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Sample records for mode-locked krypton ion

  1. $CO_{2}$ laser ion source Comparison between mode-locked and free- running laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Lisi, N; Scrivens, R

    2001-01-01

    The production of highly charged ions in a CO/sub 2/ laser-generated plasma is compared for different laser pulse-time structures. The work was performed at the CERN Laser Ion Source, which has the aim of developing a high current, high charge-state ion source for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). When an intense laser pulse is focused onto a high-Z metal target, the ions expanding in the plasma plume are suitable for extraction from the plasma and matching into a synchrotron. For the first time, a comparison is made between free- running pulses with randomly fluctuating intensity, and mode-locked pulse trains with a reproducible structure and the same energy. Despite the lower power density with respect to the mode-locked pulse train, the free-running pulse provides higher charge states and higher yield. (10 refs).

  2. Krypton ion implantation effect on selenium nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Suresh; Chauhan, R. P.

    2017-08-01

    Among the rapidly progressing interdisciplinary areas of physics, chemistry, material science etc. ion induced modifications of materials is one such evolving field. It has been realized in recent years that a material, in the form of an accelerated ion beam, embedded into a target specimen offers a most productive tool for transforming its properties in a controlled manner. In semiconductors particularly, where the transport behavior is determined by very small concentrations of certain impurities, implantation of ions may bring considerable changes. The present work is based on the study of the effect of krypton ion implantation on selenium nanowires. Selenium nanowires of diameter 80 nm were synthesized by template assisted electro deposition technique. Implantation of krypton ions was done at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, India. The effect of implantation on structural, electrical and optical properties of selenium nanowires was investigated. XRD analysis of pristine and implanted nanowires shows no shifting in the peak position but there is a variation in the relative intensity with fluence. UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the decrease in the optical band gap with fluence. PL spectra showed emission peak at higher wavelength. A substantial rise in the current was observed from I-V measurements, after implantation and with the increase in fluence. The increase in current conduction may be due to the increase in the current carriers.

  3. The role of dynamo fluctuations in anomalous ion heating, mode locking, and flow generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Gatto, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fitzpatrick, R.; Hegna, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    Anomalous ion heating intrinsic to magnetic fluctuation-induced electron heat transport, the locking of global modes through wall conditions, and flow generation via the magnetic Reynolds stress all derive from the global, m=1 tearing modes familiar in the RFP as the dynamo modes. These important processes are investigated analytically and numerically, yielding new insights and predictions for comparison with experiment. (author)

  4. An automatic mode-locked system for passively mode-locked fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Xu, Jun; Chen, Guoliang; Mei, Li; Yi, Bo

    2013-12-01

    This paper designs and implements one kind of automatic mode-locked system. It can adjust a passively mode-locked fiber laser to keep steady mode-locked states automatically. So the unsteadiness of traditional passively mode-locked fiber laser can be avoided. The system transforms optical signals into electrical pulse signals and sends them into MCU after processing. MCU calculates the frequency of the signals and judges the state of the output based on a quick judgment algorithm. A high-speed comparator is used to check the signals and the comparison voltage can be adjusted to improve the measuring accuracy. Then by controlling two polarization controllers at an angle of 45degrees to each other, MCU extrudes the optical fibers to change the polarization until it gets proper mode-locked output. So the system can continuously monitor the output signal and get it back to mode-locked states quickly and automatically. States of the system can be displayed on the LCD and PC. The parameters of the steady mode-locked states can be stored into an EEPROM so that the system will get into mode-locked states immediately next time. Actual experiments showed that, for a 6.238MHz passively mode-locked fiber lasers, the system can get into steady mode-locked states automatically in less than 90s after starting the system. The expected lock time can be reduced to less than 20s after follow up improvements.

  5. Mode-locked silicon evanescent lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Brian R; Fang, Alexander W; Cohen, Oded; Bowers, John E

    2007-09-03

    We demonstrate electrically pumped lasers on silicon that produce pulses at repetition rates up to 40 GHz. The mode locked lasers generate 4 ps pulses with low jitter and extinction ratios above 18 dB, making them suitable for data and telecommunication transmitters and for clock generation and distribution. Results of both passive and hybrid mode locking are discussed. This type of device could enable new silicon based integrated technologies, such as optical time division multiplexing (OTDM), wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), and optical code division multiple access (OCDMA).

  6. The sputtering of the deformed gold under irradiation with krypton swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didyk, A.Yu.; Semina, V.K.; Hofman, A.

    2002-01-01

    The results about sputtering yield of gold irradiated by 86 Kr ions with high inelastic energy losses up to a fluence of 10 14 ion/cm 2 are presented. It was shown that the sputtering (evaporation) yield strongly depends on the initial defect concentration in gold. The sputtering yield begins to grow very strongly with the increasing of damage created by heavy ion elastic and inelastic energy losses. The temperature on the surface in the area around krypton ion trajectory is much higher than the melting and evaporation temperatures for gold as follows from calculations with the various expressions and models

  7. The Sputtering of the Deformed Gold under Irradiation with Krypton Swift Heavy Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Didyk, A Yu; Semina, V K

    2002-01-01

    The results about sputtering yield of gold irradiated by ^{86}Kr ions with high inelastic energy losses up to a fluence of 10^{14} ion/cm^2 are presented. It was shown that the sputtering (evaporation) yield strongly depends on the initial defect concentration in gold. The sputtering yield begins to grow very strongly with the increasing of damage created by heavy ion elastic and inelastic energy losses. The temperature on the surface in the area around krypton ion trajectory is much higher than the melting and evaporation temperatures for gold as follows from calculations with the various expressions and models.

  8. Theory of Passively Mode-Locked Photonic Crystal Semiconductor Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Mikkel; Blaaberg, Søren; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We report the first theoretical investigation of passive mode-locking in photonic crystal mode-locked lasers. Related work has investigated coupled-resonator-optical-waveguide structures in the regime of active mode-locking [Opt. Express 13, 4539-4553 (2005)]. An extensive numerical investigation...

  9. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking.

  10. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-09

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  11. Delay differential equations for mode-locked semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, Andrei G; Turaev, Dmitry; Kozyreff, Gregory

    2004-06-01

    We propose a new model for passive mode locking that is a set of ordinary delay differential equations. We assume a ring-cavity geometry and Lorentzian spectral filtering of the pulses but do not use small gain and loss and weak saturation approximations. By means of a continuation method, we study mode-locking solutions and their stability. We find that stable mode locking can exist even when the nonlasing state between pulses becomes unstable.

  12. DLTS spectra of silicon diodes with p+-n-junction irradiated with high energy krypton ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai A. Poklonski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available p+-n-Diodes have been studied. The diodes were manufactured on wafers (thickness 460 μm, (111 plane of uniformly phosphorus doped float-zone-grown single-crystal silicon. The resistivity of silicon was 90 Ω cm and the phosphorus concentration was 5×1013 cm−3. The diodes were irradiated with 250 MeV krypton ions. The irradiation fluence was 108 cm−2. Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS was used to examine the defects induced by high energy krypton ion implantation. The DLTS spectra were recorded at a frequency of 1 MHz in the 78–290 K temperature range. The capacity-voltage characteristics have been measured at a reverse bias voltage from 0 to −19 V at a frequency of 1 MHz. We show that the main irradiation-induced defects are A-centers and divacancies. The behavior of DLTS spectra in the 150–260 K temperature range depends essentially on the emission voltage Ue. The variation of Ue allows us to separate the contributions of different defects into the DLTS spectrum in the 150–260 K temperature range. We show that, in addition to A-centers and divacancies, irradiation produces multivacancy complexes with the energy level Et = Ec−(0.5±0.02 eV and an electron capture cross section of ~4×10–13 cm2.

  13. Use of a krypton isotope for rapid ion changeover at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-inch cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soli, George A.; Nichols, Donald K.

    1989-01-01

    An isotope of krypton, Kr86, has been combined with a mix of Ar, Ne, and N ions at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source, at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory cyclotron, to provide rapid ion changeover in Single Event Phenomena (SEP) testing. The new technique has been proved out successfully by a recent Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) test in which it was found that there was no measurable contamination from other isotopes.

  14. Mode-Locked Semiconductor Lasers for Optical Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Larsson, David; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2005-01-01

    We present investigations on 10 and 40 GHz monolithic mode-locked lasers for applications in optical communications systems. New all-active lasers with one to three quantum wells have been designed, fabricated and characterized.......We present investigations on 10 and 40 GHz monolithic mode-locked lasers for applications in optical communications systems. New all-active lasers with one to three quantum wells have been designed, fabricated and characterized....

  15. Monolithic Hybrid and Passive Mode-Locked 40GHz Quantum Dot Laser Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, M. G.; Larsson, David; Rae, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    For the first time hybrid and passive mode-locking jitter performance is investigated in 40GHz quantum-dot mode-locked lasers. Record low passive mode-locking jitter of 219fs is presented, along with promising hybrid mode-locking results of 124fs....

  16. Choice of materials for the immobilization of 85-krypton in a metallic matrix by combined ion implantation and sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmell, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Immobilization in a metal matrix by combined ion implantation and sputtering promises to offer an ideal method for the containment of krypton-85 arising from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. A 50 kW inactive pilot plant has been built and operated to prepare a copper deposit 22 mm thick weighing 23 kg and containing over 30 liters of inactive gas. The gas incorporation rate exceeded the design figure of 0.3 liters/hour and the vessel was operated at powers up to 30 kW, which corresponds to that envisaged for the industrial vessel. The power consumption was less than 100 kWh/liter. A full-scale vessel (1 m long, 0.26 m diameter) has also been tested at low power. Samples of alternative candidate materials: stainless steel, incoloy, nickel and nickel-lanthanum have been prepared and tested. Nickel appears to be the most promising since it incorporates gas with an efficiency 70% greater than copper and also retains the gas to a temperature at least 100 0 C higher than copper. Tests are being carried out with 100 Curies of radioactive krypton in order to demonstrate that the process will operate satisfactorily at the high internal β irradiation levels that will exist in an active plant and to prepare samples containing krypton-85 for long term leakage measurements and for assessment of any effects caused by the build-up of the decay product rubidium

  17. Total projectile electron loss cross sections of U^{28+} ions in collisions with gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Beam lifetimes of stored U^{28+} ions with kinetic energies of 30 and 50  MeV/u, respectively, were measured in the experimental storage ring of the GSI accelerator facility. By using the internal gas target station of the experimental storage ring, it was possible to obtain total projectile electron loss cross sections for collisions with several gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton from the beam lifetime data. The resulting experimental cross sections are compared to predictions by two theoretical approaches, namely the CTMC method and a combination of the DEPOSIT code and the RICODE program.

  18. Pulse properties of external cavity mode locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulet, Josep; Kroh, Marcel; Mørk, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an external-cavity mode-locked semiconductor laser is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The optimization analysis focuses on the regimes of stable mode locking and the generation of sub-picosecond optical pulses. We demonstrate stable output pulses down to one...... picosecond duration with more than 30 dB trailing pulse suppression. The limiting factors to the device performance are investigated on the basis of a fully-distributed time-domain model.We find that ultrafast gain dynamics effectively reduce the pulse-shaping strength and inhibit the generation...

  19. Modelling colliding-pulse mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Svend

    or to determine the optimum operation conditions. The purpose of this thesis is to elucidate some of the physics of interest in the field of semiconductor laser modelling, semiconductor optics and fiber optics. To be more specific we will investigate: The Colliding-Pulse Mode-Locked (CPM) Quantum Well (QW) laser...

  20. Dispersion-managed semiconductor mode-locked ring laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resan, Bojan; Archundia, Luis; Delfyett, Peter J; Alphonse, Gerard

    2003-08-01

    A novel breathing-mode external sigma-ring-cavity semiconductor mode-locked laser is developed. Intracavity pulse compression and stretching produce linearly chirped pulses with an asymmetric exponential temporal profile. External dispersion compensation reduces the pulse duration to 274 fs (within 10% of the bandwidth limit).

  1. Diode array pumped, non-linear mirror Q-switched and mode-locked ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A non-linear mirror consisting of a lithium triborate crystal and a dichroic output coupler are used to mode-lock (passively) an Nd : YVO4 laser, pumped by a diode laser array. The laser can operate both in cw mode-locked and simultaneously Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) regime. The peak power of the laser ...

  2. Diode array pumped, non-linear mirror Q-switched and mode-locked ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A non-linear mirror consisting of a lithium triborate crystal and a dichroic output coupler are used to mode-lock (passively) an Nd : YVO4 laser, pumped by a diode laser array. The laser can operate both in cw mode-locked and simultaneously Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) regime. The peak power of the laser while ...

  3. Diode array pumped, non-linear mirror Q-switched and mode-locked

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A non-linear mirror consisting of a lithium triborate crystal and a dichroic output coupler are used to mode-lock (passively) an Nd : YVO4 laser, pumped by a diode laser array. The laser can operate both in cw mode-locked and simultaneously Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) regime. The peak power of the laser while ...

  4. Color center lasers passively mode locked by quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.N.; Soccolich, C.E.; Bar-Joseph, I.; Sauer, N.; Chang, T.Y.; Miller, B.I.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes how, using multiple quantum well (MQW) saturable absorbers, the authors passively mode locked a NaCl color center laser to produce 275 fs transform-limited, pedestal-free pulses with as high as 3.7 kW peak power. The pulses are tunable from λ = 1.59 to 1.7 μm by choosing MQW's with different bandgaps. They shortened the output pulses from the laser to 25 fs using the technique of soliton compression in a fiber. The steady-state operation of the laser requires the combination of a fast saturable absorber and gain saturation. In addition to the NaCl laser, they passively mode locked a Tl 0 (1):KCl color center laser and produced -- 22 ps pulses. Although the 275 fs pulses from the NaCl laser are Gaussian, when broadened, the pulses acquire an asymmetric spectrum because of carrier-induced refractive index changes

  5. Dispersion engineering of mode-locked fibre lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. I.

    2018-03-01

    Mode-locked fibre lasers are important sources of ultrashort pulses, where stable pulse generation is achieved through a balance of periodic amplitude and phase evolutions. A range of distinct cavity pulse dynamics have been revealed, arising from the interplay between dispersion and nonlinearity in addition to dissipative processes such as filtering. This has led to the discovery of numerous novel operating regimes, offering significantly improved laser performance. In this Topical Review, we summarise the main steady-state pulse dynamics reported to date through cavity dispersion engineering, including average solitons, dispersion-managed solitons, dissipative solitons, giant-chirped pulses and similaritons. Characteristic features and the stabilisation mechanism of each regime are described, supported by numerical modelling, in addition to the typical performance and limitations. Opportunities for further pulse energy scaling are discussed, in addition to considering other recent advances including automated self-tuning cavities and fluoride-fibre-based mid-infrared mode-locked lasers.

  6. Chirp of monolithic colliding pulse mode-locked diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, M.; Bischoff, S.; Franck, Thorkild

    1997-01-01

    Spectrally resolved streak camera measurements of picosecond pulses emitted by hybridly colliding pulse mode-locked (CPM) laser diodes are presented in this letter. Depending on the modulation frequency both blue-chirped (upchirped) and red-chirped (downchirped) pulses can be observed. The two...... different regimes and the transition between them are characterized experimentally and the behavior is explained on the basis of our model for the CPM laser dynamics. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics....

  7. Semiconductor Mode-Locked Lasers for Optical Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten

    2003-01-01

    The thesis deals with the design and fabrication of semiconductor mode-locked lasers for use in optical communication systems. The properties of pulse sources and characterization methods are described as well as requirements for application in communication systems. Especially, the importance of......, and ways to reduce high-frequency jitter is discussed. The main result of the thesis is a new design of the epitaxial structure that both enables simplified fabrication and improves the properties of monolithic lasers. 40 GHz monolithic lasers with record low jitter and high power is presented as well...

  8. Class-A mode-locked lasers: Fundamental solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Anton V.; Viktorov, Evgeny A.

    2017-11-01

    We consider a delay differential equation (DDE) model for mode-locked operation in class-A semiconductor lasers containing both gain and absorber sections. The material processes are adiabatically eliminated as these are considered fast in comparison to the delay time for a long cavity device. We determine the steady states and analyze their bifurcations using DDE-BIFTOOL [Engelborghs et al., ACM Trans. Math. Software 28, 1 (2002)]. Multiple forms of coexistence, transformation, and hysteretic behavior of stable steady states and fundamental periodic regimes are discussed in bifurcation diagrams.

  9. Deep-red semiconductor monolithic mode-locked lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, L.; Bajek, D.; White, S. E.; Forrest, A. F.; Cataluna, M. A., E-mail: m.a.cataluna@dundee.ac.uk [School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Wang, H. L.; Pan, J. Q. [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, X. L.; Cui, B. F. [Key Laboratory of Opto-electronics Technology, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Ding, Y. [School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-01

    A deep-red semiconductor monolithic mode-locked laser is demonstrated. Multi-section laser diodes based on an AlGaAs multi-quantum-well structure were passively mode-locked, enabling the generation of picosecond optical pulses at 752 nm, at pulse repetition rates of 19.37 GHz. An investigation of the dependence of the pulse duration as a function of reverse bias revealed a predominantly exponential decay trend of the pulse duration, varying from 10.5 ps down to 3.5 ps, which can be associated with the concomitant reduction of absorption recovery time with increasing applied field. A 30-MHz-tunability of the pulse repetition rate with bias conditions is also reported. The demonstration of such a compact, efficient and versatile ultrafast laser in this spectral region paves the way for its deployment in a wide range of applications such as biomedical microscopy, pulsed terahertz generation as well as microwave and millimeter-wave generation, with further impact on sensing, imaging and optical communications.

  10. Commercial mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubeigt, Walter; Bialkowski, Bartlomiej; Lin, Jipeng; Head, C. Robin; Hempler, Nils; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, M Squared Lasers have successfully commercialized a range of mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) operating between 920-1050nm and producing picosecond-range pulses with average powers above 1W at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) of 200MHz. These laser products offer a low-cost, easy-to-use and maintenance-free tool for the growing market of nonlinear microscopy. However, in order to present a credible alternative to ultrafast Ti-sapphire lasers, pulse durations below 200fs are required. In the last year, efforts have been directed to reduce the pulse duration of the Dragonfly laser system to below 200fs with a target average power above 1W at a PRF of 200MHz. This paper will describe and discuss the latest efforts undertaken to approach these targets in a laser system operating at 990nm. The relatively low PRF operation of Dragonfly lasers represents a challenging requirement for mode-locked VECSELs due to the very short upper state carrier lifetime, on the order of a few nanoseconds, which can lead to double pulsing behavior in longer cavities as the time between consecutive pulses is increased. Most notably, the design of the Dragonfly VECSEL cavity was considerably modified and the laser system extended with a nonlinear pulse stretcher and an additional compression stage. The improved Dragonfly laser system achieved pulse duration as short as 130fs with an average power of 0.85W.

  11. Ion time-of-flight spectroscopy: krypton charge-state spectra as a function of photon excitation energy near the K edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, J.B.; Kostroun, V.O.

    1982-01-01

    In this experiment, we have recorded the charge state distribution resulting from atomic rearrangement following the creation of the inner shell vacancies in krypton atoms. Intense, highly collimated, monochromatic and tunable x-ray radiation available at the CHESS synchrotron radiation facility at Cornell was used to photoionize krypton atoms in a gas jet target, and a time-of-flight spectrometer was used to record the ions in different charge states formed after photoionization. Charge state spectra were recorded at below, at the peak in the K edge and above the edge. Below the edge, charge states +4 to +7 were observed with appreciable intensity, while at, and above the edge, the charge states ranged from +4 to +10

  12. Anapole nanolasers for mode-locking and ultrafast pulse generation

    KAUST Repository

    Gongora, J. S. Totero

    2017-05-31

    Nanophotonics is a rapidly developing field of research with many suggestions for a design of nanoantennas, sensors and miniature metadevices. Despite many proposals for passive nanophotonic devices, the efficient coupling of light to nanoscale optical structures remains a major challenge. In this article, we propose a nanoscale laser based on a tightly confined anapole mode. By harnessing the non-radiating nature of the anapole state, we show how to engineer nanolasers based on InGaAs nanodisks as on-chip sources with unique optical properties. Leveraging on the near-field character of anapole modes, we demonstrate a spontaneously polarized nanolaser able to couple light into waveguide channels with four orders of magnitude intensity than classical nanolasers, as well as the generation of ultrafast (of 100 fs) pulses via spontaneous mode locking of several anapoles. Anapole nanolasers offer an attractive platform for monolithically integrated, silicon photonics sources for advanced and efficient nanoscale circuitry.

  13. Material Engineering for Monolithic Semiconductor Mode-Locked Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkova, Irina

    This thesis is devoted to the materials engineering for semiconductor monolithic passively mode-locked lasers (MLLs) as a compact energy-efficient source of ultrashort optical pulses. Up to the present day, the achievement of low-noise sub-picosecond pulse generation has remained a challenge...... application in MLLs. Improved QW laser performance was demonstrated using the asymmetric barrier layer approach. The analysis of the gain characteristics showed that the high population inversion beneficial for noise reduction cannot be achieved for 10 GHz QW MLLs and would have required lowering the modal....... This work has considered the role of the combined ultrafast gain and absorption dynamics in MLLs as a main factor limiting laser performance. An independent optimization of MLL amplifier and saturable absorber active materials was performed. Two promising approaches were considered: quantum dot (QD...

  14. Independent tunability of the double-mode-locked cw dye laser.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bourkoff, E

    1979-06-01

    We report a new configuration that enables the double-mode-locked cw dye laser to be independently tunable. In addition, the output coupling at each of the two wavelengths can be independently specified. A series of oscillographs shows some interesting features unique to double mode locking and also shows the effects of varying the two cavity lengths with respect to each other.

  15. Comparison of the noise performance of 10GHz QW and QD mode-locked laser diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpintero, Guillermo; Thompson, Mark G.; Yvind, Kresten

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the experimental characterization of the noise performance of a quantum dot and a quantum well 10GHz passive mode locked laser diodes.......This paper reports the experimental characterization of the noise performance of a quantum dot and a quantum well 10GHz passive mode locked laser diodes....

  16. Modeling of mode-locked coupled-resonator optical waveguide lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Christian; Skovgård, Troels Suhr; Gregersen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Coupled-resonator optical waveguides made from coupled high-Q photonic crystal nanocavities are investigated for use as cavities in mode-locked lasers. Such devices show great potential in slowing down light and can serve to reduce the cavity length of a mode-locked laser. An explicit expression...

  17. Numerical simulation of passively mode-locked fiber laser based on semiconductor optical amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingwen; Jia, Dongfang; Zhang, Zhongyuan; Chen, Jiong; Liu, Tonghui; Wang, Zhaoying; Yang, Tianxin

    2013-03-01

    Passively mode-locked fiber laser (MLFL) has been widely used in many applications, such as optical communication system, industrial production, information processing, laser weapons and medical equipment. And many efforts have been done for obtaining lasers with small size, simple structure and shorter pulses. In recent years, nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) in semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) has been studied and applied as a mode-locking mechanism. This kind of passively MLFL has faster operating speed and makes it easier to realize all-optical integration. In this paper, we had a thorough analysis of NPR effect in SOA. And we explained the principle of mode-locking by SOA and set up a numerical model for this mode-locking process. Besides we conducted a Matlab simulation of the mode-locking mechanism. We also analyzed results under different working conditions and several features of this mode-locking process are presented. Our simulation shows that: Firstly, initial pulse with the peak power exceeding certain threshold may be amplified and compressed, and stable mode-locking may be established. After about 25 round-trips, stable mode-locked pulse can be obtained which has peak power of 850mW and pulse-width of 780fs.Secondly, when the initial pulse-width is greater, narrowing process of pulse is sharper and it needs more round-trips to be stable. Lastly, the bias currents of SOA affect obviously the shape of mode-locked pulse and the mode-locked pulse with high peak power and narrow width can be obtained through adjusting reasonably the bias currents of SOA.

  18. Interaction potentials lithium and potassium ions with argon, krypton and xenon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palyukh, B.M.; Rykalyuk, R.E.; Chigin', V.I.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of obtained experimental dependences of integral cross sections of elastic scattering of Li + and K + alkali metal ions with atoms of Ar, Kr and Xe inert gases on collision energy as well as quantum oscillations of glory detected for the first time for ion-atomic collisions determined were potentials of these particle interaction in a wide range of internucleus distances including repulsion potential minimum and remote-action polarization attraction. A method for obtaining five free parameters of the potential suggested in the form of piecewise continuous function permitting to form potential minimum by means of three values: put depth epsilon, equilibrium distance Rsub(m) and curvature Ksub(epsilon) independent of change of potential at remote and small distances [ru

  19. Argon and krypton Auger spectra induced by ion bombardment of aluminium and silicon surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.P.; Gallon, T.E.; Yousif, F.; Matthew, J.A.D.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements are reported of Auger (autoionization) spectra of Ar and Kr produced by bombarding Al and Si substrates with Ar + and Kr + ions in the 110 eV-5 keV energy range. These are shown to be consistent with the simple Doppler model suggested, for Ne and Al and Si, in a previous paper. Once corrected using the model, the observed Auger energies are shown to correspond to theoretical predictions produced using Dirac-Fock calculations. (Author)

  20. Radioactive krypton gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive krypton is separated from a gas mixture comprising nitrogen and traces of carbon dioxide and radioactive krypton by selective adsorption and then cryogenic distillation of the prepurified gas against nitrogen liquid to produce krypton bottoms concentrate liquid, using the nitrogen gas from the distillation for two step purging of the adsorbent. 16 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures

  1. Radioactive krypton gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive krypton is separated from a gas mixture comprising nitrogen and traces of carbon dioxide and radioactive krypton by first selective adsorption and then cryogenic distillation of the prepurified gas against nitrogen liquid to produce krypton bottoms concentrate liquid, using the nitrogen gas from the distillation for two step purging of the adsorbent. 6 claims, 8 drawing figures

  2. Production and decay of K -shell hollow krypton in collisions with 52-197-MeV/u bare xenon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Caojie; Yu, Deyang; Cai, Xiaohong; Chen, Xi; Ma, Kun; Evslin, Jarah; Xue, Yingli; Wang, Wei; Kozhedub, Yury S.; Lu, Rongchun; Song, Zhangyong; Zhang, Mingwu; Liu, Junliang; Yang, Bian; Guo, Yipan; Zhang, Jianming; Ruan, Fangfang; Wu, Yehong; Zhang, Yuezhao; Dong, Chenzhong; Chen, Ximeng; Yang, Zhihu

    2017-07-01

    X-ray spectra of K -shell hollow krypton atoms produced in single collisions with 52-197-MeV/u X e54 + ions are measured in a heavy-ion storage ring equipped with an internal gas-jet target. Energy shifts of the K α1,2 s , K α1,2 h ,s , and K β1,3 s transitions are obtained. Thus the average number of the spectator L vacancies presented during the x-ray emission is deduced. From the relative intensities of the K α1,2 s and K α1,2 h ,s transitions, the ratio of K -shell hollow krypton to singly K -shell ionized atoms is determined to be 14 %-24 % . In the considered collisions, the K vacancies are mainly created by the direct ionization which cannot be calculated within the perturbation descriptions. The experimental results are compared with a relativistic coupled-channel calculation performed within the independent particle approximation.

  3. Widely tunable all-fiber SESAM mode-locked Ytterbium laser with a linear cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Zhaokun; Wang, Ziwei; Bai, Yang; Li, Qiurui; Zhou, Jun

    2017-07-01

    We present a widely tunable all-fiber mode-locked laser based on semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with a linear cavity design. An easy-to-use tunable bandpass filter based on thin film cavity technology is employed to tune the wavelength. By tuning the filter and adjusting the polarization controller, mode-locked operation can be achieved over the range of 1023 nm-1060 nm. With the polarization controller settled, mode-locked operation can be preserved and the wavelength can be continuously tuned from 1030 nm to 1053 nm. At 1030 nm, the laser delivers 9.6 mw average output power with 15.4 ps 10.96 MHz pulses at fundamental mode-locked operation.

  4. High-repetition-rate ultrashort pulsed fiber ring laser using hybrid mode locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Hu, Hongyu; Li, Wenbo; Dutta, Niloy K

    2016-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a hybrid mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser by combining the rational harmonic mode-locking technique and passive mode locking based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber. By carefully adjusting the modulation frequency and the polarization controllers in the cavity, a 30 GHz pulse train with improved stability and narrower pulse width is generated. The pulse width at 30 GHz using rational harmonic mode locking alone is 5.8 ps. This hybrid scheme narrows the pulse width to 1.9 ps at the repetition rate of 30 GHz. Numerical simulations are carried out that show good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Numerical investigations on the performance of external-cavity mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulet, Josep; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The performance of an external-cavity mode-locked semiconductor laser is analyzed theoretically and numerically. Passive mode-locking is described using a fully-distributed time-domain model including fast effects, spectral hole burning and carrier heating. We provide optimization rules in order...... to improve the mode-locking performance, such as reducing the pulsewidth and time-bandwidth product as much as possible. Timing jitter is determined by means of extensive numerical simulations of the model, demontrating that an external modulation is required in order to maintain moderate timing......-jitter and phase-noise levels at low frequencies. The effect of the driving conditions is investigated in order to achieve short pulses and low timing jitter. Our results are in qualitative agreement with reported experiments and predictions obtained from the master equation for mode-locking....

  6. Modelling and characterization of colliding-pulse mode-locked (CPM) quantum well lasers. [MPS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Svend; Brorson, S.D.; Franck, T.

    1996-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of passive colliding pulse mode-locked quantum well lasers is presented. The theoretical model for the gain dynamics is based on semi-classical density matrixequations. The gain dynamics are characterized exp...

  7. On the mechanisms governing the repetition rate of mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulet, Josep; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the mechanisms influencing the synchronization locking range of mode-locked lasers. We find that changes in repetition rates can be accomodated through a joint interplay of dispersion and pulse shaping effects.......We investigate the mechanisms influencing the synchronization locking range of mode-locked lasers. We find that changes in repetition rates can be accomodated through a joint interplay of dispersion and pulse shaping effects....

  8. Mode-locked terahertz quantum cascade laser by direct phase synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maussang, K.; Maysonnave, J.; Jukam, N.; Freeman, J. R.; Cavalié, P.; Dhillon, S. S.; Tignon, J.; Khanna, S. P.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Mode-locking of a terahertz quantum cascade laser is achieved using multimode injection seeding. Contrary to standard methods that rely on gain modulation, here a fixed phase relationship is directly imprinted to the laser modes. In this work, we demonstrate the generation of 9 ps phase mode-locked pulses around 2.75 THz. A direct measurement of the emitted field phase shows that it results from the phase of the initial injection

  9. K-, L- and M-shell X-ray productions induced by krypton ions in the 0.8-1.6 MeV/amu range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlachev, I.; Gluchshenko, N.; Ivanov, I.; Kireyev, A.; Alexandrenko, V.; Kurakhmedov, A.; Platov, A.; Zdorovets, M.

    2017-09-01

    The K-, L- and M-shells X-ray production cross sections induced by krypton ions for a range target elements from Ti to Bi were measured. In the experiments the thin films were irradiated by 84Kr particles with projectile energies of 67.2, 84.0, 100.8, 117.6 and 134.4 MeV. An approach based on the use of Mo grid with 500 nm deposited bismuth layer as a beam monitor was developed to determine the amount of particles delivered on the sample. The efficiency of the X-ray detector was determined using the calibration radioactive sources. The experimental results were compared to the predictions of the ECPSSR and PWBA theories calculated with the ISICS code.

  10. Directly phase-modulation-mode-locked doubly-resonant optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kavita; Kumar, S Chaitanya; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2013-10-07

    We present results on direct mode-locking of a doubly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (DRO) using an electro-optic phase modulator with low resonant frequency of 80 MHz as the single mode-locking element. Pumped by a cw laser at 532 nm and based on MgO:sPPLT as the nonlinear material, the DRO generates 533 ps pulses at 80 MHz and 471 ps pulses at 160 MHz. Stable train of mode-locked pulses is obtained at a modulation depth of 1.83 radians when the modulation frequency is precisely tuned and the cavity length is carefully adjusted. The effects of frequency detuning, modulation depth, input laser pump power, crystal temperature and position of modulator inside the cavity, on pulse duration and repetition rate have been studied. Operating at degeneracy, under mode-locked condition, the signal-idler spectrum exhibits a bandwidth of ~31 nm, and the spectrum has been investigated for different phase-matching temperatures. Mode-locked operation has been confirmed by second-harmonic-generation of the DRO output in a β-BaB₂O₄ crystal, where a 4 times enhancement in green power is observed compared to cw operation.

  11. Mode locked Nd3+ and Gd3+ co-doped calcium fluoride crystal laser at dual gain lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Wu, Yongjing; Liu, Jie; Pang, Siyuan; Ma, Fengkai; Jiang, Dapeng; Wu, Qinghui; Su, Liangbi

    2018-03-01

    Based on a novel disordered fluoride crystal-Nd3+ and Gd3+ co-doped CaF2, we demonstrate a dual-wavelength synchronously mode locked laser in a single cavity, for the first time. Two gain lines at 1064.2 nm and 1064.7 nm were synchronously mode locked by gain spectrum splitting method, corresponding to a 0.15 THz repetition rate. The mode locked laser shows a 6.5 ps separated pulse duration.

  12. Mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser oscillators pumped by wavelength-multiplexed laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Naoto; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2018-05-01

    We directly pumped a Ti:sapphire laser by combining 478 and 520 nm laser diodes to prevent the effect of absorption loss induced by the pump laser of shorter wavelengths (∼450 nm). We obtain a continuous-wave output power of 660 mW at a total incident pump power of 3.15 W. We demonstrate mode locking using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror, and 126 fs pulses were obtained at a repetition rate of 192 MHz. At the maximum pump power, the average output power is 315 mW. Shorter mode-locked pulses of 42 and 48 fs were respectively achieved by Kerr-lens mode locking with average output powers of 280 and 360 mW at a repetition rate of 117 MHz.

  13. Soliton generation from a fundamentally mode-locked fiber laser with a feed-forward path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruixin; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Xu, Kun; Li, Jianqiang; Lin, Jintong

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge, the soliton generation from a mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser using a novel saturable absorber (SA), which is realized by combining a dual-drive modulator and an intensity feed-forward path. The laser is fundamentally mode-locked under high-frequency RF signal modulation. Experimentally, the actively mode-locked laser produces a 16.7 MHz repetition rate pulse train with a 1.4 ps pulse width, and the spectrum bandwidth is 2.17 nm. The results demonstrate that the SA supports soliton pulse shaping in the cavity at the fundamental frequency.

  14. The Proper Orthogonal Decomposition for Dimensionality Reduction in Mode-Locked Lasers and Optical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Shlizerman

    2012-01-01

    energy delivered per pulse. Managing the nonlinear penalties in the cavity becomes crucial for increasing the energy and suppressing the multipulsing instability. A proper orthogonal decomposition (POD allows for the reduction of governing equations of a mode-locked laser onto a low-dimensional space. The resulting reduced system is able to capture correctly the experimentally observed pulse transitions. Analysis of these models is used to explain the sequence of bifurcations that are responsible for the multipulsing instability in the master mode-locking and the waveguide array mode-locking models. As a result, the POD reduction allows for a simple and efficient way to characterize and optimize the cavity parameters for achieving maximal energy output.

  15. Multiwavelength mode-locked cylindrical vector beam fiber laser based on mode selective coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Cai, Yu; Zhang, Zuxing

    2017-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a multiwavelength mode-locked fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam generation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The mode-locking mechanism is nonlinear polarization rotation, and the multiwavelength operation is contributed to the in-line birefringence fiber filter with periodic multiple passbands formed by incorporating a section of polarization maintaining fiber into the laser cavity with a polarizer. Furthermore, using the mode selective coupler, which acts as mode converter from fundamental mode to higher-order mode, multiwavelength mode-locked cylindrical vector beams have been obtained, which may have potential applications in mode-division multiplexing optical fiber communication and material processing.

  16. Harmonic Mode-Locked Fiber Laser based on Photonic Crystal Fiber Filled with Topological Insulator Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shan Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We reported that the photonic crystal fiber (PCF filled with TI:Bi2Te3 nanosheets solution could act as an effective saturable absorber (SA. Employing this TI-PCF SA device; we constructed an ytterbium-doped all-fiber laser oscillator and achieved the evanescent wave mode-locking operation. Due to the large cavity dispersion; the fundamental mode-locking pulse had the large full width at half maximum (FWHM of 2.33 ns with the repetition rate of ~1.11 MHz; and the radio frequency (RF spectrum with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of 61 dB. In addition; the transition dynamics from a bunched state of pulses to harmonic mode-locking (HML was also observed; which was up to 26th order.

  17. Deep learning and model predictive control for self-tuning mode-locked lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Thomas; Brunton, Steven L.; Nathan Kutz, J.

    2018-03-01

    Self-tuning optical systems are of growing importance in technological applications such as mode-locked fiber lasers. Such self-tuning paradigms require {\\em intelligent} algorithms capable of inferring approximate models of the underlying physics and discovering appropriate control laws in order to maintain robust performance for a given objective. In this work, we demonstrate the first integration of a {\\em deep learning} (DL) architecture with {\\em model predictive control} (MPC) in order to self-tune a mode-locked fiber laser. Not only can our DL-MPC algorithmic architecture approximate the unknown fiber birefringence, it also builds a dynamical model of the laser and appropriate control law for maintaining robust, high-energy pulses despite a stochastically drifting birefringence. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method on a fiber laser which is mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation. The method advocated can be broadly applied to a variety of optical systems that require robust controllers.

  18. Novel design of low-jitter 10 GHz all-active monolithic mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David; Yvind, Kresten; Christiansen, Lotte Jin

    2004-01-01

    Using a novel design, we have fabricated 10 GHz all-active monolithic mode-locked semiconductor lasers that generate 1.4 ps pulses with record-low timing jitter. The dynamical properties of lasers with 1 and 2 QWs are compared.......Using a novel design, we have fabricated 10 GHz all-active monolithic mode-locked semiconductor lasers that generate 1.4 ps pulses with record-low timing jitter. The dynamical properties of lasers with 1 and 2 QWs are compared....

  19. Jitter reduction by intracavity active phase modulation in a mode-locked semiconductor laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozharar, Sarper; Ozdur, Ibrahim; Quinlan, Franklyn; Delfyett, Peter J

    2009-03-01

    We experimentally verify the theory of Haus et al. [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 40, 41 (2004)] on the effects of timing jitter using intracavity phase modulation on the pulse train of a mode-locked laser. The theory is based on the solution of the Heisenberg-Langevin equation in the presence of dispersion and intracavity phase modulation. Using active intracavity phase modulation, we have reduced the timing jitter on a 10.24 GHz mode-locked diode laser by 50% from 304 to 150 fs integrated from 1 Hz to the Nyquist frequency of 5.12 GHz.

  20. Control of fibre laser mode-locking by narrow-band Bragg gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laegsgaard, J

    2008-01-01

    The use of narrow-band high-reflectivity fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) as end mirrors in a fibre laser cavity with passive mode-locking provided by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) is investigated numerically. The FBG is found to control the energy range of stable mode-locking, which may be shifted far outside the regime of SESAM saturation by a suitable choice of FBG and cavity length. The pulse shape is controlled by the combined effects of FBG dispersion and self-phase modulation in the fibres, and a few ps pulses can be obtained with standard uniform FBGs

  1. Low jitter and high power all-active mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Larsson, David; Christiansen, Lotte Jin

    2003-01-01

    A novel epitaxial design leading to low loss and low gain saturation improves the properties of 40 GHz mode-locked lasers. We obtain 2.8 ps nearly chirp free pulses with 228 fs jitter and -coupled power of 7 mW.......A novel epitaxial design leading to low loss and low gain saturation improves the properties of 40 GHz mode-locked lasers. We obtain 2.8 ps nearly chirp free pulses with 228 fs jitter and -coupled power of 7 mW....

  2. Low jitter and high power all-active mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Larsson, David; Christiansen, Lotte Jin

    2003-01-01

    A novel epitaxial design leading to low loss and low gain saturation improves the properties of 40 GHz mode-locked lasers. We obtain 2.8 ps nearly chirp free pulses with 228 fs jitter and fiber-coupled power of 7 mW.......A novel epitaxial design leading to low loss and low gain saturation improves the properties of 40 GHz mode-locked lasers. We obtain 2.8 ps nearly chirp free pulses with 228 fs jitter and fiber-coupled power of 7 mW....

  3. High peak power sub-nanosecond mode-locked pulse characteristics of Nd:GGG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jia; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Tao; Li, Yufei; Yang, Kejian; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Qiao, Wenchao; Feng, Chuansheng; Wang, Yonggang

    2015-10-01

    Based on the dual-loss modulation, i.e. electro-optic (EO) modulator and GaAs saturable absorber, a sub-nanosecond mode-locked pulsed Nd:GGG laser with kHz repetition rates is presented for the first time. The repetition rate (0.5-10 kHz) of this pulsed laser is controlled by the modulation rate of EO modulator, so high stability can be obtained. The sub-nanosecond pulse width depends on the mode-locked pulse underneath the Q-switched envelope in the Q-switched mode-locked (QML) laser and high peak power can be generated. The condition on the generation of sub-nanosecond pulse and the needed threshold power for different modulation rates of EO are given. The average output power, the pulse width and the peak power versus pump power for different repetition rates are demonstrated. The shortest pulse width is 426 ps and the highest peak power reaches 239.4 kW. The experimental results show that the dual-loss modulation technology with EO and GaAs saturable absorber in QML laser is an efficient method to generate sub-nanosecond mode-locked pulsed laser with kHz repetition rates.

  4. Low-jitter and high-power 40 GHz all-active mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Larsson, David; Christiansen, Lotte Jin

    2004-01-01

    A novel design strategy for the epitaxial structure of monolithic mode-locked semiconductor lasers is presented. Using an all-active design, we fabricate 40-GHz lasers generating 2.8-ps almost chirp-free pulses with record low high-frequency jitter and more than 7-mW fiber coupled output power....

  5. Fourier domain mode-locked swept source at 1050 nm based on a tapered amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Sebastian; Klein, Thomas; Wieser, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    While swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) in the 1050 nm range is promising for retinal imaging, there are certain challenges. Conventional semiconductor gain media have limited output power, and the performance of high-speed Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers suffers from...

  6. Optical flip-flop: Based on two-coupled mode-locked ring lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangdiongga, E.; Yang, X.X.; Li, Z.; Liu, Y.S.; Lenstra, D.; Khoe, G.D.; Dorren, H.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    We report an all-optical flip-flop that is based on two coupled actively mode-locked fiber ring lasers. The lasers are coupled so that when one of the lasers lases, it quenches lasing in the other laser. The state of the flip-flop is determined by the wavelength of the laser that is currently

  7. Three-dimensional graphene based passively mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Loeblein, M; Tsang, S H; Chow, K K; Teo, E H T

    2014-12-15

    We present an all-fiber passively mode-locked fiber laser incorporating three-dimensional (3D) graphene as a saturable absorber (SA) for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The 3D graphene is synthesized by template-directed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The SA is then simply formed by sandwiching the freestanding 3D graphene between two conventional fiber connectors without any deposition process. It is demonstrated that such 3D graphene based SA is capable to produce high quality mode-locked pulses. A passively mode-locked fiber laser is constructed and stable output pulses with a fundamental repetition rate of ~9.9 MHz and a pulse width of ~1 ps are generated from the fiber laser. The average output power of the laser is ~10.5 mW while the output pulse is operating at single pulse region. The results imply that the freestanding 3D graphene can be applied as an effective saturable absorption material for passively mode-locked lasers.

  8. Mode-locked Pr3+-doped silica fiber laser with an external cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Yuan; Poulsen, Christian; Sejka, Milan

    1994-01-01

    We present a Pr3+-doped silica-based fiber laser mode-locked by using a linear external cavity with a vibrating mirror. Stable laser pulses with a FWHM of less than 44 ps, peak power greater than 9 W, and repetition rate up to 100 MHz are obtained. The pulse width versus cavity mismatch ΔL and pump...

  9. Flexible picosecond thulium-doped fiber laser using the active mode-locking technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ke; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Weiqiang; Chen, He; Chen, Shengping; Hou, Jing

    2014-07-15

    An all-fiber actively mode-locked thulium-doped fiber laser (AML-TDFL) based on a 10 GHz bandwidth electro-optic intensity modulator (EOM) providing flexible picosecond pulses at 1980 nm is presented. The EOM is driven by electrical pulses rather than traditional sine-wave signals. The repetition rate of output pulses was 21.4 MHz at fundamental mode-locking, which could be scaled up to 1.498 GHz through the 70th order harmonic mode-locking, and the shortest measured output pulse width was 38 ps. Furthermore, the output pulse width could be tuned by either adjusting the modulation frequency with small detuning or changing the width of these driving electrical pulses without frequency detuning. In our work, the stability of these mode-locked pulses obtained from the AML-TDFL was superior; for instance, the measured supermode suppression ratio of 1.498 GHz pulses train was up to 48 dB.

  10. Effect of periodic optical pumping on dynamics of passive mode-locked fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung Ghiu; Kim, Joonyoung; Kim, Soeun

    2017-10-01

    We report on the effect of periodic optical pumping on a passively mode-locked fiber laser (MLFL) based on an erbium-doped fiber (EDF). We investigate the influence of various parameters (including average pump power into the fiber laser, the modulation frequency and duty cycle of the pump, and the polarization state of the light inside the cavity) on the transient response characteristic of the MLFL such as: relaxation oscillation (RO) build-up time (defined as the time delay from the onset of pumping to the generation of passively mode-locked pulses) and the power of the detected RF signal at the fundamental cavity-mode frequency (determined by the ring cavity length), which reflects the stability of mode-locking pulse train. We have found that the RO build-up time is inversely proportional to the average pump power while the RF power of the detected fundamental cavity mode (produced by the ring cavity) is proportional to the average pump power. A change in the duty cycle effectively leads the average pump power to vary, which in turn leads to changes in the transient response. The modulation frequency of the pump is rather related to the stability of the MLFL than its response time. Generally, the lower the modulation frequency, the more stable the mode-locked pulses generated in the fiber laser. Finally, the RO build-up time and, consequently, the pulse-generation time are highly sensitive to the state of polarization in the MLFL cavity.

  11. Mode-locked 1.5 micrometers semiconductor optical amplifier fiber ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels V.; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Vaa, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of a mode-locked SOA fiber ring are investigated experimentally and numerically. Generation of near transform-limited (time-bandwidth product=0.7) 1.5 μm 54 ps FWHM pulses with a peak power of 2.8 mW at a repetition rate of 960 MHz is demonstrated experimentally. The experimental...

  12. Tunable mode-locked semiconductor laser with Bragg mirror external cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Jørgensen, T.; Birkedal, Dan

    2002-01-01

    We present a simplified design for a wavelength tunable external cavity mode-locked laser by employing a wedged GaAs/AlGaAs Bragg mirror. The device emits 4-6 ps pulses at 10 GHz and is tunable over 15 nm. Although, in the present configuration, tunability is limited to 15 nm, however, we have...

  13. Multipulse dynamics of a passively mode-locked semiconductor laser with delayed optical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaurigue, Lina; Krauskopf, Bernd; Lüdge, Kathy

    2017-11-01

    Passively mode-locked semiconductor lasers are compact, inexpensive sources of short light pulses of high repetition rates. In this work, we investigate the dynamics and bifurcations arising in such a device under the influence of time delayed optical feedback. This laser system is modelled by a system of delay differential equations, which includes delay terms associated with the laser cavity and feedback loop. We make use of specialised path continuation software for delay differential equations to analyse the regime of short feedback delays. Specifically, we consider how the dynamics and bifurcations depend on the pump current of the laser, the feedback strength, and the feedback delay time. We show that an important role is played by resonances between the mode-locking frequencies and the feedback delay time. We find feedback-induced harmonic mode locking and show that a mismatch between the fundamental frequency of the laser and that of the feedback cavity can lead to multi-pulse or quasiperiodic dynamics. The quasiperiodic dynamics exhibit a slow modulation, on the time scale of the gain recovery rate, which results from a beating with the frequency introduced in the associated torus bifurcations and leads to gain competition between multiple pulse trains within the laser cavity. Our results also have implications for the case of large feedback delay times, where a complete bifurcation analysis is not practical. Namely, for increasing delay, there is an ever-increasing degree of multistability between mode-locked solutions due to the frequency pulling effect.

  14. On the jitter of mode-locked pulses introduced by an optical fibre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, R.F.X.A.M.; Mols, R.F.X.A.M.; Ernst, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements on the jitter of mode-locked pulses of a Nd:YLF laser after travelling through an optical fibre are presented. For low powers self phase modulation occurs which leaves the jitter unaltered. For powers higher than the threshold of stimulated Raman scattering the jitter increases due to

  15. All-fiber Ho-doped mode-locked oscillator based on a graphene saturable absorber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sotor, J.; Pawliszewska, M.; Sobon, G.; Kaczmarek, P.; Przewolka, A.; Pasternak, I.; Cajzl, Jakub; Peterka, Pavel; Honzátko, Pavel; Kašík, Ivan; Strupinski, W.; Abramski, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 11 (2016), s. 2592-2595 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-35256S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15122 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Fiber lasers * Graphene * Mode-locked oscillators Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.416, year: 2016

  16. Effects of resonator input power on Kerr lens mode-locked lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Using the ABCD matrix method, the common stability region between the sagittal and tangential planes of a four-mirror Kerr lens mode-locked (KLM) laser cavity is obtained for different ranges of input power. In addition, the effect of the input power on the Kerr lens sensitivity is investigated. Optimal input power and ...

  17. Mode-Locked 1.5 um Semiconductor Optical Fiber Ring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Vagn; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne; Vaa, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of a mode-locked SOA fiber ring are investigated experimentally and numerically. Generation of near transform-limited (time-bandwidth product = 0.7) 1.5 um 54 ps FWHM pulses with a peak power of 2.8 mW at a repetition rate of 960 MHz is demonstrated experimentally. The experimental...

  18. 10-GHz 1.59-μm quantum dash passively mode-locked two-section lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dontabactouny, Madhoussoudhana; Rosenberg, C.; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and the characterisation of a 10 GHz two-section passively mode-locked quantum dash laser emitting at 1.59 μm. The potential of the device's mode-locking is investigated through an analytical model taking into account both the material parameters and the laser...

  19. Systematic investigation of the temperature behavior of InAs/InP quantum nanostructure passively mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klaime, K.; Piron, R.; Grillot, F.

    2013-01-01

    for the first time a systematic investigation of the temperature-dependence on the mode-locking properties of InAs/InP QN devices. Beside, a rigorous comparison between QDashes and QDs temperature dependence is proposed through a proper analysis of the mode-locking stability maps. Experimental results also show...

  20. Passive, active, and hybrid mode-locking in a self-optimized ultrafast diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloush, M. Ali; Pilny, Rouven H.; Brenner, Carsten; Klehr, Andreas; Knigge, Andrea; Tränkle, Günther; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2018-02-01

    Semiconductor lasers are promising sources for generating ultrashort pulses. They are directly electrically pumped, allow for a compact design, and therefore they are cost-effective alternatives to established solid-state systems. Additionally, their emission wavelength depends on the bandgap which can be tuned by changing the semiconductor materials. Theoretically, the obtained pulse width can be few tens of femtoseconds. However, the generated pulses are typically in the range of several hundred femtoseconds only. Recently, it was shown that by implementing a spatial light modulator (SLM) for phase and amplitude control inside the resonator the optical bandwidth can be optimized. Consequently, by using an external pulse compressor shorter pulses can be obtained. We present a Fourier-Transform-External-Cavity setup which utilizes an ultrafast edge-emitting diode laser. The used InGaAsP diode is 1 mm long and emits at a center wavelength of 850 nm. We investigate the best conditions for passive, active and hybrid mode-locking operation using the method of self-adaptive pulse shaping. For passive mode-locking, the bandwidth is increased from 2.34 nm to 7.2 nm and ultrashort pulses with a pulse width of 216 fs are achieved after external pulse compression. For active and hybrid mode-locking, we also increased the bandwidth. It is increased from 0.26 nm to 5.06 nm for active mode-locking and from 3.21 nm to 8.7 nm for hybrid mode-locking. As the pulse width is strongly correlated with the bandwidth of the laser, we expect further reduction in the pulse duration by increasing the bandwidth.

  1. Radioactive kryptonates in the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The term ''radioactive Kryptonates'' is used for substances into which atoms or ions of the radioactive nuclide 85 Kr are incorporated. The basis of the use of radioactive Kryptonates in analytical chemistry is that during a chemical reaction the crystalline lattice of the kryptonated carrier is destroyed, the carrier consumed, and the radioactive krypton released (radio-release method). Analysis can be made with a calibration curve or by comparison with a standard. Radio-release methods with the aid of radioactive Kryptonates as analytical reagents are very useful for the analysis of environmental samples, e.g. for the determination of air pollutants (ozone, sulphur dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, mercury); and water pollutants (oxygen, dichromate, vanadium, hydrochloric acid, sulphur dioxide). (author)

  2. Passively Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:GGG laser with a Bi-doped GaAs saturable absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wen; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Xiangyang; Qiao, Hui; Liu, Ji

    2014-06-16

    A simultaneously passively Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) Nd:GGG laser using a Bi-doped GaAs wafer as saturable absorber is accomplished for the first time. The Bi-doped GaAs wafer is fabricated by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. In comparison to the passively QML laser with GaAs, the QML laser with Bi-doped GaAs can generate more stable pulses with 99% modulation depth. The experiment results indicate that the Bi-doped GaAs could be an excellent saturable absorber for diode-pumped QML lasers.

