theta area, and decreased delta and increased beta frequency. Triadimefon (75, 150 mg/kg) produced minimal changes in the EEG. The results show that the EEG is affected differently by approximately equipotent doses of pesticides with different modes of action. - Highlights: • Pesticides with different modes of action have different effects on in vivo rodent EEG. • The EEG was also changed differently after single vs. repeated treatment with fipronil. • The data suggest that EEG may be used as an apical measure for detecting chemical effects on the central nervous system.

  3. Diuron-induced rat urinary bladder carcinogenesis: mode of action and human relevance evaluations using the International Programme on Chemical Safety framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli Sanches; Arnold, Lora L; De Oliveira, Maria Luiza Cotrim Sartor; Catalano, Shadia M Ihlaseh; Cardoso, Ana Paula Ferragut; Pontes, Merielen G N; Ferrucio, Bianca; Dodmane, Puttappa R; Cohen, Samuel M; De Camargo, João Lauro V

    2014-05-01

    Diuron, a high volume substituted urea herbicide, induced high incidences of urinary bladder carcinomas and low incidences of kidney pelvis papillomas and carcinomas in rats exposed to high doses (2500 ppm) in a 2-year bioassay. Diuron is registered for both occupational and residential uses and is used worldwide for more than 30 different crops. The proposed rat urothelial mode of action (MOA) for this herbicide consists of metabolic activation to metabolites that are excreted and concentrated in the urine, leading to cytotoxicity, urothelial cell necrosis and exfoliation, regenerative hyperplasia, and eventually tumors. We show evidence for this MOA for diuron using the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) conceptual framework for evaluating an MOA for chemical carcinogens, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and IPCS framework for assessing human relevance.

  4. Physiology of inactivation of microbial cells by near-ultraviolet light: mode of action and application for the enrichment of mutants of Escherichia coli and saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.

    1976-01-01

    The mode of action of near-ultraviolet (NUV) light was studied in Escherichia coli. NUV light (maximum emission at 365 nm) caused the photodestruction of ribonucleoside diphosphate (RDP) reductase activity in vivo. Evidence was presented for a model suggesting that the loss of RDP-reductase resulted in a metabolic state analogous to that produced during starvation for thymine. Some important properties of cells irradiated by NUV light, cell death, loss of the ability to support the replication of DNA phages and a delay in the onset of cell division in sublethally irradiated cells, were accounted for in terms of photoinactivation of RDP-reductase. Conditions were described under which NUV light was an effective counterselective agent for the enrichment of mutants of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  5. Use of the antiozonant ethylenediurea (EDU) in Italy: verification of the effects of ambient ozone on crop plants and trees and investigation of EDU's mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, Elena; Contran, Nicla; Manning, William J; Ferrara, Anna M

    2009-05-01

    Twenty-four experiments where EDU was used to protect plants from ozone (O(3)) in Italy are reviewed. Doses of 150 and 450 ppm EDU at 2-3 week intervals were successfully applied to alleviate O(3)-caused visible injury and growth reductions in crop and forest species respectively. EDU was mainly applied as soil drench to crops and by stem injection or infusion into trees. Visible injury was delayed and reduced but not completely. In investigations on mode of action, EDU was quickly (8 days), as it cannot move via phloem. EDU did not enter cells, suggesting it does not directly affect cell metabolism. EDU delayed senescence, did not affect photosynthesis and foliar nitrogen content, and stimulated antioxidant responses to O(3) exposure. Preliminary results suggest developing an effective soil application method for forest trees is warranted.

  6. Probable neuro sexual mode of action of Casimiroa edulis seed extract versus [correction of verses] sildenafil citrate (Viagra(tm)) on mating behavior in normal male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Tabrez; Rakkah, Nabeeh I

    2008-01-01

    The present study deals with the aphrodisiac actions of the aqueous extract of the seeds of the hypotensive plant Casimiroa edulis on the sexual behavior of normal male rats. In this investigation 30 healthy male Wister strain white albino rats showing the brisk sexual activity age 15 weeks, weighing 400-450 grams were included. Female rats were artificially brought into estrous by hormonal treatment. Receptivity was checked by exposing them to the male rats and the most receptive females were selected for the stud The mating responses including Mounting Frequency (MF), Intromission Frequency (IF), Mounting Latency (ML), Intromission Latency (IL), Ejaculatory Latency in first and second series (EL1 and EL2) and Post Ejaculatory Interval (PEI) were recorded after treating the animals with 250 mg/kg casimiroa edulis extract (test reference) and 5 mg/kg sildenafil citrate (standard reference) respectively orally per day for 7 days. Both the groups exhibited a significant increase in Mounting Frequency, Intromission Frequency, and first and second ejaculatory latencies, where as Mounting and Intromission latencies and the Post Ejaculatory Interval showed a significant reduction than the controls. Although a similar pattern of mating behavior was observed among the test and the standard groups, however in all the cases as expected, sildenafil produced greater activity than the casimiroa edulis extract. These results suggest the possibility of a similar mode of action of casimiroa edulis and sildenafil citrate on mating behavior in these animals. Our work reported in this research thus provide preliminary evidence that the aqueous seed extract of casimiroa edulis possesses alphrodisiac activity and may be used as an alternative drug therapy to restore sexual functions probably via a neurogenic mode of action.

  7. Cogena, a novel tool for co-expressed gene-set enrichment analysis, applied to drug repositioning and drug mode of action discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhilong; Liu, Ying; Guan, Naiyang; Bo, Xiaochen; Luo, Zhigang; Barnes, Michael R

    2016-05-27

    Drug repositioning, finding new indications for existing drugs, has gained much recent attention as a potentially efficient and economical strategy for accelerating new therapies into the clinic. Although improvement in the sensitivity of computational drug repositioning methods has identified numerous credible repositioning opportunities, few have been progressed. Arguably the "black box" nature of drug action in a new indication is one of the main blocks to progression, highlighting the need for methods that inform on the broader target mechanism in the disease context. We demonstrate that the analysis of co-expressed genes may be a critical first step towards illumination of both disease pathology and mode of drug action. We achieve this using a novel framework, co-expressed gene-set enrichment analysis (cogena) for co-expression analysis of gene expression signatures and gene set enrichment analysis of co-expressed genes. The cogena framework enables simultaneous, pathway driven, disease and drug repositioning analysis. Cogena can be used to illuminate coordinated changes within disease transcriptomes and identify drugs acting mechanistically within this framework. We illustrate this using a psoriatic skin transcriptome, as an exemplar, and recover two widely used Psoriasis drugs (Methotrexate and Ciclosporin) with distinct modes of action. Cogena out-performs the results of Connectivity Map and NFFinder webservers in similar disease transcriptome analyses. Furthermore, we investigated the literature support for the other top-ranked compounds to treat psoriasis and showed how the outputs of cogena analysis can contribute new insight to support the progression of drugs into the clinic. We have made cogena freely available within Bioconductor or https://github.com/zhilongjia/cogena . In conclusion, by targeting co-expressed genes within disease transcriptomes, cogena offers novel biological insight, which can be effectively harnessed for drug discovery and

  8. Coriandrum sativum L. (Coriander essential oil: antifungal activity and mode of action on Candida spp., and molecular targets affected in human whole-genome expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irlan de Almeida Freires

    Full Text Available Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic fungal infection of the oral cavity with increasingly worldwide prevalence and incidence rates. Novel specifically-targeted strategies to manage this ailment have been proposed using essential oils (EO known to have antifungal properties. In this study, we aim to investigate the antifungal activity and mode of action of the EO from Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander leaves on Candida spp. In addition, we detected the molecular targets affected in whole-genome expression in human cells. The EO phytochemical profile indicates monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes as major components, which are likely to negatively impact the viability of yeast cells. There seems to be a synergistic activity of the EO chemical compounds as their isolation into fractions led to a decreased antimicrobial effect. C. sativum EO may bind to membrane ergosterol, increasing ionic permeability and causing membrane damage leading to cell death, but it does not act on cell wall biosynthesis-related pathways. This mode of action is illustrated by photomicrographs showing disruption in biofilm integrity caused by the EO at varied concentrations. The EO also inhibited Candida biofilm adherence to a polystyrene substrate at low concentrations, and decreased the proteolytic activity of Candida albicans at minimum inhibitory concentration. Finally, the EO and its selected active fraction had low cytotoxicity on human cells, with putative mechanisms affecting gene expression in pathways involving chemokines and MAP-kinase (proliferation/apoptosis, as well as adhesion proteins. These findings highlight the potential antifungal activity of the EO from C. sativum leaves and suggest avenues for future translational toxicological research.

  9. The first toxicological study of the antiozonant and research tool ethylene diurea (EDU) using a Lemna minor L. bioassay: Hints to its mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agathokleous, Eugenios; Mouzaki-Paxinou, Akrivi-Chara; Saitanis, Costas J.; Paoletti, Elena; Manning, William J.

    2016-01-01

    The antiozonant and research tool ethylene diurea (EDU) is widely studied as a phytoprotectant against the widespread pollutant ground-surface ozone. Although it has been extensively used, its potential toxicity in the absence of ozone is unknown and its mode of action is unclear. The purpose of this research was to toxicologically assess EDU and to further investigate its mode of action using Lemna minor L. as a model organism. Application of EDU concentrations greater than 593 mg L −1 (practically 600 mg L −1 ) resulted in adverse inhibition of colony growth. As no-observed-toxic-effects concentration (NOEL) we recommend a concentration of 296 mg L −1 (practically 300 mg L −1 ). A hormetic response was detected, i.e. stimulatory effects of low EDU concentrations, which may indicate overcompensation in response to disruption in homeostasis. Growth inhibition and suppressed biomass were associated with impacted chlorophyll a fluorescence (Φ PSII , q P and ETR). Furthermore, EDU increased mesophyll thickness, as indicated by frond succulence index. Applications of concentrations ≥593 mg L −1 to uncontrolled environments should be avoided due to potential toxicity to sensitive organisms and the environment. - Highlights: • The EDU concentration of 300 mg L −1 should be considered as NOEL. • EDU concentrations ≥600 mg L −1 should not be applied to uncontrolled environments. • Hormetic responses indicate overcompensation in response to homeostasis disruption. - Ethylene diurea is not toxic to sensitive organisms when applied at low concentrations (practically < 600 mg L −1 ).

  10. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Richard A.; Peffer, Richard C.; Goetz, Amber K.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Goodman, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA. PMID:24675475

  11. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, Richard A.; Peffer, Richard C.; Goetz, Amber K.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Goodman, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA

  12. Significando o risco sanitário: modos de atuação sobre o risco na vigilância sanitária / Meaning the health risk: modes of action on the risk in health surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valesca Fernandes GIlson Silva

    2014-05-01

    intervention there are processes that mixture the rationality, subjectivity, authority, control, experience, the formal knowledge acquired. The act of the HS professional consists of knowledge, acquired experience, socio-cultural contexts, and interactions that define and redefine the modes of action. The actions are based on the meanings of the risk that moves in the planes of objectivity and subjectivity and, the legislation is an important instrument of decision and persuasion. Although there is an offset to the use of the knowledge and experience, it is the legal framework that prints what should or should not be controlled.

  13. Transaction based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunka, Frantisek; Matula, Jiri

    2017-07-01

    Transaction based approach is utilized in some methodologies in business process modeling. Essential parts of these transactions are human beings. The notion of agent or actor role is usually used for them. The paper on a particular example describes possibilities of Design Engineering Methodology for Organizations (DEMO) and Resource-Event-Agent (REA) methodology. Whereas the DEMO methodology can be regarded as a generic methodology having its foundation in the theory of Enterprise Ontology the REA methodology is regarded as the domain specific methodology and has its origin in accountancy systems. The results of these approaches is that the DEMO methodology captures everything that happens in the reality with a good empirical evidence whereas the REA methodology captures only changes connected with economic events. Economic events represent either change of the property rights to economic resource or consumption or production of economic resources. This results from the essence of economic events and their connection to economic resources.

  14. Genotoxicity of Tri- and Hexavalent Chromium Compounds In Vivo and Their Modes of Action on DNA Damage In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhijia; Zhao, Min; Zhen, Hong; Chen, Lifeng; Shi, Ping; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Chromium occurs mostly in tri- and hexavalent states in the environment. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are extensively used in diverse industries, and trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] salts are used as micronutrients and dietary supplements. In the present work, we report that they both induce genetic mutations in yeast cells. They both also cause DNA damage in both yeast and Jurkat cells and the effect of Cr(III) is greater than that of Cr(VI). We further show that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) cause DNA damage through different mechanisms. Cr(VI) intercalates DNA and Cr(III) interferes base pair stacking. Based on our results, we conclude that Cr(III) can directly cause genotoxicity in vivo. PMID:25111056

  15. Intracellular Diagnostics: Hunting for the Mode of Action of Redox-Modulating Selenium Compounds in Selected Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Mániková

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Redox-modulating compounds derived from natural sources, such as redox active secondary metabolites, are currently of considerable interest in the field of chemoprevention, drug and phytoprotectant development. Unfortunately, the exact and occasionally even selective activity of such products, and the underlying (bio-chemical causes thereof, are often only poorly understood. A combination of the nematode- and yeast-based assays provides a powerful platform to investigate a possible biological activity of a new compound and also to explore the “redox link” which may exist between its activity on the one side and its chemistry on the other. Here, we will demonstrate the usefulness of this platform for screening several selenium and tellurium compounds for their activity and action. We will also show how the nematode-based assay can be used to obtain information on compound uptake and distribution inside a multicellular organism, whilst the yeast-based system can be employed to explore possible intracellular mechanisms via chemogenetic screening and intracellular diagnostics. Whilst none of these simple and easy-to-use assays can ultimately substitute for in-depth studies in human cells and animals, these methods nonetheless provide a first glimpse on the possible biological activities of new compounds and offer direction for more complicated future investigations. They may also uncover some rather unpleasant biochemical actions of certain compounds, such as the ability of the trace element supplement selenite to induce DNA strand breaks.

  16. A Novel High-Molecular-Mass Bacteriocin Produced by Enterococcus faecium: Biochemical Features and Mode of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilchenko, A S; Vasilchenko, A V; Valyshev, A V; Rogozhin, E A

    2018-02-08

    Discovery of a novel bacteriocin is always an event in sciences, since cultivation of most bacterial species is a general problem in microbiology. This statement is reflected by the fact that number of bacteriocins is smaller for tenfold comparing to known antimicrobial peptides. We cultivated Enterococcus faecium on simplified medium to reduce amount of purification steps. This approach allows to purify the novel heavy weight bacteriocin produced by E. faecium ICIS 7. The novelty of this bacteriocin, named enterocin-7, was confirmed by N-terminal sequencing and by comparing the structural-functional properties with available data. Purified enterocin-7 is characterized by a sequence of amino acid residues having no homology in UniProt/SwissProt/TrEMBL databases: NH2 - Asp - Ala - His - Leu - Ser - Glu - Val - Ala - Glu - Arg - Phe - Glu - Asp - Leu - Gly. Isolated thermostable protein has a molecular mass of 65 kDa, which allows it to be classified into class III in bacteriocin classification schemes. Enterocin-7 displayed a broad spectrum of activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. Fluorescent microscopy and spectroscopy showed the permeabilizing mechanism of the action of enterocin-7, which is realized within a few minutes.

  17. The role of blood cell membrane lipids on the mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Pedro M.; Freitas, Teresa; Castanho, Miguel A.R.B.; Santos, Nuno C.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sifuvirtide interacts with erythrocyte and lymphocyte membrane in a concentration dependent manner by decreasing its dipole potential. → Dipole potential variations in lipid vesicles show sifuvirtide's lipid selectivity towards saturated phosphatidylcholines. → This peptide-membrane interaction may direct the drug towards raft-like membrane domains where the receptors used by HIV are located, facilitating its inhibitory action. -- Abstract: Sifuvirtide is a gp41 based peptide that inhibits HIV-1 fusion with the host cells and is currently under clinical trials. Previous studies showed that sifuvirtide partitions preferably to saturated phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes, instead of fluid-phase lipid vesicles. We extended the study to the interaction of the peptide with circulating blood cells, by using the dipole potential sensitive probe di-8-ANEPPS. Sifuvirtide decreased the dipole potential of erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes in a concentration dependent manner, demonstrating its interaction. Also, the lipid selectivity of the peptide towards more rigid phosphatidylcholines was confirmed based on the dipole potential variations. Overall, the interaction of the peptide with the cell membranes is a contribution of different lipid preferences that presumably directs the peptide towards raft-like domains where the receptors are located, facilitating the reach of the peptide to its molecular target, the gp41 in its pre-fusion conformation.

  18. Medicinal Chemistry of the Anti-Diabetic Effects of Momordica Charantia: Active Constituents and Modes of Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaipaul; Cumming, Emmanuel; Manoharan, Gunasekar; Kalasz, Huba; Adeghate, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the oldest known human disease currently affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. Diabetes mellitus is derived from two Greek words meaning siphon and sugar. In DM, patients have high blood level of glucose and this passes out with urine. This is because the endocrine pancreas does not produce either or not enough insulin or the insulin which is produced is not exerting its biochemical effect (or insulin resistance) effectively. Insulin is a major metabolic hormone which has numerous functions in the body and one main role is to stimulate glucose uptake into body’s cells where it is utilized to provide energy. The disease is classified into type 1 and type 2 DM. Type 1 DM develops when the insulin producing β cells have been destroyed and are unable to produce insulin. This is very common in children and is treated with insulin. Type 2 DM (T2DM) develops when the body is unable to produce an adequate amount of insulin or the insulin which is provided does not work efficiently. This is due to life style habits including unhealthy diet, obesity, lack of exercise and hereditary and environmental factors. Some symptoms of DM include excess urination, constant thirst, lethargy, weight loss, itching, decreased digestive enzyme secretion, slow wound healing and other related symptoms. If left untreated, DM can result in severe long-term complications such as kidney and heart failure, stroke, blindness, nerve damage, exocrine glands insufficiency and other forms of complications. T2DM can be treated and controlled by prescribed drugs, regular exercise, diet (including some plant-based food) and general change in life style habits. This review is concerned with the role of plant-based medicine to treat DM. One such plant is Momordica charantia which is grown in tropical countries worldwide and it has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for thousands of years although its origin in unknown. This review examines the

  19. Mode of action of plectasin-derived peptides against gas gangrene-associated Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Zheng

    Full Text Available NZ2114 and MP1102 are novel plectasin-derived peptides with potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial characteristics and mechanism of NZ2114 and MP1102 against gas gangrene-associated Clostridium perfringens were studied for the first time. The minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration of NZ2114 and MP1102 against resistant C. perfringens type A strain CVCC 46 were 0.91 μM. Based on the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI result, an additive or synergic effect was observed between NZ2114 (FICI = 0.5~0.75 or MP1102 (FICI = 0.375~1.0 and antibiotics. The flow cytometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that both NZ2114 and MP1102 induced obviously membrane damage, such as the leakage of cellular materials, partial disappearance of the cell membrane and membrane peeling, as well as retracting cytoplasm and ghost cell. The gel retardation and circular dichroism (CD detection showed that NZ2114 and MP1102 could bind to C. perfringens genomic DNA and change the DNA conformation. Moreover, NZ2114 also interfered with the double helix and unwind the genomic DNA. The cell cycle analysis showed that C. perfringens CVCC 46 cells exposed to NZ2114 and MP1102 were arrested at the phase I. These data indicated that both NZ2114 and MP1102 have potential as new antimicrobial agents for gas gangrene infection resulting from resistant C. perfringens.

  20. Toxicity and mode of action of tritium alone and mixed with copper on the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rety, Celine

    2010-01-01

    Liquid releases by Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) are composed of a mixture of radioactive and non-radioactive substances. When organisms are exposed to mixtures of contaminants the resultant toxicity can be enhanced, or reduced, due to interactions. In order to identify potential interactions between substances released by NPP, two substances representative of such effluents (in term of toxicity and of quantity) were selected for studies: Tritiated water (HTO) and copper (Cu). Effects of this binary mixture were studied on the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. HTO, when examined along, was not very toxic to C. reinhardtii. The most sensitive and early effect of HTO was an increase in oxidative stress at concentrations of 40 kBq mL -1 (0.13 μGy h -1 ). Algae exposure to the binary mixture HTO/Cu induced interactive effects on oxidative stress. Reactive Oxygen Species production was higher from exposure to the mixture of contaminants than the addition of the effect from each substance individually. This interaction was explained by an enhanced copper uptake by the algae when in the presence of HTO. The observed supra-additive effect could also be due to direct toxic interactions, especially on the antioxidant system. To conclude, this study showed that the effects of a mixture of radioactive and nonradioactive substances can be greater than what would be predicted based on mere addition of individual effects. Even thought this binary mixture is just a small part of NPP effluents, the study showed that potential interactions should be considered when determining ecological risks to aquatic ecosystems from NPP effluents. (author)

  1. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Zheng, Suqing [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Huang, Jeffrey T.-J. [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Honda, Tadashi [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794 (United States); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T., E-mail: a.dinkovakostova@dundee.ac.uk [Jacqui Wood Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Research, Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 9SY, Scotland (United Kingdom); Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21205 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC{sub 0–24h} was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the k{sub el} was 0.068 h{sup −1}. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. - Highlights: • TBE-31 is a cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action. • After a single oral dose, the blood concentration of TBE-31 exhibits two peaks. • Oral TBE-31 is a potent activator of Nrf2-dependent enzymes in

  2. Cellular and Molecular Aspects of the β-N-Methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA Mode of Action within the Neurodegenerative Pathway: Facts and Controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Delcourt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The implication of the cyanotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA in long-lasting neurodegenerative disorders is still a matter of controversy. It has been alleged that chronic ingestion of BMAA through the food chain could be a causative agent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and several related pathologies including Parkinson syndrome. Both in vitro and in vivo studies of the BMAA mode of action have focused on different molecular targets, demonstrating its toxicity to neuronal cells, especially motoneurons, and linking it to human neurodegenerative diseases. Historically, the hypothesis of BMAA-induced excitotoxicity following the stimulation of glutamate receptors has been established. However, in this paradigm, most studies have shown acute, rather than chronic effects of BMAA. More recently, the interaction of this toxin with neuromelanin, a pigment present in the nervous system, has opened a new research perspective. The issues raised by this toxin are related to its kinetics of action, and its possible incorporation into cellular proteins. It appears that BMAA neurotoxic activity involves different targets through several mechanisms known to favour the development of neurodegenerative processes.

  3. Assessment of the mode of action underlying development of rodent small intestinal tumors following oral exposure to hexavalent chromium and relevance to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Haws, Laurie C.; Kirman, Christopher R.; Harris, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in drinking water causes intestinal adenomas and carcinomas in mice, but not in rats. Cr(VI) causes damage to intestinal villi and crypt hyperplasia in mice after only one week of exposure. After two years of exposure, intestinal damage and crypt hyperplasia are evident in mice (but not rats), as are intestinal tumors. Although Cr(VI) has genotoxic properties, these findings suggest that intestinal tumors in mice arise as a result of chronic mucosal injury. To better understand the mode of action (MOA) of Cr(VI) in the intestine, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted to collect histological, biochemical, toxicogenomic and pharmacokinetic data in intestinal tissues. Using MOA analyses and human relevance frameworks proposed by national and international regulatory agencies, the weight of evidence supports a cytotoxic MOA with the following key events: (a) absorption of Cr(VI) from the intestinal lumen, (b) toxicity to intestinal villi, (c) crypt regenerative hyperplasia and (d) clonal expansion of mutations within the crypt stem cells, resulting in late onset tumorigenesis. This article summarizes the data supporting each key event in the MOA, as well as data that argue against a mutagenic MOA for Cr(VI)-induced intestinal tumors. PMID:23445218

  4. Mode of action and in vitro susceptibility of mastitis pathogens to macedocin ST91KM and preparation of a teat seal containing the bacteriocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Pieterse

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is considered to be the most economically costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Regular dosage of animals with antibiotics, including use of prophylactic concentrations, may select for resistant strains. The purpose of this study was to determine the mode of action of a new bacteriocin (macedocin ST91KM, to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance of mastitis pathogens to antibiotics commonly used in treatment remedies, and to introduce the possible use of an alternative antimicrobial agent. The bacteriocin macedocin ST91KM, produced by Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus ST91KM, is bactericidal to Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis and Staphylococcus aureus associated with mastitis infections, including strains resistant to methicillin and oxacillin. Sensitive cells were deformed and secreted nucleotides, K+ and β-galactosidase when exposed to macedocin ST91KM. Adsorption of the peptide to target cells decreased in the presence of solvents, suggesting that receptors on the cell surfaces have lipid moieties. No adsorption was recorded in the presence of MgCl2, KI and Na2CO3, suggesting that ionic strength plays an important role. A teat seal preparation containing macedocin ST91KM effectively released the peptide and inhibited the growth of S. agalactiae. Macedocin ST91KM could form the basis for alternative dry cow therapy to prevent mastitis infections in dairy cows as it is effective against pathogens that display resistance to conventional antibiotic therapy.

  5. Antibacterial Mode of Action of the Essential Oil Obtained from Chamaecyparis obtusa Sawdust on the Membrane Integrity of Selected Foodborne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek K. Bajpai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the possible antibacterial mechanism of action of the essential oil obtained from Chamaecyparis obtusa (COEO sawdust against foodborne pathogenic bacteria. The COEO was obtained by microwave-assisted hydrodistillation of C. obtusa sawdust. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values of COEO against the tested foodborne pathogens including Bacillus cereus ATCC 13061, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 43174 and Escherichia coli ATCC 43889 were found in the range from 62.5 to 500 μg/mL and from 125 to 1000 μg/mL, respectively. At the MIC concentrations, the COEO had potential inhibitory effect on the cell viability of the tested bacteria. In addition, the scanning electron microscopic analysis confirmed the inhibitory effect of COEO by revealing significant morphological alterations or rupture of the cell membranes of B. cereus ATCC 13061 and E. coli ATCC 43889. Moreover, the mode of action of COEO on the cell membrane of both Gram-positive B. cereus ATCC 13061 and Gram-negative E. coli ATCC 43889 bacteria was confirmed by marked release of extracellular adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP and cellular material that absorbs at 260 nm, and by efflux of potassium ions. These findings suggest that COEO holds a broad-spectrum antibacterial efficacy, confirming its influence on the membrane integrity and morphological characteristics of tested foodborne pathogens.

  6. A structure-activity relationship study on a natural germination inhibitor, 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol (MVP), in wheat seeds to evaluate its mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Hossein Reza; Mohandessi, Shabnam; Balavar, Yadollah; Aghapoor, Kioumars

    2007-01-01

    The first aim of the present study was to evaluate which structural elements of the 2-methoxy-4-vinylphenol (MVP) molecule (1) are responsible for its observed activity as germination inhibitor in wheat seeds. To find its mode of action, a series of compounds with varying functional moieties and substitution patterns were prepared and evaluated for their inhibitory activity. This systematic competitive inhibition study characterized two criteria for the effective increase of the inhibiting ability: (i) ortho substitution to each of the hydroxy and methoxy groups; (ii) alkene moiety on the ring. Understanding how the structure of natural compounds relates to their inhibition function is fundamentally important and may help to facilitate their application as novel inhibitors to restrain preharvest sprouting (PHS) in wheat fields. In this regard, in MVP and its natural analogues 8 and 9 as the most active inhibitors, the ortho substitution of hydroxy and methoxy groups plays a key role in their activity and, as well, the alkene moiety influences the activity significantly.

  7. Linking mode of action of the model respiratory and photosynthesis uncoupler 3,5-dichlorophenol to adverse outcomes in Lemna minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li; Gomes, Tânia; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Song, You; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2018-04-01

    Standard chemical toxicity testing guidelines using aquatic plant Lemna minor have been developed by several international standardisation organisations. Although being highly useful for regulatory purposes by focusing on traditional adverse endpoints, these tests provide limited information about the toxic mechanisms and modes of action (MoA). The present study aimed to use selected functional assays in L. minor after exposure to 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-DCP) as a model to characterise the toxic mechanisms causing growth inhibition and lethality in primary producers. The results demonstrated that 3,5-DCP caused concentration-dependent effects in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), reduction in chlorophyll (Chlorophyll a and b) content, reproduction rate and frond size were the most sensitive endpoints, followed by formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduction of carotenoid content and impairment of photosynthesis efficiency. Suppression of photosystem II (PSII) efficiency, electron transport rate (ETR), chlorophyll (a and b) contents and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) were closely correlated while ROS production and LPO were negative correlated with ETR, carotenoid content and growth parameters. A network of conceptual Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) was developed to decipher the causal relationships between molecular, cellular, and apical adverse effects occurring in L. minor to form a basis for future studies with similar compounds. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy and mode of action of a noise-sensor light alarm to decrease noise in the pediatric intensive care unit: a prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousselme, Chloé; Vialet, Renaud; Jouve, Elisabeth; Lagier, Pierre; Martin, Claude; Michel, Fabrice

    2011-03-01

    To determine whether a sound-activated light-alarm device could reduce the noise in the central area of our pediatric intensive care unit and to determine whether this reduction was significant enough to decrease the noise that could be perceived by a patient located in a nearby room. The secondary objective was to determine the mode of action of the device. In a 16-bed pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit, a large and clearly noticeable sound-activated light device was set in the noisiest part of the central area of our unit, and noise measurements were made in the central area and in a nearby room. In a prospective, quasi-experimental design, sound levels were compared across three different situations--no device present, device present and turned on, and device present but turned off--and noise level measurements were made over a total of 18 days. None. Setting a sound-activated light device on or off. When the device was present, the noise was about 2 dB lower in the central area and in a nearby room, but there was no difference in noise level with the device turned on vs. turned off. The noise decrease in the central area was of limited importance but was translated in a nearby room. The sound-activated light device did not directly decrease noise when turned on, but repetition of the visual signal throughout the day raised staff awareness of noise levels over time.

  9. Effects of three pesticides that differ in mode of action on the ecology of small indoor aquatic microcosms; an evaluation of the effects of the insecticide chlorpyrifos, the herbicide atrazine and the fungicide carbendazim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daam, M.A.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In the current study, the usefulness of an eight litre microcosm for the ecological risk assessment of pesticides is examined. Risk assessment studies were performed for three pesticides with different modes of action, viz. an insecticide (chlorpyrifos), fungicide (carbendazim) and herbicide

  10. Behavioral based safety approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Michael Raj, I.

    2009-01-01

    Approach towards the establishment of positive safety culture at Heavy Water Plant, Tuticorin includes the adoption of several important methodologies focused on human behavior and culminates with achievement of Total Safety Culture where Quality and Productivity are integrated with Safety

  11. Deciphering the mode of action of a mutant Allium sativum Leaf Agglutinin (mASAL), a potent antifungal protein on Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Prithwi; Roy, Amit; Hess, Daniel; Ghosh, Anupama; Das, Sampa

    2015-10-26

    Mutant Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (mASAL) is a potent, biosafe, antifungal protein that exhibits fungicidal activity against different phytopathogenic fungi, including Rhizoctonia solani. The effect of mASAL on the morphology of R.solani was monitored primarily by scanning electron and light microscopic techniques. Besides different fluorescent probes were used for monitoring various intracellular changes associated with mASAL treatment like change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of programmed cell death (PCD). In addition ligand blot followed by LC-MS/MS analyses were performed to detect the putative interactors of mASAL. Knowledge on the mode of function for any new protein is a prerequisite for its biotechnological application. Detailed morphological analysis of mASAL treated R. solani hyphae using different microscopic techniques revealed a detrimental effect of mASAL on both the cell wall and the plasma membrane. Moreover, exposure to mASAL caused the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the subsequent intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the target organism. In conjunction with this observation, evidence of the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) was also noted in the mASAL treated R. solani hyphae. Furthermore, we investigated its interacting partners from R. solani. Using ligand blots followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses, we identified different binding partners including Actin, HSP70, ATPase and 14-3-3 protein. Taken together, the present study provides insight into the probable mode of action of the antifungal protein, mASAL on R. solani which could be exploited in future biotechnological applications.

