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Sample records for mode linac cavities

  1. Resonant excitation of high order modes in the 3.9 GHz cavity of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Solyak, N.; Sukhanov, A.; Yakovlev, V.

    2018-02-01

    Construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is underway for the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser. A central part of the LCLS-II project is a 4 GeV superconducting radio frequency electron linac that will operate in the continuous wave (cw) mode. The linac is segmented into four sections named as L 0 , L 1 , L 2 , and L 3 . Two 3.9 GHz cryomodules, each housing of eight third-harmonic cavities similar to the cavities developed for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL), will be used in section L 1 of the linac for linearizing the longitudinal beam profile. In this paper, we present a study of trapped high order modes (HOMs) excited by a cw electron beam in the third-harmonic cavities of the LCLS-II linac. A detailed comparison of the original XFEL design and the LCLS-II design with a modified end group is performed in order to estimate the effect of a reduced beam pipe aperture on the efficiency of HOM damping. Furthermore, we apply a statistical analysis of the eigenmode spectrum for the estimation of the probability of resonant HOM losses and influence of HOMs on beam dynamics.

  2. Resonant excitation of high order modes in the 3.9 GHz cavity of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lunin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II is underway for the world’s first hard x-ray free-electron laser. A central part of the LCLS-II project is a 4 GeV superconducting radio frequency electron linac that will operate in the continuous wave (cw mode. The linac is segmented into four sections named as L0, L1, L2, and L3. Two 3.9 GHz cryomodules, each housing of eight third-harmonic cavities similar to the cavities developed for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL, will be used in section L1 of the linac for linearizing the longitudinal beam profile. In this paper, we present a study of trapped high order modes (HOMs excited by a cw electron beam in the third-harmonic cavities of the LCLS-II linac. A detailed comparison of the original XFEL design and the LCLS-II design with a modified end group is performed in order to estimate the effect of a reduced beam pipe aperture on the efficiency of HOM damping. Furthermore, we apply a statistical analysis of the eigenmode spectrum for the estimation of the probability of resonant HOM losses and influence of HOMs on beam dynamics.

  3. High Power test for the first PIMS Cavity for LINAC4

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F; Giguet, J M; Wegner, R

    2011-01-01

    The first cavity of the PI Mode Structure (PIMS) section of Linac4 has been high power tested at Linac4 conditions and under high average power to simulate the operating conditions of Linac4 as a high duty cycle injector for the SPL. The PIMS section consists of 12 seven cell cavities, which accelerate the Linac4 beam from 102 MeV to 160 MeV at an RF frequency of 352.2 MHz. The cell length is constant per cavity but is adapted to the particle speed from cavity to cavity.

  4. Coupled superconducting resonant cavities for a heavy ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.

    1992-01-01

    A design for a superconducting niobium slow-wave accelerating structure has been explored that may have performance and cost advantages over existing technology. The option considered is an array of pairs of quarter-wave coaxial-line resonant cavities, the two elements of each pair strongly coupled through a short superconducting transmission line. In the linac formed by such an array, each paired structure is independently phased. A disadvantage of two-gap slow wave structures is that each cavity is relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased elements is required for a linac. Increasing the number of drift tubes per cavity reduces the number of independently-phased elements but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original, single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss in velocity acceptance. (Author) 2 figs., 8 refs

  5. Numerical simulation of coupler cavities for linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.K.; Derutyer, H.; Ko, K.

    1993-04-01

    We present numerical procedures involved in the evaluation of the performance of coupler cavities for linacs. The MAFIA code is used to simulate an X-Band accelerator section in the time domain. The input/output coupler cavities for the structure arc of the symmetrical double-input design. We calculate the transmission properties of the coupler and compare the results with measurements. We compare the performance of the symmetrical double-input design with that of the conventional single-input type by evaluating the field amplitude and phase asymmetries. We also evaluate the peak field gradient in the computer.

  6. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed.

  7. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed

  8. The split coaxial linac structure and its RF modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Split Coaxial Cavity structure has been invented and applied for the first time in the heavy-ion RFQ linac MAXILAC of GSI. It has an ideally flat RF voltage distribution and a good power economy. From another standpoint, it is a member of the small family of linac structures where the two modes, the wanted one and the unflatness mode, are clearly and strictly separable. The unflatness or ''Q Line'' mode is analyzed in more detail in this paper. It is necessary for the understanding of the interaction of the beam with the cavity, possible beam instabilities resulting from it, and for curing these instabilities with the chance of obtaining improved beams. (orig.)

  9. High order modes in Project-X linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, A., E-mail: ais@fnal.gov; Lunin, A.; Yakovlev, V.; Awida, M.; Champion, M.; Ginsburg, C.; Gonin, I.; Grimm, C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Nicol, T.; Orlov, Yu.; Saini, A.; Sergatskov, D.; Solyak, N.; Vostrikov, A.

    2014-01-11

    Project-X, a multi-MW proton source, is now under development at Fermilab. In this paper we present study of high order modes (HOM) excited in continues-wave (CW) superconducting linac of Project-X. We investigate effects of cryogenic losses caused by HOMs and influence of HOMs on beam dynamics. We find that these effects are small. We conclude that HOM couplers/dampers are not needed in the Project-X SC RF cavities.

  10. Physics design of APT linac with normal conducting rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, S.; Billen, J.H.; Stovall, J.E.; Takeda, Harunori; Young, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    The accelerator based production of tritium calls for a high-power, cw proton linac. Previous designs for such a linac use a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), followed by a drift-tube linac (DTL) to an intermediate energy and a coupled-cavity linc (CCL) to the final energy. The Los Alamos design uses a high-energy (6.7 MeV) RFQ followed by the newly developed coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) and a CCL. This design accommodates external electromagnetic quadrupole lenses which provide a strong uniform focusing lattice from the end of the RFQ to the end of the CCL. The cell lengths in linacs of traditional design are typically graded as a function of particle velocity. By making groups of cells symmetric in both the CCDTL and CCL, the cavity design as well as mechanical design and fabrication is simplified without compromising the performance. At higher energies, there are some advantages of using superconducting rf cavities. Currently, such schemes are under vigorous study. This paper describes the linac design based on normal conducting cavities and presents simulation results

  11. Design and construction of drift tube linac cavities for RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Yamada, K.; Arai, S.; Chiba, Y.; Kase, M.; Okuno, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Kamigaito, O.

    2013-09-01

    A new injector linac "RILAC2", has recently been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. The main part of the RILAC2 is a drift tube linac that consists of three newly designed cavities. These cavities operate in continuous wave (CW) mode at a fixed frequency of 36.5 MHz. Their structure is based on a quarter-wavelength resonator because this is the smallest resonator available in this frequency range among the available structures. We adopted the direct coupling method in the construction of these cavities. A power amplifier was directly coupled to the cavity without a long transmission line to reduce the installation area and simultaneously reduce construction cost. A detailed cavity and coupler design was carried out via simulation. Our work also describes the design process using three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation software. Construction and operation tests are also shown.

  12. Updating the CSNS injector linac to 250 MeV with superconducting double-spoke cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhihui; Fu Shinian

    2015-01-01

    In order to update the beam power from 100 kW to 500 kW in the China Spallation neutron source (CSNS) Phase Ⅱ, one of the important measures is to replace the 80 m long beam transport line between the present 80 MeV linac injector and the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) to another kind of acceleration structure. In this paper, we proposed a scheme based on 324 MHz double-spoke superconducting cavities. Unlike the superconducting elliptical cavity and normal conducting coupled cavity linac (CCL) structure, the double-spoke cavity belongs to the TE mode structure and has a smaller transverse dimension compared with that of the TH mode one. It can work at base frequency as the drift tube Linac (DTL) section, so that the cost and complexity of the RF system will be much decreased, and the behaviors of the beam dynamics are also improved significantly because of the low charge density and larger longitudinal acceptance. Furthermore, because of the relatively longer interactive length between the charged particle and the electromagnetic field per cell, it needs relatively less cell numbers and it has larger velocity acceptance compared with the double frequency TH structures. The superconducting section consists of 14 periods, each of which includes 3 superconducting cavities encapsulated in one cryomodule and a doublet in room temperate. The general considerations on cavity and beam dynamics design are discussed and the main results are presented. (authors)

  13. Sparking limits, cavity loading, and beam breakup instability associated with high-current rf linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The limitations on high-current rf linacs due to gap sparking, cavity loading, and the beam breakup instability are studied. It appears possible to achieve cavity accelerating gradients as high as 35 MV/m without sparking. Furthermore, a linear analysis, as well as self-consistent particle simulations of a multipulsed 10 kA beam, indicated that only a negligible small fraction of energy is radiated into nonfundamental cavity modes. Finally, the beam breakup instability is analyzed and found to be able to magnify initial radial perturbations by a factor of no more than about 20 during the beam transit time through a 1 GeV accelerator

  14. Superconducting, energy variable heavy ion linac with constant β, multicell cavities of CH-type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Minaev

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An energy variable ion linac consisting of multigap, constant-β cavities was developed. The effect of phase sliding, unavoidable in any constant-β section, is leading to a coherent rf phase motion, which fits well to the H-type structures with their long π-mode sections and separated lenses. The exact periodicity of the cell lengths within each cavity results in technical advantages, such as higher calculation accuracy when only one single period can be simulated, simpler manufacturing, and tuning. This is most important in the case of superconducting cavities. By using this concept, an improved design for a 217 MHz cw superconducting heavy ion linac with energy variation has been worked out. The small output energy spread of ±3  AkeV is provided over the whole range of energy variation from 3.5 to 7.3 AMeV. These capabilities would allow for a competitive research in the field of radiochemistry and for a production of super heavy elements (SHE, especially. A first 19-cell cavity of that type was designed, built, and rf tested successfully at the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. A 325.224 MHz, seven-cell cavity with constant β=0.16 is under development and will be operated in a frequency controlled mode. It will be equipped with a power coupler and beam tests with Unilac beams at GSI are foreseen.

  15. Resonance Excitation of Longitudinal High Order Modes in Project X Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khabiboulline, T.N.; Sukhanov, A.AUTHOR = Awida, M.; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.AUTHOR = Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Results of simulation of power loss due to excitation of longitudinal high order modes (HOMs) in the accelerating superconducting RF system of CW linac of Project X are presented. Beam structures corresponding to the various modes of Project X operation are considered: CW regime for 3 GeV physics program; pulsed mode for neutrino experiments; and pulsed regime, when Project X linac operates as a driver for Neutrino Factory/Muon Collider. Power loss and associated heat load due to resonance excitation of longitudinal HOMs are shown to be small in all modes of operation. Conclusion is made that HOM couplers can be removed from the design of superconducting RF cavities of Project X linac.

  16. Comparison of coaxial higher order mode couplers for the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac study

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085329; Gerigk, Frank; Van Rienen, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the Superconducting Proton Linac, which is studied at CERN. Under certain conditions beam-induced HOMs can accumulate sufficient energy to destabilize the beam or quench the superconducting cavities. In order to limit these effects, CERN considers the use of coaxial HOM couplers on the cutoff tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to potentially dangerous modes while sufficiently rejecting the fundamental mode. In this paper, the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various designs for the high-beta SPL cavities, which operate at 704.4 MHz. The rf and thermal behavior as well as mechanical aspects are discussed. In order to verify the designs, a rapid prototype for the favored coupler was fabricated and characterized on a low-power test-stand.

  17. Simulation at the SSCL low energy booster and coupled cavity linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourianoff, G.

    1991-01-01

    During the past year, the SSC has made significant use of the MFE computer center for simulating the low energy accelerators in the SSC complex. There are two primary supercomputer applications reported here. They are the calculation of emittance growth in the LEB due to space charge effects and simulation of the side coupled cavities used in the linac. The SSC is designed to have a luminosity of 10 33 interactions per second per square centimeter. It directly determines the amount of physics which can be done with the collider and is therefore of critical importance. The luminosity is inversely proportional to the emittance of the two colliding beams. Since emittance increases monotonically through the chain of accelerators, an emittance budget has been set up defining what the allowable emittance increase is in each individual component of the accelerator. The emittance budget for the LEB calls for the emittance to enter the LEB at .4π mm - mrad and leave the LEB at .6π mm -mrad. Therefore, a set of simulations was done to determine the actual emittance growth. The linac is designed to accelerate 25 MA of H - ions from 70 MEV to 600 MEV. There are several possible cavity designs which might be used but the side coupled cavity design operating in the π/2 mode has a number of advantages concerning operating stability and ease of manufacture. It has therefore been chosen for the linac accelerator

  18. A High Current Proton Linac with 352 MHz SC Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Pagani, C; Pierini, P

    1996-01-01

    A proposal for a 10-120 mA proton linac employing superconducting beta-graded, CERN type, four cell cavities at 352 MHz is presented. The high energy part (100 MeV-1 GeV) of the machine is split in three beta-graded sections, and transverse focusing is provided via a periodic doublet array. All the parameters, like power in the couplers and accelerating fields in the cavities, are within the state of the art, achieved in operating machines. A first stage of operation at 30 mA beam current is proposed, while the upgrade of the machine to 120 mA operation can be obtained increasing the number of klystrons and couplers per cavity. The additional coupler ports, up to four, will be integrated in the cavity design. Preliminary calculations indicate that beam transport is feasible, given the wide aperture of the 352 MHz structures. A capital cost of less than 100 M$ at 10 mA, reaching up to 280 M$ for the 120 mA extension, has been estimated for the superconducting high energy section (100 MeV-1 GeV). The high effic...

  19. Manufacturing the LINAC4 PI-Mode Structure Prototype at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, A; Dallocchio, A; Geisser, J M; Gentini, L; Gerigk, L; Mathot, S; Polini, M; Sgobba, S; Tardy, T; Wegner, R

    2011-01-01

    The PI-Mode Structure (PIMS) of Linac4 consists of 7-cell cavities made from alternating OFE copper discs and rings welded together with electron beam (EB) welding. A full-scale prototype cavity of almost 1.5 m in length has been manufactured, assembled, and tested at CERN to prepare the series production of 12 PIMS cavities as part of an international collaboration. This paper reports on the construction experience including machining operations, EB welding, vacuum brazing, and metrological measurements results.

  20. Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory coupled-cavity linac mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starling, W.J.; Cain, T.

    1992-01-01

    A collaboration between the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the engineering and mechanical design of the SSCL Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) has yielded an innovative example of the well known side coupled-cavity type of linear accelerator. The SSCL CCL accelerates an H - beam from 70 MeV to 600 MeV with an rf cavity structure consisting of eight tanks in each of nine modules for a total length of about 112 meters. Magnetically-coupled bridge couplers transfer power from tank to tank within a module. A single rf power input is located at the center bridge coupler of each module. The bridge couplers permit placement along the beam line of combined function focusing/steering electromagnets and diagnostic pods for beam instrumentation. Each tank and bridge coupler is rf frequency stabilized, nominally to 1,283 MHz, by water pumped through integral water passages. Air isolation grooves surround the water passages at each braze joint so that water-to-vacuum interfaces are avoided. Each tank is supported by adjustable spherical bearing rod end struts to permit alignment and accommodate thermal expansion and contraction of the rf structure. Tank struts, electromagnet/diagnostic pod support frames, vacuum manifolds and utilities are all mounted to a girder-and-leg support stand running the full length of the CCL. (Author) tab., fig

  1. Failure Modes Analysis for the MSU-RIA Driver Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Gorelov, Dmitry; Grimm, Terry L; Marti, Felix; York, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Previous end-to-end beam dynamics simulation studies* using experimentally-based input beams including alignment and rf errors and variation in charge-stripping foil thickness have indicated that the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac proposed by MSU has adequate transverse and longitudinal acceptances to accelerate light and heavy ions to final energies of at least 400 MeV/u with beam powers of 100 to 400 kW. During linac operation, equipment loss due to, for example, cavity contamination, availability of cryogens, or failure of rf or power supply systems, will lead to at least a temporary loss of some of the cavities and focusing elements. To achieve high facility availability, each segment of the linac should be capable of adequate performance even with failed elements. Beam dynamics studies were performed to evaluate the linac performance under various scenarios of failed cavities and focusing elements with proper correction schemes, in order to prove the flexibility and robustness of the driver ...

  2. Crossbar H-mode drift-tube linac design with alternative phase focusing for muon linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, M.; Futatsukawa, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Kitamura, R.; Kondo, Y.; Kurennoy, S.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a Crossbar H-mode (CH) drift-tube linac (DTL) design with an alternative phase focusing (APF) scheme for a muon linac, in order to measure the anomalous magnetic moment and electric dipole moment (EDM) of muons at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The CH-DTL accelerates muons from β = v/c = 0.08 to 0.28 at an operational frequency of 324 MHz. The design and results are described in this paper.

  3. First Considerations Concerning an Optimized Cavity Design for the Main Linac of BERLinPro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Riemann, T. Weis, W. Anders, J. Knobloch, A. Neumann, H.-W. Glock, C. Potratz, U. van Rienen, F. Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    The Berlin Energy Recovery Linac Project (BERLinPro) is designed to develop and demonstrate CW linac technology and expertise required to drive next-generation Energy Recovery Linacs. Strongly HOM-damped multicell 1.3 GHz cavities are required for the main linac. The optimization of the cavities presented here is primarily based on the CEBAF 1.5 GHz 5-cell high-current cavity design, including HOM waveguide couplers. The cavity was scaled to 1.3 GHz and extended to 7 cells. Modifications to the end group design have also been studied. An effort was also made to reduce the ratio Epk/Eacc while still permitting HOMs to propagate.

  4. Fiber cavities with integrated mode matching optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Podoliak, Nina; Horak, Peter; Keller, Matthias

    2017-07-17

    In fiber based Fabry-Pérot Cavities (FFPCs), limited spatial mode matching between the cavity mode and input/output modes has been the main hindrance for many applications. We have demonstrated a versatile mode matching method for FFPCs. Our novel design employs an assembly of a graded-index and large core multimode fiber directly spliced to a single mode fiber. This all-fiber assembly transforms the propagating mode of the single mode fiber to match with the mode of a FFPC. As a result, we have measured a mode matching of 90% for a cavity length of ~400 μm. This is a significant improvement compared to conventional FFPCs coupled with just a single mode fiber, especially at long cavity lengths. Adjusting the parameters of the assembly, the fundamental cavity mode can be matched with the mode of almost any single mode fiber, making this approach highly versatile and integrable.

  5. Tuning procedure for the Linac4 PI Mode Structure(PIMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Ugena Tirado, P

    2012-01-01

    PI-Mode-Structure (PIMS) cavities will be used in the high energy section of LINAC4 (102-160 MeV). Each cavity is made of 7 coupled cells, operated in the π-mode at a resonant frequency of 352.2 MHz. The cell length remains constant for each of the 12 cavities but changes from cavity to cavity to synchronise with the increased beam energy. This paper reports on the tuning process required to get a constant voltage in each cell at the resonant frequency which consists of re-machining to the required level the tuning rings located on each cell-wall. An algorithm based on single cell detuning, equivalent circuit simulations and precise 3D simulations for the 3 different cell types of each cavity has been developed and successfully applied to the tuning of the first PIMS cavity. In order to reduce the simulation effort for the remaining 11 cavities, an interpolation algorithm based on 3 cavities has been developed and validated. In a second tuning step, after the electron beam welding of all elements, the final ...

  6. Simultaneous optimization of the cavity heat load and trip rates in linacs using a genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balša Terzić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a genetic algorithm-based optimization is used to simultaneously minimize two competing objectives guiding the operation of the Jefferson Lab’s Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility linacs: cavity heat load and radio frequency cavity trip rates. The results represent a significant improvement to the standard linac energy management tool and thereby could lead to a more efficient Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility configuration. This study also serves as a proof of principle of how a genetic algorithm can be used for optimizing other linac-based machines.

  7. The hot prototype of the Pi-mode structure for LINAC4

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F; Bourquin, P; Dallocchio, A; Favre, G; Geisser, J M; Gentini, L; Giguet, J M; Mathot, S; Polini, M; Pugnat, D; Riffaud, B; Sgobba, S; Tardy, T; Ugena Tirado, P; Vretenar, M

    2010-01-01

    The PIMS (Pi-Mode-Structure) cavities for Linac4 are made of 7 coupled cells operating in !-mode at a frequency of 352 MHz. The mechanical concept is derived from the 5-cell cavities used in the LEP machine, whereas cell length and coupling are adapted for proton acceleration in the range from 50 to 160 MeV. Linac4 will be the first machine to employ this type of cavities for low-beta protons. During the first years of operation the PIMS will be used at low duty cycle (0.1%) as part of the consolidated LHC proton injector complex. It is designed, however, to operate eventually in a high duty cycle (10%) proton injector, which could be used as proton front-end for neutrino or RIB applications. To prepare for the series construction of the 12 PIMS units the first cavity (102 MeV beam energy) has been designed and constructed at CERN, to be used as a hot prototype for RF tests and as a pre-series mechanical unit. In this paper we report on some of the design features, the construction experience, and first measu...

  8. First Linac4 DTL & CCDTL cavities installed in tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On 5 June, the first Drift Tube Linac (DTL) was successfully transported to its forever home in the Linac4 tunnel. Similarly, the first Cell-Coupled Drift Tube Linac (CCDTL) was installed on 6 June. These moves marked the end of years of design and manufacturing by Linac4 teams.   Although it may seem like a relatively routine transport operation, the DTL's move was a landmark event for the entire Linac4 collaboration. "Along with the first four Cell-Coupled DTL modules, which were installed on the following two working days, these are the first accelerating structures after front-end commissioning to be installed in the tunnel," says Frank Gerigk, who is responsible for all Linac4 accelerating structures. "It is a major milestone, because work on all these structures started well over a decade ago." The transport operation was also quite a victory for the Linac4 DTL team, whose journey to a complete DTL structure has been a bit of a wild ride. &qu...

  9. Comparison of coaxial higher order mode couplers for the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Papke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher order modes (HOMs may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the Superconducting Proton Linac, which is studied at CERN. Under certain conditions beam-induced HOMs can accumulate sufficient energy to destabilize the beam or quench the superconducting cavities. In order to limit these effects, CERN considers the use of coaxial HOM couplers on the cutoff tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to potentially dangerous modes while sufficiently rejecting the fundamental mode. In this paper, the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various designs for the high-beta SPL cavities, which operate at 704.4 MHz. The rf and thermal behavior as well as mechanical aspects are discussed. In order to verify the designs, a rapid prototype for the favored coupler was fabricated and characterized on a low-power test-stand.

  10. Deflecting RF cavity design for a recirculating linac based facility for ultrafast X-ray science (LUX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    We report on superconducting deflecting RF cavity designs for a Recirculating Linac Based Facility for Ultrafast X-ray Science (LUX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The deflecting cavities operate in the lowest dipole mode and are required to produce a temporal correlation within flat electron bunches, as needed for x-ray compression in crystal optics. Deflecting voltage of up to 8.5-MV is required at 3.9-GHz. We present a 7-cell cavity design in this paper. Seven such cavities are required to generate the 8.5 MV deflecting voltage. Longitudinal and transverse impedance from LOM (lower order mode) and HOM (higher order mode) are simulated using the MAFIA code. Short-range and long-range wakefield excited through these impedances are calculated. Beam loading effects of the deflecting mode and LOM modes are estimated. Q values of the LOM monopole modes in the cavity may need to be damped to be below 10 4 -10 5 levels in order to maintain the required energy spread

  11. Superconducting Cavity Cryomodule Designs for the Next Generation of CW Linacs: Challenges and Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, Thomas [Fermilab; Orlov, Yuriy [Fermilab; Peterson, Thomas [Fermilab; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    The designs of nearly all superconducting RF (SRF) linacs over the last several years, with one notable exception being CEBAF at Jefferson Lab, have assumed pulsed beam operation with relatively low duty factors. These include the XFEL at DESY, the ILC, the original configuration for Project X at Fermilab, as well as several others. Recently proposed projects, on the other hand, including the LCLS-II at SLAC, the newly configured low and medium energy sections for Project X, and FRIB at Michigan State, to name a few, assume continuous wave or CW operation on quite a large scale with ambitious gradients and cavity performance requirements. This has implications in the cavity design as well as in many parts of the overall cryomodule due to higher dynamic heat loads in the cavities themselves and higher heat loads in the input and high-order-mode (HOM) couplers. Piping internal to the cryomodule, the effectiveness of thermal intercepts, the size of integrated heat exchangers, and many other aspects of the overall design are also affected. This paper will describe some of these design considerations as we move toward the next generation of accelerator projects.

  12. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Hammons, L.; Johnson, E.C.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Xu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs) with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM) damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC) temperatures in a prototype research and development (R and D) five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF) cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R and D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  13. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Calaga, R.; Hammons, L.; Johnson, E. C.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Xu, Wencan

    2010-12-01

    Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs) with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM) damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC) temperatures in a prototype research and development (R&D) five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF) cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R&D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  14. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hahn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC temperatures in a prototype research and development (R&D five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R&D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  15. Study of Higher Order Modes in Superconducting Accelerating Structures for Linac Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schuh, Marcel; Welsch, C P

    2011-01-01

    Higher Order Modes (HOMs) can severely limit the operation of superconducting cavities in a linear accelerator with high beam current, high duty factor and complex pulse structure. Therefore, the full HOM spectrum has to be analysed in detail to identify potentially dangerous modes already during the design phase and to define their damping requirements. For this purpose a dedicated beam dynamics simulation code, Simulation of higher order Mode Dynamics (SMD), focusing on beam-HOM interaction, has been developed in the frame of this project. SMD allows to analyse the beam behaviour under the presence of HOMs, taking into account many important effects, such as for example the HOM frequency spread, beam input jitter, different chopping patterns, as well as klystron and alignment errors. SMD is used to investigate in detail into the effects of HOMs in the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) at CERN and in particular their potential to drive beam instabili- ties in the longitudinal and transverse direction. Based...

  16. Niobium quarter-wave cavity for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1997-09-01

    This paper reports the completion of development of a 97 Mhz niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavity to be used in a booster linac for the New Delhi 16UD pellatron electrostatic accelerator. A prototype cavity, which incorporates a niobium-bellows tuning device, has been completed and operated at 4.2 K at accelerating gradients above 4 MV/m for extended periods of time.

  17. Niobium quarter-wave cavity for the New Delhi booster linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the completion of development of a 97 Mhz niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavity to be used in a booster linac for the New Delhi 16UD pellatron electrostatic accelerator. A prototype cavity, which incorporates a niobium-bellows tuning device, has been completed and operated at 4.2 K at accelerating gradients above 4 MV/m for extended periods of time

  18. Continued Monitoring of the Conditioning of the Fermilab Linac 805 MHz Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    McCrory, E.; Kroc, T.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.

    2000-01-01

    We have reported previously on the conditioning of the high-gradient accelerating cavities in the Fermilab Linac. Automated measurements of the sparking rate have been recorded since 1994 and are reported here. The sparking rate has declined since the beginning, but there are indications that this rate may have leveled off now. The X-rays emitted by the cavities are continuing to decrease.

  19. Design of a 10 MeV normal conducting CW proton linac based on equidistant multi-gap CH cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Continuous wave (CW) high current proton linacs have wide applications as the front end of high power proton machines. The low energy part of such a linac is the most difficult and there is currently no widely accepted solution. Based on the analysis of the focusing properties of the CW low energy proton linac, a 10 MeV low energy normal conducting proton linac based on equidistant seven-gap Cross-bar H-type (CH) cavities is proposed. The linac is composed of ten 7-gap CH cavities and the transverse focusing is maintained by quadrupole doublets located between the cavities. The total length of the linac is less than 6 meters and the average acceleration gradient is about 1.2 MeV/m. The electromagnetic properties of the cavities are investigated by Microwave Studio. At the nominal acceleration gradient the maximum surface electric field in the cavities is less than 1.3 times the Kilpatrick limit, and the Ohmic loss of each cavity is less than 35 kW. Multi-particle beam dynamics simulations are performed with Tracewin code, and the results show that the beam dynamics of the linac are quite stable, the linac has the capability to accelerate up to 30 mA beam with acceptable dynamics behavior. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375122, 91126003)

  20. Auto-tuning systems for J-PARC LINAC RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Z.; Kobayashi, T.; Fukui, Y.; Futatsukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Anami, S.; Suzuki, H.; Sato, F.; Shinozaki, S.; Chishiro, E.

    2014-01-01

    The 400-MeV proton linear accelerator (LINAC) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) consists of 324-MHz low-β and 972-MHz high-β accelerator sections. From October 2006 to May 2013, only the 324-MHz low-β accelerator section was in operation. From the summer of 2013 the J-PARC LINAC was upgraded by installing the 972-MHz high-β accelerator section, and the proton beam was successfully accelerated to 400 MeV in January 2014. Auto-tuning systems for the J-PARC LINAC RF cavities have been successfully developed. A first generation design, an auto-tuning system using a mechanical tuner controller, was developed and operated for the first 3 years. Then the second-generation auto-tuning system was developed using a new approach to the RF cavity warm-up process, and this was applied to the accelerator operation for the subsequent 4 years. During the RF cavity warm-up process in this system, the mechanical tuner is constantly fixed and the input RF frequency is automatically tuned to the cavity resonance frequency using the FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) of the digital feedback RF control system. After the input power level reaches the required value, input RF frequency tuning is stopped and it is switched to the operation frequency. Then, the mechanical tuner control begins operation. This second-generation auto-tuning system was extremely effective for the 324-MHz cavity operation. However, if we apply this approach to the 972-MHz RF cavities, an interlock due to the RF cavity reflection amplitude occasionally occurs at the end of the warm-up process. In order to solve this problem a third generation novel auto-tuning system was successfully developed in December 2013 and applied to the operation of the J-PARC LINAC, including the 972-MHz ACS RF cavities. During the warm-up process both the mechanical tuner controller and the input RF frequency tuning are in operation, and good matching between the input RF frequency and the RF cavity is

  1. A digital closed loop control system for automatic phase locking of superconducting cavities of IUAC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, R.N.; Rai, A.; Pandey, A.; Sahu, B.K.; Patra, P.; Karmakar, J.; Chaudhari, G.K.; Mathur, Y.; Ghosh, S.; Kanjilal, D.

    2013-01-01

    A closed loop digital control system has been designed and tested to automate the tuning process of superconducting resonators of LINAC at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. The mechanism controls the proportional valves of the He gas based pneumatic tuner in response to the phase and frequency errors of the cavity RF field. The main RF phase lock loop (PLL) is automatically closed once the resonant frequency is within locking range of the resonator PLL. The digital control scheme was successfully tested on few resonators of LINAC cryostat 1. A high stability of phase lock was observed. The details of the digital automation system are presented in the paper. (author)

  2. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kedzie, M.; Delayen, J.R.; Piller, C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed

  3. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion Linac.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-11-18

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2< v/c <0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of light ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive beam facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed.

  4. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K W; Kedzie, M; Delayen, J R; Piller, C

    1998-08-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed.