  3. Mid-infrared mode-locked pulse generation with multilayer black phosphorus as saturable absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhipeng; Xie, Guoqiang; Zhao, Chujun; Wen, Shuangchun; Yuan, Peng; Qian, Liejia

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared saturable absorber mirror is successfully fabricated by transferring the mechanically exfoliated black phosphorus onto the gold-coated mirror. With the as-prepared black phosphorus saturable absorber mirror, a continuous-wave passively mode-locked Er:ZBLAN fiber laser is demonstrated at the wavelength of 2.8 μm, which delivers a maximum average output power of 613 mW, a repetition rate of 24 MHz, and a pulse duration of 42 ps. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a black phosphorus mode-locked laser at 2.8 μm wavelength has been demonstrated. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of black phosphorus flake as a new two-dimensional material for application in mid-infrared ultrafast photonics.

  4. Passively mode-locked Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 1073 nm and 1085 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waritanant, Tanant; Major, Arkady

    2018-02-01

    A passively mode-locked Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 1073 nm and 1085 nm was demonstrated with an intracavity birefringent filter as the wavelength selecting element. The average output powers achieved were 2.17 W and 2.18 W with optical-to-optical efficiency of 19.6% and 19.7%, respectively. The slope efficiencies were more than 31% at both output wavelengths. The pulse durations at the highest average output power were 10.3 ps and 8.4 ps, respectively. We believe that this is the first report of mode locking of a Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 1073 nm or 1085 nm lines.

  5. Flat pulse-amplitude rational-harmonic-mode-locking fiber lasers with GHz pulse repetition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianhe; Yang, Tianxin; Jia, Dongfang; Wang, Zhaoying; Sang, Mei; Bai, Neng; Li, Guifang

    2013-03-01

    Rational harmonic mode locking (RHML) in an active mode-locked fiber laser can increase the output pulse repetition rate a number of times the modulation frequency of an optical modulator in a cavity when driven by gigahertz (GHz) RF. The amplitudes of the output optical pulse train in a high order RHML operation are not equalized and flat due to the GHz RF drive signals. A modified RHML technique using standard instrumentation that generates 1 GHz electrical square wave signals to accomplish up to 6th order RHML in fiber lasers is presented for improving the flatness of the amplitudes of the output optical pulse train at the pulse repetition rate of up to 12 GHz.

  6. Tungsten diselenide for mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers with short pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjun; Liu, Mengli; OuYang, Yuyi; Hou, Huanran; Ma, Guoli; Lei, Ming; Wei, Zhiyi

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a WSe2 film prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is transferred onto a tapered fiber, and a WSe2 saturable absorber (SA) is fabricated. In order to measure the third-order optical nonlinearity of the WSe2, the Z-scan technique is applied. The modulation depth of the WSe2 SA is measured as being 21.89%. Taking advantage of the remarkable nonlinear absorption characteristic of the WSe2 SA, a mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated at 1557.4 nm with a bandwidth of 25.8 nm and signal to noise ratio of 96 dB. To the best of our knowledge, the pulse duration of 163.5 fs is confirmed to be the shortest compared with previous mode-locked fiber lasers based on transition-metal dichalcogenides SAs. These results indicate that WSe2 is a powerful competitor in the application of ultrashort pulse lasers.

  7. Quasiperiodicity, mode-locking, and universal scaling in Rayleigh-Benard convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecke, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    This major review paper describes research on a model nonlinear dynamical system of small-aspect-ratio Rayleigh-Benard convection in 3 He - 4 He mixtures. The nonlinear effects of mode locking and quasiperiodic behavior are described. Analysis techniques for characterizing the state of the dynamical system include Fourier transforms, Poincare sections, phase differences, transients, multifractal f(∝) spectra and scaling function dynamics. Theoretical results such as the fractal staircase of mode-locked intervals and the Arnold tongues are reproduced in experimental data. New techniques for analyzing scaling dynamics are developed and discussed. This is a tutorial article that introduces the major important concepts in nonlinear dynamics and focuses on experimental problems and techniques. 77 refs

  8. Dark solitons of the power-energy saturation model: application to mode-locked lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablowitz, M J; Nixon, S D; Horikis, T P; Frantzeskakis, D J

    2013-01-01

    The generation and dynamics of dark solitons in mode-locked lasers is studied within the framework of a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which incorporates power-saturated loss, as well as energy-saturated gain and filtering. Mode-locking into single dark solitons and multiple dark pulses are found by employing different descriptions for the energy and power of the system defined over unbounded and periodic (ring laser) systems. Treating the loss, gain and filtering terms as perturbations, it is shown that these terms induce an expanding shelf around the soliton. The dark soliton dynamics are studied analytically by means of a perturbation method that takes into regard the emergence of the shelves and reveals their importance. (paper)

  9. Scalar-vector soliton fiber laser mode-locked by nonlinear polarization rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhichao; Liu, Deming; Fu, Songnian; Li, Lei; Tang, Ming; Zhao, Luming

    2016-08-08

    We report a passively mode-locked fiber laser by nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR), where both vector and scalar soliton can co-exist within the laser cavity. The mode-locked pulse evolves as a vector soliton in the strong birefringent segment and is transformed into a regular scalar soliton after the polarizer within the laser cavity. The existence of solutions in a polarization-dependent cavity comprising a periodic combination of two distinct nonlinear waves is first demonstrated and likely to be applicable to various other nonlinear systems. For very large local birefringence, our laser approaches the operation regime of vector soliton lasers, while it approaches scalar soliton fiber lasers under the condition of very small birefringence.

  10. Fabrication and Characterisation of Low-noise Monolithic Mode-locked Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterisation of monolithic semiconductor mode-locked lasers for use in optical communication systems. Other foreseeable applications may be as sources in microwave photonics and optical sampling. The thesis also deals with the design and fabrication...... of intracavity monolithically integrated filters. The common dnominator among the diffrent parts of the thesis is how to achieve and measure the lowest possible noise. Achieving low noise has been pinpointed as one of the most important and difficult challenges for semiconductor mode-locked lasers. The main...... result of this thesis are a fabrication process of a monolithic and deeply etched distributed Bragg reflector and a characterisation system for measurement of quantum limitid timing noise at high repetition rates. The Bragg reflector is a key component in achieving transform limited pulses with low noise...

  11. Combination of Transverse Mode Selection and Active Longitudinal Mode-Locking of Broad Area Semiconductor Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Doering

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results of the combination of transverse mode selection and active mode-locking with anti-reflection-coated broad area lasers (BALs are presented. The BALs are subject to feedback from a free-space external Fourier-optical 4f-setup with a reflective spatial frequency filter in the Fourier-plane for transverse mode selection. Driving the BALs with a high frequency modulated pump current above threshold active longitudinal mode-locking is achieved. Pulse durations as low as 88 ps are obtained, while the Gaussian-like fundamental or a higher order transverse mode up to mode number 5 is selected on purpose. Pulse duration and shape are nearly independent of the selected transverse mode.

  12. MHD stability and mode locking in pre-disruptive plasmas on TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, J.C.; Edery, D.; Joffrin, E.; Lecoustey, P.; Mohamed-Benkadda, M.S.; Pecquet, A.L.; Samain, A.; Talvard, M.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments devoted to the study of MHD activity have been carried out on TORE SUPRA. The observed disruptions are preceded by the growth of an m=2 N=1 rotating mode which locks when the magnetic field perturbation exceeds a critical value. The mode locking is interpreted as a bifurcation of the mode frequency. In addition, stabilization of the m=2 N=1 tearing mode has been obtained with the Ergodic Divertor (ED)

  13. Observation of Coexisting Dissipative Solitons in a Mode-Locked Fiber Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chengying; Chang, Wonkeun; Yang, Changxi; Akhmediev, Nail; Cundiff, Steven T

    2015-12-18

    We show, experimentally and numerically, that a mode-locked fiber laser can operate in a regime where two dissipative soliton solutions coexist and the laser will periodically switch between the solutions. The two dissipative solitons differ in their pulse energy and spectrum. The switching can be controlled by an external perturbation and triggered even when switching does not occur spontaneously. Numerical simulations unveil the importance of the double-minima loss spectrum and nonlinear gain to the switching dynamics.

  14. Mode-Locking in Broad-Area Semiconductor Lasers Enhanced by Picosecond-Pulse Injection

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, J; Fischer, I; Elsasser, W; Gehrig, E; Hess, O

    2004-01-01

    We present combined experimental and theoretical investigations of the picosecond emission dynamics of broad-area semiconductor lasers (BALs). We enhance the weak longitudinal self-mode-locking that is inherent to BALs by injecting a single optical 50-ps pulse, which triggers the output of a distinct regular train of 13-ps pulses. Modeling based on multimode Maxwell-Bloch equations illustrates how the dynamic interaction of the injected pulse with the internal laser field efficiently couples ...

  15. Universal soliton pattern formations in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, Foued; Salhi, Mohamed; Grelu, Philippe; Leblond, Hervé; Sanchez, François

    2011-05-01

    We investigate multiple-soliton pattern formations in a figure-of-eight passively mode-locked fiber laser. Operation in the anomalous dispersion regime with a double-clad fiber amplifier allows generation of up to several hundreds of solitons per round trip. We report the observation of remarkable soliton distributions: soliton gas, soliton liquid, soliton polycrystal, and soliton crystal, thus indicating the universality of such complexes.

  16. All-fiber nonlinearity- and dispersion-managed dissipative soliton nanotube mode-locked laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. [Department of Physics, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Nanjing University of Posts and Communications, Nanjing 210003 (China); Popa, D., E-mail: dp387@cam.ac.uk; Wittwer, V. J.; Milana, S.; Hasan, T.; Jiang, Z.; Ferrari, A. C. [Cambridge Graphene Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ilday, F. Ö. [Department of Physics, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-12-14

    We report dissipative soliton generation from an Yb-doped all-fiber nonlinearity- and dispersion-managed nanotube mode-locked laser. A simple all-fiber ring cavity exploits a photonic crystal fiber for both nonlinearity enhancement and dispersion compensation. The laser generates stable dissipative solitons with large linear chirp in the net normal dispersion regime. Pulses that are 8.7 ps long are externally compressed to 118 fs, outperforming current nanotube-based Yb-doped fiber laser designs.

  17. High brightness photonic band crystal semiconductor lasers in the passive mode locking regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales, R.; Kalosha, V. P.; Miah, M. J.; Bimberg, D. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Posilović, K. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); PBC Lasers GmbH, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Pohl, J.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2014-10-20

    High brightness photonic band crystal lasers in the passive mode locking regime are presented. Optical pulses with peak power of 3 W and peak brightness of about 180 MW cm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} are obtained on a 5 GHz device exhibiting 15 ps pulses and a very low beam divergence in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

  18. High brightness photonic band crystal semiconductor lasers in the passive mode locking regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales, R.; Kalosha, V. P.; Miah, M. J.; Bimberg, D.; Posilović, K.; Pohl, J.; Weyers, M.

    2014-01-01

    High brightness photonic band crystal lasers in the passive mode locking regime are presented. Optical pulses with peak power of 3 W and peak brightness of about 180 MW cm −2  sr −1 are obtained on a 5 GHz device exhibiting 15 ps pulses and a very low beam divergence in both the vertical and horizontal directions.

  19. Coupled opto electronic oscillator with a passively mode locked extended cavity diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongmin; Jang, Gwang Hoon; Yoon, Duseong; Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    An opto electronic oscillator(OEO)has very unique properties compared to the conventional quartz based microwave oscillators in that its oscillation frequency is determined by the beat note frequency of a phase coherent optical frequency comb generated as a side bands to an optical single mode carrier by using an electro optic modulator (EOM)or a direct current modulation of a semiconductor laser. Recently, a different type of OEO called a COEO has been demonstrated, where the optical carrier in the OEO system has been replaced by a mode locked laser so that an EOM or a direct current modulation are no longer necessary, but has potentially a much lower phase noise thanks to the high Q value of the optical frequency comb due to the mode locking mechanism. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a COEO based on a passively mode locked ECDL at 852nm in which the fourth harmonic of the repetition frequency of the ECDL matched exactly the ground state hyperfine splitting frequency of the Cs atoms.

  20. Coupled opto electronic oscillator with a passively mode locked extended cavity diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeongmin; Jang, Gwang Hoon; Yoon, Duseong; Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2008-01-01

    An opto electronic oscillator(OEO)has very unique properties compared to the conventional quartz based microwave oscillators in that its oscillation frequency is determined by the beat note frequency of a phase coherent optical frequency comb generated as a side bands to an optical single mode carrier by using an electro optic modulator (EOM)or a direct current modulation of a semiconductor laser. Recently, a different type of OEO called a COEO has been demonstrated, where the optical carrier in the OEO system has been replaced by a mode locked laser so that an EOM or a direct current modulation are no longer necessary, but has potentially a much lower phase noise thanks to the high Q value of the optical frequency comb due to the mode locking mechanism. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a COEO based on a passively mode locked ECDL at 852nm in which the fourth harmonic of the repetition frequency of the ECDL matched exactly the ground state hyperfine splitting frequency of the Cs atoms

  1. Femtosecond Mode-locked Fiber Laser at 1 μm Via Optical Microfiber Dispersion Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lizhen; Xu, Peizhen; Li, Yuhang; Han, Jize; Guo, Xin; Cui, Yudong; Liu, Xueming; Tong, Limin

    2018-03-16

    Mode-locked Yb-doped fiber lasers around 1 μm are attractive for high power applications and low noise pulse train generation. Mode-locked fiber lasers working in soliton and stretched-pulse regime outperform others in terms of the laser noise characteristics, mechanical stability and easy maintenance. However, conventional optical fibers always show a normal group velocity dispersion around 1 μm, leading to the inconvenience for necessary dispersion management. Here we show that optical microfibers having a large anomalous dispersion around 1 μm can be integrated into mode-locked Yb-doped fiber lasers with ultralow insertion loss down to -0.06 dB, enabling convenient dispersion management of the laser cavity. Besides, optical microfibers could also be adopted to spectrally broaden and to dechirp the ultrashort pulses outside the laser cavity, giving rise to a pulse duration of about 110 fs. We believe that this demonstration may facilitate all-fiber format high-performance ultrashort pulse generation at 1 μm and may find applications in precision measurements, large-scale facility synchronization and evanescent-field-based optical sensing.

  2. Passively mode-locked laser with an ultra-narrow spectral width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kues, Michael; Reimer, Christian; Wetzel, Benjamin; Roztocki, Piotr; Little, Brent E.; Chu, Sai T.; Hansson, Tobias; Viktorov, Evgeny A.; Moss, David J.; Morandotti, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Most mode-locking techniques introduced in the past focused mainly on increasing the spectral bandwidth to achieve ultrashort, sub-picosecond-long coherent light pulses. By contrast, less importance seemed to be given to mode-locked lasers generating Fourier-transform-limited nanosecond pulses, which feature the narrow spectral bandwidths required for applications in spectroscopy, the efficient excitation of molecules, sensing and quantum optics. Here, we demonstrate a passively mode-locked laser system that relies on simultaneous nested cavity filtering and cavity-enhanced nonlinear interactions within an integrated microring resonator. This allows us to produce optical pulses in the nanosecond regime (4.3 ns in duration), with an overall spectral bandwidth of 104.9 MHz—more than two orders of magnitude smaller than previous realizations. The very narrow bandwidth of our laser makes it possible to fully characterize its spectral properties in the radiofrequency domain using widely available GHz-bandwidth optoelectronic components. In turn, this characterization reveals the strong coherence of the generated pulse train.

  3. Silicon Photonics Transmitter with SOA and Semiconductor Mode-Locked Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso-Mártir, Alvaro; Müller, Juliana; Hauck, Johannes; Chimot, Nicolas; Setter, Rony; Badihi, Avner; Rasmussen, Daniel E; Garreau, Alexandre; Nielsen, Mads; Islamova, Elmira; Romero-García, Sebastián; Shen, Bin; Sandomirsky, Anna; Rockman, Sylvie; Li, Chao; Sharif Azadeh, Saeed; Lo, Guo-Qiang; Mentovich, Elad; Merget, Florian; Lelarge, François; Witzens, Jeremy

    2017-10-24

    We experimentally investigate an optical link relying on silicon photonics transmitter and receiver components as well as a single section semiconductor mode-locked laser as a light source and a semiconductor optical amplifier for signal amplification. A transmitter based on a silicon photonics resonant ring modulator, an external single section mode-locked laser and an external semiconductor optical amplifier operated together with a standard receiver reliably supports 14 Gbps on-off keying signaling with a signal quality factor better than 7 for 8 consecutive comb lines, as well as 25 Gbps signaling with a signal quality factor better than 7 for one isolated comb line, both without forward error correction. Resonant ring modulators and Germanium waveguide photodetectors are further hybridly integrated with chip scale driver and receiver electronics, and their co-operability tested. These experiments will serve as the basis for assessing the feasibility of a silicon photonics wavelength division multiplexed link relying on a single section mode-locked laser as a multi-carrier light source.

  4. Measuring a Fiber-Optic Delay Line Using a Mode-Locked Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Meirong; McKee, Michael R.; Pak, Kyung S.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts a laboratory setup for determining the optical length of a fiber-optic delay line at a precision greater than that obtainable by use of optical time-domain reflectometry or of mechanical measurement of length during the delay-line-winding process. In this setup, the delay line becomes part of the resonant optical cavity that governs the frequency of oscillation of a mode-locked laser. The length can then be determined from frequency-domain measurements, as described below. The laboratory setup is basically an all-fiber ring laser in which the delay line constitutes part of the ring. Another part of the ring - the laser gain medium - is an erbium-doped fiber amplifier pumped by a diode laser at a wavelength of 980 nm. The loop also includes an optical isolator, two polarization controllers, and a polarizing beam splitter. The optical isolator enforces unidirectional lasing. The polarization beam splitter allows light in only one polarization mode to pass through the ring; light in the orthogonal polarization mode is rejected from the ring and utilized as a diagnostic output, which is fed to an optical spectrum analyzer and a photodetector. The photodetector output is fed to a radio-frequency spectrum analyzer and an oscilloscope. The fiber ring laser can generate continuous-wave radiation in non-mode-locked operation or ultrashort optical pulses in mode-locked operation. The mode-locked operation exhibited by this ring is said to be passive in the sense that no electro-optical modulator or other active optical component is used to achieve it. Passive mode locking is achieved by exploiting optical nonlinearity of passive components in such a manner as to obtain ultra-short optical pulses. In this setup, the particular nonlinear optical property exploited to achieve passive mode locking is nonlinear polarization rotation. This or any ring laser can support oscillation in multiple modes as long as sufficient gain is present to overcome

  5. Various phenomena of self-mode-locked operation in optically pumped semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, C. H.; Liang, H. C.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2017-02-01

    This work presents several optical experiments to investigate the phenomenon of self-mode locking (SML) in optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSLs). First of all, we systematically explore the influence of high-order transverse modes on the SML in an OPSL with a linear cavity. Experimental results reveal that the occurrence of SML can be assisted by the existence of the first high-order transverse mode, and the laser is operated in a well-behaved SML state with the existence of the TEM0,0 mode and the first high-order transverse mode. While more high-order transverse modes are excited, it is found that the pulse train is modulated by more beating frequencies of transverse modes. The temporal behavior becomes the random dynamics when too many high-order transverse modes are excited. We observe that the temporal trace exhibits an intermittent mode-locked state in the absence of high-order transverse modes. In addition to typical mode-locked pulses, we originally observe an intriguing phenomenon of SML in an OPSL related to the formation of bright-dark pulse pairs. We experimentally demonstrated that under the influence of the tiny reflection feedback, the phase locking between lasing longitudinal modes can be assisted to form bright-dark pulse pairs in the scale of round-trip time. A theoretical model based on the multiple reflections in a phase-locked multi-longitudinal-mode laser is developed to confirm the formation of bright-dark pulse pairs.

  6. Dispersive-cavity actively mode-locked fiber laser for stable radio frequency delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Yitang; Wang, Ruixin; Yin, Feifei; Xu, Kun; Li, Jianqiang; Lin, Jintong

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel technique for highly stable transfer of a radio frequency (RF) comb over long optical fiber link, which is highly dispersive and is a part of an actively mode-locked fiber laser. Phase fluctuation along the fiber link, which is mainly induced by physical vibration and temperature fluctuations, is automatically compensated by the self-adapted wavelength shifting. Without phase-locking loop or any tunable parts, stable radio frequency is transferred over a 2-km fiber link, with a time jitter suppression ratio larger than 110. (letter)

  7. Intracavity coherent interaction of mode-locked pulse train with resonant medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Koji

    Resonant interactions of a mode-locked pulse train with intracavity samples, namely rubidium-87 (Rb-87) vapor and Fabry-Perot etalon, placed inside a laser cavity are studied in the light of developing ultra-sensitive laser sensors to measure a small magnetic field and a minute change of index of refraction of a sample material, respectively. A Rb-87 vapor provides an opportunity for a compact high-sensitivity atomic magnetometer due to its accessibility by the standard laser sources and to the large ensemble magnetization. By employing the ultra-sensitive interferometric technique utilizing the intracavity properties of a mode-locked laser, the performance of the Rb-87 magnetometer can be further improved. The fundamental properties of coherent interaction between a mode-locked pulse train and a Rb-87 vapor are studied in numerical calculations of 33 density matrix equations and the reduced wave equation, which are then examined in experiments. In particular, a coherent dark-state is created by the pulse train and is further enhanced by means of spectral shaping or polarization modulation of the excitation pulse train. Experiments performed inside a laser cavity show that the atomic coherence is still preserved due to the coherent nature of interaction between the Rb-87 vapor and the ultrashort pulses occurred within a short time scale compared to the atomic relaxation times, which results in nonlinear propagation of the pulses as well as an observation of the dark-line resonance inside the laser cavity. A Fabry-Perot etalon is a type of optical cavity and serves as a tuning element of the frequency of cw-lasers. By inserting a Fabry-Perot etalon inside a mode-locked laser, the cavity resonance modes are modied due to a coupling between the two cavities, which leads to unique temporal and spectral characteristics of the resultant pulse train and its frequency comb. Both the temporal and spectral properties of the pulse train are studied in detail in experiments as

  8. Active-passively mode-locked dye laser for diagnosis of laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Y.L.; Fedosejevs, R.; Sigel, R.

    1981-03-01

    In this report an active-passively mode-locked, flashlamp-pumped dye laser for diagnosis of laser-produced plasmas is described. This dye laser system used as a pulsed light source for high-speed photography of laser-target experiments was synchronized to the ASTERIX III iodine laser pulse with better than 100 ps accuracy. The single pulse energy was 10 μJ, pulse duration less than 10 ps. In 111 shots clear shadowgrams were obtained during a total of 151 target shots, i.e. the system worked well in 74% of the shots. (orig.)

  9. Swept source optical coherence microscopy using a Fourier domain mode-locked laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Wei; Aguirre, Aaron D; Huber, Robert A; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2007-05-14

    Swept source optical coherence microscopy (OCM) enables cellular resolution en face imaging as well as integration with optical coherence tomography (OCT) cross sectional imaging. A buffered Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) laser light source provides high speed, three dimensional imaging. Image resolutions of 1.6 microm x 8 microm (transverse x axial) with a 220 microm x 220 microm field of view and sensitivity higher than 98 dB are achieved. Three dimensional cellular imaging is demonstrated in vivo in the Xenopus laevis tadpole and ex vivo in the rat kidney and human colon.

  10. Stability of the mode-locking regime in tapered quantum-dot lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardella, P.; Drzewietzki, L.; Rossetti, M.; Weber, C.; Breuer, S.

    2018-02-01

    We study numerically and experimentally the role of the injection current and reverse bias voltage on the pulse stability of tapered, passively mode-locked, Quantum Dot (QD) lasers. By using a multi-section delayed differential equation and introducing in the model the QD inhomogenous broadening, we are able to predict the onset of leading and trailing edge instabilities in the emitted pulse trains and to identify specific trends of stability in dependence on the laser biasing conditions. The numerical results are confirmed experimentally trough amplitude and timing stability analysis of the pulses.

  11. Wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on 40-GHz monolithic mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2005-01-01

    We have performed wide-band residual phase-noise measurements on semiconductor 40-GHz mode-locked lasers by employing electrical waveguide components for the radio-frequency circuit. The intrinsic timing jitters of lasers with one, two, and three quantum wells (QW) are compared and our design...... prediction, concerning noise versus number of QWs, for the first time corroborated by experiments. A minimum jitter of 44 fs is found, by extrapolating to the Nyquist frequency, for the one-QW device having nearly transform-limited pulses of 1.2 ps. This jitter is nearly three times lower than for a three...

  12. Shape coexistence in krypton and selenium light isotopes studied through Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions beams; Etude de la coexistence de formes dans les isotopes legers du krypton et du selenium par excitation Coulombienne de faisceaux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, E

    2006-06-15

    The light krypton isotopes show two minima in their potential energy corresponding to elongated (prolate) and compressed (oblate) quadrupole deformation. Both configuration are almost equally bound and occur within an energy range of less than 1 MeV. Such phenomenon is called shape coexistence. An inversion of the ground state deformation from prolate in Kr{sup 78} to oblate in Kr{sup 72} with strong mixing of the configurations in Kr{sup 74} and Kr{sup 76} was proposed based on the systematic of isotopic chain. Coulomb excitation experiments are sensitive to the quadrupole moment. Coulomb excitation experiments of radioactive Kr{sup 74} and Kr{sup 76} beam were performed at GANIL using the SPIRAL facility and the EXOGAM spectrometer. The analysis of these experiments resulted in a complete description of the transition strength and quadrupole moments of the low-lying states. They establish the prolate character of the ground state and an oblate excited state. A complementary lifetime measurement using a 'plunger' device was also performed. Transition strength in neighboring nuclei were measured using the technique of intermediate energy Coulomb excitation at GANIL. The results on the Se{sup 68} nucleus show a sharp change in structure with respects to heavier neighboring nuclei. (author)

  13. Multiple-Pulse Operation and Bound States of Solitons in Passive Mode-Locked Fiber Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Komarov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of our research on a multiple-pulse operation of passive mode-locked fiber lasers. The research has been performed on basis of numerical simulation. Multihysteresis dependence of both an intracavity energy and peak intensities of intracavity ultrashort pulses on pump power is found. It is shown that the change of a number of ultrashort pulses in a laser cavity can be realized by hard as well as soft regimes of an excitation and an annihilation of new solitons. Bound steady states of interacting solitons are studied for various mechanisms of nonlinear losses shaping ultrashort pulses. Possibility of coding of information on basis of soliton trains with various bonds between neighboring pulses is discussed. The role of dispersive wave emitted by solitons because of lumped intracavity elements in a formation of powerful soliton wings is analyzed. It is found that such powerful wings result in large bounding energies of interacting solitons in steady states. Various problems of a soliton interaction in passive mode-locked fiber lasers are discussed.

  14. Electronic control of different generation regimes in mode-locked all-fibre F8 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtsev, Sergey; Ivanenko, Aleksey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey; Smirnov, Sergey

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate for the first time an electronically controlled realisation of markedly different generation regimes in a mode-locked all-fibre figure-eight (F8) Yb-doped laser. Electronic adjustment of the ratio of pumping powers of two amplification stages in a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror enables the establishment of stable pulse generation regimes with different degrees of coherence and control over their parameters within relatively broad limits, with the pulse duration range exceeding a factor of two in the picosecond domain for coherent and incoherent pulses, the energy range exceeding an order of magnitude for incoherent pulses (2.2-24.8 nJ) and over a factor of 8 for coherent pulses (1.9-16.2 nJ). Adjustment of the pumping powers allows one to maintain the duration of the coherent pulses and to set their peak power in the range of 32.5-292.5 W. The proposed configuration of electronic control over the radiation parameters of a mode-locked all-fibre F8 laser enables reproducible generation of pulses of different types with specified parameters within a broad range of values.

  15. Self-mode-locking operation of a diode-end-pumped Tm:YAP laser with watt-level output power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su; Zhang, Xinlu; Huang, Jinjer; Wang, Tianhan; Dai, Junfeng; Dong, Guangzong

    2018-03-01

    We report on a high power continuous wave (CW) self-mode-locked Tm:YAP laser pumped by a 792 nm laser diode. Without any additional mode-locking elements in the cavity, stable and self-starting mode-locking operation has been realized. The threshold pump power of the CW self-mode-locked Tm:YAP laser is only 5.4 W. The maximum average output power is as high as 1.65 W at the pump power of 12 W, with the repetition frequency of 468 MHz and the center wavelength of 1943 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first CW self-mode-locked Tm:YAP laser. The experiment results show that the Tm:YAP crystal is a promising gain medium for realizing the high power self-mode-locking operation at 2 µm.

  16. Cr:ZnS saturable absorber passively Q-switched mode-locking Tm,Ho:LLF laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinlu; Luo, Yong; Wang, Tianhan; Dai, Junfeng; Zhang, Jianxin; Li, Jiang; Cui, Jinhui; Huang, Jinjer

    2017-04-10

    We first report on a diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched mode-locking Tm,Ho:LLF laser at 2053 nm by using a Cr:ZnS saturable absorber. A stable Q-switched mode-locking pulse train with a nearly 100% modulation depth was achieved. The repetition frequency of the Q-switched pulse envelope increased from 0.5 to 12.3 kHz with increasing pump power from 1 to 4.36 W. The maximum average output power of 145 mW was obtained, and the width of the mode-locked pulse was estimated to be less than 682 ps with a 250 MHz repetition frequency within a Q-switched pulse envelope of about 700 ns.

  17. Immobilization of krypton in a metal matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The report presents the work carried out on the immobilization of krypton in a metallic matrix by combined ion implantation and sputtering. The process has been successfully tested using 100 curies of fully active krypton in order to demonstrate that the process operates in the radiation levels which will be obtained with active gas at a reprocessing plant. A design study for a plant for fuel reprocessing has shown that the process can be simply operated, without requiring shielded cells. These results, which complete the development programme, indicate that the process is ideal for the containment of kripton arising from the processing of nuclear fuel and that the product will retain the gas under normal storage conditions and also during simulated accident conditions

  18. Bright-dark rogue wave in mode-locked fibre laser (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kbashi, Hani; Kolpakov, Stanislav; Martinez, Amós; Mou, Chengbo; Sergeyev, Sergey V.

    2017-05-01

    Bright-Dark Rogue Wave in Mode-Locked Fibre Laser Hani Kbashi1*, Amos Martinez1, S. A. Kolpakov1, Chengbo Mou, Alex Rozhin1, Sergey V. Sergeyev1 1Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, School of Engineering and Applied Science Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET, UK kbashihj@aston.ac.uk , 0044 755 3534 388 Keywords: Optical rogue wave, Bright-Dark rogue wave, rogue wave, mode-locked fiber laser, polarization instability. Abstract: Rogue waves (RWs) are statistically rare localized waves with high amplitude that suddenly appear and disappear in oceans, water tanks, and optical systems [1]. The investigation of these events in optics, optical rogue waves, is of interest for both fundamental research and applied science. Recently, we have shown that the adjustment of the in-cavity birefringence and pump polarization leads to emerge optical RW events [2-4]. Here, we report the first experimental observation of vector bright-dark RWs in an erbium-doped stretched pulse mode-locked fiber laser. The change of induced in-cavity birefringence provides an opportunity to observe RW events at pump power is a little higher than the lasing threshold. Polarization instabilities in the laser cavity result in the coupling between two orthogonal linearly polarized components leading to the emergence of bright-dark RWs. The observed clusters belongs to the class of slow optical RWs because their lifetime is of order of a thousand of laser cavity roundtrip periods. References: 1. D. R. Solli, C. Ropers, P. Koonath,and B. Jalali, Optical rogue waves," Nature, 450, 1054-1057, 2007. 2. S. V. Sergeyev, S. A. Kolpakov, C. Mou, G. Jacobsen, S. Popov, and V. Kalashnikov, "Slow deterministic vector rogue waves," Proc. SPIE 9732, 97320K (2016). 3. S. A. Kolpakov, H. Kbashi, and S. V. Sergeyev, "Dynamics of vector rogue waves in a fiber laser with a ring cavity," Optica, 3, 8, 870, (2016). 5. S. Kolpakov, H. Kbashi, and S. Sergeyev, "Slow optical rogue waves in a unidirectional fiber laser

  19. Large net-normal dispersion Er-doped fibre laser mode-locked with a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Patrick; Erkintalo, Miro; Broderick, Neil G. R.

    2018-03-01

    We report on an environmentally stable, all-PM-fibre, Er-doped, mode-locked laser with a central wavelength of 1550 nm. Significantly, the laser possesses large net-normal dispersion such that its dynamics are comparable to that of an all-normal dispersion fibre laser at 1 μm with an analogous architecture. The laser is mode-locked with a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror to produce pulses that are externally compressible to 500 fs. Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  20. High-power femtosecond pulse generation in a passively mode-locked Nd:SrLaAlO4 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan-De; Dong, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Li-He; Berkowski, Marek; Su, Liang-Bi; Ren, Ting-Qi; Peng, Yan-Dong; Hou, Jia; Zhang, Bai-Tao; He, Jing-Liang

    2016-07-01

    A high optical quality Nd:SrLaAlO4 (Nd:SLA) crystal was grown using the Czochralski method and showed broad fluorescence spectrum with a full width at half maximum value of 34 nm, which is beneficial for generating femtosecond laser pulses. A stable diode-pumped passively mode-locked femtosecond Nd:SLA laser with 458 fs pulse duration was achieved for the first time at a central wavelength of 1077.9 nm. The average output power of the continuous-wave mode-locked laser was 520 mW and the repetition rate was 78.5 MHz.

  1. Harmonic mode-locking and sub-round-trip time nonlinear dynamics of electro-optically controlled solid state laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunkov, M. V.; Maslova, Yu Ya; Petukhov, V. A.; Semenov, M. A.; Shabalin, Yu V.; Tunkin, V. G.

    2018-03-01

    Harmonic mode-locking in a solid state laser due to optoelectronic control is studied numerically on the basis of two methods. The first one is detailed numeric simulation taking into account laser radiation fine time structure. It is shown that optimally chosen feedback delay leads to self-started mode-locking with generation of desired number of pulses in the laser cavity. The second method is based on discrete maps for short laser pulse energy. Both methods show that the application of combination of positive and negative feedback loops allows to reduce the period of regular nonlinear dynamics down to a fraction of a laser cavity round trip time.

  2. Report on first masing and single mode locking in a prebunched beam FEM oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.; Eichenbaum, A.; Kleinman, H. [Tel-Aviv Univ., Ramat-Aviv (Israel)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Radiation characteristics of a table-top free electron maser (FEM) are described in this paper. The FEM employs a prebunched electron beam and is operated as an oscillator in the low-gain collective (Raman) regime. Using electron beam prebunching single mode locking at any one of the possible oscillation modes was obtained. The electron beam is prebunched by a microwave tube section before it is injected into the wiggler. By tuning the electron beam bunching frequency, the FEM oscillation frequency can be locked to any eigen frequency of the resonant waveguide cavity which is within the frequency band of net gain of the FEM. The oscillation build up process is sped up, when the FEM operates with a prebunched electron beam, and the build-up time of radiation is shortened significantly. First measurements of masing with and without prebunching and characterization of the emitted radiation are reported.

  3. Mode locking and quasiperiodicity in a discrete-time Chialvo neuron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengjuan; Cao, Hongjun

    2018-03-01

    The two-dimensional parameter spaces of a discrete-time Chialvo neuron model are investigated. Our studies demonstrate that for all our choice of two parameters (i) the fixed point is destabilized via Neimark-Sacker bifurcation; (ii) there exist mode locking structures like Arnold tongues and shrimps, with periods organized in a Farey tree sequence, embedded in quasiperiodic/chaotic region. We determine analytically the location of the parameter sets where Neimark-Sacker bifurcation occurs, and the location on this curve where Arnold tongues of arbitrary period are born. Properties of the transition that follows the so-called two-torus from quasiperiodicity to chaos are presented clearly and proved strictly by using numerical simulations such as bifurcation diagrams, the largest Lyapunov exponent diagram on MATLAB and C++.

  4. Cavity-augmented frequency tripling of a continuous wave mode-locked laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, Gail; Ferguson, Allister I.; Langford, Nigel

    2001-01-01

    We present a model and experimental investigation of a singly-resonant optical cavity to enhance the nonlinear conversion efficiency of a continuous wave mode-locked all-solid-state laser source to produce an efficient source of ultraviolet radiation. For input pulses of approximately 33 ps duration at 4.4 ns intervals, our model predicts greater than 30% conversion from fundamental to third harmonic which is particularly attractive for fundamental sources of modest average power. Experimentally, we have achieved overall optical conversion efficiencies from fundamental to third harmonic wavelength typically greater than 11%, compared with less than 0.4% in a single pass geometry. We have measured an average power of 320 mW at λ=355 nm at picosecond pulse duration, which corresponds to a generated third harmonic average power of 0.5 W. (author)

  5. Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser pumped by a single laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, D. A.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kuritsyn, I. I.; Mavritskiy, A. O.; Perminov, B. E.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Murzina, T. V.; Maydykovskiy, A. I.

    2018-04-01

    The performance of a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a single 461 nm laser diode is presented for both the continuous-wave and the mode-locked regimes of operation. We introduce a simple astigmatism correction scheme for the laser diode beam consisting of two cylindrical lenses affecting the pump beam along the fast axis of the laser diode, which provides the mode-matching between the nearly square-shaped pump beam and the cavity mode. The resulting efficiency of the suggested Ti:Sapphire oscillator pumped by such a laser diode is analyzed for the Ti:sapphire crystals of 3 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm in length. We demonstrate that such a system provides the generation of ultrashort pulses up to 15 fs in duration with the repetition rate of 87 MHz, the average power being 170 mW.

  6. Characterization of a FBG sensor interrogation system based on a mode-locked laser scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal, Javier; Fraile-Peláez, Francisco Javier; Zheng, Di; Barrera, David; Sales, Salvador

    2017-10-02

    This paper is focused on the characterization of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor interrogation system based on a fiber ring laser with a semiconductor optical amplifier as the gain medium, and an in-loop electro-optical modulator. This system operates as a switchable active (pulsed) mode-locked laser. The operation principle of the system is explained theoretically and validated experimentally. The ability of the system to interrogate an array of different FBGs in wavelength and spatial domain is demonstrated. Simultaneously, the influence of several important parameters on the performance of the interrogation technique has been investigated. Specifically, the effects of the bandwidth and the reflectivity of the FBGs, the SOA gain, and the depth of the intensity modulation have been addressed.

  7. Electronic frequency tuning of the acousto-optic mode-locking device of a laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdich, L. N.; Balakshy, V. I.; Mantsevich, S. N.

    2017-11-01

    The effect of the electronic tuning of the acoustic resonances in an acousto-optic mode-locking device of a laser is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The problem of the excitation of a Fabry-Perot acoustic resonator by a plate-like piezoelectric transducer (PET) is solved in the approximation of plane acoustic waves taking into consideration the actual parameters of an RF generator and the elements for matching the PET to the generator. Resonances are tuned by changing the matching inductance that was connected in parallel to the transducer of the acousto-optic cell. The cell used in the experiment was manufactured from fused silica and included a lithium niobate PET. Changes in the matching inductance in the range of 0.025 to 0.2 μH provided the acoustic-resonance frequency tuning by 0.19 MHz, which exceeds the acoustic- resonance half-width.

  8. A Theoretical Investigation of Mode-Locking Phenomena in Reversed Field Pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Fitzpatrick

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 This paper investigates the formation and breakup of the ''slinky mode'' in an RFP using analytic techniques previously employed to examine mode locking phenomena in tokamaks. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field which co-rotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m = 1 core tearing modes, via a bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes lock together in a tokamak. The slinky mode breaks up via a second bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes in a tokamak unlock. However, the typical m = 1 mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error-field is also investigated analytically. Either the error-field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a non-rotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error-field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The problems associated with a locked slinky mode can be alleviated by canceling out the accidentally produced error-field responsible for locking the slinky mode, using a deliberately created ''control'' error-field. Alternatively, the locking angle of the slinky mode can be swept toroidally by rotating the control field

  9. A theoretical investigation of mode-locking phenomena in reversed field pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Fitzpatrick

    2004-03-17

    OAK-B135 This paper investigates the formation and breakup of the ''slinky mode'' in an RFP using analytic techniques previously employed to examine mode locking phenomena in tokamaks. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field which co-rotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m = 1 core tearing modes, via a bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes lock together in a tokamak. The slinky mode breaks up via a second bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes in a tokamak unlock. However, the typical m = 1 mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error-field is also investigated analytically. Either the error-field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a non-rotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error-field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The problems associated with a locked slinky mode can be alleviated by canceling out the accidentally produced error-field responsible for locking the slinky mode, using a deliberately created ''control'' error-field. Alternatively, the locking angle of the slinky mode can be swept toroidally by rotating the control field.

  10. A Theoretical Investigation of Mode-Locking Phenomena in Reversed Field Pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Fitzpatrick

    2004-04-07

    OAK-B135 This paper investigates the formation and breakup of the ''slinky mode'' in an RFP using analytic techniques previously employed to examine mode locking phenomena in tokamaks. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field which co-rotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m = 1 core tearing modes, via a bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes lock together in a tokamak. The slinky mode breaks up via a second bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes in a tokamak unlock. However, the typical m = 1 mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error-field is also investigated analytically. Either the error-field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a non-rotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error-field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The problems associated with a locked slinky mode can be alleviated by canceling out the accidentally produced error-field responsible for locking the slinky mode, using a deliberately created ''control'' error-field. Alternatively, the locking angle of the slinky mode can be swept toroidally by rotating the control field.

  11. A theoretical investigation of mode-locking phenomena in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Fitzpatrick

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 This paper investigates the formation and breakup of the ''slinky mode'' in an RFP using analytic techniques previously employed to examine mode locking phenomena in tokamaks. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field which co-rotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m = 1 core tearing modes, via a bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes lock together in a tokamak. The slinky mode breaks up via a second bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes in a tokamak unlock. However, the typical m = 1 mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error-field is also investigated analytically. Either the error-field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a non-rotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error-field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The problems associated with a locked slinky mode can be alleviated by canceling out the accidentally produced error-field responsible for locking the slinky mode, using a deliberately created ''control'' error-field. Alternatively, the locking angle of the slinky mode can be swept toroidally by rotating the control field

  12. Mode-locking neurodynamics predict human auditory brainstem responses to musical intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerud, Karl D; Almonte, Felix V; Kim, Ji Chul; Large, Edward W

    2014-02-01

    The auditory nervous system is highly nonlinear. Some nonlinear responses arise through active processes in the cochlea, while others may arise in neural populations of the cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus and higher auditory areas. In humans, auditory brainstem recordings reveal nonlinear population responses to combinations of pure tones, and to musical intervals composed of complex tones. Yet the biophysical origin of central auditory nonlinearities, their signal processing properties, and their relationship to auditory perception remain largely unknown. Both stimulus components and nonlinear resonances are well represented in auditory brainstem nuclei due to neural phase-locking. Recently mode-locking, a generalization of phase-locking that implies an intrinsically nonlinear processing of sound, has been observed in mammalian auditory brainstem nuclei. Here we show that a canonical model of mode-locked neural oscillation predicts the complex nonlinear population responses to musical intervals that have been observed in the human brainstem. The model makes predictions about auditory signal processing and perception that are different from traditional delay-based models, and may provide insight into the nature of auditory population responses. We anticipate that the application of dynamical systems analysis will provide the starting point for generic models of auditory population dynamics, and lead to a deeper understanding of nonlinear auditory signal processing possibly arising in excitatory-inhibitory networks of the central auditory nervous system. This approach has the potential to link neural dynamics with the perception of pitch, music, and speech, and lead to dynamical models of auditory system development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fourier Domain Mode Locking (FDML): A new laser operating regime and applications for optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R; Wojtkowski, M; Fujimoto, J G

    2006-04-17

    We demonstrate a new technique for frequency-swept laser operation--Fourier domain mode locking (FDML)--and its application for swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. FDML is analogous to active laser mode locking for short pulse generation, except that the spectrum rather than the amplitude of the light field is modulated. High-speed, narrowband optical frequency sweeps are generated with a repetition period equal to the fundamental or a harmonic of cavity round-trip time. An FDML laser is constructed using a long fiber ring cavity, a semiconductor optical amplifier, and a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter. Effective sweep rates of up to 290 kHz are demonstrated with a 105 nm tuning range at 1300 nm center wavelength. The average output power is 3mW directly from the laser and 20 mW after post-amplification. Using the FDML laser for swept-source OCT, sensitivities of 108 dB are achieved and dynamic linewidths are narrow enough to enable imaging over a 7 mm depth with only a 7.5 dB decrease in sensitivity. We demonstrate swept-source OCT imaging with acquisition rates of up to 232,000 axial scans per second. This corresponds to 906 frames/second with 256 transverse pixel images, and 3.5 volumes/second with a 256x128x256 voxel element 3-DOCT data set. The FDML laser is ideal for swept-source OCT imaging, thus enabling high imaging speeds and large imaging depths.

  14. Investigations of repetition rate stability of a mode-locked quantum dot semiconductor laser in an auxiliary optical fiber cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breuer, Stefan; Elsässer, Wolfgang; McInerney, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated experimentally the pulse train (mode beating) stability of a monolithic mode-locked multi-section quantum-dot laser with an added passive auxiliary optical fiber cavity. Addition of the weakly coupled (¿ -24dB) cavity reduces the current-induced shift d¿/dI of the principal...

  15. High-speed polarization-sensitive OCT at 1060 nm using a Fourier domain mode-locked swept source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Sebastian; Torzicky, Teresa; Klein, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    sufficiently large datasets. Here, we demonstrate PS-OCT imaging at 350 kHz A-scan rate using a two-channel PS-OCT system in conjunction with a Fourier domain mode-locked laser. The light source spectrum spans up to 100nm around the water absorption minimum at 1060 nm. By modulating the laser pump current, we...

  16. All-fiber Yb-doped fiber laser passively mode-locking by monolayer MoS2 saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Jianqi; Li, Pingxue; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Hua; Xiao, Kun; Li, Chunyong; Zhang, Guangyu

    2018-04-01

    We report on an all-fiber passively mode-locked ytterbium-doped (Yb-doped) fiber laser with monolayer molybdenum disulfide (ML-MoS2) saturable absorber (SA) by three-temperature zone chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The modulation depth, saturation fluence, and non-saturable loss of this ML-MoS2 are measured to be 3.6%, 204.8 μJ/cm2 and 6.3%, respectively. Based on this ML-MoS2SA, a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser has been achieved at 979 nm with pulse duration of 13 ps and repetition rate of 16.51 MHz. A mode-locked fiber laser at 1037 nm is also realized with a pulse duration of 475 ps and repetition rate of 26.5 MHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that the ML-MoS2 SA is used in an all-fiber Yb-doped mode-locked fiber laser at 980 nm. Our work further points the excellent saturable absorption ability of ML-MoS2 in ultrafast photonic applications.

  17. Tm-doped fiber laser mode-locking with MoS2-polyvinyl alcohol saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liming; Li, Xing; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Duanduan; Dai, Shixun; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian; Nie, Qiuhua

    2018-03-01

    We have designed an all-fiber passive mode-locking thulium-doped fiber laser that uses molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as a saturable absorber (SA) material. A free-standing few-layer MoS2-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film is fabricated by liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) and is then transferred onto the end face of a fiber connector. The excellent saturable absorption of the fabricated MoS2-based SA allows the laser to output soliton pulses at a pump power of 500 mW. Fundamental frequency mode-locking is realized at a repetition frequency of 13.9 MHz. The central wavelength is 1926 nm, the 3 dB spectral bandwidth is 2.86 nm and the pulse duration is 1.51 ps. Additionally, third-order harmonic mode-locking of the laser is also achieved. The pulse duration is 1.33 ps, which is slightly narrower than the fundamental frequency mode-locking bandwidth. The experimental results demonstrate that the few-layer MoS2-PVA SA is promising for use in 2 μm laser systems.

  18. Using graphene nano-particle embedded in photonic crystal fiber for evanescent wave mode-locking of fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Yang, Chun-Yu; Liou, Jia-Hong; Yu, Chin-Ping; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-07-15

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with high-quality graphene nano-particles uniformly dispersed in the hole cladding are demonstrated to passively mode-lock the erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) by evanescent-wave interaction. The few-layer graphene nano-particles are obtained by a stabilized electrochemical exfoliation at a threshold bias. These slowly and softly exfoliated graphene nano-particle exhibits an intense 2D band and an almost disappeared D band in the Raman scattering spectrum. The saturable phenomena of the extinction coefficient β in the cladding provides a loss modulation for the intracavity photon intensity by the evanescent-wave interaction. The evanescent-wave mode-locking scheme effectively enlarges the interaction length of saturable absorption with graphene nano-particle to provide an increasing transmittance ΔT of 5% and modulation depth of 13%. By comparing the core-wave and evanescent-wave mode-locking under the same linear transmittance, the transmittance of the graphene nano-particles on the end-face of SMF only enlarges from 0.54 to 0.578 with ΔT = 3.8% and the modulation depth of 10.8%. The evanescent wave interaction is found to be better than the traditional approach which confines the graphene nano-particles at the interface of two SMF patchcords. When enlarging the intra-cavity gain by simultaneously increasing the pumping current of 980-nm and 1480-nm pumping laser diodes (LDs) to 900 mA, the passively mode-locked EDFL shortens its pulsewidth to 650 fs and broadens its spectral linewidth to 3.92 nm. An extremely low carrier amplitude jitter (CAJ) of 1.2-1.6% is observed to confirm the stable EDFL pulse-train with the cladding graphene nano-particle based evanescent-wave mode-locking.

  19. Gain broadening and mode-locking in overcoupled second harmonic Q-switched microsecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Ingo; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    An intracavity frequency doubled, Q-switched Nd:YLF emitting at a wavelength of 527 nm was designed with the goal to temporally stretch the Q-switched pulses up to some microseconds at pulse energies of several millijoules. With different resonator configurations pulse durations between 12 μs and 3 μs with energies of 1 mJ-4.5 mJ have been achieved, which is demanded for an application in ophthalmology. For tighter intracavity foci and high pump power, however, strong power modulations by trains of picosecond pulses on the rear flank of the microsecond pulses were observed, indicating the occurrence of cascading nonlinearities and mode-locking. Simultaneously a significant increase of the fundamental spectrum up to 5 nm was found. A similar effect, which is referred to as gain broadening, has previously been observed by using ppKTP for intracavity second harmonic generation. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first observation of this effect with unpoled second harmonic media. This project was realized with the support of the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF).

  20. K-space linear Fourier domain mode locked laser and applications for optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenwillig, Christoph M; Biedermann, Benjamin R; Palte, Gesa; Huber, Robert

    2008-06-09

    We report on a Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) wavelength swept laser source with a highly linear time-frequency sweep characteristic and demonstrate OCT imaging without k-space resampling prior to Fourier transformation. A detailed theoretical framework is provided and different strategies how to determine the optimum drive waveform of the piezo-electrically actuated optical bandpass-filter in the FDML laser are discussed. An FDML laser with a relative optical frequency deviation ??nu/nu smaller than 8 x10(-5) over a 100 nm spectral bandwidth at 1300 nm is presented, enabling high resolution OCT over long ranging depths. Without numerical time-to-frequency resampling and without spectral apodization a sensitivity roll off of 4 dB over 2 mm, 12.5 dB over 4 mm and 26.5 dB over 1 cm at 3.5 mus sweep duration and 106.6 dB maximum sensitivity at 9.2 mW average power is achieved. The axial resolution in air degrades from 14 to 21 mum over 4 mm imaging depth. The compensation of unbalanced dispersion in the OCT sample arm by an adapted tuning characteristic of the source is demonstrated. Good stability of the system without feedback-control loops is observed over hours.

  1. High speed engine gas thermometry by Fourier-domain mode-locked laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranendonk, Laura A; An, Xinliang; Caswell, Andrew W; Herold, Randy E; Sanders, Scott T; Huber, Robert; Fujimoto, James G; Okura, Yasuhiro; Urata, Yasuhiro

    2007-11-12

    We present a novel method for low noise, high-speed, real-time spectroscopy to monitor molecular absorption spectra. The system is based on a rapidly swept, narrowband CW Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) laser source for spectral encoding in time and an optically time-multiplexed split-pulse data acquisition system for improved noise performance and sensitivity. An acquisition speed of ~100 kHz, a spectral resolution better than 0.1 nm over a wavelength range of ~1335-1373 nm and a relative noise level of ~5 mOD (~1% minimum detectable base-e absorbance) are achieved. The system is applied for crank-angle-resolved gas thermometry by H(2)O absorption spectroscopy in an engine motoring at 600 and 900 rpm with a precision of ~1%. Influences of various noise sources such as laser phase and intensity noise, trigger and synchronization jitter in the electronic detection system, and the accuracy of available H(2)O absorption databases are discussed.

  2. Electrical addressing and temporal tweezing of localized pulses in passively mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaloyes, J.; Camelin, P.; Marconi, M.; Giudici, M.