  12. Investigation of the Mode of Action Underlying the Tumorigenic Response Induced in B6C3F1 Mice Exposed Orally to Hexavalent Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chad M.; Proctor, Deborah M.; Haws, Laurie C.; Hébert, Charles D.; Grimes, Sheila D.; Shertzer, Howard G.; Kopec, Anna K.; Hixon, J.Gregory; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Harris, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water induces intestinal tumors in mice. To investigate the mode of action (MOA) underlying these tumors, a 90-day drinking water study was conducted using similar exposure conditions as in a previous cancer bioassay, as well as lower (heretofore unexamined) drinking water concentrations. Tissue samples were collected in mice exposed for 7 or 90 days and subjected to histopathological, biochemical, toxicogenomic, and toxicokinetic analyses. Described herein are the results of toxicokinetic, biochemical, and pathological findings. Following 90 days of exposure to 0.3–520 mg/l of sodium dichromate dihydrate (SDD), total chromium concentrations in the duodenum were significantly elevated at ≥ 14 mg/l. At these concentrations, significant decreases in the reduced-to-oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) were observed. Beginning at 60 mg/l, intestinal lesions were observed including villous cytoplasmic vacuolization. Atrophy, apoptosis, and crypt hyperplasia were evident at ≥ 170 mg/l. Protein carbonyls were elevated at concentrations ≥ 4 mg/l SDD, whereas oxidative DNA damage, as assessed by 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, was not increased in any treatment group. Significant decreases in the GSH/GSSG ratio and similar histopathological lesions as observed in the duodenum were also observed in the jejunum following 90 days of exposure. Cytokine levels (e.g., interleukin-1β) were generally depressed or unaltered at the termination of the study. Overall, the data suggest that Cr(VI) in drinking water can induce oxidative stress, villous cytotoxicity, and crypt hyperplasia in the mouse intestine and may underlie the MOA of intestinal carcinogenesis in mice. PMID:21712504

  13. A comparative study on the modes of action of TAK-438, a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, and lansoprazole in primary cultured rabbit gastric glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Jun; Hori, Yasunobu; Nishida, Haruyuki; Kajino, Masahiro; Inatomi, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-01

    TAK-438 is a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker (P-CAB) type antisecretory agent that reversibly inhibits gastric H+, K+-ATPase. Previously, we showed that TAK-438 has superior efficacy compared to lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, in the inhibition of acid secretion in vivo. In this study, we investigated the differences in the mode of actions of the two drugs using primary cultured rabbit gastric glands. TAK-438 and lansoprazole inhibited gastric acid formation in acutely isolated gastric glands (IC₅₀) values, 0.30 and 0.76 μM, respectively). In cultured gastric glands that were preincubated with TAK-438, the inhibitory effect on forskolin-stimulated acid formation was augmented over the incubation period, whereas the inhibitory effect of lansoprazole was not affected by time of incubation. Next, we evaluated the durations of the actions of TAK-438 and lansoprazole after gastric glands were incubated with either drug for 2h followed by washout. Even 8h after the drug washout, TAK-438 at higher concentrations inhibited acid formation, but the inhibitory effect of lansoprazole disappeared immediately after washout. Additionally, only a small amount of [¹⁴C] lansoprazole accumulated in resting glands, and this accumulation was enhanced by treatment with 1 μM of forskolin. In contrast, high levels of [¹⁴C] TAK-438 accumulated in both resting and forskolin-treated glands. Furthermore, a 2-h preincubation followed by washout demonstrated a slow clearance of [¹⁴C] TAK-438 from the glands. These findings suggest that TAK-438 exerts a longer and more potent antisecretory effect than lansoprazole as a result of its high accumulation and slow clearance from the gastric glands. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the human relevance of the constitutive androstane receptor-mediated mode of action for rat hepatocellular tumor formation by the synthetic pyrethroid momfluorothrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Yu; Kushida, Masahiko; Kikumoto, Hiroko; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Higuchi, Hashihiro; Kawamura, Satoshi; Cohen, Samuel M; Lake, Brian G; Yamada, Tomoya

    2017-01-01

    High dietary levels of the non-genotoxic synthetic pyrethroid momfluorothrin increased the incidence of hepatocellular tumors in male and female Wistar rats. Mechanistic studies have demonstrated that the mode of action (MOA) for momfluorothrin-induced hepatocellular tumors is constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)-mediated. In the present study, to evaluate the potential human carcinogenic risk of momfluorothrin, the effects of momfluorothrin (1-1,000 µM) and a major metabolite Z-CMCA (5-1,000 µM) on hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis and CYP2B mRNA expression were examined in cultured rat and human hepatocyte preparations. The effect of sodium phenobarbital (NaPB), a prototypic rodent hepatocarcinogen with a CAR-mediated MOA, was also investigated. Human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) produced a concentration-dependent increase in replicative DNA synthesis in rat and human hepatocytes. However, while NaPB and momfluorothrin increased replicative DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes, NaPB, momfluorothrin and Z-CMCA did not increase replicative DNA synthesis in human hepatocytes. NaPB, momfluorothrin and Z-CMCA increased CYP2B1/2 mRNA levels in rat hepatocytes. NaPB and momfluorothrin also increased CYP2B6 mRNA levels in human hepatocytes. Overall, while momfluorothrin and NaPB activated CAR in cultured human hepatocytes, neither chemical increased replicative DNA synthesis. Furthermore, to confirm whether the findings observed in vitro were also observed in vivo, a humanized chimeric mouse study was conducted. Replicative DNA synthesis was not increased in human hepatocytes of chimeric mice treated with momfluorothrin or its close structural analogue metofluthrin. As human hepatocytes are refractory to the mitogenic effects of momfluorothrin, in contrast to rat hepatocytes, the data support the hypothesis that the MOA for momfluorothrin-induced rat liver tumor formation is not relevant for humans.

  15. Editor's Highlight: Mode of Action Analysis for Rat Hepatocellular Tumors Produced by the Synthetic Pyrethroid Momfluorothrin: Evidence for Activation of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor and Mitogenicity in Rat Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Yu; Kushida, Masahiko; Sumida, Kayo; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Higuchi, Hashihiro; Kawamura, Satoshi; Lake, Brian G; Cohen, Samuel M; Yamada, Tomoya

    2017-08-01

    High dietary levels of momfluorothrin, a nongenotoxic synthetic pyrethroid, induced hepatocellular tumors in male and female Wistar rats in a 2-year bioassay. The mode of action (MOA) for rat hepatocellular tumors was postulated to occur via activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), as momfluorothrin is a close structural analogue of the pyrethroid metofluthrin, which is known to produce rat liver tumors through a CAR-mediated MOA. To elucidate the MOA for rat hepatocellular tumor formation by momfluorothrin, this study was conducted to examine effects on key and associative events of the CAR-mediated MOA for phenobarbital based on the International Programme on Chemical Safety framework. A 2-week in vivo study in Wistar rats revealed that momfluorothrin induced CYP2B activities, increased liver weights, produced hepatocyte hypertrophy and increased hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis. These effects correlated with the dose-response relationship for liver tumor formation and also showed reversibility upon cessation of treatment. Moreover, momfluorothrin did not increase CYP2B1/2 mRNA expression and hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis in CAR knockout rats. Using cultured Wistar rat hepatocytes and the RNA interference technique, knockdown of CAR resulted in a suppression of induction of CYP2B1/2 mRNA levels by momfluorothrin. Alternative MOAs for liver tumor formation were excluded. A global gene expression profile analysis of the liver of male Wistar rats treated with momfluorothrin for 2 weeks also showed similarity to the prototypic CAR activator phenobarbital. Overall, these data strongly support that the postulated MOA for momfluorothrin-induced rat hepatocellular tumors as being mediated by CAR activation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A Biologically-Based Computational Approach to Drug Repurposing for Anthrax Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane P. F. Bai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Developing drugs to treat the toxic effects of lethal toxin (LT and edema toxin (ET produced by B. anthracis is of global interest. We utilized a computational approach to score 474 drugs/compounds for their ability to reverse the toxic effects of anthrax toxins. For each toxin or drug/compound, we constructed an activity network by using its differentially expressed genes, molecular targets, and protein interactions. Gene expression profiles of drugs were obtained from the Connectivity Map and those of anthrax toxins in human alveolar macrophages were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus. Drug rankings were based on the ability of a drug/compound’s mode of action in the form of a signaling network to reverse the effects of anthrax toxins; literature reports were used to verify the top 10 and bottom 10 drugs/compounds identified. Simvastatin and bepridil with reported in vitro potency for protecting cells from LT and ET toxicities were computationally ranked fourth and eighth. The other top 10 drugs were fenofibrate, dihydroergotamine, cotinine, amantadine, mephenytoin, sotalol, ifosfamide, and mefloquine; literature mining revealed their potential protective effects from LT and ET toxicities. These drugs are worthy of investigation for their therapeutic benefits and might be used in combination with antibiotics for treating B. anthracis infection.

  17. Cytotoxicity and modes of action of four Cameroonian dietary spices ethno-medically used to treat cancers: Echinops giganteus, Xylopia aethiopica, Imperata cylindrica and Piper capense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuete, Victor; Sandjo, Louis P; Wiench, Benjamin; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-08-26

    Echinops giganteus, Imperata cylindrica, Piper capense and Xylopia aethiopica are four medicinal spices used in Cameroon to treat cancers. The above plants previously displayed cytotoxicity against leukemia CCRF-CEM and CEM/ADR5000 cell lines as well as human pancreatic MiaPaCa-2 cells. The present study aims at emphasizing the study of the cytotoxicity and the modes of action of the above plants on a panel of ten cancer cell lines including various sensitive and drug-resistant phenotypes. The study has been extended to the isolation of the bioactive constituents from Echinops giganteus. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was determined using a resazurin reduction assay, whereas the caspase-Glo assay was used to detect the activation of caspases 3/7, caspase 8 and caspase 9 in cells treated with the four extracts. Flow cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis and detection of apoptotic cells, analysis of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) as well as measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The four tested extracts inhibited the proliferation of all tested cancer cell lines including sensitive and drug-resistant phenotypes. Collateral sensitivity of cancer cells to the extract of Echinops giganteus was generally better than to doxorubicin. The recorded IC50 ranges were 3.29 µg/mL [against human knockout clones HCT116 (p53(-/-)) colon cancer cells] to 14.32 µg/mL (against human liver hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells) for the crude extract from Echinops giganteus, 4.17 µg/mL (against breast cancer cells transduced with control vector MDA-MB231 cells) to 19.45 µg/mL (against MDA-MB-231 BCRP cells) for that of Piper capense, 4.11 µg/mL (against leukemia CCRF-CEM cells) to 30.60 µg/mL (against leukemia HL60AR cells) for Xylopia aethiopica, 3.28 µg/mL [against HCT116 (p53(-/-)) cells] to 33.43 µg/mL (against HepG2 cells) for Imperata cylindica and 0.11 µg/mL (against CCRF-CEM cells) to 132.47 µg/mL (against HL60AR cells) for doxorubicin. The four

  18. Comparative analysis of pharmaceuticals versus industrial chemicals acute aquatic toxicity classification according to the United Nations classification system for chemicals. Assessment of the (Q)SAR predictability of pharmaceuticals acute aquatic toxicity and their predominant acute toxic mode-of-action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderson, Hans; Thomsen, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    data. Pharmaceuticals were found to be more frequent than industrial chemicals in GHS category III. Acute toxicity was predictable (>92%) using a generic (Q)SAR ((Quantitative) Structure Activity Relationship) suggesting a narcotic MOA. Analysis of model prediction error suggests that 68...... a comprehensive database based on OECD's standardized measured ecotoxicological data and to evaluate if there is generally cause of greater concern with regards to pharmaceutical aquatic toxicological profiles relative to industrial chemicals. Comparisons were based upon aquatic ecotoxicity classification under...... the United Nations Global Harmonized System for classification and labeling of chemicals (GHS). Moreover, we statistically explored whether the predominant mode-of-action (MOA) for pharmaceuticals is narcosis. We found 275 pharmaceuticals with 569 acute aquatic effect data; 23 pharmaceuticals had chronic...

  19. [Standardization of the terms for Chinese herbal functions based on functional targeting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bin; Tao, Ou; Gu, Hao; Wang, Yun; Qiao, Yan-Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Functional analysis concisely summarizes and concentrates on the therapeutic characteristics and features of Chinese herbal medicine. Standardization of the terms for Chinese herbal functions not only plays a key role in modern research and development of Chinese herbal medicine, but also has far-reaching clinical applications. In this paper, a new method for standardizing the terms for Chinese herbal function was proposed. Firstly, functional targets were collected. Secondly, the pathological conditions and the mode of action of every functional target were determined by analyzing the references. Thirdly, the relationships between the pathological condition and the mode of action were determined based on Chinese medicine theory and data. This three-step approach allows for standardization of the terms for Chinese herbal functions. Promoting the standardization of Chinese medicine terms will benefit the overall clinical application of Chinese herbal medicine.

  20. Whole genome mRNA transcriptomics analysis reveals different modes of action of the diarrheic shellfish poisons okadaic acid and dinophysis toxin-1 versus azaspiracid-1 in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodero, Marcia; Hoogenboom, Ron L A P; Bovee, Toine F H; Portier, Liza; de Haan, Laura; Peijnenburg, Ad; Hendriksen, Peter J M

    2018-02-01

    A study with DNA microarrays was performed to investigate the effects of two diarrhetic and one azaspiracid shellfish poison, okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) and azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1) respectively, on the whole-genome mRNA expression of undifferentiated intestinal Caco-2 cells. Previously, the most responding genes were used to develop a dedicated array tube test to screen shellfish samples on the presence of these toxins. In the present study the whole genome mRNA expression was analyzed in order to reveal modes of action and obtain hints on potential biomarkers suitable to be used in alternative bioassays. Effects on key genes in the most affected pathways and processes were confirmed by qPCR. OA and DTX-1 induced almost identical effects on mRNA expression, which strongly indicates that OA and DTX-1induce similar toxic effects. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicates that both compounds induce hypoxia related pathways/processes, the unfolded protein response (UPR) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The gene expression profile of AZA-1 is different and shows increased mRNA expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and glycolysis, suggesting a different mode of action for this toxin. Future studies should reveal whether identified pathways provide suitable biomarkers for rapid detection of DSPs in shellfish. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabonomic strategy for the investigation of the mode of action of the phytotoxin (5S,8R,13S,16R)-(-)-pyrenophorol using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliferis, Konstantinos A; Chrysayi-Tokousbalides, Maria

    2006-03-08

    The biochemical mode of action of (5S,8R,13S,16R)-(-)-pyrenophorol isolated from a Drechslera avenae pathotype was investigated by using metabolic fingerprinting. (1)H NMR spectra of crude leaf extracts from untreated Avena sterilis seedlings and A. sterilis seedlings treated with pyrenophorol were compared with those obtained from treatments with the herbicides diuron, glyphosate, mesotrione, norflurazon, oxadiazon, and paraquat. Multivariate analysis was carried out to group treatments according to the mode of action of the phytotoxic substances applied. Analysis results revealed that none of the herbicide treatments fitted the pyrenophorol model and indicate that the effect of the phytotoxin on A. sterilis differs than those caused by glyphosate, mesotrione, norflurazon, oxadiazon, paraquat, and diuron, which inhibit 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, 4-hydroxyphenyl-pyruvate-dioxygenase, phytoene desaturase, protoporphyrinogen oxidase, photosystem I, and photosystem II, respectively. The method applied, combined with appropriate data preprocessing and analysis, was found to be rapid for the screening of phytotoxic substances for metabolic effects.

  2. Form-based Approaches vs. Task-Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Talebi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating whether task-based approaches bear any superiority to that of more traditional ones evident in presentation-practice- and production phase .to fulfill the purpose of the study, the participants within the age range of 11-19, took part in the study. Following a pretest, treatment, and a posttest, the obtained data was analyzed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA to examine the effects of the variables. The results of the analysis showed that participants in the PPP group did significantly better in the grammar recognition of the posttest than that of the task group. However, their counterparts in the task group gained better scores in the writing section of the test .this research study provided evidence in support of task proponents' claim in the merit of task-based activity in raising learners' implicit knowledge claiming to play the primary role in spontaneous speech.

  3. An exposure-based framework for grouping pollutants for a cumulative risk assessment approach: case study of indoor semi-volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Kevin; Glorennec, Philippe; Bonvallot, Nathalie

    2014-04-01

    Humans are exposed to a large number of contaminants, many of which may have similar health effects. This paper presents a framework for identifying pollutants to be included in a cumulative risk assessment approach. To account for the possibility of simultaneous exposure to chemicals with common toxic modes of action, the first step of the traditional risk assessment process, i.e. hazard identification, is structured in three sub-steps: (1a) Identification of pollutants people are exposed to, (1b) identification of effects and mechanisms of action of these pollutants, (1c) grouping of pollutants according to similarity of their mechanism of action and health effects. Based on this exposure-based grouping we can derive "multi-pollutant" toxicity reference values, in the "dose-response assessment" step. The approach proposed in this work is original in that it is based on real exposures instead of a limited number of pollutants from a unique chemical family, as traditionally performed. This framework is illustrated by the case study of semi-volatile organic compounds in French dwellings, providing insights into practical considerations regarding the accuracy of the available toxicological information. This case study illustrates the value of the exposure-based approach as opposed to the traditional cumulative framework, in which chemicals with similar health effects were not always included in the same chemical class. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bacteriocins from Lactobacillus plantarum production, genetic organization and mode of action: produção, organização genética e modo de ação Bacteriocinas de Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav D. Todorov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins are biologically active proteins or protein complexes that display a bactericidal mode of action towards usually closely related species. Numerous strains of bacteriocin producing Lactobacillus plantarum have been isolated in the last two decades from different ecological niches including meat, fish, fruits, vegetables, and milk and cereal products. Several of these plantaricins have been characterized and the aminoacid sequence determined. Different aspects of the mode of action, fermentation optimization and genetic organization of the bacteriocin operon have been studied. However, numerous of bacteriocins produced by different Lactobacillus plantarum strains have not been fully characterized. In this article, a brief overview of the classification, genetics, characterization, including mode of action and production optimization for bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria in general, and where appropriate, with focus on bacteriocins produced by Lactobacillus plantarum, is presented.Bacteriocinas são proteínas ou complexos protéicos biologicamente ativos que apresentam atividade bactericida contra espécies relacionadas. Nas ultimas duas décadas, várias cepas de Lactobacillus plantarum produtoras de bacteriocinas foram isoladas de diferentes nichos ecológicos como carnes, peixes, frutas, vegetais e produtos lácteos e de cereais. Várias plantaricinas foram caracterizadas e suas seqüências de aminoácidos determinadas. Diferentes aspectos do modo de ação, otimização da fermentação e organização genética já foram estudados. Entretanto, muitas bacteriocinas produzidas por diferentes cepas de Lactobacillus plantarum ainda não foram completamente caracterizadas.Nesse artigo, apresenta-se uma breve revisão sobre a classificação, genética, caracterização, modo de ação, e otimização da produção de bacteriocinas de bactérias láticas em geral, e, quando apropriado, de bacteriocinas de Lactobacillus plantarum.

  5. Materiality in a Practice-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svabo, Connie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to provide an overview of the vocabulary for materiality which is used by practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. Design/methodology/approach: The overview is theoretically generated and is based on the anthology Knowing in Organizations: A Practice-based Approach edited by Nicolini, Gherardi and Yanow. The…

  6. Integrating transcriptomics and metabonomics to unravel modes-of-action of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in HepG2 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jennen, D.G.J.; Ruiz-Aracama, A.; Magkoufopoulou, C.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Lommen, A.; Delft, van J.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The integration of different 'omics' technologies has already been shown in several in vivo studies to offer a complementary insight into cellular responses to toxic challenges. Being interested in developing in vitro cellular models as alternative to animal-based toxicity assays, we

  7. Comparative analysis of pharmaceuticals versus industrial chemicals acute aquatic toxicity classification according to the United Nations classification system for chemicals. Assessment of the (Q)SAR predictability of pharmaceuticals acute aquatic toxicity and their predominant acute toxic mode-of-action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Hans; Thomsen, Marianne

    2009-06-01

    Pharmaceuticals have been reported to be ubiquitously present in surface waters prompting concerns of effects of these bioactive substances. Meanwhile, there is a general scarcity of publicly available ecotoxicological data concerning pharmaceuticals. The aim of this paper was to compile a comprehensive database based on OECD's standardized measured ecotoxicological data and to evaluate if there is generally cause of greater concern with regards to pharmaceutical aquatic toxicological profiles relative to industrial chemicals. Comparisons were based upon aquatic ecotoxicity classification under the United Nations Global Harmonized System for classification and labeling of chemicals (GHS). Moreover, we statistically explored whether the predominant mode-of-action (MOA) for pharmaceuticals is narcosis. We found 275 pharmaceuticals with 569 acute aquatic effect data; 23 pharmaceuticals had chronic data. Pharmaceuticals were found to be more frequent than industrial chemicals in GHS category III. Acute toxicity was predictable (>92%) using a generic (Q)SAR ((Quantitative) Structure Activity Relationship) suggesting a narcotic MOA. Analysis of model prediction error suggests that 68% of the pharmaceuticals have a non-specific MOA. Additionally, the acute-to-chronic ratio (ACR) for 70% of the analyzed pharmaceuticals was below 25 further suggesting a non-specific MOA. Sub-lethal receptor-mediated effects may however have a more specific MOA.

  8. Anti-methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Compound Isolation from Halophilic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and Determination of Its Mode of Action Using Electron Microscope and Flow Cytometry Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jeyanthi, Venkadapathi; Velusamy, Palaniyandi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to purify, characterize and evaluate the antibacterial activity of bioactive compound against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The anti-MRSA compound was produced by a halophilic bacterial strain designated as MHB1. The MHB1 strain exhibited 99��% similarity to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The culture conditions of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 were optimized using nutritional and environmental parameters for enhanc...

  9. Toxicity testing in the 21 century: defining new risk assessment approaches based on perturbation of intracellular toxicity pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available The approaches to quantitatively assessing the health risks of chemical exposure have not changed appreciably in the past 50 to 80 years, the focus remaining on high-dose studies that measure adverse outcomes in homogeneous animal populations. This expensive, low-throughput approach relies on conservative extrapolations to relate animal studies to much lower-dose human exposures and is of questionable relevance to predicting risks to humans at their typical low exposures. It makes little use of a mechanistic understanding of the mode of action by which chemicals perturb biological processes in human cells and tissues. An alternative vision, proposed by the U.S. National Research Council (NRC report Toxicity Testing in the 21(st Century: A Vision and a Strategy, called for moving away from traditional high-dose animal studies to an approach based on perturbation of cellular responses using well-designed in vitro assays. Central to this vision are (a "toxicity pathways" (the innate cellular pathways that may be perturbed by chemicals and (b the determination of chemical concentration ranges where those perturbations are likely to be excessive, thereby leading to adverse health effects if present for a prolonged duration in an intact organism. In this paper we briefly review the original NRC report and responses to that report over the past 3 years, and discuss how the change in testing might be achieved in the U.S. and in the European Union (EU. EU initiatives in developing alternatives to animal testing of cosmetic ingredients have run very much in parallel with the NRC report. Moving from current practice to the NRC vision would require using prototype toxicity pathways to develop case studies showing the new vision in action. In this vein, we also discuss how the proposed strategy for toxicity testing might be applied to the toxicity pathways associated with DNA damage and repair.

  10. Discriminating between adaptive and carcinogenic liver hypertrophy in rat studies using logistic ridge regression analysis of toxicogenomic data: The mode of action and predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shujie; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Morita, Osamu; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Chemical exposure often results in liver hypertrophy in animal tests, characterized by increased liver weight, hepatocellular hypertrophy, and/or cell proliferation. While most of these changes are considered adaptive responses, there is concern that they may be associated with carcinogenesis. In this study, we have employed a toxicogenomic approach using a logistic ridge regression model to identify genes responsible for liver hypertrophy and hypertrophic hepatocarcinogenesis and to develop a predictive model for assessing hypertrophy-inducing compounds. Logistic regression models have previously been used in the quantification of epidemiological risk factors. DNA microarray data from the Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System were used to identify hypertrophy-related genes that are expressed differently in hypertrophy induced by carcinogens and non-carcinogens. Data were collected for 134 chemicals (72 non-hypertrophy-inducing chemicals, 27 hypertrophy-inducing non-carcinogenic chemicals, and 15 hypertrophy-inducing carcinogenic compounds). After applying logistic ridge regression analysis, 35 genes for liver hypertrophy (e.g., Acot1 and Abcc3) and 13 genes for hypertrophic hepatocarcinogenesis (e.g., Asns and Gpx2) were selected. The predictive models built using these genes were 94.8% and 82.7% accurate, respectively. Pathway analysis of the genes indicates that, aside from a xenobiotic metabolism-related pathway as an adaptive response for liver hypertrophy, amino acid biosynthesis and oxidative responses appear to be involved in hypertrophic hepatocarcinogenesis. Early detection and toxicogenomic characterization of liver hypertrophy using our models may be useful for predicting carcinogenesis. In addition, the identified genes provide novel insight into discrimination between adverse hypertrophy associated with carcinogenesis and adaptive hypertrophy in risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Discriminating between adaptive and carcinogenic liver hypertrophy in rat studies using logistic ridge regression analysis of toxicogenomic data: The mode of action and predictive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shujie; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Morita, Osamu; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Chemical exposure often results in liver hypertrophy in animal tests, characterized by increased liver weight, hepatocellular hypertrophy, and/or cell proliferation. While most of these changes are considered adaptive responses, there is concern that they may be associated with carcinogenesis. In this study, we have employed a toxicogenomic approach using a logistic ridge regression model to identify genes responsible for liver hypertrophy and hypertrophic hepatocarcinogenesis and to develop a predictive model for assessing hypertrophy-inducing compounds. Logistic regression models have previously been used in the quantification of epidemiological risk factors. DNA microarray data from the Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System were used to identify hypertrophy-related genes that are expressed differently in hypertrophy induced by carcinogens and non-carcinogens. Data were collected for 134 chemicals (72 non-hypertrophy-inducing chemicals, 27 hypertrophy-inducing non-carcinogenic chemicals, and 15 hypertrophy-inducing carcinogenic compounds). After applying logistic ridge regression analysis, 35 genes for liver hypertrophy (e.g., Acot1 and Abcc3) and 13 genes for hypertrophic hepatocarcinogenesis (e.g., Asns and Gpx2) were selected. The predictive models built using these genes were 94.8% and 82.7% accurate, respectively. Pathway analysis of the genes indicates that, aside from a xenobiotic metabolism-related pathway as an adaptive response for liver hypertrophy, amino acid biosynthesis and oxidative responses appear to be involved in hypertrophic hepatocarcinogenesis. Early detection and toxicogenomic characterization of liver hypertrophy using our models may be useful for predicting carcinogenesis. In addition, the identified genes provide novel insight into discrimination between adverse hypertrophy associated with carcinogenesis and adaptive hypertrophy in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Hypertrophy (H) and hypertrophic

  12. Discriminating between adaptive and carcinogenic liver hypertrophy in rat studies using logistic ridge regression analysis of toxicogenomic data: The mode of action and predictive models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shujie; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Morita, Osamu [R& D, Safety Science Research, Kao Corporation, Tochigi (Japan); Yoshinari, Kouichi [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi, E-mail: honda.hiroshi@kao.co.jp [R& D, Safety Science Research, Kao Corporation, Tochigi (Japan)

    2017-03-01

    Chemical exposure often results in liver hypertrophy in animal tests, characterized by increased liver weight, hepatocellular hypertrophy, and/or cell proliferation. While most of these changes are considered adaptive responses, there is concern that they may be associated with carcinogenesis. In this study, we have employed a toxicogenomic approach using a logistic ridge regression model to identify genes responsible for liver hypertrophy and hypertrophic hepatocarcinogenesis and to develop a predictive model for assessing hypertrophy-inducing compounds. Logistic regression models have previously been used in the quantification of epidemiological risk factors. DNA microarray data from the Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System were used to identify hypertrophy-related genes that are expressed differently in hypertrophy induced by carcinogens and non-carcinogens. Data were collected for 134 chemicals (72 non-hypertrophy-inducing chemicals, 27 hypertrophy-inducing non-carcinogenic chemicals, and 15 hypertrophy-inducing carcinogenic compounds). After applying logistic ridge regression analysis, 35 genes for liver hypertrophy (e.g., Acot1 and Abcc3) and 13 genes for hypertrophic hepatocarcinogenesis (e.g., Asns and Gpx2) were selected. The predictive models built using these genes were 94.8% and 82.7% accurate, respectively. Pathway analysis of the genes indicates that, aside from a xenobiotic metabolism-related pathway as an adaptive response for liver hypertrophy, amino acid biosynthesis and oxidative responses appear to be involved in hypertrophic hepatocarcinogenesis. Early detection and toxicogenomic characterization of liver hypertrophy using our models may be useful for predicting carcinogenesis. In addition, the identified genes provide novel insight into discrimination between adverse hypertrophy associated with carcinogenesis and adaptive hypertrophy in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Hypertrophy (H) and hypertrophic

  13. First insights into the mode of action of a "lachrymatory factor synthase"--implications for the mechanism of lachrymator formation in Petiveria alliacea, Allium cepa and Nectaroscordum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quan; Kubec, Roman; Jadhav, Abhijit P; Musah, Rabi A

    2011-11-01

    A study of an enzyme that reacts with the sulfenic acid produced by the alliinase in Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae) to yield the P. alliacea lachrymator (phenylmethanethial S-oxide) showed the protein to be a dehydrogenase. It functions by abstracting hydride from sulfenic acids of appropriate structure to form their corresponding sulfines. Successful hydride abstraction is dependent upon the presence of a benzyl group on the sulfur to stabilize the intermediate formed on abstraction of hydride. This dehydrogenase activity contrasts with that of the lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) found in onion, which catalyzes the rearrangement of 1-propenesulfenic acid to (Z)-propanethial S-oxide, the onion lachrymator. Based on the type of reaction it catalyzes, the onion LFS should be classified as an isomerase and would be called a "sulfenic acid isomerase", whereas the P. alliacea LFS would be termed a "sulfenic acid dehydrogenase". Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Purification, Characterization, and Mode of Action of Pentocin JL-1, a Novel Bacteriocin Isolated from Lactobacillus pentosus, against Drug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and its drug-resistant strains, which threaten public health and food safety, are in need of effective control by biopreservatives. A novel bacteriocin, pentocin JL-1, produced by Lactobacillus pentosus that was isolated from the intestinal tract of Chiloscyllium punctatum, was purified by a four-step chromatographic process. Mass spectrometry based on MALDI-TOF indicated that pentocin JL-1 has a molecular mass of 2987.23 Da. Only six of the twenty-five amino acids could be identified by Edman degradation. This bacteriocin is thermostable and tolerates a pH range of 5–7. Also, it is sensitive to proteinase K, trypsin, pepsin, and alkaline protease. This bacteriocin has a broad inhibitory spectrum against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains and in particular is effective against multidrug-resistant S. aureus. Additionally, we showed that the cell membrane is the target of pentocin JL-1 against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, causing a loss of proton motive force. Furthermore, pentocin JL-1 has a drastic impact on the structure and integrity of MRSA cells. These results suggest that pentocin JL-1 has potential as a biopreservative in the food industry.

  15. Anti-methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Compound Isolation from Halophilic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and Determination of Its Mode of Action Using Electron Microscope and Flow Cytometry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyanthi, Venkadapathi; Velusamy, Palaniyandi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to purify, characterize and evaluate the antibacterial activity of bioactive compound against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The anti-MRSA compound was produced by a halophilic bacterial strain designated as MHB1. The MHB1 strain exhibited 99 % similarity to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The culture conditions of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens MHB1 were optimized using nutritional and environmental parameters for enhanced anti-MRSA compound production. The pure bioactive compound was isolated using silica gel column chromatography and Semi-preparative High-performance liquid chromatography (Semi-preparative HPLC). The Thin layer chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton NMR ((1)H NMR) analysis indicated the phenolic nature of the compound. The molecular mass of the purified compound was 507 Da as revealed by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The compound inhibited the growth of MRSA with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 62.5 µg mL(-1). MRSA bacteria exposed to 4× MIC of the compound and the cell viability was determined using flow cytometric analysis. Scanning electron microscope and Transmission electron microscope analysis was used to determine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria. This is the first report on isolation of anti-MRSA compound from halophilic B. amyloliquefaciens MHB1 and could act as a promising biocontrol agent.

  16. Baseline Susceptibility of Filarial Vector Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Cu-licidae to Five Insecticides with Different Modes of Action in Southeast of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Salim-Abadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae is an important vector for many human diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility level of larval and adult stages of Cu. quinquefasciatus to different groups of WHO recommended insecticides for vector control.Methods: Larval stages of the Culex mosquitoes were collected from their natural habitats in Rafsanjan County at Kerman Province, southeast of Iran in 2016. Insecticide susceptibility status of adult female Cx. quinquefasciatus against DDT (4%, deltamethrin (0.05%, malathion 5%, and bendiocarb (0.1% were determined using WHO stand­ard insecticide susceptibility test. Additional test was carried out to determine the susceptibility status of larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus to temephos. Bioassay data were analyzed by Probit program.Results: Cx. quinquefasciatus adults showed resistance to all four groups of the tested insecticides according to the WHO criteria for resistance evaluation. The lethal concentrations for 50% mortality (LC50 and 90% mortality (LC90 of temephos against Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae were 0.18mg/l and 0.78mg/l, respectively. This finding also con­firms resistance to temephos based on the WHO recommended instructions for resistance evaluation.Conclusion: Resistance to all groups of the tested insecticides should be considered for future vector control investi­gations in the study area.