  5. Development of niobium spoke cavities for a superconducting light-ion Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K. W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz niobium superconducting cavities for the velocity range 0.2< v/c <0.6. Such cavities could be used to form a linac of exceptional flexibility, capable of efficiently accelerating beams of either protons, deuterons, or any of a wide range of light ions, at intensities sufficient for a production beam for a radioactive beam facility. Results of numerical modeling for several resonator geometries are presented. The design and construction status of prototype niobium cavities is discussed

  6. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  7. Temperature control feedback loops for the linac upgrade side coupled cavities at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisp, J.

    1990-01-01

    The linac upgrade project at Fermilab will replace the last 4 drift-tube linac tanks with seven side coupled cavity strings. This will increase the beam energy from 200 to 400 MeV at injection into the Booster accelerator. The main objective of the temperature loop is to control the resonant frequency of the cavity strings. A cavity string will constant of 4 sections connected with bridge couplers driven with a 12 MW klystron at 805 MHz. Each section is a side coupled cavity chain consisting of 16 accelerating cells and 15 side coupling cells. For the linac upgrade, 7 full cavity strings will be used. A separate temperature control system is planned for each of the 28 accelerating sections, the two transition sections, and the debuncher section. The cavity strings will be tuned to resonance for full power beam loaded conditions. A separate frequency loop is planned that will sample the phase difference between a monitor placed in the end cell of each section and the rf drive. The frequency loop will control the set point for the temperature loop which will be able to maintain the resonant frequency through periods within beam or rf power. The frequency loop will need the intelligence required to determine under what conditions the phase error information is valid and the temperature set point should be adjusted. This paper will discuss some of the reason for temperature control, the implementation, and some of the problems encountered. An appendix contains some useful constants and descriptions of some of the sensor and control elements used. 13 figs

  8. Choke-Mode Damped Structure Design for the CLIC Main Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zha, Hao; Tang, Chuanxiang; Huang, Wenhui; Shi, Jiaru; Grudiev, Alexej; Wuensch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Choke-mode damped structures are being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structures of main linacs of the compact linear collider (CLIC). Choke-mode structures have the potential for much lower pulsed temperature rise, and lower cost of manufacture and fabrication. A new kind of choke-mode structure was proposed and simulated by Gdfidl. This structures has comparable wakefield damping effect as the baseline design of CLIC main linacs.

  9. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injektor Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Xiang, R; Eremeev, G V; Kneisel, P; Stirbet, M; Turlington, L

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac [1]. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning; the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing [2] was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test were carried out at TJNAF’s production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (Ø10 mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects a...

  10. Fabrication, Tuning, Treatment and Testing of Two 3.5 Cell Photo-Injector Cavities for the ELBE Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, A.; Murcek, P.; Teichert, J.; Xiang, R.; Eremeev, G. V.; Kneisel, P.; Stirbet, M.; Turlington, L.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) between Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) we have fabricated and tested two 1.3 GHz 3.5 cell photo-injector cavities from polycrystalline RRR niobium and large grain RRR niobium, respectively. The cavity with the better performance will replace the presently used injector cavity in the ELBE linac. The cavities have been fabricated and pre-tuned at TJNAF, while the more sophisticated final field tuning, the adjustment of the external couplings and the field profile measurement of transverse electric modes for RF focusing was done at HZDR. The following standard surface treatment and the vertical test was carried out at TJNAF's production facilities. A major challenge turned out to be the rinsing of the cathode cell, which has small opening (O-slash10mm) to receive the cathode stalk. Another unexpected problem encountered after etching, since large visible defects appeared in the least accessible cathode cell. This contribution reports about our experiences, initial results and the on-going diagnostic work to understand and fix the problems

  11. TM01 mode accelerating cavity optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, J.J.; Knapp, E.A.

    1978-08-01

    The cost of an accelerator depends greatly upon the effective use of rf power for particle acceleration. Before completing an accelerator design, an optimization of the accelerating cells relative to the effective shunt impedance should be made to measure the structure's efficiency in providing a high and effective acceleration of particles for a given rf power. Optimization of the accelerating cell resonant at f/sub r/ = 1350 MHz (TM 01 mode) relative to the maximum effective shunt impedance ZT 2 was performed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory using the computer program SUPERFISH. The study was parametric; one parameter was changed while the others were held constant. Frequency adjustments were made by changing the cavity radius. Results presented in this report can be used to design similar cavities at different resonant frequencies or to design a more complicated cavity (TM 02 mode) for the disk and washer structure

  12. Multiplacting analysis on 650 MHz, BETA 0.61 superconducting RF LINAC cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, Sudeshna; Som, Sumit; Mandal, Aditya; Ghosh, Surajit; Saha, S.

    2013-01-01

    Design, analysis and development of high-β multi-cell elliptical shape Superconducting RF linac cavity has been taken up by VECC, Kolkata as a part of IIFC collaboration. The project aims to provide the-art technology achieving very high electric field gradient in superconducting linac cavity, which can be used in high energy high current proton linear accelerator to be built for ADSS/SNS programme in India and in Project-X at Fermilab, USA. The performance of this type of superconducting RF structure can be greatly affected due to multipacting when we feed power to the cavity. Multipacting is a phenomenon of resonant electron multiplication in which a large number of electrons build up an electron Avalanche which absorbs RF Energy leading to remarkable power losses and heating of the walls, making it impossible to raise the electric field by increasing the RF Power. Multipacting analysis has been carried out for 650 MHz, β=0.61, superconducting elliptical cavity using 2D code MultiPac 2.1 and 3 D code CST particle studio and the result is presented in this paper. (author)

  13. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  14. Higher-order-mode (HOM) power in elliptical superconducting cavities for intense pulsed proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Ho Kim; Dong O Jeon; Sundeli, R

    2002-01-01

    In linacs for intense pulsed proton accelerators, the beam has a multiple time-structure, and each beam time-structure generates resonance. When a higher-order mode (HOM) is near these resonance frequencies, the induced voltage could be large and accordingly the resulting HOM power, too. In order to understand the effects of a complex beam time-structure on the mode excitations and the resulting HOM powers in elliptical superconducting cavities, analytic expressions are developed, with which the beam-induced voltage and corresponding power are explored, taking into account the properties of HOM frequency behavior in elliptical superconducting cavities. The results and understandings from this analysis are presented with the beam parameters of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) superconducting linac.

  15. Interacting collective modes in a laser cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graca, E.L.; Brito, A.L. de; Baseia, B.

    1985-01-01

    Collective operators are defined for the quantized radiation field in a one-dimensional laser cavity coupled to a semi-infinite outside region and the overlaps of neighbouring collective modes are considered to show how they modify, in the linear appoximation, the time evolution of the radiation field below threshold. The model and procedure work directly within a continuous spectrum of modes and allow us to get an improved insight on the prescription for the laser field in single-mode operation. (Author) [pt

  16. Higher order mode analysis of the SNS superconducting linac

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Ho Kim; Dong Jeon; Sundelin, R

    2001-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOM's) of monopoles, dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles in beta =0.61 and beta =0.81 6-cell superconducting (SC) cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, have been found up to about 3 GHz and their properties such as R/Q, trapping possibility, etc have been figured out concerning manufacturing imperfection. The main issues of HOM's are beam instabilities (published separately) and HOM induced power especially from TM monopoles. The time structure of SNS beam has three different time scales of pulses, which are micro-pulse, midi-pulse and macropulse. Each time structure will generate resonances. When a mode is near these resonance frequencies, the induced voltage could be large and accordingly the resulting HOM power. In order to understand the effects from such a complex beam time structure on the mode excitation and resulting HOM power, analytic expressions are developed. With these analytic expressions, the induced HOM voltage and HOM power were calculated by assuming e...

  17. Design of the Pi-Mode Structure (PIMS) for Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F

    2010-01-01

    The PIMS will accelerate an H| − | beam from 100 MeV to 160 MeV, the output energy of Linac4. The cell length is constant within each of the 12 seven-cell cavities, but increases from cavity to cavity according to the increasing beam velocity. Its mechanical design is derived from the five-cell normal conducting LEP cavities, which were in operation at CERN for approximately 15 years. Even though the shunt impedance is around 10% lower than for a Side-Coupled Linac (SCL) operating at 704 MHz, the PIMS has the advantage of using the same RF frequency (352 MHz) as all the other accelerating structures in Linac4, thus simplifying and standardising the linac RF system. Furthermore, the simplified mechanical construction of the PIMS, which uses only 84 cells instead of over 400 for the SCL, also reduces construction costs and tuning effort. In this paper we present the electromagnetic design of the PIMS, including the arguments for the choice of a 5% cell-to-cell coupling factor, the shape of the coupling cells,...

  18. Beam transfer between the coupled cavity linac and the low energy booster synchrotron for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, R.K.; Penner, S.

    1990-09-01

    Ion optical design of the transfer line, which will be used to inject H - beam at 600 MeV from the Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) into the Low Energy Booster (LEB) synchrotron, is described. Space charge effects of up to 50 mA average beam current have been taken into account

  19. Alternating-Phase-Focused Linac with Interdigital H-Mode Structure for Medical Injectors

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, Yoshiyuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Fujisawa, Takashi; Furukawa, Takuji; Hojo, Satoru; Honma, T; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kapin, Valery; Mitsumoto, Toshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Takeshi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Noda, Koji; Ogawa, Hirotsugu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Torikoshi, Masami; Tsutsui, Hiroshi; Yamada, Satoru; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    Tumor therapy using Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) has been performed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). With the successful clinical results over ten years, a project on developing compact accelerators has been started. To design these compact accelerators, a size of an injector as well as construction and operation costs plays an important role. To satisfy these requirements, we propose a compact injector consisting of a RFQ and Interdigital H-mode Drift-Tube-Linac (IH-DTL) having the resonant frequency of 200 MHz. The injector will accelerate carbon ion up to 4.0 AMeV. For the beam focusing of the IH-DTL, the method of Alternating-Phase-Focusing was employed. With the IH structure and rather high operating-frequency, the size of the cavities is compact; the radius is approximately 0.4 m, and the length of the RFQ and IH-DTL will be 2.5m and 3.5m respectively. The fabrication of the RFQ is in progress. For the IH-DTL, the full-scale model was fabricated. With the encourag...

  20. Beam-loading compensation in a proton linac cavity: study and design of a RF level regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitbon, Victor

    1971-01-01

    In 1969, Saturne Synchrotron's Van de Graaff injector was replaced by a 20 MeV proton linac. During normal operation, the required current is greater than 20 mA. A beam-loading compensation being necessary, specially because of the 600 μs pulse length, it was decided to study a feedback system. After a theoretical study of the real RF field build up in the cavity, a dynamic measurement of the driving loop input impedance was undertaken. A feedback circuit was then constructed, which is now operating on the 20 MeV linac; its design and performance as well as the preliminary studies are described. (author) [fr

  1. Stability study of the higher order mode beam position monitors at the Accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, L; Jones., R M

    2014-01-01

    erating cavities at FLASH linac, DESY, are equipped with electronics for beam position monitoring, which are based on HOM signals from special couplers. These monitors provide the beam position without additional vacuum components and at low cost. Moreover, they can be used to align the beam in the cavities to reduce the HOM effects on the beam. However, the HOMBPM (Higher Order Mode based Beam Position Monitor) shows an instability problem over time. In this paper, we will present the status of studies on this issue. Several methods are utilized to calibrate the HOMBPMs. These methods include DLR (Direct Linear Regression), and SVD (Singular Value Decomposition). We found that SVD generally is more suitable for HOMBPM calibration. We focus on the HOMBPMs at 1.3 GHz cavities. Techniques developed here are applicable to 3.9 ...

  2. Rigorous analysis of trapped modes in accelerating cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Schuhmann

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of different algorithms for the calculation of quality factors of eigenmodes in accelerating cavities, which have resonance frequencies above the cutoff frequency of the beam tubes. The analysis is based on a discretization of such cavity structures by the finite integration technique, and the radiation at the open boundaries is systematically taken into account by different approaches in time and frequency domain. Results indicate that even single cell cavities of the TESLA type show Q values of 10^{3} and multicell cavities values in excess of 10^{4}. Thus these modes may cause considerable beam instabilities. Comparison with the conventional method of analyzing closed cavities and identifying modes with little change in frequency as a function of boundary condition shows qualitative differences. Some modes from the closed cavity model do not exist in the open structure and thus would be misinterpreted as trapped modes when only a closed cavity analysis is employed.

  3. Commissioning of the 112 MHz SRF Gun and 500 MHz bunching cavities for the CeC PoP Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Litvinenko, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); McIntosh, P. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Moss, A. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Narayan, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Orfin, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pinayev, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rao, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wheelhouse, A. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Daresbury (United Kingdom). Daresbury Lab.; Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xin, T. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment at BNL includes a short electron linac. During Phase 1, a 112 MHz superconducting RF photo-emission gun and two 500 MHz normal conducting bunching cavities were installed and are under commissioning. The paper describes the Phase1 linac layout and presents commissioning results for the cavities and associated RF, cryogenic and other sub-systems

  4. Ultrafast Dynamics of Vibration-Cavity Polariton Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owrutsky, Jeff; Dunkelberger, Adam; Fears, Kenan; Simpkins, Blake; Spann, Bryan

    Vibrational modes of polymers, liquids, and solvated compounds can couple to Fabry-Perot optical cavity modes, creating vibration-cavity polariton modes whose energy tunes with the cavity length and incidence angle. Here we report the pump-probe infrared spectroscopy of vibration-cavity polaritons in cavity-coupled W(CO)6. At very early times, we observe quantum beating between the two polariton states find an anomalously low degree of excitation. After the quantum beating, we directly observe spectroscopic signatures of excited-state absorption from both polariton modes and uncoupled reservoir modes. An analytical expression for cavity transmission reproduces these signatures. The upper polariton mode relaxes ten times more quickly than the uncoupled vibrational mode and the polariton lifetime depends on the angle of incidence of the infrared pulses. Coupling to an optical cavity gives a means of control of the lifetime of vibration-cavity polaritons and could have important implications for chemical reactivity in vibrationally excited molecules.

  5. Effect of transients on the beam in the Superconducting Supercollider Coupled-Cavity Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Nath, S.

    1992-01-01

    Each module of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) consists of eight tanks (10 accelerating cells each) coupled with bridge couplers. The radio frequency (rf) power drive is in the center of the module at the bridge coupler between the fourth and fifth tanks. In this simulation of the beam dynamics, the rf power is turned on 10 μs before the beam is turned on. This time lapse allows the fields to build up and stabilize before they are required by the beam. When the beam is turned on, the beam loading causes the fields to change. This transient state of the fields together with their effect on the beam is presented. A model has been developed to calculate field distribution throughout the module as a function of time. Beam dynamics simulations were run with the results of this model at several times during the beam pulse. An estimate of the effect of the transients is given by the results of these simulations

  6. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Arsenyev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of higher order mode (HOM damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs. Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  7. Optical cavity cooling of mechanical modes of a semiconductor nanomembrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usami, Koji; Naesby, A.; Bagci, Tolga

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical oscillators can be optically cooled using a technique known as optical-cavity back-action. Cooling of composite metal–semiconductor mirrors, dielectric mirrors and dielectric membranes has been demonstrated. Here we report cavity cooling of mechanical modes in a high-quality-factor and......Mechanical oscillators can be optically cooled using a technique known as optical-cavity back-action. Cooling of composite metal–semiconductor mirrors, dielectric mirrors and dielectric membranes has been demonstrated. Here we report cavity cooling of mechanical modes in a high......-quality-factor and optically active semiconductor nanomembrane. The cooling is a result of electron–hole generation by cavity photons. Consequently, the cooling factor depends on the optical wavelength, varies drastically in the vicinity of the semiconductor bandgap, and follows the excitonic absorption behaviour...... an alternative cooling mechanism that is a result of electronic stress via the deformation potential, and outline future directions for cavity optomechanics with optically active semiconductors....

  8. Higher order mode damping in Kaon factory RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enegren, T.; Poirier, R.; Griffin, J.; Walling, L.; Thiessen, H.A.; Smythe, W.R.

    1989-05-01

    Proposed designs for Kaon factory accelerators require that the rf cavities support beam currents on the order of several amperes. The beam current has Fourier components at all multiples of the rf frequency. Empty rf buckets produce additional components at all multiples of the revolution frequency. If a Fourier component of the beam coincides with the resonant frequency of a higher order mode of the cavity, which is inevitable if the cavity has a large frequency swing, significant excitation of this mode can occur. The induced voltage may then excite coupled bunch mode instabilities. Effective means are required to damp higher order modes without significantly affecting the fundamental mode. A mode damping scheme based on coupled transmission lines has been investigated and is report

  9. A Comparison of pi/2-mode standing wave structures for Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Wegner, R; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2006-01-01

    Cell coupled structures at twice the basic frequency provide a higher shunt impedance for proton energies above 90 MeV for Linac4 when compared to drift tube based geometries. For this reason the nominal accelerating structure for the energy range of 90-160 MeV in Linac4 was chosen to be a Side Coupled Structure at 704.4 MHz. High power klystrons will feed this structure, with the consequence that a large number of cells are coupled together in one module. To provide field stability in a long chain of resonators, a pi/2-mode structure will be used. In this report, the three best known and most widely used ones - the Annular Ring Coupled Structure (ACS), the On Axis Coupled Structure (OCS) and the Side Coupled Structure (SCS) - are compared in terms of the electrical parameters Q-value and shunt impedance as well as structure dimensions.

  10. Cavity enhanced interference of orthogonal modes in a birefringent medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolluru, Kiran; Saha, Sudipta; Gupta, S. Dutta

    2018-03-01

    Interference of orthogonal modes in a birefringent crystal mediated by a rotator is known to lead to interesting physical effects (Solli et al., 2003). In this paper we show that additional feedback offered by a Fabry-Perot cavity (containing the birefringent crystal and the rotator) can lead to a novel strong interaction regime. Usual signatures of the strong interaction regime like the normal mode splitting and avoided crossings, sensitive to the rotator orientation, are reported. A high finesse cavity is shown to offer an optical setup for measuring small angles. The results are based on direct calculations of the cavity transmissions along with an analysis of its dispersion relation.

  11. Dual-cavity mode converter for a fundamental mode output in an over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Shao, Hao; Chen, Changhua; Zhu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    A dual-cavity TM 02 –TM 01 mode converter is designed for a dual-mode operation over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator. With the converter, the fundamental mode output is achieved. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the efficiency of beam-wave conversion was over 46% and a pureTM 01 mode output was obtained. Effects of end reflection provided by the mode converter were studied. Adequate TM 01 mode feedback provided by the converter enhances conversion efficiency. The distance between the mode converter and extraction cavity critically affect the generation of microwaves depending on the reflection phase of TM 01 mode feedback

  12. Choke-mode damped structure design for the Compact Linear Collider main linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Choke-mode damped structures are being studied as an alternative design to waveguide damped structures for the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC. Choke-mode structures have the potential for lower pulsed temperature rise and simpler and less expensive fabrication. An equivalent circuit model based on transmission line theory for higher-order-mode damping is presented. Using this model, a new choke geometry is proposed and the wakefield performance is verified using Gdfidl. This structure has a comparable wakefield damping effect to the baseline design which uses waveguide damping. A prototype structure with the same iris dimensions and accelerating gradient as the nominal CLIC design, but with the new choke geometry, has been designed for high-power tests.

  13. Choke-mode damped structure design for the Compact Linear Collider main linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zha, Hao; Grudiev, Alexej; Huang, Wenhui; Shi, Jiaru; Tang, Chuanxiang; Wuensch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Choke-mode damped structures are being studied as an alternative design to waveguide damped structures for the main linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Choke-mode structures have the potential for lower pulsed temperature rise and simpler and less expensive fabrication. An equivalent circuit model based on transmission line theory for higher-order-mode damping is presented. Using this model, a new choke geometry is proposed and the wakefield performance is verified using GDFIDL. This structure has a comparable wakefield damping effect to the baseline design which uses waveguide damping. A prototype structure with the same iris dimensions and accelerating gradient as the nominal CLIC design, but with the new choke geometry, has been designed for high-power tests. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.15.122003

  14. Cavity RF mode analysis using a boundary-integral method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, M.S. de; Adams, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    A 3-dimensional boundary-integral method has been developed for rf cavity mode analysis. A frequency-dependent, homogeneous linear matrix equation is generated from a variant of the magnetic field integral equation (MFIE) where the domain of integration is a closed surface specifying the rf envelope of the cavity. Frequencies at which the MFIE has non-zero solutions are mode frequencies of the cavity, and the solutions are the corresponding surface magnetic field distributions. The MFIE can then be used to calculate the electric and magnetic field at any other point inside the cavity. Forward iteration is used to find the largest complex eigenvalue of the matrix at a specific frequency. This eigenvalue is 1 when the frequency corresponds to a cavity rf resonance. The matrix equivalent of the MFIE is produced by approximating the cavity surface by a set of perfectly conducting surface elements, and assuming that the surface magnetic field has constant amplitude on each element. The method can handle cavities with complex symmetries, and be easily integrated with finite-element heat-transfer and stress analysis codes

  15. Regularized quasinormal modes for plasmonic resonators and open cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamandar Dezfouli, Mohsen; Hughes, Stephen

    2018-03-01

    Optical mode theory and analysis of open cavities and plasmonic particles is an essential component of optical resonator physics, offering considerable insight and efficiency for connecting to classical and quantum optical properties such as the Purcell effect. However, obtaining the dissipative modes in normalized form for arbitrarily shaped open-cavity systems is notoriously difficult, often involving complex spatial integrations, even after performing the necessary full space solutions to Maxwell's equations. The formal solutions are termed quasinormal modes, which are known to diverge in space, and additional techniques are frequently required to obtain more accurate field representations in the far field. In this work, we introduce a finite-difference time-domain technique that can be used to obtain normalized quasinormal modes using a simple dipole-excitation source, and an inverse Green function technique, in real frequency space, without having to perform any spatial integrations. Moreover, we show how these modes are naturally regularized to ensure the correct field decay behavior in the far field, and thus can be used at any position within and outside the resonator. We term these modes "regularized quasinormal modes" and show the reliability and generality of the theory by studying the generalized Purcell factor of dipole emitters near metallic nanoresonators, hybrid devices with metal nanoparticles coupled to dielectric waveguides, as well as coupled cavity-waveguides in photonic crystals slabs. We also directly compare our results with full-dipole simulations of Maxwell's equations without any approximations, and show excellent agreement.

  16. Status of higher order mode beam position monitors in 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Flisgen, T; Van Rienen, U; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  17. Higher order mode damping in an ALS test cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, A.F.; Lamberston, G.R.; Barry, W.

    1990-06-01

    The higher order mode attenuation scheme proposed for the Advanced Light Source accelerating cavities consists of two broad-band dampers placed 90 degrees apart on the outer edge. In order to assess the damping efficiency a test assembly was built. The HOM damping was obtained by comparing the peak values of the transmission through the cavity for both the damped and the undamped case. Because of the high number of modes and frequency shifts due to the damping gear, the damping was assessed statistically, by averaging over several modes. In the frequency range from 1.5 to 5.5 GHz, average damping greater than 100 was obtained. 1 ref., 6 figs

  18. Pulse properties of external cavity mode locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulet, Josep; Kroh, Marcel; Mørk, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an external-cavity mode-locked semiconductor laser is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The optimization analysis focuses on the regimes of stable mode locking and the generation of sub-picosecond optical pulses. We demonstrate stable output pulses down to one...... picosecond duration with more than 30 dB trailing pulse suppression. The limiting factors to the device performance are investigated on the basis of a fully-distributed time-domain model.We find that ultrafast gain dynamics effectively reduce the pulse-shaping strength and inhibit the generation...

  19. Field measurement of the KEK linac-cavity by bead perturbation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Shigemi; Katoh, Tadahiko; Takenaka, Tateru; Takashima, Takeo.

    1979-05-01

    The axial electric field and transit-time factors of the KEK linac were re-measured by a bead perturbation method. The acquisition and latching of the data and the resetting of the prescaler were done during 16 clock-pulse period, which reduced the counting error within one for every datum. Quadratic fitting method was adopted to smooth the fluctuation of the original data. The transit-time factors were calculated in a more strict sense than ever. The results show that the slope of the field and the transit-time factors in the low energy are slightly larger that those measured by S. Okumura and D. Swenson. The gradual decrease of synchronous phase after the 77th cell was also observed. (author)

  20. Commercial mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubeigt, Walter; Bialkowski, Bartlomiej; Lin, Jipeng; Head, C. Robin; Hempler, Nils; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, M Squared Lasers have successfully commercialized a range of mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) operating between 920-1050nm and producing picosecond-range pulses with average powers above 1W at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) of 200MHz. These laser products offer a low-cost, easy-to-use and maintenance-free tool for the growing market of nonlinear microscopy. However, in order to present a credible alternative to ultrafast Ti-sapphire lasers, pulse durations below 200fs are required. In the last year, efforts have been directed to reduce the pulse duration of the Dragonfly laser system to below 200fs with a target average power above 1W at a PRF of 200MHz. This paper will describe and discuss the latest efforts undertaken to approach these targets in a laser system operating at 990nm. The relatively low PRF operation of Dragonfly lasers represents a challenging requirement for mode-locked VECSELs due to the very short upper state carrier lifetime, on the order of a few nanoseconds, which can lead to double pulsing behavior in longer cavities as the time between consecutive pulses is increased. Most notably, the design of the Dragonfly VECSEL cavity was considerably modified and the laser system extended with a nonlinear pulse stretcher and an additional compression stage. The improved Dragonfly laser system achieved pulse duration as short as 130fs with an average power of 0.85W.

  1. Deflecting modes of the side-coupled cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Shigemi.

    1990-11-01

    The deflecting modes of the 805 MHz side-coupled cavity structure with the relativistic factor 0.566 are studied. Our main concern is the dispersion properties among different configurations of side-coupling cells and their interpretations. It is shown that the ninety degree side-coupling cell configuration, so to speak, the Mickey Mouse configuration has a merit in reducing the HEM 1 passband. Another concern is the magnitude of the transverse coupling impedance around the synchronization condition. It is shown that the existence of the coupling cell introduces the nonuniformity of the deflecting mode and gives different impedance relative to the beam axis and that the coupling impedance at π/10 exceeds 50 MΩ/m if the quality value of the mode is around 12000

  2. Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators as Optical Reference Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartel, Lukas; Thompson, Rob; Strekalov, Dmitry; Grudinin, Ivan; Yu, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Highly stabilized lasers are an increasingly valuable tool for metrology. For many applications, however, existing Fabry Perot systems are too bulky and cumbersome. We are investigating the use of miniature monolithic whispering gallery mode resonators as reference cavities for laser stabilization. We seek to exploit the benefit of small size and vibration resistance by suppressing thermally induced frequency fluctuations. We have theoretically investigated the viability of using a thin-film coating to achieve temperature compensation. We have experimentally investigated an active temperature stabilization scheme based on birefringence in a crystalline resonator. We also report progress of laser locking to the resonators.

  3. The LINAC4 Power Coupler

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F; Montesinos, E; Riffaud, B; Ugena Tirado, P; Wegner, R

    2011-01-01

    Linac4 is employing three types of accelerating structures after the RFQ: a Drift Tube Linac (DTL), a Cell- Coupled DTL (CCDTL), and a Pi-Mode Structure (PIMS) to accelerate the beam up to 160 MeV at 352.2MHz. The structures are designed for a peak power of approximately 1 MW per power coupler, which is transported via rectangular waveguides from the klystron gallery to the RF cavities. The coupler itself consists of two parts: a ceramic window, which separates the cavity vacuum from the air in the waveguides, and a Tuner-adjustablewaveguide Coupler (TaCo), which couples the RF power through an iris to the cavity. In the frame of the Linac4 R&D both devices have been significantly improvedwith respect to their commonly used design. On the coupler side, the waveguide short circuit with its matched length has been replaced by a fixedlength /4 short circuit. The RF matching is done by a simple piston tuner, which allows a quick matching to different cavity quality factors. In the window part, which usually c...

  4. SNS superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundelin, Ronald M.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) decided in early 2000 to use superconducting RF (SRF) in the linac at energies above 185 MeV. Since the SNS duty cycle is 6%, the SRF and normal conducting approaches have capital costs which are about the same, but operating costs and future upgradability are improved by using SRF. The current status of cavity and cryomodule development and procurement, including the basis for decisions made, is discussed. The current plan includes use of 805 MHz, 6-cell cavities with geometrical betas of 0.61 and 0.81. There are 33 medium beta and 60 high beta cavities in 11 and 15 cryomodules, respectively. Each cavity (except the 93rd) is powered by a 550 kW pulsed klystron. Issues addressed include choice of peak surface gradient, optimization of cavity shape, selection of a scaled KEK input power coupler, selection of scaled TESLA higher mode couplers, and control of the effects of higher order modes on the beam. (author)

  5. Single-mode cavities at frequencies of 172 and 178 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Volkov, V N; Fomin, N G; Kurkin, G Ya; Tribendis, A G

    2001-01-01

    In the report presented here the projects of two accelerating cavities with strong damping of higher modes (HOM) with special vacuum loads are presented.The designs of the cavities and loads are described.The design parameters of cavities,their spectra of higher modes and calculation results of the beam phase motion stability are given for the VEPP-2000 and NANOHANA Projects.

  6. Paired modes of heterostructure cavities in photonic crystal waveguides with split band edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmoodian, Sahand; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the modes of double heterostructure cavities where the underlying photonic crystal waveguide has been dispersion engineered to have two band-edges inside the Brillouin zone. By deriving and using a perturbative method, we show that these structures possess two modes. For unapodized...... cavities, the relative detuning of the two modes can be controlled by changing the cavity length, and for particular lengths, a resonant-like effect makes the modes degenerate. For apodized cavities no such resonances exist and the modes are always non-degenerate....

  7. Unconventional geometric logic gate in a strong-driving-assisted multi-mode cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang-Ning, Pan; Di-Wu, Yang; Xue-Hui, Zhao; Mao-Fa, Fang

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scheme to implement an unconventional geometric logic gate separately in a two-mode cavity and a multi-mode cavity assisted by a strong classical driving field. The effect of the cavity decay is included in the investigation. The numerical calculation is carried out, and the result shows that our scheme is more tolerant to cavity decay than the previous one because the time consumed for finishing the logic gate is doubly reduced. (general)

  8. Mode conversion in metal–insulator–metal waveguide with a shifted cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yueke; Yan, Xin

    2018-01-01

    We propose a method, which is utilized to achieve the plasmonic mode conversion in metal–insulator–metal (MIM) waveguide, theoretically. Our proposed structure is composed of bus waveguides and a shifted cavity. The shifted cavity can choose out a plasmonic mode (a- or s-mode) when it is in Fabry–Perot (FP) resonance. The length of the shifted cavity L is carefully chosen, and our structure can achieve the mode conversion between a- and s-mode in the communication region. Besides, our proposed structure can also achieve plasmonic mode-division multiplexing. All the numerical simulations are carried on by the finite element method to verify our design.