    2017-08-01

    This work presents an overview of a combined experimental and theoretical analysis on the manipulation of temporal localized structures (LSs) found in passively Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers coupled to resonant saturable absorber mirrors. We show that the pumping current is a convenient parameter for manipulating the temporal Localized Structures, also called localized pulses. While short electrical pulses can be used for writing and erasing individual LSs, we demonstrate that a current modulation introduces a temporally evolving parameter landscape allowing to control the position and the dynamics of LSs. We show that the localized pulses drifting speed in this landscape depends almost exclusively on the local parameter value instead of depending on the landscape gradient, as shown in quasi-instantaneous media. This experimental observation is theoretically explained by the causal response time of the semiconductor carriers that occurs on an finite timescale and breaks the parity invariance along the cavity, thus leading to a new paradigm for temporal tweezing of localized pulses. Different modulation waveforms are applied for describing exhaustively this paradigm. Starting from a generic model of passive mode-locking based upon delay differential equations, we deduce the effective equations of motion for these LSs in a time-dependent current landscape.

  3. Hybrid silicon mode-locked laser with improved RF power by impedance matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossoun, Bassem; Derickson, Dennis; Srinivasan, Sudharsanan; Bowers, John

    2015-02-01

    We design and discuss an impedance matching solution for a hybrid silicon mode-locked laser diode (MLLD) to improve peak optical power coming from the device. In order to develop an impedance matching solution, a thorough measurement and analysis of the MLLD as a function of bias on each of the laser segments was carried out. A passive component impedance matching network was designed at the operating frequency of 20 GHz to optimize RF power delivery to the laser. The hybrid silicon laser was packaged together in a module including the impedance matching circuit. The impedance matching design resulted in a 6 dB (electrical) improvement in the detected modulation spectrum power, as well as approximately a 10 dB phase noise improvement, from the MLLD. Also, looking ahead to possible future work, we discuss a Step Recovery Diode (SRD) driven impulse generator, which wave-shapes the RF drive to achieve efficient injection. This novel technique addresses the time varying impedance of the absorber as the optical pulse passes through it, to provide optimum optical pulse shaping.

  4. Compact mode-locked diode laser system for high precision frequency comparisons in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, H.; Kovalchuk, E. V.; Wicht, A.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.; Peters, A.

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays cold atom-based quantum sensors such as atom interferometers start leaving optical labs to put e.g. fundamental physics under test in space. One of such intriguing applications is the test of the Weak Equivalence Principle, the Universality of Free Fall (UFF), using different quantum objects such as rubidium (Rb) and potassium (K) ultra-cold quantum gases. The corresponding atom interferometers are implemented with light pulses from narrow linewidth lasers emitting near 767 nm (K) and 780 nm (Rb). To determine any relative acceleration of the K and Rb quantum ensembles during free fall, the frequency difference between the K and Rb lasers has to be measured very accurately by means of an optical frequency comb. Micro-gravity applications not only require good electro-optical characteristics but are also stringent in their demand for compactness, robustness and efficiency. For frequency comparison experiments the rather complex fiber laser-based frequency comb system may be replaced by one semiconductor laser chip and some passive components. Here we present an important step towards this direction, i.e. we report on the development of a compact mode-locked diode laser system designed to generate a highly stable frequency comb in the wavelength range of 780 nm.

  5. Mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser based on iron-doped carbon nitride nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongfeng; Zhou, Yan; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu; Hu, Chenxia; Gao, Linfeng; Zhang, Haoli; Wang, Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Solution based nanosheets of iron-doped graphitic carbon nitrides (Fe-g-CN) have been prepared and their optical properties (both linear and nonlinear) are studied. These two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets show an absorption spectrum extending to over 2 µm, and in particular they possess strong nonlinear (saturable) absorption in the 2 µm spectral region. A saturable absorber (SA) manufactured from 2D Fe-g-CN nanosheets gives a modulation depth and saturation intensity of 12.9% and 8.9 MW cm‑2, respectively. This SA is further used to mode-lock thulium-doped fiber lasers, producing 2 µm laser pulses with a duration of 16.6 ps (dechirped to 2.2 ps), an average power of 96.4 mW, a pulse energy of 6.3 nJ, and a repetition rate of 15.3 MHz. As a new type of 2D nonlinear material with strong modulation capabilities, solution-based Fe-g-CN nanosheets can be potentially integrated into photonic and optoelectrionic devices, particuarly in the 2 µm spectral region.

  6. CsPbBr3 nanocrystal saturable absorber for mode-locking ytterbium fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Hu, Zhiping; Li, Yue; Xu, Jianqiu; Tang, Xiaosheng; Tang, Yulong

    2016-06-01

    Cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I) have been reported as efficient light-harvesting and light-emitting semiconductor materials, but their nonlinear optical properties have been seldom touched upon. In this paper, we prepare layered CsPbBr3 nanocrystal films and characterize their physical properties. Broadband linear absorption from ˜0.8 to over 2.2 μm and nonlinear optical absorption at the 1-μm wavelength region are measured. The CsPbBr3 saturable absorber (SA), manufactured by drop-casting of colloidal CsPbBr3 liquid solution on a gold mirror, shows modulation depth and saturation intensity of 13.1% and 10.7 MW/cm2, respectively. With this SA, mode-locking operation of a polarization-maintained ytterbium fiber laser produces single pulses with duration of ˜216 ps, maximum average output power of 10.5 mW, and the laser spectrum is centered at ˜1076 nm. This work shows that CsPbBr3 films can be efficient SA candidates for fiber lasers and also have great potential to become broadband linear and nonlinear optical materials for photonics and optoelectronics.

  7. Compact 84 GHz passive mode-locked fiber laser using dual-fiber coupled fused-quartz microresonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tze-An; Hsu, Yung; Chow, Chi-Wai; Chuang, Yi-Chen; Ting, Wei-Jo; Wang, Bo-Chun; Peng, Jin-Long; Chen, Guan-Hong; Chang, Yuan-Chia

    2017-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a compact and portable-size 84-GHz passive mode-locked fiber laser, in which a dual-fiber coupled fused-quartz microresonator is employed as the intracavity optical comb filter as well as the optical nonlinear material for optical frequency comb generation. About eight coherent optical tones can be generated in the proposed fiber laser. The 20-dB bandwidth is larger than 588 GHz. The full-width half-maximum pulse-width of the proposed laser is 2.5 ps. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using the proposed passive mode-locked fiber laser to carry a 5-Gbit/s on-off-keying signal and transmit over 20-km standard single mode fiber. A 7% forward error correction requirement can be achieved, showing the proposed fiber laser can be a potential candidate for fiber-wireless applications.

  8. Passive mode locking at harmonics of the free spectral range of the intracavity filter in a fiber ring laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumin; Lu, Fuyun; Dong, Xinyong; Shum, Ping; Yang, Xiufeng; Zhou, Xiaoqun; Gong, Yandong; Lu, Chao

    2005-11-01

    We report the passive mode-locking at harmonics of the free spectral range (FSR) of the intracavity multi-channel filter in a fiber ring laser. The laser uses a sampled fiber Bragg grating (SFBG) with a free spectral range (FSR) of 0.8 nm, or 99 GHz at 1555 nm, and a length of highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber with low and flat dispersion. Stable picosecond soliton pulse trains with twofold to sevenfold enhancement in the repetition rate, relative to the FSR of the SFBG, have been achieved. The passive mode-locking mechanism that is at play in this laser relies on a dissipative four-wave mixing process and switching of repetition rate is realized simply by adjustment of the intracavity polarization controllers.

  9. Structure of picosecond pulses of a Q-switched and mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donin, V. I.; Yakovin, D. V.; Gribanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The pulse duration of a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, in which Q-switching with mode-locking (QML regime) is achieved using a spherical mirror and a travelling-wave acousto-optic modulator, is directly measured with a streak camera. It is found that the picosecond pulses can have a non-single-pulse structure, which is explained by excitation of several competing transverse modes in the Q-switching regime with a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. In the case of cw mode-locking (without Q-switching), a new (auto-QML) regime is observed, in which the pulse train repetition rate is determined by the frequency of the relaxation oscillations of the laser field while the train contains single picosecond pulses.

  10. Structure of picosecond pulses of a Q-switched and mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donin, V I; Yakovin, D V; Gribanov, A V [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-31

    The pulse duration of a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, in which Q-switching with mode-locking (QML regime) is achieved using a spherical mirror and a travelling-wave acousto-optic modulator, is directly measured with a streak camera. It is found that the picosecond pulses can have a non-single-pulse structure, which is explained by excitation of several competing transverse modes in the Q-switching regime with a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. In the case of cw mode-locking (without Q-switching), a new (auto-QML) regime is observed, in which the pulse train repetition rate is determined by the frequency of the relaxation oscillations of the laser field while the train contains single picosecond pulses. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  11. Single-shot photonic time-stretch digitizer using a dissipative soliton-based passively mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Zhang, Zhiyao; Zeng, Zhen; Zhang, Lingjie; Lyu, Yanjia; Liu, Yong; Xie, Kang

    2018-03-19

    We demonstrate a single-shot photonic time-stretch digitizer using a dissipative soliton-based passively mode-locked fiber laser. The theoretical analysis and simulation results indicate that the dissipative soliton-based optical source with a flat spectrum relieves the envelope-induced signal distortion, and its high energy spectral density helps to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, both of which are favorable for simplifying the optical front-end architecture of a photonic time-stretch digitizer. By employing a homemade dissipative soliton-based passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser in a single-shot photonic time-stretch digitizer, an effective number of bits of 4.11 bits under an effective sampling rate of 100 GS/s is experimentally obtained without optical amplification in the link and pulse envelope removing process.

  12. 256 fs, 2 nJ soliton pulse generation from MoS2 mode-locked fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zike; Chen, Hao; Li, Jiarong; Yin, Jinde; Wang, Jinzhang; Yan, Peiguang

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate an Er-doped fiber laser (EDFL) mode-locked by a MoS2 saturable absorber (SA), delivering a 256 fs, 2 nJ soliton pulse at 1563.4 nm. The nonlinear property of the SA prepared by magnetron sputtering deposition (MSD) is measured with a modulation depth (MD) of ∼19.48% and a saturable intensity of 4.14 MW/cm2. To the best of our knowledge, the generated soliton pulse has the highest pulse energy of 2 nJ among the reported mode-locked EDFLs based on transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Our results indicate that MSD-grown SAs could offer an exciting platform for high pulse energy and ultrashort pulse generation.

  13. Hysteresis in the tearing mode locking/unlocking due to resonant magnetic perturbations in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridström, R.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2015-10-01

    The physical mechanisms behind the hysteresis in the tearing mode locking and unlocking to a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) are experimentally studied in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch. The experiments show that the electromagnetic and the viscous torque increase with increasing perturbation amplitude until the mode locks to the wall. At the wall-locking, the plasma velocity reduction profile is peaked at the radius where the RMP is resonant. Thereafter, the viscous torque drops due to the relaxation of the velocity in the central plasma. This is the main reason for the hysteresis in the RMP locking and unlocking amplitude. The increased amplitude of the locked tearing mode produces further deepening of the hysteresis. Both experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the model in Fitzpatrick et al (2001 Phys. Plasmas 8 4489)

  14. Free-standing nano-scale graphite saturable absorber for passively mode-locked erbium doped fiber ring laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Y-H; Lin, G-R

    2012-01-01

    The free-standing graphite nano-particle located between two FC/APC fiber connectors is employed as the saturable absorber to passively mode-lock the ring-type Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL). The host-solvent-free graphite nano-particles with sizes of 300 – 500 nm induce a comparable modulation depth of 54%. The interlayer-spacing and lattice fluctuations of polished graphite nano-particles are observed from the weak 2D band of Raman spectrum and the azimuth angle shift of –0.32 ° of {002}-orientation dependent X-ray diffraction peak. The graphite nano-particles mode-locked EDFL generates a 1.67-ps pulsewidth at linearly dispersion-compensated regime with a repetition rate of 9.1 MHz. The time-bandwidth product of 0.325 obtained under a total intra-cavity group-delay-dispersion of –0.017 ps 2 is nearly transform-limited. The extremely high stability of the nano-scale graphite saturable absorber during mode-locking is observed at an intra-cavity optical energy density of 7.54 mJ/cm 2 . This can be attributed to its relatively high damage threshold (one order of magnitude higher than the graphene) on handling the optical energy density inside the EDFL cavity. The graphite nano-particle with reduced size and sufficient coverage ratio can compete with other fast saturable absorbers such as carbon nanotube or graphene to passively mode-lock fiber lasers with decreased insertion loss and lasing threshold

  15. All-fiber passively mode-locked thulium-doped fiber ring oscillator operated at solitary and noiselike modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Chen, T; Zhang, B; Heberle, A P; Chen, K P

    2011-10-01

    This Letter presents an all-fiber mode-locked thulium-doped fiber ring oscillator based on nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE). Pumped by an erbium-doped fiber amplified spontaneous emission source, the construction of the laser cavity consisting of only fiber optic components can operate under two different regimes of solitary and noiselike (NL) pulses. Autocorrelation measurements are performed to extract features of these two regimes. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. Rogue waves generation via nonlinear soliton collision in multiple-soliton state of a mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Junsong; Tarasov, Nikita; Sugavanam, Srikanth; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-09-19

    We report for the first time, rogue waves generation in a mode-locked fiber laser that worked in multiple-soliton state in which hundreds of solitons occupied the whole laser cavity. Using real-time spatio-temporal intensity dynamics measurements, it is unveiled that nonlinear soliton collision accounts for the formation of rogue waves in this laser state. The nature of interactions between solitons are also discussed. Our observation may suggest similar formation mechanisms of rogue waves in other systems.

  17. Self-organized compound pattern and pulsation of dissipative solitons in a passively mode-locked fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhong; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Yange; He, Ruijing; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Guangdou; Yang, Guang

    2018-02-01

    We experimentally observe soliton self-organization and pulsation in a passively mode-locked fiber laser. The optomechanical interaction in the optical fiber is key to the formation of equidistant soliton bunches. These solitons simultaneously undergo a pulsation process with a period corresponding to tens of the cavity round trip time. Using the dispersive Fourier transformation technique, we find that the Kelly sidebands in the shot-to-shot spectra appear periodically, synchronizing with the pulsation.

  18. Directly exfoliated and imprinted graphite nano-particle saturable absorber for passive mode-locking erbium-doped fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, G.-R.; Lin, Y.-C.

    2011-12-01

    By directly brushing and scribing an ultra-thin (face of a FC/APC connector in erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL), and then imprinting it with the graphite nano-particles exfoliated from a graphite foil, the intra-cavity graphite nano-particle based saturable absorber can be formed to induce passive mode-locking effect in the EDFL. Such a novel approach greatly suppresses the film-thickness induced laser-beam divergent loss to 3.4%, thus enhancing the intra-cavity circulating power to promote the shortening on mode-locking pulsewidth. The saturable absorber with area coverage ratio of graphite nano-particles is detuned from 70 to 25% to provide the modulation depth enhancing from 11 to 20% and the saturated transmittance from 27 to 60%. Optimizing the coverage ratio reduces the non-saturable loss to 40% and enhances the modulation depth to 21%, such that the sub-ps soliton mode-locking can be initiated to provide a chirped pulsewidth of 482 fs and a linewidth of 2.87 nm.

  19. Diverse mode of operation of an all-normal-dispersion mode-locked fiber laser employing two nonlinear loop mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sourav Das; Pal, Atasi; Chatterjee, Sayan; Sen, Ranjan; Pal, Mrinmay

    2018-02-10

    In this paper, we propose an all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-fiber laser with a novel ring cavity architecture having two nonlinear amplifying loop mirrors (NALM) as saturable absorbers, capable of delivering distinctly different pulses with adjustable features. By optimizing the loop lengths of the individual NALMs, the cavity can be operated to deliver Q-switched mode-locked (Q-ML) pulse bunches with adjustable repetition rates, mode-locked pulses in dissipative soliton resonance (DSR) regime or noise-like pulse (NLP) regime with tunable pulse width. The DSR pulses exhibit characteristic narrowband spectrum, while the NLPs exhibit large broadband spectrum. The operation regime of the laser can be controlled by adjusting the amplifier pump powers and the polarization controllers. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a single mode-locked cavity where narrowband DSR pulses and broadband NLPs alongside Q-ML pulse bunches can be selectively generated by employing two NALMs.

  20. Design and Applications of In-Cavity Pulse Shaping by Spectral Sculpturing in Mode-Locked Fibre Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Boscolo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We review our recent progress on the realisation of pulse shaping in passively-mode-locked fibre lasers by inclusion of an amplitude and/or phase spectral filter into the laser cavity. We numerically show that depending on the amplitude transfer function of the in-cavity filter, various regimes of advanced waveform generation can be achieved, including ones featuring parabolic-, flat-top- and triangular-profiled pulses. An application of this approach using a flat-top spectral filter is shown to achieve the direct generation of high-quality sinc-shaped optical Nyquist pulses with a widely tunable bandwidth from the laser oscillator. We also present the operation of an ultrafast fibre laser in which conventional soliton, dispersion-managed soliton (stretched-pulse and dissipative soliton mode-locking regimes can be selectively and reliably targeted by adaptively changing the dispersion profile and bandwidth programmed on an in-cavity programmable filter. The results demonstrate the strong potential of an in-cavity spectral pulse shaper for achieving a high degree of control over the dynamics and output of mode-locked fibre lasers.

  1. Comparison of the noise performance of 10 GHz repetition rate quantum-dot and quantum well monolithic mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpintero, G.; Thompson, M. G.; Yvind, Kresten

    2011-01-01

    Mode-locked lasers are commonly used in carrier-wave signal generation systems because of their excellent phase noise performance. Owing to the importance of this key parameter, this study presents a like-for-like comparison of the noise performance of the passive mode-locked regime of two devices...... fabricated with different material gain systems, one quantum well and the other quantum dot (QD), both with a monolithic all-active two-section mode-locked structure. Two important factors are identified as having a significant effect on the noise performance, the RF linewidth of the first harmonic...... and the shape of the noise pedestals, both depending on the passive mode-locked bias conditions. Nevertheless, the dominant contribution of the RF linewidth to the phase noise, which is significantly narrower for the QD laser, makes this material more suitable for optical generation of low-noise millimetre...

  2. Radiometric titration of officinal radiopharmaceuticals using radioactive kryptonates as end-point indicators. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelgyessy, J.; Dillinger, P.; Harangozo, M.; Jombik, J.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the determination of salicylic, acetylsalicylic and benzoic acids in officinal pharmaceutical based on radiometric titration with 0.1 mol.l -1 NaOH was developed. The end-point was detected with the aid of radioactive glass kryptonate. After the end-point, the excess titrant attacks the glass surface layers and this results in releasing 85 Kr, and consequently, in decreasing the radioactivity of the kryptonate employed. The radioactive kryptonate used as an indicator was prepared by the bombardment of glass with accelerated 85 Kr ions. The developed method is simple, accurate and correct. (author)

  3. Retention of krypton on polymethyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciric, M.M.; Cvjeticanin, N.M.; Radak, B.B.

    1975-01-01

    Retention of krypton on polymethyl methacrylate was studied as a function of kryptonation pressure (P), temperature (T) and time (t). It was found that the dependence of the retained quantity on P, T, and t is in accordance with the diffusion theory. The optimum results (i.e., the maximum retained quantity and the best stability of the kryptonate) were obtained at elevated kryptonation temperatures (200 0 C). The diffusion coefficients of krypton in polymethyl methacrylate, determined from the dekryptonation process, vary from 1 x 10 -10 cm 2 /s to 0.2 x 10 -10 cm 2 /s for samples kryptonated at 20 0 C and 200 0 C respectively. The results have been discussed from the viewpoint of radiation and thermal stability of kryptonated polymethyl methacrylate. Inadequate radiation stability could be the main obstacle for practical purposes. (U.S.)

  4. A SESAM passively mode-locked fiber laser with a long cavity including a band pass filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Rui; Chen, Hong-Wei; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Hou, Jing; Lu, Qi-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    A semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) passively mode-locked fiber laser with a long cavity length over 700 m is demonstrated. A band pass filter is inserted into the laser cavity to stabilize the lasing wavelength. Some interesting phenomena are observed and discussed. The central wavelength, repetition rate, average power and single pulse energy of the laser are 1064 nm, 281.5 kHz, 11 mW and 39 nJ, respectively. The laser operates stably without Q-switching instabilities, which greatly reduces the damage opportunities of the SESAM

  5. Q-switched-like soliton bunches and noise-like pulses generation in a partially mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhong; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Yan-Ge; Zhao, Wenjing; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Shangcheng; Yang, Guang; He, Ruijing

    2016-06-27

    We report an intermediate regime between c.w. emission and noise-like pulses (NLPs) regime in an Er-doped partially mode-locked fiber laser with nonlinear polarization rotation. In this regime, the soliton bunches stochastically turn up from a quasi-cw background in the Q-switched-like envelope. The soliton bunches normally last for tens or hundreds of intracavity round-trips. When the soliton bunches vanish, typical NLPs chains are generated sporadically at location where the soliton bunches collapses. These results would be helpful to understand the generation and property of the NLPs regime.

  6. Time-Gating Processes in Intra-Cavity Mode-Locking Devices Like Saturable Absorbers and Kerr Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha; Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2010-01-01

    Photons are non-interacting entities. Light beams do not interfere by themselves. Light beams constituting different laser modes (frequencies) are not capable of re-arranging their energies from extended time-domain to ultra-short time-domain by themselves without the aid of light-matter interactions with suitable intra-cavity devices. In this paper we will discuss the time-gating properties of intra-cavity "mode-locking" devices that actually help generate a regular train of high energy wave packets.

  7. Femtosecond mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser based on MoS2-PVA saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. H. M.; Latiff, A. A.; Arof, H.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-08-01

    We fabricate a free-standing few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2)-polymer composite by liquid phase exfoliation of chemically pristine MoS2 crystals and use this to demonstrate a soliton mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL). A stable self-started mode-locked soliton pulse is generated by fine-tuning the rotation of the polarization controller at a low threshold pump power of 25 mW. Its solitonic behavior is verified by the presence of Kelly sidebands in the output spectrum. The central wavelength, pulse width, and repetition rate of the laser are 1573.7 nm, 630 fs, and 27.1 MHz, respectively. The maximum pulse energy is 0.141 nJ with peak power of 210 W at pump power of 170 mW. This result contributes to the growing body of work studying the nonlinear optical properties of transition metal dichalcogenides that present new opportunities for ultrafast photonic applications.

  8. Continuous-wave to pulse regimes for a family of passively mode-locked lasers with saturable nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikandé, Alain M.; Voma Titafan, J.; Essimbi, B. Z.

    2017-10-01

    The transition dynamics from continuous-wave to pulse regimes of operation for a generic model of passively mode-locked lasers with saturable absorbers, characterized by an active medium with non-Kerr nonlinearity, are investigated analytically and numerically. The system is described by a complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a general m:n saturable nonlinearity (i.e {I}m/{(1+{{Γ }}I)}n, where I is the field intensity and m and n are two positive numbers), coupled to a two-level gain equation. An analysis of stability of continuous waves, following the modulational instability approach, provides a global picture of the self-starting dynamics in the system. The analysis reveals two distinct routes depending on values of the couple (m, n), and on the dispersion regime: in the normal dispersion regime, when m = 2 and n is arbitrary, the self-starting requires positive values of the fast saturable absorber and nonlinearity coefficients, but negative values of these two parameters for the family with m = 0. However, when the spectral filter is negative, the laser can self-start for certain values of the input field and the nonlinearity saturation coefficient Γ. The present work provides a general map for the self-starting mechanisms of rare-earth doped figure-eight fiber lasers, as well as Kerr-lens mode-locked solid-state lasers.

  9. Q-switching and mode-locking pulse generation with graphene oxide paper-based saturable absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Wadi Harun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Q-switched and mode-locked erbium-doped fibre lasers (EDFLs are demonstrated by using non-conductive graphene oxide (GO paper as a saturable absorber (SA. A stable and self-starting Q-switched operation was achieved at 1534.4 nm by using a 0.8 m long erbium-doped fibre (EDF as a gain medium. The pulse repetition rate changed from 14.3 to 31.5 kHz, whereas the corresponding pulse width decreased from 32.8 to 13.8 µs as the pump power increased from 22 to 50.5 mW. A narrow spacing dual-wavelength Q-switched EDFL could also be realised by including a photonics crystal fibre and a tunable Bragg filter in the setup. It can operate at a maximum repetition rate of 31 kHz, with a pulse duration of 7.04 µs and pulse energy of 2.8 nJ. Another GOSA was used to realise mode-locked EDFL in a different cavity consisting of a 1.6 m long EDF in conjunction with 1480 nm pumping. The laser generated a soliton pulse train with a repetition rate of 15.62 MHz and pulse width of 870 fs. It is observed that the proposed fibre lasers have a low pulsing threshold pump power as well as a low damage threshold.

  10. Simulation of dissipative-soliton-resonance generation in a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenxiong; Li, Heping; Liu, Cong; Shen, Shengnan; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong

    2017-10-01

    We present a numerical investigation of dissipative-soliton-resonance (DSR) generation in an all-normal-dispersion Ybdoped fiber laser mode-locked by a real saturable absorber (SA). In the simulation model, the SA includes both the saturable absorption and excited-state absorption (ESA) effects. The intra-cavity pulse evolution is numerically simulated with different transmission functions of SA. When omitting the ESA effect, the transmissivity of SA increases monotonically with the input pulse power. The noise-like pulse (NLP) operation in the cavity is obtained at high pump power, which is attributed to the spectral filtering effect. When the ESA effect is activated, higher instantaneous power part of pulse encounters larger loss induced by SA, causing that the pulse peak power is clamped at a certain fixed value. With increasing pump, the pulse starts to extend in the time domain while the pulse spectrum is considerably narrowed. In this case, the NLP operation state induced by the spectral filtering effect is avoided and the DSR is generated. Our simulation results indicate that the ESA effect in the SA plays a dominant role in generating the DSR pulses, which will be conducive to comprehending the mechanism of DSR generation in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

  11. Design documentation: Krypton encapsulation preconceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, D.A.

    1994-10-01

    US EPA regulations limit the release of Krypton-85 to the environment from commercial facilities after January 1, 1983. In order to comply with these regulations, Krypton-85, which would be released during reprocessing of commercial nuclear fuel, must be collected and stored. Technology currently exists for separation of krypton from other inert gases, and for its storage as a compressed gas in steel cylinders. The requirements, which would be imposed for 100-year storage of Krypton-85, have led to development of processes for encapsulation of krypton within a stable solid matrix. The objective of this effort was to provide preconceptual engineering designs, technical evaluations, and life cycle costing data for comparison of two alternate candidate processes for encapsulation of Krypton-85. This report has been prepared by The Ralph M. Parsons Company for the US Department of Energy

  12. Design documentation: Krypton encapsulation preconceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-10-01

    US EPA regulations limit the release of Krypton-85 to the environment from commercial facilities after January 1, 1983. In order to comply with these regulations, Krypton-85, which would be released during reprocessing of commercial nuclear fuel, must be collected and stored. Technology currently exists for separation of krypton from other inert gases, and for its storage as a compressed gas in steel cylinders. The requirements, which would be imposed for 100-year storage of Krypton-85, have led to development of processes for encapsulation of krypton within a stable solid matrix. The objective of this effort was to provide preconceptual engineering designs, technical evaluations, and life cycle costing data for comparison of two alternate candidate processes for encapsulation of Krypton-85. This report has been prepared by The Ralph M. Parsons Company for the US Department of Energy.

  13. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  14. Soliton compression of the erbium-doped fiber laser weakly started mode-locking by nanoscale p-type Bi2Te3 topological insulator particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Yang, Chun-Yu; Lin, Sheng-Feng; Tseng, Wei-Hsuan; Bao, Qiaoliang; Wu, Chih-I.; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate the nanoscale p-type Bi2Te3 powder-based saturable absorber-induced passive mode-locking of the erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) with sub-picosecond pulsewidth. Such a nanoscale topological insulator powder is obtained by polishing the bulk p-type Bi2Te3 in a commercial thermoelectric cooler (TE cooler). This is then directly brushed onto the end-face of a single-mode fiber patchcord, to avoid any mis-connecting loss caused by laser beam divergence, which can result in a mode-locked pulsewidth of 436 fs in the self-amplitude modulation mode of a TE cooler. To further shorten the pulse, the soliton compression is operated by well-controlling the group delay dispersion and self-phase modulation, providing the passively mode-locked EDFL with a pulsewidth as short as 403 fs.

  15. Intracavity KTP-based OPO pumped by a dual-loss modulated, simultaneously Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:GGG laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hongwei; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Yufei; Li, Dechun; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao

    2014-11-03

    An intracavity KTiOPO(4) (KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a simultaneously Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) Nd:Gd(3)Ga(5)O(12) (Nd:GGG) laser with an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and a Cr(4+):YAG saturable absorber is presented. A minimum mode-locking pulse duration underneath the Q-switched envelope was evaluated to be about 290 ps. A maximum QML output power of 82 mW at the signal wavelength of 1570 nm was achieved, corresponding to a maximum mode-locked pulse energy of about 5.12 μJ. The M(2) values were measured to be about 1.3 and 1.5 for tangential and sagittal directions using knife-edge technique.

  16. Passive harmonic mode-locking of Er-doped fiber laser using CVD-grown few-layer MoS2 as a saturable absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Han-Ding; Li He-Ping; Lan Chang-Yong; Li Chun; Deng Guang-Lei; Li Jian-Feng; Liu Yong

    2015-01-01

    Passive harmonic mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser based on few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) saturable absorber (SA) is demonstrated. The few-layer MoS 2 is prepared by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method and then transferred onto the end face of a fiber connector to form a fiber-compatible MoS 2 SA. The 20th harmonic mode-locked pulses at 216-MHz repetition rate are stably generated with a pulse duration of 1.42 ps and side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 36.1 dB. The results confirm that few-layer MoS 2 can serve as an effective SA for mode-locked fiber lasers. (paper)

  17. Widely power-tunable polarization-independent ultrafast mode-locked fiber laser using bulk InN as saturable absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Rodriguez, M; Monteagudo-Lerma, L; Monroy, E; González-Herráez, M; Naranjo, F B

    2017-03-06

    The growing demand of ultrafast mode-locked fiber lasers in the near infrared has boosted the research activity in this area. One of the most convenient ways to achieve passive mode locking consists of inserting a semiconductor saturable absorber in the laser cavity to modulate the losses. However, in such a configuration, the limited power range of operation is still an unsolved issue. Here we report the fabrication of an ultrafast, high-power, widely power-tunable and non-polarization-dependent mode-locked fiber laser operating at 1.55 µm, using an InN layer as saturable absorber. With post-amplification, this laser delivers 55-fs pulses with a repetition rate of 4.84 MHz and peak power in the range of 1 MW in an all-fiber arrangement.

  18. Tunable and switchable dual-wavelength passively mode-locked Bi-doped all-fiber ring laser based on nonlinear polarization rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, A-P; Luo, Z-C; Xu, W-C; Dvoyrin, V V; Mashinsky, V M; Dianov, E M

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a tunable and switchable dual-wavelength passively mode-locked Bi-doped all-fiber ring laser by using nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) technique. Exploiting the spectral filtering effect caused by the combination of the polarizer and intracavity birefringence, the wavelength separation of dual-wavelength mode-locked pulses can be flexibly tuned between 2.38 and 20.45 nm. Taking the advantage of NPR-induced intensity-dependent loss to suppress the mode competition, the stable dual-wavelength pulses output is obtained at room temperature. Moreover, the dual-wavelength switchable operation is achieved by simply rotating the polarization controllers (PCs)

  19. 50-fs pulse generation directly from a colliding-pulse mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser using an antiresonant ring mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, Kazunori; Mogi, Kazuo

    1991-05-01

    50-fs pulses were directly generated from a colliding-pulse mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. To achieve the colliding-pulse mode locking, a miniature antiresonant ring containing an organic saturable dye jet was employed as the end mirror for the linear cavity laser. Based on measured dispersion of intracavity elements, a prism pair was implemented to control the cavity dispersion. The generated pulses have no linear chirp but do exhibit parabolic instantaneous frequency owing to third-order dispersion introduced by the prism pair.

  20. Properties of the pulse train generated by repetition-rate-doubling rational-harmonic actively mode-locked Er-doped fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyan, R; Deparis, O; Pottiez, O; Mégret, P; Blondel, M

    2000-10-01

    We demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge, experimentally and theoretically, that the pulse-to-pulse amplitude fluctuations that occur in pulse trains generated by actively mode-locked Er-doped fiber lasers in a repetition-rate-doubling rational-harmonic mode-locking regime are completely eliminated when the modulation frequency is properly tuned. Irregularity of the pulse position in the train was found to be the only drawback of this regime. One could reduce the irregularity to a value acceptable for applications by increasing the bandwidth of the optical filter installed in the laser cavity.

  1. Generation of a 64-GHz, 3.3-ps transform-limited pulse train from a fiber laser employing higher-order frequency-modulated mode locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, K S; Onodera, N; Hyodo, M

    1999-11-15

    We demonstrate the generation of optical pulses at a repetition rate of 64 GHz directly from a frequency-modulated (FM) mode-locked fiber laser. This is achieved by phase modulation at 16 GHz and by initiating of higher-order FM mode locking by use of an intracavity Fabry-Perot filter with a free spectral range of 64 GHz. This process yielded transform-limited pulses with a width of 3.3 ps. We investigated the operating characteristics of the laser and compared them with the characteristics that were predicted theoretically.

  2. Study of simulations q-switching and mode-locking in Nd:YVO4 laser with Cr4+:YAG crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sous, M. B.

    2007-12-01

    A numerical model of rate equations for a four-level solid-state laser with Cr 4+ :YAG saturable absorber including excited state absorption ESA is presented. The cavity is divided into a large number of disks and the model is solved for each disk and its local corresponding photon flux. The flux array is shifted for each recurrence simulating the movement of photons inside the cavity during the round trip. This simulator can describe the mode locking phenomenon and can be used to simulate the simultaneous mode locking and Q-switching with a saturable absorber.(author)

  3. Passively mode-locked diode-pumped Tm3+:YLF laser emitting at 1.91 µm using a GaAs-based SESAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyazhev, A.; Soulard, R.; Godin, T.; Paris, M.; Brasse, G.; Doualan, J.-L.; Braud, A.; Moncorgé, R.; Laroche, M.; Camy, P.; Hideur, A.

    2018-04-01

    We report on a diode-pumped Tm:YLF laser passively mode-locked with an InGaAs saturable absorber. The laser emits a train of 31 ps pulses at a wavelength of 1.91 µm with a repetition rate of 94 MHz and a maximum average power of 95 mW. A sustained and robust mode-locking with a signal-to-noise ratio of ~70 dB is obtained even at high relative air humidity, making this system attractive for applications requiring ultra-short pulses in the spectral window just below 2 µm.

  4. Individual optimization of InAlGaAsP-InP sections for 1.55-μm passively mode-locked lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkova, Irina; Larsson, David; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2012-01-01

    We present integrated single QW semiconductor optical amplifier and MQW electroabsorber modulator based on InAlGaAsP-InP materials for application in a monolithic mode-locked laser. Optimized structures with high-quality butt-joint interfaces are demonstrated.......We present integrated single QW semiconductor optical amplifier and MQW electroabsorber modulator based on InAlGaAsP-InP materials for application in a monolithic mode-locked laser. Optimized structures with high-quality butt-joint interfaces are demonstrated....

  5. Passive mode locking and formation of dissipative solitons in electron oscillators with a bleaching absorber in the feedback loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, N. S., E-mail: ginzburg@appl.sci-nnov.ru; Kocharovskaya, E. R.; Vilkov, M. N.; Sergeev, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The mechanisms of passive mode locking and formation of ultrashort pulses in microwave electron oscillators with a bleaching absorber in the feedback loop have been analyzed. It is shown that in the group synchronism regime in which the translational velocity of particles coincides with the group velocity of the electromagnetic wave, the pulse formation can be described by the equations known in the theory of dissipative solitons. At the same time, the regimes in which the translational velocity of electrons differs from the group velocity and the soliton being formed and moving along the electron beam consecutively (cumulatively) receives energy from various electron fractions are optimal for generating pulses with the maximal peak amplitudes.

  6. Vector nature of multi-soliton patterns in a passively mode-locked figure-eight fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Qiu-Yi; Liu, Hao; Zheng, Xu-Wu; Yu, Wei; Luo, Ai-Ping; Huang, Xu-Guang; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Xu, Shan-Hui; Yang, Zhong-Min

    2014-05-19

    The vector nature of multi-soliton dynamic patterns was investigated in a passively mode-locked figure-eight fiber laser based on the nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM). By properly adjusting the cavity parameters such as the pump power level and intra-cavity polarization controllers (PCs), in addition to the fundamental vector soliton, various vector multi-soliton regimes were observed, such as the random static distribution of vector multiple solitons, vector soliton cluster, vector soliton flow, and the state of vector multiple solitons occupying the whole cavity. Both the polarization-locked vector solitons (PLVSs) and the polarization-rotating vector solitons (PRVSs) were observed for fundamental soliton and each type of multi-soliton patterns. The obtained results further reveal the fundamental physics of multi-soliton patterns and demonstrate that the figure-eight fiber lasers are indeed a good platform for investigating the vector nature of different soliton types.

  7. Ultrashort pulse generation in mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers with tungsten disulfide saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengli; Liu, Wenjun; Pang, Lihui; Teng, Hao; Fang, Shaobo; Wei, Zhiyi

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten disulfide (WS2), as one of typical transition metal dichalcogenides with the characteristics of strong nonlinear polarization and wide bandgap, has been widely used in such fields as biology and optoelectronics. With the magnetron sputtering technique, the saturable absorber (SA) is prepared by depositing WS2 and Au film on the tapered fiber. The heat elimination and damage threshold can be improved for the WS2 SA with evanescent field interaction. Besides, the Au film is deposited on the surface of the WS2 film to improve their reliability and avoid being oxidized. The fabricated SA has a modulation depth of 14.79%. With this SA, we obtain a relatively stable mode-locked fiber laser with the pulse duration of 288 fs, the repetition rate of 41.4 MHz and the signal to noise ratio of 58 dB.

  8. Mode-locked thin-disk lasers and their potential application for high-power terahertz generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceno, Clara J.

    2018-04-01

    The progress achieved in the last few decades in the performance of ultrafast laser systems with high average power has been tremendous, and continues to provide momentum to new exciting applications, both in scientific research and technology. Among the various technological advances that have shaped this progress, mode-locked thin-disk oscillators have attracted significant attention as a unique technology capable of providing ultrashort pulses with high energy (tens to hundreds of microjoules) and at very high repetition rates (in the megahertz regime) from a single table-top oscillator. This technology opens the door to compact high repetition rate ultrafast sources spanning the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the XUV to the terahertz regime, opening various new application fields. In this article, we focus on their unexplored potential as compact driving sources for high average power terahertz generation.

  9. 80  nJ ultrafast dissipative soliton generation in dumbbell-shaped mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2016-09-15

    A novel all-fiberized dumbbell-shaped mode-locked fiber laser was developed to directly generate 80 nJ dissipative solitons, which can be linearly compressed from 85 to 1.2 ps externally with a diffraction grating pair. The pulse peak power reached 42 kW after compression. With the most available pump power, stable dissipative soliton bundles with up to 628 nJ bundle energy were obtained. The corresponding average output power reached 2.2 W. The employment of dual-nonlinear-optical-loop mirrors and large-mode-area fibers in the cavity played an essential role in improving structural compactness and producing high-energy ultrafast pulses. To the best of our knowledge, these are the most energetic compressible dissipative solitons generated from a strictly all-fiber cavity.

  10. Real-time full-field characterization of transient dissipative soliton dynamics in a mode-locked laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryczkowski, P.; Närhi, M.; Billet, C.; Merolla, J.-M.; Genty, G.; Dudley, J. M.

    2018-04-01

    Dissipative solitons are remarkably localized states of a physical system that arise from the dynamical balance between nonlinearity, dispersion and environmental energy exchange. They are the most universal form of soliton that can exist, and are seen in far-from-equilibrium systems in many fields, including chemistry, biology and physics. There has been particular interest in studying their properties in mode-locked lasers, but experiments have been limited by the inability to track the dynamical soliton evolution in real time. Here, we use simultaneous dispersive Fourier transform and time-lens measurements to completely characterize the spectral and temporal evolution of ultrashort dissipative solitons as their dynamics pass through a transient unstable regime with complex break-up and collisions before stabilization. Further insight is obtained from reconstruction of the soliton amplitude and phase and calculation of the corresponding complex-valued eigenvalue spectrum. These findings show how real-time measurements provide new insights into ultrafast transient dynamics in optics.

  11. Contribution to the study of X-ray emission induced by accelerated bromine and krypton ions and possibilities of analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenorio Castilleros, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    In view of analytical applications the X-ray emission induced by 3 to 85 MeV Br and Kr ions has been studied. Thick target yields have been measured and ionization cross section for K and L shells have been calculated. The X-ray emission rates and energy shifts have also been determined. The results are discussed in the frame of the actually existing models for inner shell ionization in atomic collisions. As a practical application azteque ceramics have been analyzed. The possibilities and the difficulties of the technic are emphasized [fr

  12. Ion-Exchanged SAPO-34 Membranes for Krypton-Xenon Separation: Control of Permeation Properties and Fabrication of Hollow Fiber Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yeon Hye; Min, Byunghyun; Yang, Shaowei; Koh, Dong-Yeun; Bhave, Ramesh R; Nair, Sankar

    2018-02-21

    Separation of radioisotope 85 Kr from 136 Xe is of importance in used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Membrane separation based on zeolite molecular sieves such as chabazite SAPO-34 is an attractive alternative to energy-intensive cryogenic distillation. We report the synthesis of SAPO-34 membranes with considerably enhanced performance via thickness reduction based upon control of a steam-assisted vapor-solid conversion technique followed by ion exchange with alkali metal cations. The reduction of membrane thickness leads to a large increase in Kr permeance from 7.5 to 26.3 gas permeation units (GPU) with ideal Kr/Xe selectivities >20 at 298 K. Cation-exchanged membranes show large (>50%) increases in selectivity at ambient or slight subambient conditions. The adsorption, diffusion, and permeation characteristics of ion-exchanged SAPO-34 materials and membranes are investigated in detail, with potassium-exchanged SAPO-34 membranes showing particularly attractive performance. We then demonstrate the fabrication of selective SAPO-34 membranes on α-alumina hollow fibers.

  13. Comparison of symmetric and asymmetric double quantum well extended-cavity diode lasers for broadband passive mode-locking at 780  nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Heike; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V; Wenzel, Hans; Bugge, Frank; Weyers, Markus; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Tränkle, Günther

    2017-07-01

    We present a compact, mode-locked diode laser system designed to emit a frequency comb in the wavelength range around 780 nm. We compare the mode-locking performance of symmetric and asymmetric double quantum well ridge-waveguide diode laser chips in an extended-cavity diode laser configuration. By reverse biasing a short section of the diode laser chip, passive mode-locking at 3.4 GHz is achieved. Employing an asymmetric double quantum well allows for generation of a mode-locked optical spectrum spanning more than 15 nm (full width at -20  dB) while the symmetric double quantum well device only provides a bandwidth of ∼2.7  nm (full width at -20  dB). Analysis of the RF noise characteristics of the pulse repetition rate shows an RF linewidth of about 7 kHz (full width at half-maximum) and of at most 530 Hz (full width at half-maximum) for the asymmetric and symmetric double quantum well devices, respectively. Investigation of the frequency noise power spectral density at the pulse repetition rate shows a white noise floor of approximately 2100  Hz 2 /Hz and of at most 170  Hz 2 /Hz for the diode laser employing the asymmetric and symmetric double quantum well structures, respectively. The pulse width is less than 10 ps for both devices.

  14. Effect of thermal management on the properties of saturable absorber mirrors in high-power mode-locked semiconductor disk lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantamäki, Antti; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Jari Nikkinen; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2011-01-01

    The thermal management of saturable absorbers is shown to have a critical impact on a high-power mode-locked disk laser. The absorber with efficient heat removal makes it possible to generate ultrashort pulses with high repetition rates and high power density.

  15. Observation of phase noise reduction in photonically synthesized sub-THz signals using a passively mode-locked laser diode and highly selective optical filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Criado, A. R.; Acedo, P.; Carpintero, G.

    2012-01-01

    A Continuous Wave (CW) sub-THz photonic synthesis setup based on a single Passively Mode-Locked Laser Diode (PMLLD) acting as a monolithic Optical Frequency Comb Generator (OFCG) and highly selective optical filtering has been implemented to evaluate the phase noise performance of the generated sub...

  16. Robust, low-noise, polarization-maintaining mode-locked Er-fiber laser with a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) device as a multi-functional element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chur; Kwon, Dohyeon; Kim, Dohyun; Choi, Sun Young; Cha, Sang Jun; Choi, Ki Sun; Yeom, Dong-Il; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-04-15

    We demonstrate a new planar lightwave circuit (PLC)-based device, integrated with a 980/1550 wavelength division multiplexer, an evanescent-field-interaction-based saturable absorber, and an output tap coupler, which can be employed as a multi-functional element in mode-locked fiber lasers. Using this multi-functional PLC device, we demonstrate a simple, robust, low-noise, and polarization-maintaining mode-locked Er-fiber laser. The measured full-width at half-maximum bandwidth is 6 nm centered at 1555 nm, corresponding to 217 fs transform-limited pulse duration. The measured RIN and timing jitter are 0.22% [10 Hz-10 MHz] and 6.6 fs [10 kHz-1 MHz], respectively. Our results show that the non-gain section of mode-locked fiber lasers can be easily implemented as a single PLC chip that can be manufactured by a wafer-scale fabrication process. The use of PLC processes in mode-locked lasers has the potential for higher manufacturability of low-cost and robust fiber and waveguide lasers.

  17. 40-gHz, 100-fs stimulated-Brillouin-scattering-free pulse generation by combining a mode-locked laser diode and a dispersion-decreasing fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiuda, Ken-ichi; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka; Arahira, Shin; Ogawa, Yoh

    2005-03-15

    A 40-GHz, 100-fs pulse train was successfully generated by soliton compression of a mode-locked laser diode (MLLD) pulse with a dispersion-decreasing fiber. The MLLD had a longitudinal mode linewidth as broad as 60 MHz, which made it possible to suppress stimulated Brillouin scattering and achieve stable, ultrahigh-speed pulse compression without applying external frequency modulation.

  18. 110 GHz hybrid mode-locked fiber laser with enhanced extinction ratio based on nonlinear silicon-on-insulator micro-ring-resonator (SOI MRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Hsu, Yung; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yang, Ling-Gang; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Lai, Yin-Chieh; Tsang, Hon-Ki

    2016-03-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new 110 GHz high-repetition-rate hybrid mode-locked fiber laser using a silicon-on-insulator microring-resonator (SOI MRR) acting as the optical nonlinear element and optical comb filter simultaneously. By incorporating a phase modulator (PM) that is electrically driven at a fraction of the harmonic frequency, an enhanced extinction ratio (ER) of the optical pulses can be produced. The ER of the optical pulse train increases from 3 dB to 10 dB. As the PM is only electrically driven by the signal at a fraction of the harmonic frequency, in this case 22 GHz (110 GHz/5 GHz), a low bandwidth PM and driving circuit can be used. The mode-locked pulse width and the 3 dB spectral bandwidth of the proposed mode-locked fiber laser are measured, showing that the optical pulses are nearly transform limited. Moreover, stability evaluation for an hour is performed, showing that the proposed laser can achieve stable mode-locking without the need for optical feedback or any other stabilization mechanism.

  19. Retinal polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm with 350 kHz A-scan rate using an Fourier domain mode locked laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torzicky, Teresa; Marschall, Sebastian; Pircher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel, high-speed, polarization-sensitive, optical coherence tomography set-up for retinal imaging operating at a central wavelength of 1060 nm which was tested for in vivo imaging in healthy human volunteers. We use the system in combination with a Fourier domain mode locked laser...

  20. Towards low timing phase noise operation in fiber lasers mode locked by graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes at 1.5 µm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kan; Li, Xiaohui; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Qi Jie; Shum, Perry Ping; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-12

    We investigate the timing phase noise of fiber lasers mode locked by graphene oxide (GO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), respectively, integrated in a linear cavity fiber laser in the reflecting operation. Due to the shorter decay time of the GO and CNTs, weaker slow saturable absorber effects are expected and mode-locked lasers based on these two saturable absorbers exhibit low excess timing phase noise coupled from the laser intensity noise. Compared with a reference laser mode locked by semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), GO based laser obtains a timing phase noise reduction of 7 dB at 1 kHz and a timing jitter reduction of 45% experimentally whereas CNTs based laser obtains a timing phase noise reduction of 3 dB and a timing jitter reduction of 29%. This finding suggests that saturable absorbers with short decay time have the potential for achieving mode locking operation with low timing phase noise, which is important for applications including frequency metrology, high-precision optical sampling, clock distribution and optical sensing.

  1. Optical parametric generation by a simultaneously Q-switched mode-locked single-oscillator thulium-doped fiber laser in orientation-patterned gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Brenda; Kneis, Christian; Scurria, Giuseppe; Cadier, Benoît; Robin, Thierry; Lallier, Eric; Grisard, Arnaud; Gérard, Bruno; Eichhorn, Marc; Kieleck, Christelle

    2016-11-01

    Optical parametric generation is demonstrated in orientation-patterned gallium arsenide, pumped by a novel single-oscillator simultaneously Q-switched and mode-locked thulium-doped fiber laser, downconverting the pump radiation into the mid-infrared wavelength regime. The maximum output energy reached is greater than 2.0 μJ per pump pulse.

  2. Trapping of deuterium in krypton-implanted nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, R.C.; McManus, S.P.; Rehn, L.E.; Baldo, P.

    1986-01-01

    Krypton ions with energy 600 keV were implanted in nickel to fluences of 2 x 10 16 cm -2 under three different conditions. Deuterium was subsequently introduced into the implanted regions by electrolysis at room temperature. After the diffusible deuterium was permitted to escape, the 2 H( 3 He, 1 H) 4 He nuclear reaction was used to analyze for the trapped deuterium during an isochronal annealing program. The region implanted at 100 0 C with no higher temperature anneal had the largest number of traps; the region implanted at 100 0 C and annealed for 100 min at 500 0 C had considerably less; the region implanted at 500 0 C had the least. Electron diffraction patterns confirmed the existence of solid crystalline krypton in all three regions. Transmission electron microscope studies revealed precipitates with an average diameter of 8 nm in the region implanted at 500 0 C. The two regions implanted at 100 0 C contained smaller precipitates. Trap binding enthalpies were obtained by math modeling. In addition to the traps with binding enthalpy of 0.55 eV reported earlier by other investigators for helium implanted in nickel, a smaller number of traps with binding enthalpies up to 0.83 eV were also found. The trapping of deuterium by various types of imperfections, including the solid krypton precipitates, is discussed

  3. Nanoscale charcoal powder induced saturable absorption and mode-locking of a low-gain erbium-doped fiber-ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-05-01

    Triturated charcoal nano-powder directly brushed on a fiber connector end-face is used for the first time as a fast saturable absorber for a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber-ring laser (EDFL). These dispersant-free charcoal nano-powders with a small amount of crystalline graphene phase and highly disordered carbon structure exhibit a broadened x-ray diffraction peak and their Raman spectrum shows the existence of a carbon related D-band at 1350 cm-1 and the disappearance of the 2D-band peak at 2700 cm-1. The charcoal nano-powder exhibits a featureless linear absorbance in the infrared region with its linear transmittance of 0.66 nonlinearly saturated at 0.73 to give a ΔT/T of 10%. Picosecond mode-locking at a transform-limited condition of a low-gain EDFL is obtained by using the charcoal nano-powder. By using a commercial EDFA with a linear gain of only 17 dB at the saturated output power of 17.5 dB m required to initiate the saturable absorption of the charcoal nano-powder, the EDFL provides a pulsewidth narrowing from 3.3 to 1.36 ps associated with its spectral linewidth broadening from 0.8 to 1.83 nm on increasing the feedback ratio from 30 to 90%. This investigation indicates that all the carbon-based materials containing a crystalline graphene phase can be employed to passively mode-lock the EDFL, however, the disordered carbon structure inevitably induces a small modulation depth and a large mode-locking threshold, thus limiting the pulsewidth shortening. Nevertheless, the nanoscale charcoal passively mode-locked EDFL still shows the potential to generate picosecond pulses under a relatively low cavity gain. An appropriate cavity design can be used to compensate this defect-induced pulsewidth limitation and obtain a short pulsewidth.

  4. Ultra-Trace Analysis of Krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daerr, H.; Kalinowski, M.; Kohler, M.; Sahling, P.