  17. Multi-target activity of Hemidesmus indicus decoction against innovative HIV-1 drug targets and characterization of Lupeol mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Francesca; Mandrone, Manuela; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Carli, Ilaria; Distinto, Simona; Corona, Angela; Lianza, Mariacaterina; Piano, Dario; Tacchini, Massimo; Maccioni, Elias; Cottiglia, Filippo; Saccon, Elisa; Poli, Ferruccio; Parolin, Cristina; Tramontano, Enzo

    2017-08-31

    Despite the availability of several anti-retrovirals, there is still an urgent need for developing novel therapeutic strategies and finding new drugs against underexplored HIV-1 targets. Among them, there are the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT)-associated ribonuclease H (RNase H) function and the cellular α-glucosidase, involved in the control mechanisms of N-linked glycoproteins formation in the endoplasmic reticulum. It is known that many natural compounds, such as pentacyclic triterpenes, are a promising class of HIV-1 inhibitors. Hence, here we tested the pentacyclic triterpene Lupeol, showing that it inhibits the HIV-1 RT-associated RNase H function. We then performed combination studies of Lupeol and the active site RNase H inhibitor RDS1759, and blind docking calculations, demonstrating that Lupeol binds to an HIV-1 RT allosteric pocket. On the bases of these results and searching for potential multitarget active drug supplement, we also investigated the anti-HIV-1 activity of Hemidesmus indicus, an Ayurveda medicinal plant containing Lupeol. Results supported the potential of this plant as a valuable multitarget active drug source. In fact, by virtue of its numerous active metabolites, H. indicus was able to inhibit not only the RT-associated RNase H function, but also the HIV-1 RT-associated RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity and the cellular α-glucosidase. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Lactococcins : Mode of action, immunity and secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K; Kok, J; Venema, Gerhardus

    1995-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris 9B4 produces three small (around 5kDa), heat-stable, non-lanthionine containing, membrane active bacteriocins. Amino acid uptake experiments and proton motive force measurements have indicated that these peptides most probably form pores in the cytoplasmic membrane

  19. From toxicological problem to therapeutic use: the discovery of the mode of action of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC), its toxicology and development as a drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, E A; Ellis, M K; Gaskin, P; Robinson, M; Auton, T R; Provan, W M; Smith, L L; Prisbylla, M P; Mutter, L C; Lee, D L

    1998-08-01

    NTBC is a triketone with herbicidal activity that has been shown to have a novel mode of action by inhibiting the enzyme 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase in plants. Early studies on the toxicity of this compound found that rats treated with NTBC developed corneal lesions. Investigations aimed at understanding the mechanistic basis for the ocular toxicity discovered that the rats developed tyrosinaemia and excreted large amounts of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate and 4-hydroxyphenyllactate, owing to inhibition of the hepatic enzyme 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. The corneal lesions resemble those seen when rats are fed a diet supplemented with tyrosine, leading us to conclude that the ocular toxicity seen with NTBC is a consequence of a marked and sustained tyrosinaemia. Studies in collaboration with Professor Sven Lindstedt showed that NTBC was a potent inhibitor of purified human liver 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. This interaction lead to the concept of using NTBC to treat patients with tyrosinaemia type 1, to block or reduce the formation of toxic metabolites such as succinylacetoacetate in the liver. Zeneca Agrochemicals and Zeneca Pharmaceuticals made NTBC available for clinical use and, with the approval of the Swedish Medical Products Agency, a seriously ill child with an acute form of tyrosinaemia type 1 was successfully treated in February 1991. Subsequently, other children with this inborn error of metabolism in Sweden and other countries have been treated with NTBC. The drug is now available to those in need via Swedish Orphan AB.

  20. Nanoscaled boehmites' modes of action in a polymer and its carbon fiber reinforced plastic under compression load; Wirkungsweisen nanoskaliger Boehmite in einem Polymer und seinem Kohlenstofffaserverbund unter Druckbelastung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlt, Christine

    2011-07-01

    Increasing ecological awareness as well as quality and safety demands, which are present, for instance, in the aerospace and automotive sectors, lead to the need to use more sophisticated and more effective materials. For that purpose, laminates of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), which are manufactured by injection technology, are reinforced with boehmite particles. This doping strengthens the laminates, whose original properties are weaker than prepregs. Besides the shear strength, compression strength and the damage tolerance, the mode of action of the nanoparticles in resin and in CRFP is also analyzed. It thereby reveals that the hydroxyl groups and even more a taurine modification of the boehmites' surface after the elementary polymer morphology. Consequently a new flow and reaction comportment, lower glass transition temperatures and shrinkage, as well as a changed mechanical behavior occur. Due to a structural upgrading of the matrix (higher shear stiffness, reduced residual stress), a better fiber-matrix adhesion, and differing crack paths, the boehmite nanoparticles move the degradation barrier of the material to higher loadings, thus resulting in considerably upgraded new CFRP. (orig.)

  1. Mechanistic Approach to Understanding the Toxicity of the Azole Fungicide Triadimefon to a Nontarget Aquatic Insect and Implications for Exposure Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    We utilized mechanistic and stereoselective based in vitro metabolism assays and sublethal exposures of triadimefon to gain insight into the extent of carbonyl reduction and the toxic mode of action of triadimefon with black fly (Diptera: Simuliidae) larvae.

  2. Understanding images using knowledge based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tascini, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to image understanding focusing on low level image processing and proposes a rule-based approach as part of larger knowledge-based system. The general system has a yerarchical structure that comprises several knowledge-based layers. The main idea is to confine at the lower level the domain independent knowledge and to reserve the higher levels for the domain dependent knowledge, that is for the interpretation

  3. Alleviative Effects of a Kampo (a Japanese Herbal Medicine “Maoto (Ma-Huang-Tang” on the Early Phase of Influenza Virus Infection and Its Possible Mode of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Nagai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Kampo medicine, maoto, has been prescribed in an early phase of influenza-like illness and used for a treatment of influenza clinically in Japan these days. However, the efficacy of maoto against the virus infection remains to be elucidated. This study was conducted to evaluate the alleviative effects of maoto against early phase of influenza virus infection and its preliminary mode of actions through immune systems. When maoto (0.9 and 1.6 g/kg/day was orally administered to A/J mice on upper respiratory tract infection of influenza virus A/PR/8/34 from 4 hours to 52 hours postinfection (p.i. significant antipyretic effect was shown in comparison with water-treated control. Administration of maoto (0.8 and 1.3 g/kg/day significantly decreased the virus titers in both nasal (NLF and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF at 52 hours p.i., and significantly increased the anti-influenza virus IgM, IgA, and IgG1 antibody titers in NLF, BALF, and serum, respectively. Maoto also increased significantly the influenza virus-bound IgG1 and IgM antibody titers in serum and the virus-bound IgM antibody titer in even the BALF of uninfected A/J mice. These results indicate that maoto exerts antipyretic activity in influenza virus-infected mice and virus reducing effect at an early phase of the infection through probably augmentation of the virus-bound natural antibodies.

  4. Service creation: a model-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quartel, Dick; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach to support service creation. In this approach, services are assumed to be created from (available) software components. The creation process may involve multiple design steps in which the requested service is repeatedly decomposed into more detailed

  5. A Knowledge Based Approach to VLSI CAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Avail-and/or Dist ISpecial L| OI. SEICURITY CLASIIrCATION OP THIS IPA.lErllm S Daene." A KNOwLEDE BASED APPROACH TO VLSI CAD’ Louis L Steinberg and...major issues lies in building up and managing the knowledge base of oesign expertise. We expect that, as with many recent expert systems, in order to

  6. Mediated effect of ultrasound treated Diclofenac on mussel hemocytes: First evidence for the involvement of respiratory burst enzymes in the induction of DCF-mediated unspecific mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufexi, Eirini; Dailianis, Stefanos; Vlastos, Dimitris; Manariotis, Ioannis D

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates the toxic behavior of diclofenac (DCF) before and after its ultrasound (US) treatment, as well as the involvement of intracellular target molecules, such as NADPH oxidase and NO synthase, in the DCF-induced adverse effects on hemocytes of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this context, appropriate volumes (350 and 500mL) of DCF solutions (at concentrations of 2, 2.5, 5 and 10mgL(-1)) were treated under different ultrasound operating conditions (frequency at 582 and 862kHz, electric power density at 133 and 167W) for assessing US method efficiency. In parallel, DCF and US DCF-mediated cytotoxic (in terms of cell viability measured with the use of neutral red uptake/NRU method), oxidative (in terms of superoxide anions/(.)O2(-), nitric oxides such as NO2(-) and lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde/MDA content) and genotoxic (DNA damage measured by the use of Comet assay method) effects were investigated in hemocytes exposed for 1h to 5, 10 and 100ngL(-1) and 1, 10 and 20μgL(-1) of DCF. The involvement of NADPH oxidase and NO synthase to the DCF-induced toxicity was further investigated by the use of 10μΜ L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor and 10μΜ DPI, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor. According to the results, 350mL of 2mgL(-1) DCF showed higher degradation (>50%) under 167W electric power density and frequency at 862kHz for 120min, compared to degradation in all other cases, followed by a significant elimination of its toxicity. Specifically, US DCF-treated hemocytes showed a significant attenuation of DCF-mediated cytotoxic, oxidative and genotoxic effects, which appeared to be caused by NADPH oxidase and NO synthase activation, since their inhibition was followed by a significant elimination of (.)O2(-) and NO2(-) generation and the concomitant oxidative damage within cells. The results of the present study showed for the first time that unspecific mode of action of DCF, associated with the induction of NADPH oxidase

  7. Mode of action of ethyl tertiary-butyl ether hepatotumorigenicity in the rat: Evidence for a role of oxidative stress via activation of CAR, PXR and PPAR signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakehashi, Anna, E-mail: anna@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Hagiwara, Akihiro; Imai, Norio [DIMS Institute of Medical Science, Inc., 64 Goura, Nishiazai, Azai-cho, Ichinomiya, Aichi 491-0113 (Japan); Nagano, Kasuke [Nagano Toxicologic-Pathology Consulting, Ochiai, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0025 (Japan); Nishimaki, Fukumi [Biofuel Assessment Group, New Fuels Dept., Japan Petroleum Energy Center (JPEC), 4-3-9 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan); Banton, Marcy [Toxicology and Risk Assessment, LyondellBasell Industries, LyondellBasell Corporate HSE/Product Safety, One Houston Center, Suite 700, 1221 McKinney Street, Houston, TX 770 10 (United States); Wei, Min [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, Shoji [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2445 Hirasawa, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0011 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    To elucidate possible mode of action (MOA) and human relevance of hepatotumorigenicity in rats for ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE), male F344 rats were administered ETBE at doses of 0, 150 and 1000 mg/kg body weight twice a day by gavage for 1 and 2 weeks. For comparison, non-genotoxic carcinogen phenobarbital (PB) was applied at a dose of 500 ppm in diet. Significant increase of P450 total content and hydroxyl radical levels by low, high doses of ETBE and PB treatments at weeks 1 and 2, and 8-OHdG formation at week 2, accompanied accumulation of CYP2B1/2B2, CYP3A1/3A2 and CYP2C6, and downregulation of DNA oxoguanine glycosylase 1, induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in hepatocytes, respectively. Up-regulation of CYP2E1 and CYP1A1 at weeks 1 and 2, and peroxisome proliferation at week 2 were found in high dose ETBE group. Results of proteome analysis predicted activation of upstream regulators of gene expression altered by ETBE including constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane-X-receptor (PXR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). These results indicate that the MOA of ETBE hepatotumorigenicity in rats may be related to induction of oxidative stress, 8-OHdG formation, subsequent cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis, suggesting regenerative cell proliferation after week 2, predominantly via activation of CAR and PXR nuclear receptors by a mechanism similar to that of PB, and differentially by activation of PPARs. The MOA for ETBE hepatotumorigenicity in rats is unlikely to be relevant to humans. - Highlights: • We focus on MOA and human relevance of hepatotumorigenicity in rats for ETBE. • ETBE was administered to F344 rats for 1 and 2 weeks. • Oxidative stress formation, proliferation and apoptosis in the liver are analyzed. • ETBE-induced changes of gene and protein expression in the liver are examined. • The effects are compared with those induced by non-genotoxic carcinogen PB.

  8. (R)-(3-amino-2-fluoropropyl) phosphinic acid (AZD3355), a novel GABAB receptor agonist, inhibits transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation through a peripheral mode of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Anders; Antonsson, Madeleine; Holmberg, Ann Aurell

    2009-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects >10% of the Western population. Conventionally, GERD is treated by reducing gastric acid secretion, which is effective in most patients but inadequate in a significant minority. We describe a new therapeutic approach for GERD, based on inhibition...

  9. In silico prediction of toxicity of phenols to Tetrahymena pyriformis by using genetic algorithm and decision tree-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasitabar, Fatemeh; Zare-Shahabadi, Vahid

    2017-04-01

    Risk assessment of chemicals is an important issue in environmental protection; however, there is a huge lack of experimental data for a large number of end-points. The experimental determination of toxicity of chemicals involves high costs and time-consuming process. In silico tools such as quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models, which are constructed on the basis of computational molecular descriptors, can predict missing data for toxic end-points for existing or even not yet synthesized chemicals. Phenol derivatives are known to be aquatic pollutants. With this background, we aimed to develop an accurate and reliable QSTR model for the prediction of toxicity of 206 phenols to Tetrahymena pyriformis. A multiple linear regression (MLR)-based QSTR was obtained using a powerful descriptor selection tool named Memorized_ACO algorithm. Statistical parameters of the model were 0.72 and 0.68 for R training 2 and R test 2 , respectively. To develop a high-quality QSTR model, classification and regression tree (CART) was employed. Two approaches were considered: (1) phenols were classified into different modes of action using CART and (2) the phenols in the training set were partitioned to several subsets by a tree in such a manner that in each subset, a high-quality MLR could be developed. For the first approach, the statistical parameters of the resultant QSTR model were improved to 0.83 and 0.75 for R training 2 and R test 2 , respectively. Genetic algorithm was employed in the second approach to obtain an optimal tree, and it was shown that the final QSTR model provided excellent prediction accuracy for the training and test sets (R training 2 and R test 2 were 0.91 and 0.93, respectively). The mean absolute error for the test set was computed as 0.1615. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rapid detox: understanding new treatment approaches for the addicted patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, S

    2000-01-01

    Despite substantive advances in understanding of genetic and biochemical basis of substance abuse and addiction in the last decade, little information has been translated into alternative treatment models for the addicted patient. Rapid detox, an alternative form of detox treatment, is gaining in both acceptance and popularity. To increase readers' understanding of the neurobiology of addiction and the mode of action of new detox approaches for patients addicted to opiate drugs. A review of the current literature pertaining to rapid detox. Rapid detox is a viable alternative for selected patients attempting to detox from opiate agents of abuse. Increasing knowledge of new treatment approaches allows nurses working to assist addicted patients in planning and receiving treatment based on new awareness of the neurobiology of addiction.

  11. Methodological approaches based on business rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Ioana ANDREESCU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Business rules and business processes are essential artifacts in defining the requirements of a software system. Business processes capture business behavior, while rules connect processes and thus control processes and business behavior. Traditionally, rules are scattered inside application code. This approach makes it very difficult to change rules and shorten the life cycle of the software system. Because rules change more quickly than the application itself, it is desirable to externalize the rules and move them outside the application. This paper analyzes and evaluates three well-known business rules approaches. It also outlines some critical factors that have to be taken into account in the decision to introduce business rules facilities in a software system. Based on the concept of explicit manipulation of business rules in a software system, the need for a general approach based on business rules is discussed.

  12. Ecosystem based approaches to climate adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Jensen, Anne; Termansen, Mette

    This report analyses the prospects and barriers of applying ecosystem based approaches systematically to climate adaptation in urban areas, taking the case of green roofs in Copenhagen Municipality. It looks at planning aspects of green roofs in Copenhagen as well as citizen views and preferences...... regarding green roofs using policy document analysis, interviews with city planners and deliberative valuation methods....

  13. A practice based approach to forest governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, Bas; Behagel, Jelle; Turnhout, Esther; de Koning, Jessica; van Bommel, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    ‘Forest governance’ refers to new modes of regulation in the forest sector, such as decentralized, community-based and market-oriented policy instruments and management approaches. Its main theoretical basis consists of two mainstream models: rational choice and neo-institutionalism. Since these

  14. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gricius, Gediminas; Drungilas, Darius; Andziulis, Arunas; Dzemydiene, Dale; Voznak, Miroslav; Kurmis, Mindaugas; Jakovlev, Sergej

    2015-01-01

    Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys), which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information.

  15. Advanced Approach of Multiagent Based Buoy Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gediminas Gricius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, a hydrometeorological information system is faced with great data flows, but the data levels are often excessive, depending on the observed region of the water. The paper presents advanced buoy communication technologies based on multiagent interaction and data exchange between several monitoring system nodes. The proposed management of buoy communication is based on a clustering algorithm, which enables the performance of the hydrometeorological information system to be enhanced. The experiment is based on the design and analysis of the inexpensive but reliable Baltic Sea autonomous monitoring network (buoys, which would be able to continuously monitor and collect temperature, waviness, and other required data. The proposed approach of multiagent based buoy communication enables all the data from the costal-based station to be monitored with limited transition speed by setting different tasks for the agent-based buoy system according to the clustering information.

  16. Network-based Approaches in Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boezio, Baptiste; Audouze, Karine; Ducrot, Pierre; Taboureau, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    In drug discovery, network-based approaches are expected to spotlight our understanding of drug action across multiple layers of information. On one hand, network pharmacology considers the drug response in the context of a cellular or phenotypic network. On the other hand, a chemical-based network is a promising alternative for characterizing the chemical space. Both can provide complementary support for the development of rational drug design and better knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the multiple actions of drugs. Recent progress in both concepts is discussed here. In addition, a network-based approach using drug-target-therapy data is introduced as an example. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Managing projects a team-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Karen A

    2010-01-01

    Students today are likely to be assigned to project teams or to be project managers almost immediately in their first job. Managing Projects: A Team-Based Approach was written for a wide range of stakeholders, including project managers, project team members, support personnel, functional mangers who provide resources for projects, project customers (and customer representatives), project sponsors, project subcontractors, and anyone who plays a role in the project delivery process. The need for project management is on the rise as product life cycles compress, demand for IT systems increases, and business takes on an increasingly global character. This book adds to the project management knowledge base in a way that fills an unmet need—it shows how teams can apply many of the standard project management tools, as well as several tools that are relatively new to the field. Managing Projects: A Team-Based Approach offers the academic rigor found in most textbooks along with the practical attributes often foun...

  18. Safer childbirth: a rights-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boama, Vincent; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam

    2009-08-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set very high targets for women's reproductive health through reductions in maternal and infant mortality, among other things. Reductions in maternal mortality and morbidity can be achieved through various different approaches, such as the confidential review of maternal deaths, use of evidence-based treatments and interventions, using a health systems approach, use of information technology, global and regional partnerships, and making pregnancy safer through initiatives that increase the focus on human rights. A combination of these and other approaches can have a synergistic impact on reductions in maternal mortality. This paper highlights some of the current global efforts on safer pregnancy with a focus on reproductive rights. We encourage readers to do more in every corner of the world to advocate for women's reproductive rights and, in this way, we may achieve the MDGs by 2015.

  19. Materiality in a practice-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2009-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the vocabulary for materiality which is used by practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. Common terms for materiality are 'artifact' and 'object'. The interaction between social and material realities is grasped as several processes: object......-oriented activity, symbolization, embodiment, performance, alignment and mediation. Material artifacts both stabilize and destabilize organizational action. They may ensure coordination, communication, and control, but they may also create disturbance and conflict....

  20. Fragment-based approaches to TB drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Chiara; Chan, Daniel S H; Coyne, Anthony G; Abell, Chris

    2018-02-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity worldwide, particularly in developing countries. The rise of antibiotic resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) urgently demands the development of new drug leads to tackle resistant strains. Fragment-based methods have recently emerged at the forefront of pharmaceutical development as a means to generate more effective lead structures, via the identification of fragment molecules that form weak but high quality interactions with the target biomolecule and subsequent fragment optimization. This review highlights a number of novel inhibitors of Mtb targets that have been developed through fragment-based approaches in recent years.

  1. Neural network based multiscale image restoration approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Ana Paula A.; da Silva, José D. S.

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes a neural network based multiscale image restoration approach. Multilayer perceptrons are trained with artificial images of degraded gray level circles, in an attempt to make the neural network learn inherent space relations of the degraded pixels. The present approach simulates the degradation by a low pass Gaussian filter blurring operation and the addition of noise to the pixels at pre-established rates. The training process considers the degraded image as input and the non-degraded image as output for the supervised learning process. The neural network thus performs an inverse operation by recovering a quasi non-degraded image in terms of least squared. The main difference of the approach to existing ones relies on the fact that the space relations are taken from different scales, thus providing relational space data to the neural network. The approach is an attempt to come up with a simple method that leads to an optimum solution to the problem. Considering different window sizes around a pixel simulates the multiscale operation. In the generalization phase the neural network is exposed to indoor, outdoor, and satellite degraded images following the same steps use for the artificial circle image.

  2. Heutagogy: An alternative practice based learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoyrub, John; Hurley, John; Neilson, Gavin R; Ramsay, Mike; Smith, Margaret

    2010-11-01

    Education has explored and utilised multiple approaches in attempts to enhance the learning and teaching opportunities available to adult learners. Traditional pedagogy has been both directly and indirectly affected by andragogy and transformational learning, consequently widening our understandings and approaches toward view teaching and learning. Within the context of nurse education, a major challenge has been to effectively apply these educational approaches to the complex, unpredictable and challenging environment of practice based learning. While not offered as a panacea to such challenges, heutagogy is offered in this discussion paper as an emerging and potentially highly congruent educational framework to place around practice based learning. Being an emergent theory its known conceptual underpinnings and possible applications to nurse education need to be explored and theoretically applied. Through placing the adult learner at the foreground of grasping learning opportunities as they unpredictability emerge from a sometimes chaotic environment, heutagogy can be argued as offering the potential to minimise many of the well published difficulties of coordinating practice with faculty teaching and learning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SLS Navigation Model-Based Design Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, T. Emerson; Anzalone, Evan; Geohagan, Kevin; Bernard, Bill; Park, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The SLS Program chose to implement a Model-based Design and Model-based Requirements approach for managing component design information and system requirements. This approach differs from previous large-scale design efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center where design documentation alone conveyed information required for vehicle design and analysis and where extensive requirements sets were used to scope and constrain the design. The SLS Navigation Team has been responsible for the Program-controlled Design Math Models (DMMs) which describe and represent the performance of the Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Rate Gyro Assemblies (RGAs) used by Guidance, Navigation, and Controls (GN&C). The SLS Navigation Team is also responsible for the navigation algorithms. The navigation algorithms are delivered for implementation on the flight hardware as a DMM. For the SLS Block 1-B design, the additional GPS Receiver hardware is managed as a DMM at the vehicle design level. This paper provides a discussion of the processes and methods used to engineer, design, and coordinate engineering trades and performance assessments using SLS practices as applied to the GN&C system, with a particular focus on the Navigation components. These include composing system requirements, requirements verification, model development, model verification and validation, and modeling and analysis approaches. The Model-based Design and Requirements approach does not reduce the effort associated with the design process versus previous processes used at Marshall Space Flight Center. Instead, the approach takes advantage of overlap between the requirements development and management process, and the design and analysis process by efficiently combining the control (i.e. the requirement) and the design mechanisms. The design mechanism is the representation of the component behavior and performance in design and analysis tools. The focus in the early design process shifts from the development and

  4. Approach to performance based regulation development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spogen, L.R.; Cleland, L.L.

    1977-06-01

    An approach to the development of performance based regulations (PBR's) is described. Initially, a framework is constructed that consists of a function hierarchy and associated measures. The function at the top of the hierarchy is described in terms of societal objectives. Decomposition of this function into subordinate functions and their subsequent decompositions yield the function hierarchy. ''Bottom'' functions describe the roles of system components. When measures are identified for the performance of each function and means of aggregating performances to higher levels are established, the framework may be employed for developing PBR's. Consideration of system flexibility and performance uncertainty guide in determining the hierarchical level at which regulations are formulated. Ease of testing compliance is also a factor. To show the viability of the approach, the framework developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for evaluation of material control systems at fixed facilities is presented

  5. Modeling thrombin generation: plasma composition based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E; Everse, Stephen J; Mann, Kenneth G; Orfeo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Thrombin has multiple functions in blood coagulation and its regulation is central to maintaining the balance between hemorrhage and thrombosis. Empirical and computational methods that capture thrombin generation can provide advancements to current clinical screening of the hemostatic balance at the level of the individual. In any individual, procoagulant and anticoagulant factor levels together act to generate a unique coagulation phenotype (net balance) that is reflective of the sum of its developmental, environmental, genetic, nutritional and pharmacological influences. Defining such thrombin phenotypes may provide a means to track disease progression pre-crisis. In this review we briefly describe thrombin function, methods for assessing thrombin dynamics as a phenotypic marker, computationally derived thrombin phenotypes versus determined clinical phenotypes, the boundaries of normal range thrombin generation using plasma composition based approaches and the feasibility of these approaches for predicting risk.

  6. Sound Propagation An impedance Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    2010-01-01

    In Sound Propagation: An Impedance Based Approach , Professor Yang-Hann Kim introduces acoustics and sound fields by using the concept of impedance. Kim starts with vibrations and waves, demonstrating how vibration can be envisaged as a kind of wave, mathematically and physically. One-dimensional waves are used to convey the fundamental concepts. Readers can then understand wave propagation in terms of characteristic and driving point impedance. The essential measures for acoustic waves, such as dB scale, octave scale, acoustic pressure, energy, and intensity, are explained. These measures are

  7. Creative teaching an evidence-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sale, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This book contains an evidence-based pedagogic guide to enable any motivated teaching/training professional to be able to teach effectively and creatively. It firstly summarises the extensive research field on human psychological functioning relating to learning and how this can be fully utilised in the design and facilitation of quality learning experiences. It then demonstrates what creativity actually 'looks like' in terms of teaching practices, modelling the underpinning processes of creative learning design and how to apply these in lesson planning. The book, having established an evidence-based and pedagogically driven approach to creative learning design, extensively focuses on key challenges facing teaching professionals today. These include utilising information technologies in blended learning formats, differentiating instruction, and developing self-directed learners who can think well. The main purpose of the book is to demystify what it means to teach creatively, explicitly demonstrating the pr...

  8. Market-based approaches to tree valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan; David T. Butry

    2008-01-01

    A recent four-part series in Arborist News outlined different appraisal processes used to value urban trees. The final article in the series described the three generally accepted approaches to tree valuation: the sales comparison approach, the cost approach, and the income capitalization approach. The author, D. Logan Nelson, noted that the sales comparison approach...

  9. Risk-based remediation: Approach and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frishmuth, R.A.; Benson, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    The principle objective of remedial actions is to protect human health and the environment. Risk assessments are the only defensible tools available to demonstrate to the regulatory community and public that this objective can be achieved. Understanding the actual risks posed by site-related contamination is crucial to designing cost-effective remedial strategies. All to often remedial actions are overdesigned, resulting in little to no increase in risk reduction while increasing project cost. Risk-based remedial actions have recently been embraced by federal and state regulators, industry, government, the scientific community, and the public as a mechanism to implement rapid and cost-effective remedial actions. Emphasizing risk reduction, rather than adherence to ambiguous and generic standards, ensures that only remedial actions required to protect human health and the environment at a particular site are implemented. Two sites are presented as case studies on how risk-based approaches are being used to remediate two petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The sites are located at two US Air Force Bases, Wurtsmith Air Force Base (AFB) in Oscoda, Michigan and Malmstrom AFB in Great Falls, Montana

  10. Efficient approach for reliability-based optimization based on weighted importance sampling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Xiukai; Lu, Zhenzhou

    2014-01-01

    An efficient methodology is presented to perform the reliability-based optimization (RBO). It is based on an efficient weighted approach for constructing an approximation of the failure probability as an explicit function of the design variables which is referred to as the ‘failure probability function (FPF)’. It expresses the FPF as a weighted sum of sample values obtained in the simulation-based reliability analysis. The required computational effort for decoupling in each iteration is just single reliability analysis. After the approximation of the FPF is established, the target RBO problem can be decoupled into a deterministic one. Meanwhile, the proposed weighted approach is combined with a decoupling approach and a sequential approximate optimization framework. Engineering examples are given to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the presented methodology

  11. DON shares a similar mode of action as the ribotoxic stress inducer anisomycin while TBTO shares ER stress patterns with the ER stress inducer Thapsigargin based on comparative gene expression profiling in Jurkat T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmeits, P.C.J.; Katika, M.R.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Loveren, van H.; Hendriksen, P.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we studied the effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) and tributyltin oxide (TBTO) on whole genome mRNA expression profiles of human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells. These studies indicated that DON induces ribotoxic stress and both DON and TBTO induced ER stress which resulted into T-cell activation

  12. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  13. ECG biometric identification: A compression based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bras, Susana; Pinho, Armando J

    2015-08-01

    Using the electrocardiogram signal (ECG) to identify and/or authenticate persons are problems still lacking satisfactory solutions. Yet, ECG possesses characteristics that are unique or difficult to get from other signals used in biometrics: (1) it requires contact and liveliness for acquisition (2) it changes under stress, rendering it potentially useless if acquired under threatening. Our main objective is to present an innovative and robust solution to the above-mentioned problem. To successfully conduct this goal, we rely on information-theoretic data models for data compression and on similarity metrics related to the approximation of the Kolmogorov complexity. The proposed measure allows the comparison of two (or more) ECG segments, without having to follow traditional approaches that require heartbeat segmentation (described as highly influenced by external or internal interferences). As a first approach, the method was able to cluster the data in three groups: identical record, same participant, different participant, by the stratification of the proposed measure with values near 0 for the same participant and closer to 1 for different participants. A leave-one-out strategy was implemented in order to identify the participant in the database based on his/her ECG. A 1NN classifier was implemented, using as distance measure the method proposed in this work. The classifier was able to identify correctly almost all participants, with an accuracy of 99% in the database used.

  14. Linear systems a measurement based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharyya, S P; Mohsenizadeh, D N

    2014-01-01

    This brief presents recent results obtained on the analysis, synthesis and design of systems described by linear equations. It is well known that linear equations arise in most branches of science and engineering as well as social, biological and economic systems. The novelty of this approach is that no models of the system are assumed to be available, nor are they required. Instead, a few measurements made on the system can be processed strategically to directly extract design values that meet specifications without constructing a model of the system, implicitly or explicitly. These new concepts are illustrated by applying them to linear DC and AC circuits, mechanical, civil and hydraulic systems, signal flow block diagrams and control systems. These applications are preliminary and suggest many open problems. The results presented in this brief are the latest effort in this direction and the authors hope these will lead to attractive alternatives to model-based design of engineering and other systems.

  15. Carbohydrate-based heteronuclear complexes as topoisomerase Iα inhibitor: approach toward anticancer chemotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Mohd; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Usman, Mohammad; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2018-04-18

    Due to the critical role of cellular enzymes necessary for cell proliferation by deciphering topological hurdles in the process of DNA replication, topoisomerases have been one of the major targets in the anticancer drug development area. A need, therefore, arises for new metallodrugs that specifically recognizes DNA and inhibits the activity of topoisomerase enzymes, herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of new metal-based glycoconjugate entities containing heterobimetallic core Cu II -Sn IV (1) and Ni II -Sn IV (2) derived from N-glycoside ligand (L). The optimized structure of complex 1 and other significant vibrational modes have been explained using dispersion corrected B3LYP/DFT calculations. In vitro DNA binding profile of the L and both the complexes 1 and 2 were done by various biophysical studies. Complex 1 breaks pBR322 DNA via a hydrolytic means which was validated by T4 DNA enzymatic assay. To get a mechanistic insight of mode of action topoisomerase I (Topo I) inhibition assay was carried out. Also, we have taken the help of molecular modeling studies in accordance with experimental findings. In vitro cytotoxicity of the complex 1 was evaluated against a panel of cancer cells which exhibited remarkably good anticancer activity (GI 50 values <10 μg/ml). Moreover, intracellular localization of the complex 1 was visualized by confocal microscopy against HeLa cells.

  16. The SEURAT-1 Approach towards Animal Free Human Safety Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEURAT-1 is a European public-private research consortium that is working towards animal-free testing of chemical compounds and the highest level of consumer protection. A research strategy was formulated based on the guiding principle to adopt a toxicological mode-of-action fram...

  17. Stem cell-based approaches in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TA Mitsiadis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Repair of dental pulp and periodontal lesions remains a major clinical challenge. Classical dental treatments require the use of specialised tissue-adapted materials with still questionable efficacy and durability. Stem cell-based therapeutic approaches could offer an attractive alternative in dentistry since they can promise physiologically improved structural and functional outcomes. These therapies necessitate a sufficient number of specific stem cell populations for implantation. Dental mesenchymal stem cells can be easily isolated and are amenable to in vitro expansion while retaining their stemness. In vivo studies realised in small and large animals have evidenced the potential of dental mesenchymal stem cells to promote pulp and periodontal regeneration, but have also underlined new important challenges. The homogeneity of stem cell populations and their quality control, the delivery method, the quality of the regenerated dental tissues and their integration to the host tissue are some of the key challenges. The use of bioactive scaffolds that can elicit effective tissue repair response, through activation and mobilisation of endogenous stem cell populations, constitutes another emerging therapeutic strategy. Finally, the use of stem cells and induced pluripotent cells for the regeneration of entire teeth represents a novel promising alternative to dental implant treatment after tooth loss. In this mini-review, we present the currently applied techniques in restorative dentistry and the various attempts that are made to bridge gaps in knowledge regarding treatment strategies by translating basic stem cell research into the dental practice.

  18. Surrogate Motherhood: A Trust-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Katharina

    2015-12-01

    Because it is often argued that surrogacy should not be treated as contractual, the question arises in which terms this practice might then be couched. In this article, I argue that a phenomenology of surrogacy centering on the notion of trust provides a description that is illuminating from the moral point of view. My thesis is that surrogacy establishes a complex and extended reproductive unit--the "surrogacy triad" consisting of the surrogate mother, the child, and the intending parents--whose constituents are bound together by mutual trustful commitments. Even though a trust-based approach does not provide an ultimate answer to whether surrogacy should be sanctioned or prohibited, it allows for at least some practical suggestions. In particular, I will argue that, under certain conditions, surrogacy is tenable within familial or other significant relationships, and I will stress the necessity of acknowledging the new relationships and moral commitments that result from this practice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Quality based approach for adaptive face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Ali J.; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in biometric technology have pushed towards more robust and reliable systems. We aim to build systems that have low recognition errors and are less affected by variation in recording conditions. Recognition errors are often attributed to the usage of low quality biometric samples. Hence, there is a need to develop new intelligent techniques and strategies to automatically measure/quantify the quality of biometric image samples and if necessary restore image quality according to the need of the intended application. In this paper, we present no-reference image quality measures in the spatial domain that have impact on face recognition. The first is called symmetrical adaptive local quality index (SALQI) and the second is called middle halve (MH). Also, an adaptive strategy has been developed to select the best way to restore the image quality, called symmetrical adaptive histogram equalization (SAHE). The main benefits of using quality measures for adaptive strategy are: (1) avoidance of excessive unnecessary enhancement procedures that may cause undesired artifacts, and (2) reduced computational complexity which is essential for real time applications. We test the success of the proposed measures and adaptive approach for a wavelet-based face recognition system that uses the nearest neighborhood classifier. We shall demonstrate noticeable improvements in the performance of adaptive face recognition system over the corresponding non-adaptive scheme.