  9. Electron linac injector developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    There is a continuing demand for improved injectors for electron linacs. Free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators require pulse trains of high brightness and, in some applications, high average power at the same time. Wakefield-accelerator and laser-acceleration experiments require isolated bunches of high peak brightness. Experiments with alkali-halide photoemissive and thermionic electron sources in rf cavities for injector applications are described. For isolated pulses, metal photocathodes (illuminated by intense laser pulses) are being employed. Reduced emittance growth in high-peak-current electron injectors may be achieved by linearizing the cavity electric field's radial component and by using high field strengths at the expense of lower shunt impedance. Harmonically excited cavities have been proposed for enlarging the phase acceptance of linac cavities and thereby reducing the energy spread produced in the acceleration process. Operation of injector linacs at a subharmonic of the main linac frequency is also proposed for enlarging the phase acceptance

  10. Optimal alignment sensing of a readout mode cleaner cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Lefebvre, N; Ballmer, S; Evans, M; Waldman, S; Kawabe, K; Frolov, V; Mavalvala, N

    2011-11-15

    Critically coupled resonant optical cavities are often used as mode cleaners in optical systems to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a signal that is encoded as an amplitude modulation of a laser beam. Achieving the best SNR requires maintaining the alignment of the mode cleaner relative to the laser beam on which the signal is encoded. An automatic alignment system that is primarily sensitive to the carrier field component of the beam will not, in general, provide optimal SNR. We present an approach that modifies traditional dither alignment sensing by applying a large amplitude modulation on the signal field, thereby producing error signals that are sensitive to the signal sideband field alignment. When used in conjunction with alignment actuators, this approach can improve the detected SNR; we demonstrate a factor of 3 improvement in the SNR of a kilometer-scale detector of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory. This approach can be generalized to other types of alignment sensors.

  11. Piezo activated mode tracking system for widely tunable mode-hop-free external cavity mid-IR semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Gerard (Inventor); Tittel, Frank K. (Inventor); Curl, Robert F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A widely tunable, mode-hop-free semiconductor laser operating in the mid-IR comprises a QCL laser chip having an effective QCL cavity length, a diffraction grating defining a grating angle and an external cavity length with respect to said chip, and means for controlling the QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle. The laser of claim 1 wherein said chip may be tuned over a range of frequencies even in the absence of an anti-reflective coating. The diffraction grating is controllably pivotable and translatable relative to said chip and the effective QCL cavity length can be adjusted by varying the injection current to the chip. The laser can be used for high resolution spectroscopic applications and multi species trace-gas detection. Mode-hopping is avoided by controlling the effective QCL cavity length, the external cavity length, and the grating angle so as to replicate a virtual pivot point.

  12. Quantum discord dynamics of two qubits in single-mode cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chen; Chen Qing-Hu

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of quantum discord for two identical qubits in two independent single-mode cavities and a common single-mode cavity are discussed. For the initial Bell state with correlated spins, while the entanglement sudden death can occur, the quantum discord vanishes only at discrete moments in the independent cavities and never vanishes in the common cavity. Interestingly, quantum discord and entanglement show opposite behavior in the common cavity, unlike in the independent cavities. For the initial Bell state with anti-correlated spins, quantum discord and entanglement behave in the same way for both independent cavities and a common cavity. It is found that the detunings always stabilize the quantum discord. (general)

  13. Line splitting and modified atomic decay of atoms coupled with N quantized cavity modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yifu

    1992-05-01

    We study the interaction of a two-level atom with N non-degenerate quantized cavity modes including dissipations from atomic decay and cavity damps. In the strong coupling regime, the absorption or emission spectrum of weakly excited atom-cavity system possesses N + 1 spectral peaks whose linewidths are the weighted averages of atomic and cavity linewidths. The coupled system shows subnatural (supernatural) atomic decay behavior if the photon loss rates from the N cavity modes are smaller (larger) than the atomic decay rate. If N cavity modes are degenerate, they can be treated effectively as a single mode. In addition, we present numerical calculations for N = 2 to characterize the system evolution from the weak coupling to strong coupling limits.

  14. Higher Order Mode (HOM) Impedance and Damping Study for the LHC Capture Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Tückmantel, Joachim; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LHC Division

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the higher order mode, HOM, damping in the LHC 200MHz ACN cavity when using four HOM couplers, simulations have been done by both 3-D frequency domain and time domain methods. These simulations have previously been used in other studies of HOM damped cavities and shown to be effective by comparing measurement and simulation results[1] [2]. Using these methods the impedance spectrum of the HOM modes in the cavity before and after damping has been obtained. From this, detailed information about the HOM coupler's contribution to HOM damping can be obtained. The distribution and magnitude of some potentially dangerous HOM modes in the ACN cavity have been found.

  15. Simultaneous cooling and entanglement of mechanical modes of a micromirror in an optical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genes, Claudiu; Vitali, David; Tombesi, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Laser cooling of a mechanical mode of a resonator by the radiation pressure of a detuned optical cavity mode has been recently demonstrated by various groups in different experimental configurations. Here, we consider the effect of a second mechanical mode with a close but different resonance frequency. We show that the nearby mechanical resonance is simultaneously cooled by the cavity field, provided that the difference between the two mechanical frequencies is not too small. When this frequency difference becomes smaller than the effective mechanical damping of the secondary mode, the two cooling processes interfere destructively similarly to what happens in electromagnetically induced transparency, and cavity cooling is suppressed in the limit of identical mechanical frequencies. We show that also the entanglement properties of the steady state of the tripartite system crucially depend upon the difference between the two mechanical frequencies. If the latter is larger than the effective damping of the second mechanical mode, the state shows fully tripartite entanglement and each mechanical mode is entangled with the cavity mode. If instead, the frequency difference is smaller, the steady state is a two-mode biseparable state, inseparable only when one splits the cavity mode from the two mechanical modes. In this latter case, the entanglement of each mechanical mode with the cavity mode is extremely fragile with respect to temperature.

  16. Spatial mode effects in a cavity-EIT based quantum memory with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, Kasper Rothe; Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Drewsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Quantum storage and retrieval of light in ion Coulomb crystals using cavity electromagnetically induced transparency are investigated theoretically. It is found that when both the control and the probe fields are coupled to the same spatial cavity mode, their transverse mode profile affects...

  17. Experimental Demonstration on Air Cavity Mode of Violin Using Holed Sheets of Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental air cavity mode (A0) of a violin was investigated from the viewpoint of its dependence on the opening area and shape by using holed sheets of paper. The dependences of the frequency response of the A0 cavity mode on the shape, opening area, and orientation of the openings were observed. It was also demonstrated that the change of…

  18. Density Operator Description of Atomic Ordered Spatial Modes in Cavity QED

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Zhen; Yang, Baoguo; Chen, Xuzong; Zhou, Xiaoji

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantum Monte-Carlo simulation for a pumped atom in a strong coupling cavity with dissipation, where two ordered spatial modes are formed for the atomic probability density, with the peaks distributed either only in the odd sites or only in the even ones of the lattice formed by the cavity field. A mixed state density operator model, which describes the coupling between different atomic spatial modes and the corresponding cavity field components, is proposed, which goes beyond th...

  19. Scaling relations for a beam-deflecting TM110 mode in an asymmetric cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, H.

    1989-01-01

    A deflecting mode in an rf cavity caused by an aperture of the coupling hole from a waveguide is studied. If the coupling hole was a finite size, the rf modes in the cavity can be distorted. We consider the distorted mode as a sum of the accelerating mode, and the deflecting mode. The finite-size coupling hole can be considered as radiating dipole sources in a closed cavity. Following the prescription given by H. Bethe, the relative strength of the deflecting mode TM 110 to the accelerating TM 010 mode is calculated by decomposing the dipole source field into cavity eigenmodes. Scaling relations are obtained as a function of the coupling hole radius. 2 refs., 6 figs

  20. SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STOVALL, J.; NATH, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac is comprised of both normal and superconducting rf (SRF) accelerating structures. The SRF linac accelerates the beam from 186 to 1250 MeV through 117 elliptical, multi-cell niobium cavities. This paper describes the SRF linac architecture, physics design considerations, cavity commissioning, and the expected beam dynamics performance

  1. Higher Order Modes HOM's in Coupled Cavities of the Flash Module ACC39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinton, I.R.R.

    2012-01-01

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM's) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  2. Higher Order Modes HOM___s in Coupled Cavities of the Flash Module ACC39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinton, I.R.R.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Jones, R.M.; /Manchester U. /DESY; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Zhang, P.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /DESY

    2012-09-14

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM's) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  3. Higher order modes HOMs in coupled cavities of the FLASH module ACC39

    CERN Document Server

    Shinton, I R R; Li, Z; Zhang, P

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM’s) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  4. RF Design of Normal Conducting 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz Cavities for LEReC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Binping [Brookhaven Natl. Lab.; Belomestnykh, Sergey [SUNY, Stony Brook; Ben-Zvi, Ilan [RIKEN BNL; Blaskiewicz, Michael [RIKEN BNL; Brennan, Joseph [RIKEN BNL; Brutus, Jean Clifford [RIKEN BNL; Fedotov, Alexei [RIKEN BNL; Hahn, Harald [Brookhaven; McIntyre, Gary [RIKEN BNL; Pai, Chien [RIKEN BNL; Smith, Kevin [RIKEN BNL; Tuozzolo, Joseph [RIKEN BNL; Veshcherevich, Vadim [Cornell U., CLASSE; Wu, Qiong [RIKEN BNL; Xin, Tianmu [RIKEN BNL; Xu, Wencan [RIKEN BNL; Zaltsman, Alex [RIKEN BNL

    2016-06-01

    To improve RHIC luminosity for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon, the Low Energy RHIC electron Cooler (LEReC) is currently under development at BNL. Two normal conducting cavities, a single cell 704 MHz cavity and a 3 cell 2.1 GHz third harmonic cavity, will be used in LEReC for energy spread correction. Currently these two cavities are under fabrication. In this paper we report the RF design of these two cavities.

  5. Higher Order Modes in Third Harmonic Cavities for XFEL/FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinton, I.R.R.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Baboi, N.; /DESY; Eddy, N.; /Fermilab; Flisgen, T.; Glock, H.W.; /Rostock U.; Jones, R.M.; Juntong, N.; /Manchester U. /DESY; Khabiboulline, T.N.; /Fermilab; van Rienen, U; /Rostock U.; Zhang, P.; /Manchester U. /DESY /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2010-06-01

    We analyse higher order modes in the 3.9 GHz bunch shaping cavities recently installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. We report on recent experimental results on the frequency spectrum from probe based measurements made at CMTB at DESY. These are compared to those predicted by finite difference and finite element computer codes. This study is focused mainly on the dipole component of the multi-pole expansion of the wakefield. The modes are readily identifiable as single-cavity modes provided the frequencies of these modes are below the cut-off of the inter-connecting beam pipes. The modes above cut-off are coupled to the 4 cavities and are distinct from single cavity modes.

  6. Flattop mode shaping of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser using an external-cavity aspheric mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaohui; Leger, James

    2004-11-01

    Both square-shaped and circular-shaped flattop modes were experimentally demonstrated in extended-cavity broad-area VCSELs using aspheric feedback mirrors. These refractive aspheric mirrors were fabricated by electron-beam lithography on curved substrates. Excellent single-mode operation and improved power extraction efficiency were observed. The three-mirror structure of the VCSEL and the state-of-the-art fabrication of the aspheric mirror contribute to the superior VCSEL performance. The modal loss analysis using a rigid three-mirror-cavity simulation method is discussed.

  7. On the Theory of Coupled Modes in Optical Cavity-Waveguide Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Heuck, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Light propagation in systems of optical cavities coupled to waveguides can be conveniently described by a general rate equation model known as (temporal) coupled mode theory (CMT). We present an alternative derivation of the CMT for optical cavitywaveguide structures, which explicitly relies...... on the treatment of the cavity modes as quasi-normal modes with properties that are distinctly different from those of the modes in the waveguides. The two families of modes are coupled via the field equivalence principle to provide a physically appealing yet surprisingly accurate description of light propagation...... in the coupled systems. Practical application of the theory is illustrated using example calculations in one and two dimensions....

  8. A Bloch modal approach for engineering waveguide and cavity modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    uses no external excitation and determines the quasi-normal modes as unity eigenvalues of the cavity roundtrip matrix. We demonstrate the method and the quasi-normal modes for two types of two-dimensional photonic crystal structures, and discuss the quasi-normal mode eld distributions and Q...

  9. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with Anderson-localized modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapienza, Luca; Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup; Stobbe, Søren

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in quantum optics and quantum information technology is to enhance the interaction between single photons and single quantum emitters. This requires highly engineered optical cavities that are inherently sensitive to fabrication imperfections. We have demonstrated a fundamentall...

  10. Mode-locked Bloch oscillations in a ring cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoylova, M; Piovella, N; Hunter, D; Robb, G R M; Bachelard, R; Courteille, Ph W

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technique for stabilizing and monitoring Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice under the action of a constant external force. In the proposed scheme, the atoms also interact with a unidirectionally pumped optical ring cavity whose one arm is collinear with the optical lattice. For weak collective coupling, Bloch oscillations dominate over the collective atomic recoil lasing instability and develop a synchronized regime in which the atoms periodically exchange momentum with the cavity field. (letter)

  11. Design of 6 MeV X-band electron linac for dual-head gantry radiotherapy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-wook; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Chul; Kim, Huisu; Ha, Donghyup; Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Chai, Jongseo; Lee, Byung-no; Chae, Moonsik

    2017-12-01

    A compact 6 MeV electron linac is being developed at Sungkyunkwan University, in collaboration with the Korea atomic energy research institute (KAERI). The linac will be used as an X-ray source for a dual-head gantry radiotherapy system. X-band technology has been employed to satisfy the size requirement of the dual-head gantry radiotherapy machine. Among the several options available, we selected a pi/2-mode, standing-wave, side-coupled cavity. This choice of radiofrequency (RF) cavity design is intended to enhance the shunt impedance of each cavity in the linac. An optimum structure of the RF cavity with a high-performance design was determined by applying a genetic algorithm during the optimization procedure. This paper describes the detailed design process for a single normal RF cavity and the entire structure, including the RF power coupler and coupling cavity, as well as the beam dynamics results.

  12. Mode-locked Pr3+-doped silica fiber laser with an external cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Yuan; Poulsen, Christian; Sejka, Milan

    1994-01-01

    We present a Pr3+-doped silica-based fiber laser mode-locked by using a linear external cavity with a vibrating mirror. Stable laser pulses with a FWHM of less than 44 ps, peak power greater than 9 W, and repetition rate up to 100 MHz are obtained. The pulse width versus cavity mismatch ΔL and pump...

  13. Digital control of laser modes with an intra-cavity spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we outline a simple laser cavity which produces customised on-demand digitally controlled laser modes by replacing the end-mirror of the cavity with an electrically addressed reflective phase-only spatial light modulator as a digital...

  14. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X-band choke-mode cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The X-band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns.

  15. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X -band choke-mode cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Hao; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Conde, Manoel; Power, John G.; Doran, Darrell S.; Liu, Wanming; Shi, Jiaru; Li, Chen; Gai, Wei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-08-01

    The X -band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC) main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf) signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns).

  16. Lasing and Longitudinal Cavity Modes in Photo-Pumped Deep Ultraviolet AlGaN Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-29

    NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS AlGaN lasers, optical pumping, longitudinal cavity modes Jinqiao Xie, Seiji Mita , Zachary Bryan, Wei Guo, Lindsay...Lasing and longitudinal cavity modes in photo-pumped deep ultraviolet AlGaN heterostructures Jinqiao Xie,1,a) Seiji Mita ,1 Zachary Bryan,2 Wei Guo,2...Dalmau, B. Moody, R. Schlesser, S. Mita , M. Feneberg, B. Neuschl, K. Thonke, R. Collazo, A. Rice, J. Tweedie, and Z. Sitar, J. Electrochem. Soc. 158

  17. Selection of transverse modes in laser cavities containing waveguides and open parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurin, O V; Degtyarev, A V; Maslov, Vyacheslav A; Svich, V A; Tkachenko, V M; Topkov, A N

    2001-01-01

    The transverse modes of a submillimetre laser cavity that contains waveguides and open parts were studied theoretically and experimentally with the purpose of finding methods for mode selection. Two methods based on the filtering of the Fourier spectra of the waveguide modes and the use of their interference were substantiated numerically and realised in experiment. Special attention was paid to the mode selection in tunable lasers. Scaling laws allowing one to use the obtained results in a wide range of the cavity parameters and wavelengths are presented. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Canceling evanescent waves in high-energy superconducting rf linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N.

    2010-05-01

    Many future projects plan using high-current, high-energy, multipass energy-recovery linacs that are based on superconducting rf (SRF) cavities. The necessity of ensuring the transverse stability of the beam in such accelerators imposes strict limits on the high order modes (HOMs) impedances, and demands effective HOM damping. The latter requirement often precludes achieving a high real-estate accelerating gradient in such structures. The modular structure of long SRF linacs also requires incorporating vacuum flanges; however, these flanges have surface contacts and cannot tolerate strong rf fields. Locating them in the low-field areas of the linac structure may involve considerably elongating the intermodular interfaces, a change that would reduce the linac’s real-estate accelerating gradient. In this paper, I propose a novel method to resolve this issue, using compact interconnects between the SRF cavities wherein to locate effective HOM dampers and vacuum flanges.

  19. Phonon interaction with coupled photonic-plasmonic modes in a phoxonic cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. El-Jallal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical investigation of the acousto-optic interaction in a two-dimensional phoxonic crystal cavity containing a metallic nanowire. The crystal is constituted by a square array of cylindrical holes in a TiO2 matrix containing a cavity inside which a gold nanowire is introduced. The optical modes of the cavity are therefore of combined photonic-plasmonic character. We calculate the strength of coupling between these modes and the localized phonons of the cavity, based on the “Moving Interface” mechanism of acousto-optic coupling. We discuss the coupling strength as a function of the size and position of the metallic nanowire and compare the results with those of a cavity without metallic particle.

  20. Design of a choke-mode damped accelerating structure for CLIC Main LINAC

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, J; Grudiev, A; Wuensch, W; Tang, C; Chen, H; Huang, W

    2011-01-01

    Choke-mode damped accelerating structures are being studied as an alternative to the baseline structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC) by a CERN-Tsinghua collaboration. Choke-mode structures hold the potential for much lower levels of pulsed surface heating and, since milling is not needed, reduced cost. Structures with radial choke attached are simulated in GdfidL to investigate the damping of the transverse wake. The first pass-band of the dipole modes is well damped, while the higher order dipole modes are possibly reflected by the choke. Therefore, the geometry of the choke is tuned to minimize the reflection of these higher order dipole modes. Based on this damping scheme, an accelerating structure with the same iris dimensions as the nominal CLIC design but with choke-mode damping has been designed. A prototype structure will be manufactured and high power tested in the near future.

  1. Upper-limit on the Advanced Virgo output mode cleaner cavity length noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnand, R.; Ducrot, M.; Gouaty, R.; Marion, F.; Masserot, A.; Mours, B.; Pacaud, E.; Rolland, L.; Was, M.

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Virgo detector uses two monolithic optical cavities at its output port to suppress higher order modes and radio frequency sidebands from the carrier light used for gravitational wave detection. These two cavities in series form the output mode cleaner. We present a measured upper limit on the length noise of these cavities that is consistent with the thermo-refractive noise prediction of 8×10-16~m~Hz-1/2 at 15 Hz. The cavity length is controlled using Peltier cells and piezo-electric actuators to maintain resonance on the incoming light. A length lock precision of 3.5×10-13 m is achieved. These two results are combined to demonstrate that the broadband length noise of the output mode cleaner in the 10-60 Hz band is at least a factor 10 below other expected noise sources in the Advanced Virgo detector design configuration.

  2. [The influence of breathing mode on the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surtel, Anna; Klepacz, Robert; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Nose breathing is one of the key factors in the proper development and functioning of the oral cavity. The air passing through the nasal cavity is warmed and humidified while dust and other particulate matter is removed. It is also important as far as bone formation is concerned. The obstruction or congestions of the upper respiratory tract may negatively affect the correct and most optimal (nasal) respiratory tract. The switch from nasal to mouth breathing may lead to serious clinical consequences. Children with the clinical diagnosis of mouth breathing are usually pale, apathetic and they lack concentration and often get tired. Disorders resulting from hypoxy may also be the reason from sleep disturbances, such as frequent waking-up, nocturia, difficulties falling aslee. The main clinical manifestations of mouth breathing appear in the craniofacial structures. Mouth breathers frequently suffer from dental malocclusions and craniofacial bone abnormalities. Chronic muscle tension around the oral cavity could result in the widening of cranio-vertebral angle, posterior position of mandibula and narrow maxillary arch. Among dental alterations the most common are class II malocclusion (total or partial) with the protrusion of the anterior teeth, cross bite (unilateral or bilateral), anterior open bite and primary crowded teeth. Apart from malocclusion, chronic gingivitis, periodontitis, candida infections and halitosis are frequently present in mouth--breathing patients. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  3. Selection of a LGp0-shaped fundamental mode in a laser cavity: Phase versus amplitude masks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hasnaoui, A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available -plate (absorbing ring) set inside a diaphragmed laser cavity for selecting a pure LGp0 mode of radial order, p. We analyse, for each type of mask, the origin of the transverse mode selection, and contrary to what one might expect we find that it is not necessary...

  4. Calculation, normalization and perturbation of quasinormal modes in coupled cavity-waveguide systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Gregersen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    We show how one can use a non-local boundary condition, which is compatible with standard frequency domain methods, for numerical calculation of quasinormal modes in optical cavities coupled to waveguides. In addition, we extend the definition of the quasinormal mode norm by use of the theory...

  5. Active mode control of solid state laser using an intra-cavity beam shaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenguang; Zhou, Qiong; Yan, Baozhu; Jiang, Zongfu

    2015-05-01

    In high power solid state lasers, thermal lens effect always give rise to the multi-modes oscillation in the resonator. The beam quality will deteriorate with the increase of output power. In this paper, an intra-cavity beam shaper is introduced to actively compensate the thermal lens in the laser resonator. One round trip ABCD matrix of the resonator with an intra-cavity beam shaper and thermal lens is calculated. The design parameters with wide stable zone are concluded through the ABCD matrix. The mode size and stability diagram of the resonator are calculated under different focal length of the thermal lens. The relationship between the adjustment of the intra-cavity beam shaper and the mode size under different thermal lenses are concluded, and general method to actively control the modes contents by adjusting the intra-cavity beam shaper is introduced. The effectiveness and performance of active mode control with the intra-cavity beam shaper are verified by simulations of the output modes of resonators. It shows that the M2 factor is well maintained below 1.6 even the focal length of the thermal lens changes from 5m to 0.5m.

  6. Photonic crystal defect mode cavity modelling: a phenomenological dimensional reduction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Qiang, Zexuan; Chen, Li

    2007-05-01

    A phenomenological dimensional reduction approach (PDRA) for the cavity characteristics in defect mode based photonic crystal (PC) lasers is presented. Based on the fully vectorial three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D FDTD) technique, simultaneous enhancement and suppression in spontaneous emission and absorption were obtained in an absorptive photonic crystal slab (PCS) cavity. Effective index perturbation (EIP) was proposed for fast and accurate determination of the effective index and the dominant resonant cavity frequency in a 3D PCS structure, with two-dimensional (2D) FDTD simulation. Further dimensional reduction from 2D to one-dimensional planar cavity enables phenomenological modelling of lasing characteristics via the effective reflectivity calculation and rate equation analysis. Very fast and accurate results have been achieved with this PDRA approach. A high spontaneous emission factor and cavity quality factor Q were obtained in a single defect cavity, which led to over an order reduction in lasing gain threshold. The model offers a fast and accurate tool for the design and modelling of PC defect mode cavity based devices and aids the research in the proposed novel defect mode based devices such as ultra-compact light sources on Si and spectrally resolved PC infrared photodetectors.

  7. LINAC4 takes a tour of Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Along the German Autobahnen, a truck carrying 20 tonnes of copper is on its way to Poland. The metal has already made a short tour of Europe, yet the drive across the high-speed highway is only the beginning of its transformation into CERN’s next linear accelerator, LINAC4.   Grzegorz Wrochna (left), director of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), and Rolf Heuer (right), CERN DG, sign the framework agreement between the two institutes. By the summer of 2012, the PI-Mode Structures (PIMS) will be constructed and completely installed in the LINAC4 tunnel. The PIMS cavities are the final accelerating structures needed for LINAC4, and have been designed to accelerate protons from 100 to 160MeV. While the first cavity was built entirely at CERN, construction of the remaining cavities has become a larger, multi-national operation. In a 1 million euro framework agreement signed on 11 February by the Director-General, the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in Swie...

  8. R & D on Very-High-Current Superconducting Proton Linac, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2013-03-31

    The aim of this R&D project was to develop a superconducting cavity for a very-­ high-current proton accelerator. The particular application motivating the proposal was a LHC upgrade called the Superconducting Proton Linac, or SPL. Under the grant awarded to Stony Brook University the cavity was designed, a prototype copper cavity, followed by the niobium cavity, were built. A new set of HOM dampers was developed. The cavity has outstanding RF performance parameters – low surface fields, low power loss and all HOMs are fully damped. In fact, it is a “universal cavity” in the sense that it is suited for the acceleration of high-­current protons and well as high current electrons. Its damping of HOM modes is so good that it can see service in a multi-pass linac or an Energy Recovery Linac in addition to the easier service in a single-pass linac. Extensive measurements were made on the cavities and couplers, with the exception of the cold test of the niobium cavity. At the time of this report the cavity has been chemically processed and is ready for vertical testing which will be carried out shortly.

  9. Single-mode quantum cascade lasers employing a candy-cane shaped monolithic coupled cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peter Q.; Sladek, Kamil; Wang, Xiaojun; Fan, Jen-Yu; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate single-mode quantum cascade lasers emitting at ˜4.5 μm by employing a monolithic "candy-cane" shaped coupled-cavity consisting of a straight section connecting at one end to a spiral section. The fabrication process is identical to those for simple Fabry-Perot-type ridge lasers. Continuously tunable single-mode emission across ˜8 cm-1 with side mode suppression ratio up to ˜25 dB and a single-mode operating current range of more than 70% above the threshold current is achieved when the lasers are operated in pulsed-mode from 80 K to 155 K.

  10. Controllable optical bistability in a three-mode optomechanical system with atom-cavity-mirror couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Yan, Jia-Kai; Zhu, Xiao-Fei; Jiang, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the optical bistable behavior in a three-mode optomechanical system with atom-cavity-mirror couplings. The effects of the cavity-pump detuning and the pump power on the bistable behavior are discussed detailedly, the impacts of the atom-pump detuning and the atom-cavity coupling strength on the bistability of the system are also explored, and the influences of the cavity-resonator coupling strength and the cavity decay rate are also taken into consideration. The numerical results demonstrate that by tuning these parameters the bistable behavior of the system can be freely switched on or off, and the threshold of the pump power for the bistability as well as the bistable region width can also be effectively controlled. These results can find potential applications in optical bistable switch in the quantum information processing.

  11. Intra-cavity generation of high order LGpl modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the generation of symmetrical high order Laguerre Gaussian modes. These high order Laguerre-Gaussian beams are generated by forcing the laser using an annular binary Diffractive Optical Element whose geometry is in connection...

  12. Beam orbit control in TESLA superconducting cavities from dipole mode measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paparella, R.

    2006-09-01

    The knowledge of the electromagnetic interaction between a beam and the surrounding vacuum chamber is necessary in order to optimize the accelerator performance in terms of stored current. Many instability phenomena may occur in the machine because of the fields produced by the beam and acting back on itself. Basically, these fields, wake-fields, produce an extra voltage, affecting the longitudinal dynamics, and a transverse kick which deflects the beam. In this thesis we present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations to demonstrate the possibility of using the dipolar wake fields of the superconducting accelerating to measure the beam transverse position. After an introduction to the ILC project and to the TESLA technology, of superconducting RF cavities, we will approach the problem from an analytical point of view in chapter 2. The expression of the wake fields in a cylindrical cavity will be investigated and the electromagnetic field modes derived from Maxwell equations in an original way. Graphical solutions of a Matlab program simulating the fields due to a particle passing through a pill-box cavity along a generic path will be shown. The interaction of the beam with higher order modes (HOM) in the TESLA cavities has been studied in the past at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) in order to determine whether the modes with the highest loss factor are sufficiently damped. Starting from the results obtained before 2003, HOM signals has been better observed and examined in order to use dipole modes to find the electric center of each cavity in the first TTF accelerating module. The results presented in chapter 3 will show that by monitoring the HOM signal amplitude for two polarizations of a dipole mode, one can measure electrical center of the modes with a resolution of 50 μm. Moreover, a misalignment of the first TTF module with respect to the gun axis has been predicted using cavity dipole modes. Alternatives to this method are described in

  13. Study of medium beta elliptical cavities for CADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liangjian; Zhang, Shenghu; Li, Yongming; Wang, Ruoxu; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Cong; Jia, Huan; Jiang, Tiancai; Li, Chunlong; He, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    The China Accelerator-Driven Sub-critical System (CADS) is a high intensity proton facility to dispose of nuclear waste and generate electric power. CADS is based on a 1.5 GeV, 10 mA CW superconducting (SC) linac as a driver. The high energy section of the linac is composed of two families of SC elliptical cavities which are designed with geometrical beta 0.63 and 0.82. In this paper, the 650 MHz β=0.63 SC elliptical cavity is studied, including cavity optimization, multipacting, high order modes (HOMs) and generator RF power calculation. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91426303)

  14. New developed cylindrical TM010 mode EPR cavity for X-band in vivo tooth dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Junwang

    Full Text Available EPR tooth in vivo dosimetry is an attractive approach for initial triage after unexpected nuclear events. An X-band cylindrical TM010 mode resonant cavity was developed for in vivo tooth dosimetry and used in EPR applications for the first time. The cavity had a trapezoidal measuring aperture at the exact position of the cavity's cylindrical wall where strong microwave magnetic field H1 concentrated and weak microwave electric field E1 distributed. Theoretical calculations and simulations were used to design and optimize the cavity parameters. The cavity features were evaluated by measuring DPPH sample, intact incisor samples embed in a gum model and the rhesus monkey teeth. The results showed that the cavity worked at designed frequency and had the ability to make EPR spectroscopy in relative high sensitivity. Sufficient modulation amplitude and microwave power could be applied into the aperture. Radiation induced EPR signal could be observed remarkably from 1 Gy irradiated intact incisor within only 30 seconds, which was among the best in scan time and detection limit. The in vivo spectroscopy was also realized by acquiring the radiation induced EPR signal from teeth of rhesus monkey whose teeth was irradiated by dose of 2 Gy. The results suggested that the cavity was sensitive to meet the demand to assess doses of significant level in short time. This cavity provided a very potential option for the development of X-band in vivo dosimetry.