    2010-01-01

    To strengthen the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear safeguards for detecting undeclared nuclear material and activities we propose to use the radioactive krypton isotope Krypton-85 as a tracer for clandestine plutonium production. The main idea is to detect inexplicable atmospheric Kr85 concentration using the novel technology atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) in order to detect an undeclared reprocessing facility. The Additional Protocol (INFCIRC/540, 1997) establishes the possibility to take environmental samples. Krypton-85 has a combination of unique features which makes it an ideal tracer for plutonium separation activities anywhere in the world. It is always generated along with plutonium and 99.9% remains within the fuel cladding. Due to its half-life of 10.76 years, significant amounts of krypton-85 still remain in the spent fuel even after long cooling times. Krypton is not removed from the atmosphere by any processes like chemical reactions or wash-out. Furthermore, there are no other relevant sources of krypton-85 besides of reprocessing. The novel technology of atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) has been demonstrated by the physics group at Argonne National Laboratory in 1999. This is an ultra-sensitive trace analysis technique able to detect single krypton atoms. We are setting up an ATTA apparatus in our laboratory, which is designed to fulfill all requirements to detect clandestine plutonium production. Our goal is to determine Krypton-85 concentration of one liter samples of atmospheric air with an analysis time of 3 hours. This sample volume reduction is a significant step, since one liter can be taken as a grab sample by sucking it directly into pre-evacuated bottles at atmospheric pressure. The small samples size and the short analysis time of ATTA will make it possible to use krypton-85 as a tracer for clandestine plutonium production with routine operation. (author)

  5. Simultaneous generation of wavelength division multiplexing PON and RoF signals using a hybrid mode-locked laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaya, Ivan; Campuzano, Gabriel; Castañón, Gerardo

    2015-06-01

    The use of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies has been proposed to overcome the imminent saturation of the ultra high frequency band, justifying research on radio over fiber (RoF) networks as an inexpensive and green solution to distribute multi-Gbps signals. Coincidently, telecommunication operators are investing a significant effort to deploy their passive optical network (PON) infrastructure closer to the users. In this work, we present a novel cost-efficient architecture based on a hybrid mode locked laser capable to simultaneously generate up-to 5 wavelength division multiplexing PON and RoF channels, being compatible with the 50-GHz ITU frequency grid. We analyze the limits of operation of our proposed architecture considering the high modal relative intensity noise induced by mode partition noise, as well as fiber impairments, such as chromatic dispersion and nonlinearities. The feasibility of generation and transmission of 5×10-Gbps PON and 5×5-Gbps RoF using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing up to 50 km has been demonstrated through realistic numerical simulations.

  6. Calibrated Link Budget of a Silicon Photonics WDM Transceiver with SOA and Semiconductor Mode-Locked Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso-Mártir, Alvaro; Müller, Juliana; Islamova, Elmira; Merget, Florian; Witzens, Jeremy

    2017-09-20

    Based on the single channel characterization of a Silicon Photonics (SiP) transceiver with Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA) and semiconductor Mode-Locked Laser (MLL), we evaluate the optical power budget of a corresponding Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) link in which penalties associated to multi-channel operation and the management of polarization diversity are introduced. In particular, channel cross-talk as well as Cross Gain Modulation (XGM) and Four Wave Mixing (FWM) inside the SOA are taken into account. Based on these link budget models, the technology is expected to support up to 12 multiplexed channels without channel pre-emphasis or equalization. Forward Error Correction (FEC) does not appear to be required at 14 Gbps if the SOA is maintained at 25 °C and MLL-to-SiP as well as SiP-to-SOA interface losses can be maintained below 3 dB. In semi-cooled operation with an SOA temperature below 55 °C, multi-channel operation is expected to be compatible with standard 802.3bj Reed-Solomon FEC at 14 Gbps provided interface losses are maintained below 4.5 dB. With these interface losses and some improvements to the Transmitter (Tx) and Receiver (Rx) electronics, 25 Gbps multi-channel operation is expected to be compatible with 7% overhead hard decision FEC.

  7. Chair-like pulses in an all-normal dispersion Ytterbium-doped mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pradeep K; Singh, Chandra P; Singh, Amarjeet; Sharma, Sunil K; Mukhopadhyay, Pranab K; Bindra, Kushvinder S

    2016-12-10

    We report, for what we believe is the first time, generation of stable chair-like pulses (a pulse shape with an initial long flat portion followed by a short high peak power portion resembling the shape of a chair) by mode locking of a Ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber laser. Chair-like pulse shapes are achieved by implementing dual saturable absorbers, one based on a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and the other based on nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) inside the cavity. The transmission characteristics of the NOLM-NPR pair leading to the formation of chair-like pulses are numerically investigated. We also report the amplification characteristics of chair-like pulses in an external multistage Yb-doped fiber amplifier setup at different repetition rates of the pulse train. It was found that the chair-like pulses are suitable for amplification, and more than 10 W of average power at 460 kHz repetition rate have been obtained at total pump power of ∼20  W coupled to the power amplifier. At a lower repetition rate (115 kHz), ∼8  W of average power were obtained corresponding to ∼70  μJ of pulse energy with negligible contribution from amplified spontaneous emission or stimulated Raman scattering. We believe that such an oscillator-amplifier system could serve as an attractive tool for micromachining applications.

  8. Integrated Microwave Photonic Isolators: Theory, Experimental Realization and Application in a Unidirectional Ring Mode-Locked Laser Diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn J.R. Heck

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel integrated microwave photonic isolator is presented. It is based on the timed drive of a pair of optical modulators, which transmit a pulsed or oscillating optical signal with low loss, when driven in phase. A signal in the reverse propagation direction will find the modulators out of phase and, hence, will experience high loss. Optical and microwave isolation ratios were simulated to be in the range up to 10 dB and 20 dB, respectively, using parameters representative for the indium phosphide platform. The experimental realization of this device in the hybrid silicon platform showed microwave isolation in the 9 dB–22 dB range. Furthermore, we present a design study on the use of these isolators inside a ring mode-locked laser cavity. Simulations show that unidirectional operation can be achieved, with a 30–50-dB suppression of the counter propagating mode, at limited driving voltages. The potentially low noise and feedback-insensitive operation of such a laser makes it a very promising candidate for use as on-chip microwave or comb generators.

  9. Ultrathin quartz plate-based multilayer MoS2 for passively mode-locked fiber lasers (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zike; Li, Jiarong; Chen, Hao; Wang, Jinzhang; Zhang, Wenfei; Yan, Peiguang

    2018-01-01

    We have grown ultrathin quartz plate-based multilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). When employed as saturable absorber (SA), the prepared MoS2 device exhibits remarkable merits (e.g. uniform thickness, high quality of crystal lattice high damage threshold easy fabrication and good practicability). The modulation depth, saturable intensity, and non-saturable loss of this SA device are measured to be 16.1%, 0.438 MW/cm2 and 44.6% respectively. By incorporating the SA into a typical ring cavity erbium-doped fiber laser, stable passive soliton mode-locked pulse is achieved with the repetition frequency of 0.987 MHz, the signal noise ratio (SNR) of 71.4 dB and the pulse duration of 2.17 ps. The experimental results demonstrate our MoS2-SA device to be an effective mode locker, and it is promising to be used in ultrafast photonics.

  10. An experimental study of the trapping and release of krypton in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, S.E.; Ingram, D.C.; Armour, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study is reported of the trapping and release of krypton implanted into nickel at low energies ( + incident on Ni (110) the maximum quantity of gas retained in the target was found to be approximately 2.5 x 10 15 ions cm -2 . (author)

  11. Characterisation of the light pulses of a cavity dumped dye laser pumped by a cw mode-locked and q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, P.; Heisel, F.; Martz, A.; Miehe, J.A.; Miller, R.J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency doubled pulses (of 532 nm) obtained, with the help of a KTP crystal, from those delivered by either a continuous wave mode-locked (100 MHz) or mode-locked Q-switched (0-1 KHz) Nd: YAG laser, are analyzed by means of a streak camera, operating in synchroscan or triggered mode. In the step-by-step measurements the pulse stability, concerning form and amplitude, is shown. In addition, measurements effectuated with synchronously pumped and cavity dumped dye laser (Rhodamine 6G), controlled by a Pockels cell, allows the obtention of stable and reproducible single pulses of 30 ps duration, 10 μJ energy and 500Hz frequency [fr

  12. Soliton rains in a graphene-oxide passively mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser with all-normal dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S S; Yan, P G; Zhang, G L; Zhao, J Q; Li, H Q; Lin, R Y; Wang, Y G

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigated soliton rains in an ytterbium-doped fiber (YDF) laser with a net normal dispersion cavity using a graphene-oxide (GO) saturable absorber (SA). The 195 m-long-cavity, the fiber birefringence filter and the inserted 2.5 nm narrow bandwidth filter play important roles in the formation of the soliton rains. The soliton rain states can be changed by the effective gain bandwidth of the laser. The experimental results can be conducive to an understanding of dissipative soliton features and mode-locking dynamics in all-normal dispersion fiber lasers with GOSAs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of soliton rains in a GOSA passively mode-locked YDF laser with a net normal dispersion cavity. (letter)

  13. Ultralow-jitter passive timing stabilization of a mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser by injection of an optical pulse train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitomi, Dai; Kobayashi, Yohei; Kakehata, Masayuki; Takada, Hideyuki; Torizuka, Kenji; Onuma, Taketo; Yokoi, Hideki; Sekiguchi, Takuro; Nakamura, Shinki

    2006-11-15

    The pulse timing of a mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser was stabilized to a reference pulse train from a Cr:forsterite mode-locked laser by all-optical passive synchronization scheme. The reference pulses were injected into a ring cavity of the fiber laser by using a 1.3-1.5 mum wavelength-division multiplexer. The spectral shift induced by cross-phase modulation between copropagating two-color pulses realizes self-synchronization due to intracavity group-delay dispersion. The rms integration of timing jitter between the fiber laser pulse and the reference pulse was 3.7 fs in a Fourier frequency range from 1 Hz to 100 kHz.

  14. Comb multi-wavelength, rectangular pulse, passively mode-locked fiber laser enhanced by un-pumped Erbium-doped fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunyu; Luo, Ruoheng; Liu, Weiqi; Ruan, Shuangchen; Yang, Jinhui; Yan, Peiguang; Wang, Jinzhang; Hua, Ping

    2018-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a comb multi-wavelength, nanosecond rectangular pulse, passively mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser. A section of un-pumped EDF had been employed to optimize the multi-wavelength pulses for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The un-pumped EDF absorbs the unwanted the short-wavelength lasing and optimizes the gain, therefore allowing for the enhancement of the long-wavelength lasing. Because of the gain competition effect in the un-pumped EDF, the output wavelength line number of the fiber laser can be significantly increased from three wavelengths to twenty lasing wavelengths. The mode-locked pulse has a rectangular temporal profile with pump power dependent pulse duration. Experimental results illustrate that the fiber laser has a good stability at room temperature. This work provides a new configuration for the design of multi-wavelength, rectangular nanosecond pulse that may fit for specific applications.

  15. Generation of 103 fs mode-locked pulses by a gain linewidth-variable Nd,Y:CaF2 disordered crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Z P; Xie, G Q; Ma, J; Ge, W Y; Yuan, P; Qian, L J; Su, L B; Jiang, D P; Ma, F K; Zhang, Q; Cao, Y X; Xu, J

    2014-04-01

    We have demonstrated a diode-pumped passively mode-locked femtosecond Nd,Y:CaF2 disordered crystal laser for the first time to our knowledge. By choosing appropriate Y-doping concentration, a broad fluorescence linewidth of 31 nm has been obtained from the gain linewidth-variable Nd,Y:CaF2 crystal. With the Nd,Y:CaF2 disordered crystal as gain medium, the mode-locked laser generated pulses with pulse duration as short as 103 fs, average output power of 89 mW, and repetition rate of 100 MHz. To our best knowledge, this is the shortest pulse generated from Nd-doped crystal lasers so far. The research results show that the Nd,Y:CaF2 disordered crystal will be a potential alternative as gain medium of repetitive chirped pulse amplification for high-peak-power lasers.

  16. Analysis of soft-aperture Kerr-lens mode-locking in Ti:sapphire laser cavities using nonlinear ABCD-matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Woo; Cha, Yong Ho; Rhee, Yong Joo; Yoo, Byung Duk; Lee, Byoung Chul

    2004-01-01

    We have numerically analyzed the effect of soft-aperture Kerr-lens mode locking in Ti:sapphire laser cavities. Because the Kerr-lens effect depends on the intracavitiy power, we used nonlinear ABCD-matrix to calculated the power-dependent beam mode inside a cavity. In soft-aperture Kerr-lens mode locking, the Kerr-lens effect is strongly dependent on the position of the crystal, the separation of two curved mirrors, and the cavity length. Figure 1 is the schematic of the Ti:sapphire laser cavity used in our calculation. It consists of a Ti:sapphire crystal (Kerr medium), two curved mirrors, and flat mirrors. Lc is the Ti:sapphire crystal length, D1 the length between M1 and M3, D2 the length between M2 and M4, L1 the length between the crystal and M1, and L2 the length between crystal and M2

  17. Optical self-injection mode-locking of semiconductor optical amplifier fiber ring with electro-absorption modulation—fundamentals and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-04-01

    The optical self-injection mode-locking of a semiconductor optical amplifier incorporated fiber ring laser (SOAFL) with spectrally sliced multi-channel carriers is demonstrated for applications. The synthesizer-free SOAFL pulse-train is delivered by optical injection mode-locking with a 10 GHz self-pulsed electro-absorption modulator (EAM). Such a coupled optical and electronic resonator architecture facilitates a self-feedback oscillation with a higher Q-factor and lower phase/intensity noises when compared with conventional approaches. The theoretical model of such an injection-mode-locking SOAFL is derived to improve the self-pulsating performance of the optical return-to-zero (RZ) carrier, thus providing optimized pulsewidth, pulse extinction ratio, effective Q-factor, frequency variation and timing jitter of 11.4 ps, 9.1 dB, 4 × 105, pulsed carrier is also employed for the application in a 10 Gbit s-1 bi-directional WDM transmission network with down-stream RZ binary phase-shift keying (RZ-BPSK) and up-stream re-modulated RZ on-off-keying (RZ-OOK) formats. Under BPSK/OOK bi-directional data transmission, the self-pulsed harmonic mode-locking SOAFL simultaneously provides four to six WDM channels for down-stream RZ-BPSK and up-stream RZ-OOK formats with receiving sensitivities of -17 and -15.2 dBm at a bit error rate of 10-9, respectively.

  18. Uniform spacing interrogation of a Fourier domain mode-locked fiber Bragg grating sensor system using a polarization-maintaining fiber Sagnac interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hwi Don; Jung, Eun Joo; Jeong, Myung Yung; Chen, Zhongping; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2013-01-01

    A novel linearized interrogation method is presented for a Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor system. In a high speed regime over several tens of kHz modulations, a sinusoidal wave is available to scan the center wavelength of an FDML wavelength-swept laser, instead of a conventional triangular wave. However, sinusoidal wave modulation suffers from an exaggerated non-uniform wavelength-spacing response in demodulating the time-encoded parameter to the absolute ...

  19. Medium-gain erbium doped fiber amplifier ring laser passively mode-locked by graphite nano-powder adhered thin PVA film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2012-06-01

    A direct brushing process of graphite nano-powder adhered on the single-mode fiber end-face with the use of an ultrathin PVA film is demonstrated, such a graphite nano-powder adhered ultra-thin PVA film is introduced to passively mode-lock a medium-gain Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL). The structural property of the graphite nano-powder is investigated by Raman spectroscopy. Numerous structural defects induced when abrading the graphite into nano-powder are found to broaden the 2D band Raman scattered signal and attenuate its peak intensity. The graphite nano-powders exhibit the featureless transmittance to show the potential as being a broadband tuning saturable absorber. In addition, the modulation depth of 0.43 is comparable with the graphene saturable absorber. The central wavelength of the passively mode-locked medium-gain EDFL is at 1561.2 nm with the full width at half maximum (FHWM) of 1.62 nm, and the pulsewidth is 1.58 ps. Under the limited intra-cavity power of 18 dBm, a nearly transform-limited passively mode-locking EDFL with TBP of 0.32 is generated.

  20. Low-timing-jitter, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser with tunable repetition rate and high operation stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yuanshan; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guofu; Zhao, Wei; Bai, Jing

    2010-01-01

    We design a low-timing-jitter, repetition-rate-tunable, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser by using a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM), a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and a tunable optical delay line in the laser configuration. Low-timing-jitter optical pulses are stably produced when a SESAM and a 0.16 m dispersion compensation fiber are employed in the laser cavity. By inserting a tunable optical delay line between NALM and SESAM, the variable repetition-rate operation of a self-starting, passively mode-locked fiber laser is successfully demonstrated over a range from 49.65 to 50.47 MHz. The experimental results show that the newly designed fiber laser can maintain the mode locking at the pumping power of 160 mW to stably generate periodic optical pulses with width less than 170 fs and timing jitter lower than 75 fs in the 1.55 µm wavelength region, when the fundamental repetition rate of the laser is continuously tuned between 49.65 and 50.47 MHz. Moreover, this fiber laser has a feature of turn-key operation with high repeatability of its fundamental repetition rate in practice

  1. Modeling and characterization of pulse shape and pulse train dynamics in two-section passively mode-locked quantum dot lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, R.; Mee, J. K.; Crowley, M. T.; Grillot, F.; Kovanis, V.; Lester, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    A nonlinear delay differential equation model for passive mode-locking in semiconductor lasers, seeded with parameters extracted from the gain and loss spectra of a quantum dot laser, is employed to simulate and study the dynamical regimes of mode-locked operation of the device. The model parameter ranges corresponding to these regimes are then mapped to externally-controllable parameters such as gain current and absorber bias voltage. Using this approach, a map indicating the approximate regions corresponding to fundamental and harmonically mode locked operation is constructed as a function of gain current and absorber bias voltage. This is shown to be a highly useful method of getting a sense of the highest repetition rates achievable in principle with a simple, two-section device, and provides a guideline toward achieving higher repetition rates by simply adjusting external biasing conditions instantaneously while the device is in operation, as opposed to re-engineering the device with additional passive or saturable absorber sections. The general approach could potentially aid the development of numerical modeling techniques aimed at providing a systematic guideline geared toward developing microwave and RF photonic sources for THz applications.

  2. Capture of krypton by cryogenic distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geens, L.; Goossens, W.R.A.; Marien, J.; Ooms, E.; Stevens, J.; Boons, J.; Hertschap, M.

    1986-01-01

    Radioactive krypton-85 is liberated into the off-gases during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (chop and leach process). If its release to the atmosphere is to be restricted, it needs to be captured from those off-gases. With the financial support of the C.E.C., krypton recovery by cryogenic distillation in presence of oxygen was investigated. Both oxygen and ozone behaviour in the cryodistillation unit were observed. The ozone decay in the rectification column was studied in absence and in presence of a radiation source. Additionally a demonstration run with krypton-85 was performed. Experiments with different oxygen concentrations up to 21 % volume in the feed gas were carried out. The oxygen was enriched up to 85 % volume in a zone between the krypton layer and the entrance of the rectification column. No oxygen was found in the bottom product. On the other hand, ozone, when fed to the column, accumulates in the bottom product. The decay of ozone in this bottom liquid was measured in absence and in presence of a 500 Ci thulium-170 source. Without the radiation source, it took about 30 days to observe a decay from 0.9 % volume to 0.45 % volume. The decay rate decreased with decreasing ozone concentration. In presence of the 500 Ci thulium-170, a constant decay rate of 0.24 % volume per day was measured. Finally, a demonstration run with 100 Ci krypton-85 was performed in the cryodistillation unit, with air as feed gas. The krypton-85 was fed at a concentration of 30 mCi.h -1 until the total krypton inventory of the rectification column amounted to 40-45 Ci. The active run had a duration of 900 hours, during which no operational problems were encountered. 16 refs, 8 tables, 9 figs

  3. Nanoscale charcoal powder induced saturable absorption and mode-locking of a low-gain erbium-doped fiber-ring laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Triturated charcoal nano-powder directly brushed on a fiber connector end-face is used for the first time as a fast saturable absorber for a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber-ring laser (EDFL). These dispersant-free charcoal nano-powders with a small amount of crystalline graphene phase and highly disordered carbon structure exhibit a broadened x-ray diffraction peak and their Raman spectrum shows the existence of a carbon related D-band at 1350 cm −1 and the disappearance of the 2D-band peak at 2700 cm −1 . The charcoal nano-powder exhibits a featureless linear absorbance in the infrared region with its linear transmittance of 0.66 nonlinearly saturated at 0.73 to give a ΔT/T of 10%. Picosecond mode-locking at a transform-limited condition of a low-gain EDFL is obtained by using the charcoal nano-powder. By using a commercial EDFA with a linear gain of only 17 dB at the saturated output power of 17.5 dB m required to initiate the saturable absorption of the charcoal nano-powder, the EDFL provides a pulsewidth narrowing from 3.3 to 1.36 ps associated with its spectral linewidth broadening from 0.8 to 1.83 nm on increasing the feedback ratio from 30 to 90%. This investigation indicates that all the carbon-based materials containing a crystalline graphene phase can be employed to passively mode-lock the EDFL, however, the disordered carbon structure inevitably induces a small modulation depth and a large mode-locking threshold, thus limiting the pulsewidth shortening. Nevertheless, the nanoscale charcoal passively mode-locked EDFL still shows the potential to generate picosecond pulses under a relatively low cavity gain. An appropriate cavity design can be used to compensate this defect-induced pulsewidth limitation and obtain a short pulsewidth. (letter)

  4. The NA48 liquid krypton prototype calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, G.D.; Buchholz, P.; Carosi, R.; Coward, D.; Cundy, D.; Doble, N.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Hallgren, B.; Kesseler, G.; Lacourt, A.; Laverriere, G.; Linser, G.; Mast, M.; Schilly, P.; Schinzel, D.; Seidl, W.; Taureg, H.; Wahl, H.; Wicht, P. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Bertanza, L.; Bigi, A.; Calafiura, P.; Casali, R.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Gennaro, G.; Gorini, B.; Mannelli, I.; Marzulli, V.; Pierazzini, G.; Schiuma, D.; Sergiampietri, F. (INFN, Pisa (Italy) Scuola Normale, Pisa (Italy) Univ. Pisa (Italy)); Bederede, D.; Debeer, M.; Debu, P.; Peyaud, B. (CE-Saclay-DAPNIA, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); Kreutz, A. (Univ. Gesamthochschule Siegen (Germany)); Griesmayer, E.; Markytan, M.; Neuhofer, G.; Pernicka, M.; Taurok, A.; Viehhauser, G.; Wulz, C.E. (Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Inst. fuer Hochenergiephysik, Vienna (Austria)); Cagliari-Cambridge-CERN-Dubna-Edingburgh-Ferrara-Mainz-Perugia-Pisa-Saclay-Siegen-Torino-Vienna Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    The NA48 experiment for a precision measurement of the CP violation parameter element of'/element of in K[sup 0][yields]2[pi] decays will require a fast electromagnetic calorimeter with excellent energy and time resolution. A quasi homogeneous calorimeter using liquid krypton and a fast readout with 40 MHz FADCs is proposed. A prototype with 400 kg of liquid krypton was built and tested in an electron beam. Results for the energy, space and time resolution of this prototype are given. (orig.).

  5. Ambient krypton-85 air sampling at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevathan, M.S.; Price, K.R.

    1984-10-01

    In the fall of 1982, the Environmental Evaluations Section of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated a network of continuous krypton-85 air samplers located on and around the Hanford Site. This effort was in response to the resumption of operations at a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant located onsite where krypton-85 was to be released during fuel dissolution. Preoperational data were collected using noble gas samplers designed by the Environmental Protection Agency-Las Vegas (EPA-LV). The samplers functioned erratically resulting in excessive maintenance costs and prompted a search for a new sampling system. State of the art krypton-85 sampling methods were reviewed and found to be too costly, too complex and inappropriate for field application, so a simple bag collection system was designed and field tested. The system is composed of a reinforced, heavy plastic bag, connected to a variable flow pump and housed in a weatherproof enclosure. At the end of the four week sampling period the air in the bag is transferred by a compressor into a pressure tank for easy transport to the laboratory for analysis. After several months of operation, the air sampling system has proven its reliability and sensitivity to ambient levels of krypton-85. 3 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  6. Environmental consequences of atmospheric krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    This project examines the thesis that atmospheric background ionization is relevant to the understanding of weather. Projections of future world-wide use of nuclear energy imply that sufficient krypton-85 will be produced and may be released to significantly alter the natural ionization background. The scope of the project includes an assessment of krypton-85 on the electrical aspects of the atmosphere as well as the consequences of an altered electrical state of the atmosphere. The results of a first approximation model for the effects of krypton-85 on the atmosphere show that the electric field at the surface of the ocean would be reduced by about 25 percent and at a continental station by about 15 percent. At about two kilometers altitude, the electric field would be reduced by about 14 percent over the oceans and 16 percent over the land. The effects decrease quickly with increasing altitude. Analytical studies of the equations for fair weather atmospheric electricity yield solutions suitable for the interpretation of time dependent phenomena with periods longer than a few seconds. A brief analysis shows that a perfect assessment is not necessary to make an error-free decision regarding krypton-85 control measures. From the viewpoint of a decision-maker, those aspects that could swing the decision from one alternative to another are priority areas for analysis

  7. High average/peak power linearly polarized all-fiber picosecond MOPA seeded by mode-locked noise-like pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H. L.; Ma, P. F.; Tao, R. M.; Wang, X. L.; Zhou, P.; Chen, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    The characteristics of mode-locked noise-like pulses generated from a passively mode-locked fiber oscillator are experimentally investigated. By carefully adjusting the two polarization controllers, stable mode-locked noise-like pulse emission with a high radio frequency signal/noise ratio of  >55 dB is successfully achieved, ensuring the safety and possibility of high power amplification. To investigate the amplification characteristics of such pulses, one all-fiber master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) is built to boost the power and energy of such pulses. Amplified noise-like pulses with average output power of 423 W, repetition rate of 18.71 MHz, pulse energy of 22.61 μJ, pulse duration of 72.1 ps and peak power of 314 kW are obtained. Near diffraction-limited beam is also demonstrated with M2 factor measured at full power operation of ~1.2 in the X and Y directions. The polarization extinction ratio at output power of 183 W is measured to be ~13 dB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of high-power amplification of noise-like pulses and the highest peak power ever reported in all-fiber picosecond MOPAs. The temporal self-compression process of such pulses and high peak power when amplified make it an ideal pump source for generation of high-power supercontinuum. Other potential applications, such as material processing and optical coherent tomography, could also be foreseen.

  8. Influence of gain fiber on dissipative soliton pairs in passively mode-locked fiber laser based on BP as a saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Ma, Chunyang; Huo, Jiayu; Guo, Yubin; Sun, Tiegang; Wu, Ge

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the influence of gain fiber on dissipative soliton pairs in passively mode-locked (PML) fiber laser based on black phosphorus (BP) as a saturable absorber. Numerical simulations show that we can generate the dissipative soliton pairs in PML fiber laser when the gain fiber parameters (gain saturation energy and gain bandwidth) are in an appropriate dynamic range, and the dissipative soliton pairs become unstable once the range is exceeded. Then we analyze the dynamic evolution of the dissipative soliton pairs and the influence of gain fiber on the pulse separation, peak power, and single-pulse energy of the dissipative solitons pairs.

  9. The simultaneous generation of soliton bunches and Q-switched-like pulses in a partially mode-locked fiber laser with a graphene saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhong; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Yan-ge; He, Ruijing; Wang, Guangdou; Yang, Guang; Han, Simeng

    2018-05-01

    We experimentally report the coexistence of soliton bunches and Q-switched-like pulses in a partially mode-locked fiber laser with a microfiber-based graphene saturable absorber. The soliton bunches, like isolated spikes with extreme amplitude and ultrashort duration, randomly generate in the background of the Q-switched-like pulses. The soliton bunches have some pulse envelopes in which pulses operate at a fundamental repetition rate in the temporal domain. Further investigation shows that the composite pulses are highly correlated with the noise-like pulses. Our work can make a further contribution to enrich the understanding of the nonlinear dynamics in fiber lasers.

  10. Buffered Fourier domain mode locking: Unidirectional swept laser sources for optical coherence tomography imaging at 370,000 lines/s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Robert; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2006-10-15

    We describe buffered Fourier domain mode locking (FDML), a technique for tailoring the output and multiplying the sweep rate of FDML lasers. Buffered FDML can be used to create unidirectional wavelength sweeps from the normal bidirectional sweeps in an FDML laser without sacrificing sweep rate. We also investigate the role of the laser source in dynamic range versus sensitivity performance in optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Unidirectional sweep rates of 370 kHz over a 100 nm range at a center wavelength of 1300 nm are achieved. High-speed, swept-source OCT is demonstrated at record speeds of up to 370,000 axial scans per second.

  11. Quasi-continuously pumped passively mode-locked 2.4% doped Nd:YAG oscillator-amplifier system in a bounce geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Michal; Kubecek, Vaclav; Cech, Miroslav; Hirsl, Petr

    2010-02-01

    We report on oscillator-amplifier system based on two highly doped 2.4 at. % crystalline Czochralski grown Nd:YAG crystals in a diode pumped bounce geometry configuration under quasi-continuous pumping. The oscillator was passively mode-locked by the semiconductor saturable absorber in transmission mode. The output pulse train consisted of 5 pulses with total energy of 270 μJ and pulse duration of 75 ps. The output train from the oscillator was amplified to the energy of 1 mJ by single pass amplifier.

  12. Vortex states near absolute zero in a weak-pinning amorphous Mo x Ge1-x film probed by pulsed mode-locking resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohara, N.; Ochi, A.; Murakami, E.; Ienaga, K.; Kaneko, S.; Kokubo, N.; Okuma, S.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed measurements of the mode-locking (ML) resonance with pulsed currents, which generates much less heat than the conventional one with continuous currents. Here, we present the experimental details of the pulsed ML measurement. Using this technique, we have succeeded in determining the dynamic melting field of a driven vortex lattice for a weak-pinning thick amorphous Mo x Ge1-x film down to 0.05 K. We construct an ideal vortex phase diagram in the absence of pinning near zero temperature as a function of magnetic field.

  13. Carbon dioxide-krypton separation and radon removal from nuclear-fuel-reprocessing off-gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, P.M.; Higuchi, K.Y.; Abraham, L.

    1982-07-01

    General Atomic Company (GA) is conducting pilot-plant-scale tests that simulate the treatment of radioactive and other noxious volatile and gaseous constituents of off-gas streams from nuclear reprocessing plants. This paper reports the results of engineering-scale tests performed on the CO 2 /krypton separation and radon holdup/decay subsystems of the GA integrated off-gas treatment system. Separation of CO 2 from krypton-containing gas streams is necessary to facilitate subsequent waste processing and krypton storage. Molecular sieve 5A achieved this separation in dissolver off-gas streams containing relatively low krypton and CO 2 concentrations and in krypton-rich product streams from processes such as the krypton absorption in liquid carbon dioxide (KALC) process. The CO 2 /krypton separation unit is a 30.5-cm-diameter x 1.8-m-long column containing molecular sieve 5A. The loading capacity for CO 2 was determined for gas mixtures containing 250 ppM to 2.2% CO 2 and 170 to 750 ppM krypton in either N 2 or air. Gas streams rich in CO 2 were diluted with N 2 to reduce the temperature rise from the heat of adsorption, which would otherwise affect loading capacity. The effluent CO 2 concentration prior to breakthrough was less than 10 ppM, and the adsorption capacity for krypton was negligible. Krypton was monitored on-line with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and its concentration determined quantitatively by a method of continuous analysis, i.e., selected-ion monitoring. Radon-220 was treated by holdup and decay on a column of synthetic H-mordenite. The Rn-220 concentration was monitored on-line with flow-through diffused-junction alpha detectors. Single-channel analyzers were utilized to isolate the 6.287-MeV alpha energy band characteristic of Rn-220 decay from energy bands due to daughter products

  14. Carbon dioxide-krypton separation and radon removal from nuclear-fuel-reprocessing off-gas streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, P.M.; Higuchi, K.Y.; Abraham, L.

    1982-07-01

    General Atomic Company (GA) is conducting pilot-plant-scale tests that simulate the treatment of radioactive and other noxious volatile and gaseous constituents of off-gas streams from nuclear reprocessing plants. This paper reports the results of engineering-scale tests performed on the CO/sub 2//krypton separation and radon holdup/decay subsystems of the GA integrated off-gas treatment system. Separation of CO/sub 2/ from krypton-containing gas streams is necessary to facilitate subsequent waste processing and krypton storage. Molecular sieve 5A achieved this separation in dissolver off-gas streams containing relatively low krypton and CO/sub 2/ concentrations and in krypton-rich product streams from processes such as the krypton absorption in liquid carbon dioxide (KALC) process. The CO/sub 2//krypton separation unit is a 30.5-cm-diameter x 1.8-m-long column containing molecular sieve 5A. The loading capacity for CO/sub 2/ was determined for gas mixtures containing 250 ppM to 2.2% CO/sub 2/ and 170 to 750 ppM krypton in either N/sub 2/ or air. Gas streams rich in CO/sub 2/ were diluted with N/sub 2/ to reduce the temperature rise from the heat of adsorption, which would otherwise affect loading capacity. The effluent CO/sub 2/ concentration prior to breakthrough was less than 10 ppM, and the adsorption capacity for krypton was negligible. Krypton was monitored on-line with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and its concentration determined quantitatively by a method of continuous analysis, i.e., selected-ion monitoring. Radon-220 was treated by holdup and decay on a column of synthetic H-mordenite. The Rn-220 concentration was monitored on-line with flow-through diffused-junction alpha detectors. Single-channel analyzers were utilized to isolate the 6.287-MeV alpha energy band characteristic of Rn-220 decay from energy bands due to daughter products.

  15. Quantum dot cadmium selenide as a saturable absorber for Q-switched and mode-locked double-clad ytterbium-doped fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahyuddin, M. B. H.; Latiff, A. A.; Rusdi, M. F. M.; Irawati, N.; Harun, S. W.

    2017-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the integration of quantum dot (QD) cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles, which is embedded into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) film into an ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL) cavity to produce Q-switched and mode-locked fiber lasers. The QD CdSe based film functions as a saturable absorber (SA). For Q-switching operation, stable pulse is generated within 970-1200 mW pump power, with tunable repetition rate and pulse width of 24.5-40.5 kHz and 6.8-3.7 μs, respectively. Maximum pulse energy and peak power are obtained about 1.1 μJ and 0.28 W, respectively. As we tune the polarization state of the laser cavity and use a single QD CdSe film, the mode-locking operation could also be generated within 310-468 mW pump power with repetition rate of 14.5 MHz and pulse width of 3.5 ps. Maximum pulse energy and peak power are obtained about 2 nJ and 0.11 W, respectively. These results may contribute to continuous research work on laser pulse generation, providing new opportunities of CdSe material in photonics applications.

  16. Design optimization of a compact photonic crystal microcavity based on slow light and dispersion engineering for the miniaturization of integrated mode-locked lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik Kemiche

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We exploit slow light (high ng modes in planar photonic crystals in order to design a compact cavity, which provides an attractive path towards the miniaturization of near-infrared integrated fast pulsed lasers. By applying dispersion engineering techniques, we can design structures with a low dispersion, as needed by mode-locking operation. Our basic InP SiO2 heterostructure is robust and well suited to integrated laser applications. We show that an optimized 30 μm long cavity design yields 9 frequency-equidistant modes with a FSR of 178 GHz within a 11.5 nm bandwidth, which could potentially sustain the generation of optical pulses shorter than 700 fs. In addition, the numerically calculated quality factors of these modes are all above 10,000, making them suitable for reaching laser operation. Thanks to the use of a high group index (28, this cavity design is almost one order of magnitude shorter than standard rib-waveguide based mode-locked lasers. The use of slow light modes in planar photonic crystal based cavities thus relaxes the usual constraints that tightly link the device size and the quality (peak power, repetition rate of the pulsed laser signal.

  17. DWDM channel spacing tunable optical TDM carrier from a mode-locked weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode based fiber ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guo-Hsuan; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2008-08-18

    A novel optical TDM pulsed carrier with tunable mode spacing matching the ITU-T defined DWDM channels is demonstrated, which is generated from an optically injection-mode-locked weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode (FPLD) with 10%-end-facet reflectivity. The FPLD exhibits relatively weak cavity modes and a gain spectral linewidth covering >33.5 nm. The least common multiple of the mode spacing determined by both the weak-resonant-cavity FPLD and the fiber-ring cavity can be tunable by adjusting length of the fiber ring cavity or the FPLD temperature to approach the desired 200GHz DWDM channel spacing of 1.6 nm. At a specific fiber-ring cavity length, such a least-common- multiple selection rule results in 12 lasing modes between 1532 and 1545 nm naturally and a mode-locking pulsewidth of 19 ps broadened by group velocity dispersion among different modes. With an additional intracavity bandpass filter, the operating wavelength can further extend from 1520 to 1553.5 nm. After channel filtering, each selected longitudinal mode gives rise to a shortened pulsewidth of 12 ps due to the reduced group velocity dispersion. By linear dispersion compensating with a 55-m long dispersion compensation fiber (DCF), the pulsewidth can be further compressed to 8 ps with its corresponding peak-to-peak chirp reducing from 9.7 to 4.3 GHz.

  18. Influence of different approaches for dynamical performance optimization of monolithic passive colliding-pulse mode-locked laser diodes emitting around 850 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prziwarka, T.; Klehr, A.; Wenzel, H.; Fricke, J.; Bugge, F.; Weyers, M.; Knigge, A.; Tränkle, G.

    2018-02-01

    Monolithic laser diodes which generate short infrared pulses in the picosecond and sub-picosecond ranges with high peak power are ideal sources for many applications like e.g. THz-time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) scanning systems. The achievable THz bandwidth is limited by the length of the optical pulses. Due to the fact that colliding-pulse mode locking (CPM) leads to the shortest pulses which could reached by passive mode locking, we experimentally investigated in detail the dynamical and electro optical performance of InGaAsP based quantum well CPM laser diodes with well-established vertical layer structures. Simple design modifications whose implementation is technically easy were realized. Improvements of the device performance in terms of pulse duration, output power, and noise properties are presented in dependence on the different adaptions. From the results we extract an optimized configuration with which we have reached pulses with durations of ≍1.5 ps, a peak power of > 1 W and a pulse-to-pulse timing jitter < 200 fs. The laser diodes emit pulses at a wavelength around 850 nm with a repetition frequency of ≍ 12.4 GHz and could be used as pump source for GaAs antennas to generate THz-radiation. Approaches for reducing pulse width, increasing output power, and improving noise performance are described.

  19. Mode-locking peculiarities in an all-fiber erbium-doped ring ultrashort pulse laser with a highly-nonlinear resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoretskiy, Dmitriy A.; Sazonkin, Stanislav G.; Kudelin, Igor S.; Orekhov, Ilya O.; Pnev, Alexey B.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Denisov, Lev K.

    2017-12-01

    Today ultrashort pulse (USP) fiber lasers are in great demand in a frequency metrology field, THz pulse spectroscopy, optical communication, quantum optics application, etc. Therefore mode-locked (ML) fiber lasers have been extensively investigated over the last decade due the number of scientific, medical and industrial applications. It should be noted, that USP fiber lasers can be treated as an ideal platform to expand future applications due to the complex ML nonlinear dynamics in a laser resonator. Up to now a series of novel ML regimes have been investigated e.g. self-similar pulses, noise-like pulses, multi-bound solitons and soliton rain generation. Recently, we have used a highly nonlinear germanosilicate fiber (with germanium oxides concentration in the core 50 mol. %) inside the resonator for more reliable and robust launching of passive mode-locking based on the nonlinear polarization evolution effect in fibers. In this work we have measured promising and stable ML regimes such as stretched pulses, soliton rain and multi-bound solitons formed in a highly-nonlinear ring laser and obtained by intracavity group velocity dispersion (GVD) variation in slightly negative region. As a result, we have obtained the low noise ultrashort pulse generation with duration 59 dB) and relative intensity noise <-101 dBc / Hz.

  20. Reduction of timing jitter and intensity noise in normal-dispersion passively mode-locked fiber lasers by narrow band-pass filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Peng; Song, Youjian; Kim, Hyoji; Shin, Junho; Kwon, Dohyeon; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-11-17

    Fiber lasers mode-locked with normal cavity dispersion have recently attracted great attention due to large output pulse energy and femtosecond pulse duration. Here we accurately characterized the timing jitter of normal-dispersion fiber lasers using a balanced cross-correlation method. The timing jitter characterization experiments show that the timing jitter of normal-dispersion mode-locked fiber lasers can be significantly reduced by using narrow band-pass filtering (e.g., 7-nm bandwidth filtering in this work). We further identify that the timing jitter of the fiber laser is confined in a limited range, which is almost independent of cavity dispersion map due to the amplifier-similariton formation by insertion of the narrow bandpass filter. The lowest observed timing jitter reaches 0.57 fs (rms) integrated from 10 kHz to 10 MHz Fourier frequency. The rms relative intensity noise (RIN) is also reduced from 0.37% to 0.02% (integrated from 1 kHz to 5 MHz Fourier frequency) by the insertion of narrow band-pass filter.

  1. Fiber optical parametric oscillator based on photonic crystal fiber pumped with all-normal-dispersion mode-locked Yb:fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Dou-Dou; Yang Si-Gang; Zhang Lei; Wang Xiao-Jian; Chen Hong-Wei; Chen Ming-Hua; Xie Shi-Zhong; Chen Wei; Luo Wen-Yong

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a cost effective, linearly tunable fiber optical parametric oscillator based on a home-made photonic crystal fiber pumped with a mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser, providing linely tuning ranges from 1018 nm to 1038 nm for the idler wavelength and from 1097 nm to 1117 nm for the signal wavelength by tuning the pump wavelength and the cavity length. In order to obtain the desired fiber with a zero dispersion wavelength around 1060 nm, eight samples of photonic crystal fibers with gradually changed structural parameters are fabricated for the reason that it is difficult to accurately customize the structural dimensions during fabrication. We verify the usability of the fabricated fiber experimentally via optical parametric generation and conclude a successful procedure of design, fabirication, and verification. A seed source of home-made all-normal-dispersion mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser with 38.57 ps pulsewidth around the 1064 nm wavelength is used to pump the fiber optical parametric oscillator. The wide picosecond pulse pump laser enables a larger walk-off tolerance between the pump light and the oscillating light as well as a longer photonic crystal fiber of 20 m superior to the femtosecond pulse lasers, resulting in a larger parametric amplification and a lower threshold pump power of 15.8 dBm of the fiber optical parametric oscillator. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  2. Influence of krypton atoms on the structure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, M. H.; Viana, G. A.; de Lima, M. M.; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.; Marques, F. C.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane (CH4) plus krypton (Kr) mixed atmosphere. The depositions were performed as function of the bias voltage and krypton partial pressure. The goal of this work was to study the influence of krypton gas on the physical properties of a-C:H films deposited on the cathode electrode. Krypton concentration up to 1.6 at. %, determined by Rutherford Back-Scattering, was obtained at high Kr partial pressure and bias of -120 V. The structure of the films was analyzed by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. It was verified that the structure of the films remains unchanged up to a concentration of Kr of about 1.0 at. %. A slight graphitization of the films occurs for higher concentration. The observed variation in the film structure, optical band gap, stress, and hydrogen concentration were associated mainly with the subplantation process of hydrocarbons radicals, rather than the krypton ion energy.

  3. Influence of krypton atoms on the structure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M. H. Jr.; Viana, G. A.; Marques, F. C.; Lima, M. M. Jr. de; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane (CH 4 ) plus krypton (Kr) mixed atmosphere. The depositions were performed as function of the bias voltage and krypton partial pressure. The goal of this work was to study the influence of krypton gas on the physical properties of a-C:H films deposited on the cathode electrode. Krypton concentration up to 1.6 at. %, determined by Rutherford Back-Scattering, was obtained at high Kr partial pressure and bias of -120 V. The structure of the films was analyzed by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. It was verified that the structure of the films remains unchanged up to a concentration of Kr of about 1.0 at. %. A slight graphitization of the films occurs for higher concentration. The observed variation in the film structure, optical band gap, stress, and hydrogen concentration were associated mainly with the subplantation process of hydrocarbons radicals, rather than the krypton ion energy.

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the radiation-chemical synthesis of krypton hydrides in solid krypton matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameneva, Svetlana V.; Kobzarenko, Alexey V.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    The processes occurring in the X-irradiated C 2 H 2 /Kr and HCl/Kr systems in the temperature range of 7–30 K were studied using a combination of FTIR and EPR spectroscopy. In both cases, irradiation results in effective decomposition of isolated molecules (C 2 H 2 or HCl) and production of trapped H atoms. The thermal decay of trapped atoms in solid krypton was attributed to “local” reactions (below 21 K) and long-range mobility activated in the temperature range of 23–27 K. Two krypton hydrides, HKrCCH and HKrCl, were synthesized from the radiation-induced hydrogen atoms. In the case of C 2 H 2 /Kr system, competitive reaction channels of H atoms at various absorbed doses were investigated in details, and HKrCCH was found to be one of the main reaction products. The X-ray radiolysis in krypton matrices was concluded to be a promising method to obtain krypton hydrides. - Highlights: • Reactions of radiolytic H atoms in solid krypton were monitored by EPR and FTIR spectroscopy. • The role of “local” and “global” mobility of H atoms was established. • HKrCCH and HKrCl were prepared by the radiation-chemical method

  5. Occlusion and storage of krypton in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vansant, E.F.; Thijs, A.; Peeters, G.; Bievre, P. de; Verhaert, I.

    1984-01-01

    The modification process in order to change in a controlled way the effective pore size of zeolites was optimized by investigating the reaction conditions such as degree of chemisorption, reaction temperature, extent of primary/secondary reactions, type of modifying agent, type of substrate, etc. Different reaction and adsorption conditions have been tested to increase the thermal stability of encapsulated krypton in modified zeolites. The possibilities for zeolite modification have been enlarged by combining boranation and silanation with a thermal treatment of sepiolite, and by the formation of boron-nitrogen compounds in zeolites. Screening experiments, on a semi-industrial scale, of the krypton removal from air were carried out. Two kinds of Kr/air separation have been tested suscessfully on modified mordenite

  6. The NA48 liquid krypton calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, B

    1997-01-01

    The NA48 collaboration goal is to measure the CP violation parameter Re(ɛl/ɛ) at the level of 2 × 10−4. The neutral Kaon decays will be reconstructed by an electromagnetic liquid Krypton calorimeter with fine granularity and a volume almost totally sensible, to obtain excellent position and energy resolution, as well as time resolution. A description of the detector, results from tests of a prototype and the status of the final calorimeter are reported.

  7. Self-organization of the Q-switched mode-locked regime in a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donin, V. I.; Yakovin, D. V.; Gribanov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    A new Q-switched mode-locked generation regime of a solid-state laser, in which a Q-switch is "spontaneously" formed at the frequency of relaxation oscillations, has been observed for the first time. The new generation has been implemented by means of the previously proposed method of an acoustic modulator of a traveling wave in combination with a spherical mirror of a cavity. Stable pulse trains with a repetition frequency of ~30 kHz and a duration of ~2 µs have been observed in the diode-pump Nd:YAG laser with an average output power of ~3 W. Each train contains about 200 equispaced single pulses with a duration of ~45 ps.

  8. Passively mode-locked fiber laser based on a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with few-layered graphene oxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Bo; He, Xiaoying; Wang, D N

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate a nanosecond-pulse erbium-doped fiber laser that is passively mode locked by a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with few-layered graphene oxide solution. Owing to the good solution processing capability of few-layered graphene oxide, which can be filled into the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber through a selective hole filling process, a graphene saturable absorber can be successfully fabricated. The output pulses obtained have a center wavelength, pulse width, and repetition rate of 1561.2 nm, 4.85 ns, and 7.68 MHz, respectively. This method provides a simple and efficient approach to integrate the graphene into the optical fiber system. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  9. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography at up to 370,000 lines per second using buffered Fourier domain mode-locked lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Desmond C; Huber, Robert; Fujimoto, James G

    2007-03-15

    Buffered Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers are demonstrated for dynamic phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) and 3D OCT phase microscopy. Systems are operated at sweep speeds of 42, 117, and 370 kHz, and displacement sensitivities of 39, 52, and 102 pm are achieved, respectively. Sensitivities are comparable to spectrometer-based OCT phase microscopy systems, but much faster acquisition speeds are possible. An additional factor of sqrt 2 improvement in noise performance is observed for differential phase measurements, which is important for Doppler OCT. Dynamic measurements of piezoelectric transducer motion and static 3D OCT phase microscopy are demonstrated. Buffered FDML lasers provide excellent displacement sensitivities at extremely high sweep speeds.

  10. Fourier domain mode locking at 1050 nm for ultra-high-speed optical coherence tomography of the human retina at 236,000 axial scans per second.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R; Adler, D C; Srinivasan, V J; Fujimoto, J G

    2007-07-15

    A Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) laser at 1050 nm for ultra-high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the human retina is demonstrated. Achievable performance, physical limitations, design rules, and scaling principles for FDML operation and component choice in this wavelength range are discussed. The fiber-based FDML laser operates at a sweep rate of 236 kHz over a 63 nm tuning range, with 7 mW average output power. Ultra-high-speed retinal imaging is demonstrated at 236,000 axial scans per second. This represents a speed improvement of approximately10x over typical high-speed OCT systems, paving the way for densely sampled volumetric data sets and new imaging protocols.

  11. Dynamic and static strain fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogation with a 1.3 µm Fourier domain mode-locked wavelength-swept laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byoung Chang; Jeon, Min Yong; Jung, Eun-Joo; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate dynamic and static strain fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor array interrogation using a 1.3 µm Fourier-domain mode-locked (FDML) wavelength-swept laser. The FDML wavelength-swept laser provides a high speed scanning rate and wide scanning bandwidth. Using the FDML wavelength swept laser, we measure the performances of static strain sensor interrogation for both time and spectral domains. The slope coefficients for the measured relative wavelength difference and relative time delay from the static strain are 0.8 pm/µstrain and 0.086 ns/µstrain, respectively. We demonstrate the dynamic response of the FBG sensor array with a 100 Hz modulating strain based on the FDML wavelength-swept laser at a 40.6 kHz scanning rate. The FBG sensor interrogation system using the FDML wavelength-swept laser can be realized for high-speed and high-sensitivity monitoring systems

  12. Uniform spacing interrogation of a Fourier domain mode-locked fiber Bragg grating sensor system using a polarization-maintaining fiber Sagnac interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Jeong, Myung Yung; Chen, Zhongping; Kim, Chang-Seok; Jung, Eun Joo

    2013-01-01

    A novel linearized interrogation method is presented for a Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor system. In a high speed regime over several tens of kHz modulations, a sinusoidal wave is available to scan the center wavelength of an FDML wavelength-swept laser, instead of a conventional triangular wave. However, sinusoidal wave modulation suffers from an exaggerated non-uniform wavelength-spacing response in demodulating the time-encoded parameter to the absolute wavelength. In this work, the calibration signal from a polarization-maintaining fiber Sagnac interferometer shares the FDML wavelength-swept laser for FBG sensors to convert the time-encoded FBG signal to the wavelength-encoded uniform-spacing signal. (paper)

  13. Uniform spacing interrogation of a Fourier domain mode-locked fiber Bragg grating sensor system using a polarization-maintaining fiber Sagnac interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Jung, Eun Joo; Jeong, Myung Yung; Chen, Zhongping; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2013-06-01

    A novel linearized interrogation method is presented for a Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor system. In a high speed regime over several tens of kHz modulations, a sinusoidal wave is available to scan the center wavelength of an FDML wavelength-swept laser, instead of a conventional triangular wave. However, sinusoidal wave modulation suffers from an exaggerated non-uniform wavelength-spacing response in demodulating the time-encoded parameter to the absolute wavelength. In this work, the calibration signal from a polarization-maintaining fiber Sagnac interferometer shares the FDML wavelength-swept laser for FBG sensors to convert the time-encoded FBG signal to the wavelength-encoded uniform-spacing signal.

  14. High-pulse energy-stabilized passively mode-locked external cavity inverse bow-tie 980nm laser diode for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowski, M.; Resneau, P.; Garcia, M.; Vinet, E.; Robert, Y.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Gerard, B.; Kundermann, S.; Torcheboeuf, N.; Boiko, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    We report on multi-section inverse bow-tie laser producing mode-locked pulses of 90 pJ energy and 6.5 ps width (895 fs after compression) at 1.3 GHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and consuming 2.9 W of electric power. The laser operates in an 80 mm long external cavity. By translation of the output coupling mirror, the PRF was continuously tuned over 37 MHz range without additional adjustments. Active stabilization with a phase lock loop actuating on the driving current has allowed us to reach the PRF relative stability at a 2·10-10 level on 10 s intervals, as required by the European Space Agency (ESA) for inter-satellite long distance measurements.

  15. Gigahertz repetition rate, sub-femtosecond timing jitter optical pulse train directly generated from a mode-locked Yb:KYW laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heewon; Kim, Hyoji; Shin, Junho; Kim, Chur; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-01-01

    We show that a 1.13 GHz repetition rate optical pulse train with 0.70 fs high-frequency timing jitter (integration bandwidth of 17.5 kHz-10 MHz, where the measurement instrument-limited noise floor contributes 0.41 fs in 10 MHz bandwidth) can be directly generated from a free-running, single-mode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser mode-locked by single-wall carbon nanotube-coated mirrors. To our knowledge, this is the lowest-timing-jitter optical pulse train with gigahertz repetition rate ever measured. If this pulse train is used for direct sampling of 565 MHz signals (Nyquist frequency of the pulse train), the jitter level demonstrated would correspond to the projected effective-number-of-bit of 17.8, which is much higher than the thermal noise limit of 50 Ω load resistance (~14 bits).

  16. Optical frequency comb generator based on a monolithically integrated passive mode-locked ring laser with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, V; Guzmán, R; Gordón, C; Leijtens, X J M; Carpintero, G

    2016-05-01

    We report the demonstration of an optical-frequency comb generator based on a monolithically integrated ring laser fabricated in a multiproject wafer run in an active/passive integration process in a generic foundry using standardized building blocks. The device is based on a passive mode-locked ring laser architecture, which includes a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to flatten the spectral shape of the comb output. This structure allows monolithic integration with other optical components, such as optical filters for wavelength selection, or dual wavelength lasers for their stabilization. The results show a -10  dB span of the optical comb of 8.7 nm (1.08 THz), with comb spacing of 10.16 GHz. We also obtain a flatness of 44 lines within a 1.8 dB power variation.