  20. IPTV inter-destination synchronization: A network-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokking, H.M.; Deventer, M.O. van; Niamut, O.A.; Walraven, F.A.; Mekuria, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel network-based approach to inter-destination media synchronization. The approach meets the need for synchronization in advanced TV concepts like social TV and offers high scalability, unlike conventional end-point based approaches. The solution for interdestination media

  1. Cognition-Based Approaches for High-Precision Text Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, George John

    2017-01-01

    This research improves the precision of information extraction from free-form text via the use of cognitive-based approaches to natural language processing (NLP). Cognitive-based approaches are an important, and relatively new, area of research in NLP and search, as well as linguistics. Cognitive approaches enable significant improvements in both…

  2. Nanotechnology based approaches in cancer therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Amit Kumer; Islam, Md Reazul; Choudhury, Zahid Sadek; Kadir, Mohammad Fahim; Mostafa, Asif

    2014-01-01

    The current decades are marked not by the development of new molecules for the cure of various diseases but rather the development of new delivery methods for optimum treatment outcome. Nanomedicine is perhaps playing the biggest role in this concern. Nanomedicine offers numerous advantages over conventional drug delivery approaches and is particularly the hot topic in anticancer research. Nanoparticles (NPs) have many unique criteria that enable them to be incorporated in anticancer therapy. This topical review aims to look at the properties and various forms of NPs and their use in anticancer treatment, recent development of the process of identifying new delivery approaches as well as progress in clinical trials with these newer approaches. Although the outcome of cancer therapy can be increased using nanomedicine there are still many disadvantages of using this approach. We aim to discuss all these issues in this review. (review)

  3. A Constructivist Approach to Rule Bases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sileno, G.; Boer, A.; van Engers, T.; Loiseau, S.; Filipe, J.; Duval, B.; van den Herik, J.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a set of algorithms for the conversion of rule bases between priority-based and constraint-based representations. Inspired by research in precedential reasoning in law, such algorithms can be used for the analysis of a rule base, and for the study of the impact of the introduction

  4. Approaches to tobacco control: the evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, M Lober; Lowe, J B

    2004-02-01

    Tobacco production, distribution, and use are international issues with significant health and economic implications. This paper provides an overview of the effective approaches to tobacco control including decreasing demand for tobacco products through taxation, consumer education, research, bans on advertising and promotion, warning labels, and restrictions on public smoking. The effectiveness of reducing the supply of tobacco products through prohibition, restrictions on youth access, crop substitution, trade restrictions, and control of smuggling, will also be discussed. Decreasing smoking, particularly among young people, by preventing or delaying initiation, preventing regular use, and increasing cessation through behavioural approaches for all ages is reviewed. Cessation methods including pharmacological approaches, 'quitlines', Internet programmes, and the targeting of specific populations are discussed. Internet availability of tobacco products and sustainability of current efforts are presented as continuing challenges to tobacco control.

  5. Constructing a justice model based on Sen's capability approach

    OpenAIRE

    Yüksel, Sevgi; Yuksel, Sevgi

    2008-01-01

    The thesis provides a possible justice model based on Sen's capability approach. For this goal, we first analyze the general structure of a theory of justice, identifying the main variables and issues. Furthermore, based on Sen (2006) and Kolm (1998), we look at 'transcendental' and 'comparative' approaches to justice and concentrate on the sufficiency condition for the comparative approach. Then, taking Rawls' theory of justice as a starting point, we present how Sen's capability approach em...

  6. Predicting Liaison: an Example-Based Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greefhorst, A.P.M.; Bosch, A.P.J. van den

    2016-01-01

    Predicting liaison in French is a non-trivial problem to model. We compare a memory-based machine-learning algorithm with a rule-based baseline. The memory-based learner is trained to predict whether liaison occurs between two words on the basis of lexical, orthographic, morphosyntactic, and

  7. Abstract algebra an inquiry based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Hodge, Jonathan K; Sundstrom, Ted

    2013-01-01

    ""This book arose from the authors' approach to teaching abstract algebra. They place an emphasis on active learning and on developing students' intuition through their investigation of examples. … The text is organized in such a way that it is possible to begin with either rings or groups.""-Florentina Chirtes, Zentralblatt MATH 1295

  8. View based approach to forensic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, A.; van Rootseler, R.T.A.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    Face recognition is a challenging problem for surveillance view images commonly encountered in a forensic face recognition case. One approach to deal with a non-frontal test image is to synthesize the corresponding frontal view image and compare it with frontal view reference images. However, it is

  9. Automated Generation of OCL Constraints: NL based Approach vs Pattern Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IMRAN SARWAR BAJWA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an approach used for automated generations of software constraints. In this model, the SBVR (Semantics of Business Vocabulary and Rules based semi-formal representation is obtained from the syntactic and semantic analysis of a NL (Natural Language (such as English sentence. A SBVR representation is easy to translate to other formal languages as SBVR is based on higher-order logic like other formal languages such as OCL (Object Constraint Language. The proposed model endows with a systematic and powerful system of incorporating NL knowledge on the formal languages. A prototype is constructed in Java (an Eclipse plug-in as a proof of the concept. The performance was tested for a few sample texts taken from existing research thesis reports and books

  10. Dose selection based on physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah M; Mayawala, Kapil; Poulin, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are built using differential equations to describe the physiology/anatomy of different biological systems. Readily available in vitro and in vivo preclinical data can be incorporated into these models to not only estimate pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and plasma concentration-time profiles, but also to gain mechanistic insight into compound properties. They provide a mechanistic framework to understand and extrapolate PK and dose across in vitro and in vivo systems and across different species, populations and disease states. Using small molecule and large molecule examples from the literature and our own company, we have shown how PBPK techniques can be utilised for human PK and dose prediction. Such approaches have the potential to increase efficiency, reduce the need for animal studies, replace clinical trials and increase PK understanding. Given the mechanistic nature of these models, the future use of PBPK modelling in drug discovery and development is promising, however some limitations need to be addressed to realise its application and utility more broadly.

  11. Methodological approaches based on business rules

    OpenAIRE

    Anca Ioana ANDREESCU; Adina UTA

    2008-01-01

    Business rules and business processes are essential artifacts in defining the requirements of a software system. Business processes capture business behavior, while rules connect processes and thus control processes and business behavior. Traditionally, rules are scattered inside application code. This approach makes it very difficult to change rules and shorten the life cycle of the software system. Because rules change more quickly than the application itself, it is desirable to externalize...

  12. MOBILE COMMERCE APPROACH BASED ON MOBILE AGENT

    OpenAIRE

    Oussama Zerdoumi; Okba Kazar; Saber Benharzallah

    2011-01-01

    Telecommunications technologies are advanced; they introduced new technologies to meet the needs of individuals and organizations to make commercial transactions, where we find the birth of e-commerce after the emergence of the Internet. But this approach has limits like the use of a client / server model, which limit the use of these transactions in anytime and anywhere. Recently and after the emergence of the wireless networking, the commerce increase the range of the E-commerce application...

  13. Problem-Based Learning Approaches in Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Perez, Andrew James

    2013-01-01

    Problem-Based Learning, despite recent controversies about its effectiveness, is used extensively as a teaching method throughout higher education. In meteorology, there has been little attempt to incorporate Problem-Based Learning techniques into the curriculum. Motivated by a desire to enhance the reflective engagement of students within a…

  14. Antirandom Testing: A Distance-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Hui Wu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Random testing requires each test to be selected randomly regardless of the tests previously applied. This paper introduces the concept of antirandom testing where each test applied is chosen such that its total distance from all previous tests is maximum. This spans the test vector space to the maximum extent possible for a given number of vectors. An algorithm for generating antirandom tests is presented. Compared with traditional pseudorandom testing, antirandom testing is found to be very effective when a high-fault coverage needs to be achieved with a limited number of test vectors. The superiority of the new approach is even more significant for testing bridging faults.

  15. Behavior based safety approach towards fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar, R.

    2009-01-01

    The behavior of the individual who notice fire first is very important because it affect the safety of all occupants of the area. Human behavior on fire depends on variables of the buildings in which fire occurs and by the appearance of the fire when it is detected. Altruistic behavior of human being will help to handle the critical conditions due to fire emergencies. NPCIL have developed a culture of systematic approach to safeguard men and materials from fire by training and awareness. In our Nuclear Power Plants, we have an effective plan and system to test the plans. In each emergency exercises, the behavior of individuals will be monitored and recorded

  16. A systematic approach for component-based software development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guareis de farias, Cléver; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis

    2000-01-01

    Component-based software development enables the construction of software artefacts by assembling prefabricated, configurable and independently evolving building blocks, called software components. This paper presents an approach for the development of component-based software artefacts. This

  17. A Combined Approach for Component-based Software Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guareis de farias, Cléver; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Quartel, Dick; Baldoni, R.

    2001-01-01

    Component-based software development enables the construction of software artefacts by assembling binary units of production, distribution and deployment, the so-called software components. Several approaches addressing component-based development have been proposed recently. Most of these

  18. Sensitivity based reduced approaches for structural reliability analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    captured by a safety-factor based approach due to the intricate nonlinear ... give the accounts of extensive research works which have been done over ... (ii) simulation based methods, for example, importance sampling (Bucher 1988; Mahade-.

  19. Supplier selection an MCDA-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Krishnendu

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present a comprehensive review of the latest research and development trends at the international level for modeling and optimization of the supplier selection process for different industrial sectors. It is targeted to serve two audiences: the MBA and PhD student interested in procurement, and the practitioner who wishes to gain a deeper understanding of procurement analysis with multi-criteria based decision tools to avoid upstream risks to get better supply chain visibility. The book is expected to serve as a ready reference for supplier selection criteria and various multi-criteria based supplier’s evaluation methods for forward, reverse and mass customized supply chain. This book encompasses several criteria, methods for supplier selection in a systematic way based on extensive literature review from 1998 to 2012. It provides several case studies and some useful links which can serve as a starting point for interested researchers. In the appendix several computer code wri...

  20. Construction of the first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and comparative compendium approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sangjo [Bioinformatics Lab, Healthcare Group, SK Telecom, 9-1, Sunae-dong, Pundang-gu, Sungnam-si, Kyunggi-do 463-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Minho [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyeshik [Department of Biological Science, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Miyoung [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Han-Oh [Bioneer Corp., 8-11 Munpyeongseo-ro, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Youn-Sig [Department of Applied Biology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hye-jeong [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongsup [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung-Ook [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Inha University Hospital, 7-206 Sinheung-dong, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-711 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Uk [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •The first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles form fission yeast was generated. •The first HTS of drug mode-of-action in fission yeast was performed. •The first comparative chemical genetic analysis between two yeasts was conducted. -- Abstract: Genome-wide chemical genetic profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae since the budding yeast deletion library construction have been successfully used to reveal unknown mode-of-actions of drugs. Here, we introduce comparative approach to infer drug target proteins more accurately using two compendiums of chemical-genetic profiles from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For the first time, we established DNA-chip based growth defect measurement of genome-wide deletion strains of S. pombe, and then applied 47 drugs to the pooled heterozygous deletion strains to generate chemical-genetic profiles in S. pombe. In our approach, putative drug targets were inferred from strains hypersensitive to given drugs by analyzing S. pombe and S. cerevisiae compendiums. Notably, many evidences in the literature revealed that the inferred target genes of fungicide and bactericide identified by such comparative approach are in fact the direct targets. Furthermore, by filtering out the genes with no essentiality, the multi-drug sensitivity genes, and the genes with less eukaryotic conservation, we created a set of drug target gene candidates that are expected to be directly affected by a given drug in human cells. Our study demonstrated that it is highly beneficial to construct the multiple compendiums of chemical genetic profiles using many different species. The fission yeast chemical-genetic compendium is available at (http://pombe.kaist.ac.kr/compendium)

  1. Advantages of condition-based maintenance approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareiss, J.; Roos, E.; Jovanovic, A.; Perunicic, M.; Balos, D.

    2004-01-01

    Pilot applications in EnBW steam boiler components and high-pressure pipe systems in the context of the European research project RIMAP (''Risk Based Inspection and Maintenance Procedures for European Industry'') showed that application of a risk-based maintenance strategy (e.g. RIMAP) will make the decision process more transparent and enable better condition-oriented maintenance. With regard to life management of the systems (availability, product quality), this appears to be more important than than the aspect of cost reduction in the maintenance sector, although the latter may not be unwelcome. (orig.) [de

  2. Knowledge-Based Approaches: Two cases of applicability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Basic issues of the term: A knowledge-based approach (KBA) are discussed. Two cases of applicable to KBA are presented, and its concluded that KBA is more than just IT.......Basic issues of the term: A knowledge-based approach (KBA) are discussed. Two cases of applicable to KBA are presented, and its concluded that KBA is more than just IT....

  3. A Task-Based Approach to Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to present a task-based approach to materials development. In the first part of the chapter, I sketch out the evolution of task based language teaching, drawing on a distinction between synthetic and analytical approaches to syllabus design first articulated by Wilkins (1976).

  4. Investigative Primary Science: A Problem-Based Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherington, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the success of using a problem-based learning approach (PBL) as a pedagogical mode of learning open inquiry science within a traditional four-year undergraduate elementary teacher education program. In 2010, a problem-based learning approach to teaching primary science replaced the traditional content driven syllabus. During…

  5. The intrinsically disordered structural platform of the plant defence hub protein RPM1-interacting protein 4 provides insights into its mode of action in the host-pathogen interface and evolution of the nitrate-induced domain protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolin; Greenwood, David R; Templeton, Matthew D; Libich, David S; McGhie, Tony K; Xue, Bin; Yoon, Minsoo; Cui, Wei; Kirk, Christopher A; Jones, William T; Uversky, Vladimir N; Rikkerink, Erik H A

    2014-09-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana (At) RPM1-interacting protein 4 (RIN4), targeted by many defence-suppressing bacterial type III effectors and monitored by several resistance proteins, regulates plant immune responses to pathogen-associated molecular patterns and type III effectors. Little is known about the overall protein structure of AtRIN4, especially in its unbound form, and the relevance of structure to its diverse biological functions. AtRIN4 contains two nitrate-induced (NOI) domains and is a member of the NOI family. Using experimental and bioinformatic approaches, we demonstrate that the unbound AtRIN4 is intrinsically disordered under physiological conditions. The intrinsically disordered polypeptide chain of AtRIN4 is interspersed with molecular recognition features (MoRFs) and anchor-identified long-binding regions, potentially allowing it to undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding to partner(s). A poly-l-proline II structure, often responsible for protein recognition, is also identified in AtRIN4. By performing bioinformatics analyses on RIN4 homologues from different plant species and the NOI proteins from Arabidopsis, we infer the conservation of intrinsic disorder, MoRFs and long-binding regions of AtRIN4 in other plant species and the NOI family. Intrinsic disorder and MoRFs could provide RIN4 proteins with the binding promiscuity and plasticity required to act as hubs in a pivotal position within plant defence signalling cascades. © 2014 FEBS.

  6. Model-based experimental design for assessing effects of mixtures of chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baas, Jan, E-mail: jan.baas@falw.vu.n [Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam, Dept of Theoretical Biology, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stefanowicz, Anna M., E-mail: anna.stefanowicz@uj.edu.p [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Klimek, Beata, E-mail: beata.klimek@uj.edu.p [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Laskowski, Ryszard, E-mail: ryszard.laskowski@uj.edu.p [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Kooijman, Sebastiaan A.L.M., E-mail: bas@bio.vu.n [Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam, Dept of Theoretical Biology, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15

    We exposed flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum) to a mixture of four poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The experimental setup was chosen such that the emphasis was on assessing partial effects. We interpreted the effects of the mixture by a process-based model, with a threshold concentration for effects on survival. The behavior of the threshold concentration was one of the key features of this research. We showed that the threshold concentration is shared by toxicants with the same mode of action, which gives a mechanistic explanation for the observation that toxic effects in mixtures may occur in concentration ranges where the individual components do not show effects. Our approach gives reliable predictions of partial effects on survival and allows for a reduction of experimental effort in assessing effects of mixtures, extrapolations to other mixtures, other points in time, or in a wider perspective to other organisms. - We show a mechanistic approach to assess effects of mixtures in low concentrations.

  7. Model-based experimental design for assessing effects of mixtures of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baas, Jan; Stefanowicz, Anna M.; Klimek, Beata; Laskowski, Ryszard; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    We exposed flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum) to a mixture of four poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The experimental setup was chosen such that the emphasis was on assessing partial effects. We interpreted the effects of the mixture by a process-based model, with a threshold concentration for effects on survival. The behavior of the threshold concentration was one of the key features of this research. We showed that the threshold concentration is shared by toxicants with the same mode of action, which gives a mechanistic explanation for the observation that toxic effects in mixtures may occur in concentration ranges where the individual components do not show effects. Our approach gives reliable predictions of partial effects on survival and allows for a reduction of experimental effort in assessing effects of mixtures, extrapolations to other mixtures, other points in time, or in a wider perspective to other organisms. - We show a mechanistic approach to assess effects of mixtures in low concentrations.

  8. SLAM - Based Approach to Dynamic Ship Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Wrobel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dynamically positioned vessels, used by offshore industry, use not only satellite navigation but also different positioning systems, often referred to as reference' systems. Most of them use multiple technical devices located outside the vessel which creates some problems with their accessibility and performance. In this paper, a basic concept of reference system independent from any external device is presented, basing on hydroacoustics and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM method. Theoretical analysis of its operability is also performed.

  9. Nanotechnology-Based Approach in Tuberculosis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasiruddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, commonly known as TB, is the second most fatal infectious disease after AIDS, caused by bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Prolonged treatment, high pill burden, low compliance, and stiff administration schedules are factors that are responsible for emergence of MDR and XDR cases of tuberculosis. Till date, only BCG vaccine is available which is ineffective against adult pulmonary TB, which is the most common form of disease. Various unique antibodies have been developed to overcome drug resistance, reduce the treatment regimen, and elevate the compliance to treatment. Therefore, we need an effective and robust system to subdue technological drawbacks and improve the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs which still remains a major challenge for pharmaceutical technology. Nanoparticle-based ideology has shown convincing treatment and promising outcomes for chronic infectious diseases. Different types of nanocarriers have been evaluated as promising drug delivery systems for various administration routes. Controlled and sustained release of drugs is one of the advantages of nanoparticle-based antituberculosis drugs over free drug. It also reduces the dosage frequency and resolves the difficulty of low poor compliance. This paper reviews various nanotechnology-based therapies which can be used for the treatment of TB.

  10. Media approach to gender-based violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mršević Zorica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author grounds her research and the latter analysis on continually conducted daily press-clipping of seven main printed daily newspapers and two main electronic media in Serbia, within the three years period (2009 - 2011. An analysis of media reports on gender based violence, with particular focus on the most frequent domestic violence cases within the two years period, 2010 to 2011 is presented. As the best of media reports on gender based violence, the author stressed out its „whistle blower“ role - media are the main source of information on cases, dimensions and forms of gender based violence. Also the worse moments of media reporting in the mentioned period are presented - when the violence was justified or when reality is deformed by presenting these cases as romantic love stories. For example, in 2010 the worst was reporting on the „Pajčin/Kapisoda“ case, while in 2011 it was the „Ponjiger“ case. In the end, the author also warned on the worrysome fact of sudden dissapearance of media reports on partners’ murdering their wives after the last such report published in mid-october 2011, which could mean that now we have a new problem of diminished freedom of media.

  11. Anti-viral properties and mode of action of standardized Echinacea purpurea extract against highly pathogenic avian Influenza virus (H5N1, H7N7 and swine-origin H1N1 (S-OIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoop Roland

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus (IV infections are a major threat to human welfare and animal health worldwide. Anti-viral therapy includes vaccines and a few anti-viral drugs. However vaccines are not always available in time, as demonstrated by the emergence of the new 2009 H1N1-type pandemic strain of swine origin (S-OIV in April 2009, and the acquisition of resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors such as Tamiflu® (oseltamivir is a potential problem. Therefore the prospects for the control of IV by existing anti-viral drugs are limited. As an alternative approach to the common anti-virals we studied in more detail a commercial standardized extract of the widely used herb Echinacea purpurea (Echinaforce®, EF in order to elucidate the nature of its anti-IV activity. Results Human H1N1-type IV, highly pathogenic avian IV (HPAIV of the H5- and H7-types, as well as swine origin IV (S-OIV, H1N1, were all inactivated in cell culture assays by the EF preparation at concentrations ranging from the recommended dose for oral consumption to several orders of magnitude lower. Detailed studies with the H5N1 HPAIV strain indicated that direct contact between EF and virus was required, prior to infection, in order to obtain maximum inhibition in virus replication. Hemagglutination assays showed that the extract inhibited the receptor binding activity of the virus, suggesting that the extract interferes with the viral entry into cells. In sequential passage studies under treatment in cell culture with the H5N1 virus no EF-resistant variants emerged, in contrast to Tamiflu®, which produced resistant viruses upon passaging. Furthermore, the Tamiflu®-resistant virus was just as susceptible to EF as the wild type virus. Conclusion As a result of these investigations, we believe that this standard Echinacea preparation, used at the recommended dose for oral consumption, could be a useful, readily available and affordable addition to existing control options

  12. Alternative approaches to risk-based technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atefi, B.; Gallagher, D.W.; Liner, R.T.; Lofgren, E.V.

    1987-01-01

    Four alternative risk-based approaches to Technical Specifications are identified. These are: a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) oriented approach; a reliability goal-oriented approach; an approach based on configuration control; a data-oriented approach. Based on preliminary results, the PRA-oriented approach, which has been developed further than the other approaches, seems to offer a logical, quantitative basis for setting Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) and Surveillance Test Intervals (STIs) for some plant components and systems. The most attractive feature of this approach is that it directly links the AOTs and STIs with the risk associated with the operation of the plant. This would focus the plant operator's and the regulatory agency's attention on the most risk-significant components of the plant. A series of practical issues related to the level of detail and content of the plant PRAs, requirements for the review of these PRAs, and monitoring cf the plant's performance by the regulatory agency must be resolved before the approach could be implemented. Future efforts will examine the other three approaches and their practicality before firm conclusions are drawn regarding the viability of any of these approaches

  13. A hybrid agent-based approach for modeling microbiological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zaiyi; Sloot, Peter M A; Tay, Joc Cing

    2008-11-21

    Models for systems biology commonly adopt Differential Equations or Agent-Based modeling approaches for simulating the processes as a whole. Models based on differential equations presuppose phenomenological intracellular behavioral mechanisms, while models based on Multi-Agent approach often use directly translated, and quantitatively less precise if-then logical rule constructs. We propose an extendible systems model based on a hybrid agent-based approach where biological cells are modeled as individuals (agents) while molecules are represented by quantities. This hybridization in entity representation entails a combined modeling strategy with agent-based behavioral rules and differential equations, thereby balancing the requirements of extendible model granularity with computational tractability. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach with models of chemotaxis involving an assay of 10(3) cells and 1.2x10(6) molecules. The model produces cell migration patterns that are comparable to laboratory observations.

  14. INDIVIDUAL BASED MODELLING APPROACH TO THERMAL ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diadromous fish populations in the Pacific Northwest face challenges along their migratory routes from declining habitat quality, harvest, and barriers to longitudinal connectivity. Changes in river temperature regimes are producing an additional challenge for upstream migrating adult salmon and steelhead, species that are sensitive to absolute and cumulative thermal exposure. Adult salmon populations have been shown to utilize cold water patches along migration routes when mainstem river temperatures exceed thermal optimums. We are employing an individual based model (IBM) to explore the costs and benefits of spatially-distributed cold water refugia for adult migrating salmon. Our model, developed in the HexSim platform, is built around a mechanistic behavioral decision tree that drives individual interactions with their spatially explicit simulated environment. Population-scale responses to dynamic thermal regimes, coupled with other stressors such as disease and harvest, become emergent properties of the spatial IBM. Other model outputs include arrival times, species-specific survival rates, body energetic content, and reproductive fitness levels. Here, we discuss the challenges associated with parameterizing an individual based model of salmon and steelhead in a section of the Columbia River. Many rivers and streams in the Pacific Northwest are currently listed as impaired under the Clean Water Act as a result of high summer water temperatures. Adverse effec

  15. Old plants newly discovered: Cassia sieberiana D.C. and Cassia abbreviata Oliv. Oliv. root extracts inhibit in vitro HIV-1c replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by different modes of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leteane, Melvin M; Ngwenya, Barbara N; Muzila, Mbaki; Namushe, Amos; Mwinga, John; Musonda, Rosemary; Moyo, Sikhulile; Mengestu, Yehualashete B; Abegaz, Berhanu M; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin

    2012-05-07

    Despite advances in anti-retroviral therapy which has transformed HIV/AIDS from a fatal to a manageable chronic disease, increasing viral drug resistance, side effects and uneven access to anti-retroviral drugs remain considerable therapeutic challenges. Partly as a consequence of these shortcomings and partly based on the fact that HIV/AIDS gives rise to opportunistic infections whose symptoms have been managed in Africa in an HIV/AIDS-independent context by traditional healers for centuries, many HIV/AIDS patients use herbal medicines. The aim of this study was to screen selected medicinal plants from Botswana, used by traditional healers to treat/manage HIV/AIDS, for inhibitory activities on HIV replication. Based on an ethnomedical survey, ethanolic tannin-containing and tannin-free extracts from 10 medicinal plants were tested for inhibitory properties against a clone of HIV-1c (MJ(4)) measuring cytopathic effect protection and levels of viral p24 antigen in infected PBMCs. Cassia sieberiana D.C., Cassia abbreviata Oliv. Oliv. and Plumbago zeylanica L. extracts showed significant inhibition of HIV-1c (MJ(4)) replication. The inhibitory activity of the Plumbago zeylanica extract could be attributed to its tannin content. Anti-HIV activity of Cassia sieberiana root and bark extracts, and Cassia abbreviata root extracts occurred in a concentration-dependent manner with an effective concentration (EC(50)) of 65.1μg/ml, 85.3μg/ml and 102.8μg/ml, respectively. Experiments to elucidate possible mechanism(s) of action revealed that Cassia sieberiana root and bark extracts blocked HIV replication at its binding- (EC(50)=70.2μg/ml and 90.8μg/ml, respectively) and entry stage (EC(50)=88.9μg/ml and 100.5μg/ml, respectively) while Cassia abbreviata extracts did not. We report here for the first time a direct inhibitory effect on HIV-1c replication of extracts from two extremely popular medicinal plants, Cassia sieberiana and Cassia abbreviata. Considering the

  16. Algebraic Verification Method for SEREs Properties via Groebner Bases Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an efficient solution using computer algebra system to perform linear temporal properties verification for synchronous digital systems. The method is essentially based on both Groebner bases approaches and symbolic simulation. A mechanism for constructing canonical polynomial set based symbolic representations for both circuit descriptions and assertions is studied. We then present a complete checking algorithm framework based on these algebraic representations by using Groebner bases. The computational experience result in this work shows that the algebraic approach is a quite competitive checking method and will be a useful supplement to the existent verification methods based on simulation.

  17. Foundry based approach for InP based PIC development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Europe is making significant investments in development of generic photonic foundry platform infrastructures for InP-based and Silicon Photonic ICs. Here we present the present status for the InP-based JePPIX platform.

  18. Assessing Acid-Base Status: Physiologic Versus Physicochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrogué, Horacio J; Madias, Nicolaos E

    2016-11-01

    The physiologic approach has long been used in assessing acid-base status. This approach considers acids as hydrogen ion donors and bases as hydrogen ion acceptors and the acid-base status of the organism as reflecting the interaction of net hydrogen ion balance with body buffers. In the physiologic approach, the carbonic acid/bicarbonate buffer pair is used for assessing acid-base status and blood pH is determined by carbonic acid (ie, Paco 2 ) and serum bicarbonate levels. More recently, the physicochemical approach was introduced, which has gained popularity, particularly among intensivists and anesthesiologists. This approach posits that the acid-base status of body fluids is determined by changes in the dissociation of water that are driven by the interplay of 3 independent variables: the sum of strong (fully dissociated) cation concentrations minus the sum of strong anion concentrations (strong ion difference); the total concentration of weak acids; and Paco 2 . These 3 independent variables mechanistically determine both hydrogen ion concentration and bicarbonate concentration of body fluids, which are considered as dependent variables. Our experience indicates that the average practitioner is familiar with only one of these approaches and knows very little, if any, about the other approach. In the present Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case, we attempt to bridge this knowledge gap by contrasting the physiologic and physicochemical approaches to assessing acid-base status. We first outline the essential features, advantages, and limitations of each of the 2 approaches and then apply each approach to the same patient presentation. We conclude with our view about the optimal approach. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Research-based approaches to nuclear education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donev, J.M.K.C., E-mail: jason.donev@ucalgary.ca [Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada); Carpenter, Y., E-mail: ycarpenter@gmail.com [Univ.ty of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Teaching nuclear power requires an expert to communicate a significant number of abstract concepts from diverse disciplines, and assemble these into a larger intellectual framework for the students. Scholarly education research, particularly in individual science disciplines, has provided significant advances in teaching core subject material by breaking away from traditional lecturing. Thus far, however,little work has applied these results to introductory nuclear power classes. This paper explores a method of engaging introductory nuclear students deeply by using a combination of Socratic and mastery methods of teaching. Students develop conceptual understanding of the material through the group work and the use of diverse resources, including textbooks, online references, and computer models that encourage free exploration of these concepts. Marks have improved considerably, and students engage with the material at a significantly deeper level than in previous lecture-based iterations of this course. (author)

  20. Staffing in Radiotherapy: An Activity Based Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy requires competent professional staff to ensure safe and effective patient treatment and management. There is a need to provide guidelines that recommend appropriate staffing levels to support the initiation of new services as well as the expansion or upgrade of existing services as even simple upgrades or replacement of existing equipment may have a significant impact on staffing needs. Similarly, the introduction of education and training programmes will require staffing adjustments. A calculation algorithm was developed to predict staffing levels based on the inputs that are known or can be easily estimated. This publication complements other IAEA publications used to support the initiation of basic radiation medicine services including Setting up a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects, published in 2008

  1. Research-based approaches to nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donev, J.M.K.C.; Carpenter, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching nuclear power requires an expert to communicate a significant number of abstract concepts from diverse disciplines, and assemble these into a larger intellectual framework for the students. Scholarly education research, particularly in individual science disciplines, has provided significant advances in teaching core subject material by breaking away from traditional lecturing. Thus far, however,little work has applied these results to introductory nuclear power classes. This paper explores a method of engaging introductory nuclear students deeply by using a combination of Socratic and mastery methods of teaching. Students develop conceptual understanding of the material through the group work and the use of diverse resources, including textbooks, online references, and computer models that encourage free exploration of these concepts. Marks have improved considerably, and students engage with the material at a significantly deeper level than in previous lecture-based iterations of this course. (author)

  2. Anti-pancreatic cancer deliverables from sea: first-hand evidence on the efficacy, molecular targets and mode of action for multifarious polyphenols from five different brown-algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeja Aravindan

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC remains the fourth leading cause of cancer death with an unacceptable survival that has remained relatively unchanged over the past 25 years. The presence of occult or clinical metastases at the time of diagnosis together with the lack of effective chemotherapies pose a dire need for designing new and targeted therapeutic deliverables that favors the clinical outcome. Herein, we investigated the anti-tumorigenic potential of polyphenols from five different brown-algae in human PC cells (MiaPaCa-2, Panc-1, BXPC-3 and Panc-3.27. Total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC analysis on stepwise polyphenol separations with increasing polarity (Hexane-DCM-EA-methanol identified high levels of TAC in DCM and EA extractions across all seaweeds assessed. All DCM and EA separated polyphenols induced a dose-dependent and sustained (time-independent inhibition of cell proliferation and viability. Further, these polyphenols profoundly enhanced DNA damage (acridine orange/Ethidium bromide staining and DNA fragmentation in all the cell lines investigated. More importantly, luciferase reporter assay revealed a significant inhibition of NFκB transcription in cells treated with polyphenols. Interestingly, QPCR analysis identified a differential yet definite regulation of pro-tumorigenic EGFR, VEGFA, AKT, hTERT, kRas, Bcl2, FGFα and PDGFα transcription in cells treated with DCM and EA polyphenols. Immunoblotting validates the inhibitory potential of seaweed polyphenols in EGFR phosphorylation, kRas, AurKβ and Stat3. Together, these data suggest that intermediate polarity based fractions of seaweed polyphenols may significantly potentiate tumor cell killing and may serve as potential drug deliverable for PC cure. More Studies dissecting out the active constituents in potent fractions, mechanisms of action and synergism, if any, are warranted and are currently in process.

  3. Arts-based and creative approaches to dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a review of arts-based and creative approaches to dementia care as an alternative to antipsychotic medications. While use of antipsychotics may be appropriate for some people, the literature highlights the success of creative approaches and the benefits of their lack of negative side effects associated with antipsychotics. The focus is the use of biographical approaches, music, dance and movement to improve wellbeing, enhance social networks, support inclusive practice and enable participation. Staff must be trained to use these approaches. A case study is presented to demonstrate how creative approaches can be implemented in practice and the outcomes that can be expected when used appropriately.