  15. Study on RFQ linacs for heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Nozomu.

    1990-11-01

    Study on a prototype linac 'LITL', the first Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac that accelerated heavy ions in the world, 1.4 m in length and 0.6 m in diameter has revealed: a vane mounting method using 'base plugs' is effective to align the large vanes within a precision of 100 μm: a circle approximation of the ideal vane shape can give a satisfactory rf field distribution in the beam aperture and can yield a high surface field strength exceeding 21 kV/mm. A long RFQ linac 'TALL', 7.3 m in length, has been realized by 'vane separation' method. The cavity has been fabricated by joining four sections which had been assembled independently. The vanes are separated at the joints with gaps between them, which to tolerate machining errors and unequal thermal expansion. This method enables the precise alignment of the vane for a long RFQ. It does not decrease the sparking limit and does not increase beam loss. By devising end inductive tuners, sufficient mode separation was obtained. By compensating the capacitance errors owing to the vane misalignment with side inductive tuners, azimuthal and longitudinal field uniformities of ±1.5 % and ±5 %, respectively have been obtained. The frequency can be controlled without destroying the field uniformity. The cavity is excited stably by a simple loop coupler for a peak rf power up to 240 kW. Beam tests show the output beam characteristics which have been predicted by computer simulations are realized. Through the construction and performance studies of the two linacs, a type of the RFQ linac for heavy ions has been established. (author)

  16. Ion cyclotron modes in a low density plasma cavity. Part II: Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawley, M.L.; Paris, P.J.

    1990-12-01

    Ion cyclotron modes have been excited in a low density, cylindrical plasma cavity using an external inductive antenna. These modes, which have a long parallel wavelength, exhibit a strong electrostatic character and are only weakly coupled to the antenna fields. Comparison is made of the measured wavefields with those predicted by a theory that includes the influence of electron dynamics. It is thus shown that electron Landau damping, as well as the electron inertia, plays an important role in determining the cavity structure. (author) 7 figs., 12 refs

  17. Dynamics of the collective modes of an inhomogeneous spin ensemble in a cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesenberg, Janus; Kurucz, Zoltan; Mølmer, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We study the excitation dynamics of an inhomogeneously broadened spin ensemble coupled to a single cavity mode. The collective excitations of the spin ensemble can be described in terms of generalized spin waves, and, in the absence of the cavity, the free evolution of the spin ensemble can be de...... without dispersion from negative to positive-valued wavenumbers without populating the zero wavenumber spin wave mode. The results are relevant for multimode collective quantum memories where qubits are encoded in different spin waves....

  18. Cavity length dependence of mode beating in passively Q-switched Nd-solid state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.; Wanke, Michael; Bossert, David

    2013-03-01

    The temporal intensity profile of pulse(s) from passively Q-switched and passively Q-switched mode locked (QSML) solid-state lasers is known to be dependent on cavity length. In this work, the pulse width, modulation depth, and beat frequencies of a Nd:Cr:GSGG laser using a Cr+4:YAG passive Q-switch are investigated as function cavity length. Measured temporal widths are linearly correlated with cavity length but generally 3-5 ns larger than theoretical predictions. Some cavity lengths exhibit pulse profiles with no modulation while other lengths exhibit complete amplitude modulation. The observed beat frequencies at certain cavity lengths cannot be accounted for with passively QSML models in which the pulse train repetition rate is τRT-1, τRT= round-trip time. They can be explained, however, by including coupled cavity mode-locking effects. A theoretical model developed for a two section coupled cavity semiconductor laser is adapted to a solid-state laser to interpret measured beat frequencies. We also numerically evaluate the temporal criterion required to achieve temporally smooth Q-switched pulses, versus cavity length and pump rate. We show that in flash lamp pumped systems, the difference in buildup time between longitudinal modes is largely dependent on the pump rate. In applications where short pulse delay is important, the pumping rate may limit the ability to achieve temporally smooth pulses in passively Q-switched lasers. Simulations support trends in experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. A beamline design and data acquisition with the 20-MeV, 20-ps electron beam for the higher-order mode studies of the APS SR-rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.; Nassiri, A.; Daly, R.

    1993-01-01

    A beamline has been designed and assembled to use the ANL Chemistry Division 20-MeV electron linac for the testing of higher-order mode excitation and damping in rf cavities. The beamline consists of two sections (a beam collimating section with a 1.5 inches-OD vacuum line, and a cavity test section with a 3 inches-OD vacuum line), separated by two double aluminum foil windows. The beam diagnostics consist of a stripline beam position monitor, integrating current transformers, fluorescent screens, and a Faraday cup. EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) is used for beamline control, monitoring, and data acquisition. Also described is the diagnostic system used for beam image capture and analysis using EPICS-controlled hardware and PV-WAVE software. The rf cavity measurement will be described in a separate paper

  20. Dynamic mode decomposition of turbulent cavity flows for self-sustained oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seena, Abu; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► DMD modes were extracted from two cavity flow data set at Re D = 12,000 and 3000. ► At Re D = 3000, frequencies of boundary layer and shear layer structures coincides. ► Boundary layer structures exceed in size with shear layer structures. ► At Re D = 12,000, structure showed coherence leading to self-sustained oscillations. ► Hydrodynamic resonance occurs if coherence exists in wavenumber and frequency. - Abstract: Self-sustained oscillations in a cavity arise due to the unsteady separation of boundary layers at the leading edge. The dynamic mode decomposition method was employed to analyze the self-sustained oscillations. Two cavity flow data sets, with or without self-sustained oscillations and possessing thin or thick incoming boundary layers (Re D = 12,000 and 3000), were analyzed. The ratios between the cavity depth and the momentum thickness (D/θ) were 40 and 4.5, respectively, and the cavity aspect ratio was L/D = 2. The dynamic modes extracted from the thick boundary layer indicated that the upcoming boundary layer structures and the shear layer structures along the cavity lip line coexisted with coincident frequency space but with different wavenumber space, whereas structures with a thin boundary layer showed complete coherence among the modes to produce self-sustained oscillations. This result suggests that the hydrodynamic resonances that gave rise to the self-sustained oscillations occurred if the upcoming boundary layer structures and the shear layer structures coincided, not only in frequencies, but also in wavenumbers. The influences of the cavity dimensions and incoming momentum thickness on the self-sustained oscillations were examined.

  1. Transverse-mode-selectable microlens vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Debernardi, Pierluigi; Lee, Yong Tak

    2010-01-01

    of the mode selection properties of the new structure is rigorously analyzed and compared to other structures reported in the literature. The possibility of engineering the emission shape while retaining strong single mode operation is highly desirable for low-cost mid-range optical interconnects applications......A new vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structure employing a thin microlens is suggested and numerically investigated. The laser can be made to emit in either a high-power Gaussian-shaped single-fundamental mode or a high-power doughnut-shaped higher-order mode. The physical origin...

  2. Tunable single and dual mode operation of an external cavity quantum-dot injection laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biebersdorf, A [Photonics and Optoelectronics Group, Physics Department and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Amalienstrasse 54, D-80799 Munich (Germany); Lingk, C [Photonics and Optoelectronics Group, Physics Department and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Amalienstrasse 54, D-80799 Munich (Germany); De Giorgi, M [Photonics and Optoelectronics Group, Physics Department and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Amalienstrasse 54, D-80799 Munich (Germany); Feldmann, J [Photonics and Optoelectronics Group, Physics Department and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Amalienstrasse 54, D-80799 Munich (Germany); Sacher, J [Sacher Lasertechnik GmbH, Hannah Arendt Strasse 3-7, D-35037 Marburg (Germany); Arzberger, M [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ulbrich, C [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Boehm, G [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Amann, M-C [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Abstreiter, G [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2003-08-21

    We investigate quantum-dot (QD) lasers in an external cavity using Littrow and Littman configurations. Here, we report on a continuously tunable QD laser with a broad tuning range from 1047 to 1130 nm with high stability and efficient side mode suppression. The full-width at half-maximum of the laser line is 0.85 nm determined mainly by the quality of the external grating. This laser can be operated in a dual-mode modus, where the mode-spacing can be tuned continuously between 1.1 and 34 nm. Simultaneous emission of the two laser modes is shown by sum frequency generation experiments.

  3. Higher-order mode-based cavity misalignment measurements at the free-electron laser FLASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Hellert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available At the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH and the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser, superconducting TeV-energy superconducting linear accelerator (TESLA-type cavities are used for the acceleration of electron bunches, generating intense free-electron laser (FEL beams. A long rf pulse structure allows one to accelerate long bunch trains, which considerably increases the efficiency of the machine. However, intrabunch-train variations of rf parameters and misalignments of rf structures induce significant trajectory variations that may decrease the FEL performance. The accelerating cavities are housed inside cryomodules, which restricts the ability for direct alignment measurements. In order to determine the transverse cavity position, we use a method based on beam-excited dipole modes in the cavities. We have developed an efficient measurement and signal processing routine and present its application to multiple accelerating modules at FLASH. The measured rms cavity offset agrees with the specification of the TESLA modules. For the first time, the tilt of a TESLA cavity inside a cryomodule is measured. The preliminary result agrees well with the ratio between the offset and angle dependence of the dipole mode which we calculated with eigenmode simulations.

  4. Higher-order mode-based cavity misalignment measurements at the free-electron laser FLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellert, Thorsten; Baboi, Nicoleta; Shi, Liangliang

    2017-12-01

    At the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser, superconducting TeV-energy superconducting linear accelerator (TESLA)-type cavities are used for the acceleration of electron bunches, generating intense free-electron laser (FEL) beams. A long rf pulse structure allows one to accelerate long bunch trains, which considerably increases the efficiency of the machine. However, intrabunch-train variations of rf parameters and misalignments of rf structures induce significant trajectory variations that may decrease the FEL performance. The accelerating cavities are housed inside cryomodules, which restricts the ability for direct alignment measurements. In order to determine the transverse cavity position, we use a method based on beam-excited dipole modes in the cavities. We have developed an efficient measurement and signal processing routine and present its application to multiple accelerating modules at FLASH. The measured rms cavity offset agrees with the specification of the TESLA modules. For the first time, the tilt of a TESLA cavity inside a cryomodule is measured. The preliminary result agrees well with the ratio between the offset and angle dependence of the dipole mode which we calculated with eigenmode simulations.

  5. Fabrication and measurement of a 10x scale model of a double-sided planar mm-wave linac cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Matthews, P.; Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    A double-sided planar mm-wave linear accelerating cavity, structure has been investigated. An 80-cell constant impedance structure working with 2π/3-mode traveling wave was chosen as an accelerator section. A 10x scale model of the structure has been fabricated and the basic electrical performances have been tested. The nodal shift measurement technique with a rectangular detuning plunger was used to measure the phase advance between the cells with a vector network analyzer

  6. Widely tunable all-fiber SESAM mode-locked Ytterbium laser with a linear cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Zhaokun; Wang, Ziwei; Bai, Yang; Li, Qiurui; Zhou, Jun

    2017-07-01

    We present a widely tunable all-fiber mode-locked laser based on semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with a linear cavity design. An easy-to-use tunable bandpass filter based on thin film cavity technology is employed to tune the wavelength. By tuning the filter and adjusting the polarization controller, mode-locked operation can be achieved over the range of 1023 nm-1060 nm. With the polarization controller settled, mode-locked operation can be preserved and the wavelength can be continuously tuned from 1030 nm to 1053 nm. At 1030 nm, the laser delivers 9.6 mw average output power with 15.4 ps 10.96 MHz pulses at fundamental mode-locked operation.

  7. A Bloch modal approach for engineering waveguide and cavity modes in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lasson, Jakob R.; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper; Gregersen, Niels

    2013-05-01

    In open nanophotonic structures, the natural modes are so-called quasi-normal modes satisfying an outgoing wave boundary condition. We present a new scheme based on a modal expansion technique, a scattering matrix approach and Bloch modes of periodic structures for determining these quasi-normal modes. As opposed to spatial discretization methods like the finite-difference time-domain method and the finite element method, the present approach satisfies automatically the outgoing wave boundary condition in the propagation direction which represents a significant advantage of our new method. The scheme uses no external excitation and determines the quasi-normal modes as unity eigenvalues of the cavity roundtrip matrix. We demonstrate the method and the quasi-normal modes for two types of two-dimensional photonic crystal structures, and discuss the quasi-normal mode field distributions and Q-factors in relation to the transmission spectra of these structures.

  8. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Pei

    2013-02-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrumentation. At the FLASH facility in DESY, 1.3 GHz (known as TESLA) and 3.9 GHz (third harmonic) cavities are installed. Wakefields in 3.9 GHz cavities are significantly larger than in the 1.3 GHz cavities. It is therefore important to mitigate the adverse effects of HOMs to the beam by aligning the beam on the electric axis of the cavities. This alignment requires an accurate beam position diagnostics inside the 3.9 GHz cavities. It is this aspect that is focused on in this thesis. Although the principle of beam diagnostics with HOM has been demonstrated on 1.3 GHz cavities, the realization in 3.9 GHz cavities is considerably more challenging. This is due to the dense HOM spectrum and the relatively strong coupling of most HOMs amongst the four cavities in the third harmonic cryo-module. A comprehensive series of simulations and HOM spectra measurements have been performed in order to study the modal band structure of the 3.9 GHz cavities. The dependencies of

  9. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei

    2013-02-15

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrumentation. At the FLASH facility in DESY, 1.3 GHz (known as TESLA) and 3.9 GHz (third harmonic) cavities are installed. Wakefields in 3.9 GHz cavities are significantly larger than in the 1.3 GHz cavities. It is therefore important to mitigate the adverse effects of HOMs to the beam by aligning the beam on the electric axis of the cavities. This alignment requires an accurate beam position diagnostics inside the 3.9 GHz cavities. It is this aspect that is focused on in this thesis. Although the principle of beam diagnostics with HOM has been demonstrated on 1.3 GHz cavities, the realization in 3.9 GHz cavities is considerably more challenging. This is due to the dense HOM spectrum and the relatively strong coupling of most HOMs amongst the four cavities in the third harmonic cryo-module. A comprehensive series of simulations and HOM spectra measurements have been performed in order to study the modal band structure of the 3.9 GHz cavities. The dependencies of

  10. Harmonic cavities and the transverse mode-coupling instability driven by a resistive wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venturini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of rf harmonic cavities on the transverse mode-coupling instability (TMCI is still not very well understood. We offer a fresh perspective on the problem by proposing a new numerical method for mode analysis and investigating a regime of potential interest to the new generation of light sources where resistive wall is the dominant source of transverse impedance. When the harmonic cavities are tuned for maximum flattening of the bunch profile we demonstrate that at vanishing chromaticities the transverse single-bunch motion is unstable at any current, with growth rate that in the relevant range scales as the 6th power of the current. With these assumptions and radiation damping included, we find that for machine parameters typical of 4th-generation light sources the presence of harmonic cavities could reduce the instability current threshold by more than a factor two.

  11. Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity Field Profile Analysis and Higher Order Mode Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Carlos [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator R and D Div.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Physics and Astronomy Dept.; Xiao, B. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator R and D Div.; Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator R and D Div.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Physics and Astronomy Dept.

    2014-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is underway for a major upgrade to increase its luminosity by an order of magnitude beyond its original design specifications. This novel machine configuration known as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on various innovative technologies including very compact and ultra-precise superconducting crab cavities for beam rotation. A double quarter wave crab cavity (DQWCC) has been designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the HL-LHC. This cavity as well as the structural support components were fabricated and assembled at Niowave. The field profile of the crabbing mode for the DQWCC was investigated using a phase shift bead pulling technique and compared with simulated results to ensure proper operation or discover discrepancies from modeled results and/or variation in fabrication tolerances. Higher-Order Mode (HOM) characterization was also performed and correlated with simulations.

  12. Harmonic cavities and the transverse mode-coupling instability driven by a resistive wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, M.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of rf harmonic cavities on the transverse mode-coupling instability (TMCI) is still not very well understood. We offer a fresh perspective on the problem by proposing a new numerical method for mode analysis and investigating a regime of potential interest to the new generation of light sources where resistive wall is the dominant source of transverse impedance. When the harmonic cavities are tuned for maximum flattening of the bunch profile we demonstrate that at vanishing chromaticities the transverse single-bunch motion is unstable at any current, with growth rate that in the relevant range scales as the 6th power of the current. With these assumptions and radiation damping included, we find that for machine parameters typical of 4th-generation light sources the presence of harmonic cavities could reduce the instability current threshold by more than a factor two.

  13. Proton acceleration by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobajima, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Masuda, Kai [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. of Advanced Energy

    1997-03-01

    We found that protons are accelerated significantly by RF TE{sub 11} mode in a cylindrical cavity. In this method, protons get the perpendicular kinetic energy, so we thought it might be a compact accelerator, and studied the feasibility by numerical simulation. (author)

  14. Tunable mode-locked semiconductor laser with Bragg mirror external cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yvind, Kresten; Jørgensen, T.; Birkedal, Dan

    2002-01-01

    We present a simplified design for a wavelength tunable external cavity mode-locked laser by employing a wedged GaAs/AlGaAs Bragg mirror. The device emits 4-6 ps pulses at 10 GHz and is tunable over 15 nm. Although, in the present configuration, tunability is limited to 15 nm, however, we have...

  15. Determination of the cavity mode in the water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikulin Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic oscillations find their wide application in various sectors and industries: metallurgy, chemical and food industries, in engineering, in medicine. This is due to physical and chemical changes when exposed to the sound field. Cavitation in ultrasonic field causes the dispersion and emulsification of certain substances and promotes coagulation and degassing affects of crystallization and dissolution. It is known that ultrasonic vibrations also cause a variety of chemical transformations of substances such as oxidation, recovery, polymerization, and depolymerization. Researchers of cavitation action on the matter find the explanation of these phenomena: shock waves and, consequently, acoustic wind. The experiments were conducted in liquid environment (non-distilled water. The volume of the experimental sample amounted to 10 dm3. Method of the magnetostriction was applied to receive ultrasonic vibration, the principle of which consists in transforming electrical oscillations into mechanical. The level of cavitation was checked in two stages to evaluate the cavitation mode according to the degree of erosion of the artificial barriers and to measure the intensity of cavitation noise in the volume.

  16. HOM study and parameter calculation of the TESLA cavity model

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Ri-Hua; Gerigk Frank; Wang Guang-Wei; Wegner Rolf; Liu Rong; Schuh Marcel

    2010-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is the project for a superconducting, high current H-accelerator at CERN. To find dangerous higher order modes (HOMs) in the SPL superconducting cavities, simulation and analysis for the cavity model using simulation tools are necessary. The. existing TESLA 9-cell cavity geometry data have been used for the initial construction of the models in HFSS. Monopole, dipole and quadrupole modes have been obtained by applying different symmetry boundaries on various cavity models. In calculation, scripting language in HFSS was used to create scripts to automatically calculate the parameters of modes in these cavity models (these scripts are also available in other cavities with different cell numbers and geometric structures). The results calculated automatically are then compared with the values given in the TESLA paper. The optimized cavity model with the minimum error will be taken as the base for further simulation of the SPL cavities.

  17. 400-MeV upgrade for the Fermilab linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.E.; Noble, R.J.

    1989-09-01

    Fermilab plans to upgrade the Tevatron to expand the physics research program in both the fixed target and the collider operating modes. The first phase of this program is to increase the energy of the H{sup -} linac from 200 to 400 MeV in order to reduce the incoherent space change tuneshift at injection into the Booster which can limit either the brightness or the total intensity of the beam. The linac upgrade will be achieved by replacing the last four 201 MeV, with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules operating at an average axial field of about 8 MV/m. This will allow acceleration to 400 MeV in the existing Linac enclosure. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Cavity modes with optical orbital angular momentum in a metamaterial ring based on transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H W; Wang, F; Dong, Y Q; Shu, F Z; Zhang, K; Peng, R W; Xiong, X; Wang, Mu

    2015-12-14

    In this work, we theoretically study the cavity modes with transverse orbital angular momentum in metamaterial ring based on transformation optics. The metamaterial ring is designed to transform the straight trajectory of light into the circulating one by enlarging the azimuthal angle, effectively presenting the modes with transverse orbital angular momentum. The simulation results confirm the theoretical predictions, which state that the transverse orbital angular momentum of the mode not only depends on the frequency of the incident light, but also depends on the transformation scale of the azimuthal angle. Because energy dissipation inevitably reduces the field amplitude of the modes, the confined electromagnetic energy and the quality factor of the modes inside the ring are also studied in order to evaluate the stability of those cavity modes. The results show that the metamaterial ring can effectively confine light with a high quality factor and maintain steady modes with the orbital angular momentum, even if the dimension of the ring is much smaller than the wavelength of the incident light. This technique for exploiting the modes with optical transverse orbital angular momentum may provides a unique platform for applications related to micromanipulation.

  19. Study of a cylindrical cavity gyrotron, influence of power reflection and of the oscillation of a travelling mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggli, P.

    1991-11-01

    The quality factor and oscillating mode of a gyrotron cavity are essential parameters to consider when trying to obtain a high power (>500 kW), high efficiency (∼50%) microwave source, which oscillates in a stable manner in the principal mode of the cavity. The study and development of an 8 GHz gyrotron whose resonant cavity is formed by a cylindrical waveguide of slowly varying radius, is undertaken. The study is principally concerned with the phenomena associated with the low quality factor of the TE o 011 mode of the cavity. (author) figs., tabs., 102 refs

  20. Investigations of repetition rate stability of a mode-locked quantum dot semiconductor laser in an auxiliary optical fiber cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breuer, Stefan; Elsässer, Wolfgang; McInerney, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated experimentally the pulse train (mode beating) stability of a monolithic mode-locked multi-section quantum-dot laser with an added passive auxiliary optical fiber cavity. Addition of the weakly coupled (¿ -24dB) cavity reduces the current-induced shift d¿/dI of the principal...

  1. Ion cyclotron modes in a low density plasma cavity. Part I: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawley, M.L.

    1990-12-01

    Ion cyclotron modes excited in a low density, cylindrical plasma cavity using an external inductive antenna are investigated theoretically. These modes, which have a long parallel wavelength, exhibit a strong electrostatic character and are only weakly coupled to the antenna fields. It is shown that, despite the low frequency considered, electron dynamics play a dominant role via the effects of both Landau damping and electron inertia. The characteristics of the wavefields associated with these modes, relevant to an experimental investigation, are described. (author) 8 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs

  2. Existence of Majorana fermion mode and Dirac equation in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Sujit, E-mail: sujit.tifr@gmail.com

    2015-10-15

    We present the results of low lying collective mode of coupled optical cavity arrays. We derive the Dirac equation for this system and explain the existence of Majorana fermion mode in the system. We present quite a few analytical relations between the Rabi frequency oscillation and the atom–photon coupling strength to explain the different physical situation of our study and also the condition for massless collective mode in the system. We present several analytical relations between the Dirac spinor field, order and disorder operators for our systems. We also show that the Luttinger liquid physics is one of the intrinsic concepts in our system.

  3. Using Higher Order Modes in Superconducting Accelerating Cavities for Beam Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloy, S.; Baboi, N.; Eddy, N.; Frisch, J.; Hendrickson, L.; Hensler, O.; McCormick, D.; May, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.C.; Petrosyan, L.; Piccolli, L.; Rechenmacher, R.; Ross, M.; Simon, C.; Smith, T.; Watanabe, K.; Wendt, M.

    2008-01-01

    Dipole modes have been shown to be successful diagnostics for the beam position in superconducting accelerating cavities at the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) facility at DESY. By help of downmixing electronics the signals from the two higher order mode (HOM) couplers mounted on each cavity are monitored. The calibration, based on singular value decomposition, is more complicated than in standard position monitors. Position like signals based on this calibration are currently being in the process of being included in the control system. A second setup based on digitizing the spectrum from the HOM couplers has been used for monitoring monopole modes. The beam phase with respect to the RF has been thus monitored. The position calibration measurements and phase monitoring made at the FLASH are presented

  4. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Baboi, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrum...

  5. Near-self-imaging cavity for three-mode optoacoustic parametric amplifiers using silicon microresonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Torres, F A; Ma, Yubo; Zhao, C; Ju, L; Blair, D G; Chao, S; Roch-Jeune, I; Flaminio, R; Michel, C; Liu, K-Y

    2014-02-10

    Three-mode optoacoustic parametric amplifiers (OAPAs), in which a pair of photon modes are strongly coupled to an acoustic mode, provide a general platform for investigating self-cooling, parametric instability and very sensitive transducers. Their realization requires an optical cavity with tunable transverse modes and a high quality-factor mirror resonator. This paper presents the design of a table-top OAPA based on a near-self-imaging cavity design, using a silicon torsional microresonator. The design achieves a tuning coefficient for the optical mode spacing of 2.46  MHz/mm. This allows tuning of the mode spacing between amplification and self-cooling regimes of the OAPA device. Based on demonstrated resonator parameters (frequencies ∼400  kHz and quality-factors ∼7.5×10(5) we predict that the OAPA can achieve parametric instability with 1.6 μW of input power and mode cooling by a factor of 1.9×10(4) with 30 mW of input power.

  6. Induction linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.

    1986-07-01

    The principle of linear induction acceleration is described, and examples are given of practical configurations for induction linacs. These examples include the Advanced Technology Accelerator, Long Pulse Induction Linac, Radial Line Accelerator (RADLAC), and Magnetically-Insulated Electron-Focussed Ion Linac. A related concept, the auto accelerator, is described in which the high-current electron-beam technology in the sub-10 MeV region is exploited to produce electron beams at energies perhaps as high as the 100 to 1000 MeV range. Induction linacs for ions are also discussed. The efficiency of induction linear acceleration is analyzed

  7. Higher order mode spectra and the dependence of localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position in third harmonic superconducting cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M. [The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    An electron beam entering an accelerating cavity excites a wakefield. This wakefield can be decomposed into a series of multi-poles or modes. The dominant component of the transverse wakefield is dipole. This report summarizes the higher order mode (HOM) signals of the third harmonic cavities of FLASH measured at various stages: transmission measurements in the single cavity test stand at Fermilab, at CMTB (Cryo- Module Test Bench) and at FLASH, and beam-excited measurements at FLASH. Modes in the first two dipole bands and the fifth dipole band have been identified using a global Lorentzian fit technique. The beam-pipe modes at approximately 4 GHz and some modes in the fifth dipole band have been observed as localized modes, while the first two dipole bands, containing some strong coupling cavity modes, propagate. This report also presents the dependence of the localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position. Linear dependence for various modes has been observed. This makes them suitable for beam position diagnostics. These modes, together with some propagating, strong coupling modes, have been considered in the design of a dedicated electronics for beam diagnostics with HOMs for the third harmonic cavities.

  8. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mother's bacteria from being passed to the child. Treatment of Cavities Fluoride Fillings Root canal or tooth extraction If ... to help the world be well. From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people ...

  9. Matching of the coupler cavity to travelling wave structures at any operating mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanudet, M.

    1993-06-01

    For the realization of an accelerating travelling wave structure, it is important to adjust the coupler so that the rf power arriving through a rectangular waveguide is coupled to the structure without reflection from the input aperture of the first cavity, the coupler cavity. The problem consists in carefully determining the dimensions of the coupling aperture. A method is proposed to measure this coupling in the case of monoperiodic forward and backward wave structures. The theory is based on the possibility of representing the properties of electromagnetic modes in periodic structures by coupled RLC circuits. The study of current I and voltage V versus frequency ω allows the simulation of H and E fields, respectively, for the different modes appearing in a travelling wave structure. (K.A.) 4 refs.; 14 figs

  10. Optimizing of the higher order mode dampers in the 56MHz SRF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2010-01-01

    Earlier, we reported that a 56 MHz cavity was designed for a luminosity upgrade of the RHIC, and presented the requirements for Higher Order Mode (HOM) damping, the design of the HOM dampers, along with measurements and simulations of the HOM dampers. In this report, we describe our optimization of the dampers performance, and the modifications we made to their original design. We also optimized the number of the HOM dampers, and tested different configurations of locations for them.

  11. Numerical investigations on the performance of external-cavity mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulet, Josep; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    The performance of an external-cavity mode-locked semiconductor laser is analyzed theoretically and numerically. Passive mode-locking is described using a fully-distributed time-domain model including fast effects, spectral hole burning and carrier heating. We provide optimization rules in order...... to improve the mode-locking performance, such as reducing the pulsewidth and time-bandwidth product as much as possible. Timing jitter is determined by means of extensive numerical simulations of the model, demontrating that an external modulation is required in order to maintain moderate timing......-jitter and phase-noise levels at low frequencies. The effect of the driving conditions is investigated in order to achieve short pulses and low timing jitter. Our results are in qualitative agreement with reported experiments and predictions obtained from the master equation for mode-locking....

  12. Progress in design of the SNS linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardekopf, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2001-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a six-laboratory collaboration to build an intense pulsed neutron facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The linac design has evolved from the conceptual design presented in 1997 in order to achieve higher initial performance and to incorporate desirable upgrade features. The linac is now designed to produce 2-MW beam power using a combination of radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, drift-tube linac (DTL), coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and superconducting-RF (SRF) linac. Designs of each of these elements support the high peak intensity and high quality beam required for injection into the SNS accumulator ring. This paper will trace the evolution of the linac design and the progress made in the R and D program. (author)

  13. Progress in design of the SNS linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardekopf, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a six-laboratory collaboration to build an intense pulsed neutron facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The linac design has evolved from the conceptual design presented in 1997 in order to achieve higher initial performance and to incorporate desirable upgrade features. The linac is now designed to produce 2-MW beam power using a combination of radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, drift-tube linac (DTL), coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and superconducting-RF (SRF) linac. Designs of each of these elements support he high peak intensity and high quality beam required for injection into the SNS accumulator ring. This paper will trace the evolution of the linac design and the progress made in the R and D program. (author)

  14. The FAIR proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kester, O.

    2015-01-01

    FAIR - the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe - constructed at GSI in Darmstadt comprises an international centre of heavy ion accelerators that will drive heavy ion and antimatter research. FAIR will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities, allowing a large variety of fore-front research in physics and applied science. FAIR will deliver antiproton and ion beams of unprecedented intensities and qualities. The main part of the FAIR facility is a sophisticated accelerator system, which delivers beams to different experiments of the FAIR experimental collaborations - APPA, NuSTAR, CBM and PANDA - in parallel. Modern H-type cavities offer highest shunt impedances of resonant structures of heavy ion linacs at low beam energies < 20 MeV/u and enable the acceleration of intense proton and ion beams. One example is the interdigital H-type structure. The crossed-bar H-cavities extend these properties to high energies even beyond 100 MeV/u. Compared to conventional Alvarez cavities, these crossed-bar (CH) cavities feature much higher shunt impedance at low energies. The design of the proton linac is based on those cavities

  15. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Content Medical News Cavities ˈkav-ət-ē (Dental Caries) By James T. Ubertalli, DMD, Private Practice, Hingham, ... access to dental care, and better treatment for tooth decay and periodontal disease. When teeth are lost, chewing is greatly hindered, and speaking ...

  16. Dynamics of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected long-cavity feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected long-cavity feedback is studied experimentally. Different dynamics are observed when different lateral modes are selected. When the feedback mirror is aligned perfectly and high-order modes are selected, in most of the c......The temporal dynamics of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected long-cavity feedback is studied experimentally. Different dynamics are observed when different lateral modes are selected. When the feedback mirror is aligned perfectly and high-order modes are selected, in most....... When the feedback mirror is aligned non-perfectly, pulse-package oscillation is observed, for the first time to our knowledge, in a diode laser with long-cavity feedback....