  17. High-resolution retinal swept source optical coherence tomography with an ultra-wideband Fourier-domain mode-locked laser at MHz A-scan rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Jan Philip; Pfeiffer, Tom; Eibl, Matthias; Hakert, Hubertus; Huber, Robert

    2018-01-01

    We present a new 1060 nm Fourier domain mode locked laser (FDML laser) with a record 143 nm sweep bandwidth at 2∙ 417 kHz  =  834 kHz and 120 nm at 1.67 MHz, respectively. We show that not only the bandwidth alone, but also the shape of the spectrum is critical for the resulting axial resolution, because of the specific wavelength-dependent absorption of the vitreous. The theoretical limit of our setup lies at 5.9 µm axial resolution. In vivo MHz-OCT imaging of human retina is performed and the image quality is compared to the previous results acquired with 70 nm sweep range, as well as to existing spectral domain OCT data with 2.1 µm axial resolution from literature. We identify benefits of the higher resolution, for example the improved visualization of small blood vessels in the retina besides several others.

  18. Charge state distribution studies of pure and oxygen mixed krypton ECR plasma - signature of isotope anomaly and gas mixing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Mal, Kedar; Rodrigues, G

    2016-11-01

    We report the charge state distributions of the pure, 25% and 50% oxygen mixed krypton plasma to shed more light on the understanding of the gas mixing and the isotope anomaly [A. G. Drentje, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 (1992) 2875 and Y Kawai, D Meyer, A Nadzeyka, U Wolters and K Wiesemann, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 (2001) 451] in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The krypton plasma was produced using a 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet ECR ion source. The intensities of the highly abundant four isotopes, viz. 82 Kr (~11.58%), 83 Kr (~11.49%), 84 Kr (~57%) and 86 Kr (17.3%) up to ~ +14 charge state have been measured by extracting the ions from the plasma and analysing them in the mass and the energy using a large acceptance analyzer-cum-switching dipole magnet. The influence of the oxygen gas mixing on the isotopic krypton ion intensities is clearly evidenced beyond +9 charge state. With and without oxygen mixing, the charge state distribution of the krypton ECR plasma shows the isotope anomaly with unusual trends. The anomaly in the intensities of the isotopes having quite closer natural abundance, viz. 82 Kr, 86 Kr and 83 Kr, 86 Kr is prominent, whereas the intensity ratio of 86 Kr to 84 Kr shows a weak signature of it. The isotope anomaly tends to disappear with increasing oxygen mixing in the plasma. The observed trends in the intensities of the krypton isotopes do not follow the prediction of linear Landau wave damping in the plasma. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The distribution, atmospheric transfer, and assessment of krypton-85; Distribution, transfert atmospherique et bilan du krypton-85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannetier, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    Techniques for sampling and measuring krypton-85 have been developed which allowed to determine its geographical distribution. From its use as a tracer, an evaluation of the air masses which cross over the subtropical fronts has been derived. Besides, the stratospheric character of air pollution by krypton-85 at the level of the antarctic soil has been shown out. Levels of krypton-85 seem to point out to an underestimation of the assessment of nuclear explosion fission energies as adopted by the United Nations Scientific committee on the effects of atomic radiation and emphasize the need to set limits as soon as possible to the amounts of krypton-85 released to the atmosphere by fuel-reprocessing plants. (author) [French] La mise au point de techniques de prelevement et de mesure du krypton-85 atmospherique a permis de determiner sa repartition geographique. De son utilisation comme traceur on deduit une evaluation des masses d'air qui traversent les fronts subtropicaux. Par ailleurs, le caractere stratospherique de la pollution de l'air par le krypton-85 au niveau du sol antarctique est mis en evidence. Le bilan du krypton-85 semble reveler une sous-estimation du bilan des energies de fission des explosions adopte par le Comite scientifique des Nations Unies et souligne la necessite de limiter des que possible les quantites de krypton-85 rejetees dans l'atmosphere par les usines de traitement de combustibles irradies. (auteur)

  20. Krypton red laser photocoagulation for subretinal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakin, J L; Yannuzzi, L A; Shakin, E P; Fisher, Y L

    1985-10-01

    One hundred fifty-seven patients with subretinal neovascularization (SRN) were treated in a prospective, nonrandomized, consecutive study with the krypton red laser (KRL). The patients were analyzed with respect to age, etiology of the SRN, location of the SRN, and pre- and post-treatment visual acuity in patients with at least three months follow-up. Previous studies have not investigated KRL photocoagulation within the foveal avascular zone (FAZ). The results of this study compare favorably with other large series in which patients with SRN located outside the FAZ were treated with the argon blue-green laser (ABGL).

  1. Theory of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Lindroth, Eva; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    A theory for time-domain attosecond pump–attosecond probe photoabsorption spectroscopy is formulated and related to the atomic response. The theory is illustrated through a study of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton. The atomic parameters entering the formulation such as energies...... of the hole in this manner. In a second example, a hole is created in an inner shell by the first pulse, and the second probe pulse couples an even more tightly bound state to that hole. The hole decays in this example by Auger electron emission, and the absorption spectroscopy follows the decay of the hole...

  2. A Distant Planet: Finding Superman's Krypton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricca, B.

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, Neil deGrasse Tyson made headlines when he appeared in a Superman comic book and pinpointed a real planet (located in Corvus) that matched the description of Superman's homeworld, the fictional planet of Krypton. This story tracked all over the world. Why? I will look at the figure of Superman, whose backstory—orphan from an exploding planet—is somehow known by everyone from the age of eight on. I will look at how specific astronomical phenomena (in the sky and in the news) may have inspired Superman's young teenaged creators in the 1930s to create this iconic modern myth—a myth, like many, grounded in astronomy. My goal is to show that comics—which we normally think of as juvenile, throwaway entertainment— actually tried to base themselves (and certainly were inspired by) actual astronomical events in the thirties and forties, made more accessible to the public by new scientific explanations, including a real supernova that may have inspired the destruction of Krypton.

  3. Solid state storage of radioactive krypton in a silica matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Lytle, J.M.; Gray, W.J.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1980-12-01

    The feasibility of loading a low density SiO 2 glass with krypton for storage of radioactive 85 Kr has been demonstrated by studies using non-radioactive krypton. A 96% SiO 2 glass with 28% porosity was heated at an elevated pressure of Kr gas to a temperature of 850 to 900 0 C and held at that temperature to sinter the glass-krypton composite to a density of about 2 g/cm 3 . A krypton content of 30 cm 3 of Kr(STP)/cm 3 of glass has been demonstrated when loading pressures of 140 MPa are used. Krypton release rates from the glass are lower than reported for any other waste form considered currently. At 420 0 C a diffusion parameter, D/r 0 2 , of 8.66 x 10 -13 min -1 was determined which leads to a total release of 0.7% of the krypton in 10 years. Release rates increase moderately with increasing temperature up to 600 0 C and increase rapidly above 600 0 C. The lower loading pressures (about 40 MPa) may appear to yield a more favorable product from the point of view of krypton release than the high pressures. Advantages and disadvantages of the technique are given in the conclusions section

  4. Second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling optical pulse injection for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking of an SOA fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Jui; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-09-01

    A second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling of a 10 GHz optical pulse-train is demonstrated to backward injection mode-lock a semiconductor optical amplifier fiber laser (SOAFL) for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking (RHML). That is, a real all-optical gain-modulation of the SOAFL can be created by injecting such a time-multiplexed but pseudo-frequency-doubled pulse-train into the cavity. The time-multiplexing pulse-train can thus be transformed into a frequency-multiplied pulse-train via cross-gain modulation (XGM). The optical pulse-train at 10 GHz is generated by nonlinearly driving an electro-absorption modulator (EAM), which experiences the second-order fractional Talbot effect after propagating through a 4 km long dispersion compensation fiber (DCF). The DCF not only plays the role of frequency-doubler but also compensates the frequency chirp of the 10 GHz optical pulse-train. The pulsewidth broadening from 22 to 60 ps for initiating the time-domain Talbot effect is simulated by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. With careful detuning of the RF modulation power of the EAM at 5 dBm, the generated 20 GHz optical pulse-train exhibits a positive frequency chirp with minimum peak-to-peak value of 2 GHz, and the peak-amplitude fluctuation between adjacent pulses is below 1.4%. In comparison with the SOAFL pulse-train repeated at 40 GHz generated by the fourth-order purely RHML process, the optimized second-order fractional Talbot effect in combination with the second-order RHML mechanism significantly enhances the modulation-depth of RHML, thus improving the on/off extinction ratio of the 40 GHz SOAFL pulse-train from 1.8 to 5.6 dB. Such a new scheme also provides a more stable 40 GHz RHML pulse-train from the SOAFL with its timing jitter reducing from 0.51 to 0.23 ps.

  5. Performance of an electromagnetic liquid krypton calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanti, V.; Barr, G.D.; Buchholz, P.; Cundy, D.; Doble, N.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Hallgren, B.; Kesseler, G.; Lacourt, A.; Laverriere, G.; Linser, G.; Norton, A.; Schinzel, D.; Seidl, W.; Stemmler, T.; Taureg, H.; Viehhauser, G.; Wahl, H.; Duclos, J.; Gianoli, A.; Martini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Savrie, M.; Kalinin, A.; Kekelidze, J.; Kozhevnikov, Y.; Coward, D.; Leber, F.; Cenci, P.; Lariccia, P.; Lubrano, P.; Pepe, M.; Calafiura, P.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Gorini, B.; Laico, F.; Mannelli, I.; Marzulli, V.; Schiuma, D.; Debu, P.; Mazzucato, E.; Migliori, A.; Peyaud, B.; Turlay, R.; Kreutz, A.; Biino, C.; Ceccucci, A.; Palestini, S.; Griesmayer, E.; Markytan, M.; Neuhofer, G.; Pernicka, M.; Taurok, T.; Wulz, C.E. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. Cagliari (Italy) INFN, Cagliari (Italy) CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. Ferrara (Italy) INFN, Ferrara (Italy) Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation) Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Mainz (Germany) Dipt. di Fisica, Un; Cagliari-Cambridge-CERN-Dubna-Edinburgh-Ferrara-Mainz-Perugia-Pisa-Saclay-Siegen-Torino-Vienna Collaboration

    1994-05-15

    A prototype electromagnetic calorimeter containing 180 litres of liquid krypton has been tested in electron and muon beams at the CERN SPS. The main features of this detector are its active shower medium, a granularity of 2 cm with tower readout, and the use of the initial current readout technique with an effective shaping time of about 60 ns. An energy resolution for electrons of 4.1%/[radical]E[GeV] with a constant term of 0.4% and a noise contribution of 50 MeV has been achieved. The calorimeter has a spatial resolution of 4.5 mm/[radical]E[GeV] with a constant term of 0.3 mm and a time resolution of about 0.5 ns for energies larger than 10 GeV. (orig.)

  6. Mode-locked semiconductor laser for long and absolute distance measurement based on laser pulse repetition frequency sweeping: a comparative study between three types of lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Alves, D.; Abreu, Manuel; Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, J. M.

    2017-08-01

    In this work we present a study on three types of semiconductor mode-locked lasers as possible sources for a high precision absolute distance metrology measurement concept based on pulse repetition frequency (PRF) sweep. In this work, we evaluated one vertical emission laser and two transversal emission sources. The topology of the gain element is quantum-well, quantum-dot and quantum-dash, respectively. Only the vertical emission laser has optical pump, whilst the others operate with electric pumping. The quantum-dash laser does not have a saturable absorber in its configuration but relies on a dispersion compensating fiber for generating pulses. The bottleneck of vertical emission laser is his high power density pump (4.5W/165μm), increasing the vulnerability of damaging the gain element. The other lasers, i.e., the single (quantum-dash) and double section (quantum-dot) lasers present good results either in terms of applicability to the metrology system or in terms of robustness. Using RF injection on the gain element, both lasers show good PRF stabilization results (better than σy(10ms) = 10-9 ) which is a requirement for the mentioned metrology technique.

  7. Superluminescent high-efficient parametric generation in PPLN crystal with pumping by a Q-switched mode locked Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donin, V. I.; Yakovin, D. V.; Yakovin, M. D.; Gribanov, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    We present results on parametric superluminescence in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped by a train of 45 ps pulses using a Q-switched mode locked Nd:YAG laser. The conversion efficiency (with respect to the absorbed power) was ~83%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest efficiency obtained with powerful superluminescent parametric sources. At the average pumping power of the laser of ~0.5 W and repetition rates of 1 and 1.7 kHz, the peak total output powers were as high as 210 and 200 kW, and the powers of the idler wavelength (3.82 µm) were 55 and 50 kW. New lines in the visible and UV spectrum were observed and are explained. The experiments demonstrated that the spectral and angular characteristics of superluminescence are determined by the pumping laser. In particular, the line width of the signal wave was close to that of the pumping line at ~200 GHz, and the divergence of the signal and idler waves depended only on the convergence (divergence) angle of the pumping radiation (30 mrad) and was independent of the wavelength.

  8. Design studies on compact four mirror laser resonator with mode-locked pulsed laser for 5 μm laser wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawankar, Arpit [Department of Accelerator Science, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan International Village, Hayama, Miura, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Urakawa, Junji, E-mail: junji.urakawa@kek.jp [Department of Accelerator Science, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan International Village, Hayama, Miura, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Shimizu, Hirotaka [Department of Accelerator Science, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan International Village, Hayama, Miura, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); You, Yan [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Terunuma, Nobuhiro [Department of Accelerator Science, School of High Energy Accelerator Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan International Village, Hayama, Miura, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Aryshev, Alexander; Honda, Yosuke [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    A compact prototype four-mirror optical cavity is being constructed at KEK-ATF to measure low-emittance electron beams in the damping ring. Four-mirror-resonators reduce the sensitivity to the misalignment of mirrors in comparison to two mirror-resonators. The aspect ratio is important when constructing a compact resonator with a very small beam waist of less than 5 μm. The total cavity length of a four-mirror resonator is matched according to the pulse repetition of mode-locked laser oscillator. Minimum beam waist is obtained in the sagittal plane using an IR pulsed laser. The advantage of such types of compact four-mirror-resonators is the total scanning time for measurement of the beam profile is much shorter in comparison to a CW laser wire system. By using a pulsed green laser that has been converted to the second harmonics from an IR pulsed laser, a minimum beam waist that has half the beam waist when using an IR laser oscillator can be obtained. Therefore, it is possible to obtain the beam waist of less than 5 μm (σ value) that is required for effective photon–electron collision. We report on the development and performance studies for such types of compact four-mirror laser wire systems.

  9. Ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography imaging and visualization of the embryonic avian heart using a buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M W; Adler, D C; Gargesha, M; Huber, R; Rothenberg, F; Belding, J; Watanabe, M; Wilson, D L; Fujimoto, J G; Rollins, A M

    2007-05-14

    The embryonic avian heart is an important model for studying cardiac developmental biology. The mechanisms that govern the development of a four-chambered heart from a peristaltic heart tube are largely unknown due in part to a lack of adequate imaging technology. Due to the small size and rapid motion of the living embryonic avian heart, an imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolution is required to study these models. Here, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser is applied for ultrahigh-speed non-invasive imaging of embryonic quail hearts at 100,000 axial scans per second. The high scan rate enables the acquisition of high temporal resolution 2D datasets (195 frames per second or 5.12 ms between frames) and 3D datasets (10 volumes per second). Spatio-temporal details of cardiac motion not resolvable using previous OCT technology are analyzed. Visualization and measurement techniques are developed to non-invasively observe and quantify cardiac motion throughout the brief period of systole (less than 50 msec) and diastole. This marks the first time that the preseptated embryonic avian heart has been imaged in 4D without the aid of gating and the first time it has been viewed in cross section during looping with extremely high temporal resolution, enabling the observation of morphological dynamics of the beating heart during systole.

  10. Ultrahigh-speed optical coherence tomography imaging and visualization of the embryonic avian heart using a buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Adler, D. C.; Gargesha, M.; Huber, R.; Rothenberg, F.; Belding, J.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Fujimoto, J. G.; Rollins, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic avian heart is an important model for studying cardiac developmental biology. The mechanisms that govern the development of a four-chambered heart from a peristaltic heart tube are largely unknown due in part to a lack of adequate imaging technology. Due to the small size and rapid motion of the living embryonic avian heart, an imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolution is required to study these models. Here, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a buffered Fourier Domain Mode Locked (FDML) laser is applied for ultrahigh-speed non-invasive imaging of embryonic quail hearts at 100,000 axial scans per second. The high scan rate enables the acquisition of high temporal resolution 2D datasets (195 frames per second or 5.12 ms between frames) and 3D datasets (10 volumes per second). Spatio-temporal details of cardiac motion not resolvable using previous OCT technology are analyzed. Visualization and measurement techniques are developed to non-invasively observe and quantify cardiac motion throughout the brief period of systole (less than 50 msec) and diastole. This marks the first time that the preseptated embryonic avian heart has been imaged in 4D without the aid of gating and the first time it has been viewed in cross section during looping with extremely high temporal resolution, enabling the observation of morphological dynamics of the beating heart during systole. PMID:19546930

  11. Mitigation of mode partition noise in quantum-dash Fabry-Perot mode-locked lasers using Manchester encoding and balanced detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaibi, Mohamed Essghair; Bramerie, Laurent; Lobo, Sébastien; Peucheret, Christophe

    2017-07-10

    We propose the use of Manchester encoding in conjunction with balanced detection to overcome the mode partition noise (MPN) limit of quantum-dash Fabry-Perot mode-locked lasers (QD-MLLs) used as multi-wavelength sources in short-reach applications. The proposed approach is demonstrated for a 10-mode laser, each carrying a 10-Gb/s signal. We show that bit-error-rate floors as high as 10 -4 when traditional non-return-to-zero (NRZ) modulation is employed with a single-ended detection scheme can be pushed below 10 -9 thanks to the introduction of Manchester encoding together with balanced detection. The benefit of the scheme could be attributed to the spectral shift of the Manchester spectrum, resulting in a smaller overlap with the high-relative intensity noise (RIN) region present at low frequencies, and the use of balanced detection. We clarify the origin of the performance improvement through comparisons of single-ended and balanced detection and the use of a RIN emulation technique. We unambiguously show that the use of balanced detection plays the leading role in MPN mitigation enabled by Manchester modulation.

  12. The distribution, atmospheric transfer, and assessment of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannetier, R.

    1968-06-01

    Techniques for sampling and measuring krypton-85 have been developed which allowed to determine its geographical distribution. From its use as a tracer, an evaluation of the air masses which cross over the subtropical fronts has been derived. Besides, the stratospheric character of air pollution by krypton-85 at the level of the antarctic soil has been shown out. Levels of krypton-85 seem to point out to an underestimation of the assessment of nuclear explosion fission energies as adopted by the United Nations Scientific committee on the effects of atomic radiation and emphasize the need to set limits as soon as possible to the amounts of krypton-85 released to the atmosphere by fuel-reprocessing plants. (author) [fr

  13. Climate aspects of radioactive trace gases, especially krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollert, R.; Butzin, M.

    1990-01-01

    The amount of krypton 85 currently present in the atmosphere is 3.300 Peta Bq. This atmospheric krypton contamination stems from atom bomb tests of the past and from nuclear power plants as well as spent fuel reprocessing plants. The paper investigates the air-electric and air-chemical impact of Kr-85 on the atmosphere and makes a forecast of the future Kr-85 contamination. (DG) [de

  14. 2s 2p 3P10 → 2s21S0 intercombination line in beryllium-like krypton, molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.

    1979-01-01

    Transition probabilities are evaluated for the 2s 2p 3 P 1 0 → 2s 2 1 S 0 transition in beryllium-like ions for krypton, molybdenum and tungsten, using configuration-interaction wavefunctions. The importance of the 2s 3p 1 P 1 0 configuration is considered

  15. Analysis of methods for obtaining of a uniform particle distribution on a target on its irradiation by a beam of the krypton ions extracted from the implantator IC-100

    CERN Document Server

    Gikal, B N; Kazarinov, N

    2002-01-01

    Some methods of the target uniform irradiation by heavy ions have been analyzed. As a result the scanning system for the sup 8 sup 4 Kr sup 1 sup 5 sup + ion beam extracted from the cyclotron IC-100 has been chosen and worked up. It consists of two deflecting yokes creating horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. The yokes are supplied by generators of saw-tooth current having the definitely fixed frequencies. When both generators work synchronously the centre of mass of the ion beam 'draws' a pattern on the target. The dimensions of the pattern cells are determined by the ratio of these frequencies. The correlation between the generator frequencies when heterogeneity of the particle density distribution does not exceed the required value of +- 5% is obtained. It has been shown that for the moving target the chosen scanning scheme allows one to obtain its uniform density distribution. For the slow target velocities (20-50 cm/s) this scheme also allows one to compensate the collapse in the particle density di...

  16. 41 GHz and 10.6 GHz low threshold and low noise InAs/InP quantum dash two-section mode-locked lasers in L band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dontabactouny, M.; Piron, R.; Klaime, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports recent results on InAs/InP quantum dash-based, two-section, passively mode-locked lasers pulsing at 41 GHz and 10.6 GHz and emitting at 1.59 mu m at 20 degrees C. The 41-GHz device (1 mm long) starts lasing at 25 mA under uniform injection and the 10.6 GHz (4 mm long) at 71 m...

  17. Mathematical solutions of rate equations of a laser-diode end-pumped passively Q-switched and mode locked Nd-laser with Cr4+:YAG polarized saturable absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Ghani, B.; Hammadi, M.

    2012-01-01

    The intracavity frequency-doubling (IFD) of a simultaneous passively Q-switched mode-locked diode-pumped Nd 3 + - laser is studied with a polarized isotropic Cr 4 +: YAG saturable absorber. A general recurrence formula for the mode-locked pulses under the Q-switched envelope at fundamental wavelength has been reconstructed in order to analyze the temporal shape behavior of a single Q-switched envelope with mode-locking pulse trains. This formula has been derived taking into account the impact of the IFD and polarized Cr 4 +: YAG saturable absorber.The presented mathematical model describes the self-induced anisotropy appeared in the polarized Cr 4 +: YAG in the nonlinear stage of the giant pulse formation. For the anisotropic Nd 3 +: YVO 4 active medium, the generated polarized waves are assumed to be fixed through the lasing cycle. Besides, the maximum absorber initial transmission and the minimum mirror reflectivity values have been determined from the second threshold criterion. The calculated numerical results demonstrate the impact of the variation of the input laser parameters (rotational angle of the polarized crystal, absorber initial transmission and the output mirror reflectivity) on the characteristics of the output laser pulse (SH peak power, pulse width, pulse duration and shift pulse position of central mode). The calculated numerical results in this work is in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the available experimental data reported in the references. (author)

  18. Fundamental and harmonic soliton mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser using single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in poly (ethylene oxide) film saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosdin, R. Z. R. R.; Zarei, A.; Ali, N. M.; Arof, H.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a simple, compact and low cost mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) using a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) embedded in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) film as a passive saturable absorber. The film was fabricated using a prepared homogeneous SWCNT solution, which was mixed with a diluted PEO solution and casted onto a glass petri dish to form a thin film by evaporation technique. The film, with a thickness of 50 μm, is sandwiched between two fiber connectors to construct a saturable absorber, which is then integrated in an EDFL cavity to generate a self-started stable soliton pulses operating at 1560.8 nm. The soliton pulse starts to lase at 1480 nm pup power threshold of 12.3 mW to produce pulse train with repetition rate of 11.21 MHz, pulse width of 1.02 ps, average output power of 0.65 mW and pulse energy of 57.98 pJ. Then, we observed the 4th, 7th and 15th harmonic of fundamental cavity frequency start to occur when the pump powers are further increased to 14.9, 17.5 and 20.1 mW, respectively. The 4th harmonic pulses are characterized in detail with a repetition rate of 44.84 MHz, a transform-limited pulse width of 1.19 ps, side-mode suppression ratio of larger than 20 dB and pulse energy of 9.14 pJ.

  19. Diagnosis of high-temperature implosions using low- and high-opacity Krypton lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaakobi, B.; Epstein, R.

    1996-01-01

    High-temperature laser target implosions can be achieved by using relatively thin-shell targets, and they can be. diagnosed by doping the fuel with krypton and measuring K-shell and L-shell lines. Electron temperatures of up to 5 keV at modest compressed densities (∼1-5g/cm 3 ) are predicted for such experiments, with ion temperatures peaking above 10 keV at the center. It is found that the profiles of low-opacity (optically thin) lines in the expected density range are dominated by the Doppler broadening and can provide a measurement of the ion temperature if spectrometers of spectral resolution Δλ/λ ≥ 1000 are used. For high-opacity lines, obtained with a higher krypton fill pressure, the measurement of the escape factor can yield the ρR of the compressed fuel. At higher densities, Stark broadening of low-opacity lines becomes important and can provide a density measurement, whereas lines of higher opacity can be used to estimate the extent of mixing

  20. Krypton red laser photocoagulation of the ocular fundus. 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Shakin, Jeffrey L

    2012-02-01

    The theoretical rationale, the histopathologic evidence, and the preliminary clinical studies related to krypton red laser (KRL) photocoagulation of the ocular fundus are reviewed. The authors report on their experience with currently available laser systems using this wavelength (647.1 nm) for photocoagulation of retinal vascular proliferative diseases and chorioretinal diseases associated with exudative manifestations. A histopathologic and clinical comparison of argon blue-green laser (ABGL), the pure argon green laser (AGL), and the krypton yellow laser (KYL), with reference to photocoagulation treatment of the ocular fundus is also discussed.

  1. Krypton red laser photocoagulation of the ocular fundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannuzzi, L A; Shakin, J L

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical rationale, the histopathologic evidence, and the preliminary clinical studies related to krypton red laser (KRL) photocoagulation of the ocular fundus are reviewed. The authors report on their experience with currently available laser systems using this wavelength (647.1 nm) for photocoagulation of retinal vascular proliferative diseases and chorioretinal diseases associated with exudative manifestations. A histopathologic and clinical comparison of argon blue-green laser (ABGL), the pure argon green laser (AGL), and the krypton yellow laser (KYL), with reference to photocoagulation treatment of the ocular fundus is also discussed.

  2. Experience gained in the cryodistillation unit for krypton removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geens, L.; Collard, G.; Goossens, W.R.A.; Vaesen, P.J.

    1981-08-01

    This unit with a nominal gas throughput of 8.5 g.s -1 has been used to investigate the removal of krypton from reprocessing off-gases under non-radioactive conditions. During the investigation a total operation time of more than 13.000 hours was reached with an average availability factor of 99.36%. The trapping efficiency for krypton was higher than 99.9%. The operation experience acquired indicates some critical aspects for the design of such a unit. The experimental results obtained allow to show the influence of feed pressure and temperature, reflux flow rate and noble gas concentrations on the performance of the unit. (author)

  3. Evaluation of target power supplies for krypton storage in sputter-deposited metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwell, E.N.; McClanahan, E.D.; Moss, R.W.

    1986-04-01

    Implantation of 85 Kr in a growing sputtered metal deposit has been studied for the containment of 85 Kr recovered from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. PNL, as part of DOE's research program for 85 Kr storage, has developed krypton trapping storage devices (KTSDs) in a range of sizes for ''cold'' and radioactive testing. The KTSD is a stainless steel canister that contains a sputtering target for depositing an amorphous rare-earth transition metal on the inner wall and simultaneously implanting low-energy krypton ions in the growing deposit. This report covers the design requirements for the target power supply and the description, testing and evaluation of three basic designs. The designs chosen for evaluation were: (1) a standard commercial power supply with an external PNL-designed current interrupter, (2) a commercially manufactured power supply with an integral series-type interrupter, and (3) a commercially manufactured power supply with an integral shunt-type interrupter. The units were compared on the basis of performance, reliability, and life-cycle cost. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  4. L-shell spectroscopic diagnostics of radiation from krypton HED plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkov, E. E., E-mail: emilp@unr.edu; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Shlyaptseva, V. V. [University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Rawat, R. S.; Tan, K. S. [National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, 96049 Bamberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    X-ray spectroscopy is a useful tool for diagnosing plasma sources due to its non-invasive nature. One such source is the dense plasma focus (DPF). Recent interest has developed to demonstrate its potential application as a soft x-ray source. We present the first spectroscopic studies of krypton high energy density plasmas produced on a 3 kJ DPF device in Singapore. In order to diagnose spectral features, and to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of plasma parameters, a new non-local thermodynamic equilibrium L-shell kinetic model for krypton was developed. It has the capability of incorporating hot electrons, with different electron distribution functions, in order to examine the effects that they have on emission spectra. To further substantiate the validity of this model, it is also benchmarked with data gathered from experiments on the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where data were collected using the high resolution EBIT calorimeter spectrometer.

  5. Monitoring of kratom or Krypton intake in urine using GC-MS in clinical and forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Anika A; Meyer, Markus R; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Weber, Armin A; Zoerntlein, Siegfried W; Zweipfenning, Peter G M; Maurer, Hans H

    2011-04-01

    The Thai medicinal plant Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) is misused as a herbal drug. Besides this, a new herbal blend has appeared on the drugs of abuse market, named Krypton, a mixture of O-demethyltramadol (ODT) and kratom. Therefore, urine drug screenings should include ODT and focus on the metabolites of the kratom alkaloids mitragynine (MG), paynantheine (PAY), speciogynine (SG), and speciociliatine (SC). The aim of this study was to develop a full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure for monitoring kratom or Krypton intake in urine after enzymatic cleavage of conjugates, solid-phase extraction, and trimethylsilylation. With use of reconstructed mass chromatography with the ions m/z 271, 286, 329, 344, 470, 526, 528, and 586, the presence of MG, 16-carboxy-MG, 9-O-demethyl-MG, and/or 9-O-demethyl-16-carboxy-MG could be indicated, and in case of Krypton, with m/z 58, 84, 116, 142, 303, 361, 393, and 451, the additional presence of ODT and its nor metabolite could be indicated. Compounds were identified by comparison with their respective reference spectra. Depending on the plant type, dose, administration route, and/or sampling time, further metabolites of MG, PAY, SG, and SC could be detected. The limits of detection (signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were 100 ng/ml for the parent alkaloids and 50 ng/ml for ODT. As mainly metabolites of the kratom alkaloids were detected in urine, the detectability of kratom was tested successfully using rat urine after administration of a common user's dose of MG. As the metabolism in humans was similar, this procedure should be suitable to prove an intake of kratom or Krypton.

  6. Thermal stability of the krypton Hall effect thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Krypton Large IMpulse Thruster (KLIMT ESA/PECS project, which has been implemented in the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM and now is approaching its final phase, was aimed at incremental development of a ~500 W class Hall effect thruster (HET. Xenon, predominantly used as a propellant in the state-of-the-art HETs, is extremely expensive. Krypton has been considered as a cheaper alternative since more than fifteen years; however, to the best knowledge of the authors, there has not been a HET model especially designed for this noble gas. To address this issue, KLIMT has been geared towards operation primarily with krypton. During the project, three subsequent prototype versions of the thruster were designed, manufactured and tested, aimed at gradual improvement of each next exemplar. In the current paper, the heat loads in new engine have been discussed. It has been shown that thermal equilibrium of the thruster is gained within the safety limits of the materials used. Extensive testing with both gases was performed to compare KLIMT’s thermal behaviour when supplied with krypton and xenon propellants.

  7. Design and performance characteristics of a krypton chloride (λ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-07

    Jan 7, 2014 ... Development of a discharge-pumped krypton chloride (KrCl) laser operating at 222 nm wavelength is demonstrated. In this paper the design, successful realization and operating characteristics of KrCl excimer laser are reported. The laser is driven by a simple and efficient excitation technique using ...

  8. Design and performance characteristics of a krypton chloride (λ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-07

    Jan 7, 2014 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 1. Design and performance characteristics of a krypton chloride ( = 222 nm) excimer laser. N S Benerji N ... In this paper the design, successful realization and operating characteristics of KrCl excimer laser are reported. The laser is driven ...

  9. Oxygen sensitivity of krypton and Lyman-alpha hygrometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.; Kohsiek, W.; Bruin, de H.A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The oxygen sensitivity of krypton and Lyman-¿ hygrometers is studied. Using a dewpoint generator and a controlled nitrogen/oxygen flow the extinction coefficients of five hygrometers associated with the third-order Taylor expansion of the Lambert¿Beer law around reference conditions for oxygen and

  10. An experimental investigation of proton-induced phenomena in krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulders, J.J.L.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis proton-induced phenomena in krypton gas are described. The considered reactions of protons on krypton are both nuclear and atomic. The nuclear conversion processes mainly result in the production of several Rb radioisotopes, such as 81 Rb that is used in 81 Rb-sup(81m)Kr generator systems for medical diagnostics. The irradiation of krypton gas (natural composition) with protons of about 26 MeV can be used for the routine production of 81 Rb from the direct production reaction 82 Kr(p,2n) 81 Rb and from the indirect reaction 82 Kr(p,2n)sup(81m)Rb → 81 Rb. To determine the scattering of protons in krypton gas targets a quantitative autoradiographic technique was developed. Proton profiles have been determined from the proton-induced activity distribution on a copper foil. For the on-line detection of produced Rb radioisotopes several optical detection techniques were investigated. (Auth.)

  11. Particle dynamics during electronic sputtering of solid krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    We have modeled electronic sputtering of solid krypton by excimer production with molecular dynamics. Both excimer evolution in the solid and deexcitation processes have been incorporated in the simulation. The excimer dynamics in the lattice has been analyzed: the excimers formed near the surface...

  12. Immobilization of krypton-85 in zeolite 5A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, A.B.; Del Debbio, J.A.; Knecht, D.A.; Tanner, J.E.; Cossel, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the technical feasibility and presents a summary of a preconceptual design and cost estimate for a process to immobilize krypton-85 by sintering in zeolite 5A at 700 0 C and 100 MPa for 2 to 4 h. Krypton loading of 30 to 60 m 3 at STP per m 3 solid can be achieved. The initial water concentration in zeolite 5A has a catalytic effect on the sintering rate and must be kept at about 1 wt% by heating prior to the encapsulation run. High initial water loadings and/or encapsulation times longer than 4 h must be avoided because the sintered zeolite 5A recrystallizes to an anorthite-type feldspar and releases the trapped krypton. Data are presented to show how the process conditions affect krypton encapsulation in zeolie 5A and how to assure the quality of the product. By adding a powdered glass frit to the commercial zeolite 5A 2 mm beads, a solid mass is formed during encapsulation, which can be further compacted using standard hot isotatic pressing techniques at 33 MPa and 600 0 C to form a fused glassy matrix enclosing the amorphous zeolite. A process for encapsulating the annual krypton-85 production at a commercial 2000 metric ton of heavy metal spent fuel reprocessing plant is developed. A hot isostatic press (HIP) with an isolated work zone of 8 or 16 L capacity is required to operate for 600 or 300 cycles per year, respectively. Existing HIP technology uses work zones from 1 to 3500 L capacity at similar production rates. A combined encapsulation/compaction cycle is proposed as an option to most effectively immobilize the krypton and the zeolite. A preconceptual design and cost estimate is given for a commercial-scale Kr encapsulation facility. The facility is designed to withstand a worst case rupture of the HIP. The maximum lease is estimated to result in an off-site dose well below accident protective action guidance levels

  13. Loading and leakage of krypton immobilized in zeolites and glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, A.B.; Del Debbio, J.A.; Knecht, D.A.; Tanner, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Krypton-85 is formed in nuclear power reactors and remains trapped until the fuel is reprocessed. Federal regulations limit the release of 85 Kr to the environment, requiring recovery and storage of 85% of the 85 Kr produced in commercial light-water reactors after January 1, 1983. One of the long-term storage options involves encapsulating 85 Kr in zeolites or glasses at high pressure and temperature. This paper presents experimental results for krypton encapsulation and leakage in sodalite, zeolite 5A, and Vycor Thristy glass. The results show that all three materials are feasible for 85 Kr immobilization and long-term storage, although zeolite 5A and Thirsty Vycor are preferable due to lower leakage rates

  14. Electron drift velocity measurements in liquid krypton-methane mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Folegani, M; Magri, M; Piemontese, L

    1999-01-01

    Electron drift velocities have been measured in liquid krypton, pure and mixed with methane at different concentrations (1-10% in volume) versus electric field strength, and a possible effect of methane on electron lifetime has been investigated. While no effect on lifetime could be detected, since lifetimes were in all cases longer than what measurable, a very large increase in drift velocity (up to a factor 6) has been measured.

  15. Background Pressure Effects on Krypton Hall Effect Thruster Internal Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The first compo- nent passes through a krypton opto-galvanic cell and is terminated by a beam dump. The opto-galvanic cell current is...critical densities at the thruster exit and test chamber environment. The chamber background pressure is de- rived from the perfect gas law, P = nkT ...If we take the pressure to be lowered by reducing the mean temperature of the background neutrals, via the ideal gas law, P = nkT (where P is the

  16. Evaluation of activated charcoal for dynamic adsorption of krypton and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.A.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Ramarathinam, K.; Kishore, A.G.

    1975-01-01

    From the standpoint of radiation safety, the release of radioactive krypton and xenon from power reactors should be kept as low as practicable. The decay of shortlived isotopes of krypton and xenon by adsorptive delay on activated charcoal has shown promising results for this purpose. The delay provided by activated charcoal is proportional to the dynamic adsorption coefficients of these gases which are characteristic of the adsorbent. These coefficients were determined for krypton and xenon on indigenous gas-adsorbing activated charcoal at different moisture contents of carrier air stream and activated charcoal, concentrations of krypton around ambient temperatures, to find its suitability for designing adsorber columns. (author)

  17. Krypton-85 and other airborne radioactivity measurements throughout Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.J.; Murray, M.; Wong, J.; Sequeira, S.; Long, S.C.; Rafferty, B.

    2004-01-01

    In compliance with articles 35 and 36 of the EURATOM Treaty, the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) undertakes a comprehensive programme of radioactivity monitoring in the Irish terrestrial environment. Radioactivity is present in the terrestrial environment due to natural processes, the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere, accidents such as the Chernobyl accident and the routine discharge of radionuclides from nuclear installations. The RPII monitors airborne radioactivity concentrations at ten stations throughout Ireland, of which, nine are equipped with low volume particulate samplers and one, in Dublin, with a high volume particulate sampler. The low volume particulate samples are assessed for total beta activity and high volume samples for gamma emitting radionuclides such as caesium-137 and beryllium-7. In addition, air sampled at the RPII laboratory in Dublin, is monitored for krypton-85, a radioactive noble gas, released into the environment primarily as a result of the reprocessing of nuclear fuel at installations such as Sellafield in the UK and La Hague in France. Since the inception of the krypton measurements in 1993 a trend of increasing atmospheric concentrations has been observed. The results of the krypton-85 monitoring, as well as the airborne radioactivity concentration measurements, will be presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  18. 10 CFR 32.22 - Self-luminous products containing tritium, krypton-85 or promethium-147: Requirements for license...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Self-luminous products containing tritium, krypton-85 or... containing tritium, krypton-85 or promethium-147: Requirements for license to manufacture, process, produce... self-luminous products containing tritium, krypton-85, or promethium-147, or to initially transfer such...

  19. 10 CFR 30.19 - Self-luminous products containing tritium, krypton-85, or promethium-147.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Self-luminous products containing tritium, krypton-85, or... DOMESTIC LICENSING OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Exemptions § 30.19 Self-luminous products containing tritium... transfer for sale or distribution self-luminous products containing tritium, krypton-85, or promethium-147...

  20. Krypton gas cylinders as a source of radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Helmut W; Bielefeld, Tom; Hettwig, Bernd

    2010-07-01

    A standard 40 foot shipping container with a cargo of pressurized krypton gas in 159 steel cylinders, which had triggered a radiation alarm, was investigated to address radiation safety and illicit nuclear trafficking concerns. The investigation included contamination and dose rate measurements as well as in situ high resolution gamma spectroscopy. The dose rate measurements gave a maximum value of 0.07 microSv h(-1) above background (0.08 to 0.11 microSv h(-1)) on the cylinder surface and no detectable increase above background at distances of 1 m and higher. Contamination monitor readings showed a similar relative increase (plus 8 cpm) above background (about 12 cpm) to the dose rate readings. Quantitative gamma spectroscopy revealed a contamination of the gas with 85Kr at a level of 3.5 x 10(5) Bq kg(-1). This value was found to be consistent with analytical and numerical estimates based on current data for atmospheric 85Kr, which is captured from ambient air together with stable krypton during the production process. This incident demonstrates an apparent lack of radiation-related knowledge by those who handle krypton gas, as well as by border control personnel and emergency responders. We therefore propose to improve labeling and documentation standards for such shipments. This effort may be facilitated by introducing the new category of "technically enhanced artificial radioactive material," or "TEARM" (similar to the existing "naturally occurring radioactive material" or "NORM" and "technically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material" or "TENORM" categories).

  1. Monitoring of air pollutants and greenhouse gases. Monitoring Krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novitchkov, V.

    1996-01-01

    Krypton-85 is an anthropogenic radioactive noble gas, a gaseous fission product which builds up in the atmosphere. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) integrates many monitoring and research activities involving the measurements of atmospheric composition. Kr-85 represents one of the gases recommended by the WMO for monitoring. The collaborative program of the Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute (MEPI) and the US Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) NOAA activities is aimed at determining the possible future consequences of Krypton-85 content (trend) increasing in the earth's atmosphere. The research is conducted at the MEPI to study the character of KR-85 release into the atmosphere and its distribution in the atmosphere, to determine Kr-85 possible sources. If only the question of the direct impact of Kr-85 on climate would be considered, only the order of magnitude of the atmospheric concentration would be of interest. In this case almost any available detection method and a precision as low as some 10% would be acceptable. If however, Kr-85 is to be applied as a tracer for the improvement of our present knowledge of local, regional and global transport and mixing processes and the validation of global-scale transport and mixing models, a much higher precision is required (order of +1%). This high standard cannot be met without a permanent quality assurance programmer. It is within the framework of the WMO that MEPI and the Air Resources Laboratory NOAA USA proposes collaboration of Kr-85 scientific findings. The project MEPI open-quotes Monitoring Krypton-85close quotes is being financed through the International Science and Technology Center

  2. Development of krypton-85 measurement in ocean samples by beta counting and use of the krypton-85 as a tracer in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternon, Jean-Francois

    1990-01-01

    Krypton-85 present in the environment has essentially an anthropogenic origin, and the knowledge of the evolution of its concentration in the atmosphere, and of its mode of penetration in the ocean by gaseous exchange at the surface, and its bio-geochemical stability in the environment make it a potential tool to trace movements of water masses in the ocean. This research thesis aims at being a contribution to the implementation of an experimental device which would allow very low concentrations of krypton-85 in the ocean to be measured. After a presentation of the general context, the author reports the development of the two last steps of krypton-85 measurement: the separation of krypton by gas chromatography, and the measurement of krypton-85 by low-level radioactive counting. Then, the author reports the study of the use of krypton-85 as a tracer in oceanography, and notably highlights its similarities with CFC which are widely used to study ocean circulation [fr

  3. Supershort avalanche electron beam in SF6 and krypton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Gu, Jianwei; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.; Beloplotov, Dmitry V.; Burachenko, Alexander G.; Yan, Ping; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Shao, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Runaway electrons play an important role in the avalanche formation in nanosecond- and subnanosecond- pulse discharges. In this paper, characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) generated at the subnanosecond and nanosecond breakdown in sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 ) in an inhomogeneous electric field were studied. One pulser operated at negative polarity with voltage pulse amplitude of ˜130 kV and rise time of 0.3 ns. The other pulser operated at negative polarity with voltage pulse amplitude of 70 kV and rise time of ˜1.6 ns . SAEB parameters in SF6 are compared with those obtained in krypton (Kr), nitrogen (N2 ), air, and mixtures of SF6 with krypton or nitrogen. Experimental results showed that SAEB currents appeared during the rise-time of the voltage pulse for both pulsers. Moreover, amplitudes of the SAEB current in SF6 and Kr approximately ranged from several to tens of milliamps at atmospheric pressure, which were smaller than those in N2 and air (ranging from hundreds of milliamps to several amperes). Furthermore, the concentration of SF6 additive could significantly reduce the SAEB current in N2-SF6 mixture, but it slightly affected the SAEB current in Kr -SF6 mixture because of the atomic/molecular ionization cross section of the gas had a much greater impact on the SAEB current rather than the electronegativity.

  4. Krypton-85 hydrofracture engineering feasibility and safety evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretz, F.J.; Muller, M.E.; Pan, P.Y.

    1981-07-01

    Engineering studies have been made to determine the hazards associated with the disposal of /sup 85/Kr using the hydrofracture process. To assess the hazards, an effort has been made to identify the equipment required to entrain and dissolve the noble gas into the grout stream at hydrofracture pressure (up to 350 bar). Off-the-shelf or slightly modified equipment has been identified for safe and effective compression and gas-grout mixing. Each monthly injection disposes of 1.6 x 10/sup 6/ Ci of /sup 85/Kr. By connecting only one gas cylinder to the injection system at a time, the maximum amount of krypton likely to be released as a result of equipment failure is limited to 128,000 Ci. An evaluation by Los Alamos Technical Associates shows that releasing this amount of gas in less than one hour under worst-case meteorological conditions through a 30-m stack would result in a whole-body dose of 170 millirem at a distance of 1 km from the facility. A krypton collection and recovery system can further reduce this dose to 17 millirem; increasing the distance to the site boundary to 3 km can also reduce the dose by a factor of ten. Lung and skin dose estimates are 1.6 and 120 times the whole-body dose, respectively. These are all worst-case values; releases under more typical conditions would result in a significantly lower dose. No insurmountable safety or engineering problems have been identified.

  5. Theoretical investigation of the secondary ionization in krypton and xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffo, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the secondary ionization processes that responsible for the pre-breakdown ionization current growth in a uniform electric field was studied in krypton and xenon gases, especially at low values of E/P 0 which is corresponding to high values of pressure, since there are a number of possible secondary ionization processes. It is interesting to carry out a quantitative analysis for the generalized secondary ionization coefficient obtained previously by many workers in terms of the production of excited states and their diffusion to the cathode and their destruction rate in the gas body. From energy balance equation for the electrons in the discharge, the fractional percentage energy losses of ionization, excitation, and elastic collisions to the total energy gained by the electron from the field has been calculated for krypton and xenon, as a result of such calculations; the conclusion drawn is that at low values of E/P 0 the main energy loss of electrons are in excited collision. Therefore, we are adopting a theoretical calculation for W/α under the assumption that the photo-electron emission at the cathode is the predominated secondary ionization process. 14 tabs.; 12 figs.; 64 refs

  6. All-fiber interferometer-based repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers to 10-14-level frequency instability and 1-fs-level jitter over 1  s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dohyeon; Kim, Jungwon

    2017-12-15

    We report on all-fiber Michelson interferometer-based repetition-rate stabilization of femtosecond mode-locked lasers down to 1.3×10 -14 frequency instability and 1.4 fs integrated jitter in a 1 s time scale. The use of a compactly packaged 10 km long single-mode fiber (SMF)-28 fiber link as a timing reference allows the scaling of phase noise at a 10 GHz carrier down to -80  dBc/Hz at 1 Hz Fourier frequency. We also tested a 500 m long low-thermal-sensitivity fiber as a reference and found that, compared to standard SMF-28 fiber, it can mitigate the phase noise divergence by ∼10  dB/dec in the 0.1-1 Hz Fourier frequency range. These results suggest that the use of a longer low-thermal-sensitivity fiber may achieve sub-femtosecond integrated timing jitter with sub-10 -14 -level frequency instability in repetition rate by a simple and robust all-fiber-photonic method.

  7. Molecular hydrogen isotopes adsorbed on krypton-preplated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Joseph; Boninsegni, Massimo

    2007-09-01

    Adsorption of ortho-deuterium and para-hydrogen films on a graphite substrate, preplated with a single atomic layer of krypton, is studied theoretically by means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations at low temperature. Our model explicitly includes substrate corrugation. Energetic and structural properties of these adsorbed films are computed for a range of hydrogen coverages. Thermodynamically stable adsorbed films are solid, with no clear evidence of any liquidlike phase. Quantum exchanges of ortho-deuterium and para-hydrogen are essentially absent in this system, down to zero temperature; consequently, this system displays no superfluidity in this limit. Our simulations provide evidence of a stable domain-wall fluid at low temperature, consistent with recent experimental observations.

  8. The NA62 Liquid Krypton calorimeter data acquisition upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Hallgren, Bjorn; Piccini, Mauro; Wendler, Helmut; 10.1109/NSSMIC.2008.4774802

    2009-01-01

    The NA62 experiment at CERN, aiming to start data taking in 2011, intends to measure the branching ratio of extremely rare kaon decays. The existing Liquid Krypton (LKr) calorimeter of the NA48 experiment will play an essential role in the new experiment. For this reason a program for the consolidation of the LKr read-out system was launched in 2006. The first part of the program consists of updating the existing data acquisition system to a modern more reliable technology using Gigabit Ethernet and PC-farm. In the second stage the readout event rate has to be increased from 13 kHz to 1 MHz. Methods to do this, while keeping much of the existing analog system, are discussed.

  9. Structures of small mixed krypton-xenon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Masanari; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Rühl, Eckart

    2012-06-21

    Structures of small mixed krypton-xenon clusters of different compositions with an average size of 30-37 atoms are investigated. The Kr 3d(5/2) and Xe 4d(5/2) surface core level shifts and photoelectron intensities originating from corner, edge, and face/bulk sites are analyzed by using soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Structural models are derived from these experiments, which are confirmed by theoretical simulation taking induced dipole interactions into account. It is found that one or two small Xe cores are partly embedded in the surface of the Kr clusters. These may grow and merge leading to a phase separation between the two rare gas moieties in mixed clusters with increasing the Xe content.

  10. The evaluation of right ventricular performance using krypton-81m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, H.R.; Piepsz, A.; Vandevivere, J.; Guillaume, M.; Goethals, P.; Lenaers, A.

    1983-01-01

    The availability of krypton-81m suitable for intravenous injection provides an easy means for assessing right ventricular function. The superimposition of the other heart chambers does not constitute a problem. The activity in the left heart is negligible and the study can be performed in the right anterior oblique position to obtain optimal separation between the right atrium and the right ventricle. Lung activity is quite high and should be corrected before computing the right ventricular ejection fraction. This correction can be accomplished by performing Tc-99m MAA perfusion scintigraphy. The measurement of the right ventricular ejection fraction appears to be reproducible with very small inter-and intraobserver variability. Good quality phase and amplitude images can be obtained with such high count rates

  11. Ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer for evaluating krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Y.; Sekiya, H.; Ito, C.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasensitive resonance ionization mass spectrometer that can be applied to evaluate krypton (Kr) contamination in xenon (Xe) dark matter detectors has been developed for measuring Kr at the parts-per-trillion (ppt) or sub-ppt level in Xe. The gas sample is introduced without any condensation into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer through a pulsed supersonic valve. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 212.6 nm, 84 Kr atoms in the sample are resonantly ionized along with other Kr isotopes. 84 Kr ions are then mass separated and detected by the mass spectrometer in order to measure the Kr impurity concentration. With our current setup, approximately 0.4 ppt of Kr impurities contained in pure argon (Ar) gas are detectable with a measurement time of 1000 s. Although Kr detection sensitivity in Xe is expected to be approximately half of that in Ar, our spectrometer can evaluate Kr contamination in Xe to the sub-ppt level

  12. Radiometric titration of officinal radiopharmaceuticals using radioactive kryptonates as end-point indicators. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harangozo, M.; Jombik, J.; Schiller, P.; Toelgyessy, J.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the determination of citric, tartaric and undecylenic acids based on radiometric titration with 0.1 or 0.05 mole.l -1 NaOH was developed. As an indicator of the end point, radioactive kryptonate of glass was used. Experimental technique, results of determinations as well as other possible applications of the radioactive kryptonate of glass for end point determination in alkalimetric analyses of officinal pharmaceuticals are discussed. (author)

  13. Dynamic ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppenheim, I.F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Dynamic Ion Implantation Technique consists of ion implantation of a film during the film-deposition process. This technique was investigated theoretically and experimentally with ions whose incident energy is of the order of a few times 100 keV. It was found to be a viable alternative low-temperature method for the preparation of thick zirconium nitride films (∼1 μm) with good mechanical properties. Theoretical modeling of the processes involved during dynamic ion implantation lead to analytical expressions for the ions' depth-profile distributions. Numerical evaluations of these equations indicated that the depth distributions of dynamically implanted ions are in general more uniform than those predicted by the model for ions implanted by more conventional techniques. Mechanical properties of stoichiometric RF sputter-deposited zirconium nitride films post implanted with krypton and rubidium ions were investigated. Scratch-adhesion critical load and Vickers microhardness of samples implanted with doses varying from 1 x 10 15 to 5 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 and energies ranging from 300 to 500 keV were studied. In general, best mechanical properties were observed for 300- keV krypton implantations

  14. Mode Locking of Quantum Cascade Lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Capasso, Federico; Kaertner, Franz X

    2007-01-01

    .... A wide variety of experimental data on multimode regimes is presented. Lasers with narrow active region and/or with metal coating on the sides tend to develop a splitting in the spectrum, approximately equal to twice the Rabi frequency...