  4. Information theory based approaches to cellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltermann, Christian; Klipp, Edda

    2011-10-01

    Cells interact with their environment and they have to react adequately to internal and external changes such changes in nutrient composition, physical properties like temperature or osmolarity and other stresses. More specifically, they must be able to evaluate whether the external change is significant or just in the range of noise. Based on multiple external parameters they have to compute an optimal response. Cellular signaling pathways are considered as the major means of information perception and transmission in cells. Here, we review different attempts to quantify information processing on the level of individual cells. We refer to Shannon entropy, mutual information, and informal measures of signaling pathway cross-talk and specificity. Information theory in systems biology has been successfully applied to identification of optimal pathway structures, mutual information and entropy as system response in sensitivity analysis, and quantification of input and output information. While the study of information transmission within the framework of information theory in technical systems is an advanced field with high impact in engineering and telecommunication, its application to biological objects and processes is still restricted to specific fields such as neuroscience, structural and molecular biology. However, in systems biology dealing with a holistic understanding of biochemical systems and cellular signaling only recently a number of examples for the application of information theory have emerged. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Systems Biology of Microorganisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ethics education for health professionals: a values based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbold, Rosemary; Lees, Amanda

    2013-11-01

    It is now widely accepted that ethics is an essential part of educating health professionals. Despite a clear mandate to educators, there are differing approaches, in particular, how and where ethics is positioned in training programmes, underpinning philosophies and optimal modes of assessment. This paper explores varying practices and argues for a values based approach to ethics education. It then explores the possibility of using a web-based technology, the Values Exchange, to facilitate a values based approach. It uses the findings of a small scale study to signal the potential of the Values Exchange for engaging, meaningful and applied ethics education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interteaching: An Evidence-Based Approach to Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas Wade; Killingsworth, Kenneth; Alavosius, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes "interteaching" as an evidence-based method of instruction. Instructors often rely on more traditional approaches, such as lectures, as means to deliver instruction. Despite high usage, these methods are ineffective at achieving desirable academic outcomes. We discuss an innovative approach to delivering instruction…

  7. [Evidence-based medicine: an approach without any weakness?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, A F

    2000-04-06

    Evidence-based medicine is a methodological approach giving access to the best information derived from clinical research for an individual patient. It requires the formulation of a question, a strategy to search for the best information, the selection of the latter, its critical appraisal and its application to the patient. The qualities, but also the limitations of this approach are discussed.

  8. On the antifungal mode of action of tridemorph

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkenaar, A.; Barug, D.; Kaars Sijpesteijn, A.

    1979-01-01

    Tridemorph (2,6-dimethyl-N-tridecylmorpholine) was active against representative of nearly all taxonomic groups of fungi; gram-positive bacteria were also sensitive although gram-negative were not. Tridemorph, 3–10 μg/ml, inhibited the multiplication of sporidia of Ustilago maydis more strongly than

  9. Antibacterial Activity and Mode of Action of Mentha arvensis Ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and protein leakage from the bacterial cells induced by the extract were also evaluated. .... as well as MIC/MBC values of the extract were calculated. The results of the disc diffusion assay .... This work was supported by grants from the. Science and Technology Innovation Fund of.

  10. THE MODE OF ACTION OF SULFANILAMIDE ON STREPTOCOCCUS. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, F P; Clark, A R; Street, J A; Miles, D W

    1939-04-30

    The precise mode of therapeutic action of sulfanilamide on streptococcus can be arrived at only by considering the sum total of factors that inhibit or favor the natural growth of the microorganism under the experimental conditions that obtain, whether in vivo or in vitro. Too sweeping conclusions have hitherto been drawn from the study of a single variable factor, such as an unfavorable temperature or the absence or presence of peptone. We have attempted here to analyze the factors that have hitherto been recognized and some new ones, but particularly the relationship of these factors to one another. The result obtained on adding sulfanilamide to the streptococcus in the test tube is usually bacteriostasis and not complete destruction of even small numbers of bacteria. This is on the condition that the suspending medium is a favorable one for the growth of the microorganism; the more growth-promoting the medium is the less the bacteriostasis. If, on the other hand, the medium is too poor, or one that in itself inhibits growth, the addition of sulfanilamide may lead to sterilization of the culture. The conditions for growth of the streptococcus in the body of the rabbit or mouse, depend on the strain of bacteria used, but are on the whole favorable. Defence, however, in the form of phagocytosis by both polymorphonuclear and by mononuclear cells is attempted even in the susceptible animal. When sulfanilamide is used to treat such an animal, or when sulfanilamide-grown (inhibited) streptococci are employed, phagocytosis is pronounced, whether studied in the test tube or in the animal body. In the rabbit the delay by sulfanilamide and resultant increased phagocytosis by polymorphonuclears allows mononuclear cells to accumulate and recovery may result. Sulfanilamide not only does not completely destroy the streptococcus but does not even impair its innate virulence. It acts upon the streptococcus not only by inhibiting growth but by a temporary inhibition of hemotoxin formation, but only under certain conditions. The drug does not neutralize hemotoxin already formed. No significant effect of sulfanilamide on the formation of leucocidin or fibrinolysin by streptococcus has been evident in our experiments. Sulfanilamide differs in one important respect from other drugs that are destructive either in the test tube or actually in the body, for protozoa and bacteria. Protozoa fix or adsorb arsenicals and acriflavine that kill them variably in vitro and in vivo. Streptococci fix both gentian violet and acriflavine, which dyes have marked destructive action in the test tube but are less effective in vivo. Sulfanilamide is not diminished at all by contact in vitro with large masses of streptococci, nor does the action of this drug render the microorganism more capable than untreated cocci to adsorb gentian violet or acriflavine, or to be destroyed by these highly bactericidal substances.

  11. Digital food activism: Values, expertise and modes of action

    OpenAIRE

    Eli, Karin; Schneider, Tanja; Dolan, Catherine; Ulijaszek, Stanley

    2018-01-01

    New information and communication technologies (ICTs) increasingly enable social action and civic organisation, on both local and global scales. Ranging from social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, to mobile apps such as Buycott, and to data sharing wiki platforms and hacktivist projects, the activist landscape is rapidly shifting, collapsing geographic boundaries to form new issue publics and fast, sometimes mercurial, collective action. Within these emerging digital platforms f...

  12. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes: Insecticidal activity, mammalian toxicity, and mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsham, M.A.; Palmer, C.J.; Cole, L.M.; Casida, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    4-Ethynyl- and 4-(prop-1-ynyl)phenylsilatranes [N(CH 2 CH 2 O) 3 SiR, R = C 6 H 4 -4-C triple-bond CH or C 6 H 4 -4-C triple-bond CCH 3 ] are highly toxic to houseflies (pretreated with piperonyl butoxide) and milkweed bugs (topical LD 50 s 3-14 μg/g) and to mice (intraperitoneal LD 50 s 0.4-0.9 mg/kg), and they are moderately potent inhibitors of the [ 35 S]-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate or TBPS binding site (GABA-gated chloride channel) of mouse brain membranes. Scatchard analysis indicates noncompetitive interaction of 4-ethynylphenylsilatrane with the TBPS binding site. Phenylsilatrane analogues with 4-substituents of H, CH 3 , Cl, Br, and C triple-bond CSi(CH 3 ) 3 are highly toxic to mice but have little or no activity in the insect and receptor assays. Radioligand binding studies with [4- 3 H]phenylsilatrane failed to reveal a specific binding site in mouse brain. Silatranes with R = H, CH 3 , CH 2 Cl, CH double-bond CH 2 , OCH 2 CH 3 , and C 6 H 4 -4-CH 2 CH 3 are of little or no activity in the insect and mouse toxicity and TBPS binding site assays as are the trithia and monocyclic analogues of phenylsilatrane. 4-Alkynylphenylsilatranes are new probes to examine the GABA receptor-ionophore complex of insects and mammals

  13. Mode of action of Fusarium moniliforme endopolygalacturonase towards acetylated pectin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnin, E.; Alebeek, van G.J.W.M.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Thibault, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Endopolygalacturonase from Fusarium moniliforme was used to degrade acetylated homogalacturonan previously prepared from sugar beet pulp. The initial velocity and the final percentage of hydrolysis decreased-very rapidly with increasing degree of acetylation, showing that acetyl substitution

  14. Light Regulation of Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Mode of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martinez, José Luis; Gil, Joan

    2001-12-01

    Some phenotypic effects produced in plants by light are very similar to those induced by hormones. In this review, the light-gibberellin (GA) interaction in germination, de-etiolation, stem growth, and tuber formation (process regulated by GAs) are discussed. Germination of lettuce and Arabidopsis seeds depends on red irradiation (R), which enhances the expression of GA 3-oxidase genes (GA3ox) and leads to an increase in active GA content. De-etiolation of pea seedling alters the expression of GA20ox and GA3ox genes and induces a rapid decrease of GA1 content. Stem growth of green plants is also affected by diverse light irradiation characteristics. Low light intensity increases stem elongation and active GA content in pea and Brassica. Photoperiod controls active GA levels in long-day rosette (spinach and Silene) and in woody plants (Salix and hybrid aspen) by regulating different steps of GA biosynthesis, mainly through transcript levels of GA20ox and GA3ox genes. Light modulation of stem elongation in light-grown plants is controlled by phytochrome, which modifies GA biosynthesis and catabolism (tobacco, potato, cowpea, Arabidopsis) and GA-response (pea, cucumber, Arabidopsis). In Arabidopsis and tobacco, ATH1 (a gene encoding an homeotic transcription factor) is a positive mediator of a phyB-specific signal transduction cascade controlling GA levels by regulating the expression of GA20ox and GA3ox. Tuber formation in potato is controlled by photoperiod (through phyB) and GAs. Inductive short-day conditions alter the diurnal rhythm of GA20ox transcript abundance, and increases the expression of a new protein (PHOR1) that plays a role in the photoperiod-GA interaction.

  15. Mode of action of Organotins in Immune cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, P.J.M.; Schmeits, P.C.J.; Loveren, van H.; Shao, J.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses mainly on the effects of organotin compounds in various human and animal models and describes the research performed to elucidate the immunotoxic mechanism of action of organotin compounds. Both dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltins (TBT) organotin compounds can cause atrophy of the

  16. Mode of Action and Synergy of Ceftazidime and Baicalein against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research April 2015; 14 (4): 641-648 ... Results: The MIC of ceftazidime and baicalein against all the S. pyogenes strains were 0.50 and >. 256.0 µg/ml, respectively. .... against the S. pyogenes and S. aureus strains were performed ..... Resistance Genes and Some Virulence Factors in.

  17. Vasodilatation with pinacidil. Mode of action in rat resistance vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videbaek, L.M.; Aalkjaer, C.; Mulvany, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Pinacidil is a newly developed antihypertensive vasodilator, proposed to belong to the new group of smooth muscle relaxants, the K+ channel openers. The in vitro effects of pinacidil on induced tone, smooth muscle membrane potential and 86 Rb and 42 K efflux from rat resistance vessels (internal diameter about 200 microns) were studied. Tone induced with noradrenaline was concentration-dependently inhibited by pinacidil. Responses to electrical field stimulation were also inhibited. However, tone induced with high K+ depolarization, noradrenaline in the presence of high K+, caffeine-induced contractions and noradrenaline contractions in the presence of felodipine were little affected by pinacidil. Pinacidil caused concentration-dependent hyperpolarisation of the resting smooth muscle. Pinacidil caused only a small and transient increase of the 86 Rb efflux rate constant, while the same concentrations of pinacidil produced a significant increase in the 42 K efflux rate constant. Our results seem to indicate that the relaxant effect of pinacidil is the result of an increase in K+ permeability, thus causing hyperpolarisation and relaxation. The opened K+ channels appear to be selective for K+ over Rb+

  18. [Modes of action of agrochemicals against plant pathogenic organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The chemical control of plant pathogens concerns mainly fungal diseases of crops. Most of the available fungicides act directly on essential fungal functions such as respiration, sterol biosynthesis or cell division. Consequently, these compounds can exhibit undesirable toxicological and environmental effects and sometimes select fungal resistant strains. Plant activators are expected to provide sustainable disease management in several crops because the development of resistance is not expected. Considering the future, the discovery of novel antifungal molecules will reap advantage from throughput screening methodologies and functional genomics.

  19. Mode of Action and Synergy of Ceftazidime and Baicalein against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research April 2015; 14 (4): 641-648 ... Revised accepted: 26 March 2015 ... Keywords: Streptococcus pyogenes, Cytoplasmic membrane permeability, ..... destroyed, with a resultant leak in the plasma.

  20. Neurotoxicological effects and the mode of action of pyrethroid insecticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, H.P.M.; Bercken, Joep van den

    1990-01-01

    Neuroexcitatory symptoms of acute poisoning of vertebrates by pyrethroids are related to the ability of these insecticides to modify electrical activity in various parts of the nervous system. Repetitive nerve activity, particularly in the sensory nervous system, membrane depolarization, and

  1. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  2. Peptide antibiotics: discovery, modes of action, and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dutton, Christopher J

    2002-01-01

    ... and the application of biotechnology to many aspects of their development. While the origins of the peptides covered in this book are diverse, common themes can be readily identified. Peptides originally found in frogs and insects are now produced by bacterial fermentation, and site-directed mutagenesis has been brought to bear to produce novel ...

  3. Biostimulation of grapevine : mode of action and possible agronomic uses

    OpenAIRE

    Krzyzaniak, Yuko; Trouvelot, Sophie; Heloir, Marie-Claire; Fourquez, P.; Magnin-Robert, Jean-Bernard; Randoux, B.; Siah, A.; Halama, Patrice; Moreau, Emmanuelle; Adrian, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Although there is a growing interest for the use of biostimulants in agriculture, only few methods allowing a precise description of their effects on plants have been reported. In the IRIS+ FUI project, two major and highly different worldwide crops, wheat (annual, monocotyledon) and grapevine (perennial, broadleaf), were chosen to deepen our knowledge of such compounds and explore their potential additional interest. The first objective is to develop in greenhouse conditions, a panel of tool...

  4. Mode of Action and Synergy of Ceftazidime and Baicalein against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytoplasmic membrane (CM) permeability technique, enzyme assays, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transforminfrared microspectroscopy were used to investigate the changes in the bacterial biomolecules. Results: The MIC of ceftazidime and baicalein against all the S. pyogenes strains were 0.50 and ...

  5. Modes of Action of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Bullous Pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Culton, Donna; Diaz, Luis A; Liu, Zhi

    2018-06-01

    Bullous pemphigoid is an autoantibody-mediated skin blistering disease. Previous studies revealed that intravenous Ig is therapeutic in animal models of bullous pemphigoid by saturating the IgG-protective receptor FcRn, thereby accelerating degradation of pathogenic IgG. Sasaoka et al. demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of intravenous Ig on bullous pemphigoid are also associated with negative modulation of cytokine production by keratinocytes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ecdysone Agonist: New Insecticides with Novel Mode of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Andi Trisyono

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of insect resistance to insecticide has been the major driving force for the development of new insecticides. Awareness and demand from public for more environmentally friendly insecticides have contributed in shifting the trend from using broad spectrum to selective insecticides. As a result, scientists have looked for new target sites beyond the nervous system. Insect growth regulators (IGRs are more selective insecticides than conventional insecticides, and ecdysone agonists are the newest IGRs being commercialized, e.g. tebufenozide, methoxyfenozide, and halofenozide. Ecdysone agonists bind to the ecdysteroid receptors, and they act similarly to the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. The binding provides larvae or nymphs with a signal to enter a premature and lethal molting cycle. In addition, the ecdysone agonists cause a reduction in the number of eggs laid by female insects. The ecdysone agonists are being developed as selective biorational insecticides. Tebufenozide and methoxyfenozide are used to control lepidopteran insect pests, whereas halofenozide is being used to control coleopteran insect pests. Their selectivity is due to differences in the binding affinity between these compounds to the receptors in insects from different orders. The selectivity of these compounds makes them candidates to be used in combinations with other control strategies to develop integrated pest management programs in agricultural ecosystems. Key words: new insecticides, selectivity, ecdysone agonists

  7. Hyperthermic radiosensitization : mode of action and clinical relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, HH; Dikomey, E

    Purpose: To provide an update on the recent knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of thermal radiosensitization and its possible relevance to thermoradiotherapy. Summary: Hyperthermia is probably the most potent cellular radiosensitizer known to date. Heat interacts with radiation and potentiates

  8. Mode of action of plant defensins suggests therapeutic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Cammue, B.P.A.; Thevissen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Higher vertebrates can rely both on an innate as well as an adaptive immune system for defense against invading pathogens. In contrast, plants can only employ an innate immune system that largely depends on the production of antimicrobial compounds such as plant defensins and other

  9. Mosquitocidal Activity and Mode of Action of the Isoxazoline Fluralaner

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Shiyao; Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R.; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Mosquitoes, such as Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae, are important vectors of human diseases. Fluralaner, a recently introduced parasiticide, was evaluated as a mosquitocide in this study. On Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae fourth-instar larvae, fluralaner had 24-h LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% mortality) values of 1.8 ppb and 0.4 ppb, respectively. Following topical application to adult Ae. aegypti, fluralaner toxicity reached a plateau in about 3 days, with 1- and 3-day LD50 (lethal do...

  10. Mosquitocidal Activity and Mode of Action of the Isoxazoline Fluralaner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shiyao; Tsikolia, Maia; Bernier, Ulrich R; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2017-02-06

    Mosquitoes, such as Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae , are important vectors of human diseases. Fluralaner, a recently introduced parasiticide, was evaluated as a mosquitocide in this study. On Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae fourth-instar larvae, fluralaner had 24-h LC 50 (lethal concentration for 50% mortality) values of 1.8 ppb and 0.4 ppb, respectively. Following topical application to adult Ae. aegypti , fluralaner toxicity reached a plateau in about 3 days, with 1- and 3-day LD 50 (lethal dose for 50% mortality) values of 1.3 ng/mg and 0.26 ng/mg, suggesting a slowly developing toxicity. Fipronil outperformed fluralaner by up to 100-fold in adult topical, glass contact, and feeding assays on Ae. aegypti . These data show that fluralaner does not have exceptional toxicity to mosquitoes in typical exposure paradigms. In electrophysiological recordings on Drosophila melanogaster larval central nervous system, the effectiveness of fluralaner for restoring nerve firing after gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment, a measure of GABA antagonism, was similar in susceptible Oregon-R and cyclodiene-resistant rdl -1675 strains, with EC 50 (half maximal effective concentration) values of 0.34 µM and 0.29 µM. Although this finding suggests low cross resistance in the presence of rdl , the moderate potency, low contact activity, and slow action of fluralaner argue against its use as an adult mosquitocide for vector control.

  11. Mosquitocidal Activity and Mode of Action of the Isoxazoline Fluralaner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyao Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes, such as Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae, are important vectors of human diseases. Fluralaner, a recently introduced parasiticide, was evaluated as a mosquitocide in this study. On Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae fourth-instar larvae, fluralaner had 24-h LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% mortality values of 1.8 ppb and 0.4 ppb, respectively. Following topical application to adult Ae. aegypti, fluralaner toxicity reached a plateau in about 3 days, with 1- and 3-day LD50 (lethal dose for 50% mortality values of 1.3 ng/mg and 0.26 ng/mg, suggesting a slowly developing toxicity. Fipronil outperformed fluralaner by up to 100-fold in adult topical, glass contact, and feeding assays on Ae. aegypti. These data show that fluralaner does not have exceptional toxicity to mosquitoes in typical exposure paradigms. In electrophysiological recordings on Drosophila melanogaster larval central nervous system, the effectiveness of fluralaner for restoring nerve firing after gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA treatment, a measure of GABA antagonism, was similar in susceptible Oregon-R and cyclodiene-resistant rdl-1675 strains, with EC50 (half maximal effective concentration values of 0.34 µM and 0.29 µM. Although this finding suggests low cross resistance in the presence of rdl, the moderate potency, low contact activity, and slow action of fluralaner argue against its use as an adult mosquitocide for vector control.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of GN peptides and their mode of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Jenssen, Håvard

    2016-01-01

    peptides due to their characteristics as naturally derived compounds with antimicrobial activity. In this study, we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of a small set of in silico optimized peptides. Following determination of peptide activity against E. coli, S. aureus, and P. aeruginosa......Increasing prevalence of bacteria that carries resistance towards conventional antibiotics has prompted the investigation into new compounds for bacterial intervention to ensure efficient infection control in the future. One group of potential lead structures for antibiotics is antimicrobial...

  13. Leisure market segmentation : an integrated preferences/constraints-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemerding, M.P.; Oppewal, H.; Beckers, T.A.M.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Traditional segmentation schemes are often based on a grouping of consumers with similar preference functions. The research steps, ultimately leading to such segmentation schemes, are typically independent. In the present article, a new integrated approach to segmentation is introduced, which

  14. Agile Service Development: A Rule-Based Method Engineering Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Martijn Zoet; Stijn Hoppenbrouwers; Inge van de Weerd; Johan Versendaal

    2011-01-01

    Agile software development has evolved into an increasingly mature software development approach and has been applied successfully in many software vendors’ development departments. In this position paper, we address the broader agile service development. Based on method engineering principles we

  15. An improved Hough transform-based fingerprint alignment approach

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mlambo, CS

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An improved Hough Transform based fingerprint alignment approach is presented, which improves computing time and memory usage with accurate alignment parameter (rotation and translation) results. This is achieved by studying the strengths...

  16. A sampling-based approach to probabilistic pursuit evasion

    KAUST Repository

    Mahadevan, Aditya; Amato, Nancy M.

    2012-01-01

    Probabilistic roadmaps (PRMs) are a sampling-based approach to motion-planning that encodes feasible paths through the environment using a graph created from a subset of valid positions. Prior research has shown that PRMs can be augmented

  17. Poverty reduction Approaches in Kenya: Assessing the Usefulness of the Right Based Approach in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wambua Leonard Munyao, Ph.D

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available While billions of dollars have been spent in development projects in least developed countries, poverty continues to increase. This study proposes human-rights based approach to poverty eradication. To this end, the study seeks to assess the key determinants of use of rights- based approaches to poverty reduction and it’s usefulness in Kenya with special reference to NGOs in Kibera. The study further high lights some of the basic skills of implementing the rights based approach to poverty reduction. The attempts to establish the proportion of NGOs applying rights based approach to poverty reduction in Kibera Division as well. The review of relevant literature has been undertaken and a field study done. The study is informed by a qualitative human rights framework.

  18. User-based and Cognitive Approaches to Knowledge Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2013-01-01

    ’s PageRank are not based on the empirical studies of users. In knowledge organization, the Book House System is one example of a system based on user studies. In cognitive science the important WordNet database is claimed to be based on psychological research. This article considers such examples......In the 1970s and 1980s, forms of user-based and cognitive approaches to knowledge organization came to the forefront as part of the overall development in library and information science and in the broader society. The specific nature of userbased approaches is their basis in the empirical studies...

  19. A model-data based systems approach to process intensification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    . Their developments, however, are largely due to experiment based trial and error approaches and while they do not require validation, they can be time consuming and resource intensive. Also, one may ask, can a truly new intensified unit operation be obtained in this way? An alternative two-stage approach is to apply...... a model-based synthesis method to systematically generate and evaluate alternatives in the first stage and an experiment-model based validation in the second stage. In this way, the search for alternatives is done very quickly, reliably and systematically over a wide range, while resources are preserved...... for focused validation of only the promising candidates in the second-stage. This approach, however, would be limited to intensification based on “known” unit operations, unless the PI process synthesis/design is considered at a lower level of aggregation, namely the phenomena level. That is, the model-based...

  20. A new approach to hand-based authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amayeh, G.; Bebis, G.; Erol, A.; Nicolescu, M.

    2007-04-01

    Hand-based authentication is a key biometric technology with a wide range of potential applications both in industry and government. Traditionally, hand-based authentication is performed by extracting information from the whole hand. To account for hand and finger motion, guidance pegs are employed to fix the position and orientation of the hand. In this paper, we consider a component-based approach to hand-based verification. Our objective is to investigate the discrimination power of different parts of the hand in order to develop a simpler, faster, and possibly more accurate and robust verification system. Specifically, we propose a new approach which decomposes the hand in different regions, corresponding to the fingers and the back of the palm, and performs verification using information from certain parts of the hand only. Our approach operates on 2D images acquired by placing the hand on a flat lighting table. Using a part-based representation of the hand allows the system to compensate for hand and finger motion without using any guidance pegs. To decompose the hand in different regions, we use a robust methodology based on morphological operators which does not require detecting any landmark points on the hand. To capture the geometry of the back of the palm and the fingers in suffcient detail, we employ high-order Zernike moments which are computed using an effcient methodology. The proposed approach has been evaluated on a database of 100 subjects with 10 images per subject, illustrating promising performance. Comparisons with related approaches using the whole hand for verification illustrate the superiority of the proposed approach. Moreover, qualitative comparisons with state-of-the-art approaches indicate that the proposed approach has comparable or better performance.

  1. Knowledge-based biomedical word sense disambiguation: comparison of approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aronson Alan R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Word sense disambiguation (WSD algorithms attempt to select the proper sense of ambiguous terms in text. Resources like the UMLS provide a reference thesaurus to be used to annotate the biomedical literature. Statistical learning approaches have produced good results, but the size of the UMLS makes the production of training data infeasible to cover all the domain. Methods We present research on existing WSD approaches based on knowledge bases, which complement the studies performed on statistical learning. We compare four approaches which rely on the UMLS Metathesaurus as the source of knowledge. The first approach compares the overlap of the context of the ambiguous word to the candidate senses based on a representation built out of the definitions, synonyms and related terms. The second approach collects training data for each of the candidate senses to perform WSD based on queries built using monosemous synonyms and related terms. These queries are used to retrieve MEDLINE citations. Then, a machine learning approach is trained on this corpus. The third approach is a graph-based method which exploits the structure of the Metathesaurus network of relations to perform unsupervised WSD. This approach ranks nodes in the graph according to their relative structural importance. The last approach uses the semantic types assigned to the concepts in the Metathesaurus to perform WSD. The context of the ambiguous word and semantic types of the candidate concepts are mapped to Journal Descriptors. These mappings are compared to decide among the candidate concepts. Results are provided estimating accuracy of the different methods on the WSD test collection available from the NLM. Conclusions We have found that the last approach achieves better results compared to the other methods. The graph-based approach, using the structure of the Metathesaurus network to estimate the relevance of the Metathesaurus concepts, does not perform well

  2. Component-Based Approach in Learning Management System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Larisa; Bule, Jekaterina; Makarov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes component-based approach (CBA) for learning management system development. Learning object as components of e-learning courses and their metadata is considered. The architecture of learning management system based on CBA being developed in Riga Technical University, namely its architecture, elements and possibilities are…

  3. Rights-Based Approach: The Hub of Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choondassery, Yesudas

    2017-01-01

    A rights-based approach to the environmental issues has been gaining momentum since the United Nations' Environmental Agency proposed a new rights-based agenda for sustainable development in the document, "Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development" (UN, 2015). Our moral responsibility toward the environment is…

  4. A scenario based approach for flexible resource loading under uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wullink, Gerhard; Gademann, Noud; Hans, Elias W.; van Harten, Aart

    2003-01-01

    Order acceptance decisions in manufacture-to-order environments are often made based on incomplete or uncertain information. To promise reliable due dates and to manage resource capacity adequately, resource capacity loading is an indispensable supporting tool. We propose a scenario based approach

  5. Zero base approach to fiscal management of the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, D A; Majonos, J S

    1985-08-01

    Lab administrators who face the challenge of providing quality care while cutting costs need a way to periodically re-evaluate all lab functions and services. The guidelines presented here, based on the Zero Base Budget approach, formulate a management strategy for the lab that could lead to better fiscal planning.

  6. A GIS based hydrogeomorphic approach for identification of site ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a Geographical Information System (GIS) based hydrogeomorphic approach in the Bhatsa and. Kalu river basins of Thane district, in western DVP. The criteria adopted for the GIS analysis were based .... segments of the rivers. The majority of the lineaments correspond to either dyke ridges or stream channels which are of ...

  7. Approaches in anomaly-based network intrusion detection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolzoni, D.; Etalle, S.; Di Pietro, R.; Mancini, L.V.

    2008-01-01

    Anomaly-based network intrusion detection systems (NIDSs) can take into consideration packet headers, the payload, or a combination of both. We argue that payload-based approaches are becoming the most effective methods to detect attacks. Nowadays, attacks aim mainly to exploit vulnerabilities at

  8. Approaches in Anomaly-based Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolzoni, D.; Etalle, Sandro

    Anomaly-based network intrusion detection systems (NIDSs) can take into consideration packet headers, the payload, or a combination of both. We argue that payload-based approaches are becoming the most effective methods to detect attacks. Nowadays, attacks aim mainly to exploit vulnerabilities at

  9. A Database Approach to Content-based XML retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a rst prototype system for content-based retrieval from XML data. The system's design supports both XPath queries and complex information retrieval queries based on a language modelling approach to information retrieval. Evaluation using the INEX benchmark shows that it is

  10. Implementing Project Based Learning Approach to Graphic Design Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanti, Menul Teguh; Erwin, Tuti Nuriah; Suriani, S. H.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a learning model based Commercial Graphic Design Drafting project-based learning approach, was chosen as a strategy in the learning product development research. University students as the target audience of this model are the students of the fifth semester Visual Communications Design Studies Program…

  11. A knowledge-based approach for recognition of handwritten Pitman ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The paper describes a knowledge-based approach for the recognition of PSL strokes. Information about location and the direction of the starting point and final point of strokes are considered the knowledge base for recognition of strokes. The work comprises preprocessing, determination of starting and final points, ...

  12. A computational approach to mechanistic and predictive toxicology of pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hadrup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Emerging challenges of managing and interpreting large amounts of complex biological data have given rise to the growing field of computational biology. We investigated the applicability of an integrated systems toxicology approach on five selected pesticides to get an overview of their modes...... of action in humans, to group them according to their modes of action, and to hypothesize on their potential effects on human health. We extracted human proteins associated to prochloraz, tebuconazole, epoxiconazole, procymidone, and mancozeb and enriched each protein set by using a high confidence human......, and procymidone exerted their effects mainly via interference with steroidogenesis and nuclear receptors. Prochloraz was associated to a large number of human diseases, and together with tebuconazole showed several significant associations to Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome. Mancozeb showed a differential mode...

  13. A Brief Introduction of Task-based Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹

    2012-01-01

    The task-based language teaching approach is one of the syllabus models that have been proposed in the last twenty years or so. Task-based syllabus represent a particular realization of communicative language teaching. Task-based teaching/learning helps develop students’ communicative competence, enabling them to communicate effectively in real communicating world and engage in interaction. The most active element in the process of the task-based teaching is the learner’ creativity. By exploiting this kind of creativity, learning can be made significantly more efficient and more interesting. It is well-known that the task-based teaching/learning have a rich potential for promoting successful second language learning than the traditional teaching/learning. Task-based approach is reflected not only in China but also in some other countries, such as America, Canada, Singapore, Hong Kong and son on.

  14. Pharmacokinetics in Drug Discovery: An Exposure-Centred Approach to Optimising and Predicting Drug Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Andreas; Lienau, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The role of pharmacokinetics (PK) in drug discovery is to support the optimisation of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties of lead compounds with the ultimate goal to attain a clinical candidate which achieves a concentration-time profile in the body that is adequate for the desired efficacy and safety profile. A thorough characterisation of the lead compounds aiming at the identification of the inherent PK liabilities also includes an early generation of PK/PD relationships linking in vitro potency and target exposure/engagement with expression of pharmacological activity (mode-of-action) and efficacy in animal studies. The chapter describes an exposure-centred approach to lead generation, lead optimisation and candidate selection and profiling that focuses on a stepwise generation of an understanding between PK/exposure and PD/efficacy relationships by capturing target exposure or surrogates thereof and cellular mode-of-action readouts in vivo. Once robust PK/PD relationship in animal PD models has been constructed, it is translated to anticipate the pharmacologically active plasma concentrations in patients and the human therapeutic dose and dosing schedule which is also based on the prediction of the PK behaviour in human as described herein. The chapter outlines how the level of confidence in the predictions increases with the level of understanding of both the PK and the PK/PD of the new chemical entities (NCE) in relation to the disease hypothesis and the ability to propose safe and efficacious doses and dosing schedules in responsive patient populations. A sound identification of potential drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK)-related development risks allows proposing of an effective de-risking strategy for the progression of the project that is able to reduce uncertainties and to increase the probability of success during preclinical and clinical development.

  15. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PROCESS-BASED APPROACH TO MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urij V. Lyandau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the timeline of the approaches to management of the industrial processes and organizations in general.The Adam Smith’s idea of specialization, the Henry Ford’s conveyor and Frederick Taylor’s scientific approach created functional corporations, in which specialized departments consisted of specialized workers. Such organizational chart was optimized for every department’s tasks, which are necessary to perform.During the life cycle evolution of industrial and then informational ages external conditions of production has changed. In consequence, there was born the necessity to change key factors of the management paradigm. These changes are the transfer from the functional management to the process-based approach. The functional management was the basic type of management in many organizations during the 20th century. Only in the end of 1990 companies started to integrate the process-based approach. This conversion was born cause of special conditions that the informational age created.

  16. Computer based approach to fatigue analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comstock, T.R.; Bernard, T.; Nieb, J.

    1979-01-01

    An approach is presented which uses a mini-computer based system for data acquisition, analysis and graphic displays relative to fatigue life estimation and design. Procedures are developed for identifying an eliminating damaging events due to overall duty cycle, forced vibration and structural dynamic characteristics. Two case histories, weld failures in heavy vehicles and low cycle fan blade failures, are discussed to illustrate the overall approach. (orig.) 891 RW/orig. 892 RKD [de

  17. A New Classification Approach Based on Multiple Classification Rules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongmei Zhou

    2014-01-01

    A good classifier can correctly predict new data for which the class label is unknown, so it is important to construct a high accuracy classifier. Hence, classification techniques are much useful in ubiquitous computing. Associative classification achieves higher classification accuracy than some traditional rule-based classification approaches. However, the approach also has two major deficiencies. First, it generates a very large number of association classification rules, especially when t...