  17. Single mode operation in a pulsed Ti:sapphire laser oscillator with a grazing-incidence four-mirror cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, D K; Binks, D J; Gloster, L A W; King, T A

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate stable single mode operation in a pulsed Ti:sapphire laser oscillator with a novel grazing-incidence four-mirror coupled cavity. This cavity consists of a grating, a gain medium, and four mirrors and, therefore, has a four-arm interferometer configuration. Through the interferometric effect, we could suppress the adjacent modes and obtain stable single mode operation with a bandwidth of < 200 MHz. We also have developed a general analysis of the laser modes and the threshold conditions for configuration and the experimental results agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  18. Superconducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.; Shepard, K.W.; Wangler, T.P.

    1978-01-01

    This project has two goals: to design, build, and test a small superconducting linac to serve as an energy booster for heavy ions from an FN tandem electrostatic accelerator, and to investigate various aspects of superconducting rf technology. The main design features of the booster are described, a status report on various components (resonators, rf control system, linac control system, cryostats, buncher) is given, and plans for the near future are outlined. Investigations of superconducting-linac technology concern studies on materials and fabrication techniques, resonator diagnostic techniques, rf-phase control, beam dynamics computer programs, asymmetry in accelerating field, and surface-treatment techniques. The overall layout of the to-be-proposed ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System, is shown; the ATLAS would use superconducting technology to produce beams of 5 to 25 MeV/A. 6 figures

  19. Higher order mode spectra and the dependence of localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position in third harmonic superconducting cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M

    2012-01-01

    An electron beam entering an accelerating cavity excites a wakefield. This wakefield can be decomposed into a series of multi-poles or modes. The dominant component of the transverse wakefield is dipole. This report summarizes the higher order mode (HOM) signals of the third harmonic cavities of FLASH measured at various stages: transmission measurements in the single cavity test stand at Fermilab, at CMTB (Cryo-Module Test Bench) and at FLASH, and beam-excited measurements at FLASH. Modes in the first two dipole bands and the fifth dipole band have been identified using a global Lorentzian fit technique. The beam-pipe modes at approximately 4 GHz and some modes in the fifth dipole band have been observed as localized modes, while the first two dipole bands, containing some strong coupling cavity modes, propagate. This report also presents the dependence of the localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position. Linear dependence for various modes has been observed. This makes them suitable for beam posit...

  20. Commissioning of the Superconducting Linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Campisi, Isidoro E.

    2007-01-01

    The use of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities in particle accelerator is becoming more widespread. Among the projects that make use of that technology is the Spallation Neutron Source, where H-ions are accelerated to about 1 GeV, mostly making use of niobium elliptical cavities. SNS will use the accelerated short (about 700 ns) sub-bunches of protons to generate neutrons by spallation, which will in turn allow probing structural and magnetic properties of new and existing materials. The SNS superconducting linac is the largest application of RF superconductivity to come on-line in the last decade. The SRF cavities, operated at 805 MHz, were designed, built and integrated into cryomodules at Jefferson Lab and installed and tested at SNS. SNS is also the first proton-like accelerator which uses SRF cavities in a pulse mode. Many of the details of the cavity performance are peculiar to this mode of operation, which is also being applied to lepton accelerators (TESLA test facility and X-FEL at DESY and the international linear collider project). Thanks to the low frequency of the SNS superconducting cavities, operation at 4.2 K has been possible without beam energy degradation, even though the cavities and cryogenic systems were originally designed for 2.1 K operation. The testing of the superconducting cavities, the operating experience with beam and the performance of the superconducting linac will be presented

  1. TBCI and URMEL - New computer codes for wake field and cavity mode calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, T.

    1983-01-01

    Wake force computation is important for any study of instabilities in high current accelerators and storage rings. These forces are generated by intense bunches of charged particles passing cylindrically symmetric structures on or off axis. The adequate method for computing such forces is the time domain approach. The computer Code TBCI computes for relativistic as well as for nonrelativistic bunches of arbitrary shape longitudinal and transverse wake forces up to the octupole component. TBCI is not limited to cavity-like objects and thus applicable to bellows, beam pipes with varying cross sections and any other nonresonant structures. For the accelerating cavities one also needs to know the resonant modes and frequencies for the study of instabilities and mode couplers. The complementary code named URMEL computes these fields for any azimuthal dependence of the fields in ascending order. The mathematical procedure being used is very safe and does not miss modes. Both codes together represent a unique tool for accelerator design and are easy to use

  2. HOM frequency control of SRF cavity in high current ERLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2018-03-01

    The acceleration of high-current beam in Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities is a challenging but essential for a variety of advanced accelerators. SRF cavities should be carefully designed to minimize the High Order Modes (HOM) power generated in the cavities by the beam current. The reduction of HOM power we demonstrate in a particular case can be quite large. This paper presents a method to systematically control the HOM resonance frequencies in the initial design phase to minimize the HOM power generation. This method is expected to be beneficial for the design of high SRF cavities addressing a variety of Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) applications.

  3. Passive mode locking in a multisegment laser diode with an external cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, E V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Koroteev, Nikolai I; Salik, E; Feinberg, J; Starodubov, D S; Shramenko, M V; Yakubovich, S D

    1999-01-01

    The structure and operating conditions of multisegment laser (GaAl)As diodes with passive locking of the modes of an external cavity (bulk and fibre) were optimised. Regular trains of optical single pulses of picosecond duration were generated in a spectral range 850 - 860 nm. The peak power of these pulses was several watts and the repetition rate was near 1 GHz. Under certain conditions these output pulses were linearly chirped, i.e. they were suitable for subpicosecond time compression. Laboratory prototypes were made of miniature light-emitting modules with these characteristics. (lasers)

  4. Comparison of measured and computed loss to parasitic modes in cylindrical cavities with beam ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.; Styles, J.B.; Bane, K.L.F.

    1977-03-01

    Good agreement was obtained between computed values and results from a bench measurement technique for the total loss to parasitic modes in several cylindrical cavities with beam ports. The measurement of loss as a function of time within the current pulse also gives results which are in good agreement with computed functions, especially considering the fact that there are questionable points concerning both the theory and the measurement technique. Within measurement errors, there is also agreement in a few cases where a comparison is possible between a bench measurement result and the heating produced directly in a component by the SPEAR beam

  5. Design development of the SCDTL structure for the TOP linac

    CERN Document Server

    Picardi, L; Spataro, B

    1999-01-01

    The Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac (SCDTL) is an attractive 3 GHz accelerating structure composed of short DTL tanks coupled together by side coupling cavities, in the course of development of the 200 MeV proton linear accelerator for proton therapy planned for the Terapia Oncologica con Protoni (TOP) program of the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanita, ISS). The TOP Linac will be used to boost to 70 MeV the 7 MeV proton beam from a linac injector. Our main concern is to investigate in detail the characteristics of the structure in terms of RF properties of the accelerating mode, like longitudinal and transverse shunt impedance and quality factor, and of the other modes that cause the origin of the tank dispersion curve, in order to stabilize the behaviour under operating conditions. Calculations performed with the computer three-dimensional (3D) codes MAFIA and SOPRANO on the smallest unit of the system (a single DTL tank without coupling cavities) and experimental measurements m...

  6. Redesign of the End Group in the 3.9 GHz LCLS-II Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunin, Andrei [Fermilab; Gonin, Ivan [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, Timergali [Fermilab; Solyak, Nikolay [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    Development and production of Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is underway. The central part of LCLS-II is a continuous wave superconducting RF (CW SCRF) electron linac. The 3.9 GHz third harmonic cavity similar to the XFEL design will be used in LCLS-II for linearizing the longitudinal beam profile*. The initial design of the 3.9 GHz cavity developed for XFEL project has a large, 40 mm, beam pipe aperture for better higher-order mode (HOM) damping. It is resulted in dipole HOMs with frequencies nearby the operating mode, which causes difficulties with HOM coupler notch filter tuning. The CW linac operation requires an extra caution in the design of the HOM coupler in order to prevent its possible overheating. In this paper we present the modified 3.9 GHz cavity End Group for meeting the LCLS-II requirements

  7. Investigation of Fano resonances induced by higher order plasmon modes on a circular nano-disk with an elongated cavity

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad Ruhul

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, a planar metallic nanostructure design, which supports two distinct Fano resonances in its extinction cross-section spectrum under normally incident and linearly polarized electromagnetic field, is proposed. The proposed design involves a circular disk embedding an elongated cavity; shifting and rotating the cavity break the symmetry of the structure with respect to the incident field and induce higher order plasmon modes. As a result, Fano resonances are generated in the visible spectrum due to the destructive interference between the sub-radiant higher order modes and super-radiant the dipolar mode. The Fano resonances can be tuned by varying the cavity\\'s width and the rotation angle. An RLC circuit, which is mathematically equivalent to a mass-spring oscillator, is proposed to model the optical response of the nanostructure design.

  8. Single Mode ZnO Whispering-Gallery Submicron Cavity and Graphene Improved Lasing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jitao; Lin, Yi; Lu, Junfeng; Xu, Chunxiang; Wang, Yueyue; Shi, Zengliang; Dai, Jun

    2015-07-28

    Single-mode ultraviolet (UV) laser of ZnO is still in challenge so far, although it has been paid great attention along the past decades. In this work, single-mode lasing resonance was realized in a submicron-sized ZnO rod based on serially varying the dimension of the whispering-gallery mode (WGM) cavities. The lasing performance, such as the lasing quality factor (Q) and the lasing intensity, was remarkably improved by facilely covering monolayer graphene on the ZnO submicron-rod. The mode structure evolution from multimodes to single-mode was investigated systematically based on the total internal-wall reflection of the ZnO microcavities. Graphene-induced optical field confinement and lasing emission enhancement were revealed, indicating an energy coupling between graphene SP and ZnO exciton emission. This result demonstrated the response of graphene in the UV wavelength region and extended its potential applications besides many previous reports on the multifunctional graphene/semiconductor hybrid materials and devices in advanced electronics and optoelectronics areas.

  9. Transverse mode tailoring in diode lasers based on coupled large optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, N. Yu; Maximov, M. V.; E Zhukov, A.

    2017-08-01

    The key principles of transverse mode engineering in edge-emitting lasers with broadened waveguides based on coupled large optical cavity (CLOC) structures are presented. The CLOC laser design is shown to be an effective approach for reducing the optical loss, broadening the waveguide, and lowering the beam divergence. Having simulated the sensitivity of the CLOC design to variations in layer thicknesses and compositions we have shown its high robustness. Advanced versions of the CLOC laser structures having two extra passive waveguides have been treated and shown to effectively eliminate several transverse modes. We have considered an application of the CLOC concept for waveguides with shifted active regions aimed at reducing laser thermal and electric resistances.

  10. Temporal coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals with cavity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghirzadeh Darki, Behnam, E-mail: b.saghirzadeh@ec.iut.ac.ir; Zeidaabadi Nezhad, Abolghasem; Firouzeh, Zaker Hossein

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose the time-dependent coupled mode analysis of one-dimensional magneto-photonic crystals including one, two or multiple defect layers. The performance of the structures, namely the total transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity, is obtained using the proposed method. The results of the developed analytic approach are verified by comparing them to the results of the exact numerical transfer matrix method. Unlike the widely used numerical method, our proposed analytic method seems promising for the synthesis as well as the analysis purposes. Moreover, the proposed method has not the restrictions of the previously examined analytic methods. - Highlights: • A time-dependent coupled mode analysis is proposed for the cavity-type 1D MPCs. • Analytical formalism is presented for the single, double and multiple-defect MPCs. • Transmission, Faraday rotation and ellipticity are gained using the proposed method. • The proposed analytic method has advantages over the previously examined methods.

  11. Spontaneous emission of two quantum dots in a single-mode cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Liu; Zhang Ke; Li Zhi-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The spontaneous emission spectrum from two quantum dots (QDs) that are strongly coupled with a single-mode nanocavity is investigated using rigorous numerical calculations and simple analytical solutions of quantum dynamics. The emission spectra both from the side and along the axis of the cavity are considered. Modification of two parameters, the coupling strength and the detuning between the transition frequencies of the two quantum dots, allows us to efficiently control the shape of the spontaneous emission spectrum. Different profiles and their physical origins can be well understood in the dressed-state picture for the light—QD interaction in the on-resonance and off-resonance situations. In the on-resonance situation, the emission spectra exhibit symmetric features, and they are not altered by the asymmetry in the coupling parameters. The axis spectra show two emission peaks while the side spectra have three emission peaks. In the off-resonance situation, the emission spectra always show an asymmetrical three-peak feature. When the two QDs have different decay parameters, singular features (a peak or a dip) can take place at the frequency of the cavity mode, and this is attributed to the unbalanced process of the emission and absorption of a single photon. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. Fundamental transverse mode selection and self-stabilization in large optical cavity diode lasers under high injection current densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrutin, Eugene A.; Ryvkin, Boris S.; Payusov, Alexey S.; Serin, Artem A.; Gordeev, Nikita Yu

    2015-11-01

    It is shown that in high-power, large optical cavity laser diodes at high injection currents, the optical losses due to nonuniform carrier accumulation in the optical confinement layer can ensure the laser operation in the fundamental transverse mode. An experimental demonstration of switching from second order mode to fundamental mode in large optical cavity lasers with current and/or temperature increase is reported and explained, with the calculated values for the switching current and temperature in good agreement with the measurements. The results experimentally prove the nonuniform nature of carrier accumulation in the confinement layer and may aid laser design for optimizing the output.

  13. Probing the fundamental limit of niobium in high radiofrequency fields by dual mode excitation in superconducting radiofrequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari

    2011-07-01

    We have studied thermal breakdown in several multicell superconducting radiofrequency cavity by simultaneous excitation of two TM{sub 010} passband modes. Unlike measurements done in the past, which indicated a clear thermal nature of the breakdown, our measurements present a more complex picture with interplay of both thermal and magnetic effects. JLab LG-1 that we studied was limited at 40.5 MV/m, corresponding to B{sub peak} = 173 mT, in 8{pi}/9 mode. Dual mode measurements on this quench indicate that this quench is not purely magnetic, and so we conclude that this field is not the fundamental limit in SRF cavities.

  14. HF power couplers for pulsed superconducting cavity resonators; Coupleurs de puissance HF pour cavites supraconductrices en mode pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenhani, Hassen [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, IN2P3-CNRS et Universite de Paris-Sud, BP 34, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    Recent years have seen an impressive improvement in the accelerating gradients obtained in superconducting cavities. Consequently, such cavities have become attractive candidates for large superconducting linear accelerator projects such as the European XFEL and the International Linear Collider (ILC). As a result, there is a strong interest in reducing RF conditioning time and improving the performance of the input power couplers for these cavities. The so-called TTF-III input power coupler, adopted for the XFEL superconducting RF cavities are complex components. In order to better understand the behavior of this component we have performed a series of experiments on a number of such couplers. Initially, we developed a fully automated RF high power test stand for coupler conditioning procedure. Following this, we performed a series of coupler conditioning tests. This has allowed the study of the coupler behavior during processing. A number of experiments were carried out to evaluate the in-situ baking effect on the conditioning time. Some of the conditioned couplers were sent to DESY in order to be tested on 9-cells TESLA cavities under cryogenic conditions. These tests have shown that the couplers in no way limit the cavity performance, even up to gradients of 35 MV/m. The main objective of our coupler studies was the reduction of their conditioning time, which represents one of the most important criteria in the choice of coupler for high energy linacs. Excellent progress in reducing the conditioning time has been demonstrated by making appropriate modifications to the conditioning procedure. Furthermore, special attention was paid to electron generation processes in the couplers, via multipacting. Simulations of this process were made on both the TTF-III coupler and on a new coupler prototype, TTF-V. Experiments aimed at suppressing multipacting were also successfully achieved by using a DC bias on the inner conductor of the co-axial coupler. (author)

  15. Active material, optical mode and cavity impact on nanoscale electro-optic modulation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rubab; Suer, Can; Ma, Zhizhen; Sarpkaya, Ibrahim; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Agarwal, Ritesh; Sorger, Volker J.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-optic modulation is a key function in optical data communication and possible future optical compute engines. The performance of modulators intricately depends on the interaction between the actively modulated material and the propagating waveguide mode. While a variety of high-performance modulators have been demonstrated, no comprehensive picture of what factors are most responsible for high performance has emerged so far. Here we report the first systematic and comprehensive analytical and computational investigation for high-performance compact on-chip electro-optic modulators by considering emerging active materials, model considerations and cavity feedback at the nanoscale. We discover that the delicate interplay between the material characteristics and the optical mode properties plays a key role in defining the modulator performance. Based on physical tradeoffs between index modulation, loss, optical confinement factors and slow-light effects, we find that there exist combinations of bias, material and optical mode that yield efficient phase or amplitude modulation with acceptable insertion loss. Furthermore, we show how material properties in the epsilon near zero regime enable reduction of length by as much as by 15 times. Lastly, we introduce and apply a cavity-based electro-optic modulator figure of merit, Δλ/Δα, relating obtainable resonance tuning via phase shifting relative to the incurred losses due to the fundamental Kramers-Kronig relations suggesting optimized device operating regions with optimized modulation-to-loss tradeoffs. This work paves the way for a holistic design rule of electro-optic modulators for high-density on-chip integration.

  16. ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENT OF FUNDAMENTAL AND HIGHER-ORDER MODES FOR 7-CELL CAVITY OF PETRA-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Y.; Blednykh, A.; Cupolo, J.; Davidsaver, M.; Holub, B.; Ma, H.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The booster synchrotron for NSLS-II will include a 7-cell PETRA cavity, which was manufactured for the PETRA-II project at DESY. The cavity fundamental frequency operates at 500 MHz. In order to verify the impedances of the fundamental and higher-order modes (HOM), which were calculated by computer code, we measured the magnitude of the electromagnetic field of the fundamental acceleration mode and HOM using the bead-pull method. To keep the cavity body temperature constant, we used a chiller system to supply cooling water at 20 degrees C. The bead-pull measurement was automated with a computer. We encountered some issues during the measurement process due to the difficulty in measuring the electromagnetic field magnitude in a multi-cell cavity. We describe the method and apparatus for the field measurement, and the obtained results.

  17. Full power to the first Linac4 module

    CERN Multimedia

    Francesco Poppi

    2010-01-01

    Since last week the first of a total of 23 accelerating structures for Linac4 has been undergoing high-power tests. Although still a prototype, this structure is destined to be the first of the 12 PIMS cavities to be installed in the Linac4 tunnel and it has been completely designed, developed and constructed at CERN.   The PIMS prototype. The new Linac4 has 4 different types of accelerating structures. The PI-Mode Structures (PIMS) are the last stage and are designed to accelerate protons up to 160 MeV. “PIMS have never before been used to accelerate protons”, explains Frank Gerigk, the project engineer responsible for the Linac4 accelerating structures. “In LEP, they were used to accelerate electrons, and now we have modified them and improved several design features to make them suitable for protons”. The first prototype was entirely manufactured in the CERN workshop. Due to the size of the pieces it was difficult to achieve and preserve the required to...

  18. The μs and ns mode modulation system for grid controlled gun of the HESYRL linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guicheng; Hong, Jun; Pei, Yuanji

    1988-01-01

    A μs and ns mode modulation system has been developed for the grid-controlled gun in the HESYRL. The gun drived by this system generated 1A and 500 MA pulse current for μs and ns mode respectively. In the ns mode modulation pulse formulation system, the sharper was built up using one transistor 3DA87D as avalanche switch and a shortcircuit coaxal cable as waveform sharp element. Outline of the μs mode system and details of the ns mode system are presented. (author)

  19. Gate and magnetic field tunable ultrastrong coupling between a magnetoplasmon and the optical mode of an LC cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravicini-Bagliani, Gian L.; Scalari, Giacomo; Valmorra, Federico; Keller, Janine; Maissen, Curdin; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2017-05-01

    The coupling between the optical mode of an LC cavity and a magnetoplasmon is studied by terahertz transmission spectroscopy. The magnetoplasmons are created by etching a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas into stripes. As a result, we identify three different regimes, depending on the plasmon frequency relative to the cavity frequency. We find a significant coupling to the cyclotron dispersion even in presence of screening of the electric field by the plasmon.

  20. Analysis of HOM Problems in the C-ADS Main Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Burn [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou (China). Inst. of Modern Physics; Ng, King Yuen [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-05-18

    Excitation of higher-order modes (HOMs) in superconducting cavities may severely affect the operation of the main linac in the Chinese Accelerator Driven System (CADS). Preliminary analysis is made on the effects of beam dynamic, which includes possible longitudinal and transverse emittance enlargements, as well as the possibility of beam breakup. Suggestions are given for further investigation. Comparison is made between the C-ADS and the Fermilab Project X.

  1. Measurement of the high-field Q drop in the TM010 and TE011 modes in a niobium cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2006-04-01

    In the last few years superconducting radio-frequency (rf) cavities made of high-purity (residual resistivity ratio>200) niobium achieved accelerating gradients close to the theoretical limits. An obstacle towards achieving reproducibly higher fields is represented by ''anomalous'' losses causing a sharp degradation of the cavity quality factor when the peak surface magnetic field (Bp) is above about 90 mT, in the absence of field emission. This effect, called ''Q drop'' has been measured in many laboratories with single- and multicell cavities mainly in the gigahertz range. In addition, a low-temperature (100-140 C) ''in situ'' baking of the cavity was found to be beneficial in reducing the Q drop. In order to gain some understanding of the nature of these losses, a single-cell cavity has been tested in the TM010 and TE011 modes at 2 K. The feature of the TE011 mode is to have zero electric field on the cavity surface, so that electric field effects can be excluded as a source for the Q drop. This article will present some of the experimental results for different cavity treatments and will compare them with existing models.

  2. Wirebond crosstalk and cavity modes in large chip mounts for superconducting qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenner, J; Neeley, M; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lenander, M; Lucero, Erik; O'Connell, A D; Sank, D; Wang, H; Weides, M; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the performance of a microwave chip mount that uses wirebonds to connect the chip and mount grounds. A simple impedance ladder model predicts that transmission crosstalk between two feedlines falls off exponentially with distance at low frequencies, but rises to near unity above a resonance frequency set by the chip to ground capacitance. Using SPICE simulations and experimental measurements of a scale model, the basic predictions of the ladder model were verified. In particular, by decreasing the capacitance between the chip and box grounds, the resonance frequency increased and transmission decreased. This model then influenced the design of a new mount that improved the isolation to - 65 dB at 6 GHz, even though the chip dimensions were increased to 1 cm x 1 cm, three times as large as our previous devices. We measured a coplanar resonator in this mount as preparation for larger qubit chips, and were able to identify cavity, slotline, and resonator modes.

  3. Cavity-augmented frequency tripling of a continuous wave mode-locked laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, Gail; Ferguson, Allister I.; Langford, Nigel

    2001-01-01

    We present a model and experimental investigation of a singly-resonant optical cavity to enhance the nonlinear conversion efficiency of a continuous wave mode-locked all-solid-state laser source to produce an efficient source of ultraviolet radiation. For input pulses of approximately 33 ps duration at 4.4 ns intervals, our model predicts greater than 30% conversion from fundamental to third harmonic which is particularly attractive for fundamental sources of modest average power. Experimentally, we have achieved overall optical conversion efficiencies from fundamental to third harmonic wavelength typically greater than 11%, compared with less than 0.4% in a single pass geometry. We have measured an average power of 320 mW at λ=355 nm at picosecond pulse duration, which corresponds to a generated third harmonic average power of 0.5 W. (author)

  4. Stable and High OSNR Compound Linear-Cavity Single-Longitudinal-Mode Erbium-Doped Silica Fiber Laser Based on an Asymmetric Four-Cavity Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Ting; Yan Feng-Ping; Li Qi; Peng Wan-Jing; Feng Su-Chun; Wen Xiao-Dong; Tan Si-Yu; Liu Peng

    2012-01-01

    We propose a stable and high optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) compound linear-cavity single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped silica fiber laser. It consists of three uniform fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and two fiber couplers to form a simple asymmetric four-cavity structure to select the longitudinal mode. The stable SLM operation at the wavelength of 1544.053 nm with a 3 dB bandwidth of 0.014 nm and an OSNR of ∼60 dB was verified experimentally. Under laboratory conditions, a power fluctuation performance of less than 0.05 dB for 5 h and wavelength variation of less than 0.01 nm for about 150 min is demonstrated. Finally, the characteristic of laser output power as a function of pump power is investigated. The proposed system provides a simple and cost-effective approach to realize a stable SLM fiber laser

  5. Time-Gating Processes in Intra-Cavity Mode-Locking Devices Like Saturable Absorbers and Kerr Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha; Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2010-01-01

    Photons are non-interacting entities. Light beams do not interfere by themselves. Light beams constituting different laser modes (frequencies) are not capable of re-arranging their energies from extended time-domain to ultra-short time-domain by themselves without the aid of light-matter interactions with suitable intra-cavity devices. In this paper we will discuss the time-gating properties of intra-cavity "mode-locking" devices that actually help generate a regular train of high energy wave packets.

  6. An rf modulated electron gun pulser for linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legg, R.; Hartline, R.

    1991-01-01

    Present linac injector designs often make use of sub-harmonic prebuncher cavities to properly bunch the electron beam before injection into a buncher and subsequent accelerating cavities. This paper proposes an rf modulated thermionic gun which would allow the sub-harmonic buncher to be eliminated from the injector. The performance parameters for the proposed gun are 120 kV operating voltage, macropulse duration-single pulse mode 2 nsec, multiple pulse mode 100 nsec, rf modularing frequency 500 MHz, charge per micropulse 0.4 nC, macropulse repetition frequency 10 Hz (max). The gun pulser uses a grid modulated planar triode to drive the gun cathode. The grid driver takes advantage of recently developed modular CATV rf drivers, high performance solid state pulser devices, and high-frequency fiber optic transmitters for telecommunications. Design details are presented with associated SPICE runs simulating operation of the gun

  7. Higher-order Laguerre-Gauss modes in (non-) planar four-mirror cavities for future gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Andreas; Bogan, Christina; Willke, Benno

    2017-02-15

    One of the limiting noise sources in the current generation of gravitational wave detectors, such as the advanced laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (aLIGO), is the thermal noise in the interferometer's test mass coatings. One proposed method to reduce the coupling of this noise source to the gravitational wave readout is using a laser beam in the higher-order spatial LG33 mode within the interferometer. Here we show that the current four-mirror cavities of aLIGO are not compatible with Laguerre-Gauss modes due to astigmatism. A non-degeneracy of modes of the same order could be observed in experiment and simulation. We demonstrate that a non-planar cavity could be used instead as it compensates for the astigmatism and transmits the LG33 mode undisturbed.

  8. WE-FG-BRA-05: Potential Clinical Benefit of LINAC Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) Mode - Improvement of Treatment Therapeutic Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Rivera, J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tian, H [Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu (China); Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Price, A [Department of Radiation Oncology, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Santos, C [Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Zhang, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou, Jiangsu (China); Lineberger Clinical Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Ultrahigh dose-rate radiation at >40Gy/s has demonstrated astonishing normal-tissue sparing and tumor control in recent preclinical naive and tumor-bearing rodent studies when compared to the same radiation dose at a conventional dose-rate. The working mechanism of this fascinating dose-rate effect is currently under investigation. The aims of this work include investigating 1) whether LINAC FFF mode radiation at approximately 1Gy/s also has an improved therapeutic ratio compared to the same radiation dose at the conventional dose-rate of 0.05Gy/s, and 2) the dose-rate effect’s potential working mechanism by studying the expression of the P53 gene, linked to tumor suppression and cell regulation after radiation damage. Methods: We used mouse model C57BL/6J, the same as that used in the ultrahigh dose-rate studies, and exposed them to total body irradiation (TBI) using the Elekta Versa accelerator 10MV photons. Mice (N=20) were given a total dose of 12Gy in both the high dose-rate group (n=10) using the FFF-mode and the conventional dose-rate group (n=10) using the conventional does rate mode. The FFF-mode treatment setup consisted of a 15cm×15cm field size setting at 53.2cm SSD while the conventional-mode set-up consisted of a 10cm×10cm field size at 100SSD. Post-radiation, animals were monitored daily for survival analysis and signs of moribundity requiring euthanasia. In addition, mouse spleens were harvested for P53 analysis at different time points. Results: For 12Gy TBI, the 1.3Gy/s FFF-mode high dose-rate produced a statistically significant (p=0.02) improvement in mouse survival compared to the 0.05Gy/s conventional dose-rate. An initial P53 study at the time of death time-point indicates that high dose-rate radiation induced a stronger expression of P53 than conventional dose-rate radiation. Conclusion: Our pilot study indicates that the FFF-mode high dose-rate radiation, which has been used largely to improve clinical throughput, may provide

  9. WE-FG-BRA-05: Potential Clinical Benefit of LINAC Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) Mode - Improvement of Treatment Therapeutic Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S; Rivera, J; Tian, H; Price, A; Santos, C; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrahigh dose-rate radiation at >40Gy/s has demonstrated astonishing normal-tissue sparing and tumor control in recent preclinical naive and tumor-bearing rodent studies when compared to the same radiation dose at a conventional dose-rate. The working mechanism of this fascinating dose-rate effect is currently under investigation. The aims of this work include investigating 1) whether LINAC FFF mode radiation at approximately 1Gy/s also has an improved therapeutic ratio compared to the same radiation dose at the conventional dose-rate of 0.05Gy/s, and 2) the dose-rate effect’s potential working mechanism by studying the expression of the P53 gene, linked to tumor suppression and cell regulation after radiation damage. Methods: We used mouse model C57BL/6J, the same as that used in the ultrahigh dose-rate studies, and exposed them to total body irradiation (TBI) using the Elekta Versa accelerator 10MV photons. Mice (N=20) were given a total dose of 12Gy in both the high dose-rate group (n=10) using the FFF-mode and the conventional dose-rate group (n=10) using the conventional does rate mode. The FFF-mode treatment setup consisted of a 15cm×15cm field size setting at 53.2cm SSD while the conventional-mode set-up consisted of a 10cm×10cm field size at 100SSD. Post-radiation, animals were monitored daily for survival analysis and signs of moribundity requiring euthanasia. In addition, mouse spleens were harvested for P53 analysis at different time points. Results: For 12Gy TBI, the 1.3Gy/s FFF-mode high dose-rate produced a statistically significant (p=0.02) improvement in mouse survival compared to the 0.05Gy/s conventional dose-rate. An initial P53 study at the time of death time-point indicates that high dose-rate radiation induced a stronger expression of P53 than conventional dose-rate radiation. Conclusion: Our pilot study indicates that the FFF-mode high dose-rate radiation, which has been used largely to improve clinical throughput, may provide

  10. Effects of Field Distortions in IH-APF Linac for a Compact Medical Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kapin, Valery; Yamada, Satoru

    2004-01-01

    The project on developing compact medical accelerators for the tumor therapy using carbon ions has been started at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Alternating-phase-focused (APF) linac using an interdigital H-mode (IH) cavity has been proposed for the injector linac. The IH-cavity is a doubly ridged circular resonator loaded by the drift-tubes mounted on ridges with supporting stems. The effects of intrinsic and random field distortions in a practical design of the 4-Mev/u 200-MHz IH-APF linac are considered. The intrinsic field distortions in the IH-cavity are caused by an asymmetry of the gap fields due to presence of the stems and pair of ridges. The random field distortions are caused by drift-tube misalignments and non-regular deviations of the gap voltages from programmed values. The RF fields in the IH-cavity have been calculated using Microwave Studio (MWS) code. The effects of field distortions on beam dynamics have been simulated numerically. The intrinsic field distortions a...