  15. Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick R. Soelberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of volatile radionuclides generated during used nuclear fuel reprocessing in the US is almost certain to be necessary for the licensing of a reprocessing facility in the US. Various control technologies have been developed, tested, or used over the past 50 years for control of volatile radionuclide emissions from used fuel reprocessing plants. The US DOE has sponsored, since 2009, an Off-gas Sigma Team to perform research and development focused on the most pressing volatile radionuclide control and immobilization problems. In this paper, we focus on the control requirements and methodologies for 85Kr and 129I. Numerous candidate technologies have been studied and developed at laboratory and pilot-plant scales in an effort to meet the need for high iodine control efficiency and to advance alternatives to cryogenic separations for krypton control. Several of these show promising results. Iodine decontamination factors as high as 105, iodine loading capacities, and other adsorption parameters including adsorption rates have been demonstrated under some conditions for both silver zeolite (AgZ and Ag-functionalized aerogel. Sorbents, including an engineered form of AgZ and selected metal organic framework materials (MOFs, have been successfully demonstrated to capture Kr and Xe without the need for separations at cryogenic temperatures.

  16. Noble Liquid (Xenon or Krypton) Totally Active Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Main Goals\\\\ \\\\ Determine ionization and scintillation yields in liquid Xenon (LXe) or Krypton.\\\\ \\\\ Determine the electron lifetime and photon mean free path in LXe or LKr. \\\\ \\\\ Determine energy resolution of LXe or LKr via ionization or scintillation.\\\\ \\\\ Determine correlation of fluctuations between ionization and scintillation. Summary of Results \\\\ \\\\ -~measured the electron lifetime in LXe, ($\\tau$~$>$~400 $\\mu$s).\\\\ \\\\ -~measured the energy to create an ionization electron in LXe, W=9.8 eV.\\\\ \\\\ -~measured the energy to create a LXe scintillation photon, W$ _{s} $~=~14.2~eV. \\\\ \\\\ -~measured the anticorrelation of scintillation and ionization yields. \\\\ \\\\ -~measured the energy resolution in LXe via ionization, $ sigma _{E} / $E=0.07\\%/$\\sqrt$E(GeV). \\\\ \\\\ -~measured resolution in LXe via scintillation $ sigma _{E} / $E=0.24\\%/$\\sqrt$E(GeV)+0.26\\%. \\\\ \\\\ -~measured electron drift velocity in LXe:~neat (2.5 mm/$\\mu$s), doped (4.4~mm/$\\mu$s). \\\\ \\\\ -~measured the photon mean free path in LXe vs $ lambd...

  17. First Detection of Krypton and Xenon in a White Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Ringat, Ellen; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the first detection of the noble gases krypton (Z = 36) and xenon (54) in a white dwarf. About 20 KrVI-VII and Xe VI-VII lines were discovered in the ultraviolet spectrum of the hot DO-type white dwarf RE 0503-289. The observations, performed with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, also reveal highly ionized photospheric lines from other trans-iron group elements, namely Ga (31), Ge (32), As (33), Se (34), Mo (42), Sn (50), Te (52), and I (53), from which gallium and molybdenum are new discoveries in white dwarfs, too. For Kr and Xe, we performed an NLTE analysis and derived mass fractions of log Kr = -4.3 plus or minus 0.5 and log Xe = -4.2 plus or minus 0.6, corresponding to an enrichment by factors of 450 and 3800, respectively, relative to the Sun. The origin of the large overabundances is unclear. We discuss the roles of neutron-capture nucleosynthesis in the-precursor star and radiation-driven diffusion. It is possible that diffusion is insignificant and thaI the observed metal abundances constrain the evolutionary history of the star. Its hydrogen deficiency may be the consequence of a late helium-shell nash or a binary white dwarf merger.

  18. Shock Compression of Cryogenic Noble Gas Mixtures: Xenon - Krypton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth; Magyar, Rudolph; Lemke, Raymond; Mattsson, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    In past work, we have examined the multi-Mbar response of cryogenically cooled liquid xenon and liquid krypton measuring their Hugoniots to 8 Mbar. These results were utilized in the development of new EOS models for Xe and Kr to use in high energy density physics applications. The previous work demonstrated the usefulness of integrating high accuracy shock compression experiments with DFT to generate the basis for equation of state (EOS) models. In many physics applications, such as Z-pinch experiments, gas mixtures are used instead. However, we do not have reliable experimental data on these mixtures to provide informed decisions about the EOS models or mixture rules. To improve our understanding of mixtures at extreme conditions, we performed dynamic compression experiments using Sandia's Z - facility on a 70/30 molar ratio Kr/Xe cryogenically cooled liquid mixture. We measured the Hugoniot state and reshock state of the liquid mixture to several Mbar. The experimental data validated the DFT simulations for identical molar ratio mixtures. The combined experimental and DFT results are used to assess the EOS models and test the mixture rules. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Securities Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Neutron production with mixture of deuterium and krypton in Sahand Filippov type plasma focus facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, M.A.; Sobhanian, S.; Rawat, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    This Letter reports the order of magnitude enhancement in neutron yield from Sahand plasma focus device with krypton seeded deuterium operation. The highest average neutron yield of 2.2x10 9 neutrons per shot was achieved at 1.00 Torr deuterium with 3% krypton which is higher than the best average neutron yield of 3.18x10 8 neutrons per shot for pure deuterium operation. Estimation of average neutron energy showed that the maximum and minimum average energies are 2.98±0.6 MeV at 16 kV in 0.25 Torr deuterium with 3% Kr and 2.07±0.2 MeV at 18 kV operation in 0.5 Torr deuterium with 3% Kr, respectively. The anisotropy of neutron emission from Sahand DPF showed that the neutrons are produced mainly by beam-target mechanisms. -- Highlights: → The highest average neutron yield of 2.2x10 9 neutrons per shot was achieved at mixture of deuterium and krypton. → In the krypton seeding of deuterium also anisotropy of neutron emission deuterium is found. → The krypton seeding of deuterium made the neutron emission more reliable over wider operating pressure ranges.

  20. Krypton separation from ambient air for application in collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tarek; Strohaber, James; Nava, Ricardo; Kolomenskii, Alexandre; Thonnard, Norbert; Schuessler, Hans A

    2012-07-01

    A portable apparatus for the separation of krypton from environmental air samples was tested. The apparatus is based on the cryogenic trapping of gases at liquid nitrogen temperature followed by controlled releases at higher temperatures. The setup consists of a liquid nitrogen trap for the removal of H(2)O and CO(2), followed by charcoal-filled coils that sequentially collect and release krypton and other gases providing four stages of gas chromatography to achieve separation and purification of krypton from mainly N(2), O(2), and Ar. Residual reactive gases remaining after the final stage of chromatography are removed with a hot Ti sponge getter. A thermal conductivity detector is used to monitor the characteristic elution times of the various components of condensed gases in the traps during step-wise warming of the traps from liquid nitrogen temperatures to 0 °C, and then to 100 °C. This allows optimizing the switching times of the valves between the stages of gas chromatography so that mainly krypton is selected and loaded to the next stage while exhausting the other gases using a He carrier. A krypton separation efficiency of ~80 % was determined using a quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  1. Answers to questions about removing krypton from the Three Mile Island, Unit 2 reactor building. Public information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    This document presents answers to frequently asked questions about the probable effects of controlled releases of the krypton presently contained within the reactor building of Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Also answered are questions about alternative means for removing the krypton

  2. Bonding xenon and krypton on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbrowski Ludwik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present density functional theory (DFT calculation results of krypton and xenon atoms interaction on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal. A pseudo-potential approach in the generalised gradient approximation (GGA was applied using the ABINIT program package. To compute the unit cell parameters, the 25 atom super-cell was chosen. It has been revealed that close to the surface of a potential well is formed for xenon and krypton atom due to its interaction with the atoms of oxygen and uranium. Depth and shape of the well is the subject of ab initio calculations in adiabatic approximation. The calculations were performed both for the case of oxygenic and metallic surfaces. It has been shown that the potential well for the oxygenic surface is deeper than for the metallic surface. The thermal stability of immobilising the atoms of krypton and xenon in the potential wells were evaluated. The results are shown in graphs.

  3. Gain characteristics of a 100 μm thick GEM in Krypton-CO2 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, R. C.; Natal da Luz, H.; Carramate, L. F. N. D.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Mir, J. A.; Amaro, F. D.

    2017-12-01

    The operation of a Micropattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD) comprising a cascade of two non-standard Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) made from a 100 μm kapton foil was evaluated in pure krypton and in krypton-CO2 mixtures. The final avalanche charge was collected in a 2D strip readout, providing an active area of 10×10 cm2 for the entire detection system. For each mixture, the effective gain and energy resolution were measured as a function of the electric field in the drift, transfer and induction regions. Using X-rays from a 55Fe radioactive source (5.9 keV), gains close to 104 and energy resolution of 22% (FWHM) were achieved in pure krypton under stable conditions, showing the potential of the experimental setup for the following imaging studies.

  4. Numerical simulations of gas mixing effect in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mironov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions code nam-ecris is used to simulate the electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS plasma sustained in a mixture of Kr with O_{2}, N_{2}, Ar, Ne, and He. The model assumes that ions are electrostatically confined in the ECR zone by a dip in the plasma potential. A gain in the extracted krypton ion currents is seen for the highest charge states; the gain is maximized when oxygen is used as a mixing gas. The special feature of oxygen is that most of the singly charged oxygen ions are produced after the dissociative ionization of oxygen molecules with a large kinetic energy release of around 5 eV per ion. The increased loss rate of energetic lowly charged ions of the mixing element requires a building up of the retarding potential barrier close to the ECR surface to equilibrate electron and ion losses out of the plasma. In the mixed plasmas, the barrier value is large (∼1  V compared to pure Kr plasma (∼0.01  V, with longer confinement times of krypton ions and with much higher ion temperatures. The temperature of the krypton ions is increased because of extra heating by the energetic oxygen ions and a longer time of ion confinement. In calculations, a drop of the highly charged ion currents of lighter elements is observed when adding small fluxes of krypton into the source. This drop is caused by the accumulation of the krypton ions inside plasma, which decreases the electron and ion confinement times.

  5. Numerical simulations of gas mixing effect in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, V.; Bogomolov, S.; Bondarchenko, A.; Efremov, A.; Loginov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions code nam-ecris is used to simulate the electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma sustained in a mixture of Kr with O2 , N2 , Ar, Ne, and He. The model assumes that ions are electrostatically confined in the ECR zone by a dip in the plasma potential. A gain in the extracted krypton ion currents is seen for the highest charge states; the gain is maximized when oxygen is used as a mixing gas. The special feature of oxygen is that most of the singly charged oxygen ions are produced after the dissociative ionization of oxygen molecules with a large kinetic energy release of around 5 eV per ion. The increased loss rate of energetic lowly charged ions of the mixing element requires a building up of the retarding potential barrier close to the ECR surface to equilibrate electron and ion losses out of the plasma. In the mixed plasmas, the barrier value is large (˜1 V ) compared to pure Kr plasma (˜0.01 V ), with longer confinement times of krypton ions and with much higher ion temperatures. The temperature of the krypton ions is increased because of extra heating by the energetic oxygen ions and a longer time of ion confinement. In calculations, a drop of the highly charged ion currents of lighter elements is observed when adding small fluxes of krypton into the source. This drop is caused by the accumulation of the krypton ions inside plasma, which decreases the electron and ion confinement times.

  6. In Situ Measurement of Atmospheric Krypton and Xenon on Mars with Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, P. G.; Malespin, C. A.; Franz, H. B.; Pepin, R. O.; Trainer, M. G.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Atreya, S. K.; Freissinet, C.; Jones, J. H.; Manning, H.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratorys Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation has measured all of the stable isotopes of the heavy noble gases krypton and xenon in the martian atmosphere, in situ, from the Curiosity Rover at Gale Crater, Mars. Previous knowledge of martian atmospheric krypton and xenon isotope ratios has been based upon a combination of the Viking missions krypton and xenon detections and measurements of noble gas isotope ratios in martian meteorites. However, the meteorite measurements reveal an impure mixture of atmospheric, mantle, and spallation contributions. The xenon and krypton isotopic measurements reported here include the complete set of stable isotopes, unmeasured by Viking. The new results generally agree with Mars meteorite measurements but also provide a unique opportunity to identify various non-atmospheric heavy noble gas components in the meteorites. Kr isotopic measurements define a solar-like atmospheric composition, but deviating from the solar wind pattern at 80Kr and 82Kr in a manner consistent with contributions originating from neutron capture in Br. The Xe measurements suggest an intriguing possibility that isotopes lighter than 132Xe have been enriched to varying degrees by spallation and neutron capture products degassed to the atmosphere from the regolith, and a model is constructed to explore this possibility. Such a spallation component, however, is not apparent in atmospheric Xe trapped in the glassy phases of martian meteorites.

  7. Environmental consequences of atmosphereic krypton-85. Final report, January 1, 1977-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Krypton-85 is a radioactive inert gas produced during normal operations of the nuclear fuel cycle. The quantities of krypton-85, that will be produced in the next century, are sufficient, if released, to alter the electrical state of the atmosphere. The principal hypothesis is that an anthropogenic alteration of the electric state of the atmosphere could alter other meterological phenomena and lead to significant environmental impacts. The goal of this project was to explore some areas of basic science related to the evaluation of that hypothesis. The approach was primarily theoretical. The following topics were addressed: a first approximation model to estimate the effects of krypton-85 on the electrical state of the atmosphere; an analysis of the pathways between krypton-85 production and the atmosphere; an analytical model for fair weather atmospheric electricity; and a dipole model for atmospheric electricity. The results will provide a framework on which detailed models can be built. The results should provide better understanding of some topics in atmospheric electricity

  8. Effects of control technology on the projected krypton-85 environmental inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, E.E.

    1973-01-01

    Growth projections for the USA nuclear power industry may be used to make projections of future radioactive material inventories available for potential release to the environment. Since krypton-85 is produced in reactors, the potential routes of release to the environment are at the reactors or the fuel reprocessing plants. The present generation of reactors and fuel reprocessing plants do not use any systems to limit the release of krypton-85 into the biosphere. Clean-up systems are currently being designed and could be introduced when necessary. The cumulative inventory of krypton-85 in the environment is dependent upon the time of introduction of these clean-up systems and their efficiencies, in addition to the total quantity produced. Annual and cumulative inventories of krypton-85 are projected to increase dramatically over the next 50 years. If controls are assumed to be initiated at various years, a series of graphs of different cumulative environmental inventories and the associated doses and health effects are drawn. Varying the year of introduction and the efficiency of these systems allows one to speculate as to the optimum time for control implementation

  9. Purification of krypton-xenon mixture from fluorine-containing gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamov, V. S.; Yatkin, V. A.

    2007-06-01

    Active alumina was used to purify krypton-xenon mixtures from fluorine-containing gases (tetrafluoromethane and sulfur hexafluoride). At 580°C, the admixtures are converted into aluminum trifluoride, with their content in the test gas mixture reducing from hundreds of ppm to 0.1 ppm or even below.

  10. Nuclear reactions and application to production rates of krypton in extraterrestrial materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavielle, B.

    1982-01-01

    Noble gases have been largely outgassed from most solar system materials through several heating processes. Consequently, their cosmogenic component, produced by cosmic-ray-induced nuclear reactions near the surface of atmosphere-free planetary objects, is detectable in meteorites and lunar samples. This work deals with the production of cosmogenic Krypton in the four main targets Zr, Y, Sr and Rb. Excitation functions of Krypton isotopes with A = 78, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85 and 86 were mass-spectrometrically measured in Y and Zr targets bombarded with 0.059, 0.075, 0.168, 0.200, 1.0, 2.5 and 24 GeV protons. Also the Krypton relative cross sections were measured in Sr at 0.168 GeV. The results, combined with a general survey of nuclear reactions in Ga to Nb targets, permitted the development of new systematics in order to estimate unknown cross-sections in Rb and Sr. Measured and estimated excitation functions allowed to calculate the concentrations and isotopic ratios of cosmogenic Krypton in same well-documented lunar samples. Compared to observed values in 9 rocks, 83 Kr is predicted with a precision better than 33% and the production ratios sup(i)Kr/ 83 Kr are predicted to better than 25%. Also it is concluded that the cosmogenic ratios 86 Kr/ 83 Kr and 81 Kr/ 83 Kr are dependent on the main target elements concentrations [fr

  11. Development of the Krypton Absorption in Liquid CO2 (KALC) process: mass transfer efficiencies of packed columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments to determine the mass transfer efficiencies of the packed columns making up the Krypton Absorption in Liquid CO 2 (KALC) process were performed at a nominal pressure of 2 MPa over a wide range of flow rates and flow ratios for the CO 2 --O 2 --Kr system. The height of the transfer unit values, which were relatively independent of gas or liquid flow rates, were 0.13 m for krypton in the absorber, 0.16 m for O 2 in the fractionator, and 0.21 m for krypton in the stripper

  12. Simulations of Atmospheric Krypton-85 to Assess the Detectability of Clandestine Nuclear Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, O.; Ahlswede, J.; Annewandter, R.; Kalinowski, M.B.; Rast, S.; Schluenzen, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    The results of this study were achieved in the project 'Simulation of Atmospheric Noble Gas Concentrations to Assess Sampling Procedures for the Detection of Clandestine Nuclear Reprocessing' (IAEA GER 1643) in the joint programme of IAEA and Federal Government of Germany. In the first year of the project the detectability of additional krypton-85 sources was investigated using atmospheric transport modelling. Krypton-85 is released into the air during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel rods. Therefore the krypton-85 signature can possibly be used for the detection of undeclared plutonium separation. First, the global krypton-85 background produced by known reprocessing facilities from 1971 until 2006 was simulated with the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 using annual emission data. The model results were evaluated by extensive comparison with measurements performed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection. Of particular interest for an assessment of the detectability of unknown sources is the background variability. The variability of concentrations is very high over central Europe, where the large reprocessing plants La Hague and Sellafield are located, and it is very low on the Southern Hemisphere, where no nuclear reprocessing takes place. The analysis of concentration time series on various time scales allows partly a distinction between fluctuations caused by the variability of the sources from variations due to atmospheric dynamics. Furthermore the detection sensitivity to a set of arbitrarily specified source locations is analysed with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model. This, in combination with the location specific background variability, is giving first benchmarks on the capability of using krypton-85 for IAEA Safeguards based on the Additional Protocols foreseeing environmental sampling. (author)

  13. Radiometric titration of officinal radiopharmaceuticals using radioactive kryptonates as end-point indicators. II. Citric, tartaric, undecylenic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harangozo, M.; Jombik, J.; Schiller, P. (Komenskeho Univ., Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Farmaceuticka Fakulta); Toelgyessy, J. (Slovenska Vysoka Skola Technicka, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Chemickotechnologicka Fakulta)

    1981-01-01

    A method for the determination of citric, tartaric and undecylenic acids based on radiometric titration with 0.1 or 0.05 mole.l/sup -1/ NaOH was developed. As an indicator of the end point, radioactive kryptonate of glass was used. Experimental technique, results of determinations as well as other possible applications of the radioactive kryptonate of glass for end point determination in alkalimetric analyses of officinal pharmaceuticals are discussed.

  14. ions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (MP2 B2). In order to draw the final conclusion about the content of the isomers of pentaatomic ions in saturated vapor over cesium chloride, we have taken into account the entropy factor. We considered the isomerization reactions which are given below: Cs3Cl2. + (V-shaped) = Cs3Cl2. + (cyclic or bipyramidal). (1). Cs2Cl3.

  15. Comparison of krypton and argon laser photocoagulation. Results of stimulated clinical treatment of primate retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiddy, W E; Fine, S L; Quigley, H A; Hohman, R M; Addicks, E A

    1984-07-01

    We compared the clinical and histological effects of argon blue-green laser (ABGL), argon green laser (AGL), and krypton red laser (KRL) photocoagulation on the primate retina. Burns were produced in juxtafoveal and papillomacular bundle and in nonmacular areas in a manner simulating treatment of a choroidal neovascular membrane (NVM). In the juxtafoveal and papillomacular bundle areas, ABGL photocoagulation caused extensive inner retinal damage while KRL photocoagulation spared inner retinal structures. The effects of AGL photocoagulation in the fovea were intermediate in extent between KRL and ABGL photocoagulation. Axonal transport studies also showed differential effects of these wavelengths on retinal ganglion cell function. Nonmacular effects were similar for all three modalities. These results suggest that the krypton red wavelength may be more suitable than the argon green or argon blue-green wavelengths in treating choroidal NVMs near the fovea.

  16. Experimental studies on the krypton absorption in liquid CO2 (KALC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.W.; Beaujean, H.W.R.; Fowler, V.L.; Gilliam, T.M.; Inman, D.J.; Levins, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for a series of experiments to quantify krypton removal from simulated High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor reprocessing off-gas by the KALC process. The Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas Decontamination Facility used in the campaign provides engineering-scale experiments with nominal gas and liquid flows of 5 scfm and 0.5 gpm respectively. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium mass transfer experiments for the CO 2 --O 2 --Kr system are described. Data analysis indicates values of HTU for krypton on the order of 0.5 ft for decontamination factors from 100 to 10,000. Recent flooding information for the packed columns is combined with previous data and is shown to be well represented by an empirical flooding equation

  17. Steady state operation of the first cryogenic column in a krypton separation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Ammon, R.; Bumiller, W.; Hutter, E.; Neffe, G.

    1981-01-01

    Recent results obtained during the operation of the inactive test unit KRETA for the cryogenic separation of krypton from simulated reprocessing off-gases are presented. The first rectification column of this unit was modified by shortening its lower part from 18 to 8 practical plates and placing the feed point into the warmer, krypton-rich section. Two essential results were thus achieved: plugging by desubliming xenon was not observed even at xenon feed concentrations as high as 1 vol.-%; and, accumulation of oxygen was much lower than in the column version used previously, thus reducing the potential hazard by ozone formation drastically. The accumulation of methane, however, was found to be high, in agreement with calculations

  18. Performance of an electromagnetic liquid krypton calorimeter based on a ribbon electrode tower structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, G. D.; Bruschini, C.; Bocquet, C.; Buchholz, P.; Cundy, D.; Doble, N.; Funk, W.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Hallgren, B.; Kesseler, G.; Lacourt, A.; Laverrière, G.; Linser, G.; Martini, M.; Norton, A.; Schinzel, D.; Seidl, W.; Sozzi, M. S.; Taureg, H.; Vossnack, O.; Wahl, H.; Wertelaers, P.; Weterings, J.; Ziolkowski, M.; Kalinin, A.; Kekelidze, V.; Kozhevnikov, Yu.; Bertolotto, L.; Carassiti, V.; Duclos, J.; Gianoli, A.; Frabetti, P. L.; Savriè, M.; Zeitnitz, O.; Calvetti, M.; Lubrano, P.; Pepe, M.; Calafiura, P.; Cerri, C.; Costantini, F.; Fantechi, R.; Gorini, B.; Mannelli, I.; Marzulli, V.; Bédérède, D.; Debu, P.; Givernaud, A.; Gosset, L.; Heitzmann, J.; Mazzucato, E.; Peyaud, B.; Turlay, R.; Biino, C.; Ceccucci, A.; Maas, P.; Palestini, S.; Cagliari-Cambridge-CERN-Dubna-Edinburgh-Ferrara-Mainz-Orsay-Perugia-Pisa-Saclay-Siegen-Torino-Vienna Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The NA48 collaboration is preparing a new experiment at CERN aiming to study CP violation in the K 0- overlineK 0 system with an accuracy of 2 × 10 -4 in the parameter Re(ɛ'/ɛ). Decays in two π0's will be recorded by a quasi-homogeneous liquid krypton calorimeter. A liquid krypton calorimeter has been chosen to combine good energy, position and time resolution with precise charge calibration and long-term stability. The prototype calorimeter incorporating the final design of the electrode read-out structure is presented in this paper. An energy resolution of {≃3.5%}/{√E} with a constant term smaller than 0.5% has been obtained. The time resolution was found to be better than 300 ps above 15 GeV.

  19. Demonstrate the removal efficiency and capacity of MOF materials for krypton recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thallapally, Praveen K.; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.

    2013-08-23

    Metal organic framework materials (MOFs) were developed and tested in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle Technology Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal of xenon (Xe) and krypton (Kr) from gaseous products of nuclear fuel reprocessing unit operations. Two metal organic framework structures were investigated in greater detail to demonstrate the removal efficiency and capacity of MOF materials for krypton recovery. Our two bed breakthrough measurements on NiDOBDC and FMOFCu indicate these materials can capture and separate parts per million levels of Xe and Kr from air. The removal efficiency and adsorption capacity for Kr on these two MOFs were further increased upon removal of Xe upfront.

  20. Removing krypton from xenon by cryogenic distillation to the ppq level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arneodo, F.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berger, T.; Breur, P. A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Calvén, J.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Di Gangi, P.; Di Giovanni, A.; Diglio, S.; Duchovni, E.; Eurin, G.; Fei, J.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Fulgione, W.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Galloway, M.; Gao, F.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Grandi, L.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Hasterok, C.; Hogenbirk, E.; Huhmann, C.; Itay, R.; Kaminsky, B.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Calloch, M. Le; Lin, Q.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Manfredini, A.; Maris, I.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Masson, D.; Mayani, D.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Ni, K.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Piro, M.-C.; Pizzella, V.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; Saldanha, R.; Santos, J. M. F. dos; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Shockley, E.; Silva, M.; Simgen, H.; Sivers, M. v.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; Upole, N.; Wang, H.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wulf, J.; Ye, J.; Zhang, Y.; Cristescu, I.

    2017-05-01

    The XENON1T experiment aims for the direct detection of dark matter in a detector filled with 3.3 tons of liquid xenon. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity, the background induced by radioactive decays inside the detector has to be sufficiently low. One major contributor is the β -emitter ^{85}Kr which is present in the xenon. For XENON1T a concentration of natural krypton in xenon ^{nat}Kr/Xe McCabe-Thiele approach is described. The system demonstrated a krypton reduction factor of 6.4\\cdot 10^5 with thermodynamic stability at process speeds above 3 kg/h. The resulting concentration of ^{nat}Kr/Xe<26 ppq is the lowest ever achieved, almost one order of magnitude below the requirements for XENON1T and even sufficient for future dark matter experiments using liquid xenon, such as XENONnT and DARWIN.

  1. Experimental development and design aspects of a 85krypton removal distillation unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, G.E.R.; Geens, L.P.M.; Vaesen, P.J.; Goossens, W.R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Cryogenic distillation as a method for the removal of krypton from gaseous effluents of reprocessing plants has been studied with non active gases at the pilot scale of up to 0.010 kg.s -1 through-put (30 STP m 3 .h -1 ), in a packed bed configuration. Pressure and temperature of the feed, reflux rate, heating power of the kettle of the column are the most important parameters which have been studied in order to avoid crystallization of xenon in the precoolers as well as formation of solid phase xenon-nitrogen mixtures in the column. The use of a simple thermal regulation system, based on the narrow separation front of two components, made it possible to fulfil the mass- and heat-balances in order to condense variable quantities of noble gases, representing a mean accumulation to feed mass ratio of down to 0.01%. The unit has continuously worked troubleless during more than 13,000 hours with an average availability factor of 99.70%. During this long campaign supply of cooling nitrogen appeared to be the most critical part of the unit. Indeed, during 0.20% of the time the unit had to be worked batchwise for its maintenance. It appears that nitrogen containing up to 1% argon, 10 to 2000 ppM krypton and up to 8000 ppM xenon can be continuously treated by distillation acquiring large krypton decontamination factors without any problems due to the high xenon concentration and without accumulation of other compounds than xenon and krypton in the kettle of the column

  2. [Treatment of macular choroidal neovascular membrane with krypton red laser photocoagulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X Q

    1989-03-01

    Ten (10) cases of macular choroidal neovascular membrane were treated successfully with krypton red laser (KRL) photocoagulation. The patients were followed up 3-15 months with no recurrence. Choroidal neovascular membranes outside the foveal region carried good visual prognosis, while poor visual outcome accompanied foveal involvement. The authors were encouraged by the efficacy of KRL photocoagulation in the treatment of macular choroidal neovascular membranes. Complications were few; however, the laser parameters, especially the output power, were key points to success.

  3. Study on the possibility of sea-disposal of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalen, A. van; Vons, L.H.; Verkerk, B.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a feasibility study, performed under a contract with the Commission of the European Communities, regarding technical and radiological aspects of sea-disposal of all krypton-85 retained in a large fuel reprocessing facility, are presented. The design of a double-walled, essentially spherical container is described that provides both double containment of the compressed gas and permanent 'disposable' radiation shielding. Three sizes have been studied, i.e. with internal volumes of 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 m 3 , each designed to hold 0.1 m 3 (STP) of krypton, and each containing approximately 400 TBq of 85 Kr per 0.001 m 3 sphere volume. This results in an internal heat production of 17.5 kW/m 3 . Calculations of temperatures and stresses that would result from the conditions of the required fire test for B(U) transport packages showed that the design would allow the containers to pass this test. Radiological consequences have been considered for disposal of petabecquerel amounts of 85 Kr as a function of undamaged container lifetime on the sea bed. Finally, an indication is given of the necessary amendments to the London Convention in order to allow sea-disposal of these large amounts of radioactive krypton. (author)

  4. Charge States of Krypton and Xenon in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsler, Peter; Fludra, Andrzej; Giunta, Alessandra

    2017-09-01

    We calculate charge state distributions of Kr and Xe in a model for two different types of solar wind using the effective ionization and recombination rates provided from the OPEN_ADAS data base. The charge states of heavy elements in the solar wind are essential for estimating the efficiency of Coulomb drag in the inner corona. We find that xenon ions experience particularly low Coulomb drag from protons in the inner corona, comparable to the notoriously weak drag of protons on helium ions. It has been found long ago that helium in the solar wind can be strongly depleted near interplanetary current sheets, whereas coronal mass ejecta are sometimes strongly enriched in helium. We argue that if the extraordinary variability of the helium abundance in the solar wind is due to inefficient Coulomb drag, the xenon abundance must vary strongly. In fact, a secular decrease of the solar wind xenon abundance relative to the other heavier noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr) has been postulated based on a comparison of noble gases in recently irradiated and ancient samples of ilmenite in the lunar regolith. We conclude that decreasing solar activity and decreasing frequency of coronal mass ejections over the solar lifetime might be responsible for a secularly decreasing abundance of xenon in the solar wind.

  5. Krypton irradiation damage in Nd-doped zirconolite and perovskite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoisne, C. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); LRCS, CNRS-UMR 6007, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens (France); Stennett, M.C.; Hyatt, N.C. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Peng, N.; Jeynes, C. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Lee, W.E., E-mail: w.e.lee@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-01

    Understanding the effect of radiation damage and noble gas accommodation in potential ceramic hosts for plutonium disposition is necessary to evaluate their long-term behaviour during geological disposal. Polycrystalline samples of Nd-doped zirconolite and Nd-doped perovskite were irradiated ex situ with 2 MeV Kr{sup +} at a dose of 5 x 10{sup 15} ions cm{sup -2} to simulate recoil of Pu nuclei during alpha decay. The feasibility of thin section preparation of both pristine and irradiated samples by Focused Ion Beam sectioning was demonstrated. After irradiation, the Nd-doped zirconolite revealed a well defined amorphous region separated from the pristine material by a thin (40-60 nm) damaged interface. The zirconolite lattice was lost in the damaged interface, but the fluorite sublattice was retained. The Nd-doped perovskite contained a defined irradiated layer composed of an amorphous region surrounded by damaged but still crystalline layers. The structural evolution of the damaged regions is consistent with a change from orthorhombic to cubic symmetry. In addition in Nd-doped perovskite, the amorphisation dose depended on crystallographic orientation and possibly sample configuration (thin section or bulk). Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy revealed Ti remained in the 4+ oxidation state but there was a change in Ti coordination in both Nd-doped perovskite and Nd-doped zirconolite associated with the crystalline to amorphous transition.

  6. Comparison of Medium Power Hall Effect Thruster Ion Acceleration for Krypton and Xenon Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    thrusters. It is a lower cost replacement for xenon, may optimize to similar or potentially higher performance, and is enabling for very large solar ...lower cost replacement for xenon, may optimize to similar or potentially higher performance, and is enabling for very large solar electric transfer...ERC, Inc, Edwards AFB, CA, USA. fractional distillation of atmospheric gases for use pri- marily by the steel industry. Due to the low concentra- tion

  7. Krypton and helium irradiation damage in neodymium-zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, M., E-mail: m.gilbert@imperial.ac.uk [Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Davoisne, C. [Laboratoire de Reactivite et Chimie des Solides, CNRS-UMR 6007, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039 Amiens (France); Stennett, M.; Hyatt, N. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Peng, N.; Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, Nodus Laboratory, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH Surrey (United Kingdom); Lee, W.E. [Centre for Advanced Structural Ceramics, Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-01

    A leading candidate for the immobilisation of actinides, zirconolite's suitability as a potential ceramic host for plutonium disposition, both in storage and geological disposal, has been the subject of much research. One key aim of this study is to understand the effects of radiation damage and noble gas accommodation within the zirconolite material. To this end, a series of ex situ irradiations have been performed on polycrystalline (Ca{sub 0.8}Nd{sub 0.2})Zr(Ti{sub 1.8}Al{sub 0.2})O{sub 7} zirconolite samples. Zirconolite samples, doped with Nd{sup 3+} (as a Pu surrogate) on the Ca-site and charge-balanced by substituting Al{sup 3+} onto the Ti-site, were irradiated with {sup 36}Kr{sup +} (2 MeV) ions at fluences of 1 x 10{sup 14} and 5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} and {sup 4}He{sup +} (200 keV) ions at fluences of 1 x 10{sup 14}, 5 x 10{sup 15} and 1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to simulate the impact of alpha decay on the microstructure. Microstructural analysis revealed no damage present at the lower Kr{sup +} fluence, but that the higher {sup 36}Kr{sup +} fluence rendered the zirconolite completely amorphous. Similarly, evidence of helium accumulation was only seen at the highest {sup 4}He{sup +} fluence (1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}). Monte Carlo simulations using the TRIM code predict the highest concentration of helium accumulating at a depth of 720 nm, in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. A review of the separation and immobilisation of krypton arising from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The techniques for the separation and immobilisation of 85 Kr are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to processes currently available or undergoing development on the technical to industrial scale. Of the separation processes, cryogenic distillation has reached the most advanced stage of development, with a pilot facility already undergoing radioactive demonstration. The PNC Kr-recovery pilot plant, which has a off-gas flow capacity of 110 m 3 hr -1 (approximately 1/4 the scale of THORP), is currently undergoing tests at Tokai Mura. Low-temperature absorption and adsorption processes have also reached the pilot plant stage but have yet to undergo radiological tests. The separated krypton has been conventionally stored as the compressed gas in cylinders, but progress made in encapsulation techniques suggest that more secure immobilisation can be achieved by encapsulation within a metal or zeolite matrix. Processes based on the implantation of krypton in a metal or metal alloy have been demonstrated on the technical scale with the radioactive gas. It is concluded that the technology for the separation, isolation and immobilisation of radioactive krypton is available only on a reduced scale compared with THORP. The investment cost of a 85 Kr management facility for THORP, based on cryogenic distillation followed by immobilisation by implantation in metal and assuming a 20 year plant life, is estimated at 51-57M pounds. The cost of prepurification of the off-gas stream is included in this figure. Accompanying operating costs, including those incurred by disposal of the encapsulate in geological formations, are estimated at 2.2-3.3 M pounds per annum. Further development work under radioactive conditions is still required prior to the application of existing technology to full-scale fuel reprocessing plant. (author)

  9. Method of determining paper-deposited materials, eg. lead, by their reaction with radioactive krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.; Pruzinec, J.

    1976-01-01

    The invention claims a method of determining substances on a paper carrier based on the substance reaction with 85 Kr gas and the measurement of radioactivity of the kryptonate formed. Lead is shown as an example. Different amounts of lead acetate were deposited on Whatman 2 chromatographic paper as was an unknown sample of Pb salt. The paper was exposed to a 2.5 mCi 85 Kr atmosphere for 48 hours. The activity of the individual spots was then measured, a calibration curve established and the amount of lead in the analyzed sample read-out. (Ha)

  10. Kratom alkaloids and O-desmethyltramadol in urine of a "Krypton" herbal mixture consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Torsten; Claussen, Ulrich; Güssregen, Brunhilde; Schröfel, Stefanie; Stürzer, Birgit; Werle, Annika; Wolf, Gerald

    2011-05-20

    A drug and alcohol withdrawal rehabilitation centre requested an analysis for "Krypton" in urine of a former opiate-addictive woman. She showed an altered clinical picture and behaviour with miosis, itchiness, agitation, and moderate euphoria after 3 months of until than successful treatment. Literature search revealed that "Krypton" is said to contain "Kratom" (leaves of Mitragyna speciosa), but could also contain O-desmethyltramadol (European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction thematic paper "Spice"). Immunological drug screenings were done with test strips (nal von minden, Regensburg, Germany) and with cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (Microgenics, Passau, Germany). "Kratom" alkaloids and tramadol (metabolites) were analyzed by LC-MS/MS (ThermoFisher Scientific Quantum Ultra Triple Quadrupole mass spectrometer). Immunoassays were negative for amphetamines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, benzoylecgonine, buprenorphine, ethylglucuronide, methadone (metabolite), opiates, oxycodone, and THC-COOH, and test strips were negative for tramadol and its metabolites (cut-off 10 mg/L for O-desmethyltramadol). LC-MS/MS detected the "Kratom" alkaloids mitragynine, speciociliatine, speciogynine, mitraciliatine, and paynantheine and approximately 9mg/L O-desmethyltramadol, but no tramadol and N-desmethyltramadol. The detection of M. speciosa alkaloids is a proof of "Kratom" abuse. Confronted with the analysis data, the patient admitted to have consumed 3-4 infusions of "Krypton". The origin of the O-desmethyltramadol is unclear. Tramadol abuse is unlikely since tramadol and N-desmethyltramadol (physiologically occurring in urine after tramadol intake) were not detectable. Consumption of a "Krypton" product spiked with O-desmethyltramadol could explain our findings and the patient's clinical picture. This would be in agreement with a most recent report about spiking apparently natural herbal mixtures with the synthetic opioid O-desmethyltramadol. Analysis of "Kratom

  11. Study of production by cosmic radiation of krypton and xenon in the Saint-Severin meteorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavielle, B.

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of Kr and Xe isotropes have been measured by a high sensitivity mass spectrometry technique in 11 samples from a core of the Saint-Severin meteorite. On the basis of our results, we were able to show the role of the shielding depth on the production of Kr and Xe by cosmic ray bombardment. More-over, the experimental results for krypton were compared with calculated values obtained by the Reedy and Arnold model (1972) adapted to cosmic ray irradiation of small spherical objects. Our elaboration of a new systematics of nuclear reactions has lead to a good agreement between experiments and calculations within this model [fr

  12. Process and apparatus for separating and recovering krypton-85 from exhaust gas of nuclear reactor or the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusa, H.; Kamiya, K.; Murata, T.; Yamaki, H.; Hisatomi, S.

    1975-01-01

    An apparatus is described for separating and recovering radioactive krypton-85 contained in an exhaust gas of a nuclear reactor or the like, which comprises a plurality of adsorption beds connected in parallel with respect to a passageway for the exhaust gas, each being packed with activated carbon, wherein adsorption and desorption of krypton-85 in each of the beds are alternatively and repeatedly performed by operating valves disposed between each of the beds and means for reducing pressure in the beds to be desorbed in accordance with a predetermined time schedule. The adsorption and concentration efficiencies are markedly increased by combining the above adsorption apparatus and a distillation apparatus

  13. Laser-optogalvanic studies of the 4p5 ns and nd autoionizing resonances in krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, M A; Hanif, M; Aslam, M

    2008-01-01

    We report new measurements of the odd-parity autoionizing resonances in krypton using resonant two-photon excitation from the 4p 5 5s[3/2] 2 metastable level in a mild DC discharge and an optogalvanic detection technique. We have observed the 4p 5 ns [1/2] 0,1 , 4p 5 nd [3/2] 2 and 4p 5 nd [5/2] 2,3 autoionizing resonances excited from three intermediate levels 4p 5 5p' [1/2] 1 , 4p 5 5p' [3/2] 1 and 4p 5 5p' [3/2] 2 . The spectra are notable for the absence of the broad autoionizing 4p 5 nd [3/2] 1 series which dominates in the photo-absorption spectrum from the ground state. The prominent transitions follow ΔK = ΔJ = Δl selection rules of the JK-coupling scheme. We report nearly 100 new energy levels in krypton besides the quantum defects and the reduced widths Γ r Γ(ν) 3 of the nd' [3/2] 2 , nd' [5/2] 2 and nd' [5/2] 3 Rydberg states

  14. Effective and accurate approach for modeling of commensurate–incommensurate transition in krypton monolayer on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Commensurate–incommensurate (C-IC) transition of krypton molecular layer on graphite received much attention in recent decades in theoretical and experimental researches. However, there still exists a possibility of generalization of the phenomenon from thermodynamic viewpoint on the basis of accurate molecular simulation. Recently, a new technique was developed for analysis of two-dimensional (2D) phase transitions in systems involving a crystalline phase, which is based on accounting for the effect of temperature and the chemical potential on the lattice constant of the 2D layer using the Gibbs–Duhem equation [E. A. Ustinov, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074706 (2014)]. The technique has allowed for determination of phase diagrams of 2D argon layers on the uniform surface and in slit pores. This paper extends the developed methodology on systems accounting for the periodic modulation of the substrate potential. The main advantage of the developed approach is that it provides highly accurate evaluation of the chemical potential of crystalline layers, which allows reliable determination of temperature and other parameters of various 2D phase transitions. Applicability of the methodology is demonstrated on the krypton–graphite system. Analysis of phase diagram of the krypton molecular layer, thermodynamic functions of coexisting phases, and a method of prediction of adsorption isotherms is considered accounting for a compression of the graphite due to the krypton–carbon interaction. The temperature and heat of C-IC transition has been reliably determined for the gas–solid and solid–solid system

  15. Simulations Of Xenon and Krypton Doped Gas Puff Z-Pinch Implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangri, Varun; Giuliani, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Ouart, N. D.; Dasgupta, A.; Apruzese, J. P.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Jones, B.; Jennings, C. A.

    2017-10-01

    The intriguing result that the presence of a small fraction of Xe (0.8% by number in the center jet) in an Ar gas puff shot can have a significant impact on the emitted K-shell radiation is examined. Experimental indications of this result were recently obtained from a pair of experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' Z machine. These shots were Z2603 (with Xe) and Z2605 (without Xe). The pair had similar initial density profile (outer shell, inner shell, and center jet) but one had the small aforementioned percentage of Xe dopant in the center jet. In addition, both shots had 1% Krypton in the middle shell. The resultant Ar K-shell yield considerably reduced from 373 +/-9% to 129 +/-9% kJ without an analogous change in the total radiation yield or emitted power. Simulations of this pair of shots will be presented using the using the Mach2-TCRE code. Detailed examination of the implosion dynamics and emitted radiation and its time- and space resolved K-shell synthetic spectra will be reported and compared with previous analysis. The effect of varying the Xenon fraction as well as Krypton fraction on K-shell radiation and yield will also be examined. Work Supported by DOE/NNSA.

  16. Electron microscopy and krypton adsorption characterization of high-purity MgO powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretz, M.; Shastri, A.G.; Schwank, J.

    1986-01-01

    A promising method for the preparation of sizeable quantities of structurally well-defined, high-purity MgO powder is reported. The morphology and surface uniformity of the powder is comparable to that of MgO smokes but with narrow size distribution of particles. Sample characterization of these oxide powders is accomplished by combining structural TEM/STEM examination with krypton gas adsorption isotherms. The latter technique is sensitive to the presence of surface hydroxyl groups and of surface roughness on an atomic scale. High-resolution TEM indicates a perfect cubic morphology, intra-crystallite orientation, and dendritic sintering of cubes. In the STEM mode sharp convergent beam electron diffraction patterns are obtained, and in thick specimen regions Kikuchi lines appear, indicating the absence of crystal defects. After prolonged outgassing to remove surface hydroxyl groups, a krypton adsorption isotherm contains a near vertical submonolayer riser and second layer step along with partial wetting features near saturation. These near-ideal dendritic ceramic powders, therefore, provide a research bridge between single crystal surface studies and large-scale powder technology

  17. Unintentional fatal intoxications with mitragynine and O-desmethyltramadol from the herbal blend Krypton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronstrand, Robert; Roman, Markus; Thelander, Gunilla; Eriksson, Anders

    2011-05-01

    The leaves of Kratom, a medicinal plant in Southeast Asia, have been used as an herbal drug for a long time. At least one of the alkaloids present in Kratom, mitragynine, is a mu-receptor agonist. Both Kratom and an additional preparation called Krypton are available via the internet. It seems to consist of powdered Kratom leaves with another mu-receptor agonist, O-desmethyltramadol, added. O-Desmethyltramadol is an active metabolite of tramadol, a commonly prescribed analgesic. We present nine cases of intoxication, occurring in a period of less than one year, where both mitragynine and O-desmethyltramadol were detected in the postmortem blood samples. Neither tramadol nor N-desmethyltramadol was present in these samples, which implies that the ingested drug was O-desmethyltramadol. The blood concentrations of mitragynine, determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, ranged from 0.02 to 0.18 μg/g, and O-desmethyltramadol concentrations, determined by gas chromatography with nitrogen-specific detection, ranged from 0.4 to 4.3 μg/g. We believe that the addition of the potent mu-receptor agonist O-desmethyltramadol to powdered leaves from Kratom contributed to the unintentional death of the nine cases presented and conclude that intake of Krypton is not as harmless as it often is described on internet websites.

  18. All-optical atom trap trace analysis for rare krypton isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woelk, Pablo; Kohler, Markus; Sieveke, Carsten; Hebel, Simon; Sahling, Peter [Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker Centre for Science and Peace Research, University of Hamburg (Germany); Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The isotope Krypton-85 is an excellent indicator for the detection of nuclear reprocessing activities. However, for the analysis of atmospheric air samples, sensitive measuring methods down to the single atom level are required because of the small concentrations. Furthermore, for a practical and effective detection of clandestine reprocessing, small sample sizes and a high sample throughput rate are desirable. Established methods using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) allow high sensitivity but have a limited throughput of about 200 samples per year, since the vacuum chambers have to be flushed for several hours after each measurement to avoid cross contamination due to the RF-driven excitation of metastable states. Here we present an enhanced ATTA apparatus, which in contrast to the established methods, produces metastable Kr all-optically. This avoids cross contamination, therefore allowing a much higher throughput rate. The apparatus is based on a self-made VUV-lamp and a 2D-3D magneto-optical trap setup. In the 2D trap metastable krypton is produced and a beam of atoms is formed by Doppler-cooling simultaneously.

  19. Removing krypton from xenon by cryogenic distillation to the ppq level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Orrigo, S.E.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [Physik-Institut, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Undagoitia, T.M.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Duchovni, E.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M.; Sivers, M. v. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/In2p3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Huhmann, C.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Lin, Q. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Meng, Y.; Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Lavina, L.S. [LPNHE, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Cristescu, I. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-05-15

    The XENON1T experiment aims for the direct detection of dark matter in a detector filled with 3.3 tons of liquid xenon. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity, the background induced by radioactive decays inside the detector has to be sufficiently low. One major contributor is the β-emitter {sup 85}Kr which is present in the xenon. For XENON1T a concentration of natural krypton in xenon {sup nat}Kr/Xe < 200 ppq (parts per quadrillion, 1 ppq = 10{sup -15} mol/mol) is required. In this work, the design, construction and test of a novel cryogenic distillation column using the common McCabe-Thiele approach is described. The system demonstrated a krypton reduction factor of 6.4 . 10{sup 5} with thermodynamic stability at process speeds above 3 kg/h. The resulting concentration of {sup nat}Kr/Xe < 26 ppq is the lowest ever achieved, almost one order of magnitude below the requirements for XENON1T and even sufficient for future dark matter experiments using liquid xenon, such as XENONnT and DARWIN. (orig.)

  20. The determination of surface of powders by BET method using nitrogen and krypton with computer calculation of the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dembinski, W.; Zlotowski, T.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program written in FORTRAN language for calculations of final results of specific surface analysis based on BET theory has been described. Two gases - nitrogen and krypton were used. A technical description of measuring apparaturs is presented as well as theoretical basis of the calculations together with statistical analysis of the results for uranium compounds powders. (author)

  1. Insatured polymeric thin film formation by energetic ions irradiations of fluoropolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Moel, A.; Duraud, J.P.; Darnez, C.

    1987-03-01

    This work deals with the study of both structural and electronic modifications of polyvinyldene fluoride (PVDF) by monochromatised X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Monochromatised XPS has been used to follow the surface modifications of PVDF samples subjected to various levels of irradiations (oxygen ions: 800 MeV, krypton ions: 3600 MeV). Desorption of hydrogen fluoride molecules and the creation of cumulene compounds are observed. 46 refs

  2. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, C1510, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  3. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-12-01

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  4. Separation of krypton from dissolver off-gas of a reprocessing plant using preparative gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoni, M.

    1984-02-01

    Kr-85 can be separated from the pre-purified purge air in the final processing step of the purification phase for dissolver off-gases of a reprocessing plant with the aid of preparative gas chromatography. Activated carbon adsorbers in combination with helium as carrier gas permits maximum gas mixture through-flow. A separation temperature of 30 0 C is considered optimal. An adsorbent volume of 40 dm 3 is necessary for processing the residual gas flow of 2.5 Nm 3 /h; the adsorbent is divided between 2 columns linked in series each of which are 2 m long with an internal diameter of 100 mm. The helium flow required is five times greater than the off-gas flow. The degree of purity for krypton is greater than 90% for a decontamination factor of greater than 1000. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Irradiation temperature memorization by retention of krypton-85. Application to the temperature determination for the internal cladding surface of fuel elements in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremiot, Claude

    1977-01-01

    The temperature of the inner surface of the cladding fuel elements, which can not be measured directly, can be determined after irradiation. During its stage within the reactor, the cladding is bombarded by krypton-85 fission product, which is trapped in the metallic lattice defects. The experience shows that the krypton release during postirradiation heating takes place at the irradiation temperature. This method was applied for PWR fuel element. A very simple model for retention and release of the krypton is proposed. The krypton trap-energy in zircaloy partakes in this model. This technique can be ordered amongst the Hot'Lab' control methods and expert appraisements. It is pointed out that the principal interest in that method is the fact that it does not need any fuel element instrumentation. At the present, this method is being used by CEA for routine-control. [fr

  6. Experimental studies of ion flow near the sheath edge in multiple ion species plasma including argon, xenon and neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severn, Greg; Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-05-01

    The Bohm sheath criterion was studied with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. It was found in the first LIF studies of three ion species plasma (Yip et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 050703) in which krypton was added to a mixture of argon and xenon plasma confined in a multidipole, dc hot filament discharge, that the addition of krypton served to turn off instability enhanced collisional friction (IEF) found in two ion species plasma (Yip et al 2010 Phys. Plasmas). In this study, neon, a less massive atomic gas than argon was added. Argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) were measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate, and the Ne+ density was systematically increased. We found in both cases that once the added ion density significantly exceeded the density of the other two ions, IVDF measurements consistent with the absence of the instability were obtained, and the measured ion sheath edge speeds tended toward their individual Bohm velocities. For all other relative concentrations, the ions reached the sheath edge neither at their Bohm speeds nor the ion sound speed of the system, consistent, qualitatively, with the action of the IEF.

  7. Development of a krypton-doped gas symmetry capsule platform for x-ray spectroscopy of implosion cores on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Chen, H; Patel, P K; Schneider, M B; Barrios, M A; Casey, D T; Chung, H-K; Hammel, B A; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Jarrott, L C; Khan, S F; Lahmann, B; Nora, R; Rosenberg, M J; Pak, A; Regan, S P; Scott, H A; Sio, H; Spears, B K; Weber, C R

    2016-11-01

    The electron temperature at stagnation of an ICF implosion can be measured from the emission spectrum of high-energy x-rays that pass through the cold material surrounding the hot stagnating core. Here we describe a platform developed on the National Ignition Facility where trace levels of a mid-Z dopant (krypton) are added to the fuel gas of a symcap (symmetry surrogate) implosion to allow for the use of x-ray spectroscopy of the krypton line emission.