  18. Case-based approaches for knowledge application and organisational learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chengbo; Johansen, John; Luxhøj, James T.

    2005-01-01

    In dealing with the strategic issues within a manufacturing system, it is necessary to facilitate formulating the composing elements of a set of strategic manufacturing practices and activity patterns that will support an enterprise to reinforce and increase its competitive advantage....... These practices and activity patterns are based on learning and applying the knowledge internal and external to an organisation. To ensure their smooth formulation process, there are two important techniques designed – an expert adaptation approach and an expert evaluation approach. These two approaches provide...

  19. Lessons learned about art-based approaches for disseminating knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Anne; Makaroff, Kara L Schick; Sheilds, Laurene; Beuthin, Rosanne; Molzahn, Anita; Shermak, Sheryl

    2013-01-01

    To present a case example of using an arts-based approach and the development of an art exhibit to disseminate research findings from a narrative research study. Once a study has been completed, the final step of dissemination of findings is crucial. In this paper, we explore the benefits of bringing nursing research into public spaces using an arts-based approach. Findings from a qualitative narrative study exploring experiences of living with life-threatening illnesses. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 participants living with cancer, chronic renal disease, or HIV/AIDS. Participants were invited to share a symbol representing their experience of living with life-threatening illness and the meaning it held for them. The exhibit conveyed experiences of how people story and re-story their lives when living with chronic kidney disease, cancer or HIV. Photographic images of symbolic representations of study participants' experiences and poetic narratives from their stories were exhibited in a public art gallery. The theoretical underpinning of arts-based approaches and the lessons learned in creating an art exhibit from research findings are explored. Creative art forms for research and disseminating knowledge offer new ways of understanding and knowing that are under-used in nursing. Arts-based approaches make visible patients' experiences that are often left unarticulated or hidden. Creative dissemination approaches such as art exhibits can promote insight and new ways of knowing that communicate nursing research to both public and professional audiences.

  20. A Market-Based Approach to Multi-factory Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vytelingum, Perukrishnen; Rogers, Alex; MacBeth, Douglas K.; Dutta, Partha; Stranjak, Armin; Jennings, Nicholas R.

    In this paper, we report on the design of a novel market-based approach for decentralised scheduling across multiple factories. Specifically, because of the limitations of scheduling in a centralised manner - which requires a center to have complete and perfect information for optimality and the truthful revelation of potentially commercially private preferences to that center - we advocate an informationally decentralised approach that is both agile and dynamic. In particular, this work adopts a market-based approach for decentralised scheduling by considering the different stakeholders representing different factories as self-interested, profit-motivated economic agents that trade resources for the scheduling of jobs. The overall schedule of these jobs is then an emergent behaviour of the strategic interaction of these trading agents bidding for resources in a market based on limited information and their own preferences. Using a simple (zero-intelligence) bidding strategy, we empirically demonstrate that our market-based approach achieves a lower bound efficiency of 84%. This represents a trade-off between a reasonable level of efficiency (compared to a centralised approach) and the desirable benefits of a decentralised solution.

  1. Grid-based electronic structure calculations: The tensor decomposition approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhuba, M.V., E-mail: rakhuba.m@gmail.com [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Novaya St. 100, 143025 Skolkovo, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Oseledets, I.V., E-mail: i.oseledets@skoltech.ru [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Novaya St. 100, 143025 Skolkovo, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkina St. 8, 119333 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-01

    We present a fully grid-based approach for solving Hartree–Fock and all-electron Kohn–Sham equations based on low-rank approximation of three-dimensional electron orbitals. Due to the low-rank structure the total complexity of the algorithm depends linearly with respect to the one-dimensional grid size. Linear complexity allows for the usage of fine grids, e.g. 8192{sup 3} and, thus, cheap extrapolation procedure. We test the proposed approach on closed-shell atoms up to the argon, several molecules and clusters of hydrogen atoms. All tests show systematical convergence with the required accuracy.

  2. The anterior interhemispheric approach: a safe and effective approach to anterior skull base lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Dorothee; Mayfrank, Lothar; Psychogios, Marios Nikos; Rohde, Veit

    2014-04-01

    Many approaches to the anterior skull base have been reported. Frequently used are the pterional, the unilateral or bilateral frontobasal, the supraorbital and the frontolateral approach. Recently, endoscopic transnasal approaches have become more popular. The benefits of each approach has to be weighted against its complications and limitations. The aim of this study was to investigate if the anterior interhemispheric approach (AIA) could be a safe and effective alternative approach to tumorous and non-tumorous lesions of the anterior skull base. We screened the operative records of all patients with an anterior skull base lesion undergoing transcranial surgery. We have used the AIA in 61 patients. These were exclusively patients with either olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) (n = 43), ethmoidal dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) ( n = 6) or frontobasal fractures of the anterior midline with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage ( n = 12). Patient records were evaluated concerning accessibility of the lesion, realization of surgical aims (complete tumor removal, dAVF obliteration, closure of the dural tear), and approach related complications. The use of the AIA exclusively in OGMs, ethmoidal dAVFs and midline frontobasal fractures indicated that we considered lateralized frontobasal lesions not suitable to be treated successfully. If restricted to these three pathologies, the AIA is highly effective and safe. The surgical aim (complete tumor removal, complete dAVF occlusion, no rhinorrhea) was achieved in all patients. The complication rate was 11.5 % (wound infection (n = 2; 3.2 %), contusion of the genu of the corpus callosum, subdural hygroma, epileptic seizure, anosmia and asymptomatic bleed into the tumor cavity (n = 1 each). Only the contusion of the corpus callosum was directly related to the approach (1.6 %). Olfaction, if present before surgery, was preserved in all patients, except one (1.6 %). The AIA is an effective and a safe approach

  3. A multiparameter chaos control method based on OGY approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza de Paula, Aline; Amorim Savi, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    Chaos control is based on the richness of responses of chaotic behavior and may be understood as the use of tiny perturbations for the stabilization of a UPO embedded in a chaotic attractor. Since one of these UPO can provide better performance than others in a particular situation the use of chaos control can make this kind of behavior to be desirable in a variety of applications. The OGY method is a discrete technique that considers small perturbations promoted in the neighborhood of the desired orbit when the trajectory crosses a specific surface, such as a Poincare section. This contribution proposes a multiparameter semi-continuous method based on OGY approach in order to control chaotic behavior. Two different approaches are possible with this method: coupled approach, where all control parameters influences system dynamics although they are not active; and uncoupled approach that is a particular case where control parameters return to the reference value when they become passive parameters. As an application of the general formulation, it is investigated a two-parameter actuation of a nonlinear pendulum control employing coupled and uncoupled approaches. Analyses are carried out considering signals that are generated by numerical integration of the mathematical model using experimentally identified parameters. Results show that the procedure can be a good alternative for chaos control since it provides a more effective UPO stabilization than the classical single-parameter approach.

  4. Efeito e modo de ação das bacteriocinas produzidas por Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383, ATCC 11454 e CNRZ 150 contra Listeria innocua LIN 11 Effect and mode of action of the bacterioncin produced by Lactococcus. lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383, ATCC 11454 e CNRZ 150 against Listeria innocua LIN 11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izildinha MORENO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available O efeito e o modo de ação das bacteriocinas produzidas por L. lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383 e CNRZ 150 são similares à nisina de L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454. Estas bacteriocinas apresentaram um modo de ação bactericida, causando a lise de células de L. innocua LIN 11, associada ao decréscimo da absorbância e da viabilidade celular. O efeito letal foi maior para células em fase exponencial comparativamente à fase estacionária de crescimento. A adsorção dessas bacteriocinas às células de L. innocua LIN 11 foi muito rápida e influenciada pelo pH do meio de suspensão; adsorção máxima foi verificada a pH 6,0 e logo após o contato inicial. Perda completa de adsorção ocorreu em pH 2,0.The effect and mode of action of the bacteriocin produced by L. lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383 and CNRZ 150 are similar to the nisin produced by L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454. It was clearly bactericidal, and caused lysis of a strain of L. innocua LIN 11 detected by the decrease of absorbance values and the cell viability. Their lethal effect was considerably higher during the logarithmic growth when compared to the stationary phase. Adsorption developed rapidly and was influenced by the pH value of the suspension medium. Maximum adsorption was observed at pH 6,0 and immediately after initial contact and loss at pH 2,0.

  5. Human rights-based approach to unintentional injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, J Morag; Ryan, Mark Andrew

    2018-06-01

    Unintentional injury remains an important global public health issue, and efforts to address it are often hampered by a lack of visibility, leadership, funding, infrastructure, capacity and evidence of effective solutions. The growing support for a socioecological model and a systems approach to prevention-along with the acknowledgement that injury prevention can be a byproduct of salutogenic design and activities-has increased opportunities to integrate unintentional injury prevention into other health promotion and disease prevention agendas. It has also helped to integrate it into the broader human development agenda through the Sustainable Development Goals. This growing support provides new opportunities to use a human rights-based approach to address the issue. The human rights-based approach is based on the idea that all members of society have social, economic and cultural rights and that governments are responsible and accountable for upholding those rights. It incorporates a systems approach, addresses inequity and places an emphasis on the most vulnerable corners of humanity. It also leverages legal statutes and provides organisations with the opportunity to build existing international goals and benchmarks into their monitoring efforts. This paper describes the approach and highlights how it can leverage attention and investment to address current challenges for unintentional injury. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Intelligent Transportation and Evacuation Planning A Modeling-Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Naser, Arab

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation and Evacuation Planning: A Modeling-Based Approach provides a new paradigm for evacuation planning strategies and techniques. Recently, evacuation planning and modeling have increasingly attracted interest among researchers as well as government officials. This interest stems from the recent catastrophic hurricanes and weather-related events that occurred in the southeastern United States (Hurricane Katrina and Rita). The evacuation methods that were in place before and during the hurricanes did not work well and resulted in thousands of deaths. This book offers insights into the methods and techniques that allow for implementing mathematical-based, simulation-based, and integrated optimization and simulation-based engineering approaches for evacuation planning. This book also: Comprehensively discusses the application of mathematical models for evacuation and intelligent transportation modeling Covers advanced methodologies in evacuation modeling and planning Discusses principles a...

  7. An innovative approach to capability-based emergency operations planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the innovative use information technology for assisting disaster planners with an easily-accessible method for writing and improving evidence-based emergency operations plans. This process is used to identify all key objectives of the emergency response according to capabilities of the institution, community or society. The approach then uses a standardized, objective-based format, along with a consensus-based method for drafting capability-based operational-level plans. This information is then integrated within a relational database to allow for ease of access and enhanced functionality to search, sort and filter and emergency operations plan according to user need and technological capacity. This integrated approach is offered as an effective option for integrating best practices of planning with the efficiency, scalability and flexibility of modern information and communication technology.

  8. A Learning Object Approach To Evidence based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Zabin Visram; Bruce Elson; Patricia Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the philosophy, development and framework of the body of elements formulated to provide an approach to evidence-based learning sustained by Learning Objects and web based technology Due to the demands for continuous improvement in the delivery of healthcare and in the continuous endeavour to improve the quality of life, there is a continuous need for practitioner's to update their knowledge by accomplishing accredited courses. The rapid advances in medical science has mea...

  9. A rights-based approach to accessing health determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Fran

    2009-03-01

    This commentary summarizes the experience and learnings from a site visit in May 2008 to a drop-in centre for vulnerable women in downtown Cairo run by El-Shehab Institution for Comprehensive Development, which provides street outreach for the prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI). The Centre successfully provides services and support for women, many of who are displaced or refugees and are from the most marginalized areas in Cairo. Through a rights-based approach to the work, the Centre helps people living in the slums fight and win the right to access clean water, sewerage and electrical power in their communities. An individual-based approach to human rights is also used. In the last year El-Shehab have helped 67 women go to court and win their marriage rights from husbands who have abandoned them. Their approach is an example of a successful way to achieve access to basic health determinants.

  10. A Multi-Faceted Approach to Inquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudzinski, M. R.; Sikorski, J.

    2009-12-01

    In order to fully attain the benefits of inquiry-based learning, instructors who typically employ the traditional lecture format need to make several adjustments to their approach. This change in styles can be intimidating and logistically difficult to overcome. A stepwise approach to this transformation is likely to be more manageable for individual faculty or departments. In this session, we will describe several features that we are implementing in our introductory geology course with the ultimate goal of converting to an entirely inquiry-based approach. Our project is part of the Miami University initiative in the top 25 enrolled courses to move towards the “student as scholar” model for engaged learning. Some of the features we developed for our course include: student learning outcomes, student development outcomes, out-of-class content quizzes, in-class conceptests, pre-/post-course assessment, reflective knowledge surveys, and daily group activities.

  11. Non-frontal Model Based Approach to Forensic Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutta, A.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a non-frontal model based approach which ensures that a face recognition system always gets to compare images having similar view (or pose). This requires a virtual suspect reference set that consists of non-frontal suspect images having pose similar to the surveillance

  12. What does an enquiry-based approach offer undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Physiotherapy students in their final year at Stellenbosch University (SU) complete a module that follows an enquiry-based learning (EBL) approach. This module exposes them to higher-order problem solving and was developed to facilitate independent self-directed learning and improved higher-order ...

  13. PETRA - an Activity-based Approach to Travel Demand Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    This paper concerns the PETRA model developed by COWI in a project funded by the Danish Ministry of Transport, the Danish Transport Council and the Danish Energy Research Program. The model provides an alternative approach to activity based travel demand analysis that excludes the time dimension...

  14. Saccharide-based Approach to Green Metallic Nanostructure Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Sørensen, Karsten Holm; Jensen, Palle Skovhus

    A green approach to solution synthesis of metallic nanoparticles has been developed using harmless and bioapplicable chemicals as well as moderate temperatures. Metal precursors are reduced by glucose/buffers and sterically stabilized by starch. The saccharide based procedure is highly diverse pr...... producing specifically a wide range of spherical, anisotropic, metallic, semi - conductor and core-shell nanostructures....

  15. Evaluation of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach by Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra; Ekizoglu, Nihat

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of parent involvement in children's education, research clearly shows that it is difficult to effectively involve parents. This study aims to capture parents' views of a Blog Based Parent Involvement Approach (BPIA) designed to secure parent involvement in education by strengthening school-parent communication. Data…

  16. The Task-Based Approach in Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Aquilino

    2004-01-01

    The Task-Based Approach (TBA) has gained popularity in the field of language teaching since the last decade of the 20th Century and significant scholars have joined the discussion and increased the amount of analytical studies on the issue. Nevertheless experimental research is poor, and the tendency of some of the scholars is nowadays shifting…

  17. A Project-based Learning approach for teaching Robotics to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research we used a project-based learning approach to teach robotics basics to undergraduate business computing students. The course coverage includes basic electronics, robot construction and programming using arduino. Students developed and tested a robot prototype. The project was evaluated using a ...

  18. Effect of the inquiry-based teaching approach on students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experimental group was treated with a teaching approach that integrated inquiry-based teaching into classroom discourse. Tests (pre- and post-), for assessing students' understanding of circle theorems and a questionnaire for measuring the students' perception of motivation to learn were given to the two groups ...

  19. Predicting footbridge vibrations using a probability-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Frier, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vibrations in footbridges may be problematic as excessive vibrations may occur as a result of actions of pedestrians. Design-stage predictions of levels of footbridge vibration to the action of a pedestrian are useful and have been employed for many years based on a deterministic approach to mode...

  20. Intelligent assembly time analysis, using a digital knowledge based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Y.; Curran, R.; Butterfield, J.; Burke, R.; Welch, B.

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of effective time analysis methods fast and accurately in the era of digital manufacturing has become a significant challenge for aerospace manufacturers hoping to build and maintain a competitive advantage. This paper proposes a structure oriented, knowledge-based approach for

  1. Binaural speech enhancement using a codebook based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavalekalam, Mathew Shaji; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Boldt, Jesper B.

    2016-01-01

    term predictor (STP) parameters using a codebook based approach, when we have access to binaural noisy signals. The estimated STP parameters are subsequently used for enhancement in a dual channel scenario. Objective measures indicate, that the proposed method is able to improve the speech...

  2. From Equation to Inequality Using a Function-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verikios, Petros; Farmaki, Vassiliki

    2010-01-01

    This article presents features of a qualitative research study concerning the teaching and learning of school algebra using a function-based approach in a grade 8 class, of 23 students, in 26 lessons, in a state school of Athens, in the school year 2003-2004. In this article, we are interested in the inequality concept and our aim is to…

  3. A sampling-based approach to probabilistic pursuit evasion

    KAUST Repository

    Mahadevan, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Probabilistic roadmaps (PRMs) are a sampling-based approach to motion-planning that encodes feasible paths through the environment using a graph created from a subset of valid positions. Prior research has shown that PRMs can be augmented with useful information to model interesting scenarios related to multi-agent interaction and coordination. © 2012 IEEE.

  4. Effect of the inquiry-based teaching approach on students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    mathematics as a vital tool for the understanding and application of science and .... In view of senior high school students' poor performance in circle theorems and their ..... taught using the inquiry-based approach on the other hand perceive their .... visualization and spatial reasoning to middle school mathematics students.

  5. Tennis: Applied Examples of a Game-Based Teaching Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Miguel; Reid, Machar M.; Miley, Dave

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors reveal that tennis has been increasingly taught with a tactical model or game-based approach, which emphasizes learning through practice in match-like drills and actual play, rather than in practicing strokes for exact technical execution. Its goal is to facilitate the player's understanding of the tactical, physical…

  6. An Approach to Quality Estimation in Model-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegaard, Jens Peter; Koch, Peter; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2004-01-01

    We present an approach to estimation of parameters for design space exploration in Model-Based Development, where synthesis of a system is done in two stages. Component qualities like space, execution time or power consumption are defined in a repository by platform dependent values. Connectors...

  7. Development of Scientific Approach Based on Discovery Learning Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellizar, E.; Hardeli, H.; Beltris, S.; Suharni, R.

    2018-04-01

    Scientific Approach is a learning process, designed to make the students actively construct their own knowledge through stages of scientific method. The scientific approach in learning process can be done by using learning modules. One of the learning model is discovery based learning. Discovery learning is a learning model for the valuable things in learning through various activities, such as observation, experience, and reasoning. In fact, the students’ activity to construct their own knowledge were not optimal. It’s because the available learning modules were not in line with the scientific approach. The purpose of this study was to develop a scientific approach discovery based learning module on Acid Based, also on electrolyte and non-electrolyte solution. The developing process of this chemistry modules use the Plomp Model with three main stages. The stages are preliminary research, prototyping stage, and the assessment stage. The subject of this research was the 10th and 11th Grade of Senior High School students (SMAN 2 Padang). Validation were tested by the experts of Chemistry lecturers and teachers. Practicality of these modules had been tested through questionnaire. The effectiveness had been tested through experimental procedure by comparing student achievement between experiment and control groups. Based on the findings, it can be concluded that the developed scientific approach discovery based learning module significantly improve the students’ learning in Acid-based and Electrolyte solution. The result of the data analysis indicated that the chemistry module was valid in content, construct, and presentation. Chemistry module also has a good practicality level and also accordance with the available time. This chemistry module was also effective, because it can help the students to understand the content of the learning material. That’s proved by the result of learning student. Based on the result can conclude that chemistry module based on

  8. Adjoint current-based approaches to prostate brachytherapy optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J. A.; Henderson, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper builds on previous work done at the Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison to employ the adjoint concept of nuclear reactor physics in the so-called greedy heuristic of brachytherapy optimization. Whereas that previous work focused on the adjoint flux, i.e. the importance, this work has included use of the adjoint current to increase the amount of information available in optimizing. Two current-based approaches were developed for 2-D problems, and each was compared to the most recent form of the flux-based methodology. The first method aimed to take a treatment plan from the flux-based greedy heuristic and adjust via application of the current-displacement, or a vector displacement based on a combination of tissue (adjoint) and seed (forward) currents acting as forces on a seed. This method showed promise in improving key urethral and rectal dosimetric quantities. The second method uses the normed current-displacement as the greedy criterion such that seeds are placed in regions of least force. This method, coupled with the dose-update scheme, generated treatment plans with better target irradiation and sparing of the urethra and normal tissues than the flux-based approach. Tables of these parameters are given for both approaches. In summary, these preliminary results indicate adjoint current methods are useful in optimization and further work in 3-D should be performed. (authors)

  9. EVALUATING HUMAN CAPITAL IN A KNOWLEDGE – BASED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanoil MUSCALU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The widespread enthusiasm for a knowledge-based approach to understanding the nature of a business and the possible basis for sustained competitive advantage have renewed interest in human capital evaluation or measurement. While many attempts have been made to develop methods for measuring intellectual capital, none have been widely adopted in the business world. In the knowledge-based organizations, and generally, in the information society, human capital is recognized as the fundamental factor of overall progress, and experts agree that long-term investment in human capital has strong drive-propagation effects at the individual, organizational, national and global level. In this paper, we consider that a knowledge-based approach can offer new possibilities and answers to illustrate the importance of evaluation the human capital and knowledge assets by consistently generating added value in the business world.

  10. Surrogate based approaches to parameter inference in ocean models

    KAUST Repository

    Knio, Omar

    2016-01-06

    This talk discusses the inference of physical parameters using model surrogates. Attention is focused on the use of sampling schemes to build suitable representations of the dependence of the model response on uncertain input data. Non-intrusive spectral projections and regularized regressions are used for this purpose. A Bayesian inference formalism is then applied to update the uncertain inputs based on available measurements or observations. To perform the update, we consider two alternative approaches, based on the application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods or of adjoint-based optimization techniques. We outline the implementation of these techniques to infer dependence of wind drag, bottom drag, and internal mixing coefficients.

  11. Surrogate based approaches to parameter inference in ocean models

    KAUST Repository

    Knio, Omar

    2016-01-01

    This talk discusses the inference of physical parameters using model surrogates. Attention is focused on the use of sampling schemes to build suitable representations of the dependence of the model response on uncertain input data. Non-intrusive spectral projections and regularized regressions are used for this purpose. A Bayesian inference formalism is then applied to update the uncertain inputs based on available measurements or observations. To perform the update, we consider two alternative approaches, based on the application of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods or of adjoint-based optimization techniques. We outline the implementation of these techniques to infer dependence of wind drag, bottom drag, and internal mixing coefficients.

  12. Problems and Projects Based Approach For Analog Electronic Circuits' Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahé Nerguizian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available New educational methods and approaches are recently introduced and implemented at several North American and European universities using Problems and Projects Based Approach (PPBA. The PPBA employs a teaching technique based mostly on competences/skills rather than only on knowledge. This method has been implemented and proven by several pedagogical instructors and authors at several educational institutions. This approach is used at different disciplines such as medicine, biology, engineering and many others. It has the advantage to improve the student's skills and the knowledge retention rate, and reflects the 21st century industrial/company needs and demands. Before implementing this approach to a course, a good resources preparation and planning is needed upfront by the responsible or instructor of the course to achieve the course and students related objectives. This paper presents the preparation, the generated documentation and the implementation of a pilot project utilizing PPBA education for a second year undergraduate electronic course over a complete semester, and for two different class groups (morning and evening groups. The outcome of this project (achieved goals, observed difficulties and lessons learned is presented based on different tools such as students 'in class' communication and feedback, different course evaluation forms and the professor/instructor feedback. Resources, challenges, difficulties and recommendations are also assessed and presented. The impact, the effect and the results (during and at the end of the academic fall session of the PPBA on students and instructor are discussed, validated, managed and communicated to help other instructor in taking appropriate approach decisions with respect to this new educational approach compared to the classical one.

  13. Estimating Soil Hydraulic Parameters using Gradient Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, P. K.; Tripathi, S.

    2017-12-01

    The conventional way of estimating parameters of a differential equation is to minimize the error between the observations and their estimates. The estimates are produced from forward solution (numerical or analytical) of differential equation assuming a set of parameters. Parameter estimation using the conventional approach requires high computational cost, setting-up of initial and boundary conditions, and formation of difference equations in case the forward solution is obtained numerically. Gaussian process based approaches like Gaussian Process Ordinary Differential Equation (GPODE) and Adaptive Gradient Matching (AGM) have been developed to estimate the parameters of Ordinary Differential Equations without explicitly solving them. Claims have been made that these approaches can straightforwardly be extended to Partial Differential Equations; however, it has been never demonstrated. This study extends AGM approach to PDEs and applies it for estimating parameters of Richards equation. Unlike the conventional approach, the AGM approach does not require setting-up of initial and boundary conditions explicitly, which is often difficult in real world application of Richards equation. The developed methodology was applied to synthetic soil moisture data. It was seen that the proposed methodology can estimate the soil hydraulic parameters correctly and can be a potential alternative to the conventional method.

  14. Practice-Based Interdisciplinary Approach and Environmental Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Kumar Datta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary researchers and educators, as community members, creators of knowledge, and environmental activists and practitioners, have a responsibility to build a bridge between community practice, academic scholarship, and professional contributions aimed at establishing environmental sustainability. In this paper, I focus on an undervalued area of environmental politics, practices, and often unarticulated assumptions which underlie human–environmental relations. This article challenges interdisciplinary studies that are not connected with practice by reconfiguring the meaning of a community-based, interdisciplinary approach. Drawing from works by Foucault, Latour, and Haraway, this paper first shows how to reconfigure the meaning of an interdisciplinary approach. Second, using Bourdieu and Brightman’s ethnographic studies as a framework, the paper situates practice as central to our efforts to deconstruct and replace current interdisciplinary initiatives with a practice-based approach. Through a practice-based interdisciplinary approach (PIA, environmental educators and researchers gain an awareness of and learn to make an investment in sustainable communities. As teams of environmental researchers practising in the local community, they are meaningfully involved with the community, with each other, and with the environment.

  15. Fragment approaches in structure-based drug discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Roderick E.

    2008-01-01

    Fragment-based methods are successfully generating novel and selective drug-like inhibitors of protein targets, with a number of groups reporting compounds entering clinical trials. This paper summarizes the key features of the approach as one of the tools in structure-guided drug discovery. There has been considerable interest recently in what is known as 'fragment-based lead discovery'. The novel feature of the approach is to begin with small low-affinity compounds. The main advantage is that a larger potential chemical diversity can be sampled with fewer compounds, which is particularly important for new target classes. The approach relies on careful design of the fragment library, a method that can detect binding of the fragment to the protein target, determination of the structure of the fragment bound to the target, and the conventional use of structural information to guide compound optimization. In this article the methods are reviewed, and experiences in fragment-based discovery of lead series of compounds against kinases such as PDK1 and ATPases such as Hsp90 are discussed. The examples illustrate some of the key benefits and issues of the approach and also provide anecdotal examples of the patterns seen in selectivity and the binding mode of fragments across different protein targets

  16. A New Acoustic Emission Sensor Based Gear Fault Detection Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junda Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce wind energy costs, prognostics and health management (PHM of wind turbine is needed to ensure the reliability and availability of wind turbines. A gearbox is an important component of a wind turbine. Therefore, developing effective gearbox fault detection tools is important to the PHM of wind turbine. In this paper, a new acoustic emission (AE sensor based gear fault detection approach is presented. This approach combines a heterodyne based frequency reduction technique with time synchronous average (TSA and spectrum kurtosis (SK to process AE sensor signals and extract features as condition indictors for gear fault detection. Heterodyne technique commonly used in communication is first employed to preprocess the AE signals before sampling. By heterodyning, the AE signal frequency is down shifted from several hundred kHz to below 50 kHz. This reduced AE signal sampling rate is comparable to that of vibration signals. The presented approach is validated using seeded gear tooth crack fault tests on a notational split torque gearbox. The approach presented in this paper is physics based and the validation results have showed that it could effectively detect the gear faults.

  17. An Approach for Composing Services Based on Environment Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjun Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Service-oriented computing is revolutionizing the modern computing paradigms with its aim to boost software reuse and enable business agility. Under this paradigm, new services are fabricated by composing available services. The problem arises as how to effectively and efficiently compose heterogeneous services facing the high complexity of service composition. Based on environment ontology, this paper introduces a requirement-driven service composition approach. We propose the algorithms to decompose the requirement, the rules to deduct the relation between services, and the algorithm for composing service. The empirical results and the comparison with other services’ composition methodologies show that this approach is feasible and efficient.

  18. Histopathological assessment and inflammatory response in the digestive gland of marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to cadmium-based quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Laboratory of Cellular Behavior, Biological Sciences Institute, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás (Brazil); Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira [Laboratory of Cellular Behavior, Biological Sciences Institute, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás (Brazil); Bebianno, Maria João, E-mail: mbebian@ualg.pt [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Digestive gland of marine mussels is target for Cd-based QDs toxicity. • Both Cd forms increase the frequency of atrophic digestive tubules in a time dependent pattern. • QDs induce higher inflammatory responses when compared to dissolved Cd. • Multiparametric tissue-levels biomarkers show distinct mode of action in the digestive gland. - Abstract: Although tissue-level biomarkers have been widely applied in environmental toxicology studies, the knowledge using this approach in marine invertebrates exposed to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) remains limited. This study investigated histopathological alterations and inflammatory responses induced by Cd-based quantum dots (QDs), in comparison with their dissolved counterparts, in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were exposed to CdTe QDs and dissolved Cd at the same concentration (10 μg Cd L{sup −1}) for 14 days and a total of 15 histopathological alterations and 17 histomorphometric parameters were analysed in the digestive gland along with the determination of histopathological condition indices (I{sub h}). A multivariate analysis showed that the mussel response to QDs was more related to exposure time, inflammatory conditions (frequency of haemocytic infiltration and granulocytomas) and changes of cell-type composition (especially the rate between basophilic and digestive cells) when compared to dissolved Cd, while the response to dissolved Cd was associated with histomorphometric parameters of the epithelium and lumen of digestive tubules and increase of the atrophic tubule frequency. Both Cd forms induced higher I{sub h} compared to unexposed mussels indicating a significant decrease in the health status of digestive gland in a Cd form and time-dependent pattern. Results indicate that the multiparametric tissue-level biomarkers in the digestive gland provide a suitable approach to assess the ecotoxicity and mode of action of metal-based ENMs in marine bivalves.

  19. Phishing Detection: Analysis of Visual Similarity Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Kumar Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phishing is one of the major problems faced by cyber-world and leads to financial losses for both industries and individuals. Detection of phishing attack with high accuracy has always been a challenging issue. At present, visual similarities based techniques are very useful for detecting phishing websites efficiently. Phishing website looks very similar in appearance to its corresponding legitimate website to deceive users into believing that they are browsing the correct website. Visual similarity based phishing detection techniques utilise the feature set like text content, text format, HTML tags, Cascading Style Sheet (CSS, image, and so forth, to make the decision. These approaches compare the suspicious website with the corresponding legitimate website by using various features and if the similarity is greater than the predefined threshold value then it is declared phishing. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of phishing attacks, their exploitation, some of the recent visual similarity based approaches for phishing detection, and its comparative study. Our survey provides a better understanding of the problem, current solution space, and scope of future research to deal with phishing attacks efficiently using visual similarity based approaches.

  20. Collaborative design of Open Educational Practices: An Assets based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Helen Miller

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a collaborative approach to the design of open educational resources (OER with community stakeholders so they can be shared with other community practitioners openly, online and repurposed for other contexts. We view curriculum not as something that educationalists provide but rather something that emerges as learners engage with an educational context. We draw on a Project consisting of a partnership between five European Institutions of Higher Education and a range of community stakeholder groups. The partnership will develop a suite of OER for community workers who are implementing assets based approaches in different contexts. We argue that these approaches are negotiated in that one cannot decide how they might operate in a given context without engaging in deliberative discussion. The challenge for us as open education practitioners is how to turn those deliberations into OER and to highlight the important pedagogical aspect of the design process.

  1. A fuzzy behaviorist approach to sensor-based robot control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pin, F.G.

    1996-05-01

    Sensor-based operation of autonomous robots in unstructured and/or outdoor environments has revealed to be an extremely challenging problem, mainly because of the difficulties encountered when attempting to represent the many uncertainties which are always present in the real world. These uncertainties are primarily due to sensor imprecisions and unpredictability of the environment, i.e., lack of full knowledge of the environment characteristics and dynamics. An approach. which we have named the {open_quotes}Fuzzy Behaviorist Approach{close_quotes} (FBA) is proposed in an attempt to remedy some of these difficulties. This approach is based on the representation of the system`s uncertainties using Fuzzy Set Theory-based approximations and on the representation of the reasoning and control schemes as sets of elemental behaviors. Using the FBA, a formalism for rule base development and an automated generator of fuzzy rules have been developed. This automated system can automatically construct the set of membership functions corresponding to fuzzy behaviors. Once these have been expressed in qualitative terms by the user. The system also checks for completeness of the rule base and for non-redundancy of the rules (which has traditionally been a major hurdle in rule base development). Two major conceptual features, the suppression and inhibition mechanisms which allow to express a dominance between behaviors are discussed in detail. Some experimental results obtained with the automated fuzzy, rule generator applied to the domain of sensor-based navigation in aprion unknown environments. using one of our autonomous test-bed robots as well as a real car in outdoor environments, are then reviewed and discussed to illustrate the feasibility of large-scale automatic fuzzy rule generation using the {open_quotes}Fuzzy Behaviorist{close_quotes} concepts.