  11. Noninvasive Vibrational Mode Spectroscopy of Ion Coulomb Crystals through Resonant Collective Coupling to an Optical Cavity Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan; Albert, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    We report on a novel noninvasive method to determine the normal mode frequencies of ion Coulomb crystals in traps based on the resonance enhanced collective coupling between the electronic states of the ions and an optical cavity field at the single photon level. Excitations of the normal modes...... are observed through a Doppler broadening of the resonance. An excellent agreement with the predictions of a zero-temperature uniformly charged liquid plasma model is found. The technique opens up for investigations of the heating and damping of cold plasma modes, as well as the coupling between them....

  12. Some Relevant Aspects in the Design and Construction of a 30-62 MeV Linac Booster for Proton Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, V G

    2004-01-01

    Recent results in accelerator physics showed the feasibility of a coupling scheme between a cyclotron and a linac for proton acceleration. Cyclotrons with energies up to 30 MeV, mainly devoted to radioisotopes production, are available in a large number of medical centres. This suggested to design a linac booster able to increase the proton energy up to 62 MeV as required for treating tumours like the ocular ones. In this paper we will review the rationale of the project; we will discuss the basic design of a compact 3 GHz SCL (Side Coupled Linac) with a new approach to the linac cavities. Among the many challenges of such a project one of the most interesting is the tuning of the cavities. Because the tuning can be done only after assembling the system, it is difficult to detect which cavities are responsible for the detuning: indeed the resonant behavior of single cavity is lost since the resonances merge into the resonant modes of the whole system. It is shown how, from the measured mode frequencies of the...

  13. Design and Applications of In-Cavity Pulse Shaping by Spectral Sculpturing in Mode-Locked Fibre Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Boscolo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We review our recent progress on the realisation of pulse shaping in passively-mode-locked fibre lasers by inclusion of an amplitude and/or phase spectral filter into the laser cavity. We numerically show that depending on the amplitude transfer function of the in-cavity filter, various regimes of advanced waveform generation can be achieved, including ones featuring parabolic-, flat-top- and triangular-profiled pulses. An application of this approach using a flat-top spectral filter is shown to achieve the direct generation of high-quality sinc-shaped optical Nyquist pulses with a widely tunable bandwidth from the laser oscillator. We also present the operation of an ultrafast fibre laser in which conventional soliton, dispersion-managed soliton (stretched-pulse and dissipative soliton mode-locking regimes can be selectively and reliably targeted by adaptively changing the dispersion profile and bandwidth programmed on an in-cavity programmable filter. The results demonstrate the strong potential of an in-cavity spectral pulse shaper for achieving a high degree of control over the dynamics and output of mode-locked fibre lasers.

  14. Transverse mode dynamics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers: Spatiotemporal versus modal expansion descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulet, Josep; Balle, Salvador

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the range of validity of a modal description for the spatiotemporal dynamics of the optical field in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. We focus on the secondary pulsations that appear during the turn-off transients when the injection current is modulated by a square-wave signal. We compare the results obtained with both a full spatiotemporal model [J. Mulet and S. Balle, IEEE J. Quantum. Electron. 38, 291 (2002)] and a modal expansion derived from this model. We find that the results obtained from the two descriptions agree for strong lateral guiding. However, for weak lateral guiding we find differences because the optical-field profile changes significantly due to spatial changes in the refractive index induced by the carrier density. The reason is that in the full spatiotemporal model a shrinkage of the mode profile occurs, which leads to an enhancement of the secondary pulsations. This effect is not included in the modal expansion, and it determines the limits of validity of such an approach for gain-guided devices

  15. A SESAM passively mode-locked fiber laser with a long cavity including a band pass filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Rui; Chen, Hong-Wei; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Hou, Jing; Lu, Qi-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    A semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) passively mode-locked fiber laser with a long cavity length over 700 m is demonstrated. A band pass filter is inserted into the laser cavity to stabilize the lasing wavelength. Some interesting phenomena are observed and discussed. The central wavelength, repetition rate, average power and single pulse energy of the laser are 1064 nm, 281.5 kHz, 11 mW and 39 nJ, respectively. The laser operates stably without Q-switching instabilities, which greatly reduces the damage opportunities of the SESAM

  16. Whispering-gallery-mode laser-based noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Ma, Weiguang; Axner, Ove

    2017-08-15

    The whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) laser is a type of laser that has an exceptionally narrow linewidth. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry, which is a detection technique with extraordinary properties that benefit from narrow linewidth lasers, has been realized with a WGM laser. By locking to a cavity with a finesse of 55 000, acetylene and carbon dioxide could be simultaneously detected down to an unprecedented noise equivalent absorption per unit length of 6.6×10 -14   cm -1 over 150 s, corresponding to 5 ppt of C 2 H 2 .

  17. Stabilization Strategies for Drift Tube Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085420; Lamehi Rashti, Mohammad

    The average axial electric fields in drift tube linac cavities are known to be sensitive with respect to the perturbation errors. Postcoupler is a powerful stabilizer devices that is used to reduce this sensitivity of average axial field. Postcouplers are the cylindrical rod which is extended from cavity wall toward the drift tube without touching the drift tube surface. Postcouplers need to be adjusted to the right length to stabilize the average axial field. Although postcouplers are used successfully in many projects, there is no straightforward procedure for postcouplers adjustment and it has been done almost based on trial and errors. In this thesis, the physics and characteristics of postcouplers has been studied by using an equivalent circuit model and 3D finite element method calculations. Finally, a straightforward and accurate method to adjust postcouplers has been concluded. The method has been verified by using experimental measurements on CERN Linac4 drift tube linac cavities.

  18. Widely Tunable Mode-Hop-Free External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Gerard; Curl, Robert F.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2010-01-01

    The external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) system is based on an optical configuration of the Littrow type. It is a room-temperature, continuous wave, widely tunable, mode-hop-free, mid-infrared, EC-QCL spectroscopic source. It has a single-mode tuning range of 155 cm(exp -1) (approximately equal to 8% of the center wavelength) with a maximum power of 11.1 mW and 182 cm(exp -1) (approximately equal to 15% of the center wavelength), and a maximum power of 50 mW as demonstrated for 5.3 micron and 8.4 micron EC-QCLs, respectively. This technology is particularly suitable for high-resolution spectroscopic applications, multi-species tracegas detection, and spectroscopic measurements of broadband absorbers. Wavelength tuning of EC-QCL spectroscopic source can be implemented by varying three independent parameters of the laser: (1) the optical length of the gain medium (which, in this case, is equivalent to QCL injection current modulation), (2) the length of the EC (which can be independently varied in the Rice EC-QCL setup), and (3) the angle of beam incidence at the diffraction grating (frequency tuning related directly to angular dispersion of the grating). All three mechanisms of frequency tuning have been demonstrated and are required to obtain a true mode-hop-free laser frequency tuning. The precise frequency tuning characteristics of the EC-QCL output have been characterized using a variety of diagnostic tools available at Rice University (e.g., a monochromator, FTIR spectrometer, and a Fabry-Perot spectrometer). Spectroscopic results were compared with available databases (such as HITRAN, PNNL, EPA, and NIST). These enable precision verification of complete spectral parameters of the EC-QCL, such as wavelength, tuning range, tuning characteristics, and line width. The output power of the EC-QCL is determined by the performance of the QC laser chip, its operating conditions, and parameters of the QC laser cavity such as mirror reflectivity or intracavity

  19. Quantum dynamics of a Josephson junction driven cavity mode system in the presence of voltage bias noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Blencowe, M. P.; Armour, A. D.; Rimberg, A. J.

    2017-09-01

    We give a semiclassical analysis of the average photon number as well as photon number variance (Fano factor F ) for a Josephson junction (JJ) embedded microwave cavity system, where the JJ is subject to a fluctuating (i.e., noisy) bias voltage with finite dc average. Through the ac Josephson effect, the dc voltage bias drives the effectively nonlinear microwave cavity mode into an amplitude squeezed state (F Armour et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 247001 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.247001], but bias noise acts to degrade this squeezing. We find that the sensitivity of the Fano factor to bias voltage noise depends qualitatively on which stable fixed point regime the system is in for the corresponding classical nonlinear steady-state dynamics. Furthermore, we show that the impact of voltage bias noise is most significant when the cavity is excited to states with large average photon number.

  20. Linac design algorithm with symmetric segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Harunori; Young, L.M.; Nath, S.; Billen, J.H.; Stovall, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The cell lengths in linacs of traditional design are typically graded as a function of particle velocity. By making groups of cells and individual cells symmetric in both the CCDTL AND CCL, the cavity design as well as mechanical design and fabrication is simplified without compromising the performance. We have implemented a design algorithm in the PARMILA code in which cells and multi-cavity segments are made symmetric, significantly reducing the number of unique components. Using the symmetric algorithm, a sample linac design was generated and its performance compared with a similar one of conventional design

  1. A tunable and switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength fiber laser with a simple linear cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoying; Fang, Xia; Liao, Changrui; Wang, D N; Sun, Junqiang

    2009-11-23

    A simple linear cavity erbium-doped fiber laser based on a Fabry-Perot filter which consists of a pair of fiber Bragg gratings is proposed for tunable and switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength operation. The single-longitudinal-mode is obtained by the saturable absorption of an unpumed erbium-doped fiber together with a narrow-band fiber Bragg grating. Under the high pump power (>166 mW) condition, the stable dual-wavelength oscillation with uniform amplitude can be realized by carefully adjusting the polarization controller in the cavity. Wavelength selection and switching are achieved by tuning the narrow-band fiber Bragg grating in the system. The spacing of the dual-wavelength can be selected at 0.20 nm (approximately 25.62 GHz), 0.22 nm (approximately 28.19 GHz) and 0.54 nm (approximately 69.19 GHz).

  2. Characterization technique for long optical fiber cavities based on beating spectrum of multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser and beating spectrum in the RF domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    The characterization of long fiber cavities is essential for many systems to predict the system practical performance. The conventional techniques for optical cavity characterization are not suitable for long fiber cavities due to the cavities' small free spectral ranges and due to the length variations caused by the environmental effects. In this work, we present a novel technique to characterize long fiber cavities using multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser source and RF spectrum analyzer. The fiber laser source is formed in a ring configuration, where the fiber laser cavity length is chosen to be 15 km to ensure that the free spectral range is much smaller than the free spectral range of the characterized passive fiber cavities. The method has been applied experimentally to characterize ring cavities with lengths of 6.2 m and 2.4 km. The results are compared to theoretical predictions with very good agreement.

  3. Heavy-ion LINAC development for the US RIA project

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The RIA development effort involves several US Laboratories (ANL, JLAB, LBNL, MSU, ORNL). The RIA facility includes a CW 1.4 GeV driver LINAC and a 100 MV post-accelerator both based on superconducting (SC) cavities operating at frequencies from 48 MHz to 805 MHz. An initial acceleration in both LINACs is ...

  4. 3 GHz Barrel Open Cavity (BOC) RF pulse compressor for CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A prototype 3 GHz RF pulse compressor, based on a single 'Barrel shaped Open Cavity' (BOC), was designed, manufactured and successfully high power tested into a RF load. It is now planned to install five such devices in the CTF3 drive beam linac currently being built at CERN. A specific feature of the BOC is the so-called "whispering gallery" mode which has a high internal Q-factor. Contrary to other cavity-based pulse compressors, such as SLED or LIPS, with this mode one can operate in a resonant rotating wave regime. Consequently, when used as an RF pulse compressor a single BOC is sufficient, whereas the LIPS and SLED schemes require two cavities and a 3-dB hybrid. A short description of the BOC and the results of high power operation specific to the CTF3 drive beam linac are presented.

  5. DWDM channel spacing tunable optical TDM carrier from a mode-locked weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode based fiber ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guo-Hsuan; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2008-08-18

    A novel optical TDM pulsed carrier with tunable mode spacing matching the ITU-T defined DWDM channels is demonstrated, which is generated from an optically injection-mode-locked weak-resonant-cavity Fabry-Perot laser diode (FPLD) with 10%-end-facet reflectivity. The FPLD exhibits relatively weak cavity modes and a gain spectral linewidth covering >33.5 nm. The least common multiple of the mode spacing determined by both the weak-resonant-cavity FPLD and the fiber-ring cavity can be tunable by adjusting length of the fiber ring cavity or the FPLD temperature to approach the desired 200GHz DWDM channel spacing of 1.6 nm. At a specific fiber-ring cavity length, such a least-common- multiple selection rule results in 12 lasing modes between 1532 and 1545 nm naturally and a mode-locking pulsewidth of 19 ps broadened by group velocity dispersion among different modes. With an additional intracavity bandpass filter, the operating wavelength can further extend from 1520 to 1553.5 nm. After channel filtering, each selected longitudinal mode gives rise to a shortened pulsewidth of 12 ps due to the reduced group velocity dispersion. By linear dispersion compensating with a 55-m long dispersion compensation fiber (DCF), the pulsewidth can be further compressed to 8 ps with its corresponding peak-to-peak chirp reducing from 9.7 to 4.3 GHz.

  6. Novel deflecting cavity design for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2011-07-25

    To prevent significant loss of the luminosity due to large crossing angle in the future ERL based Electron Ion Collider at BNL (eRHIC), there is a demand for crab cavities. In this article, we will present a novel design of the deflecting/crabbing 181 MHz superconducting RF cavity that will fulfil the requirements of eRHIC. The quarter-wave resonator structure of the new cavity possesses many advantages, such as compact size, high R{sub t}/Q, the absence of the same order mode and lower order mode, and easy higher order mode damping. We will present the properties and characteristics of the new cavity in detail. As the accelerator systems grow in complexity, developing compact and efficient deflecting cavities is of great interest. Such cavities will benefit situations where the beam line space is limited. The future linac-ring type electron-ion collider requires implementation of a crab-crossing scheme for both beams at the interaction region. The ion beam has a long bunches and high rigidity. Therefore, it requires a low frequency, large kicking angle deflector. The frequency of the deflecting mode for the current collider design is 181 MHz, and the deflecting angle is {approx}5 mrad for each beam. At such low frequency, the previous designs of the crab cavities will have very large dimensions, and also will be confronted by typical problems of damping the Lower Order Mode (LOM), the Same Order Mode (SOM), and as usual, the Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this paper we describe how one can use the concept of a quarter-wave (QW) resonator for a deflecting/crabbing cavity, and use its fundamental mode to deflect the beam. The simplicity of the cavity geometry and the large separation between its fundamental mode and the first HOM make it very attractive.

  7. Cumulative beam break-up study of the spallation neutron source superconducting linac

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, D; Krafft, G A; Yunn, B; Sundelin, R; Delayen, J; Kim, S; Doleans, M

    2002-01-01

    Beam instabilities due to High Order Modes (HOMs) are a concern to superconducting (SC) linacs such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac. The effects of pulsed mode operation on transverse and longitudinal beam breakup instability are studied for H sup - beam in a consistent manner for the first time. Numerical simulation indicates that cumulative transverse beam breakup instabilities are not a concern in the SNS SC linac, primarily due to the heavy mass of H sup - beam and the HOM frequency spread resulting from manufacturing tolerances. As little as +-0.1 MHz HOM frequency spread stabilizes all the instabilities from both transverse HOMs, and also acts to stabilize the longitudinal HOMs. Such an assumed frequency spread of +-0.1 MHz HOM is small, and hence conservative compared with measured values of sigma=0.00109(f sub H sub O sub M -f sub 0)/f sub 0 obtained from Cornell and the Jefferson Lab Free Electron Laser cavities. However, a few cavities may hit resonance lines and generate a high heat lo...

  8. Low-Power RF Tuning of the Spallation Neutron Source Warm LINAC Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Deibele, C

    2004-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A conventional 402.5 MHz drift-tube linac (DTL) accelerates the beam from 2.5 to 86 MeV, and the 805 MHz coupled-cavity linac (CCL) continues acceleration to 186 MeV. Tuning the six DTL tanks involves adjusting post-coupler lengths and slug tuners to achieve the design resonant frequency and stabilized field distribution. A 2.5 MW klystron feeds RF power into each DTL tank through a ridge-loaded waveguide that does not perturb either the frequency or field distribution in the tank. The CCL consists of 4 RF modules operating in the βλ/2 mode. Each module contains 96 accelerating cavities in 12 segments of 8 cavities each, 11 active bridge coupler cavities, and 106 nominally unexcited coupling cavities. For each RF module, power from a single 5 MW klystron splits once and drives bridge couplers 3 and 9. We will discuss the special tools and measurement techniques developed f...

  9. Requirements for longitudinal HOM damping in superconducting recirculating linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, J.J.; Fripp, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Transverse beam breakup provides the primary current limitation in the operation of superconducting recirculating linacs and requires the significant damping of transverse-deflecting higher order modes. The need to damp the coexisting longitudinal HOMs in these nominally isochronous machines, however, is not as clear. Isochronicity implies that energy variations induced by excitation of longitudinal modes do not translate directly into position and current modulations. Such modulations, if present, could enhance the initial excitation, effectively closing a potentially unstable feedback loop. Design optimization of cavity structures may suggest that no longitudinal damping be provided. On the other hand, easing of the isochronicity requirement may provide desired flexibility in lattice design. In this note, limits are placed on the requirements for longitudinal HOM damping and on the tolerances for isochronicity which are driven by possible longitudinal multipass phenomena. 2 refs., 1 fig

  10. Beam-induced wakefield observation in X -band choke-mode cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Hao; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Conde, Manoel; Power, John G.; Doran, Darrell S.; Liu, Wanming; Shi, Jiaru; Li, Chen; Gai, Wei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-08-01

    The X-band choke-mode structure is currently being studied as an alternative design for the accelerating structure of the compact linear collider (CLIC) main linac. The geometry of the choke-mode structure is designed to ensure the strong suppression of the beam-induced long-range transverse wakefield and therefore maintain the stability and quality of the beam in the CLIC main linac. Experiments conducted at the ArgonneWakefield Accelerator Facility are presented in this study to verify the design of the wakefield suppressor. The beam-induced radio frequency (rf) signals in a three-cell choke-mode structure were measured, and measured results show good agreement with the simulation results. The measured results also show strong damping in high-order dipolar modes with a quality factor Q of 10 to 20. The difference between the frequencies of the first and second dipole modes is about 3 GHz, which validates the special design of the cancelling dipole modes at the time of the succeeding bunch (0.5 ns).

  11. Correlated motion of two atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asboth, Janos K.; Domokos, Peter; Ritsch, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    We study the motion of two atoms trapped at distant positions in the field of a driven standing-wave high-Q optical resonator. Even without any direct atom-atom interaction the atoms are coupled through their position dependent influence on the intracavity field. For sufficiently good trapping and low cavity losses the atomic motion becomes significantly correlated and the two particles oscillate in their wells preferentially with a 90 deg. relative phase shift. The onset of correlations seriously limits cavity cooling efficiency, raising the achievable temperature to the Doppler limit. The physical origin of the correlation can be traced back to a cavity mediated crossfriction, i.e., a friction force on one particle depending on the velocity of the second particle. Choosing appropriate operating conditions allows for engineering these long range correlations. In addition this cross-friction effect can provide a basis for sympathetic cooling of distant trapped clouds

  12. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Linear Accelerator A linear accelerator (LINAC) customizes high energy x-rays or ... ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the device most commonly used ...

  13. Preliminary design of a dedicated proton therapy linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.W.; Crandall, K.R.; Potter, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary design has been completed for a low current, compact proton linac dedicated to cancer therapy. A 3 GHz side-coupled structure accelerates the beam from a 70 MeV drift tube linac using commercially available S-band rf power systems and accelerating cavities. This significantly reduces the linac cost and allows incremental energies up to 250 MeV. The short beam pulse width and high repetition rate make the linac similar to the high energy electron linacs now used for cancer therapy, yet produce a proton flux sufficient for treatment of large tumors. The high pulse repetition rate permits raster scanning, and the small output beam size and emittance result in a compact isocentric gantry design. Such a linac will reduce the facility and operating costs for a dedicated cancer therapy system

  14. Higher‐order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha, Hao [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing CN-100086 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Shi, Jiaru, E-mail: shij@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing CN-100086 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing CN-100086 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle and Radiation Imaging, Tsinghua University, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China)

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  15. Higher-order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Hao; Shi, Jiaru; Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  16. HOM Couplers for CERN SPL Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Papke, Kai; Van Rienen, U

    2013-01-01

    Higher-Order-Modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the SPL, which is studied at CERN as the driver for future neutrino facilities. In order to limit beam-induced HOM effects, CERN considers the use of HOM couplers on the cut-off tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to modes of a specific frequency range. In this paper the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various design options for the medium and high-beta SPL cavities, both operating at 704.4 MHz. The RF characteristics and thermal behaviour of the various designs are discussed.

  17. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R; Flisgen, T; Glock, H W

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using Higher Order Mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR) and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  18. Overview and status of RF systems for the SSC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynk, J.; Grippe, J.; Cutler, R.I.; Rodriguez, R.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Linear Accelerator (Linac) produces a 600-MeV, 35-μs, H-beam at a 10-Hz repetition rate. The beam is accelerated by a series of RF cavities. These consist of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), two bunchers, and four Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tanks at 427.617 MHz, and two bunchers, nine side-coupled Linac modules, and an energy compressor at 1282.851 MHz. The RFQ amplifier and the low-frequency buncher cavity amplifiers use gridded tubes, while the other cavities use klystron amplifier systems. The RF control system consists of a reference line and cavity feedback and feedforward loops for each amplifier. The RF amplifier system for each of these accelerator cavities is described, and the current status of each system is presented

  19. Characteristics of the Single-Longitudinal-Mode Planar-Waveguide External Cavity Diode Laser at 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Alalusi, Mazin; Stolpner, Lew; Margaritis, Georgios; Camp, Jordan; Krainak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We describe the characteristics of the planar-waveguide external cavity diode laser (PW-ECL). To the best of our knowledge, it is the first butterfly-packaged 1064 nm semiconductor laser that is stable enough to be locked to an external frequency reference. We evaluated its performance from the viewpoint of precision experiments. Using a hyperfine absorption line of iodine, we suppressed its frequency noise by a factor of up to 104 at 10 mHz. The PWECL's compactness and low cost make it a candidate to replace traditional Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillators and fiber lasers in applications that require a single longitudinal mode.

  20. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The Varian EDGE machine is a new stereotactic platform, combining Calypso and VisionRT localization systems with a stereotactic linac. The system includes TrueBeam DeveloperMode, making possible the use of XML-scripting for automation of linac-related tasks. This study details the use of DeveloperMode to automate commissioning tasks for Varian EDGE, thereby improving efficiency and measurement consistency. Methods: XML-scripting was used for various commissioning tasks,including couch model verification,beam-scanning,and isocenter verification. For couch measurements, point measurements were acquired for several field sizes (2×2,4×4,10×10cm 2 ) at 42 gantry angles for two couch-models. Measurements were acquired with variations in couch position(rails in/out,couch shifted in each of motion axes) compared to treatment planning system(TPS)-calculated values,which were logged automatically through advanced planning interface(API) scripting functionality. For beam scanning, XML-scripts were used to create custom MLC-apertures. For isocenter verification, XML-scripts were used to automate various Winston-Lutz-type tests. Results: For couch measurements, the time required for each set of angles was approximately 9 minutes. Without scripting, each set required approximately 12 minutes. Automated measurements required only one physicist, while manual measurements required at least two physicists to handle linac positions/beams and data recording. MLC apertures were generated outside of the TPS,and with the .xml file format, double-checking without use of TPS/operator console was possible. Similar time efficiency gains were found for isocenter verification measurements Conclusion: The use of XML scripting in TrueBeam DeveloperMode allows for efficient and accurate data acquisition during commissioning. The efficiency improvement is most pronounced for iterative measurements, exemplified by the time savings for couch modeling measurements(approximately 10 hours

  1. Analysis of soft-aperture Kerr-lens mode-locking in Ti:sapphire laser cavities using nonlinear ABCD-matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Woo; Cha, Yong Ho; Rhee, Yong Joo; Yoo, Byung Duk; Lee, Byoung Chul

    2004-01-01

    We have numerically analyzed the effect of soft-aperture Kerr-lens mode locking in Ti:sapphire laser cavities. Because the Kerr-lens effect depends on the intracavitiy power, we used nonlinear ABCD-matrix to calculated the power-dependent beam mode inside a cavity. In soft-aperture Kerr-lens mode locking, the Kerr-lens effect is strongly dependent on the position of the crystal, the separation of two curved mirrors, and the cavity length. Figure 1 is the schematic of the Ti:sapphire laser cavity used in our calculation. It consists of a Ti:sapphire crystal (Kerr medium), two curved mirrors, and flat mirrors. Lc is the Ti:sapphire crystal length, D1 the length between M1 and M3, D2 the length between M2 and M4, L1 the length between the crystal and M1, and L2 the length between crystal and M2

  2. Simulation of large acceptance LINAC for muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyadera, H.; Kurennoy, S.; Jason, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    There has been a recent need for muon accelerators not only for future Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders but also for other applications in industry and medical use. We carried out simulations on a large-acceptance muon linac with a new concept 'mixed buncher/acceleration'. The linac can accept pions/muons from a production target with large acceptance and accelerate muon without any beam cooling which makes the initial section of muon-linac system very compact. The linac has a high impact on Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider (NF/MC) scenario since the 300-m injector section can be replaced by the muon linac of only 10-m length. The current design of the linac consists of the following components: independent 805-MHz cavity structure with 6- or 8-cm-radius aperture window; injection of a broad range of pion/muon energies, 10-100 MeV, and acceleration to 150 - 200 MeV. Further acceleration of the muon beam are relatively easy since the beam is already bunched.

  3. 25 years of Pelletron Linac facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, A.; Palit, R.

    2014-01-01

    The DAE-BRNS International Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held in BARC during 2nd to 6th December 2013. A summary of the highlights of this symposium has recently appeared in Physics News. As a part of the symposium, a special session was held to commemorate 25 years of operation of the Mumbai Pelletron Linac Facility (PLF). PLF, being operated jointly by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre and Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, has been a major centre for heavy-ion accelerator based research in India. The Pelletron accelerator was formally inaugurated on 30th December 1988, and marked an important milestone in nuclear physics research in India. The facility was augmented with the indigenously developed superconducting LINAC booster to enhance the energy of the accelerated beams. The LINAC booster was commissioned in a phased manner and the entire facility was dedicated to the users on the 28th November 2007. The LINAC booster consists of seven liquid helium cryostat modules, each housing four lead coated (2 μm) copper quarter wave resonators (QWR). The cavities are designed to operate at 150 MHz with an optimum acceptance at a velocity corresponding to β=0.1. The performance of the QWRs is found to be excellent with an average energy gain of 0.4 MV/q per cavity corresponding to 80% of the design value. Beam transmission from the entry to the exit of the LINAC was found to be 80% and the beam timing (FWHM) of 600 ps was measured at the target position. Development of the superconducting LINAC is a major milestone in the accelerator technology in our country. Most of the critical components of the LINAC booster, the first superconducting heavy-ion accelerator in India, have been designed, developed and fabricated indigenously

  4. Large gain quantum-limited qubit measurement using a two-mode nonlinear cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S; Clerk, A A; Vijay, R; Siddiqi, I

    2014-01-01

    We provide a thorough theoretical analysis of qubit state measurement in a setup where a driven, parametrically-coupled cavity system is directly coupled to the qubit, with one of the cavities having a weak Kerr nonlinearity. Such a system could be readily realized using circuit QED architectures. We demonstrate that this setup is capable in the standard linear-response regime of both producing a highly amplified output signal while at the same time achieving near quantum-limited performance: the measurement backaction on the qubit is near the minimal amount required by the uncertainty principle. This setup thus represents a promising route for performing efficient large-gain qubit measurement that is completely on-chip, and that does not rely on the use of circulators or complex non-reciprocal amplifiers. (paper)

  5. Digital low level RF control system for the DESY TTF VUV-FEL Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayvazyan, V.; Choroba, S.; Matyushin, A.; Moeller, G.; Petrosyan, G.; Rehlich, K.; Simrock, S.N.; Vetrov, P.

    2005-01-01

    In the RF system for the Vacuum Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (VUV-FEL) Linac each klystron supplies RF power to up to 32 cavities. The superconducting cavities are operated in pulsed mode and high accelerating gradients close to the performance limit. The RF control of the cavity fields to the level of 10 -4 for amplitude and 0.1 degree for phase however presents a significant technical challenge due to the narrow bandwidth of the cavities which results in high sensitivity to perturbations of the resonance frequency by mechanical vibrations (microphonics) and Lorenz force detuning. The VUV-FEL Linac RF control system employs a completely digital feedback system to provide flexibility in the control algorithms, precise calibration of the accelerating field vector-sum, and extensive diagnostics and exception handling capabilities. The RF control algorithm is implemented in DSP (Digital Signal Processor) firmware and DOOCS (Distributed Object Oriented Control System) servers. The RF control system design objectives are discussed. Hardware and software design of the DSP based RF control are presented. (orig.)

  6. Frequency choice of eRHIC SRF linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-05

    eRHIC is a FFAG lattice-based multipass ERL. The eRHIC SRF linac has been decided to change from 422 MHz 5-cell cavity to 647 MHz 5-cell cavity. There are several considerations affecting the frequency choice for a high-current multipass-ERL: the beam structure, bunch length, energy spread, beam-break-up (BBU) threshold, SRF loss considerations. Beyond the physics considerations, cost and complexity or risk is an important consideration for the frequency choice, especially when we are designing a machine to be built in a few years. Although there are some benefits of using a 422 MHz cavity for eRHIC ERL, however, there are some very critical drawbacks, including lack of facilities to fabricate a 422 MHz 5-cell cavity, very few facilities to process such a cavity and no existing facility to test the cavity anywhere. As the cavity size is big and its weight is large, it is difficult to handle it during fabrication, processing and testing, and no one has experience in this area. As the cavity size is large, the cryomodule becomes big as well. All of these considerations drive the risk of building eRHIC ERL with 422 MHz cavities to a very high level. Therefore, a decision was made to change the frequency of main linac to be 647 MHz 5-cell cavities. This note will compare these two linacs: 422MHz 5-cell cavity linac and 647Mz 5-cell cavity SRF linac, from both practical point of view and physics point of view.

  7. A SUPER-CONDUCTING LINAC DRIVER FOR THE HFBR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, J.; Raparia, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    2000-08-21

    This paper reports on the feasibility study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac (SCL) as a driver for the High-Flux Breeder Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Linac operates in Continuous Wave (CW) mode to produce an average 10 MW of beam power. The Linac beam energy is 1.0 GeV. The average proton beam intensity in exit is 10 mA.