  8. A dual-loss-modulated intra-cavity frequency-doubled Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:Lu0.15Y0.85VO4/KTP green laser with a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber and an acousto-optic modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Cheng, Kang; Han, Chao; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    By using both a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA) and an acousto-optic (AO) modulator, a dual-loss-modulated intra-cavity frequency-doubled Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) Nd:Lu 0.15 Y 0.85 VO 4 /KTP (KTiOPO 4 ) green laser was demonstrated for the first time. The QML green laser characteristics such as the pulse width and single-pulse energy have been measured for different modulation frequencies of the AO modulator (f p ). In particular, in comparison with the solely passively QML green laser with an SWCNT-SA, the dual-loss-modulated QML green laser can generate a more stable pulse train, a shorter pulse width of the Q-switched envelope, a greater pulse energy and a higher average peak power. For the dual-loss-modulated QML green laser, at a pump power of 7.9 W and a repetition rate of 10 kHz, the pulse width and the pulse energy of the Q-switch envelope and the average peak power of the QML green laser are 50 ns, 20.34 µJ and 15.5 kW, respectively, corresponding to a pulse width compression of 77%, a pulse energy improvement factor of six times and a QML peak power increase factor of 16 times when compared with those for the solely passively QML green laser. The experimental results show that the dual-loss modulation is an efficient method for the generation of a stable QML green laser with an SWCNT-SA

  9. California GAMA Special Study. Development of a Capability for the Analysis of Krypton-85 in Groundwater Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Ate [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bibby, Richard K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, Jean E. [California State Univ. (CalState), Long Beach, CA (United States); Singleton, Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Esser, Bradley K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A capability for the analysis of krypton-85 (85Kr) in groundwater samples was developed at LLNL. Samples are collected by extracting gas from 2000-4000 L of groundwater at the well, yielding approximately 0.2 cm3 STP krypton. Sample collection takes 1 to 4 hours. Krypton is purified in the laboratory using a combination of molecular sieve and activated charcoal traps, and transferred to a liquid scintillation vial. The 85Kr activity is measured by liquid scintillation on a Quantulus 1220 liquid scintillation counter from PerkinElmer. The detection limit for a typical 0.2 cm3Kr sample size is 11% of the present day activity in air, corresponding to the decay corrected activity in air in 1987. The typical measurement uncertainty is below 10% for recently recharged samples. Six groundwater samples were collected, purified and counted. 85Kr was not detected in any of the samples counted at LLNL. 85Kr was detected by the low level counting laboratory of Bern University in all samples between 1.5 and 6.6 decays per minute per cm3 krypton, corresponding to decay corrected activities in air between 1971 and 1985. The new capability is an excellent complement to tritium-helium, expanding the existing suite of age dating tools available to the GAMA program (35S, 3H/3He, 14C and radiogenic helium). 85Kr can replace 3H/3He in settings where 3H/3He ages are impossible to determine (for example where terrigenic helium overwhelms tritiogenic helium) and provides additional insight into travel time distributions in complex mixed groundwater systems.

  10. Development of the krypton absorption in liquid carbon dioxide (KALC) process for HTGR off-gas reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.W.; Beaujean, H.W.R.; Cochran, H.D. Jr.; Haas, P.A.; Levins, D.M.; Woods, W.M.

    1975-01-01

    Reprocessing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel involves burning of the graphite-matrix elements to release the fuel for recovery purposes. The resulting off-gas is primarily CO 2 with residual amounts of N 2 , O 2 , and CO, together with fission products. Trace quantities of krypton-85 must be recovered in a concentrated form from the gas stream, but processes commonly employed for rare gas removal and concentration are not suitable for use with off-gas from graphite burning. The KALC (Krypton Absorption in Liquid CO 2 ) process employs liquid CO 2 as a volatile solvent for the krypton and is, therefore, uniquely suited to the task. Engineering development of the KALC process is currently under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). The ORNL system is designed for close study of the individual separation operations involved in the KALC process, while the ORGDP system provides a complete pilot facility for demonstrating combined operations on a somewhat larger scale. Packed column performance and process control procedures have been of prime importance in the initial studies. Computer programs have been prepared to analyze and model operational performance of the KALC studies, and special sampling and in-line monitoring systems have been developed for use in the experimental facilities. (U.S.)

  11. Heavy ion source support gas mixing experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, E.D.; Mallory, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments on mixing an easily ionized support gas with the primary ion source gas have produced large beam enhancements for high charge state light ions (masses less than or equal to 20). In the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC), the beam increase has been a factor of 5 or greater, depending on ion species and charge state. Approximately 0.1 cc/min of the easily ionized support gas (argon, krypton, or xenon) is supplied to the ion source through a separate gas line and the primary gas flow is reduced by approximately 30 percent. The proposed mechanism for increased intensity is as follows: The heavier support gas ionizes readily to a higher charge state, providing increased cathode heating. The increased heating permits a reduction in primary gas flow (lower pressure) and the subsequent beam increase

  12. Mode-locked Bloch oscillations in a ring cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoylova, M; Piovella, N; Hunter, D; Robb, G R M; Bachelard, R; Courteille, Ph W

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technique for stabilizing and monitoring Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice under the action of a constant external force. In the proposed scheme, the atoms also interact with a unidirectionally pumped optical ring cavity whose one arm is collinear with the optical lattice. For weak collective coupling, Bloch oscillations dominate over the collective atomic recoil lasing instability and develop a synchronized regime in which the atoms periodically exchange momentum with the cavity field. (letter)

  13. Separation of krypton and xenon from the offgas of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammon, R. von; Bumiller, W.; Burkhardt, H.G.; Franz, G.; Hutter, E.; Knittel, G.; Neffe, G.; Penzhorn, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    During the test runs of the KRETA plant with the three-component system N 2 -Kr-Xe the concentration range of Kr and Xe in the feed gas could be determined where desublimation in the vicinity of the feed entry into the column takes place. This range decreases with decreasing total gas flow and increasing column pressure. The Kr recycle stream which is being planned for the improved offgas specification system of the WAK (project AZUR) was simulated by increasing the Kr feed concentration. The tendency of xenon to freeze out also decreases by this means. Analysis and control of H 2 during the catalytic reduction of O 2 and NOsub(x) is achieved best using the method of measuring combustion heats. The cell of Leeds and Northrup operates at room temperature and is insensitive towards NOsub(x). CO 2 is partially reduced by H 2 on the Ru-catalyst, but only if there is no O 2 present. Acid resistant molecular sieves (e.g. Norton Zeolen) adsorb Krypton almost twice as well as the type 5A. The same is true with NO. However, NH 3 and NO 2 are adsorbed less strongly on Zeolen as on 5A. (orig.) [de

  14. Separation of nitrogen-krypton by the freeze-dried cellulose acetate membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanioka, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Kinzo; Kakuta, Akio; Ozaki, Osamu; Oono, Masanori.

    1977-01-01

    The utility of freeze-dried cellulose acetate membranes, which consist of a thin skin layer supported upon a more porous matrix substructure, was examined for separation of nitrogen-radioactive krypton 85. The high permeable and separative membranes were prepared by fixed freezed-drying of swollen membrane after evaporation of acetone for 4-6 minutes. The permeation rate of nitrogen was 10 -1 -10 -3 (cc/cm 2 .sec.atm). Knudsen flow was predominant, since the permeation rate was inversely proportional to square root of molecular weight of gases. The influence of viscous flow was also observed by slight dependence on the pressure. The mean pore size was calculated by the equation of gas permeation in porous media. There exist fine pores of 30-40A radii in the skin layer. The separation factor (dilution of Kr) was about 0.7 and the separation efficiency was 60%. The collision between different gas molecules (Present-de Bethunes' effect) and the influence of viscous flow depreciates the efficiency. The separation efficiency which was determined by the experiment coincided with the one predicted according to the Present-de Bethunes' equation, supposing that the pore size in skin layer was 10-25A. (auth.)

  15. COREDIV modelling of JET ILW discharges with different impurity seeding: nitrogen, neon, argon and krypton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova-Stanik Irena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations with the COREDIV code of JET H-mode discharges with 25 MW of auxiliary heating in the ITER-like wall (ILW configuration with different impurity seedings – nitrogen (N, neon (Ne, argon (Ar and krypton (Kr – are presented. All simulations have been performed with the same transport model and input discharge parameters like auxiliary heating, volume average plasma density, confinement factor. Only the seeded impurity puff rate was changed in the calculations. It appears that for the considered heating power of 25 MW and relatively low volume electron average density = 6.2 × 1019 m−3, impurity seeding is necessary. It has been found that for every gas at the maximum level of the seeding rate, allowed by the code convergence, the power to the plate is reduced up to 2–4 MW, with electron temperature at the plate of about 2 eV, indicating semi-detached conditions in the divertor region. It should be noted, however, that in cases with low and medium Z impurity (N, Ne and Ar, tungsten radiation is a significant part of radiation losses and stays above 22–32% of the total energy losses, but for high Z impurity (Kr it is reduced up to 10% of the total losses. The maximum of the Kr radiation is between the pedestal region and separatrix, showing that radiative mantle can be created, which might have a strong influence on the plasma parameters in the pedestal region.

  16. Selective scanning of the right ventricle with the ultrashort-lived isotope krypton-81m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, M.; Witztum, K.; Neveu, C.; Perkins, G.

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of right ventricular function using /sup 99m/Tc gated blood-pool imaging is hampered by the difficulty in separating the right ventricle from the left heart as well as from the right atrium. Krypton-81m, an ultrashort-lived isotope (t/sub 1/2/, 13 sec) with a single 190-keV gamma ray, can be infused into the venous circulation to yield stable count rates over the right heart. The authors have developed a technique for delivering a continuous infusion of /sup 81m/Kr via an antecubital vein for gated right ventricle (RV) equilibrium studies. Preliminary rest studies have been performed in 15 normal subjects ranging in age from 23 to 62 years. Right-heart structures including the right atrium, tricuspid valve, right ventricle, pulmonic valve, and pulmonary outflow tract are clearly identifiable. Essentially no counts are present over the left heart. RV ejection fractions in this group averaged 48.3 (+/- 5.7)%. Changes in pulmonary blood flow distribution from supine to upright position, which may be an index of pulmonary arterial pressures, are also easily demonstrated

  17. Radioactive ion implantation as a tool for wear measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagger, C.; Soerensen, G.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with ion implantation of radioactive krypton ions in surfaces with aim of measuring wear of different magnetic materials in sound-heads. The technique is especially suited for a relatively fast comparison of wear-characteristics of materials of varying composition in small inaccessible areas. In the present case utilisation of a 60 KeV accelerator allows determination of a total wear as small as 0.05 μm with an accuracy of 10%. Further the technique yields information of the time dependence of the wear process with an accuracy less than 0.001 μm. (author)

  18. Climate risks by radioactive krypton-85 from nuclear fission. Atmospheric-electrical and air-chemical effects of ionizing radiation in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollert, R.

    1994-01-01

    The study shows that krypton-85 from nuclear fission enhances air ionization and, thus, interferes with the atmospheric-electrical system and the water balance of the earth atmosphere. This is reason for concern: There are unforeseeable effects for weather and climate if the krypton-85 content of the earth atmosphere continues to rise. There may be a krypton-specific greenhouse effect and a collapse of the natural atmospheric-electrical field. In addition, human well-being may be expected to be impaired as a result of the diminished atmospheric-electrical field. There is also the risk of radiochemical actions and effects caused-by krypton-85-containing plumes in other air-borne pollutants like the latters' transformation to aggressive oxidants. This implies radiation smog and more acid rain in the countries exposed. This study summarizes findings gained in these issues by various sciences, analyses them and elaborates hypotheses on the actions and effects of krypton-85 on the air, the atmosphere and the climate. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Ion fragmentation in an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer interface with different gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, B B; Douglas, D J; Chen, D D

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen, argon, and krypton are used as curtain gases in an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer in an attempt to study the effect of these gases on the extent of ion fragmentation between the orifice and the skimmer of the interface region. A previously published collision model predicts that the degree of ion fragmentation increases with increasing mass of the curtain gas. However, the fragmentation yields are found to be the opposite to that expected. It is believed that the reversed trend with argon and krypton is caused by condensation of the gases within the free jet expansion between the orifice and the skimmer. A condensation parameter can be used to predict the degree of clustering of gases within a free jet expansion. When the condensation parameter is minimized, the predicted trend of fragmentation with mass is observed. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Effect of the fcc-hcp martensitic transition on the equation of state of solid krypton up to 140 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, A. D.; Garbarino, G.; Briggs, R.; Svitlyk, V.; Morard, G.; Bouhifd, M. A.; Jacobs, J.; Irifune, T.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.

    2018-03-01

    Solid krypton (Kr) undergoes a pressure-induced martensitic phase transition from a face-centered cubic (fcc) to a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. These two phases coexist in a very wide pressure domain inducing important modifications of the bulk properties of the resulting mixed phase system. Here, we report a detailed in situ x-ray diffraction and absorption study of the influence of the fcc-hcp phase transition on the compression behavior of solid krypton in an extended pressure domain up to 140 GPa. The onset of the hcp-fcc transformation was observed in this study at around 2.7 GPa and the coexistence of these two phases up to 140 GPa, the maximum investigated pressure. The appearance of the hcp phase is also evidenced by the pressure-induced broadening and splitting of the first peak in the XANES spectra. We demonstrate that the transition is driven by a continuous nucleation and intergrowth of nanometric hcp stacking faults that evolve in the fcc phase. These hcp stacking faults are unaffected by high-temperature annealing, suggesting that plastic deformation is not at their origin. The apparent small Gibbs free-energy differences between the two structures that decrease upon compression may explain the nucleation of hcp stacking faults and the large coexistence domain of fcc and hcp krypton. We observe a clear anomaly in the equation of state of the fcc solid at ˜20 GPa when the proportion of the hcp form reaches ˜20 % . We demonstrate that this anomaly is related to the difference in stiffness between the fcc and hcp phases and propose two distinct equation of states for the low and high-pressure regimes.

  1. Solvation of fluoroform and fluoroform-dimethylether dimer in liquid krypton: A theoretical cryospectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohls, Emilija; Mishev, Anastas; Pejov, Ljupčo

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid, sequential statistical physics-quantum mechanical electronic-quantum mechanical nuclei approach has been applied to study the C-H stretching frequencies of bare fluoroform dissolved in liquid krypton under cryogenic conditions (at ˜130 K), as well as upon blue shifting hydrogen bonding interactions with dimethylether in the same solvent. The structure of the liquid at 130 K was generated by Monte Carlo simulations of cryogenic Kr solutions containing either fluoroform or fluoroform and dimethylether molecules. Statistically uncorrelated configurations were appropriately chosen from the equilibrated MC runs and supermolecular clusters containing solute and solvent molecules (either standalone or embedded in the "bulk" part of the solvent treated as a polarizable continuum) were subjected to quantum mechanical electronic (QMel) and subsequent quantum mechanical nuclei (QMnuc) calculations. QMel calculations were implemented to generate the in-liquid 1D intramolecular C-H stretching vibrational potential of the fluoroform moiety and subsequently in the QMnuc phase the corresponding anharmonic C-H stretching frequency was computed by diagonalization techniques. Finally, the constructed vibrational density of states histograms were compared to the experimental Raman bands. The calculated anharmonic vibrational frequency shifts of the fluoroform C-H stretching mode upon interaction with dimethylether in liquid Kr are in very good agreement with the experimental data (20.3 at MP2 level vs. 16.6 cm-1 experimentally). Most of this relatively large frequency blue shift is governed by configurations characterized by a direct C-H⋯O contact between monomers. The second population detected during MC simulations, characterized by reversed orientation of the monomers, has a minor contribution to the spectral appearance. The experimentally observed trend in the corresponding bandwidths is also correctly reproduced by our theoretical approach. Solvation of the

  2. Pathway to cryogen free production of hyperpolarized Krypton-83 and Xenon-129.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Six

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarized (hp (129Xe and hp (83Kr for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are typically obtained through spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP in gas mixtures with dilute concentrations of the respective noble gas. The usage of dilute noble gases mixtures requires cryogenic gas separation after SEOP, a step that makes clinical and preclinical applications of hp (129Xe MRI cumbersome. For hp (83Kr MRI, cryogenic concentration is not practical due to depolarization that is caused by quadrupolar relaxation in the condensed phase. In this work, the concept of stopped flow SEOP with concentrated noble gas mixtures at low pressures was explored using a laser with 23.3 W of output power and 0.25 nm linewidth. For (129Xe SEOP without cryogenic separation, the highest obtained MR signal intensity from the hp xenon-nitrogen gas mixture was equivalent to that arising from 15.5±1.9% spin polarized (129Xe in pure xenon gas. The production rate of the hp gas mixture, measured at 298 K, was 1.8 cm(3/min. For hp (83Kr, the equivalent of 4.4±0.5% spin polarization in pure krypton at a production rate of 2 cm(3/min was produced. The general dependency of spin polarization upon gas pressure obtained in stopped flow SEOP is reported for various noble gas concentrations. Aspects of SEOP specific to the two noble gas isotopes are discussed and compared with current theoretical opinions. A non-linear pressure broadening of the Rb D(1 transition was observed and taken into account for the qualitative description of the SEOP process.

  3. Adsorptive Separation and Sequestration of Krypton, I and C14 on Diamond Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Tushar [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Loyalka, Sudarsha [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Prelas, Mark [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Viswanath, Dabir [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this research proposal was to address the separation and sequestration of Kr and I from each other using nano-sized diamond particles and retaining these in diamond until they decay to the background level or can be used as a byproduct. Following removal of Kr and I, an adsorbent will be used to adsorb and store CO2 from the CO2 rich stream. A Field Enhanced Diffusion with Optical Activation (FEDOA-a large scale process that takes advantage of thermal, electrical, and optical activation to enhance the diffusion of an element into diamond structure) was used to load Kr and I on micron or nano sized particles having a larger relative surface area. The diamond particles can be further increased by doping it with boron followed by irradiation in a neutron flux. Previous studies showed that the hydrogen storage capacity could be increased significantly by using boron-doped irradiated diamond particles. Diamond powders were irradiated for a longer time by placing them in a quartz tube. The surface area was measured using a Quantachrome Autosorb system. No significant increase in the surface area was observed. Total surface area was about 1.7 m2/g. This suggests the existence of very minimal pores. Interestingly it showed hysteresis upon desorption. A reason for this may be strong interaction between the surface and the nitrogen molecules. Adsorption runs at higher temperatures did not show any adsorption of krypton on diamond. Use of a GC with HID detector to determine the adsorption capacity from the breakthrough curves was attempted, but experimental difficulties were encountered.

  4. Kinetics of inhaled krypton in the blood of pregnant ewes and their fetuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meznarich, H.K.; Sikov, M.R.; Ballou, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    There has been concern about exposure of pregnant women and their fetuses to radiokrypton (Kr-85) released to the general environment. This led to previous studies on the distribution and effects of inhaled Kr-85 in sheep and rats. The data on hematogenous concentrations obtained during and after continuous inhalation by pregnant ewes had neither been analyzed nor reported in detail, which led to the kinetic analyses reported in this communication. Indwelling catheters were placed in an artery and a vein of pregnant ewes, and into a fetal artery or vein at gestational ages between 93 and 123 days. Ewes were exposed for 1.5 to 2 hors via a face mask to an atmosphere of 50 nCi/ml (1850 Bq/ml) Kr-85 in air; mean respiration rates were about 20 breaths per min. Blood samples were collected from each catheter at intervals throughout the accumulation and steady-state periods, and during a 90-min period following discontinuation of exposure. Results from 7 ewes, in which complete sampling was obtained, showed that both maternal fetal blood concentrations of Kr rose rapidly and attained a steady state by approximately 1 hr after initiation of exposure. The steady state concentrations of Kr-85 were significantly higher in maternal venous blood than in maternal arterial or fetal blood. There were no significant concentration differences between fetal arterial and venous bloods. The rate of disappearance of Kr-85 (per min) from maternal and fetal blood after discontinuation of exposure, 0.17 ± 0.02 and 0.06 ± 0.01, respectively, were significantly different. Thus, krypton is freely accessible to the fetal blood and rapidly reaches and maintains an equilibrium state with maternal blood during continuous exposure, although it disappears from fetal blood less rapidly after cessation of exposure

  5. Vision parameters in krypton and laser photocoagulation of subfoveal neovascular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, M A; Magargal, L E; Donoso, L A; Goldberg, R E; Edmonds, S E

    1985-08-01

    A prospective study of 78 patients, treated with krypton red laser (KRL) photocoagulation, who had senile macular degeneration (SMD) and subretinal neovascular membranes (SRNVM) located within 200u of the center of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ), was undertaken to determine if complete eradication of the SRNVM would minimize the resultant foveal scar size and retain the maximal useful functional vision as compared to untreated fellow eyes with a disciform scar. The typical patient profile with SMD and subfoveal SRNVM included: average age, 73.6 years; caucasian, 99%; females, 62%; lightly pigmented iris, 70%; hyperopic refractive error, 93%; and evidence of bilateral involvement with either predisciform or disciform lesions, 73%. In comparing eyes treated with KRL having 100% FAZ involvement with fellow untreated eyes having disciform scars, the latter had poorer average visual acuity (44% vs 100% less than or equal to 20/200), scars which were an average of five times larger (8.4 vs 38.6 sq mm) and scotomas which were an average of six times larger (15.7 vs 90 sq cm) as determined by new microcomputer technology. In all bilaterally affected cases, eyes with smaller scars and scotomas required less magnification from a low vision aid to read continuous standardized 1M print. Sixteen of 17 patients (94%) preferred the low vision aid for their treated eye. These preliminary results suggest that treatment of SRNVM within the FAZ using KRL may be successful in arresting the progressive macular hemorrhagic-exudative damage typical of untreated cases which culminate in loss of central visual function. Successful treatment, by preserving areas of paracentral fixation, can enhance the chances of visual rehabilitation using conventional low vision aids.

  6. Technical and economic evaluation of processes for krypton-85 recovery from power fuel-reprocessing plant off-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggoner, R.C.

    1982-08-01

    A technical and economical analysis has been made of methods for collecting and concentrating krypton from the off-gas from a typical nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The methods considered were cryogenic distillation, fluorocarbon absorption, mordenite adsorption, and selective permeation. The conclusions reached were: Cryogenic distillation is the only demonstrated route to date. Fluorocarbon absorption may offer economic and technical advantages if fully developed and demonstrated. Mordenite adsorption has been demonstrated only on a bench scale and is estimated to cost more than either cryogenic distillation or fluorocarbon absorption. Selective permeation through a silicone rubber membrane is not sufficiently selective for the route to be cost effective

  7. Ion Acceleration by Double Layers with Multi-Component Ion Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Timothy; Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; West Virginia University Team

    2017-10-01

    Current-free double layers (CFDL) models have been proposed to explain observations of magnetic field-aligned ion acceleration in plasmas expanding into divergent magnetic field regions. More recently, experimental studies of the Bohm sheath criterion in multiple ion species plasma reveal an equilibration of Bohm speeds at the sheath-presheath boundary for a grounded plate in a multipole-confined filament discharge. We aim to test this ion velocity effect for CFDL acceleration. We report high resolution ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) measurements using laser induced fluorescence downstream of a CFDL in a helicon plasma. Combinations of argon-helium, argon-krypton, and argon-xenon gases are ionized and measurements of argon or xenon IVDFs are investigated to determine whether ion acceleration is enhanced (or diminished) by the presence of lighter (or heavier) ions in the mix. We find that the predominant effect is a reduction of ion acceleration consistent with increased drag arising from increased gas pressure under all conditions, including constant total gas pressure, equal plasma densities of different ions, and very different plasma densities of different ions. These results suggest that the physics responsible for acceleration of multiple ion species in simple sheaths is not responsible for the ion acceleration observed in these expanding plasmas. Department of Physics, Gettysburg College.

  8. Electronic structure of the actinides and their dioxides. Application to the defect formation energy and krypton solubility in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, T.; CEA Centre d'Etudes de Grenoble, 38

    1996-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is the standard nuclear fuel used in French h power plants. During irradiation, fission products such as krypton and xenon are created inside fuel pellets. So, gas release could become, at very high burnup, a limiting factor in the reactor exploitation. To study this subject, we have realised calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) into the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Atomic Sphere Approximation (ASA). First, we have validated our approach by calculating cohesive properties of thorium, protactinium and uranium metals. The good agreement between our results and experimental values implies that 5f electrons are itinerant. Calculated lattice parameter, cohesive energy and bulk modulus for uranium and thorium dioxides are in very good agreement with experiment. We show that binding between uranium and oxygen atoms is not completely ionic but partially covalent. The question of the electrical conductivity still remains an open problem. We have been able to calculate punctual defect formation energies in uranium dioxide. Accordingly to experimental observations, we find that it is easier to create a defect in the oxygen sublattice than in the uranium sublattice. Finally, we have been able to predict a probable site of krypton atoms in nuclear fuel: the Schottky trio. Experiences of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) on uranium dioxide doped by ionic implantation will help us in the comprehension of the studied phenomena and the interpretation of our calculations. (author)

  9. Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2013-10-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

  10. Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2013-09-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

  11. Control of radical and ion production in chlorine plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, David; Scime, Earl; Biloiu, Costel

    2017-10-01

    Chlorine gas is widely used in the nanochip industry for ion etching of silicon wafers. As feature sizes on chips shrink, greater control of ion production is needed. Despite its popularity as an etching gas, it is difficult to control the dissociation and densities of ions and radicals. In this work, rare gas actinometry is used to determine an absolute number density for Cl2. Plasma parameters are then varied to control chlorine densities. We focus on obtaining the measurements using an argon or krypton dopant while confirming previous work done with xenon. Density measurements are achieved by comparing the relative peak intensities produced in an inductively coupled chlorine plasma mixed with 5% rare gas. The plasma is sampled using line-of-sight spectroscopy in the source and across a blank silicon wafer. The benefit of creating a scheme for these rare gases is that argon and krypton provide stronger spectral lines and are cheaper than xenon. This work demonstrates a method for chlorine ion and radical production that will allow the precise control needed for nanochip etching. This work was supported by U.S. National Science Foundation Grant No. PHY-1617880.

  12. Interaction between 4p photoionization and 3p resonant excitation channels of krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhr, T.; Kover, A.; Varga, D.; Muller, A.; Ricz, S.; Justus-Liebig- Universitat Giessen, Giessen; Holste, K.; Borovik, Jr.A.A.; Bernhardt, D.; Schippers, S.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The angular distribution of Kr 4p photoelectrons was measured employing a linearly polarized photon beam at energies from 205 eV to 230 eV. In this range the Kr 3p→ns/md (n,m=4,5,6, etc.) resonances can be excited. The experimental anisotropy parameters (β, γ and δ) were determined for the Kr 4p shell and its fine structure components. The measurement was carried out at beamline BW3 of the DORIS III synchrotron light source at HASYLAB (Hamburg, Germany). The ESA-22D electrostatic electron spectrometer was used to analyze the emitted electrons. The spectrometer consists of a spherical and a cylindrical mirror analyzer. The spherical mirror focuses the electrons from the scattering plane to the entrance slit of the cylindrical analyzer performing the energy analysis of the electrons. (For detailed description of an ESA- 22-type electron spectrometer see Ref. [1].) The measured dipole anisotropy parameters ? of Kr 4p photoelectrons are shown in Fig. 1 as a function of photon energy. Resonance-like structure can be seen in the photon energy dependence of the dipole parameters. This structure indicates that the channel interactions are important between the 3p resonant excitation-autoionization and 4p direct photoionization processes in krypton. The natural line width of the 3p photoelectron peaks was determined from the measured spectra and it is about 0.8 eV while the experimental width of the resonance near 220 eV photon energy (3p 1/2 -1 →5s resonant excitation) is approximately 2 eV in Fig. 1. This broadening can be explained with the strong interference between the ionization and excitation channels. As before, we conclude that the angular distribution of photoelectrons is strongly influenced by the excitation processes. Acknowledgements. The authors wish to thank the DORIS III staff for providing excellent working conditions. This work was supported by the NKTH-OTKA (Grant No. K67719), and by the European Community

  13. Synchrotron-radiation experiments with recoil ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Studies of atoms, ions and molecules with synchrotron radiation have generally focused on measurements of properties of the electrons ejected during, or after, the photoionization process. Much can also be learned, however, about the atomic or molecular relaxation process by studies of the residual ions or molecular fragments following inner-shell photoionization. Measurements are reported of mean kinetic energies of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon recoil ions produced by vacancy cascades following inner-shell photoionization using white and monochromatic synchrotron x radiation. Energies are much lower than for the same charge-state ions produced by charged-particle impact. The results may be applicable to design of future angle-resolved ion-atom collision experiments. Photoion charge distributions are presented and compared with other measurements and calculations. Related experiments with synchrotron-radiation produced recoil ion, including photoionization of stored ions and measurement of shakeoff in near-threshold excitation, are briefly discussed. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  14. Simulation of atmospheric krypton-85 transport to assess the detectability of clandestine nuclear reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Jens Ole

    2010-02-02

    The radioactive noble gas krypton-85 is released into the atmosphere during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel or irradiated breeding targets. This is a necessary step for plutonium separation. Therefore the {sup 85}Kr signature of reprocessing could possibly be used for the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities producing nuclear weaponusable material. The {sup 85}Kr content of the atmosphere has grown over the last decades as the emissions from military and civilian nuclear industry could not be compensated by the decay with a half-life of 10.76 years. In this study, the global {sup 85}Kr background distribution due to emissions of known reprocessing facilities for the period from 1971 until 2006 was simulated using the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 applying the newest available annual emission data. The convective tracer transport scheme and the operator splitting for the physical calculations in the model were modified in order to guarantee physically correct results for tracer point sources, in particular non negative concentrations. An on-line routine controlling the {sup 85}Kr -budget in the model enforced exact mass conservation. The results of the simulation were evaluated by extensive comparison with measurements performed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection with very good agreement at most observation sites except those in the direct vicinity of {sup 85}Kr sources. Of particular interest for the {sup 85}Kr detection potential was the variability of {sup 85}Kr background concentrations which was evaluated for the first time in a global model. In addition, the interhemispheric transport as simulated by ECHAM5 was analyzed using a two-box model providing a mean exchange time of τ {sub ex} = 10.5 months. The analysis of τ{sub ex} over simulated 35 years indicates that in years with strong South Asian or African Monsoon the interhemispheric transport is faster during the monsoon season. A correlation analysis of

  15. Study of emission of a volume nanosecond discharge plasma in xenon, krypton and argon at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baksht, E Kh; Lomaev, Mikhail I; Rybka, D V; Tarasenko, Viktor F

    2006-01-01

    The emission properties of a volume nanosecond discharge plasma produced in xenon, krypton and argon at high pressures in a discharge gap with a cathode having a small radius of curvature are studied. Spectra in the range 120-850 nm and amplitude-time characteristics of xenon emission at different regimes and excitation techniques are recorded and analysed. It is shown that upon excitation of the volume discharge initiated by a beam of avalanche electrons, at least 90% of the energy in the spectral range 120-850 nm is emitted by xenon dimers. For xenon at a pressure of 1.2 atm, ∼45 mJ of the spontaneous emission energy was obtained in the full solid angle in a pulse with the full width at half-maximum ∼130 ns. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Argon, Krypton, and Xenon Using Two-Body and Three-Body Intermolecular Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goharshadi, Elaheh K; Abbaspour, Mohsen

    2006-07-01

    We have performed the molecular dynamics simulation to obtain energy and pressure of argon, krypton, and xenon at different temperatures using a HFD-like potential which has been obtained with an inversion of viscosity data at zero pressure. The contribution of three-body dispersion resulting from third-order triple-dipole interactions has been computed using an accurate simple relation between two-body and three-body interactions developed by Marcelli and Sadus. Our results indicate that this simple three-body potential which was originally used in conjunction with the BFW potential is also valid when used with the HFD-like potential. This appears to support the conjecture that the relationship is independent of the two-body potential. The energy and pressure obtained are in good overall agreement with the experiment, especially for argon. A comparison of our simulated results with HMSA and ODS integral equations and a molecular simulation have been also included.

  17. Communication: electron transfer mediated decay enabled by spin-orbit interaction in small krypton/xenon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobel, J Patrick; Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V; Pernpointner, Markus

    2014-04-28

    In this work we study the influence of relativistic effects, in particular spin-orbit coupling, on electronic decay processes in KrXe2 clusters of various geometries. For the first time it is shown that inclusion of spin-orbit coupling has decisive influence on the accessibility of a specific decay pathway in these clusters. The radiationless relaxation process is initiated by a Kr 4s ionization followed by an electron transfer from xenon to krypton and a final second ionization of the system. We demonstrate the existence of competing electronic decay pathways depending in a subtle way on the geometry and level of theory. For our calculations a fully relativistic framework was employed where omission of spin-orbit coupling leads to closing of two decay pathways. These findings stress the relevance of an adequate relativistic description for clusters with heavy elements and their fragmentation dynamics.

  18. Study of single and binary ion plasma expansion into laboratory-generated plasma wakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, K.H. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Plasma expansion into the wake of a large rectangular plate immersed in a collisionless, supersonic plasma was investigated in laboratory experiments. The experimental conditions address both single ion and binary ion plasma flows for the case of a body whose size is large in comparison with the Debye length, when the potential difference between the body and the plasma is relatively small. A new plasma source was developed to generate equi-velocity, binary ion plasma flows, which allows access to new parameter space that have previously been unavailable for laboratory studies. Specifically, the new parameters are the ionic mass ratio and the ionic component density ratio. In a series of experiments, a krypton-neon plasma is employed where the ambient density ratio of neon to krypton is varied more than an order of magnitude. The expansion in both the single ion and binary ion plasma cases is limited to early times, i.e., a few ion plasma periods, by the combination of plasma density, plasma drift speed, and vacuum chamber size, which prevented detailed comparison with self-similar theory

  19. An analysis of plasma ion toroidal rotation during large amplitude MHD activity in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, J.A.; Esch, H.P.L. de; Lazzaro, E.; Stork, D.; Hellermann, M. von; Galvao, R.; Hender, T.C.; Zasche, D.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed study of plasma ion toroidal rotation in JET during large amplitude MHD activity has revealed a strong viscous force that couples plasma ions to MHD modes. Depending on the MHD modes present, this force can couple across all of the plasma cross section, across only the central region, roughly within the q=1 surface, or across only the outer region outside the q=1.5 surface. The force acts to flatten the ion toroidal rotation frequency profile, measured by the JET active charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic, across the coupled region of plasma. The frequency of rotation in this region agrees with the MHD oscillation frequency measured by magnetic pick-up coils at the wall. The strength of the force between the ions and modes becomes evident during high power NBI when the mode locks and drags the ion toroidal rotation frequency to zero, within the errors of the measurements. The present theories of plasma rotation either ignore MHD effects entirely, consider only moderate n toroidal field ripple, or low n ripple effects. (author) 7 refs., 3 figs

  20. Pulsed magnetic field-electron cyclotron resonance ion source operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehle, C.; Ratzinger, U.; Joest, G.; Leible, K.; Schennach, S.; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-01-01

    The pulsed magnetic field (PuMa)-electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source uses a pulsed coil to improve the peak current by opening the magnetic bottle along the beam axis. After demonstration of the principle of the pulsed magnetic extraction, the ion source was tested with different gases. We received promising results from helium to krypton. The influence of the current in the pulsed coil on the analyzed ion current was measured. With increased current levels within the pulsed coil not only the pulse height of the PuMa pulse, but the pulse length can also be controlled. By using the pulsed coil the maximum of the charge state distribution can be shifted to higher charge states. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  1. A Positron Annihilation Study of Copper Containing a High Concentration of Krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Evans, John H.

    1982-01-01

    Bulk Cu samples containing up to 4 at.% Kr have been produced by the Harwell combined ion implantation and sputtering method at temperatures near ambient, and then examined by the positron annihilation technique. Both angular correlation and lifetime measurements were made and, in addition...

  2. Clinical use of ultrashort-lived radionuclide krypton-81m for noninvasive analysis of right ventricular performance in normal subjects and patients with right ventricular dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nienaber, C.A.; Spielmann, R.P.; Wasmus, G.; Mathey, D.G.; Montz, R.; Bleifeld, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ultrashort-lived radionuclide krypton-81m, eluted in 5% dextrose from a bedside rubidium-81m generator, was intravenously infused for rapid imaging of the right-sided heart chambers in the right anterior oblique projection adjusted for optimal right atrioventricular separation. Left-sided heart and lung background was minimized by rapid decay and efficient exhalation of krypton-81m, requiring no algorithm for background correction. A double region of interest method decreased the variability in the assessment of ejection fraction to 5%. In 10 normal subjects, 11 patients with pulmonary hypertension, 4 patients with right ventricular outflow tract obstruction and 4 patients with right ventricular infarction, right ventricular ejection fraction determined by krypton-81m equilibrium blood pool imaging ranged from 14 to 76%. The correlation between these values and those determined by cineangiography according to Simpson's rule was close: r . 0.93 for all data points, r . 0.92 for studies at rest and r . 0.93 for exercise studies. Exercise-related changes in right ventricular function revealed a disturbed functional reserve with pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular infarction, whereas in compensated right ventricular outflow tract obstruction there was a physiologic increase in ejection fraction with exercise. Thus, equilibrium-gated right ventricular imaging using ultrashort-lived krypton-81m is a simple, accurate and reproducible method with potential for serial assessment of right ventricular ejection fraction in a variety of right ventricular anatomic and functional abnormalities, both at rest and during exercise. Advantages of this method include an extremely low radiation dose to patients and clear right atrioventricular separation without the need to correct for background activity

  3. Mass spectrometer diagnostic technique in the study of stationary afterglow plasmas in helium, argon and krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenwalter, M.

    1979-01-01

    Since some years the method of massspectrometric monitoring has become an important tool in the analysis of time resolved (or stationary) afterglow plasmas. The present thesis reports the construction and testing of a new fully bakeable UHV-stationary-afterglow-apparatus using a hollow cathode discharge as plasma source for the first time. The hollow cathode is moveable perpendicular to its axis relative to the sampling orifice (i.e. a very small hole at the centre of the plasma container's boundary), so that the radical distribution of the charged particle density can be studied. Several specific extraction conditions for ions from the plasma especially the sampling probe potential have been systematically investigated. Results are illustrated and discussed. The new apparatus has been tested by determining the ambipolar diffusion coefficient of the molecular ion He 2 + in a pure Helium-plasma in thermal equilibrium. The present result (Dsub(a2) = 603 +- 38 / P 0 cm 2 s -1 ) is in agreement with results reported by other workers. Finally an example for the radial behaviour of the Ar + -sampling current in an Argon-discharge for several different times in the afterglow period is given. The shown behaviour agrees relatively well with the theoretically predicted radial ion density distribution, i.e. the zero-order Ressel'function. (Author)

  4. Effect of irradiation-damaged layer location on reverse currents of diodes irradiated with high-energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poklonskij, N.A.; Gorbachuk, N.I.; Ermakova, A.V.; Shpakovskij, S.V.; Filipenya, V.A; Solov'ev, Ya.A.; Skuratov, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon diodes with p + n-junction irradiated with high-energy (100-250 MeV) ions of krypton and xenon are examined. It is shown that at the identical fluences of irradiation and energies of ions the reverse currents of diodes are smaller in the case of the larger distance δ between the maximum of primary vacancies distribution and the border of p + n-junction. The location of irradiation damaged layer in the vicinity of the space charge region does not lead to suffice decrease in reverse currents. (authors)

  5. Production of krypton and xenon isotopes in thick stony and iron targets isotropically irradiated with 1600 MeV protons

    CERN Document Server

    Gilabert, E; Lavielle, B; Leya, I; Michel, R; Neumann, S

    2002-01-01

    Two spherical targets made of gabbro with a radius of 25 cm and of steel with a radius of 10 cm were irradiated isotropically with 1600 MeV protons at the SATURNE synchrotron at Laboratoire National Saturne (LNS)/CEN Saclay, in order to simulate the production of nuclides in meteorites induced by galactic cosmic-ray protons in space. These experiments supply depth-dependent production rate data for a wide range of radioactive and stable isotopes in up to 28 target elements. In this paper, we report results for /sup 78/Kr, /sup 80-86/Kr isotopes in Rb, Sr, Y and Zr and for /sup 124/Xe, /sup 126/Xe, /sup 128-132/Xe, /sup 134/Xe, /sup 136/Xe isotopes in Ba and La. Krypton and xenon concentrations have been measured at different depths in the spheres by using conventional mass spectrometry. Based on Monte-Carlo techniques, theoretical production rates are calculated by folding depth-dependent spectra of primary and secondary protons and secondary neutrons with the excitation functions of the relevant nuclear reac...

  6. A new model validation database for evaluating AERMOD, NRPB R91 and ADMS using krypton-85 data from BNFL Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.; Taylor, J.; Lowles, I.; Emmerson, K.; Parker, T.

    2004-01-01

    The emission of krypton-85 ( 85 Kr) from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations provide a classical passive tracer for the study of atmospheric dispersion. This is because of the persistence of this radioisotope in the atmosphere, due to its long radioactive halflife and inert chemistry; and the low background levels that result due to the limited number of anthropogenic sources globally. The BNFL Sellafield site in Cumbria (UK) is one of the most significant point sources of 85 Kr in the northern hemisphere, with 85 Kr being discharged from two stacks on the site, MAGNOX and THORP. Field experiments have been conducted since October 1996 using a cryogenic distillation technique (Janssens et al., 1986) to quantify the ground level concentration of 85 Kr. This paper reports on the construction of a model validation database to allow evaluation of regulatory atmospheric dispersion models using the measured 85 Kr concentrations as a tracer. The results of the database for local and regional scale dispersion are presented. (orig.)

  7. Kryptonate-based instrumentation development for automobile exhaust pollutants. Phase III report: design and construction of four (4) experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.; Donaghue, T.

    This phase of the program encompasses the design, construction and evaluation of four (4) prototype instruments for the detection of automobile exhaust pollutant. These instruments employ the radio release mechanism utilized by Panametrics in detection of various trace gases. The prototype instruments are of two (2) designs. One design is operable from a power source supplied by an automobile battery. The second design is operable from 110 volts AC power. Successful evaluation in the laboratory as well as with various automobiles were performed with both type instruments. Scale-up of the quantity of sensor material prepared introduced unexpected problems with respect to detection lifetime which were not satisfactorily resolved within the time and funds available to the program. Nevertheless, a Kryptonate-based instrument using a single detection method for the measurement of hydrocarbons, CO and NO/sub x/ as pollutants by automobile exhausts was shown to be operable with actual automobile exhausts, to provide more than adequate sensitivity for inspection purposes, and to provide response and recovery times for full scale reading in the range 10-15 secs. (auth)

  8. Pyrolytic effects induced by energetic ions in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckenreiter, T.; Balanzat, E.; Fuess, H.; Trautmann, C.

    1999-05-01

    Degradation processes in various polymers (polycarbonate, poly(ethyleneterephthalate), polyimide, and polysulfone) induced by krypton and molybdenum ions of several hundred MeV were studied by infrared and mass spectroscopy. A wide spectrum of degradation products well known from low ionizing radiation were found, which are strongly enhanced if the irradiation takes place in oxygen atmosphere. Most notables are the formation of triple bonded species such as alkynes, cyanates and acetylene. They are created within a radius of about 3-4 nm around the ion trajectory. The complementing observation of degradation products in the bulk polymer and as volatile fragments allows a detailed description of the underlying decomposition mechanisms. The observation of degradation products in close analogy to pyrolysis and the thermal stability of acetylene, strongly suggest that transient temperatures above 1500 K are involved in the track formation process.

  9. Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-08-01

    The risks involved in the routine release of /sup 85/Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of /sup 85/Kr. Instead of releasing the /sup 85/Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing /sup 85/Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from /sup 85/Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of /sup 85/Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for /sup 85/Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C also encourage delaying implementation of the /sup 85/Kr recovery in the early plants.

  10. Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-08-01

    The risks involved in the routine release of 85 Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of 85 Kr. Instead of releasing the 85 Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing 85 Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from 85 Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of 85 Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for 85 Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated 3 H and 14 C also encourage delaying implementation of the 85 Kr recovery in the early plants

  11. Plasma diagnostics of the SIMPA Ecr ion source by X-ray spectroscopy, Collisions of H-like Neon ions with Argon clusters; Diagnostic du plasma de la source d'ions ECR SIMPA par spectroscopie X, Collision d'ions neon hydrogenoides avec des agregats d'argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrouche, N

    2006-09-15

    The first part of this thesis is devoted to the SIMPA ECR ion source characterization, first, I explored the ion source's capacities on the point of view of extracted currents for three elements, argon, krypton and neon. By analyzing the Bremsstrahlung spectra, I determined the electronic temperature in the plasma and the electronic and ionic densities. In a second time, I recorded high resolution X-spectra of argon and krypton plasma's. By taking into account the principal mechanisms of production of a K hole in the ions inside the plasma, I determined the ionic densities of the high charge states of argon. Lastly, I highlighted a correlation between the ions charge states densities with the intensities of extracted currents. The second part of the thesis is devoted to Ne{sup 9+-} argon clusters collisions. First, I presented simple and effective theoretical models allowing to describe the phenomena occurring during a collision, from the point of view of the projectile. I carried out a simulation for a collision of an ion Ne{sup 9+} with an argon cluster of a given size, which has enabled us to know the energy levels populated during the electronic capture and to follow the number of electrons in each projectile shell. Lastly, I presented the first results of a collision between a Ne{sup 9+} beam and argon clusters. These results, have enabled me by using projectile X-ray spectroscopy during the ions-clusters collision, to evidence a strong clustering of targets atoms and to highlight an electronic multi-capture in the projectile ion excited states. (author)

  12. Iodine, krypton and xenon retention efficiencies of silver impregnated silica gel media with different silver loadings and under different test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motes, B.G.; Fernandez, S.J.; Tkachyk, J.W.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of an independent study conducted by Exxon Nuclear Idaho, Co. (ENICO) was to evaluate a silver impregnated silica gel adsorption medium associated with a radioiodine air sampler developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Specifically, ENICO's responsibility was to evaluate the iodine and noble gas retention efficiencies of the adsorption medium. The evaluation was comprised of a four-phase program: 1) test assemblies capable of challenging the silver silica gel filled adsorber canister with radioiodine species or noble gases at flow rates up to 10 scfm and relative humidities up to 83% were constructed; 2) more than 45 kgs of the 4 and 8% silver impregnated silica gel were prepared and characterized for particle size distribution, bulk silver content, bulk density, and silver content by particle size; 3) iodine species retention efficiencies of the silver silica gel were determined; and 4 krypton and xenon retention efficiencies were measured. The iodine species retention efficiencies were greater than 90% under most conditions. A combination of flow rates >5 scfm and 4% silver loaded silica gel reduced the methyl iodide retention efficiency to less than 90%. The retention efficiencies for both krypton and xenon were on the order of 8 x 10 -2 % and were not affected greatly by any test variable except test duration. A reduced retention efficiency with increased test durations indicates adsorption equilibrium may be established within five minutes. (author)

  13. Effect of hydration on the organo-noble gas molecule HKrCCH: role of krypton in the stabilization of hydrated HKrCCH complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Biswajit; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2015-11-11

    The effect of hydration on the fluorine free organo-noble gas compound HKrCCH and the role of krypton in the stabilization of the hydrated HKrCCH complexes have been investigated using the quantum chemical calculations on the HKrCCH-(H2O)n=1-6 clusters. Structure and energetics calculations show that water stabilizes HKrCCH through the π hydrogen bond in which the OH group of water interacts with the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C group of HKrCCH. A maximum of four water molecules can directly interact with the C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C of HKrCCH and after that only inter-hydrogen bonding takes place between the water molecules indicating that the primary hydration shell contains four water molecules. Atom in molecule analysis depicts that π hydrogen bonded complexes of the hydrated HKrCCH are cyclic structures in which the OKr interaction cooperates in the formation of strong O-HC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C interaction. Structure, energetics and charge analysis clearly established that krypton plays an important role in the stabilization as well as the formation of the primary hydration shell of hydrated HKrCCH complexes.

  14. Moessbauer Effect applications using intense radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Moessbauer Effect is reviewed as a promising tool for a number of new solid state studies when used in combination with radioactive beam/implantation facilities. The usual Moessbauer Effect involves long-lived radioactive parents (days to years) that populate low-lying nuclear excited states that subsequently decay to the ground state. Resonant emission/absorption of recoil-free gamma rays from these states provide information on a number of properties of the host materials. Radioactive ion beams (RIB) produced on-line allow new Moessbauer nuclei to be studied where there is no suitable parent. The technique allows useful sources to be made having extremely low local concentrations. The ability to separate the beams in both Z and A should provide high specific activity ''conventional'' sources, a feature important in some applications such as Moessbauer studies in diamond anvil high pressure cells. Exotic chemistry is proposed using RIB and certain Krypton and Xenon Moessbauer isotopes

  15. Operation of TFTR neutral beams with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Stevenson, T.N.; Wright, K.E.; Dudek, L.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Newman, R.A.; O'Connor, T.E.; Oldaker, M.E.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1991-07-01

    High Z neutral atoms have been injected into TFTR plasmas in an attempt to enhance plasma confinement through modification of the edge electric field. TFTR ion sources have extracted 9 A of 62 keV Ne + for up to 0.2 s during injection into deuterium plasmas, and for 0.5 s during conditioning pulses. Approximately 400 kW of Ne 0 have been injected from each of two ion sources. Operation was at full bending magnet current, with the Ne + barely contained on the ion dump. Beamline design modifications to permit operation up to 120 keV with krypton or xenon are described. Such ions are too massive to be deflected up to the ion dump. The plan, therefore, is to armor those components receiving these ions. Even with this armor, modest increases in the bending magnet current capability are necessary to safely reach 120 kV with Kr or Xe. Information relevant to heavy ion operation was also acquired when several ion sources were inadvertently operated with water contamination. Spectroscopic analysis of certain pathological pulses indicate that up to 6% of the extracted ions were water. After dissociation in the neutralizer, water yields oxygen ions which, as with Ne, Kr, and Xe, are under-deflected by the magnet. Damage to a calorimeter scraper, due to the focal properties of the magnet, has resulted. A magnified power density of 6 KW/cm 2 for 2 s, from ∼ 90 kW of O + , is the suspected cause. 11 refs., 4 figs

  16. A compact electron beam ion source with integrated Wien filter providing mass and charge state separated beams of highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M. [DREEBIT GmbH, Zur Wetterwarte 50, D-01109 Dresden (Germany); Peng, H. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zschornack, G. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Mommsenstr. 13, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Sykora, S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Mommsenstr. 13, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    A Wien filter was designed for and tested with a room temperature electron beam ion source (EBIS). Xenon charge state spectra up to the charge state Xe{sup 46+} were resolved as well as the isotopes of krypton using apertures of different sizes. The complete setup consisting of an EBIS and a Wien filter has a length of less than 1 m substituting a complete classical beamline setup. The Wien filter is equipped with removable permanent magnets. Hence total beam current measurements are possible via simple removal of the permanent magnets. In dependence on the needs of resolution a weak (0.2 T) or a strong (0.5 T) magnets setup can be used. In this paper the principle of operation and the design of the Wien filter meeting the requirements of an EBIS are briefly discussed. The first ion beam extraction and separation experiments with a Dresden EBIS are presented.

  17. A compact electron beam ion source with integrated Wien filter providing mass and charge state separated beams of highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.; Peng, H.; Zschornack, G.; Sykora, S.

    2009-06-01

    A Wien filter was designed for and tested with a room temperature electron beam ion source (EBIS). Xenon charge state spectra up to the charge state Xe46+ were resolved as well as the isotopes of krypton using apertures of different sizes. The complete setup consisting of an EBIS and a Wien filter has a length of less than 1 m substituting a complete classical beamline setup. The Wien filter is equipped with removable permanent magnets. Hence total beam current measurements are possible via simple removal of the permanent magnets. In dependence on the needs of resolution a weak (0.2 T) or a strong (0.5 T) magnets setup can be used. In this paper the principle of operation and the design of the Wien filter meeting the requirements of an EBIS are briefly discussed. The first ion beam extraction and separation experiments with a Dresden EBIS are presented.

  18. Toxicology of Krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to obtain biological data to supplement earlier evaluations of the hazards of 85 Kr exposure. The studies include both short-term and chronic exposure of rats, dogs and sheep to determine tissue distribution and retention kinetics for metabolic modeling purposes. Dose-effect studies in rats exposed acutely as newborns or chronically for most of their life span are included to identify tissues at risk and determine tumorigenic potency

  19. Toxicology of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to obtain biological data to supplement earlier evaluations of the hazards of 85 Kr exposure. Dose-effect studies in rats exposed chronically for their life span are included to identify tissues at risk and determine tumorigenic potency. Effects of chronic 85 Kr exposure in adult and newborn rats are summarized

  20. Breaking through the glass ceiling: The correlation between the self-diffusivity in and krypton permeation through deeply supercooled liquid nanoscale methanol films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2010-03-01

    Molecular beam techniques, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to explore the relationship between krypton permeation through and the self-diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol at temperatures (100-115 K) near the glass transition temperature, Tg (103 K). Layered films, consisting of CH3OH and CD3OH, are deposited on top of a monolayer of Kr on a graphene covered Pt(111) substrate at 25 K. Concurrent Kr TPD and RAIRS spectra are acquired during the heating of the composite film to temperatures above Tg. The CO vibrational stretch is sensitive to the local molecular environment and is used to determine the supercooled liquid diffusivity from the intermixing of the isotopic layers. We find that the Kr permeation and the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid are directly and quantitatively correlated. These results validate the rare-gas permeation technique as a tool for probing the diffusivity of supercooled liquids.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of ozone in cryosolutions: FT-IR spectra of 16O3 in liquid nitrogen, oxygen, argon and krypton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanin, Kirill M.; Bulanin, Michael O.; Rudakova, Aida V.; Kolomijtsova, Tatiana D.; Shchepkin, Dmitrij N.

    2018-03-01

    We have measured and interpreted the IR spectra of ozone dissolved in liquid nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and krypton in the 650-4700 cm-1 spectral region at 79-117 K. Frequency shifts, band intensities and bandshapes of 22 spectral features of soluted ozone were analyzed. The bands of the A1 symmetry have a complex contour and possess an excess intensity with respect to the value of the purely vibrational transition moment. It was found that this effect is related to the manifestation of the Coriolis interaction. The bandshape distortion manifests itself as an additional intensity from the side of the B1 symmetry band being an intensity source in the case of the Coriolis interaction.

  2. AKUT: a process for the separation of aerosols, krypton, and tritium from burner off-gas in HTR-fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser, M.; Barnert-Wiemer, H.; Beaujean, H.; Merz, E.; Vygen, H.