  2. An Iterative Load Disaggregation Approach Based on Appliance Consumption Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM, monitoring single-appliance consumption level by decomposing the aggregated energy consumption, is a novel and economic technology that is beneficial to energy utilities and energy demand management strategies development. Hardware costs of high-frequency sampling and algorithm’s computational complexity hampered NILM large-scale application. However, low sampling data shows poor performance in event detection when multiple appliances are simultaneously turned on. In this paper, we contribute an iterative disaggregation approach that is based on appliance consumption pattern (ILDACP. Our approach combined Fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm, which provide an initial appliance operating status, and sub-sequence searching Dynamic Time Warping, which retrieves single energy consumption based on the typical power consumption pattern. Results show that the proposed approach is effective to accurately disaggregate power consumption, and is suitable for the situation where different appliances are simultaneously operated. Also, the approach has lower computational complexity than Hidden Markov Model method and it is easy to implement in the household without installing special equipment.

  3. A Semantics-Based Approach to Retrieving Biomedical Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik; Zambach, Sine

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to representing, organising, and accessing conceptual content of biomedical texts using a formal ontology. The ontology is based on UMLS resources supplemented with domain ontologies developed in the project. The approach introduces the notion of ‘generative ontol...... of data mining of texts identifying paraphrases and concept relations and measuring distances between key concepts in texts. Thus, the project is distinct in its attempt to provide a formal underpinning of conceptual similarity or relatedness of meaning.......This paper describes an approach to representing, organising, and accessing conceptual content of biomedical texts using a formal ontology. The ontology is based on UMLS resources supplemented with domain ontologies developed in the project. The approach introduces the notion of ‘generative...... ontologies’, i.e., ontologies providing increasingly specialised concepts reflecting the phrase structure of natural language. Furthermore, we propose a novel so called ontological semantics which maps noun phrases from texts and queries into nodes in the generative ontology. This enables an advanced form...

  4. Assessment of Constraint Effects based on Local Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Rin; Chang, Yoon Suk; Choi, Jae Boong; Seok, Chang Sung; Kim, Young Jin

    2005-01-01

    Traditional fracture mechanics has been used to ensure a structural integrity, in which the geometry independence is assumed in crack tip deformation and fracture toughness. However, the assumption is applicable only within limited conditions. To address fracture covering a broad range of loading and crack geometries, two-parameter global approach and local approach have been proposed. The two-parameter global approach can quantify the load and crack geometry effects by adopting T-stress or Q-parameter but time-consuming and expensive since lots of experiments and finite element (FE) analyses are necessary. On the other hand, the local approach evaluates the load and crack geometry effects based on damage model. Once material specific fitting constants are determined from a few experiments and FE analyses, the fracture resistance characteristics can be obtained by numerical simulation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate constraint effects for compact tension (CT) specimens with different in-plane or out-of-plane size using local approach. Both modified GTN model and Rousselier model are adopted to examine the ductile fracture behavior of SA515 Gr.60 carbon steel at high temperature. The fracture resistance (J-R) curves are estimated through numerical analysis, compared with corresponding experimental results and, then, crack length, thickness and side-groove effects are evaluated

  5. An SQL-based approach to physics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limper, Dr Maaike

    2014-01-01

    As part of the CERN openlab collaboration a study was made into the possibility of performing analysis of the data collected by the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through SQL-queries on data stored in a relational database. Currently LHC physics analysis is done using data stored in centrally produced 'ROOT-ntuple' files that are distributed through the LHC computing grid. The SQL-based approach to LHC physics analysis presented in this paper allows calculations in the analysis to be done at the database and can make use of the database's in-built parallelism features. Using this approach it was possible to reproduce results for several physics analysis benchmarks. The study shows the capability of the database to handle complex analysis tasks but also illustrates the limits of using row-based storage for storing physics analysis data, as performance was limited by the I/O read speed of the system.

  6. English to Sanskrit Machine Translation Using Transfer Based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ganesh R.; Godse, Sachin P.

    2010-11-01

    Translation is one of the needs of global society for communicating thoughts and ideas of one country with other country. Translation is the process of interpretation of text meaning and subsequent production of equivalent text, also called as communicating same meaning (message) in another language. In this paper we gave detail information on how to convert source language text in to target language text using Transfer Based Approach for machine translation. Here we implemented English to Sanskrit machine translator using transfer based approach. English is global language used for business and communication but large amount of population in India is not using and understand the English. Sanskrit is ancient language of India most of the languages in India are derived from Sanskrit. Sanskrit can be act as an intermediate language for multilingual translation.

  7. Deep-Learning-Based Approach for Prediction of Algal Blooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Algal blooms have recently become a critical global environmental concern which might put economic development and sustainability at risk. However, the accurate prediction of algal blooms remains a challenging scientific problem. In this study, a novel prediction approach for algal blooms based on deep learning is presented—a powerful tool to represent and predict highly dynamic and complex phenomena. The proposed approach constructs a five-layered model to extract detailed relationships between the density of phytoplankton cells and various environmental parameters. The algal blooms can be predicted by the phytoplankton density obtained from the output layer. A case study is conducted in coastal waters of East China using both our model and a traditional back-propagation neural network for comparison. The results show that the deep-learning-based model yields better generalization and greater accuracy in predicting algal blooms than a traditional shallow neural network does.

  8. Earthquake insurance pricing: a risk-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jeng-Hsiang

    2018-04-01

    Flat earthquake premiums are 'uniformly' set for a variety of buildings in many countries, neglecting the fact that the risk of damage to buildings by earthquakes is based on a wide range of factors. How these factors influence the insurance premiums is worth being studied further. Proposed herein is a risk-based approach to estimate the earthquake insurance rates of buildings. Examples of application of the approach to buildings located in Taipei city of Taiwan were examined. Then, the earthquake insurance rates for the buildings investigated were calculated and tabulated. To fulfil insurance rating, the buildings were classified into 15 model building types according to their construction materials and building height. Seismic design levels were also considered in insurance rating in response to the effect of seismic zone and construction years of buildings. This paper may be of interest to insurers, actuaries, and private and public sectors of insurance. © 2018 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2018.

  9. Triangulation based inclusion probabilities: a design-unbiased sampling approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fehrmann, Lutz; Gregoire, Timothy; Kleinn, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    A probabilistic sampling approach for design-unbiased estimation of area-related quantitative characteristics of spatially dispersed population units is proposed. The developed field protocol includes a fixed number of 3 units per sampling location and is based on partial triangulations over their natural neighbors to derive the individual inclusion probabilities. The performance of the proposed design is tested in comparison to fixed area sample plots in a simulation with two forest stands. ...

  10. Flow-based approach for holistic factory engineering and design

    OpenAIRE

    Constantinescu, C.; Westkämper, E.

    2010-01-01

    The engineering of future factories requires digital tools along life cycle phases from investment planning to ramp-up. Manufacturers need scientific-based integrated highly dynamic data management systems for the participative and integrated factory planning. The paper presents a new approach for the continuously integrated product design, factory and process planning, through a service-oriented architecture for the implementation of digital factory tools. A first prototype of the digital fa...

  11. A corpus-based approach to generalising a chatbot system

    OpenAIRE

    Abu Shawar, Bayan; Atwell, Eric

    2003-01-01

    International research in NLP is dominated by work on English. NLP techniques and systems can be ported to other natural languages, but this is generally a labour-intensive task, requiring scarce computational and linguistic expertise; hence minority languages are poorly represented in NLP technology. We present an automated approach to porting an NLP technology, the AIML-based chatbot, to new languages, by using a corpus in the target language to retrain the chatbot. We have s...

  12. An ontology-based approach for modelling architectural styles

    OpenAIRE

    Pahl, Claus; Giesecke, Simon; Hasselbring, Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    peer-reviewed The conceptual modelling of software architectures is of central importance for the quality of a software system. A rich modelling language is required to integrate the different aspects of architecture modelling, such as architectural styles, structural and behavioural modelling, into a coherent framework.We propose an ontological approach for architectural style modelling based on description logic as an abstract, meta-level modelling instrument. Architect...

  13. A structural informatics approach to mine kinase knowledge bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooijmans, Natasja; Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, Rajiah A; Feyfant, Eric; Diller, David; Bikker, Jack; Humblet, Christine

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a combination of structural informatics approaches developed to mine data extracted from existing structure knowledge bases (Protein Data Bank and the GVK database) with a focus on kinase ATP-binding site data. In contrast to existing systems that retrieve and analyze protein structures, our techniques are centered on a database of ligand-bound geometries in relation to residues lining the binding site and transparent access to ligand-based SAR data. We illustrate the systems in the context of the Abelson kinase and related inhibitor structures. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ray-based approach to integrated 3D visual communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemura, Takeshi; Harashima, Hiroshi

    2001-02-01

    For a high sense of reality in the next-generation communications, it is very important to realize three-dimensional (3D) spatial media, instead of existing 2D image media. In order to comprehensively deal with a variety of 3D visual data formats, the authors first introduce the concept of "Integrated 3D Visual Communication," which reflects the necessity of developing a neutral representation method independent of input/output systems. Then, the following discussions are concentrated on the ray-based approach to this concept, in which any visual sensation is considered to be derived from a set of light rays. This approach is a simple and straightforward to the problem of how to represent 3D space, which is an issue shared by various fields including 3D image communications, computer graphics, and virtual reality. This paper mainly presents the several developments in this approach, including some efficient methods of representing ray data, a real-time video-based rendering system, an interactive rendering system based on the integral photography, a concept of virtual object surface for the compression of tremendous amount of data, and a light ray capturing system using a telecentric lens. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  15. Knowledge-based approach to video content classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Wong, Edward K.

    2001-01-01

    A framework for video content classification using a knowledge-based approach is herein proposed. This approach is motivated by the fact that videos are rich in semantic contents, which can best be interpreted and analyzed by human experts. We demonstrate the concept by implementing a prototype video classification system using the rule-based programming language CLIPS 6.05. Knowledge for video classification is encoded as a set of rules in the rule base. The left-hand-sides of rules contain high level and low level features, while the right-hand-sides of rules contain intermediate results or conclusions. Our current implementation includes features computed from motion, color, and text extracted from video frames. Our current rule set allows us to classify input video into one of five classes: news, weather, reporting, commercial, basketball and football. We use MYCIN's inexact reasoning method for combining evidences, and to handle the uncertainties in the features and in the classification results. We obtained good results in a preliminary experiment, and it demonstrated the validity of the proposed approach.

  16. Toward a Mechanism-Based Approach to Pain Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeh, Daniel; Mannion, Richard J; Woolf, Clifford J

    2016-09-01

    The past few decades have witnessed a huge leap forward in our understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings of pain, in normal states where it helps protect from injury, and also in pathological states where pain evolves from a symptom reflecting tissue injury to become the disease itself. However, despite these scientific advances, chronic pain remains extremely challenging to manage clinically. Although the number of potential treatment targets has grown substantially and a strong case has been made for a mechanism-based and individualized approach to pain therapy, arguably clinicians are not much more advanced now than 20 years ago, in their capacity to either diagnose or effectively treat their patients. The gulf between pain research and pain management is as wide as ever. We are still currently unable to apply an evidence-based approach to chronic pain management that reflects mechanistic understanding, and instead, clinical practice remains an empirical and often unsatisfactory journey for patients, whose individual response to treatment cannot be predicted. In this article we take a common and difficult to treat pain condition, chronic low back pain, and use its presentation in clinical practice as a framework to highlight what is known about pathophysiological pain mechanisms and how we could potentially detect these to drive rational treatment choice. We discuss how present methods of assessment and management still fall well short, however, of any mechanism-based or precision medicine approach. Nevertheless, substantial improvements in chronic pain management could be possible if a more strategic and coordinated approach were to evolve, one designed to identify the specific mechanisms driving the presenting pain phenotype. We present an analysis of such an approach, highlighting the major problems in identifying mechanisms in patients, and develop a framework for a pain diagnostic ladder that may prove useful in the future, consisting of successive

  17. Influencing factors for condition-based maintenance in railway tracks using knowledge-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamshidi, A.; Hajizadeh, S.; Naeimi, M.; Nunez Vicencio, Alfredo; Li, Z.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a condition-based maintenance decision method using
    knowledge-based approach for rail surface defects. A railway track may contain a considerable number of surface defects which influence track maintenance decisions. The proposed method is based on two sets of

  18. Conceptual design of jewellery: a space-based aesthetics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzintzi Vaia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual design is a field that offers various aesthetic approaches to generation of nature-based product design concepts. Essentially, Conceptual Product Design (CPD uses similarities based on the geometrical forms and functionalities. Furthermore, the CAD-based freehand sketch is a primary conceptual tool in the early stages of the design process. The proposed Conceptual Product Design concept is dealing with jewelleries that are inspired from space. Specifically, a number of galaxy features, such as galaxy shapes, wormholes and graphical representation of planet magnetic field are used as inspirations. Those space-based design ideas at a conceptual level can lead to further opportunities for research and economic success of the jewellery industry. A number of illustrative case studies are presented and new opportunities can be derived for economic success.

  19. Mapping site-based construction workers’ motivation: Expectancy theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Ghoddousi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to apply a recently proposed model of motivation based on expectancy theory to site-based workers in the construction context and confirm the validity of this model for the construction industry. The study drew upon data from 194 site-based construction workers in Iran to test the proposed model of motivation. To this end, the structural equation modelling (SEM approach based on the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA technique was deployed. The study reveals that the proposed model of expectancy theory incorporating five indicators (i.e. intrinsic instrumentality, extrinsic instrumentality, intrinsic valence, extrinsic valence and expectancy is able to map the process of construction workers’ motivation. Nonetheless, the findings posit that intrinsic indicators could be more effective than extrinsic ones. This proffers the necessity of construction managers placing further focus on intrinsic motivators to motivate workers. 

  20. Mapping site-based construction workers’ motivation: Expectancy theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Ghoddousi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to apply a recently proposed model of motivation based on expectancy theory to site-based workers in the construction context and confirm the validity of this model for the construction industry. The study drew upon data from 194 site-based construction workers in Iran to test the proposed model of motivation. To this end, the structural equation modelling (SEM approach based on the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA technique was deployed. The study reveals that the proposed model of expectancy theory incorporating five indicators (i.e. intrinsic instrumentality, extrinsic instrumentality, intrinsic valence, extrinsic valence and expectancy is able to map the process of construction workers’ motivation. Nonetheless, the findings posit that intrinsic indicators could be more effective than extrinsic ones. This proffers the necessity of construction managers placing further focus on intrinsic motivators to motivate workers.

  1. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  2. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Cetin; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal; Carmack, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R and D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  3. Towards a mechanism-based approach to pain diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeh, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The last few decades have witnessed a huge leap forward in our understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings of pain, both in normal states where it helps protect from injury, and in pathological states where pain evolves from a symptom reflecting tissue injury to become the disease itself. However, despite these scientific advances, chronic pain remains extremely challenging to manage clinically. While the number of potential treatment targets has grown substantially and a strong case has been made for a mechanism-based and individualized approach to pain therapy, arguably clinicians are not much more advanced now than 20 years ago, in their capacity to either diagnose or effectively treat their patients. The gulf between pain research and pain management is as wide as ever. We are still currently unable to apply an evidence-based approach to chronic pain management that reflects mechanistic understanding, and instead, clinical practice remains an empirical and often unsatisfactory journey for patients, whose individual response to treatment cannot be predicted. Here we take a common and difficult to treat pain condition, chronic low back pain, and use its presentation in clinical practice as a framework to highlight what is known about pathophysiological pain mechanisms and how we could potentially detect these to drive rational treatment choice. We discuss how present methods of assessment and management still fall well short, however, of any mechanism-based or precision-medicine approach. Nevertheless, substantial improvements in chronic pain management could be possible if a more strategic and coordinated approach were to evolve, one designed to identify the specific mechanisms driving the presenting pain phenotype. We present an analysis of such an approach, highlighting the major problems in identifying mechanisms in patients, and develop a framework for a pain diagnostic ladder that may prove useful in the future, consisting of successive identification of

  4. Frame-Based and Subpicture-Based Parallelization Approaches of the HEVC Video Encoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Migallón

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The most recent video coding standard, High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC, is able to significantly improve the compression performance at the expense of a huge computational complexity increase with respect to its predecessor, H.264/AVC. Parallel versions of the HEVC encoder may help to reduce the overall encoding time in order to make it more suitable for practical applications. In this work, we study two parallelization strategies. One of them follows a coarse-grain approach, where parallelization is based on frames, and the other one follows a fine-grain approach, where parallelization is performed at subpicture level. Two different frame-based approaches have been developed. The first one only uses MPI and the second one is a hybrid MPI/OpenMP algorithm. An exhaustive experimental test was carried out to study the performance of both approaches in order to find out the best setup in terms of parallel efficiency and coding performance. Both frame-based and subpicture-based approaches are compared under the same hardware platform. Although subpicture-based schemes provide an excellent performance with high-resolution video sequences, scalability is limited by resolution, and the coding performance worsens by increasing the number of processes. Conversely, the proposed frame-based approaches provide the best results with respect to both parallel performance (increasing scalability and coding performance (not degrading the rate/distortion behavior.

  5. A probabilistic approach to the drag-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoletano, Gianluca; Forte, Roberta; Moro, Dario Del; Pietropaolo, Ermanno; Giovannelli, Luca; Berrilli, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    The forecast of the time of arrival (ToA) of a coronal mass ejection (CME) to Earth is of critical importance for our high-technology society and for any future manned exploration of the Solar System. As critical as the forecast accuracy is the knowledge of its precision, i.e. the error associated to the estimate. We propose a statistical approach for the computation of the ToA using the drag-based model by introducing the probability distributions, rather than exact values, as input parameters, thus allowing the evaluation of the uncertainty on the forecast. We test this approach using a set of CMEs whose transit times are known, and obtain extremely promising results: the average value of the absolute differences between measure and forecast is 9.1h, and half of these residuals are within the estimated errors. These results suggest that this approach deserves further investigation. We are working to realize a real-time implementation which ingests the outputs of automated CME tracking algorithms as inputs to create a database of events useful for a further validation of the approach.

  6. Bifurcation-based approach reveals synergism and optimal combinatorial perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanwei; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Zengrong; Wang, Ruiqi

    2016-06-01

    Cells accomplish the process of fate decisions and form terminal lineages through a series of binary choices in which cells switch stable states from one branch to another as the interacting strengths of regulatory factors continuously vary. Various combinatorial effects may occur because almost all regulatory processes are managed in a combinatorial fashion. Combinatorial regulation is crucial for cell fate decisions because it may effectively integrate many different signaling pathways to meet the higher regulation demand during cell development. However, whether the contribution of combinatorial regulation to the state transition is better than that of a single one and if so, what the optimal combination strategy is, seem to be significant issue from the point of view of both biology and mathematics. Using the approaches of combinatorial perturbations and bifurcation analysis, we provide a general framework for the quantitative analysis of synergism in molecular networks. Different from the known methods, the bifurcation-based approach depends only on stable state responses to stimuli because the state transition induced by combinatorial perturbations occurs between stable states. More importantly, an optimal combinatorial perturbation strategy can be determined by investigating the relationship between the bifurcation curve of a synergistic perturbation pair and the level set of a specific objective function. The approach is applied to two models, i.e., a theoretical multistable decision model and a biologically realistic CREB model, to show its validity, although the approach holds for a general class of biological systems.

  7. Feedback structure based entropy approach for multiple-model estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen-tu Han; Xue Anke; Guo Yunfei

    2013-01-01

    The variable-structure multiple-model (VSMM) approach, one of the multiple-model (MM) methods, is a popular and effective approach in handling problems with mode uncertainties. The model sequence set adaptation (MSA) is the key to design a better VSMM. However, MSA methods in the literature have big room to improve both theoretically and practically. To this end, we propose a feedback structure based entropy approach that could find the model sequence sets with the smallest size under certain conditions. The filtered data are fed back in real time and can be used by the minimum entropy (ME) based VSMM algorithms, i.e., MEVSMM. Firstly, the full Markov chains are used to achieve optimal solutions. Secondly, the myopic method together with particle filter (PF) and the challenge match algorithm are also used to achieve sub-optimal solutions, a trade-off between practicability and optimality. The numerical results show that the proposed algorithm provides not only refined model sets but also a good robustness margin and very high accuracy.

  8. Contingent approach to Internet-based supply network integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jessica; Boughton, Nick; Kehoe, Dennis; Michaelides, Zenon

    2001-10-01

    The Internet is playing an increasingly important role in enhancing the operations of supply networks as many organizations begin to recognize the benefits of Internet- enabled supply arrangements. However, the developments and applications to-date do not extend significantly beyond the dyadic model, whereas the real advantages are to be made with the external and network models to support a coordinated and collaborative based approach. The DOMAIN research group at the University of Liverpool is currently defining new Internet- enabled approaches to enable greater collaboration across supply chains. Different e-business models and tools are focusing on different applications. Using inappropriate e- business models, tools or techniques will bring negative results instead of benefits to all the tiers in the supply network. Thus there are a number of issues to be considered before addressing Internet based supply network integration, in particular an understanding of supply chain management, the emergent business models and evaluating the effects of deploying e-business to the supply network or a particular tier. It is important to utilize a contingent approach to selecting the right e-business model to meet the specific supply chain requirements. This paper addresses the issues and provides a case study on the indirect materials supply networks.

  9. An approach for fixed coefficient RNS-based FIR filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa Reddy, Kotha; Sahoo, Subhendu Kumar

    2017-08-01

    In this work, an efficient new modular multiplication method for {2k-1, 2k, 2k+1-1} moduli set is proposed to implement a residue number system (RNS)-based fixed coefficient finite impulse response filter. The new multiplication approach reduces the number of partial products by using pre-loaded product block. The reduction in partial products with the proposed modular multiplication improves the clock frequency and reduces the area and power as compared with the conventional modular multiplication. Further, the present approach eliminates a binary number to residue number converter circuit, which is usually needed at the front end of RNS-based system. In this work, two fixed coefficient filter architectures with the new modular multiplication approach are proposed. The filters are implemented using Verilog hardware description language. The United Microelectronics Corporation 90 nm technology library has been used for synthesis and the results area, power and delay are obtained with the help of Cadence register transfer level compiler. The power delay product (PDP) is also considered for performance comparison among the proposed filters. One of the proposed architecture is found to improve PDP gain by 60.83% as compared with the filter implemented with conventional modular multiplier. The filters functionality is validated with the help of Altera DSP Builder.

  10. Pedestrian detection from thermal images: A sparse representation based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bin; John, Vijay; Liu, Zheng; Mita, Seiichi

    2016-05-01

    Pedestrian detection, a key technology in computer vision, plays a paramount role in the applications of advanced driver assistant systems (ADASs) and autonomous vehicles. The objective of pedestrian detection is to identify and locate people in a dynamic environment so that accidents can be avoided. With significant variations introduced by illumination, occlusion, articulated pose, and complex background, pedestrian detection is a challenging task for visual perception. Different from visible images, thermal images are captured and presented with intensity maps based objects' emissivity, and thus have an enhanced spectral range to make human beings perceptible from the cool background. In this study, a sparse representation based approach is proposed for pedestrian detection from thermal images. We first adopted the histogram of sparse code to represent image features and then detect pedestrian with the extracted features in an unimodal and a multimodal framework respectively. In the unimodal framework, two types of dictionaries, i.e. joint dictionary and individual dictionary, are built by learning from prepared training samples. In the multimodal framework, a weighted fusion scheme is proposed to further highlight the contributions from features with higher separability. To validate the proposed approach, experiments were conducted to compare with three widely used features: Haar wavelets (HWs), histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), and histogram of phase congruency (HPC) as well as two classification methods, i.e. AdaBoost and support vector machine (SVM). Experimental results on a publicly available data set demonstrate the superiority of the proposed approach.

  11. Rights-Based Approaches to Ensure Sustainable Nutrition Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sweta

    2016-01-01

    In India, a rights-based approach has been used to address large-scale malnutrition, including both micro- and macro-level nutrition deficiencies. Stunting, which is an intergenerational chronic consequence of malnutrition, is especially widespread in India (38% among children under 5 years old). To tackle this problem, the government of India has designed interventions for the first 1,000 days, a critical period of the life cycle, through a number of community-based programs to fulfill the rights to food and life. However, the entitlements providing these rights have not yet produced the necessary changes in the malnutrition status of people, especially women and children. The government of India has already implemented laws and drafted a constitution that covers the needs of its citizens, but corruption, bureaucracy, lack of awareness of rights and entitlements and social discrimination limit people's access to basic rights and services. To address this crisis, Welthungerhilfe India, working in remote villages of the most backward states in India, has shifted from a welfare-based approach to a rights-based approach. The Fight Hunger First Initiative, started by Welthungerhilfe in 2011, is designed on the premise that in the long term, poor people can only leave poverty behind if adequate welfare systems are in place and if basic rights are fulfilled; these rights include access to proper education, sufficient access to adequate food and income, suitable health services and equal rights. Only then can the next generation of disadvantaged populations look forward to a new and better future and can growth benefit the entire society. The project, co-funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, is a long-term multi-sectoral program that involves institution-building and empowerment. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Improving information extraction using a probability-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, S.; Ahmed, Saeema; Wallace, K.

    2007-01-01

    Information plays a crucial role during the entire life-cycle of a product. It has been shown that engineers frequently consult colleagues to obtain the information they require to solve problems. However, the industrial world is now more transient and key personnel move to other companies...... or retire. It is becoming essential to retrieve vital information from archived product documents, if it is available. There is, therefore, great interest in ways of extracting relevant and sharable information from documents. A keyword-based search is commonly used, but studies have shown...... the recall, while maintaining the high precision, a learning approach that makes identification decisions based on a probability model, rather than simply looking up the presence of the pre-defined variations, looks promising. This paper presents the results of developing such a probability-based entity...

  13. APPROACH ON INTELLIGENT OPTIMIZATION DESIGN BASED ON COMPOUND KNOWLEDGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Jianchu; Zhou Ji; Yu Jun

    2003-01-01

    A concept of an intelligent optimal design approach is proposed, which is organized by a kind of compound knowledge model. The compound knowledge consists of modularized quantitative knowledge, inclusive experience knowledge and case-based sample knowledge. By using this compound knowledge model, the abundant quantity information of mathematical programming and the symbolic knowledge of artificial intelligence can be united together in this model. The intelligent optimal design model based on such a compound knowledge and the automatically generated decomposition principles based on it are also presented. Practically, it is applied to the production planning, process schedule and optimization of production process of a refining & chemical work and a great profit is achieved. Specially, the methods and principles are adaptable not only to continuous process industry, but also to discrete manufacturing one.

  14. New approaches to addiction treatment based on learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Falk; Dinter, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that physiological learning processes are similar to changes observed in addicts at the molecular, neuronal, and structural levels. Based on the importance of classical and instrumental conditioning in the development and maintenance of addictive disorders, many have suggested cue-exposure-based extinction training of conditioned, drug-related responses as a potential new treatment of addiction. It may also be possible to facilitate this extinction training with pharmacological compounds that strengthen memory consolidation during cue exposure. Another potential therapeutic intervention would be based on the so-called reconsolidation theory. According to this hypothesis, already-consolidated memories return to a labile state when reactivated, allowing them to undergo another phase of consolidation-reconsolidation, which can be pharmacologically manipulated. These approaches suggest that the extinction of drug-related memories may represent a viable treatment strategy in the future treatment of addiction.

  15. Bridging Ayurveda with evidence-based scientific approaches in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews contemporary approaches for bridging Ayurveda with evidence-based medicine. In doing so, the author presents a pragmatic assessment of quality, methodology and extent of scientific research in Ayurvedic medicine. The article discusses the meaning of evidence and indicates the need to adopt epistemologically sensitive methods and rigorous experimentation using modern science. The author critically analyzes the status of Ayurvedic medicine based on personal observations, peer interactions and published research. This review article concludes that traditional knowledge systems like Ayurveda and modern scientific evidence-based medicine should be integrated. The author advocates that Ayurvedic researchers should develop strategic collaborations with innovative initiatives like 'Horizon 2020' involving predictive, preventive and personalized medicine (PPPM).

  16. Intelligent Flowcharting Developmental Approach to Legal Knowledge Based System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Balaji Bilgi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The basic aim of this research, described in this paper is to develop a hybrid legal expert system/ knowledge based system, with specific reference to the transfer of property act, within the Indian legal system which is often in demand. In this paper the authors discuss an traditional approach to combining two types of reasoning methodologies, Rule Based Reasoning (RBR and Case Based Reasoning (CBR. In RBR module we have interpreted and implemented rules that occur in legal statutes of the Transfer of property act. In the CBR module we have an implementation to find the related cases. The VisiRule software made available by Logic Programming Associates is used in the development of RBR part this expert system. The authors have used java Net Beans for development of CBR. VisiRule is a decision charting tool, in which the rules are defined by a combination of graphical shapes and pieces of text, and produces rules.

  17. A New Design Approach to game or play based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    to ground the students sense of meaning. This paper proposes another approach: using visualization in immersive 3D-worlds as documentation of learning progress while at the same time constituting a reward system which motivate further learning. The overall design idea is to build a game based learning......Abstract: The present paper proposes a new design perspective for game based learning. The general idea is to abandon the long and sought after dream of designing a closed learning system, where students from elementary school to high school without teachers’ interference could learn whatever...... game based learning system, but also confront aspects of modern learning theory especially the notion of reference between content of an assignment and the reality with which it should or could be connected (situated learning). The second idea promotes a way to tackle the common experience...

  18. An Asset-Based Approach to Tribal Community Energy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Rachael A. [Pratt Inst., Brooklyn, NY (United States). City and Regional Planning; Martino, Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials, Devices, and Energy Technologies; Begay, Sandra K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials, Devices, and Energy Technologies

    2016-08-01

    Community energy planning is a vital component of successful energy resource development and project implementation. Planning can help tribes develop a shared vision and strategies to accomplish their energy goals. This paper explores the benefits of an asset-based approach to tribal community energy planning. While a framework for community energy planning and federal funding already exists, some areas of difficulty in the planning cycle have been identified. This paper focuses on developing a planning framework that offsets those challenges. The asset-based framework described here takes inventory of a tribe’s capital assets, such as: land capital, human capital, financial capital, and political capital. Such an analysis evaluates how being rich in a specific type of capital can offer a tribe unique advantages in implementing their energy vision. Finally, a tribal case study demonstrates the practical application of an asset-based framework.

  19. Scattered Data Processing Approach Based on Optical Facial Motion Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, animation reconstruction of facial expressions has become a popular research field in computer science and motion capture-based facial expression reconstruction is now emerging in this field. Based on the facial motion data obtained using a passive optical motion capture system, we propose a scattered data processing approach, which aims to solve the common problems of missing data and noise. To recover missing data, given the nonlinear relationships among neighbors with the current missing marker, we propose an improved version of a previous method, where we use the motion of three muscles rather than one to recover the missing data. To reduce the noise, we initially apply preprocessing to eliminate impulsive noise, before our proposed three-order quasi-uniform B-spline-based fitting method is used to reduce the remaining noise. Our experiments showed that the principles that underlie this method are simple and straightforward, and it delivered acceptable precision during reconstruction.

  20. Alcoholism and its Effects: an Approach Based on Health Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de las Mercedes Pretel Olite

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholism is a complex biopsychosocial disorder that requires a specialised and multidisciplinary approach focusing on both the patient and the family. Alcohol consumption is the most important addiction worldwide due to its prevalence and impact. Therefore, the main objective of a primary care physician should be to facilitate the referral of patients and their families to a structured treatment, support and guidance program during the whole detoxification process. In every health area in Cienfuegos, there are community mental health centers with a staff trained to deal with these disorders in addicts and their family. A literature review was conducted to establish the relationship between alcohol consumption and its harmful effects on health, family and society, using an approach based on Health Psychology.

  1. Applying a Problem Based Learning Approach to Land Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    Land management covers a wide range activities associated with the management of land and natural resources that are required to fulfil political objectives and achieve sustainable development. This paper presents an overall understanding of the land management paradigm and the benefits of good...... land governance to society. A land administration system provides a country with the infrastructure to implement land-related policies and land management strategies. By applying this land management profile to surveying education, this paper suggests that there is a need to move away from an exclusive...... engineering focus toward adopting an interdisciplinary and problem-based approach to ensure that academic programmes can cope with the wide range of land administration functions and challenges. An interdisciplinary approach to surveying education calls for the need to address issues and problems in a real...

  2. Quantum Ensemble Classification: A Sampling-Based Learning Control Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Dong, Daoyi; Qi, Bo; Petersen, Ian R; Rabitz, Herschel

    2017-06-01

    Quantum ensemble classification (QEC) has significant applications in discrimination of atoms (or molecules), separation of isotopes, and quantum information extraction. However, quantum mechanics forbids deterministic discrimination among nonorthogonal states. The classification of inhomogeneous quantum ensembles is very challenging, since there exist variations in the parameters characterizing the members within different classes. In this paper, we recast QEC as a supervised quantum learning problem. A systematic classification methodology is presented by using a sampling-based learning control (SLC) approach for quantum discrimination. The classification task is accomplished via simultaneously steering members belonging to different classes to their corresponding target states (e.g., mutually orthogonal states). First, a new discrimination method is proposed for two similar quantum systems. Then, an SLC method is presented for QEC. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for the binary classification of two-level quantum ensembles and the multiclass classification of multilevel quantum ensembles.

  3. Road traffic management based on self-load-balancing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnane Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traffic congestion is one of the most challenging problems for nowadays cities. Several contributions mainly based on V2V (Vehicle-to-Vehicle communication have been published, but most of them have never been applied due to their communication related problems and costs. In this article, a novel cost-effective approach is introduced inspired by social life of insects where direct (V2V communication does not exist anymore. Vehicles are equipped with devices that perform simple tasks, but their interactions with the environment through RSUs (Road Side Units allow the creation of an intelligence which notifies drivers about congested road segments to avoid them. We call this emerging behavior self-load balancing. Description of the fundamentals of this approach and its performance are detailed in this work.