  8. 4-rod RFQ linac for ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka [Nisshin Electric Co. Ltd., Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A 34 MHz 4-rod RFQ linac system has been upgraded in both its rf power efficiency and beam intensity. The linac is able to accelerate in cw operation 0.83 mA of a B{sup +} ion beam from 0.03 to 0.91 MeV with transmission of 61 %. The rf power fed to the RFQ is 29 kW. The unloaded Q-value of the RFQ has been improved approximately 61 % to 5400 by copper-plating stainless steel cooling pipes in the RFQ cavity. (author)

  9. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. CONCLUSION: In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  10. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hoon-Sang; Cho, Kyu-Jeong; Park, Su-Jung; Lee, Bin-Na; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Oh, Won-Mann; Hwang, In-Nam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA) was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea) using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden) for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  11. Linac Optics for Energy Recovery Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivan Bazarov; Geoffrey Krafft; Lia Merminga

    2001-01-01

    Several possible scenarios of Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam optics design are investigated to support the low emittance high current CW electron beam needed to drive a new ERL based X-ray Source. It is shown by numerical simulations that sufficiently high multipass beam break-up (BBU) threshold current can be achieved in a straightforward one-pass one-linac ERL scenario. A simple guideline for choosing optimal linac and recirculating transport line optics is suggested to realize best possible BBU threshold current

  12. Efficient energy exchange between plasmon and cavity modes via Rabi-analogue splitting in a hybrid plasmonic nanocavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shumei; Li, Guixin; Lei, Dangyuan; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2013-10-07

    Plasmonic analogues of Rabi-splitting have been extensively studied in various metallic nanosystems hybridized with semiconductor quantum dots, nanocrystals and organic molecules, with a focus on the splitting energy gap where surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) strongly couple with excitons. Similar strong coupling also occurs for individual metallic nanoparticles locating inside a photonic microcavity or nearby a waveguide due to the strong interaction between localized surface plasmons and photonic modes in the near-infrared wavelength range. In this work we study experimentally and theoretically the strong coupling between propagating SPPs and the Fabry-Perot (F-P) cavity mode in a metallic nanoparticle array-nanocavity hybrid system in the visible spectral range. The strong modal hybridization created giant modal anti-crossing which can be considered as the classical phenomenon of Rabi splitting i.e. a Rabi-analogue. In addition to the observation of a giant Rabi-analogue splitting energy of 148 meV at the strong coupling regime, we also reveal highly-efficient energy exchange between SPP and F-P modes at the low frequency dispersion branch through detailed numerical near-field studies and experimental phase delay analysis. The observed efficient mode conversion in the investigated plasmonic nanocavity is useful for designing novel nanophotonic devices, in which conventional photonic components need to be integrated with miniaturized plasmonic devices or vice versa.

  13. Theory and Modeling of Lasing Modes in Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Klein

    1998-01-01

    modes that the VCSEL can support are then determined by matching the gain necessary for the optical system in both magnitude and phase to the gain available from the laser's electronic system. Examples are provided.

  14. Band gaps and cavity modes in dual phononic and photonic strip waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Pennec

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss theoretically the simultaneous existence of phoxonic, i.e., dual phononic and photonic, band gaps in a periodic silicon strip waveguide. The unit-cell of this one-dimensional waveguide contains a hole in the middle and two symmetric stubs on the sides. Indeed, stubs and holes are respectively favorable for creating a phononic and a photonic band gap. Appropriate geometrical parameters allow us to obtain a complete phononic gap together with a photonic gap of a given polarization and symmetry. The insertion of a cavity inside the perfect structure provides simultaneous confinement of acoustic and optical waves suitable to enhance the phonon-photon interaction.

  15. GHz-bandwidth upconversion detector using a unidirectional ring cavity to reduce multilongitudinal mode pump effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lichun; Høgstedt, Lasse; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    narrow-linewidth lasers in a fiber coupler while tuning their wavelength difference down to 10 pm or less. The SFG crystal is placed inside an Nd:YVO4 ring cavity that provides 1064 nm circulating pump powers of up to 150 W in unidirectional operation. Measured Fabry-Perot spectrum at 1064 nm confirms...... for cooling, the GHz-bandwidth upconverter can readily be extended to the mid-IR (2 - 5 mu m) as an alternative to cooled low-bandgap semiconductor detectors for applications such as high-speed free-space optical communications. (C) 2017 Optical Society of America...

  16. High intensity proton linac activities at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusnak, B.; Chan, K.C.; Campbell, B.

    1998-01-01

    High-current proton linear accelerators offer an attractive alternative for generating the intense neutron fluxes needed for transmutations technologies, tritium production and neutron science. To achieve the fluxes required for tritium production, a 100-mA, 1700-MeV cw proton accelerator is being designed that uses superconducting cavities for the high-energy portion of the linac, from 211 to 1,700 MeV. The development work supporting the linac design effort is focused on three areas: superconducting cavity performance for medium-beta cavities at 700 MHz, high power rf coupler development, and cryomodule design. An overview of the progress in these three areas is presented

  17. Transverse Matching Techniques for the SNS Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon Dong Oh; Danilov, Viatcheslav V

    2005-01-01

    It is crucial to minimize beam loss and machine activation by obtaining optimal transverse matching for a high-intensity linear accelerator such as the Spallation Neutron Source linac. For matching the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) to Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL), there are four wire-scanners installed in series in CCL module 1 as proposed by the author.* A series of measurements was conducted to minimize envelope breathing and the results are presented here. As an independent approach, Chu et al is developing an application based on another technique by estimating rms emittance using the wire scanner profile data.** For matching the Medium Energy Beam Transport Line to the DTL, a technique of minimizing rms emittance was used and emittance data show that tail is minimized as well.

  18. Superconducting Hadron Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Ostroumov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the main building blocks of a superconducting (SC) linac, the choice of SC resonators, their frequencies, accelerating gradients and apertures, focusing structures, practical aspects of cryomodule design, and concepts to minimize the heat load into the cryogenic system. It starts with an overview of design concepts for all types of hadron linacs differentiated by duty cycle (pulsed or continuous wave) or by the type of ion species (protons, H-, and ions) being accelerated. Design concepts are detailed for SC linacs in application to both light ion (proton, deuteron) and heavy ion linacs. The physics design of SC linacs, including transverse and longitudinal lattice designs, matching between different accelerating–focusing lattices, and transition from NC to SC sections, is detailed. Design of high-intensity SC linacs for light ions, methods for the reduction of beam losses, preventing beam halo formation, and the effect of HOMs and errors on beam quality are discussed. Examples are ta...

  19. Coupled opto electronic oscillator with a passively mode locked extended cavity diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongmin; Jang, Gwang Hoon; Yoon, Duseong; Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    An opto electronic oscillator(OEO)has very unique properties compared to the conventional quartz based microwave oscillators in that its oscillation frequency is determined by the beat note frequency of a phase coherent optical frequency comb generated as a side bands to an optical single mode carrier by using an electro optic modulator (EOM)or a direct current modulation of a semiconductor laser. Recently, a different type of OEO called a COEO has been demonstrated, where the optical carrier in the OEO system has been replaced by a mode locked laser so that an EOM or a direct current modulation are no longer necessary, but has potentially a much lower phase noise thanks to the high Q value of the optical frequency comb due to the mode locking mechanism. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a COEO based on a passively mode locked ECDL at 852nm in which the fourth harmonic of the repetition frequency of the ECDL matched exactly the ground state hyperfine splitting frequency of the Cs atoms.

  20. Coupled opto electronic oscillator with a passively mode locked extended cavity diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeongmin; Jang, Gwang Hoon; Yoon, Duseong; Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2008-01-01

    An opto electronic oscillator(OEO)has very unique properties compared to the conventional quartz based microwave oscillators in that its oscillation frequency is determined by the beat note frequency of a phase coherent optical frequency comb generated as a side bands to an optical single mode carrier by using an electro optic modulator (EOM)or a direct current modulation of a semiconductor laser. Recently, a different type of OEO called a COEO has been demonstrated, where the optical carrier in the OEO system has been replaced by a mode locked laser so that an EOM or a direct current modulation are no longer necessary, but has potentially a much lower phase noise thanks to the high Q value of the optical frequency comb due to the mode locking mechanism. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a COEO based on a passively mode locked ECDL at 852nm in which the fourth harmonic of the repetition frequency of the ECDL matched exactly the ground state hyperfine splitting frequency of the Cs atoms

  1. All-solid-state cavity QED using Anderson-localized modes in disordered photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter; Sapienza, Luca; Nielsen, Henri Thyrrestrup

    2010-01-01

    We employ Anderson-localized modes in deliberately disordered photonic crystal waveguides to confine light and enhance the interaction with matter. A 15-fold enhancement of the decay rate of a single quantum dot is observed meaning that 94% of the emitted single photons are coupled to an Anderson...

  2. Investigation of cavity mode and excitonic transition in an InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs vertical-cavity surface emitting laser structure by variable-temperature micro-photoluminescence, reflectance and photomodulated reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J L; Chen, Y H; Jiang, C Y; Zhang, H Y

    2012-01-01

    Variable-temperature micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL), reflectance (R) and photomodulated reflectance (PR) have been used to study an InGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs vertical-cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) structure. μ-PL and R spectra have been recorded at different temperatures between 80 K and 300 K By comparing μ-PL with R spectra, both the excitonic transition and cavity mode are clearly identified. The Variable-temperature μ-PL and PR results of the etched sample with the top distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) being removed further confirmed our identification. Our results demonstrate that variable-temperature μ-PL is a powerful noninvasive tool to measure accurate the quantum well transition and the cavity mode alignment.

  3. Cavity QED experiments with a whispering-gallery-mode bottle resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, D.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of a two-level atom with a single mode of the quantized electromagnetic field constitutes one of the most fundamental systems investigated in quantum optics. We have pursued such an investigation where rubidium atoms are strongly coupled to the modes of a whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonator that is itself interfaced with an optical fiber. In order to facilitate studies of this atom-light interaction, an experimental apparatus was constructed around a novel type of WGM resonator developed in our group. The spectral and spatial mode structure of this resonator yield an intriguing atom-light response arising principally from the existence of two frequency-degenerate modes. This thesis reports on high resolution experiments studying the transmission and reflection spectra of modes with a high quality factor (Q=10 7 -10 8 ) in our WGM resonator. Light is coupled into and out of WGMs by frustrated total internal reflection using an optical nanofiber. The atom-light interaction is facilitated by an atomic fountain that delivers a cloud of atoms to the location of the resonator. At random moments, single-atoms are clearly observed transiting the evanescent field of the resonator modes with a transit time of a few microseconds. A high-speed experimental control system was developed to firstly detect the coupling of individual atoms to the resonator and secondly to perform time-resolved spectroscopy on the strongly coupled atom-resonator system. Spectral measurements clearly resolve an atom-induced change in the resonant transmission of the coupled system (65% absolute change) that is much larger than predicted in the standard Jaynes-Cummings model (25% absolute change) and that has thus far not been observed. To gain further insight, we experimentally explored the properties of the interaction and performed supporting simulations. Spectroscopy was performed on the atom-resonator system using two nanofibers to in- and out-couple light for probing

  4. Linac 1, inner structure

    CERN Multimedia

    1968-01-01

    This photo shows the inner structure of Linac 1. As injector to the PS, and later to the Booster, Linac 1 accelerated protons to 50 MeV, but it has also accelerated heavier ions. Fitted with a 520 keV RFQ pre-injector (instead of the original Cockcroft-Walton generator), it delivered protons and heavy ions to LEAR, from 1982 to 1992. After 33 years of faithful service, Linac 1 was dismantled in 1992 to make room for Linac 3 (Pb ions).

  5. Beam-breakup calculations for the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL) linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    In addition to the usual circularly symmetric TM/sub 010/ mode used to accelerate particles in an rf linac, there is a large number of modes with cos phi or sin phi dependence, for example the TM/sub 1xx/ modes. These latter modes possess a uniform magnetic (dipole) field near the axis of symmetry and therefore can deflect the beam away from the axis. Any portion of an accelerated beam that is off-axis will drive these modes, so that subsequent portions of the beam will be deflected. This deflected beam will then resonantly drive the same modes in downstream cavities, so that still later portions of the beam will be more severely deflected, and so on. In this paper are reported the results of numerical simulations of this so-called cumulative beam-breakup instability. The simulation assumes that only the TM/sub 110/ mode acts to deflect the beam, and further assumes that this mode does not couple from one accelerating cavity to the next

  6. Dynamic evolution of double Λ five-level atom interacting with one-mode electromagnetic cavity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, N. H.; Salah, Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the model describing a double Λ five-level atom interacting with a single mode electromagnetic cavity field in the (off) non-resonate case is studied. We obtained the constants of motion for the considered model. Also, the state vector of the wave function is given by using the Schrödinger equation when the atom is initially prepared in its excited state. The dynamical evolutions for the collapse revivals, the antibunching of photons and the field squeezing phenomena are investigated when the field is considered in a coherent state. The influence of detuning parameters on these phenomena is investigated. We noticed that the atom-field properties are influenced by changing the detuning parameters. The investigation of these aspects by numerical simulations is carried out using the Quantum Toolbox in Python (QuTip).

  7. An induction Linac driven heavy-ion fusion systems model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuckerman, D.S.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Waganer, L.M.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized systems model of a heavy-ion fusion (HIF) reactor power plant is presented. The model can be used to analyze the behavior and projected costs of a commercial power plant using an induction linear accelerator (Linac) as a driver. Each major component of the model (targets, reactor cavity, Linac, beam transport, power flow, balance of plant, and costing) is discussed. Various target, reactor cavity, Linac, and beam transport schemes are examined and compared. The preferred operating regime for such a power plant is also examined. The results show that HIF power plants can compete with other advanced energy concepts at the 1000-MW (electric) power level [cost of electricity (COE) -- 50 mill/kW . h] provided that the cost savings predicted for Linacs using higher charge-state ions (+3) can be realized

  8. Cavity types

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, Frank

    2011-01-01

    In the field of particle accelerators the most common use of RF cavities is to increase the particle velocity of traversing particles. This feature makes them one of the core ingredients of every accelerator, and in the case of linear accelerators they are even the dominant machine component. Since there are many different types of accelerator, RF cavities have been optimized for different purposes and with different abilities, e.g., cavities with fixed or variable RF frequency, cavities for short or long pulses/CW operation, superconducting and normal-conducting cavities. This lecture starts with a brief historical introduction and an explanation on how to get from Maxwell's equations to a simple cavity. Then, cavities will be classified by the type of mode that is employed for acceleration, and an explanation is given as to why certain modes are used in particular cavity types. The lecture will close with a comparison of normal versus superconducting cavities and a few words on the actual power consumption ...

  9. Muon acceleration in a superconducting proton Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, Milorad; FermilabJohnson, Rolland P.; MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2005-01-01

    This note describes how a future Fermilab proton driver [1] based on TESLA superconducting linac modules can perform as both the source of protons to produce the muons and as the accelerator of the muons to be used for a neutrino factory or muon collider. Recent advances in muon cooling [2] have the promise of muon emittances that are compatible with the 1300 MHz accelerating structures that are the basis for the ILC design. In the design described here, H - ions are accelerated to 8 GeV in the superconducting Linac, then stripped, stored and bunched in a ring while the Linac cavities are rephased for muon acceleration. Then the protons are extracted from the ring to produce pions and muons which are cooled in a few hundred meters, accelerated to a few GeV and injected into the Linac at the β = 1 point for acceleration to add 7 GeV. By recirculating the muons in the constant frequency section of such a proton driver Linac, even higher energies can be achieved quickly so that losses from muon decay are minimized. By adding additional refrigeration and RF power, the repetition rate of the Linac can be increased to make large increases in the average flux of a neutrino factory and the average luminosity of a muon collider. driver linac to be able to accelerate muons, including the costs to produce and cool the muons, will be considerably less than the costs estimated in previous neutrino factory design studies. We also believe that such an approach can produce a much higher neutrino flux and, because of the necessity for effective muon cooling, also be on the path to an energy frontier muon collider

  10. The LINAC4 Project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaudon, L; Bertone, C; Body, Y; Broere, J; Brunner, O; Buzio, M; Carli, C; Caspers, F; Corso, JP; Coupard, J; Dallocchio, A; Dos Santos, N; Garoby, R; Gerigk, F; Hammouti, L; Hanke, K; Jones, M; Kozsar, I; Lettry, J; Lallement, JB; Lombardi, A; Lopez-Hernandez, LA; Maglioni, C; Mathot, S; Maury, S; Mikulec, B; Nisbet, D; Noels, C; Paoluzzi, M; Puccio, B; Raich, U; Ramberger, S; Rossi, C; Schwerg, N; Scrivens, R; Vandoni, G; Weisz, S; Vollaire, J; Vretenar, M; Zickler, T

    2011-01-01

    As the first step of a long-term programme aiming at an increase in the LHC luminosity, CERN is building a new 160 MeV H¯ linear accelerator, Linac4, to replace the ageing 50 MeV Linac2 as injector to the PS Booster (PSB). Linac4 is an 86-m long normal-conducting linac made of an H¯ source, a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), a chopping line and a sequence of three accelerating structures: a Drift-Tube Linac (DTL), a Cell-Coupled DTL (CCDTL) and a Pi-Mode Structure (PIMS). The civil engineering has been recently completed, and construction of the main accelerator components has started with the support of a network of international collaborations. The low-energy section up to 3 MeV including a 3-m long 352 MHz RFQ entirely built at CERN is in the final construction phase and is being installed on a dedicated test stand. The present schedule foresees beam commissioning of the accelerator in the new tunnel in 2013/14; the moment of connection of the new linac to the CERN accelerator chain will depend on the L...

  11. High power operational experience with the LANSCE Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The heart of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a pulsed linear accelerator that is used to simultaneously provide H+ and H- beams to several user facilities. This accelerator contains two Cockcroft-Walton style injectors, a 100-MeV drift tube linac and an 800-MeV coupled cavity linac. This presentation will touch on various aspects of the high power operation including performance, tune-up strategy, beam losses and machine protection.

  12. Evolution of the 400 MeV linac design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The basic premises of the conceptual design for the linac upgrade are pursued to establish lengths, gradients, power dissipation, etc., for the 400 MeV linac and matching section. The discussion is limited to accelerating and focusing components. Wherever values depend on the choice of the accelerating structure, the disk-and-washer structure is emphasized; the results are generally relevant to the side coupled cavity choice also

  13. Evolution of the 400 MeV linac design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1987-11-09

    The basic premises of the conceptual design for the linac upgrade are pursued to establish lengths, gradients, power dissipation, etc., for the 400 MeV linac and matching section. The discussion is limited to accelerating and focusing components. Wherever values depend on the choice of the accelerating structure, the disk-and-washer structure is emphasized; the results are generally relevant to the side coupled cavity choice also.

  14. The Linac4 DTL Prototype: Low and High Power Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    De Michele, G; Marques-Balula, J; Ramberger, S

    2012-01-01

    The prototype of the Linac4 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) has undergone low power measurements in order to verify the RF coupling and to adjust the post-coupler lengths based on bead-pull and spectrum measurements. Following the installation at the test stand, the cavity has been subjected to high power operation at Linac4 and SPL duty cycles. Saturation effects and multipacting have been observed and linked to X-ray emission. Voltage holding is reported in the presence of magnetic fields from permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQ) installed in the first drift tubes.

  15. A new method for improving beam quality of LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jialin; Li Fengtian; Wang Yanshan; Wang Bosi

    1999-01-01

    The principle of the self-adaptive feed-forward (SAFF) control to improve the beam quality of linac is introduced. the analytical procedure for calculating the control signals, the structure of a practical control system, and applications of SAFF in klystron, RF gun, and linac are presented, especially the application in the thermionic gun whose response is non-linear, time-variant and of large time-delay. The described control system is operational and some primary experimental results have been obtained, including the control of amplitude and phase fluctuations of the klystron output, the microwave field in the gun cavity and linac

  16. Dispersive-cavity actively mode-locked fiber laser for stable radio frequency delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Yitang; Wang, Ruixin; Yin, Feifei; Xu, Kun; Li, Jianqiang; Lin, Jintong

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel technique for highly stable transfer of a radio frequency (RF) comb over long optical fiber link, which is highly dispersive and is a part of an actively mode-locked fiber laser. Phase fluctuation along the fiber link, which is mainly induced by physical vibration and temperature fluctuations, is automatically compensated by the self-adapted wavelength shifting. Without phase-locking loop or any tunable parts, stable radio frequency is transferred over a 2-km fiber link, with a time jitter suppression ratio larger than 110. (letter)

  17. Workshop: Linac90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, Olin

    1990-01-01

    In 1960 the first linear accelerator (linac) conference was organized at Brookhaven by John Blewett. In the few years following, linear accelerator energies jumped from 50 MeV (at Brookhaven and CERN) to 2 GeV at Stanford. With the realization that, at least for electrons, circular accelerators have reached their practical limits, linacs are once more in the spotlight

  18. Linac pre-injector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    New accelerating column of the linac pre-injector, supporting frame and pumping system. This new system uses two mercury diffusion pumps (in the centre) and forms part of the modifications intended to increase the intensity of the linac. View taken during assembly in the workshop.

  19. The Linac4 project

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108735

    2016-01-01

    Linac4 is a normal conducting, 160 MeV H- ion accelerator that is being constructed within the scope of the LHC injectors upgrade project. Linac4 will be connected to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) during the next long LHC shut-down and it will replace the current 50 MeV hadron linac, Linac2. Linac4 is presently being commissioned, with the aim of achieving the final energy at the end of the year. A test of the injection chicane and a reliability run will follow. The beam commissioning, in steps of increasing energy, has been prepared by an extended series of studies and interlaced with phases of installation. In this paper we will detail the beam dynamics challenges and we will report on the commissioning results.

  20. Spallation Neutron Source Superconducting Linac Commissioning Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Stuart; Galambos, John; Jeon Dong Oh; Zhang, Yan

    2005-01-01

    We describe the techniques which will be employed for establishing RF and quadrupole setpoints in the SNS superconducting linac. The longitudinal tuneup will be accomplished using phase-scan methods, as well as a technique that makes use of the beam induced field in the unpowered cavity.* The scheme for managing the RF and quadrupole setpoints to achieve a given energy profile will be described.

  1. First operation of the rf-focused interdigital linac structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel Starling, W.; Swenson, Donald A.

    2007-08-01

    The new rf-focused interdigital (RFI) linac structure came into operation at the Linac Systems laboratory in May of 2006, after a multi-year development program supported by the US Department of Energy. The RFI linac structure is basically an interdigital (or Wideröe) linac structure with rf quadrupole focusing incorporated into each drift tube. The RFI prototype operates at 200-MHz and consists of an ECR ion source, an Einzel lens LEBT, a radial-strut, four-bar RFQ linac section to 0.75 MeV and an RFI linac section to a final energy of 2.5 MeV. The total length of the prototype is 2.2 m. The RFQ and RFI linac sections are resonantly coupled and require a total of 120 kW of rf power for cavity excitation. The energy of the accelerated beam was confirmed by requiring it to pass through a 2.25-MeV energy-degrading foil. The specifications for the RFI linac prototype were chosen to address the demanding Boron Neutron Capture Therapy medical application. There are, however, many other potential applications for the structure as it has efficiency and size advantages for both protons and heavy ions at a variety of energies and currents. To date, we have achieved a beam current of approximately 1 mA peak at a relatively low duty factor. We continue to improve the performance of the prototype structure on a daily basis as we better understand the optimal operational settings for the prototype system. Now that the first operational milestone for the RFI linac structure has been achieved, Linac Systems will vigorously pursue projects and partnerships for multiple applications such as compact and intense neutron sources, proton and carbon injector linacs for synchrotrons and PET isotope production.

  2. Tailoring optical resonant cavity modes in SnO2 microstructures through doping and shape engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Tecedor, M.; Maestre, D.; Cremades, A.; Piqueras, J.

    2017-10-01

    Optical resonances are effectively tailored by engineering size, morphology and doping in tin oxide microstructures. The use of Cr shifts the light confinement to the near-infrared region, as compared to the undoped microstructures, while achieving good Q and F factors. Other issues, such as appropriate thickness to width ratio, allow the selection of Fabry-Pérot or Whispering Gallery modes, or the appearance of a combination of both kinds of resonances in the same microstructure. Morphology variability would contribute with flexibility in the design of systems for different applications, while combining the observed waveguiding behavior with the optical resonances in the same material is an advantage for applications based in a monolithic design. Refraction index of Cr doped tin oxide has been obtained.

  3. Interaction of a single mode field cavity with the 1D XY model: Energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonchev, H; Donkov, A A; Chamati, H

    2016-01-01

    In this work we use the fundamental in quantum optics Jaynes-Cummings model to study the response of spin 1/2chain to a single mode of a laser light falling on one of the spins, a focused interaction model between the light and the spin chain. For the spin-spin interaction along the chain we use the XY model. We report here the exact analytical results, obtained with the help of a computer algebra system, for the energy spectrum in this model for chains of up to 4 spins with nearest neighbors interactions, either for open or cyclic chain configurations. Varying the sign and magnitude of the spin exchange coupling relative to the light-spin interaction we have investigated both cases of ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic spin chains. (paper)

  4. Beam dynamics design of the 211 MeV APT normal conducting linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Billen, J.H.; Takeda, H.; Wood, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the normal conducting linac design that is part of the Accelerator for Production of Tritium (APT) project. The new version of PARMILA designed this linac. This linac accepts the beam from the 6.7 MeV radio frequency quadrupole without a separate matching section. At about 10 MeV, it has a smooth transition in the length of period from 8βλ to 9βλ in quadrupole focusing lattice. This adjustment of the period was needed to provide sufficient space for the quadrupole focusing magnets and beam diagnostic equipment. The linac consists of the coupled cavity drift tube linac up to 97 MeV and coupled cavity linac above 97 MeV

  5. Cavity Processing and Preparation of 650 MHz Elliptical Cell Cavities for PIP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Allan [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, Saravan Kumar [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Merio, Margherita [Fermilab; Reid, Thomas [Argonne (main); Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    The PIP-II project at Fermilab requires fifteen 650 MHz SRF cryomodules as part of the 800 MeV LINAC that will provide a high intensity proton beam to the Fermilab neutrino program. A total of fifty-seven high-performance SRF cavities will populate the cryomodules and will operate in both pulsed and continuous wave modes. These cavities will be processed and prepared for performance testing utilizing adapted cavity processing infrastructure already in place at Fermilab and Argonne. The processing recipes implemented for these structures will incorporate state-of-the art processing and cleaning techniques developed for 1.3 GHz SRF cavities for the ILC, XFEL, and LCLS-II projects. This paper describes the details of the processing recipes and associated chemistry, heat treatment, and cleanroom processes at the Fermilab and Argonne cavity processing facilities. This paper also presents single and multi-cell cavity test results with quality factors above 5·10¹⁰ and accelerating gradients above 30 MV/m.

  6. A Novel Technique for Sterilization Using a Power Self-Regulated Single-Mode Microwave Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. Reverte-Ors

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel technique to achieve precise temperatures in food sterilization has been proposed. An accurate temperature profile is needed in order to reach a commitment between the total removal of pathogens inside the product and the preservation of nutritional and organoleptic characteristics. The minimal variation of the target temperature in the sample by means of a monitoring and control software platform, allowing temperature stabilization over 100 °C, is the main goal of this work. A cylindrical microwave oven, under pressure conditions and continuous control of the microwave supply power as function of the final temperature inside the sample, has been designed and developed with conditions of single-mode resonance. The uniform heating in the product is achieved by means of sample movement and the self-regulated power control using the measured temperature. Finally, for testing the sterilization of food with this technology, specific biological validation based on Bacillus cereus as a biosensor of heat inactivation has been incorporated as a distribution along the sample in the experimental process to measure the colony-forming units (CFUs for different food samples (laboratory medium, soup, or fish-based animal by-products. The obtained results allow the validation of this new technology for food sterilization with precise control of the microwave system to ensure the uniform elimination of pathogens using high temperatures.

  7. The RF system for the 70 MeV linac injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planner, C.W.

    1975-12-01

    The Radio Frequency System for the 70 MeV Linac Injector for Nimrod is required to power the four Accelerating Cavities and the Buncher and Debuncher Cavities. The frequency of operation is 202.5 MHz and is determined by the use of existing equipment from the redundant 50 MeV Proton Linac for the second and third accelerating cavities and the buncher and de-buncher cavities. The subject is discussed under the following headings: low power drive chain; RF feed lines; cavity field level stabilisation. Circuit diagrams are presented. (U.K.)

  8. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

    2008-07-07

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

  9. Compendium of Scientific Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, James E

    2003-05-16

    The International Committee supported the proposal of the Chairman of the XVIII International Linac Conference to issue a new Compendium of linear accelerators. The last one was published in 1976. The Local Organizing Committee of Linac96 decided to set up a sub-committee for this purpose. Contrary to the catalogues of the High Energy Accelerators which compile accelerators with energies above 1 GeV, we have not defined a specific limit in energy. Microtrons and cyclotrons are not in this compendium. Also data from thousands of medical and industrial linacs has not been collected. Therefore, only scientific linacs are listed in the present compendium. Each linac found in this research and involved in a physics context was considered. It could be used, for example, either as an injector for high energy accelerators, or in nuclear physics, materials physics, free electron lasers or synchrotron light machines. Linear accelerators are developed in three continents only: America, Asia, and Europe. This geographical distribution is kept as a basis. The compendium contains the parameters and status of scientific linacs. Most of these linacs are operational. However, many facilities under construction or design studies are also included. A special mention has been made at the end for the studies of future linear colliders.

  10. Review of superconducting linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of the technology of superconducting (SC) linacs designed for the acceleration of ions. The emphasis is on the technical issues involved, with only brief descriptions of the numerous linacs now in operation or under construction. Recent developments of special interest are treated in more detail, and remaining technical challenges are outlined. The technology required for acceleration of ions with velocity β ∼ 1 is not discussed because it is almost the same as for relativistic electrons. That is, this paper is mainly about SC linacs for low-velocity heavy ions. (Author) 5 tabs., 6 figs., 29 refs

  11. Precision measurement of single atoms strongly coupled to the higher-order transverse modes of a high-finesse optical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jinjin; Li, Wenfang; Wen, Ruijuan; Li, Gang; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Tiancai [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Opto-Electronics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2013-08-19

    We have experimentally demonstrated the strong coupling between single atoms and the higher-order Hermite-Gaussian transverse modes in a high-finesse optical microcavity. Compared to the usual low-order symmetric transverse modes, multiple lobes and the asymmetric spatial pattern of the titled modes provide more information about the motion of single atoms in the cavity. The motional information can be extracted from the measured transmission spectra, which includes the velocities and the positions of the atoms in vertical and off-axis directions. The scheme has great potential in time-resolved atom-cavity microscopy and in tracking the three-dimensional single atom trajectory in real time.