    1975-01-01

    The AKUT process consists of the following process steps: (1) aerosol retention by an electrostatic separator followed by HEPA filters, (2) oxidation of CO with O 2 or reaction of excess O 2 with CO, respectively, (3) compression, (4) scrubbing and/or liquefaction, (5) separation of krypton by distillation, and (6) separation of tritiated water and iodine by adsorption or chemical reaction. Liquefied off-gas with low permanent gas content resulting from graphite burning with oxygen may be distilled at ambient temperature. Off-gas with higher permanent gas content from burning with oxygen enriched air must be processed at lower temperature. The ambient temperature flow sheet is preferable from an economic as well as safety point of view. (U.S.)

  3. Application of a 222-nm krypton-chlorine excilamp to control foodborne pathogens on sliced cheese surfaces and characterization of the bactericidal mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jae-Won; Lee, Jae-Ik; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2017-02-21

    This study was conducted to investigate the basic spectral properties of a 222-nm krypton-chlorine (KrCl) excilamp and its inactivation efficacy against major foodborne pathogens on solid media, as well as on sliced cheese compared to a conventional 254-nm low-pressure mercury (LP Hg) lamp. Selective media and sliced cheese inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes were irradiated with a KrCl excilamp and a LP Hg lamp at the same dose. The KrCl excilamp showed full radiant intensity from the outset at a wide range of working temperatures, especially at low temperatures of around 0 to 10°C. Irradiation with 222nm UV-C showed significantly (PUV-C surface disinfecting system can be applied as an alternative to conventional LP Hg lamp treatment by the dairy industry. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Oxide glass structure evolution under swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, C.; Peuget, S.; Charpentier, T.; Moskura, M.; Caraballo, R.; Bouty, O.; Mir, A.H.; Monnet, I.; Grygiel, C.; Jegou, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Structure of SHI irradiated glass is similar to the one of a hyper quenched glass. • D2 Raman band associated to 3 members ring is only observed in irradiated glass. • Irradiated state seems slightly different to an equilibrated liquid quenched rapidly. - Abstract: The effects of ion tracks on the structure of oxide glasses were examined by irradiating a silica glass and two borosilicate glass specimens containing 3 and 6 oxides with krypton ions (74 MeV) and xenon ions (92 MeV). Structural changes in the glass were observed by Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a multinuclear approach ( 11 B, 23 Na, 27 Al and 29 Si). The structure of irradiated silica glass resembles a structure quenched at very high temperature. Both borosilicate glass specimens exhibited depolymerization of the borosilicate network, a lower boron coordination number, and a change in the role of a fraction of the sodium atoms after irradiation, suggesting that the final borosilicate glass structures were quenched from a high temperature state. In addition, a sharp increase in the concentration of three membered silica rings and the presence of large amounts of penta- and hexacoordinate aluminum in the irradiated 6-oxide glass suggest that the irradiated glass is different from a liquid quenched at equilibrium, but it is rather obtained from a nonequilibrium liquid that is partially relaxed by very rapid quenching within the ion tracks

  5. Forbidden lines of highly ionized ions for localized plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinnov, E.; Fonck, R.; Suckewer, S.

    1980-06-01

    Numerous optically forbidden lines resulting from magnetic dipole transitions in low-lying electron configurations of highly ionized Fe, Ti and Cr atoms have been identified in PLT and PDX tokamak discharges, and applied for localized diagnostics in the high-temperature (0.5 to 3.0 keV) interior of these plasmas. The measurements include determination of local ion densities and their variation in time, and of ion motions (ion temperature, plasma rotations) through Doppler effect of the lines. These forbidden lines are particularly appropriate for such measurements because under typical tokamak conditions their emissivities are quite high (10 11 to 10 14 photons/cm 3 -sec), and their relatively long wavelengths allow the use of intricate optical techniques and instrumentation. The spatial location of the emissivity is directly measurable, and tends to occur near radii where the ionization potential of the ion in question is equal to the local electron temperature. In future larger and presumably higher-temperature tokamaks analogous measurements with somewhat heavier atoms, particularly krypton, and perhaps zirconium appear both feasible and desirable

  6. Erosion of volatile elemental condensed gases by keV electron and light-ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schou, J.

    1991-11-01

    Erosion of the most volatile elemental gases by keV electron and light-ion bombardment has been studied at the experimental setup at Risoe. The present work includes frozen neon, argon, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen and three hydrogen isotopes, deuterium, hydrogen deuteride and hydrogen. The yield of these condensed gases has been measured as a function of film thickness and primary energy for almost all combinations of primary particles (1-3 keV electrons, 5-10 keV hydrogen- and helium ions) and ices. These and other existing results show that there are substantial common features for the sputtering of frozen elemental gases. Within the two groups, the solid rare gases and the solid molecular gases, the similarity is striking. The hydrogenic solids deviate in some respects from the other elements. The processes that liberate kinetic energy for the particle ejection in sputtering are characteristic of the specific gas. (au) 3 tabs., 12 ills., 159 refs

  7. Applications and interpretation of krypton 81m ventilation/technetium 99m macroaggregate perfusion lung scanning in childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Hugh Trevor Frimston

    Radionuclide ventilation perfusion lung scans now play an important part in the investigation of paediatric lung disease, providing a safe, noninvasive assessment of regional lung function in children with suspected pulmonary disease. In paediatric practice the most suitable radionuclides are Krypton 81m (Kr81m) and Technetium 99m (Tc99m), which are jointly used in the Kr81m ventilation/Tc99m macroaggregate perfusion lung scan (V/Q lung scan). The Kr81m ventilation scan involves a low radiation dose, requires little or no subject cooperation and because of the very short half life of Kr81m (13 seconds) the steady state image acquired during continuous inhalation of the radionuclide is considered to reflect regional distribution of ventilation. It is now the most important noninvasive method available for the investigation of the regional abnormalities of ventilation characteristic of many congenital and acquired paediatric respiratory diseases, such as diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary sequestration, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, foreign body inhalation and bronchiectasis. It improves diagnostic accuracy, aids clinical decision making and is used to monitor the progress of disease and response to therapy. Theoretical analysis of the steady state Kr81m ventilation image suggests that it may only reflect regional ventilation when specific ventilation (ventilation per unit volume of lung) is within or below the normal adult range (1-3 L/L/min). At higher values such as those seen in neonates and infants (8-15 L/L/min) Kr81m activity may reflect regional lung volume rather than ventilation, a conclusion supported by the studies of Ciofetta et al. There is some controversy on this issue as animal studies have demonstrated that the Kr81m image reflects ventilation over a much wider range of specific ventilation (up to 13 L/L/min). A clinical study of sick infants and very young children is in agreement with this animal work and suggests that the steady state Kr81m image

  8. A study of the atmospheric dispersion of a high release of krypton-85 above a complex coastal terrain, comparison with the predictions of Gaussian models (Briggs, Doury, ADMS4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, C; Maro, D; Hébert, D; Solier, L; Rozet, M; Le Cavelier, S; Connan, O

    2010-11-01

    Atmospheric releases of krypton-85, from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at the AREVA NC facility at La Hague (France), were used to test Gaussian models of dispersion. In 2001-2002, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) studied the atmospheric dispersion of 15 releases, using krypton-85 as a tracer for plumes emitted from two 100-m-high stacks. Krypton-85 is a chemically inert radionuclide. Krypton-85 air concentration measurements were performed on the ground in the downwind direction, at distances between 0.36 and 3.3 km from the release, by neutral or slightly unstable atmospheric conditions. The standard deviation for the horizontal dispersion of the plume and the Atmospheric Transfer Coefficient (ATC) were determined from these measurements. The experimental results were compared with calculations using first generation (Doury, Briggs) and second generation (ADMS 4.0) Gaussian models. The ADMS 4.0 model was used in two configurations; one takes account of the effect of the built-up area, and the other the effect of the roughness of the surface on the plume dispersion. Only the Briggs model correctly reproduced the measured values for the width of the plume, whereas the ADMS 4.0 model overestimated it and the Doury model underestimated it. The agreement of the models with measured values of the ATC varied according to distance from the release point. For distances less than 2 km from the release point, the ADMS 4.0 model achieved the best agreement between model and measurement; beyond this distance, the best agreement was achieved by the Briggs and Doury models.

  9. Passive mode locking in a multisegment laser diode with an external cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, E V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Koroteev, Nikolai I; Salik, E; Feinberg, J; Starodubov, D S; Shramenko, M V; Yakubovich, S D

    1999-01-01

    The structure and operating conditions of multisegment laser (GaAl)As diodes with passive locking of the modes of an external cavity (bulk and fibre) were optimised. Regular trains of optical single pulses of picosecond duration were generated in a spectral range 850 - 860 nm. The peak power of these pulses was several watts and the repetition rate was near 1 GHz. Under certain conditions these output pulses were linearly chirped, i.e. they were suitable for subpicosecond time compression. Laboratory prototypes were made of miniature light-emitting modules with these characteristics. (lasers)

  10. Monolithic mode-locked lasers with deeply dry etched Bragg mirror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, David; Yvind, Kresten; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    and high index regions (etched andunetched), is 240 nm for a 1st order grating and 480 nm for the 2nd order.Fabrication: The mask for the grating is formed by a combination of E-beam writing andUV-lithography. The resist pattern is transferred to a 100 nm SiO2-film, with a CHF3(Freon) based dry etch...

  11. Double pass locking and spatial mode locking for gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cusack, B J; Slagmolen, B; Vine, G D; Gray, M B; McClelland, D E

    2002-01-01

    We present novel techniques for overcoming problems relating to the use of high-power lasers in mode cleaner cavities for second generation laser interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Rearranging the optical components into a double pass locking regime can help to protect locking detectors from damage. Modulator thermal lensing can be avoided by using a modulation-free technique such as tilt locking, or its recently developed cousin, flip locking.

  12. Diode array pumped, non-linear mirror Q-switched and mode-locked ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to control the air dispersion of the FW and SH beam by introducing proper phase shift between them and to achieve the maximum loss modulation. The laser output power at .... pulse train as a faithful replica of the fundamental train. But the correspondence between the central peak of the fundamental and that of the SH is ...

  13. Construction and Measurement of an Actively Mode-Locked Sigma Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, James

    1998-01-01

    .... The amplitude-modulated pulses become the discrete samples of the analog signal. Limiting factors in an optical ADC are the pulsewidth, the pulse rate, and the jitter noise of the optical pulse train...

  14. Amplitude and Temporal Jitter Associated with the NPS Active Mode-Locked Sigma Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, James

    2000-01-01

    .... They have the capability of being used for direct signal reception and ADC at an antenna. A fundamental requirement for these designs is a high-frequency optical pulse train with uniform amplitude and pulse spacing...

  15. A mode-locked thulium-doped fiber laser based on a nonlinear loop mirror

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honzátko, Pavel; Baravets, Yauhen; Todorov, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 7 (2013) ISSN 1612-2011 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1840 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : PULSE GENERATION * RING LASER * OSCILLATOR Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.964, year: 2013

  16. Polarisation Dynamics of Vector Soliton Molecules in Mode Locked Fibre Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatourian, Veronika; Sergeyev, Sergey V.; Mou, Chengbo; Rozhin, Alex; Mikhailov, Vitaly; Rabin, Bryan; Westbrook, Paul S.; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2013-01-01

    Two fundamental laser physics phenomena - dissipative soliton and polarisation of light are recently merged to the concept of vector dissipative soliton (VDS), viz. train of short pulses with specific state of polarisation (SOP) and shape defined by an interplay between anisotropy, gain/loss, dispersion, and nonlinearity. Emergence of VDSs is both of the fundamental scientific interest and is also a promising technique for control of dynamic SOPs important for numerous applications from nano-optics to high capacity fibre optic communications. Using specially designed and developed fast polarimeter, we present here the first experimental results on SOP evolution of vector soliton molecules with periodic polarisation switching between two and three SOPs and superposition of polarisation switching with SOP precessing. The underlying physics presents an interplay between linear and circular birefringence of a laser cavity along with light induced anisotropy caused by polarisation hole burning. PMID:24193374

  17. MHD-mode locking by controlled halo-current in the T-10 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, N.V.; Chudnovskiy, A.N.; Gvozdkov, Yu.V.; Kakurin, A.M.; Orlovskiy, I.I.; Pavlov, Yu.D.; Piterskiy, V.V.; Safonova, M.B.; Volkov, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments on a non-disruptive halo-current influence on the m = 2 mode behaviour at the flat-top stage of a tokamak discharge are presented. The halo-current in the Rail Limiter - Plasma - Vacuum Vessel - External Circuit - Rail Limiter loop was used. An EMF source controlled with a pre-programmed signal or with a feedback m = 2 signal was introduced into the external part of the halo-current circuit. The EMF source generated oscillating halo-currents with up to 500 A amplitude in the frequency range 0-20 kHz. In the case of the pre-programmed control signal the switching on of the EMF source resulted in the shift of the m = 2 mode frequency to the frequency of the halo-current oscillations. In particular, the rotation of the m = 2 mode stopped under a pulse of zero-frequency halo-current. In the tokamak discharges when the mode rotation stopped by itself before the switching on of the oscillating halo-current, the mode rotation was restored at the halo-current frequency. In the case of the halo-current feedback control by the m = 2 mode signal, the effect depended on the choice of the phase shift in the feedback loop. Some increase or decrease of the m = 2 mode amplitude as well as some variations of the mode frequency were observed at different values of the phase shift. The halo-current effect on the m = 2 mode behaviour can be attributed to a coupling between the m/n = 2/1 magnetic islands and the halo-current magnetic field. The experiment was simulated on the assumption that the tearing mode is affected by the halo-current magnetic field helical component with the same space structure. The equation for the disturbed poloidal flux in the presence of the external helical surface current was used for the analysis. In the calculations for the T-10 conditions, the mode behaviour under the effect of the halo-current was similar to the experimental observations. (author)

  18. Conversion of Stability of Femtosecond Stabilized Mode-locked Laser to Optical Cavity Length

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmíd, Radek; Číp, Ondřej; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2010), s. 636-640 ISSN 0885-3010 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/1276; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk 2C06012; GA MPO 2A-1TP1/127; GA MPO FT-TA3/133; GA MPO 2A-3TP1/113; GA ČR GA102/07/1179 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : laser * Fabry-Perot * interferometer * length etalon Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.460, year: 2010

  19. MHD-mode locking by controlled halo-current in T-10 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, N.V.

    2002-01-01

    The experiment on a non-disruptive halo-current influence on the m=2 mode rotation at the steady-state stage of tokamak discharge is presented. The halo current in the (Rail Limiter - Plasma - Vacuum Chamber - External Circuit - Rail Limiter) loop was used. The switching on of an EMF source in the external circuit resulted in locking of the m=2 magnetic islands by the halo current of 400 A amplitude. This effect can be attributed to a coupling between the halo-current magnetic field and the m=2/n=1 mode. A set of magnetic probes was used to measure the halo-current space structure in plasma. The dimensions of the halo-current path in plasma along the magnetic field were much shorter in poloidal and toroidal directions than the corresponding wavelengths for m=2/n=1 mode. The experiment was simulated in the assumption that the tearing mode is affected by halo-current helical component with the same space structure. The equation for disturbed poloidal flux in presence of external helical surface current was used for the analysis. In calculations for T-10 conditions the halo-current affected the mode rotation frequency, like it was observed in the experiment. (author)

  20. Cryogenically-cooled Yb:YGAG ceramic mode-locked laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mužík, Jiří; Jelínek, M.; Jambunathan, Venkatesan; Miura, Taisuke; Smrž, Martin; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš; Kubeček, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2015), s. 1402-1408 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143; GA MŠk LO1602; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : solid-states laser * lasing characteristics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 3.148, year: 2015

  1. Effects of resonator input power on Kerr lens mode-locked lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pramana – Journal of Physics. Current Issue : Vol. 90, Issue 3 · Current Issue Volume 90 | Issue 3. March 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription ...

  2. Mode-Locked Deceleration of Molecular Beams: Physics with Ultracold Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Enter name(s) of person(s) responsible for writing the report, performing the research, or credited with the content of the report. The form of entry...778 nm, which demonstrates an auto -scanning, interferometrically stable delay range of 1.5 cm. DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release...that experiment has been moved to the NSF through their CAREER program. We also published two more theoretical papers with our colleagues at

  3. Amplitude characteristics of a solid-state ring laser with active mode locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkina, E.M.; Klochan, E.L.; Lariontsev, E.G.

    1986-09-01

    A system of equations is obtained for the parameters of ultrashort light pulses (USLP) in a solid-state ring laser (SSRL) with periodic loss modulation. Allowance is made for the coupling between counterpropagating USLP due to backscattering in the modulator. The regime of counter-propagating wave frequency capture (CPWFC) is studied. It is shown that the coupling of counterpropagating waves due to backscattering at the modulator ends leads to the suppression of one of the counterpropagating waves during an increase in the detuning of the modulation frequency relative to its optimal value. The influence of rotation on the amplitude characteristics of an SSRL in the CPWFC regime is studied. 9 references.

  4. Effects of resonator input power on Kerr lens mode-locked lasers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Additionally, in order to simplify the article, a Gaussian beam is considered. Figure 1. Resonator configuration for KLM laser: tilted mirrors M2 and M3 are focussing; output mirror M1 and back mirror M4 are flat; S1 and S2 are the slits;. L1 and L2 are the arms. The Kerr medium is placed between the mirrors M2 and M3.

  5. Broadband Fourier domain mode-locked laser for optical coherence tomography at 1060 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Sebastian; Klein, Thomas; Wieser, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    , enable acquisition of densely sampled three-dimensional datasets covering a wide field of view. However, semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs)-the typical laser gain media for swept sources-for the 1060nm band could until recently only provide relatively low output power and bandwidth. We have...

  6. Pulse Characteristics of Passively Mode-Locked Quantum Dot Lasers (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    wide, 1.8-m deep ridges by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching in BCl3. Then a BCB layer was applied for isolation between the p-type metal and...GaAs substrate and annealed at 380C for 1 minute to form the n-ohmic contact. A temperature greater than 380C can crack the BCB . Another Ti/Au metal

  7. Spatial instabilities of light bullets in passively-mode-locked lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, S. V.; Javaloyes, J.

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the existence of robust three-dimensional light bullets (LBs) was predicted theoretically in the output of a laser coupled to a distant saturable absorber. In this paper, we analyze the stability and the range of existence of these dissipative localized structures and provide guidelines and realistic parameter sets for their experimental observation. In order to reduce the complexity of the analysis, we first approximate the three-dimensional problem by a reduced equation governing the dynamics of the transverse profile. This effective theory provides an intuitive picture of the LB formation mechanism. Moreover, it allows us to perform a detailed multiparameter bifurcation study and to identify the different mechanisms of instability. It is found that the LBs experience dominantly either homogeneous oscillation or symmetry-breaking transversal wave radiation. In addition, our analysis reveals several nonintuitive scaling behaviors as functions of the linewidth enhancement factors and the saturation parameters. Our results are confirmed by direct numerical simulations of the full system.

  8. Kinetic studies of ion - recombination in gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulfield, K.J.; Bhave, R.N.; Cooper, R. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-31

    Full text: Subsequent to primary ionisation/excitation and dissociation events in irradiated systems, the medium relaxes by various secondary processes which may also be precursors to lasting chemical and physical changes in the system. Pulse radiolysis techniques can be successfully utilised to directly observe such processes so that kinetic parameters may be determined to subsequently accurately model these processes in irradiated systems. Time resolved microwave absorption techniques on a Febetron 706 pulsed electron beam system have been used to study ion recombination in simple gas systems. The microwave absorption method relies on the mobility of charged species within the system and effectively measures an ac-conductivity of the irradiated medium. The technique has a time resolution of about one nanosecond. The decay of conductivity in irradiated gases over the pressure range 50 to 1500 torr has been measured on time scales from 10 nanoseconds to 10 microseconds. Bulk gas pressure and ion densities were such that measurements yielded recombination coefficients for dimeric rare gas cations with thermal electrons. The recombination rate constant, {alpha}{sub T}, is shown to be both independent and dependent on the total pressure in the system ({alpha}{sub T} = {alpha}{sub 2} + {alpha}{sub 3} [M]; {alpha}{sub T} has values up to approx 10{sup +14} L. M{sup -1} s{sup -1} ). Total recombination coefficients {alpha}{sub T} have been measured for the noble gases helium, neon, argon, krypton and xenon. Measurements have also been made for the simple diatomic molecules nitrogen and hydrogen. All the systems studied, except for argon, show both two and three body processes occurring. The three body or assisted process requires the thermalisation of electrons in the neighborhood of the positive ion prior capture. The two body effect is thought to be a radiative or dissociative process. The mechanistic implications of the pulse radiolysis results will be discussed in

  9. Protonated ions as systemic trapping agents for noble gases: From electronic structure to radiative association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgurel, O.; Pauzat, F.; Pilmé, J.; Ellinger, Y.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Mousis, O.

    2017-10-01

    The deficiencies of argon, krypton, and xenon observed in the atmosphere of Titan as well as anticipated in some comets might be related to a scenario of sequestration by H3+ in the gas phase at the early evolution of the solar nebula. The chemical process implied is a radiative association, evaluated as rather efficient in the case of H3+, especially for krypton and xenon. This mechanism of chemical trapping might not be limited to H3+ only, considering that the protonated ions produced in the destruction of H3+ by its main competitors present in the primitive nebula, i.e., H2O, CO, and N2, might also give stable complexes with the noble gases. However the effective efficiency of such processes is still to be proven. Here, the reactivity of the noble gases Ar, Kr, and Xe, with all protonated ions issued from H2O, CO, and N2, expected to be present in the nebula with reasonably high abundances, has been studied with quantum simulation method dynamics included. All of them give stable complexes and the rate coefficients of their radiative associations range from 10-16 to 10-19 cm3 s-1, which is reasonable for such reactions and has to be compared to the rates of 10-16 to 10-18 cm3 s-1, obtained with H3+. We can consider this process as universal for all protonated ions which, if present in the primitive nebula as astrophysical models predict, should act as sequestration agents for all three noble gases with increasing efficiency from Ar to Xe.

  10. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  11. Adsorptive separation of xenon/krypton mixtures using a zirconium-based metal-organic framework with high hydrothermal and radioactive stabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Joon; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Kim, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seo-Yul [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Ho; Hwang, Young Kyu [Research Group for Nanocatalyst, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yeon, Jei-Won [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Youn-Sang, E-mail: mowbae@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The separation of xenon/krypton mixtures is important for both environmental and industrial purposes. The potential of three hydrothermally stable MOFs (MIL-100(Fe), MIL-101(Cr), and UiO-66(Zr)) for use in Xe/Kr separation has been experimentally investigated. From the observed single-component Xe and Kr isotherms, isosteric heat of adsorption (Q{sub st}{sup o}), and IAST-predicted Xe/Kr selectivities, we observed that UiO-66(Zr) has the most potential as an adsorbent among the three candidate MOFs. We performed dynamic breakthrough experiments with an adsorption bed filled with UiO-66(Zr) to evaluate further the potential of UiO-66(Zr) for Xe/Kr separation under mixture flow conditions. Remarkably, the experimental breakthrough curves show that UiO-66(Zr) can efficiently separate the Xe/Kr mixture. Furthermore, UiO-66(Zr) maintains most of its Xe and Kr uptake capacity, as well as its crystallinity and internal surface area, even after exposure to gamma radiation (2 kGy) for 7 h and aging for 16 months under ambient conditions. This result indicates that UiO-66(Zr) can be considered to be a potential adsorbent for Xe/Kr mixtures under both ambient and radioactive conditions.

  12. Breaking through the glass ceiling: the correlation between the self-diffusivity in and krypton permeation through deeply supercooled liquid nanoscale methanol films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D

    2010-03-28

    Molecular beam techniques, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to explore the relationship between krypton permeation through and the self-diffusivity of supercooled liquid methanol at temperatures (100-115 K) near the glass transition temperature, T(g) (103 K). Layered films, consisting of CH(3)OH and CD(3)OH, are deposited on top of a monolayer of Kr on a graphene covered Pt(111) substrate at 25 K. Concurrent Kr TPD and RAIRS spectra are acquired during the heating of the composite film to temperatures above T(g). The CO vibrational stretch is sensitive to the local molecular environment and is used to determine the supercooled liquid diffusivity from the intermixing of the isotopic layers. We find that the Kr permeation and the diffusivity of the supercooled liquid are directly and quantitatively correlated. These results validate the rare-gas permeation technique as a tool for probing the diffusivity of supercooled liquids.

  13. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  14. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  15. System for Coupling an IEC Reactor to Ion Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Burton, Rodney; Momoto, Hiromu; Miley, George; Richardson, Nathan

    2002-11-01

    A conceptual design for an electric-thruster-driven space ship using a D-He3 fueled Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion power unit was recently developed [1]. This propulsion system uses a bank of modified NSTAR-type krypton ion thrusters (specific impulse of 16,000 sec.) giving a total thrust of 1020 N. The thrust time for a typical outer planet mission ( e.g. Jupiter) with a delta-V of 50,000 m/s is then 200 days. A key component of this concept is a traveling wave direct energy converter that converts the kinetic energy of 14-MeV fusion reaction product protons to high voltage (about 1 MV) DC electrical output. A unique step-down transformer and rectifier system condition this output for use in the ion thrusters. Details of these components, the NSTAR-thruster modifications plus a magnetic hexa-pole collimator designed to guide the emitted protons into the traveling wave converter will be described. This advanced electric thruster design offers a very high power-to-weight ratio system that is crucial for deep space propulsion. [1] George H. Miley, Hiromu Momota, R. Burton, N.Richardson, M. Coventry, and Y. Shaban, IEC Based D-He3 Fusion for Space Propulsion, Trans Am. Nuclear Society, Annual Meeting, Hollywood, FL, June 2002.

  16. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  17. Phase transformations in nickel-aluminum alloys during ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eridon, J.; Rehn, L.; Was, G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of ion beam mixing of nickel-aluminum alloys with 500 keV krypton ions has been investigated over a range of temperature, composition, ion dose, and post-irradiation thermal treatments. Samples were formed by alternate evaporation of layers of aluminum and nickel. A portion of these samples was subsequently annealed to form intermetallic compounds. Irradiations were performed at both room temperature and 80 0 K using the 2MV ion accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. Phase transformations were observed during both in situ irradiations in the High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM) at Argonne, and also in subsequent analysis of an array of irradiated samples. Electron diffraction indicates the presence of metastable crystalline structures not present in the conventional nickel-aluminum phase diagram. Transformations occur at doses as low as 5 x 10 14 cm -2 and continue to develop as the irradiation progresses up to 2 x 10 16 cm -2 . Layer mixing is followed through Rutherford Backscattering analysis. Samples are also checked with x-rays and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). A thermodynamic argument is presented to explain the phase transformations in terms of movements on a free energy diagram. This analysis explains the interesting paradox concerning the radiation hardness of the NiAl phase and the amorphous structure of mixed Ni-50% Al layers

  18. Study of performances of the liquid krypton calorimeter of the NA48 experiment for measurement of Re({epsilon}'/{epsilon}); Etude des performances du calorimetre a krypton liquide de l'experience NA48 pour la mesure de Re({epsilon}'/{epsilon})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocariz, Jose [Lab. de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-04-19

    The purpose of the NA48 experiment is the study of direct violation of CP symmetry in the system of neutral kaons. The double ratio of neutral and charged two pion decays, violating and conserving CP should be measured with an ultimate accuracy of about 0.1%. In attain this objective one of the important ingredients is the liquid krypton calorimeter, which allows to identify the neutral modes with a very good accuracy. One should therefore ensure that the systematic effects are weak. The performances of this calorimeter, particularly in energy response, are studied with data acquired in 1997. These studies are mainly effected for the K{sub e3} semileptonic decays by comparing the energy reconstructed in the calorimeter with the momentum obtained by the magnetic spectrometer. These data allow to constrain significantly the energy resolution, the response non-linearity as well as the detector geometry and to optimize the calibration. The energy resolution achieved is better than 1% for energies above 25 GeV. This allows to reduce the background in the neutral mode at the level of 0.1%. The systematic uncertainties from calorimeter on the measurement of double ratio are estimated for the 1997 data at 0.1%. This value is clearly below the statistical error of 0.27% for these data.

  19. Ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The ion source comprises a cylindrically shaped chamber with a longitudinal outlet slot formed therein and two uniform anode wires which extend along the length of the chamber in the middle region thereof and which are symmetrically introduced with respect to the length axis of the chamber and the outlet groove, characterised in that at each outer end of the outlet groove at a nearly null potential or direct potential is introduced a mask, whereby the lowest distance between the inner and outer ends of the mask is equivalent to the breadth of the ion beam emitted from the source. (G.C.)

  20. Kr-86 Ion-Beam Irradiation of Hydrated DNA: Free Radical and Unaltered Base Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, David; Adhikary, Amitava; Tetteh, Smedley T.; Bull, Arthur W.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This work reports an ESR and product analysis investigation of Kr-86 ion-beam irradiation of hydrated DNA at 77 K. The irradiation results in the formation and trapping of both base radicals and sugar phosphate radicals (DNA backbone radicals). The absolute yields (G, μmol/J) of the base radicals are smaller than the yields found in similarly prepared γ-irradiated DNA samples, and the relative yields of backbone radicals relative to base radicals are much higher than that found in γ-irradiated samples. From these results, we have elaborated our radiation chemical model of the track structure for ion-beam irradiated DNA as it applies to krypton ion-beams. The base radicals, which are trapped as ion radicals or reversibly protonated or deprotonated ion radicals, are formed almost entirely in the track penumbra, a region in which radiation chemical effects are similar to those found in γ-irradiated samples. By comparing the yields of base radicals in ion-beam samples to the yields of the same radicals in γ-irradiated samples, the partition of energy between the low-LET region (penumbra) and the core is experimentally determined. The neutral sugar and other backbone radicals, which are not as susceptible to recombination as are ion radicals, are formed largely in the track core. The backbone radicals show a linear dose response up to very high doses. Unaltered base release yields in Kr-86 irradiated hydrated DNA are equal to sugar radical yields within experimental error limits, consistent with radiation-chemical processes in which all base release originates with sugar radicals. Two phosphorus-centered radicals from fragmentation of the DNA backbone are found in low yields. PMID:23106211

  1. Ion channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erramli, H.; Blondiaux, G.

    1994-01-01

    Channeling phenomenon was predicted, many years ago, by stark. The first channeling experiments were performed in 1963 by Davies and his coworkers. Parallely Robinson and Oen have investigated this process by simulating trajectories of ions in monocrystals. This technique has been combined with many methods like Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (R.B.S.), Particles Induced X-rays Emission (P.I.X.E) and online Nuclear Reaction (N.R.A.) to localize trace elements in the crystal or to determine crystalline quality. To use channeling for material characterization we need data about the stopping power of the incident particle in the channeled direction. The ratios of channeled to random stopping powers of silicon for irradiation in the direction have been investigated and compared to the available theoretical results. We describe few applications of ion channeling in the field of materials characterization. Special attention is given to ion channeling combined with Charged Particle Activation Analysis (C.P.A.A.) for studying the behaviour of oxygen atoms in Czochralski silicon lattices under the influence of internal gettering and in different gaseous atmospheres. Association between ion channeling and C.P.A.A was also utilised for studying the influence of the growing conditions on concentration and position of carbon atoms at trace levels in the MOVPE Ga sub (1-x) Al sub x lattice. 6 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs. (author)

  2. Metastable phase formation in ion-irradiated nickel-aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eridon, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Phase transformations induced by ion beam mixing of nickel-aluminum alloys with 500-keV krypton ions were investigated over a range of temperatures (80 K to 300K), composition (NiAl 3 , NiAl, Ni 1 Al), initial structures (both nickel-aluminum layers and ordered intermetallic compounds), and doses (ranging from 2 x 10 14 cm -2 to 5 x 10 16 cm -2 ). Samples were formed by alternate evaporation of layers of nickel and aluminum in high vacuum onto copper grids. These samples were check for purity with energy dispersive-x-ray spectroscopy, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. A portion of these samples was annealed to form the intermetallic compounds appropriate to the given composition. Irradiations were performed at both room temperature (300 K) and 80 K using the 2-MV ion accelerator at Argonne National Laboratory. Phase transformations were observed during both in-situ irradiations in the High Voltage Electron Microscopy at Argonne and also in subsequent electron-diffraction analysis of an array of samples irradiated in a target chamber. Metastable phases formed include disordered crystalline structures at composition s of 25% and 50% aluminum, an amorphous structure at 75% aluminum, and a hexagonal closed-packed structure formed at 25% aluminum. These metastable states were all converted to the stable intermetallic compounds through annealing treatments

  3. Gamow-Teller decay and nuclear deformation: implementing of a new total absorption spectrometer, study of isotopes N {approx_equal} Z krypton and strontium; Decroissance Gamow-Teller et deformation nucleaire: mise en oeuvre d'un nouveau spectrometre a absorption totale, etude d'isotopes N {approx_equal} Z de krypton et strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, E

    2002-12-01

    Nuclei with A {approx} 70 along the N=Z line are known to be the scene of phenomena closely related to the nuclear deformation and are of particular interest since theoretical mean field calculations predict that a large part of the Gamow-Teller resonance might be located below the ground state of the mother nucleus and then be accessible through {beta}-decay studies. These results have shown the effect of the shape of the ground state on the intensity of the Gamow-Teller strength. Thus, the experimental determination, through {delta}-decay, of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution and the comparison to the theoretical predictions allow to pin down the quadrupolar deformation parameter of the ground state of the parent nucleus. In order to study the neutron deficient isotopes of krypton (A=72,73,74,75) and strontium (A=76,77,78) and to establish the {beta}-strength on the full energy range, a new total absorption spectrometer (TAgS) has been built in the frame of an international collaboration and installed at the (SOLDE/CERN mass separator. For the data analysis, the response function R of the spectrometer has been calculated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations, based on the GEANT4 code, and of a statistical description of the level scheme in the daughter nucleus. The {beta}-feeding distribution has been obtained from experimental spectra through a method based on Bayes theorem and then converted into Gamow-Teller strength. The results coming from the {sup 74}Kr decay analysis allow to describe the ground state of such a nucleus as the coexistence of an oblate shape and of a prolate shape. In the case of {sup 76}Sr, the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution strongly indicates a prolate deformation. (author)

  4. ION VATAMANU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    l. Povar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ion Vatamanu was a chemist, writer and public figure. He was equally passionate about both his chosen fields of activity: chemistry and poetry. Chemistry, with its perfect equilibrium of logic and precision, provided inspiration for lyrical creativity, whereas poetry writing enlivened his imagination and passion for chemistry. He loved his parents. He adored his wife Elena, whom he often gifted a sea of flowers. He loved his daughters Mihaela, Mariana, and Leontina. He loved life, and he loved people.

  5. Ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Fusao; Okuyama, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Yasuo.

    1996-01-01

    In a negative ion source having magnetic filters, bisecting magnetic fields are formed using electromagnets disposed at the outside of a plasma source. The position of the electromagnets is made adjustable and removable to optimize a negative ion generation efficiency. Further, a plurality of electromagnets are disposed in longitudinal direction of the plasma source, and the intensity of the magnetic fields of the filters in the longitudinal direction is made adjustable to control a beam distribution. Since uniform magnetic fields which bisect the plasma source can be formed by the electromagnets, and magnetomotive force of the electromagnets can be increased easily compared with that of permanent magnets, the magnetomotive force is changed to obtain appropriate filter magnetic fields easily. Then, optimum magnetic fields corresponding to the state of source plasmas can be generated by the control of the power source of the electromagnets, which also increases the negative ion drawing current density, thereby enabling to reduce the drawing area and size of the plasma source. (N.H.)

  6. Krypton-85 removal and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Fernandez, J.

    1978-01-01

    A literature survey was made in order to predict the atmospheric Kr-85 concentration in the future and it s effect on the population. As a consequence the need for its treatment and removal as a previous step to gaseous waste disposal is justified. A literature review of possible methods of Kr-85 removal and storage is also included. (Author) 43 refs

  7. Ion Beam Extraction by Discrete Ion Focusing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus (900) and methods are disclosed for ion beam extraction. In an implementation, the apparatus includes a plasma source (or plasma) (802) and an ion extractor (804). The plasma source is adapted to generate ions and the ion extractor is immersed in the plasma source to extract a fraction...... of the generated ions. The ion extractor is surrounded by a space charge (810) formed at least in part by the extracted ions. The ion extractor includes a biased electrode (806) forming an interface with an insulator (808). The interface is customized to form a strongly curved potential distribution (812......) in the space-charge surrounding the ion extractor. The strongly curved potential distribution focuses the extracted ions towards an opening (814) on a surface of the biased electrode thereby resulting in an ion beam....

  8. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  9. Heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Antinori, Federico

    2001-01-01

    Colliding two heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies allows to create in the laboratory a bulk system with huge density, pressure and temperature and to study its properties. It is estimated that in Pb-Pb collisions at CERN-SPS we reach over an appreciable volume an energy density which exceeds by more than a factor 20 that of normal nuclear matter. At such densities, the hadrons are so closely packed that they interpenetrate; novel physics phenomena are expected to appear. QCD predicts that under such conditions a phase transition from a system composed of colourless hadrons to a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) should occur. A rich ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics programme is under way both at BNL-AGS and at CERN-SPS since 1986. The results obtained so far have led CERN to officially announce evidence for a new state of matter last year. A long-range programme of heavy-ion physics at higher energies is under way (BNL-RHIC) and in preparation (CERN-LHC). These lectures are meant as an introduction to the phy...

  10. ION GUN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-10-24

    An ion gun is described for the production of an electrically neutral ionized plasma. The ion gun comprises an anode and a cathode mounted in concentric relationship with a narrow annulus between. The facing surfaces of the rear portions of the anode and cathode are recessed to form an annular manifold. Positioned within this manifold is an annular intermediate electrode aligned with the an nulus between the anode and cathode. Gas is fed to the manifold and an arc discharge is established between the anode and cathode. The gas is then withdrawn from the manifold through the annulus between the anode and cathode by a pressure differential. The gas is then ionized by the arc discharge across the annulus. The ionized gas is withdrawn from the annulus by the combined effects of the pressure differential and a collimating magnetic field. In a 3000 gauss magnetic field, an arc voltage of 1800 volts, and an arc current of 0.2 amp, a plasma of about 3 x 10/sup 11/ particles/cc is obtained. (AEC)

  11. Compton polarimetry of 6-35 keV X-rays. Influence of Breit interaction on the linear polarisation of KLL dielectronic recombination transitions in highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joerg, Holger Eric

    2016-12-21

    The polarisation of X-rays emitted during K shell dielectronic recombination (DR) into highly charged ions was studied using electron beam ion traps. In the first experiment, the degree of linear polarisation of X-rays due to K shell DR transitions of highly charged krypton ions was measured with a newly developed Compton polarimeter based on SiPIN diodes. Such polarisation measurements allow a study of the population mechanism of magnetic sublevels in collisions between electrons and ions. In a second experiment, the influence of Breit interaction between electrons on the polarisation of X-rays emitted during K shell DR into highly charged xenon ions was studied. Here, polarisation measurements provide an access to the finer details of the electron-electron interaction in electron-ion collisions. Furthermore, a second Compton polarimeter based on silicon drift detectors has been developed for polarisation measurements at synchrotrons. It has been developed for X-ray polarimetry with a high energy resolution for energies between 6 keV and 35 keV. It was tested in the course of polarisation measurements at an electron beam ion trap and at a synchrotron radiation source.

  12. Effect of narrow spectral filter position on the characteristics of active similariton mode-locked femtosecond fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Hussein; Abdelalim, Mohamed A; Anis, Hanan

    2015-11-16

    A significant change in active similariton characteristics, both numerically and experimentally, is observed as a function of the location of the lumped spectral filter. The closer the spectral filter is to the input of the Yb(3+)-doped fiber, the shorter the de-chirped pulse width. The peak power of the de-chirped pulse has its maximum value at a certain location of the spectral filter. Four different positions of the spectral filter inside the laser cavity have been theoretically studied and two of them have been verified experimentally.

  13. 2-μm mode-locked nanosecond fiber laser based on MoS2 saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fa; Peng, Xiao-Ling; Jiang, Qiu-Xia; Gu, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Jun-Hong; Mao, Xue-Feng; Yuan, Su-Zhen

    2017-10-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304409), the Natural Science Foundation of Chongqing City, China (Grant No. CSTC2013jcyjA4004), the Scientific and Technological Research Program of Chongqing Municipal Education Commission, China (Grant No. KJ1500422), and the Special Theme Projects on LCD Industrial Generic Technology Innovation of Chongqing City, China (Grant No. CSTC2015zdcy-ztzx40003).

  14. Theoretical Study of an Actively Mode-Locked Fiber Laser Stabilized by an Intracavity Fabry-Perot Etalon: Linear Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    competition without a significant ncrease in the pulse duration. . MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR THE ASER ur mathematical model of the laser is similar to...to he case 1=0. The increase in the parameter P̂ yields an ncrease in the pulse duration by a factor of approxi- ately 10. It is possible to...etalon and it increases as the finesse of the etalon ncreases . Therefore, in a laser with an etalon, the total ispersion is determined by the parameter D̂

  15. Mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in tapered ZBLAN fiber with a standard Erbium mode-locked fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubat, Irnis; Moselund, Peter M.; Bang, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Mid-InfraRed (MIR) broadband SuperContinuum (SC) sources are desirable for applications such as polution monitoring, spectroscopy, and IR countermeasures due to their high spatial coherence and high power density over a broad bandwidth [1]. Conventional silica fibers cannot facilitate this need due...

  16. Nonlinear High-Energy Pulse Propagation in Graded-Index Multimode Optical Fibers for Mode-Locked Fiber Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    is a reasonable approximation, which is also supported by experi- mental measurements [15]. Therefore, we derive a generalized Sellmeier equation to...value of ~L is chosen such that, in the linear case, the relative power transmission is at its mini - mum value. The most notable differences between...spatial profiles Fe(x) = Fe(−x) and Fo(x) = −Fo(−x) being invariant along the y-axis. The symmetries of these two profiles are dictated by the parity

  17. 260 fs and 1 nJ pulse generation from a compact, mode-locked Tm-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2015-11-30

    We report on generation of 260 fs-short pulses with energy of 1.1 nJ from a fully fiberized, monolithic Tm-doped fiber laser system. The design comprises a simple, graphene-based ultrafast oscillator and an integrated all-fiber chirped pulse amplifier (CPA). The system generates 110 mW of average power at 100.25 MHz repetition rate and central wavelength of 1968 nm. This is, to our knowledge, the highest pulse energy generated from a fully fiberized sub-300 fs Tm-doped laser, without the necessity of using grating-based dispersion compensation. Such compact, robust and cost-effective system might serve as a seed source for nonlinear frequency conversion or mid-infrared supercontinuum generation.

  18. Absolute Measurement of the Refractive Index of Water by a Mode-Locked Laser at 518 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaopeng Meng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate a method using a frequency comb, which can precisely measure the refractive index of water. We have developed a simple system, in which a Michelson interferometer is placed into a quartz-glass container with a low expansion coefficient, and for which compensation of the thermal expansion of the water container is not required. By scanning a mirror on a moving stage, a pair of cross-correlation patterns can be generated. We can obtain the length information via these cross-correlation patterns, with or without water in the container. The refractive index of water can be measured by the resulting lengths. Long-term experimental results show that our method can measure the refractive index of water with a high degree of accuracy—measurement uncertainty at 10−5 level has been achieved, compared with the values calculated by the empirical formula.

  19. The tearing mode locking-unlocking mechanism to an external resonant field in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Fridström, R.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2014-10-01

    The tearing mode (TM) locking and unlocking process due to an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) is experimentally studied in EXTRAP T2R. The RMP produces a reduction of the natural TM velocity and ultimately the TM locking if a threshold in the RMP amplitude is exceeded. During the braking process, the TM slows down via a mechanism composed of deceleration and acceleration phases. During the acceleration phases, the TM can reach velocities higher than the natural velocity. Once the TM locking occurs, the RMP must be reduced to a small amplitude to obtain the TM unlocking, showing that the unlocking threshold is significantly smaller than the locking threshold and that the process is characterized by hysteresis. Experimental results are in qualitative agreement with a model that describes the locking-unlocking process via the balance of the electromagnetic torque produced by the RMP that acts to brake the TM and the viscous torque that tends to re-establish the unperturbed velocity.

  20. Q-Switched and Mode Locked Short Pulses from a Diode Pumped, YB-Doped Fiber Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-26

    polarization maintaining (PM) at a length of 8.7 ± 0.1 m. The surface area of the PANDA -style fiber is pictured in figure 3.3 (a) [46]. The core diameter was...diode- pumped c-cut Nd:GdVO4 laser,” Optics Communications 231 (2004) pg 365-369. 36. W. G. Wagner, B. A. Lengyel, "Evolution of the giant pulse in a

  1. Ion beam monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    An ion beam analyzer is specified, having an ion source for generating ions of a sample to be analyzed, means for extracting the sample ions, means for focusing the sample ions into a beam, separation means positioned along the ion beam for selectively deflecting species of ions, and means for detecting the selected species of ions. According to the specification, the analyzer further comprises (a) means for disabling at least a portion of the separation means, such that the ion beam from the source remains undeflected; (b) means located along the path of the undeflected ion beam for sensing the sample ions; and (c) enabling means responsive to the sensing means for automatically re-enabling the separation means when the sample ions reach a predetermined intensity level. (author)

  2. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  3. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 1 covers papers on the advances of gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the advances in flow tubes and the measurement of ion-molecule rate coefficients and product distributions; the ion chemistry of the earth's atmosphere; and the classical ion-molecule collision theory. The text also describes statistical methods in reaction dynamics; the state selection by photoion-photoelectron coincidence; and the effects of temperature and pressure in the kinetics of ion-molecule reactions. The energy distribution in the unimolecular decomposition of ions, as well

  4. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  5. Negative ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Takagi, Toshinori

    1983-01-01

    Negative ion sources have been originally developed at the request of tandem electrostatic accelerators, and hundreds of nA to several μA negative ion current has been obtained so far for various elements. Recently, the development of large current hydrogen negative ion sources has been demanded from the standpoint of the heating by neutral particle beam injection in nuclear fusion reactors. On the other hand, the physical properties of negative ions are interesting in the thin film formation using ions. Anyway, it is the present status that the mechanism of negative ion action has not been so fully investigated as positive ions because the history of negative ion sources is short. In this report, the many mechanisms about the generation of negative ions proposed so far are described about negative ion generating mechanism, negative ion source plasma, and negative ion generation on metal surfaces. As a result, negative ion sources are roughly divided into two schemes, plasma extraction and secondary ion extraction, and the former is further classified into the PIG ion source and its variation and Duoplasmatron and its variation; while the latter into reflecting and sputtering types. In the second half of the report, the practical negative ion sources of each scheme are described. If the mechanism of negative ion generation will be investigated more in detail and the development will be continued under the unified know-how as negative ion sources in future, the development of negative ion sources with which large current can be obtained for any element is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Electron Beam Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zschornacka, G.; Thorn, A.

    2013-12-16

    Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

  7. Radioactive Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Stora, T

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic requirements for ion sources designed and operated in radioactive ion beam facilities. The facilities where these sources are operated exploit the isotope separation online (ISOL) technique, in which a target is combined with an ion source to maximize the secondary beam intensity and chemical element selectivity. Three main classes of sources are operated, namely surface-type ion sources, arc discharge-type ion sources, and finally radio-frequency-heated plasma-type ion sources.

  8. Ions and light

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 3: Ions and Light discusses how ions are formed by electron impact, ion-molecule reactions, or electrical discharge. This book discusses the use of light emitted by excited molecules to characterize either the chemistry that formed the excited ion, the structure of the excited ion, or both.Organized into 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the extension of the classical flowing afterglow technique to include infrared and chemiluminescence and laser-induced fluorescence detection. This text then examines the experiments involving molecules that ar

  9. Single Cathode Ion Thruster

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Objective is to design an electrostatic ion thruster that is more efficient, simpler, and lower cost than the current gridded ion thruster. Initial objective is to...

  10. Applications of decelerated ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.

    1985-03-01

    Many facilities whose sole purpose had been to accelerate ion beams are now becoming decelerators as well. The development and current status of accel-decel operations is reviewed here. Applications of decelerated ions in atomic physics experiments are discussed

  11. Gas phase ion chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bowers, Michael T

    1979-01-01

    Gas Phase Ion Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in gas phase ion chemistry. The book discusses the stabilities of positive ions from equilibrium gas-phase basicity measurements; the experimental methods used to determine molecular electron affinities, specifically photoelectron spectroscopy, photodetachment spectroscopy, charge transfer, and collisional ionization; and the gas-phase acidity scale. The text also describes the basis of the technique of chemical ionization mass spectrometry; the energetics and mechanisms of unimolecular reactions of positive ions; and the photodissociation

  12. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  13. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-01-01

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas

  14. Enhanced ion acoustic fluctuations and ion outflows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. E. Forme

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of observations showing enhanced ion acoustic echoes observed by means of incoherent scatter radars have been reported in the literature. The received power is extremely enhanced by up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude above usual values, and it is mostly contained in one of the two ion acoustic lines. This spectral asymmetry and the intensity of the received signal cannot be resolved by the standard analysis procedure and often causes its failure. As a result, and in spite of a very clear spectral signature, the analysis is unable to fit the plasma parameters inside the regions of ion acoustic turbulence. We present European Incoherent Scatter radar (EISCAT observations of large ion outflows associated with the simultaneous occurrence of enhanced ion acoustic echoes. The ion fluxes can reach 1014 m-2 s-1 at 800 km altitude. From the very clear spectral signatures of these echoes, a method is presented to extract estimates of the electron temperature and the ion drift within the turbulent regions. It is shown that the electron gas is strongly heated up to 11 000 K. Also electron temperature gradients of about 0.02 K/m exist. Finally, the estimates of the electron temperature and of the ion drift are used to study the possible implications for the plasma transport inside turbulent regions. It is shown that strong electron temperature gradients cause enhancement of the ambipolar electric field and can account for the observed ion outflows.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere · magnetosphere interactions; plasma waves and instabilities.

  15. Argon green vs. krypton red laser photocoagulation for extrafoveal choroidal neovascularization secondary to age-related macular degeneration: 3-year results of a multicentre randomized trial. Canadian Ophthalmology Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willan, A R; Cruess, A F; Ballantyne, M

    1996-02-01

    To determine whether argon green laser (AGL) or krypton red laser (KRL) is superior for the treatment of well-defined extrafoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) after 3 years of follow-up. Multicentre randomized clinical trial. University-based referral practices in Canada. Among 210 patients selected by ophthalmologists at 13 participating centres there were 191 eligible patients aged 50 years or more with angiographically proven CNV whose posterior edge was 200 to 2500 microns from the foveal avascular zone. Other inclusion criteria included the presence of drusen in either eye, a best corrected visual acuity in the study eye of at least 35 letters on the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart (equivalent of 20/200 or better on the Snellen chart) and no prior photocoagulation in the study eye. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either AGL (96 patients) or KRL (95 patients) treatment. Treatment with 200-microns spots of 0.2 to 0.5 seconds' exposure to produce a homogeneous grey white lesion that completely covered the CNV. Change from baseline in visual acuity at 1, 2 and 3 years (primary measure), development of persistent or recurrent CNV (secondary measure). There were no significant differences between the treatment groups in drop-out rates. No significant differences were found between the two groups in loss of visual acuity or angiographic evidence of persistent or recurrent CNV. KRL is no better than AGL in preserving vision and preventing loss of visual acuity in patients with AMD with well-defined extrafoveal CNV followed for 3 years.

  16. Multicharged ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venikov, N.I.

    1979-01-01

    The main principles of action, beam parameters, basic problems and prospects for development of the available multicharged ion sources for various types of accelerators are considered. Descriptions of three types of Penneng sources (a source with coid cathodes, direct-heated source, and a source with a heated cathode), duoplasmatron, SHP source using electron-cyclotron resonance, electron-ray and laser sources are given. The problems productions for solid substance ions, lithium and beryllium ions in Penning sources, are considered as well as the problem of ion charge growth on passage of accelerated ion/or atom beam through a stripping target [ru

  17. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I.

    2013-12-16

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the source has grown, so also have the operational characteristics been improved in a variety of different ways. Here we review the principles, design, and performance of vacuum arc ion sources.

  18. Quantitative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, W.H.

    1976-06-01

    This is a report of the study of the implantation of heavy ions at medium keV-energies into electrically conducting mono-elemental solids, at ion doses too small to cause significant loss of the implanted ions by resputtering. The study has been undertaken to investigate the possibility of accurate portioning of matter in submicrogram quantities, with some specific applications in mind. The problem is extensively investigated both on a theoretical level and in practice. A mathematical model is developed for calculating the loss of implanted ions by resputtering as a function of the implanted ion dose and the sputtering yield. Numerical data are produced therefrom which permit a good order-of-magnitude estimate of the loss for any ion/solid combination in which the ions are heavier than the solid atoms, and for any ion energy from 10 to 300 keV. The implanted ion dose is measured by integration of the ion beam current, and equipment and techniques are described which make possible the accurate integration of an ion current in an electromagnetic isotope separator. The methods are applied to two sample cases, one being a stable isotope, the other a radioisotope. In both cases independent methods are used to show that the implantation is indeed quantitative, as predicted. At the same time the sample cases are used to demonstrate two possible applications for quantitative ion implantation, viz. firstly for the manufacture of calibration standards for instrumental micromethods of elemental trace analysis in metals, and secondly for the determination of the half-lives of long-lived radioisotopes by a specific activity method. It is concluded that the present study has advanced quantitative ion implantation to the state where it can be successfully applied to the solution of problems in other fields

  19. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  20. Ion photon emission microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.