  4. A Component Based Approach to Scientific Workflow Management

    CERN Document Server

    Le Goff, Jean-Marie; Baker, Nigel; Brooks, Peter; McClatchey, Richard

    2001-01-01

    CRISTAL is a distributed scientific workflow system used in the manufacturing and production phases of HEP experiment construction at CERN. The CRISTAL project has studied the use of a description driven approach, using meta- modelling techniques, to manage the evolving needs of a large physics community. Interest from such diverse communities as bio-informatics and manufacturing has motivated the CRISTAL team to re-engineer the system to customize functionality according to end user requirements but maximize software reuse in the process. The next generation CRISTAL vision is to build a generic component architecture from which a complete software product line can be generated according to the particular needs of the target enterprise. This paper discusses the issues of adopting a component product line based approach and our experiences of software reuse.

  5. A component based approach to scientific workflow management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, N.; Brooks, P.; McClatchey, R.; Kovacs, Z.; LeGoff, J.-M.

    2001-01-01

    CRISTAL is a distributed scientific workflow system used in the manufacturing and production phases of HEP experiment construction at CERN. The CRISTAL project has studied the use of a description driven approach, using meta-modelling techniques, to manage the evolving needs of a large physics community. Interest from such diverse communities as bio-informatics and manufacturing has motivated the CRISTAL team to re-engineer the system to customize functionality according to end user requirements but maximize software reuse in the process. The next generation CRISTAL vision is to build a generic component architecture from which a complete software product line can be generated according to the particular needs of the target enterprise. This paper discusses the issues of adopting a component product line based approach and our experiences of software reuse

  6. Evolutionary modeling-based approach for model errors correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Q. Wan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The inverse problem of using the information of historical data to estimate model errors is one of the science frontier research topics. In this study, we investigate such a problem using the classic Lorenz (1963 equation as a prediction model and the Lorenz equation with a periodic evolutionary function as an accurate representation of reality to generate "observational data."

    On the basis of the intelligent features of evolutionary modeling (EM, including self-organization, self-adaptive and self-learning, the dynamic information contained in the historical data can be identified and extracted by computer automatically. Thereby, a new approach is proposed to estimate model errors based on EM in the present paper. Numerical tests demonstrate the ability of the new approach to correct model structural errors. In fact, it can actualize the combination of the statistics and dynamics to certain extent.

  7. Nucleic Acid-Based Therapy Approaches for Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Vagner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is caused by a dominant mutation that results in an unstable expansion of a CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene leading to a toxic gain of function in huntingtin protein which causes massive neurodegeneration mainly in the striatum and clinical symptoms associated with the disease. Since the mutation has multiple effects in the cell and the precise mechanism of the disease remains to be elucidated, gene therapy approaches have been developed that intervene in different aspects of the condition. These approaches include increasing expression of growth factors, decreasing levels of mutant huntingtin, and restoring cell metabolism and transcriptional balance. The aim of this paper is to outline the nucleic acid-based therapeutic strategies that have been tested to date.

  8. An Agent Based approach to design Serious Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Gentile

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Serious games are designed to train and educate learners, opening up new learning approaches like exploratory learning and situated cognition.  Despite growing interest in these games, their design is still an artisan process.On the basis of experiences in designing computer simulation, this paper proposes an agent-based approach to guide the design process of a serious game. The proposed methodology allows the designer to strike the right equilibrium between educational effectiveness and entertainment, realism and complexity.The design of the PNPVillage game is used as a case study. The PNPVillage game aims to introduce and foster an entrepreneurial mindset among young students. It was implemented within the framework of the European project “I  can… I cannot… I go!” Rev.2

  9. Microarray-based cancer prediction using soft computing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaosheng; Gotoh, Osamu

    2009-05-26

    One of the difficulties in using gene expression profiles to predict cancer is how to effectively select a few informative genes to construct accurate prediction models from thousands or ten thousands of genes. We screen highly discriminative genes and gene pairs to create simple prediction models involved in single genes or gene pairs on the basis of soft computing approach and rough set theory. Accurate cancerous prediction is obtained when we apply the simple prediction models for four cancerous gene expression datasets: CNS tumor, colon tumor, lung cancer and DLBCL. Some genes closely correlated with the pathogenesis of specific or general cancers are identified. In contrast with other models, our models are simple, effective and robust. Meanwhile, our models are interpretable for they are based on decision rules. Our results demonstrate that very simple models may perform well on cancerous molecular prediction and important gene markers of cancer can be detected if the gene selection approach is chosen reasonably.

  10. A Survey on Trust-Based Web Service Provision Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragoni, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    The basic tenet of Service-Oriented Computing (SOC) is the possibility of building distributed applications on the Web by using Web Services as fundamental building blocks. The proliferation of such services is considered the second wave of evolution in the Internet age, moving the Web from...... a collection of pages to a collections of services. Consensus is growing that this Web Service “revolution” won't eventuate until we resolve trust-related issues. Indeed, the intrinsic openness of the SOC vision makes crucial to locate useful services and recognize them as trustworthy. In this paper we review...... the field of trust-based Web Service selection, providing a structured classification of current approaches and highlighting the main limitations of each class and of the overall field. As a result, we claim that a soft notion of trust lies behind such weaknesses and we advocate the need of a new approach...

  11. Hypercompetitive Environments: An Agent-based model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Manuel; Araújo, Tanya

    Information technology (IT) environments are characterized by complex changes and rapid evolution. Globalization and the spread of technological innovation have increased the need for new strategic information resources, both from individual firms and management environments. Improvements in multidisciplinary methods and, particularly, the availability of powerful computational tools, are giving researchers an increasing opportunity to investigate management environments in their true complex nature. The adoption of a complex systems approach allows for modeling business strategies from a bottom-up perspective — understood as resulting from repeated and local interaction of economic agents — without disregarding the consequences of the business strategies themselves to individual behavior of enterprises, emergence of interaction patterns between firms and management environments. Agent-based models are at the leading approach of this attempt.

  12. New approach for risk based inspection of H2S based Process Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinod, Gopika; Sharma, Pavan K.; Santosh, T.V.; Hari Prasad, M.; Vaze, K.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Study looks into improving the consequence evaluation in risk based inspection. • Ways to revise the quantity factors used in qualitative approach. • New approach based on computational fluid dynamics along with probit mathematics. • Demonstrated this methodology along with a suitable case study for the said issue. - Abstract: Recent trend in risk informed and risk based approaches in life management issues have certainly put the focus on developing estimation methods for real risk. Idea of employing risk as an optimising measure for in-service inspection, termed as risk based inspection, was accepted in principle from late 80s. While applying risk based inspection, consequence of failure from each component needs to be assessed. Consequence evaluation in a Process Plant is a crucial task. It may be noted that, in general, the number of components to be considered for life management is very large and hence the consequence evaluation resulting from their failures (individually) is a laborious task. Screening of critical components is usually carried out using simplified qualitative approach, which primarily uses influence factors for categorisation. This necessitates logical formulation of influence factors and their ranges with a suitable technical basis for acceptance from regulators. This paper describes application of risk based inspection for H 2 S based Process Plant along with the approach devised for handling the influence factor related to the quantity of H 2 S released

  13. Assessment of acid-base balance. Stewart's approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fores-Novales, B; Diez-Fores, P; Aguilera-Celorrio, L J

    2016-04-01

    The study of acid-base equilibrium, its regulation and its interpretation have been a source of debate since the beginning of 20th century. Most accepted and commonly used analyses are based on pH, a notion first introduced by Sorensen in 1909, and on the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (1916). Since then new concepts have been development in order to complete and make easier the understanding of acid-base disorders. In the early 1980's Peter Stewart brought the traditional interpretation of acid-base disturbances into question and proposed a new method. This innovative approach seems more suitable for studying acid-base abnormalities in critically ill patients. The aim of this paper is to update acid-base concepts, methods, limitations and applications. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Minimal incision surgery in strabismus: Modified fornix-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Flores, I

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the modified fornix-based technique as an approach for minimal incision surgery in strabismus. The medical records of all consecutive patients that underwent strabismus surgery with fornix-based conjunctival incision between 2007 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. As a primary variable, an analysis was made of the wound size depending on the number of stitches. A descriptive study was performed on the variables related to patients and to the type of strabismus and surgery. Out of 153patients identified, 138 with 294 surgeries were included. In 200 (68%) interventions, the incision was sutured with one stitch, in 77 (26.2%) with 2, in 13 (4.4%) with 3, and in 4 (1.4%) with 4, with the mean number of stitches being 1.39±0.64. The mean age of the patients was 39years (2-80), and 36 (26.1%) had previous strabismus surgery, with topical anaesthesia being used in 35 (25.4%) cases. At 3months after surgery deviation was ≤10DP in 114 (82.6%) patients. There were no wound-related complications. The modified fornix-based technique is an effective and safe approach for minimal incision surgery in strabismus, in patients at all ages, with previous history of strabismus surgery and with topical anaesthesia. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. A web-based approach to data imputation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhixu

    2013-10-24

    In this paper, we present WebPut, a prototype system that adopts a novel web-based approach to the data imputation problem. Towards this, Webput utilizes the available information in an incomplete database in conjunction with the data consistency principle. Moreover, WebPut extends effective Information Extraction (IE) methods for the purpose of formulating web search queries that are capable of effectively retrieving missing values with high accuracy. WebPut employs a confidence-based scheme that efficiently leverages our suite of data imputation queries to automatically select the most effective imputation query for each missing value. A greedy iterative algorithm is proposed to schedule the imputation order of the different missing values in a database, and in turn the issuing of their corresponding imputation queries, for improving the accuracy and efficiency of WebPut. Moreover, several optimization techniques are also proposed to reduce the cost of estimating the confidence of imputation queries at both the tuple-level and the database-level. Experiments based on several real-world data collections demonstrate not only the effectiveness of WebPut compared to existing approaches, but also the efficiency of our proposed algorithms and optimization techniques. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  16. A collaborative filtering-based approach to biomedical knowledge discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Jake; Gakkhar, Sitanshu; Gottlieb, Michael; Rashnavadi, Tahereh; Lin, Santina; Siu, Celia; Smith, Maia; Jones, Martin R; Krzywinski, Martin; Jones, Steven J M; Wren, Jonathan

    2018-02-15

    The increase in publication rates makes it challenging for an individual researcher to stay abreast of all relevant research in order to find novel research hypotheses. Literature-based discovery methods make use of knowledge graphs built using text mining and can infer future associations between biomedical concepts that will likely occur in new publications. These predictions are a valuable resource for researchers to explore a research topic. Current methods for prediction are based on the local structure of the knowledge graph. A method that uses global knowledge from across the knowledge graph needs to be developed in order to make knowledge discovery a frequently used tool by researchers. We propose an approach based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) that is able to combine data from across the knowledge graph through a reduced representation. Using cooccurrence data extracted from published literature, we show that SVD performs better than the leading methods for scoring discoveries. We also show the diminishing predictive power of knowledge discovery as we compare our predictions with real associations that appear further into the future. Finally, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of the SVD approach against another well-performing system using several predicted associations. All code and results files for this analysis can be accessed at https://github.com/jakelever/knowledgediscovery. sjones@bcgsc.ca. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Lessons Learned From Community-Based Approaches to Sodium Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Heather; Strazza, Karen; Losby PhD, Jan L.; Lane, Rashon; Mugavero, Kristy; Anater, Andrea S.; Frost, Corey; Margolis, Marjorie; Hersey, James

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This article describes lessons from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiative encompassing sodium reduction interventions in six communities. Design A multiple case study design was used. Setting This evaluation examined data from programs implemented in six communities located in New York (Broome County, Schenectady County, and New York City); California (Los Angeles County and Shasta County); and Kansas (Shawnee County). Subjects Participants (n = 80) included program staff, program directors, state-level staff, and partners. Measures Measures for this evaluation included challenges, facilitators, and lessons learned from implementing sodium reduction strategies. Analysis The project team conducted a document review of program materials and semi structured interviews 12 to 14 months after implementation. The team coded and analyzed data deductively and inductively. Results Five lessons for implementing community-based sodium reduction approaches emerged: (1) build relationships with partners to understand their concerns, (2) involve individuals knowledgeable about specific venues early, (3) incorporate sodium reduction efforts and messaging into broader nutrition efforts, (4) design the program to reduce sodium gradually to take into account consumer preferences and taste transitions, and (5) identify ways to address the cost of lower-sodium products. Conclusion The experiences of the six communities may assist practitioners in planning community-based sodium reduction interventions. Addressing sodium reduction using a community-based approach can foster meaningful change in dietary sodium consumption. PMID:24575726

  18. TOURISM SEGMENTATION BASED ON TOURISTS PREFERENCES: A MULTIVARIATE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Dominique Ferreira

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, tourism became one of the most important sectors of the international economy. Specifically in Portugal and Brazil, its contribution to Gross Domestic Product (GDP and job creation is quite relevant. In this sense, to follow a strong marketing approach on the management of tourism resources of a country comes to be paramount. Such an approach should be based on innovations which help unveil the preferences of tourists with accuracy, turning it into a competitive advantage. In this context, the main objective of the present study is to illustrate the importance and benefits associated with the use of multivariate methodologies for market segmentation. Another objective of this work is to illustrate on the importance of a post hoc segmentation. In this work, the authors applied a Cluster Analysis, with a hierarchical method followed by an  optimization method. The main results of this study allow the identification of five clusters that are distinguished by assigning special importance to certain tourism attributes at the moment of choosing a specific destination. Thus, the authors present the advantages of post hoc segmentation based on tourists’ preferences, in opposition to an a priori segmentation based on socio-demographic characteristics.

  19. Lessons learned from community-based approaches to sodium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Heather; Strazza, Karen; Losby, Jan L; Lane, Rashon; Mugavero, Kristy; Anater, Andrea S; Frost, Corey; Margolis, Marjorie; Hersey, James

    2015-01-01

    This article describes lessons from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiative encompassing sodium reduction interventions in six communities. A multiple case study design was used. This evaluation examined data from programs implemented in six communities located in New York (Broome County, Schenectady County, and New York City); California (Los Angeles County and Shasta County); and Kansas (Shawnee County). Participants (n = 80) included program staff, program directors, state-level staff, and partners. Measures for this evaluation included challenges, facilitators, and lessons learned from implementing sodium reduction strategies. The project team conducted a document review of program materials and semistructured interviews 12 to 14 months after implementation. The team coded and analyzed data deductively and inductively. Five lessons for implementing community-based sodium reduction approaches emerged: (1) build relationships with partners to understand their concerns, (2) involve individuals knowledgeable about specific venues early, (3) incorporate sodium reduction efforts and messaging into broader nutrition efforts, (4) design the program to reduce sodium gradually to take into account consumer preferences and taste transitions, and (5) identify ways to address the cost of lower-sodium products. The experiences of the six communities may assist practitioners in planning community-based sodium reduction interventions. Addressing sodium reduction using a community-based approach can foster meaningful change in dietary sodium consumption.

  20. A risk-based approach to prioritize underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambariah, V.; Travis, C.C.; Trabalka, J.R.; Thomas, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a risk-based approach for rapid prioritization of low level liquid radioactive waste underground storage tanks (LLLW USTs) for possible interim corrective measures and/or ultimate closure. The ranking of LLLW USTs is needed to ensure that tanks with the greatest potential for adverse impact on the environment and human health receive top priority for further evaluation and remediation. Wastes from the LLLW USTs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were pumped out at the time the tanks were removed from service. The residual liquids and sludge contain a mixture of radionuclides and chemicals. Contaminants of concern that were identified in the liquid phase of the inactive LLLW USTs include, the radionuclides, 9O Sr, 137 Cs and 233 U and the chemicals, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, methyl ethyl ketone, mercury, lead and chromium. The risk-based approach for prioritization of the LLLW USTs is based upon three major criteria: (1) leaking characteristics of the tank; (2) location of the tanks; and (3) toxic potential of the tank contents

  1. Big data analytics in immunology: a knowledge-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Sun, Jing; Chitkushev, Lou; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    With the vast amount of immunological data available, immunology research is entering the big data era. These data vary in granularity, quality, and complexity and are stored in various formats, including publications, technical reports, and databases. The challenge is to make the transition from data to actionable knowledge and wisdom and bridge the knowledge gap and application gap. We report a knowledge-based approach based on a framework called KB-builder that facilitates data mining by enabling fast development and deployment of web-accessible immunological data knowledge warehouses. Immunological knowledge discovery relies heavily on both the availability of accurate, up-to-date, and well-organized data and the proper analytics tools. We propose the use of knowledge-based approaches by developing knowledgebases combining well-annotated data with specialized analytical tools and integrating them into analytical workflow. A set of well-defined workflow types with rich summarization and visualization capacity facilitates the transformation from data to critical information and knowledge. By using KB-builder, we enabled streamlining of normally time-consuming processes of database development. The knowledgebases built using KB-builder will speed up rational vaccine design by providing accurate and well-annotated data coupled with tailored computational analysis tools and workflow.

  2. Big Data Analytics in Immunology: A Knowledge-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Lan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the vast amount of immunological data available, immunology research is entering the big data era. These data vary in granularity, quality, and complexity and are stored in various formats, including publications, technical reports, and databases. The challenge is to make the transition from data to actionable knowledge and wisdom and bridge the knowledge gap and application gap. We report a knowledge-based approach based on a framework called KB-builder that facilitates data mining by enabling fast development and deployment of web-accessible immunological data knowledge warehouses. Immunological knowledge discovery relies heavily on both the availability of accurate, up-to-date, and well-organized data and the proper analytics tools. We propose the use of knowledge-based approaches by developing knowledgebases combining well-annotated data with specialized analytical tools and integrating them into analytical workflow. A set of well-defined workflow types with rich summarization and visualization capacity facilitates the transformation from data to critical information and knowledge. By using KB-builder, we enabled streamlining of normally time-consuming processes of database development. The knowledgebases built using KB-builder will speed up rational vaccine design by providing accurate and well-annotated data coupled with tailored computational analysis tools and workflow.

  3. Renewable resources-based approach to biantennary glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabandeh, Mojtaba; Salman, Abbas Abdulameer; Goh, Ean Wai; Heidelberg, Thorsten; Hussen, Rusnah Syahila Duali

    2018-01-31

    A new synthesis approach towards biantennary lipids of Guerbet glycoside type was developed based on oleic acid as sustainable resource. Functionalization of the double bond provided access to primary alcohols with α-branched C 19 -skeleton. Formulation studies with corresponding lactosides indicated formation of vesicles with high assembly stability. A relatively narrow bimodal size distribution of the latter, which turns into a narrow unimodal distribution of small vesicles upon addition of an ionic cosurfactant, suggests potential for a vesicular drug delivery system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dependence-Based Segmentation Approach for Detecting Morpheme Boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khorsi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The unsupervised morphology processing in the emerging mutant languages has the advantage over the human/supervised processing of being more agiler. The main drawback is, however, their accuracy. This article describes an unsupervised morphemes identification approach based on an intuitive and formal definition of event dependence. The input is no more than a plain text of the targeted language. Although the original objective of this work was classical Arabic, the test was conducted on an English set as well. Tests on these two languages show a very acceptable precision and recall. A deeper refinement of the output allowed 89% precision and 78% recall on Arabic.

  5. A design approach for systems based on magnetic pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen Kumar, D. Durga; Mitra, S.; Senthil, K.; Sharma, D. K.; Rajan, Rehim N.; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2008-01-01

    A design approach giving the optimum number of stages in a magnetic pulse compression circuit and gain per stage is given. The limitation on the maximum gain per stage is discussed. The total system volume minimization is done by considering the energy storage capacitor volume and magnetic core volume at each stage. At the end of this paper, the design of a magnetic pulse compression based linear induction accelerator of 200 kV, 5 kA, and 100 ns with a repetition rate of 100 Hz is discussed with its experimental results

  6. Distributed, price-based control approach to market-based operation of future power systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokic, A.; Bosch, van den P.P.J.; Hermans, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present, discuss and illustrate on examples the price-based control paradigm as a suitable approach to solve some of the challenging problems facing future, market-based power systems. It is illustrated how global objectives and constraints are optimally translated into time-varying

  7. One Piece Orbitozygomatic Approach Based on the Sphenoid Ridge Keyhole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiriev, Toma; Poulsgaard, Lars; Fugleholm, Kåre

    2016-01-01

    The one-piece orbitozygomatic (OZ) approach is traditionally based on the McCarty keyhole. Here, we present the use of the sphenoid ridge keyhole and its possible advantages as a keyhole for the one-piece OZ approach. Using transillumination technique the osteology of the sphenoid ridge...... was examined on 20 anatomical dry skull specimens. The results were applied to one-piece OZ approaches performed on freshly frozen cadaver heads. We defined the center of the sphenoid ridge keyhole as a superficial projection on the lateral skull surface of the most anterior and thickest part of the sphenoid...... ridge. It was located 22 mm (standard deviation [SD], 0.22 mm) from the superior temporal line; 10.7 mm (SD, 0.08 mm) posterior and 7.1 mm (SD, 0.22 mm) inferior to the frontozygomatic suture. The sphenoid ridge burr hole provides exposure of frontal, temporal dura as well as periorbita, which...

  8. Pedestrian safety management using the risk-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanowska Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a concept of a multi-level pedestrian safety management system. Three management levels are distinguished: strategic, tactical and operational. The basis for the proposed approach to pedestrian safety management is a risk-based method. In the approach the elements of behavioural and systemic theories were used, allowing for the development of a formalised and repeatable procedure integrating the phases of risk assessment and response to the hazards of road crashes involving pedestrians. Key to the method are tools supporting pedestrian safety management. According to the risk management approach, the tools can be divided into two groups: tools supporting risk assessment and tools supporting risk response. In the paper attention is paid to selected tools supporting risk assessment, with particular emphasis on the methods for estimating forecasted pedestrian safety measures (at strategic, national and regional level and identification of particularly dangerous locations in terms of pedestrian safety at tactical (regional and local and operational level. The proposed pedestrian safety management methods and tools can support road administration in making rational decisions in terms of road safety, safety of road infrastructure, crash elimination measures or reducing the consequences suffered by road users (particularly pedestrians as a result of road crashes.

  9. Systematic approach for synthesis of palm oil-based biorefinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NG, Rex T. L.; NG, Denny K. S.; LAM, Hon Loong [Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Centre of Excellence for Green Technologies, Univ. of Nottingham, Selangor, (Malaysia); TAY, Douglas H. S.; LIM, Joseph H. E. [2GGS Eco Solutions Sdn Bhd, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2012-11-01

    Various types of palm oil biomasses are generated from palm oil mill when crude palm oil (CPO) is produced from fresh fruit bunch (FFB). In the current practice, palm oil biomasses are used as the main source of energy input in the palm oil mill to produce steam and electricity. Moreover, those biomasses are regarded as by-products and can be reclaimed easily. Therefore, there is a continuous increasing interest concerning biomasses generated from the palm oil mill as a source of renewable energy. Although various technologies have been exploited to produce bio-fuel (i.e., briquette, pellet, etc.) as well as heat and power generation, however, no systematic approach which can analyse and optimise the synthesise biorefinery is presented. In this work, a systematic approach for synthesis and optimisation of palm oil-based biorefinery which including palm oil mill and refinery with maximum economic performance is developed. The optimised network configuration with achieves the maximum economic performance can also be determined. To illustrate the proposed approach, a case study is solved in this work.

  10. Fuzzy Axiomatic Design approach based green supplier selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannan, Devika; Govindan, Kannan; Rajendran, Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    proposes a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) approach called Fuzzy Axiomatic Design (FAD) to select the best green supplier for Singapore-based plastic manufacturing company. At first, the environmental criteria was developed along with the traditional criteria based on the literature review......Abstract Green Supply Chain Management (GSCM) is a developing concept recently utilized by manufacturing firms of all sizes. All industries, small or large, seek improvements in the purchasing of raw materials, manufacturing, allocation, transportation efficiency, in curbing storage time, importing...... responsible in addition to being efficiently managed. A significant way to implement responsible GSCM is to reconsider, in innovative ways, the purchase and supply cycle, and a preliminary step would be to ensure that the supplier of goods successfully incorporates green criteria. Therefore, this paper...

  11. A Model-Based Approach to Constructing Music Similarity Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Kris; Lamere, Paul

    2006-12-01

    Several authors have presented systems that estimate the audio similarity of two pieces of music through the calculation of a distance metric, such as the Euclidean distance, between spectral features calculated from the audio, related to the timbre or pitch of the signal. These features can be augmented with other, temporally or rhythmically based features such as zero-crossing rates, beat histograms, or fluctuation patterns to form a more well-rounded music similarity function. It is our contention that perceptual or cultural labels, such as the genre, style, or emotion of the music, are also very important features in the perception of music. These labels help to define complex regions of similarity within the available feature spaces. We demonstrate a machine-learning-based approach to the construction of a similarity metric, which uses this contextual information to project the calculated features into an intermediate space where a music similarity function that incorporates some of the cultural information may be calculated.

  12. Polynomial fuzzy model-based approach for underactuated surface vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khooban, Mohammad Hassan; Vafamand, Navid; Dragicevic, Tomislav

    2018-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to introduce a new polynomial fuzzy model-based structure for a class of marine systems with non-linear and polynomial dynamics. The suggested technique relies on a polynomial Takagi–Sugeno (T–S) fuzzy modelling, a polynomial dynamic parallel distributed compensation...... surface vessel (USV). Additionally, in order to overcome the USV control challenges, including the USV un-modelled dynamics, complex nonlinear dynamics, external disturbances and parameter uncertainties, the polynomial fuzzy model representation is adopted. Moreover, the USV-based control structure...... and a sum-of-squares (SOS) decomposition. The new proposed approach is a generalisation of the standard T–S fuzzy models and linear matrix inequality which indicated its effectiveness in decreasing the tracking time and increasing the efficiency of the robust tracking control problem for an underactuated...

  13. A New Design Approach to Game-Based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2012-01-01

    to ground the student’s reason to learn. This paper proposes a different approach: using visualisation in immersive 3D worlds as both documentation of learning progress and as a reward system which motivates further learning. The overall design idea is to build a game based learning system from three......This paper puts forward a new design perspective for gamebased learning. The general idea is to abandon the long sought-after dream of designing a closed learning system, where students in both primary and secondary school could learn – without the interference of teachers – whatever subject......-based learning system, but will also confront aspects of modern learning theory, especially the notion of reference between the content of an assignment and the reality with which it should or could be connected (situated learning). The second idea promotes a way of tackling the common experience of the average...

  14. Opportunistic splitting for scheduling using a score-based approach

    KAUST Repository

    Rashid, Faraan

    2012-06-01

    We consider the problem of scheduling a user in a multi-user wireless environment in a distributed manner. The opportunistic splitting algorithm is applied to find the best group of users without reporting the channel state information to the centralized scheduler. The users find the best among themselves while requiring just a ternary feedback from the common receiver at the end of each mini-slot. The original splitting algorithm is modified to handle users with asymmetric channel conditions. We use a score-based approach with the splitting algorithm to introduce time and throughput fairness while exploiting the multi-user diversity of the network. Analytical and simulation results are given to show that the modified score-based splitting algorithm works well as a fair scheduling scheme with good spectral efficiency and reduced feedback. © 2012 IEEE.

  15. Taxonomy-Based Approaches to Quality Assurance of Ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Halper

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ontologies are important components of health information management systems. As such, the quality of their content is of paramount importance. It has been proven to be practical to develop quality assurance (QA methodologies based on automated identification of sets of concepts expected to have higher likelihood of errors. Four kinds of such sets (called QA-sets organized around the themes of complex and uncommonly modeled concepts are introduced. A survey of different methodologies based on these QA-sets and the results of applying them to various ontologies are presented. Overall, following these approaches leads to higher QA yields and better utilization of QA personnel. The formulation of additional QA-set methodologies will further enhance the suite of available ontology QA tools.

  16. Space nuclear reactor system diagnosis: Knowledge-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, Y.T.D.

    1990-01-01

    SP-100 space nuclear reactor system development is a joint effort by the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The system is designed to operate in isolation for many years, and is possibly subject to little or no remote maintenance. This dissertation proposes a knowledge based diagnostic system which, in principle, can diagnose the faults which can either cause reactor shutdown or lead to another serious problem. This framework in general can be applied to the fully specified system if detailed design information becomes available. The set of faults considered herein is identified based on heuristic knowledge about the system operation. The suitable approach to diagnostic problem solving is proposed after investigating the most prevalent methodologies in Artificial Intelligence as well as the causal analysis of the system. Deep causal knowledge modeling based on digraph, fault-tree or logic flowgraph methodology would present a need for some knowledge representation to handle the time dependent system behavior. A proposed qualitative temporal knowledge modeling methodology, using rules with specified time delay among the process variables, has been proposed and is used to develop the diagnostic sufficient rule set. The rule set has been modified by using a time zone approach to have a robust system design. The sufficient rule set is transformed to a sufficient and necessary one by searching the whole knowledge base. Qualitative data analysis is proposed in analyzing the measured data if in a real time situation. An expert system shell - Intelligence Compiler is used to develop the prototype system. Frames are used for the process variables. Forward chaining rules are used in monitoring and backward chaining rules are used in diagnosis

  17. A hierarchical fuzzy rule-based approach to aphasia diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Moshtagh-Khorasani, Majid

    2007-10-01

    Aphasia diagnosis is a particularly challenging medical diagnostic task due to the linguistic uncertainty and vagueness, inconsistencies in the definition of aphasic syndromes, large number of measurements with imprecision, natural diversity and subjectivity in test objects as well as in opinions of experts who diagnose the disease. To efficiently address this diagnostic process, a hierarchical fuzzy rule-based structure is proposed here that considers the effect of different features of aphasia by statistical analysis in its construction. This approach can be efficient for diagnosis of aphasia and possibly other medical diagnostic applications due to its fuzzy and hierarchical reasoning construction. Initially, the symptoms of the disease which each consists of different features are analyzed statistically. The measured statistical parameters from the training set are then used to define membership functions and the fuzzy rules. The resulting two-layered fuzzy rule-based system is then compared with a back propagating feed-forward neural network for diagnosis of four Aphasia types: Anomic, Broca, Global and Wernicke. In order to reduce the number of required inputs, the technique is applied and compared on both comprehensive and spontaneous speech tests. Statistical t-test analysis confirms that the proposed approach uses fewer Aphasia features while also presenting a significant improvement in terms of accuracy.

  18. THE TASK-BASED APPROACH IN LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquilino Sánchez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The Task-Based Approach (TBA has gained popularity in the field of language teaching since the last decade of the 20th Century and significant scholars have joined the discussion and increased the amount of analytical studies on the issue. Nevertheless experimental research is poor, and the tendency of some of the scholars is nowadays shifting towards a more tempered and moderate stand on their claims. Reasons for that are various: the difficulty in the implementation of the method in the classroom, the difficulty in elaborating materials following the TBA and the scarcity of task-based manuals count as important and perhaps decisive arguments. But there are also theoretical implications in the TBA which do not seem to be fully convincing or may lack sound foundations. In this paper I will attempt to describe the TBA criticaIly, pointing out what I consider positive in this approach, and underlining the inadequacy of some assumptions and conclusions. The design of a new TBA model is not the goal of this study. But the conclusions suggest that tasks may contribute to the production of a more refined and complete foreign language syllabus, helping to motivate the students and focus the attention of teachers and learners on meaning and communicative language use.

  19. Interactive teaching materials based on scientific approach: triangles and quadrilaterals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujiastuti Heni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the Indonesian government’s efforts to improve the quality of education is by changing the curriculum. Currently the Curriculum 2013 is being implemented in schools. Implementation of Curriculum 2013 is require teaching materials in accordance with the characteristics of the students, utilizing computer technology facilities, and contains the components of the scientific approach. Therefore, it is necessary to develop teaching materials in accordance with the Curriculum 2013. In this research we developed the Interactive Teaching Materials based on Scientific Approach (ITMSA. The research method is research and development (R&D which consist of ten steps. The product design validation performed by multimedia, mathematics, and mathematics education expert involving lecturers and mathematics teacher. Utility testing of product conducted on junior high school students in Serang City, Banten Province, Indonesia. Based on research known that the ITMSA obtained a total score 85,30% from mathematics expert, 87,80% from mathematics education expert, 83,60% from multimedia expert, and 89,40% from students. In addition, students mathematical concept understanding who learn by using ITMSA better than student who learn without ITMSA. From these results concluded that the ITMSA is considered feasible and can be used in mathematics teaching in schools.

  20. Radar Rainfall Bias Correction based on Deep Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Han, Dawei; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.

    2017-04-01

    Radar rainfall measurement errors can be considerably attributed to various sources including intricate synoptic regimes. Temperature, humidity and wind are typically acknowledged as critical meteorological factors in inducing the precipitation discrepancies aloft and on the ground. The conventional practices mainly use the radar-gauge or geostatistical techniques by direct weighted interpolation algorithms as bias correction schemes whereas rarely consider the atmospheric effects. This study aims to comprehensively quantify those meteorological elements' impacts on radar-gauge rainfall bias correction based on a deep learning approach. The deep learning approach employs deep convolutional neural networks to automatically extract three-dimensional meteorological features for target recognition based on high range resolution profiles. The complex nonlinear relationships between input and target variables can be implicitly detected by such a scheme, which is validated on the test dataset. The proposed bias correction scheme is expected to be a promising improvement in systematically minimizing the synthesized atmospheric effects on rainfall discrepancies between radar and rain gauges, which can be useful in many meteorological and hydrological applications (e.g., real-time flood forecasting) especially for regions with complex atmospheric conditions.