  12. Electro neutrons around a 12 MV Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Perez L, L. H.

    2012-10-01

    Neutron contamination around Linacs for radiotherapy is a source of undesirable doses for the patient. The main source of these neutrons is the photonuclear reactions occurring in the Linac head and the patient body. Electrons also produce neutrons through (e, en) reactions. This reaction is known as electro disintegration and is carried out by the electron scattering that produce a virtual photon that is absorbed by the scattering nucleus producing the reaction e + A → (A-1) + n + e'. In this work the electron-neutron spectrum to 100 cm from the isocenter of a 12 MV Linac has been measured using a passive Bonner spheres spectrometer in a novel procedure named Planetary mode. (Author)

  13. SRF LINAC for future extension of the PEFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Seol, Kyoung Tae; Jang, Ji Ho; Cho, Yong Sub

    2014-01-01

    A study on the superconducting RF linac is underway in order to increase the beam energy up to 1 GeV by extending the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) 100-MeV linac. The operating frequency of the PEFP superconducting linac (SCL) is 700 MHz, which is determined by the fact that the frequency of the existing normal conducting linac is 350 MHz. A preliminary study on the beam dynamics showed that two types of cavities with geometrical betas of 0.50 and 0.74 could cover the entire energy range from 100 MeV to 1 GeV. An inductive output tube (IOT) based RF system is under consideration as a high-power RF source for the SCL due to its low operating voltage and high efficiency. As a prototyping activity for a reduced beta cavity, a five-cell cavity with a geometrical beta of 0.42 was designed and fabricated. A vertical test of the prototype cavity at low temperatures was performed to check the performance of the cavity. The design study and the prototyping activity for the PEFP SCL will be presented in this paper.

  14. SRF LINAC FOR FUTURE EXTENSION OF THE PEFP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN-SUNG KIM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A study on the superconducting RF linac is underway in order to increase the beam energy up to 1 GeV by extending the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP 100-MeV linac. The operating frequency of the PEFP superconducting linac (SCL is 700 MHz, which is determined by the fact that the frequency of the existing normal conducting linac is 350 MHz. A preliminary study on the beam dynamics showed that two types of cavities with geometrical betas of 0.50 and 0.74 could cover the entire energy range from 100 MeV to 1 GeV. An inductive output tube (IOT based RF system is under consideration as a high-power RF source for the SCL due to its low operating voltage and high efficiency. As a prototyping activity for a reduced beta cavity, a five-cell cavity with a geometrical beta of 0.42 was designed and fabricated. A vertical test of the prototype cavity at low temperatures was performed to check the performance of the cavity. The design study and the prototyping activity for the PEFP SCL will be presented in this paper.

  15. Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)—positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis—produces commercially...

  16. Investigation of using shrinking method in construction of Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences Electron Linear Accelerator TW-tube (IPM TW-Linac tube)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, F.; Davani, F. Abbasi

    2015-01-01

    Due to Iran's growing need for accelerators in various applications, IPM's electron Linac project has been defined. This accelerator is a 15 MeV energy S-band traveling-wave accelerator which is being designed and constructed based on the klystron that has been built in Iran. Based on the design, operating mode is π /2 and the accelerating chamber consists of two 60cm long tubes with constant impedance and a 30cm long buncher. Amongst all construction methods, shrinking method is selected for construction of IPM's electron Linac tube because it has a simple procedure and there is no need for large vacuum or hydrogen furnaces. In this paper, different aspects of this method are investigated. According to the calculations, linear ratio of frequency alteration to radius change is 787.8 MHz/cm, and the maximum deformation at the tube wall where disks and the tube make contact is 2.7μ m. Applying shrinking method for construction of 8- and 24-cavity tubes results in satisfactory frequency and quality factor. Average deviations of cavities frequency of 8- and 24-cavity tubes to the design values are 0.68 MHz and 1.8 MHz respectively before tune and 0.2 MHz and 0.4 MHz after tune. Accelerating tubes, buncher, and high power couplers of IPM's electron linac are constructed using shrinking method

  17. Numerical and experimental investigation of multi-mode heat transfer in a square cavity with and without triangular fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sudhanshu; Gedupudi, Sateesh; Venkateshan, S. P.

    2018-03-01

    Numerical and experimental studies on laminar natural convection and radiation in a differentially heated cavity with/without triangular fins are presented. The square cavity is filled with air (Pr = 0.71). The top and bottom walls are adiabatic, while the active (hot) and cold walls are isothermal. Triangular conductive fins made of highly conductive material are placed on the heated and cooled vertical surfaces of a square cavity. The effects of pertinent parameters on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are studied. The governing differential equations, assuming laminar flow, are solved using the commercial software FLUENT. Experiments have been carried out for three different configurations viz square cavity without fins, square cavity with two fins on vertical walls and square cavity with continuous fins on vertical walls. Rayleigh number varies from 1.18 × 105 to 2.15 × 105 for the first experiment (square cavity without fins). The other two experiments with fins have been conducted for six different heat inputs. The numerical results have been validated against the experimental results obtained. It is concluded that the triangular fins on isothermal walls enhance the heat transfer in the cavity. Natural convection is influenced by wall surface emissivity. The square cavity with continuous fins is more effective than square cavity with two fins on vertical isothermal walls.

  18. Industrialization of the nitrogen-doping preparation for SRF cavities for LCLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, D.; Aderhold, S.; Burrill, A.; Daly, E.; Davis, K.; Grassellino, A.; Grimm, C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Marhauser, F.; Melnychuk, O.; Palczewski, A.; Posen, S.; Ross, M.; Sergatskov, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Wilson, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is a new state-of-the-art coherent X-ray source being constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. It employs 280 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in order operate in continuous wave (CW) mode. To reduce the overall cryogenic cost of such a large accelerator, nitrogen-doping of the SRF cavities is being used. Nitrogen-doping has consistently been shown to increase the efficiency of SRF cavities operating in the 2.0 K regime and at medium fields (15-20 MV/m) in vertical cavity tests and horizontal cryomodule tests. While nitrogen-doping's efficacy for improvement of cavity performance was demonstrated at three independent labs, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and Cornell University, transfer of the technology to industry for LCLS-II production was not without challenges. Here we present results from the beginning of LCLS-II cavity production. We discuss qualification of the cavity vendors and the first cavities from each vendor. Finally, we demonstrate that nitrogen-doping has been successfully transferred to SRF cavity vendors, resulting in consistent production of cavities with better cryogenic efficiency than has ever been achieved for a large-scale accelerator.

  19. RF Structures for Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F; Pasini, M; Ramberger, S; Vretenar, M; Wegner, R

    2007-01-01

    Linac4 is proposed to replace the existing proton linac at CERN (Linac2). Using an increased injection energy of 160 MeV instead of 50 MeV, Linac4 is expected to double the beam intensity in the PS Booster (PSB) and will thus be the first step towards higher brightness beams in the LHC. In this paper we re-assess the choice of RF structures for Linac4. Different accelerating structures for different energy ranges are compared in terms of RF efficiency, ease of construction and alignment, and necessary infrastructure. Eventually we present the final choice for Linac4.

  20. Radiation processing using electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeown, J.

    1985-01-01

    The performance capabilities of a modern linac make it a commercially viable tool for enterprising applied radiation chemists and biologists. Good economics requires efficient transformation of main power to beam power and although pulsed travelling wave linacs have been used in industrial applications for several years, their high cost per watt is a disadvantage. The cw linac with its variants is a developed technology which could be used profitably in selected applications. More integrated designs like the self-excited linac and the induction linac also offer promise for the near future. Linac design optimization in relation to the physical and chemical processes desired in the irradiated product is discussed

  1. PIMS—A simple and robust accelerating structure for high intensity proton Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Wegner, F

    2009-01-01

    A π-mode structure (PIMS) is investigated for an application in a high duty cycle, high intensity proton Linac. Motivated by the objective to employ a simple and robust accelerating structure at a resonance frequency of 352 MHz for the high energy part of Linac4 (100–160 MeV), the normal conducting LEP cavity is restudied and its design is adopted for a medium application. The geometry of the accelerating cell is optimised, the necessary cell-to-cell coupling coefficient is analysed and a novel solution for the shape of the coupling slots is discussed. Simulation results are compared to measurement results obtained from three 3-cell cold models and one 7-cell cold model. The method of tuning the resonance frequency of individual cells is presented and the tuning of end cells is explained in detail. An adjustable wave guide coupler is used to power the cavities, and we present the design process for this device. The behaviour of the PIMS to dynamical changes—as observed during the filling process of the c...

  2. Design considerations for high-current superconducting ion linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as fusion materials irradiation testing, spallation neutron source, transmutation of radioactive waste, tritium production, and energy production. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. Superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs, respectively. However, cost-effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement. Key aspects of high-current cw superconducting linac designs are explored in this context

  3. Superconducting RF for energy-recovery linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepe, M.; Knobloch, J.

    2006-01-01

    Since superconducting RF for particle accelerators made its first appearance in the 1970s, it has found highly successful application in a variety of machines. Recent progress in this technology has made so-called Energy-Recovery Linacs (ERLs)-originally proposed in 1965-feasible, and interest in this type of machine has increased enormously. A superconducting linac is the driving heart of ERLs, and emittance preservation and cost efficiency is of utmost importance. The resulting challenges for the superconducting cavity technology and RF field control are manifold. In March 2005 the first international workshop on ERLs was held at Newport News, VA, to explore the potential of ERLs and to discuss machine-physics and technology challenges and their solutions. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in superconducting RF and RF control for ERLs, and summarizes the discussions of the SRF working group on this technology during the ERL2005 workshop

  4. Status of the SNS superconducting linac and future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho

    2008-01-01

    The use of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities in particle accelerator is becoming more widespread. Among the projects that make use of that technology is the Spallation Neutron Source, where H- ions are accelerated to about 1 GeV, mostly making use of niobium elliptical cavities. SNS generates neutrons by the spallation reaction with the accelerated short (about 700 ns) sub-bunches of protons, which will in turn allow probing structural and magnetic properties of new and existing materials. The SNS superconducting linac is the largest application of RF superconductivity to come on-line in the last decade and has been operating with beam for almost two years. As the first operational pulsed superconducting linac, many of the aspects of its performance were unknown and unpredictable. A lot of experiences and data have been gathered on the pulsed behavior of cavities and cryomodules at various repetition rates and at various temperatures during the commissioning of its components and beam operations. This experience is of great value in determining future optimizations of SNS as well in guiding in the design and operation of future pulsed superconducting linacs. The testing of the superconducting cavities, the operating experience with beam, the performance of the superconducting linac and the future plans will be presented.

  5. The Very Model of a Modern PI-Mode Structure

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Linac4's PI-Mode Structures (PIMS) are the first structures of their kind to accelerate protons. Now, over three years after work began on production, over 180 PIMS elements have been rough-machined and the first new PIMS cavity is being assembled at CERN.   The newly assembled PIMS cavity undergoes testing in CERN's Main Workshop. As the final accelerating structures of Linac4, located 53 m to 74 m downstream of the source, the state-of-the-art PIMS cavities will take protons from 100 to 160 MeV. While the first cavity was built entirely at CERN, construction of the remaining cavities has become a larger, multi-national operation. The newest PIMS cavity is being assembled and validated at CERN's Main Workshop. Built in collaboration with the National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ, Poland) and the Jülich Research Centre (Germany), it is the first of its kind to be produced outside the Organization. Sharing all the required know...

  6. The DARHT Phase 2 Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Zachary R.

    2000-01-01

    The second phase accelerator for the Dual Axis Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) is designed to provide an electron beam pulse that is 2μs long, 2kA, and 20 MeV in particle energy. The injector provides 3.2 MeV so that the linac need only provide 16.8 MeV. The linac is made with two types of induction accelerator cells. The first block of 8 cells have a 14 in. beam pipe compared to 10 in. in the remaining 80 cells. The other principal difference is that the first 8 cells have reduced volt-sec in their induction cores as a result of a larger diameter beam pipe. The cells are designed for very reliable high voltage operation. The insulator is Mycalex. Results from prototype tests are given including results from solenoid measurements. Each cell contains a solenoid for beam transport and a set of x-y correction coils to reduce corkscrew motion. Details of tests to determine RF mode impedances relevant to BBU generation are given. Blocks of cells are separated by intercells some of which contain transport solenoids. The intercells provide vacuum pumping stations as well. Issues of alignment and installation are discussed

  7. Superconducting TESLA cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aune

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with an accelerating gradient of E_{acc}≥25 MV/m at a quality factor Q_{0}≥5×10^{9}. The design goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF linac was set to the more moderate value of E_{acc}≥15 MV/m. In a first series of 27 industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} was measured to be 20.1±6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering from serious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTF cavities, additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular, an eddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusions and stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. The average gradient of these cavities at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} amounts to 25.0±3.2 MV/m with the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only a moderate improvement in production and preparation techniques will be needed to meet the ambitious TESLA goal with an adequate safety margin. In this paper we present a detailed description of the design, fabrication, and preparation of the TESLA Test Facility cavities and their associated components and report on cavity performance in test cryostats and with electron beam in the TTF linac. The ongoing research and development towards higher gradients is briefly addressed.

  8. High field electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duff, J.

    1985-12-01

    High field electron linacs are considered as potential candidates to provide very high energies beyond LEP. Since almost twenty years not much improvement has been made on linac technologies as they have been mostly kept at low and medium energies to be used as injectors for storage rings. Today, both their efficiency and their performances are being reconsidered, and for instance the pulse compression sheme developed at SLAC and introduced to upgrade the energy of that linac is a first step towards a new generation of linear accelerators. However this is not enough in terms of power consumption and more development is needed to improve both the efficiency of accelerating structures and the performances of RF power sources

  9. Dynamics of 1.55 μm Wavelength Single-Mode Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser Output under External Optical Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyong Hon Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the temporal dynamics of the laser output spectrum and polarization state of 1.55 μm wavelength single-mode (SM vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs induced by external optical beam injection. Injection of an external continuous-wave laser beam to a gain-switched SM VCSEL near the resonance wavelength corresponding to its main polarization-mode output was critical for improvement of its laser pulse generation characteristics, such as pulse timing-jitter reduction, linewidth narrowing, pulse amplitude enhancement, and pulse width shortening. Pulse injection of pulse width shorter than the cavity photon lifetime into the SM VCSEL in the orthogonal polarization direction with respect to its main polarization mode caused temporal delay of the polarization recovery after polarization switching (PS, and its delay was found to be the minimum at an optimized bias current. Polarization-mode bistability was observed even in the laser output of an SM VCSEL of a standard circularly cylindrical shape and used for all-optical flip-flop operations with set and reset injection pulses of very low pulse energy of order of the 3.5~4.5 fJ.

  10. Control system in the technological electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boriskin, V.N.; Akchurin, Yu.I.; Bahmetev, N.N.; Gurin, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    The special system has been developed for linac control.It controls the electron beam current,the energy and the position,protects the accelerating and scanning systems from the damage caused by the beam;blocks the modulator and the klystron amplifier in the case of intolerable operating modes;regulates the phase and power of the HF signals in the injecting system and also regulates the source power currents in the magnetic system

  11. Inherent calibration of a blue LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thalman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0. We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420–490 nm to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, methyl glyoxal (CH3COCHO, iodine oxide (IO, water vapour (H2O and oxygen dimers (O4. We demonstrate the first direct detection of methyl glyoxal, and the first CE-DOAS detection of CHOCHO and IO. The instrument is further inherently calibrated for light extinction from the cavity by observing O4 or H2O (at 477 nm and 443 nm and measuring the pressure, relative humidity and temperature independently. This approach is demonstrated by experiments where laboratory aerosols of known size and refractive index were generated and their extinction measured. The measured extinctions were then compared to the theoretical extinctions calculated using Mie theory (3–7 × 10−7cm−1. Excellent agreement is found from both the O4 and H2O retrievals. This enables the first inherently calibrated CEAS measurement at blue wavelengths in open cavity mode, and eliminates the need for sampling lines to supply air to the cavity, i.e., keep the cavity enclosed and/or aerosol free. Measurements in open cavity mode are demonstrated for CHOCHO, CH3COCHO, NO2, H2O and aerosol extinction. Our prototype

  12. Bulk filling of Class II cavities with a dual-cure composite: Effect of curing mode and enamel etching on marginal adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahillo, Jose; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Roig, Miguel; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-12-01

    This study attempted to find a simple adhesive restorative technique for class I and II cavities on posterior teeth. The tested materials were a self-etching adhesive (Parabond, Coltène/Whaledent) and a dual-cure composite (Paracore, Coltène/Whaledent) used in bulk to restore the cavities. Class II MO cavities were performed and assigned to 4 groups depending on the orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) conditioning of enamel and polymerization method used (chemical or dual). Specimens were subjected to quantitative marginal analysis before and after thermo-mechanical loading. Higher percentages of marginal adaptation at the total margin length, both before and after thermo-mechanical loading, were found in groups in which enamel was etched with phosphoric acid, without significant differences between the chemically and dual-cured modes. The restorations performance was similar on enamel and dentin, obtaining low results of adaptation on occlusal enamel in the groups without enamel etching, the lowest scores were on cervical dentin in the group with no ortophosphoric acid and self-cured. A dual-cure composite applied in bulk on acid etched enamel obtained acceptable marginal adaptation results, and may be an alternative technique for the restoration of class II cavities. Key words:Dual-cure composite, bulk technique, class II restoration, selective enamel etching, marginal adaptation.

  13. Opto-mechanical design of a buckling cavity in a novel high-performance outside-plant robust field installable single-mode fibre connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebraert, Evert; Van Erps, Jürgen; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    Fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) networks provide an ideal means to reach the goal the European Union has set to provide 50 % of the households with a broadband connection faster than 100 Mb/s. Deployment of FTTH networks, which is still costly today, could be significantly boosted by novel ferrule-less connectors which don't require highly skilled personnel and allow installation in the field. We propose a ferrule-less connector in which two single-mode fibres (SMFs) are aligned and maintain physical contact by ensuring that at least one fibre is in a buckled state. To this end, we design a cavity in which a fibre can buckle in a controlled way. Using finite element analysis simulations to investigate the shape of the formed buckle for various buckling cavity lengths, we show that it can be accurately approximated by a cosine function. In addition, the optical performance of a buckled SMF is investigated by bending loss calculations and simulations. We show a good agreement between the analytical and the simulated bending loss results for a G.652 fibre at a wavelength of 1550 nm. Buckling cavity lengths smaller than 20 mm should be avoided to keep the optical bending loss due to buckling below 0.1 dB. In this case the cavity height should at least be 2 mm to avoid mechanical confinement of the fibre.

  14. Progress in the Construction of Linac4 at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, M; Baudrenghien, P; Bertone, C; Body, Y; Broere, J; Brunner, O; Bellodi, G; Buzio, M; Carli, C; Roncarolo, F; Ramberger, S; Raich, U; Puccio, B; Paoluzzi, M; Nisbet, D; Mikulec, B; Mathot, S; Maglioni, C; Lopez-Hernandez, LA; Lombardi, A; Lallement, J B; Lettry, J; Kozsar, I; Hansen, J; Hanke, K; Hammouti, L; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Funken, A; Fuchs, J F; Dos Santos, N; Dallocchio, A; Coupard, J; Corso, JP; Scrivens, R; Schwerg, N; Vollaire, J; Zickler, T; Weisz, S; Wegner, R; Vandoni, G; Rossi, C

    2013-01-01

    As first step of the LHC luminosity upgrade program CERN is building a new 160 MeV H¯ linear accelerator, Linac4, to replace the ageing 50 MeV Linac2 as injector to the PS Booster (PSB). Linac4 is an 86-m long normalconducting linac made of a 3 MeV injector followed by 22 accelerating cavities of three different types. The general service infrastructure has been installed in the new tunnel and surface building and its commissioning is progressing; high power RF equipment is being installed in the hall and installations in the tunnel will start soon. Construction of the accelerator parts is in full swing involving industry, the CERN workshops and a network of international collaborations. The injector section including a newly designed and built H¯ source, a 3-m long RFQ and a chopping line is being commissioned in a dedicated test stand. Beam commissioning of the linac will take place in steps of increasing energy between 2013 and 2015. From end of 2014 Linac4 could deliver 50 MeV protons i...

  15. Preliminary design study and problem definition for intense CW superconducting deuteron ion linac for fusion material study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Y.; Kakutani, N.; Ota, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Takeda, O.; Wachi, Y.; Yamazaki, C.; Morii, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The advantages of superconducting (SC) cavity have been verified for many electron accelerators and the application of SC cavity to high intensity CW ion linacs is currently being considered. These linacs have been required for neutron irradiation tests of materials, transmutation of nuclear waste and so on. An SC linac consisting of SC cavities, SC quadrupole magnets and cryostats, was preliminarily designed to investigate the feasibility of applying to deuteron machine. Beam dynamics analysis was also carried out by using a modified PARMILA code in order to confirm no beam loss. Since radiation damage of superconductors is especially severe for such a machine, data relating to the damage were surveyed and discussed. Moreover, other major facilities such as cryogenic system, radio frequency amplifier and RF control system were considered. Many problems to be solved were defined but no critical issues were found. In consequence, it became clear that SC linac is very attractive and competitive with a room-temperature linac. (orig.)

  16. Characterisation of the light pulses of a cavity dumped dye laser pumped by a cw mode-locked and q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, P.; Heisel, F.; Martz, A.; Miehe, J.A.; Miller, R.J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency doubled pulses (of 532 nm) obtained, with the help of a KTP crystal, from those delivered by either a continuous wave mode-locked (100 MHz) or mode-locked Q-switched (0-1 KHz) Nd: YAG laser, are analyzed by means of a streak camera, operating in synchroscan or triggered mode. In the step-by-step measurements the pulse stability, concerning form and amplitude, is shown. In addition, measurements effectuated with synchronously pumped and cavity dumped dye laser (Rhodamine 6G), controlled by a Pockels cell, allows the obtention of stable and reproducible single pulses of 30 ps duration, 10 μJ energy and 500Hz frequency [fr

  17. Electron Induction Linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan

    Electron induction linacs have been used for over four decades for a variety of applications. As discussed in Chap. 8, these include basic studies in magnetically confined fusion, transport of intense electron beams in various gases, the generation of electromagnetic radiation from free electron lasers, radiation processing of materials and food, and flash X-ray radiography sources.

  18. TOP LINAC design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, A.

    1997-11-01

    The report describes a linear accelerator for protons named TOP LINAC designed for the TOP (Terapia Oncologica con Protoni, Oncological Protontherapy) project launched by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanita', ISS) to explore in collaboration with the biggest Oncological Hospital in Rome (Istituto Regina Elena, IRE) the potentialities of the therapy with accelerated protons and establish guide lines for the application of this new type of radiotherapy in comparison with the more traditional electron and x-rays radiotherapy. The concept of a compact accelerator for protontherapy applications bore within the Italian Hadrontherapy Collaboration (TERA Collaboration) with the aim to diffuse the protontherapy on the National territory. The ISS program plans to use the TOP linac proton beam also for production of PET (Positron Emission Tomography) radioisotopes and radiobiology studies. Official agreements are in course between ISS and ENEA which provides its experience in the industrial and medical accelerators for the design and the construction of the TOP linac. The accelerator that will be the first 3 GHz proton linac in the world, will be composed of a 428.3 MHz 7 Me V RFQ + DTL injector followed by a 7-65 Me V section of a 3 GHz SCDTL structure and a 65 - 200 Me V variable energy SCL 3 GHz structure. In particular the SCDTL section uses a highly innovative accelerating structure patented by ENEA. In this report the clinical and physical requests are discussed and a preliminary design of the whole machine is given

  19. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV PS Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows Linac 2 drift-tubes, suspended on stems coming from the top, in contrast to Linac 1, where the drift-tubes stood on stems coming from the bottom.

  20. Effect of Surface Plasmon Coupling to Optical Cavity Modes on the Field Enhancement and Spectral Response of Dimer-Based sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Alrasheed, Salma

    2017-09-05

    We present a theoretical approach to narrow the plasmon linewidth and enhance the near-field intensity at a plasmonic dimer gap (hot spot) through coupling the electric localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance of a silver hemispherical dimer with the resonant modes of a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. The strong coupling is demonstrated by the large anticrossing in the reflection spectra and a Rabi splitting of 76 meV. Up to 2-fold enhancement increase can be achieved compared to that without using the cavity. Such high field enhancement has potential applications in optics, including sensors and high resolution imaging devices. In addition, the resonance splitting allows for greater flexibility in using the same array at different wavelengths. We then further propose a practical design to realize such a device and include dimers of different shapes and materials.

  1. Optimal choice of cell geometry for a multicell superconducting cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Shemelin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for optimization of the multicell cavity cells is proposed. Inner cells are optimized for minimal losses or minimal magnetic field, when the aperture diameter, E_{pk}/E_{acc}—the ratio of peak electric field to the accelerating field, and the wall slope angle are given. Optimization of the end cells is done for minimal losses or maximal acceleration in them. Two shapes of the end cells—with and without the end irises—are analyzed. This approach facilitates further optimization for higher order modes extraction because it permits keeping the achieved optimal values nearly the same while changing some dimensions of the cells. Comparison of the proposed cavity geometry with the TESLA cavity geometry illustrates the traits of the presented approach. It is also shown that lower values of the wall slope angle, which lead to the reentrant shape for the inner cells, are also beneficial for the end cells. For the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac most dangerous are dipole modes causing the beam breakup (BBU. Minimization of power of higher order modes (HOMs in a multicell cavity was done using derivatives of the BBU parameter with respect to geometric parameters of the cavity cells. As a starting point of optimization, the shape with minimal losses at the fundamental mode was taken. Further changing the shape for better propagation of HOMs was done with degradation of the fundamental mode loss parameter G·R_{sh}/Q within 1% while decrease of the BBU parameter was nearly 3 orders of magnitude. The BBU threshold current tends to be inversely proportional to this parameter.

  2. HOM damping properties of fundamental power couplers in the superconducting electron gun of the energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.

    2011-03-28

    Among the accelerator projects under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is an R and D energy recovery LINAC (ERL) test facility. The ERL includes both a five-cell superconducting cavity as well as a superconducting, photoinjector electron gun. Because of the high-charge and high-current demands, effective higher-order mode (HOM) damping is essential, and several strategies are being pursued. Among these is the use of the fundamental power couplers as a means for damping some HOMs. Simulation studies have shown that the power couplers can play a substantial role in damping certain HOMs, and this presentation discusses these studies along with measurements.

  3. Progress Report on SIMULINK Modelling of RF Cavity Control for SPL Extension to LINAC4 Theory and Analysis behind Simulation Results of SPL Model Using I/Q Components in SIMULINK to Date, Including Lorentz Force Effects and Multiple Cavities Driven by Single Feedback Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, M

    2011-01-01

    In the context of a luminosity upgrade for the LHC within the coming years, works have started on LINAC4 to provide an infrastructure for updating the LHC supplier chain. In order to achieve energy levels and particles per bunch necessary for the expected rate of events at LHC detectors and related experiments, a project proposal is underway for an appended Superconducting Proton LINAC (SPL) that will run from the normal conducting LINAC4 and LP-SPL onto the LHC supplier chain. Thus, the SPL will have two main functions: Firstly, to provide H- beam for injection into the PS2 which is compatible with LHC luminosity. For this purpose the SPL will accelerate the output beam of LINAC4 from 1GeV to 4GeV,removing, at the same time, the necessity for PSB operation in the LHC supply chain. Secondly, it will provide an infrastructure upgradeable to meet the needs of all potential high-power proton users at CERN (EURISOL) and possibly neutrino production facilities. For high-power applications of this nature the SPL wi...

  4. Semi-analytical quasi-normal mode theory for the local density of states in coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mørk, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    We present and validate a semi-analytical quasi-normal mode (QNM) theory for the local density of states (LDOS) in coupled photonic crystal (PhC) cavity-waveguide structures. By means of an expansion of the Green's function on one or a few QNMs, a closed-form expression for the LDOS is obtained......-trivial spectrum with a peak and a dip is found, which is reproduced only when including both the two relevant QNMs in the theory. In both cases, we find relative errors below 1% in the bandwidth of interest....

  5. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, H; Jain, Puneet; Johnson, Elliott C; Xu, Wencan

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of the Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) cavity at superconducting temperature produced a long list of high order modes (HOMs). The niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated at each end with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to levels required to avoid beam break up (BBU) instabilities. However, a number of un-damped resonances with Q≥106 were found at 4 K and their mode identification forms the focus of this paper. The approach taken here consists of bead pulling on a copper (Cu) replica of the ERL cavity with dampers involving various network analyzer measurements. Several different S21 transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, others between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes, and also between probes placed into the cells. The bead pull technique suitable for HOM identification with a metallic needle or dielectric bead is detailed. This paper presents the...

  6. Beam Loss in Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Beam loss is a critical issue in high-intensity accelerators, and much effort is expended during both the design and operation phases to minimize the loss and to keep it to manageable levels. As new accelerators become ever more powerful, beam loss becomes even more critical. Linacs for H- ion beams, such as the one at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source, have many more loss mechanisms compared to H+ (proton) linacs, such as the one being designed for the European Spallation Neutron Source. Interesting H- beam loss mechanisms include residual gas stripping, H+ capture and acceleration, field stripping, black-body radiation and the recently discovered intra-beam stripping mechanism. Beam halo formation, and ion source or RF turn on/off transients, are examples of beam loss mechanisms that are common for both H+ and H- accelerators. Machine protection systems play an important role in limiting the beam loss.

  7. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang, Chuji

    2012-09-01

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 109 (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 106 (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 1012 (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min-1; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the detection limit to 131 ppb. These elements in lower

  8. Progress in the Development of the TOP Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Picardi, L

    2004-01-01

    The TOP Linac (Oncological Therapy with Protons), under development by ENEA and ISS is a sequence of three pulsed (5 msec, 300 Hz) linear accelerators: a 7 MeV, 425 MHz RFQ+DTL (AccSys Model PL-7), a 7–65 MeV, 2998 MHz Side Coupled Drift Tube Linac (SCDTL) and a 65–200 MeV, variable energy 2998 MHz Side Coupled Linac (SCL). The first SCDTL module is composed by 11 DTL tanks coupled by 10 side cavities. The tanks has modified to overcome vacuum leakage that occurred during brazing, and now the module has been completed, and is ready to be tested with protons. The 7 MeV injector has been recently installed in the ENEA Frascati laboratories for preliminary test, before being transferred to the main Oncologycal Hospital in Rome, Istituto Regina Elena.

  9. An overview of BARC-TIFR Pelletron-Linac Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    The 14UD Pelletron Accelerator at Mumbai has recently completed twenty five years of successful operation. The accelerator is primarily used for basic research in the fields of nuclear, atomic, condensed matter and material science. The superconducting Linac booster provides additional acceleration to the ions from Pelletron injector up to A~60 region with E~5 MeV/A. Further, an alternate injector system to the Superconducting LINAC booster is planned as an augmentation programme, comprising of a superconducting ECR ion source, room temperature RFQ and superconducting low-beta cavity resonators. This talk will provide an overview of the recent developmental activities carried out at the Pelletron Accelerator Facility, resulting in enhanced overall performance and uptime of the accelerator. The application oriented programs initiated at Pelletron Accelerator and the current status of the alternate injector system at the Pelletron-Linac facility will also be discussed. (author)

  10. An overview of BARC-TIFR pelletron linac facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    The 14UD Pelletron Accelerator at Mumbai has recently completed twenty five years of successful operation. The accelerator is primarily used for basic research in the fields of nuclear, atomic, condensed matter and material science. The superconducting Linac booster provides additional acceleration to the ions from Pelletron injector up to A∼60 region with E∼5 MeV/A. Further, an alternate injector system to the Superconducting LINAC booster is planned as an augmentation programme, comprising of a superconducting ECR ion source, room temperature RFQ and superconducting low-beta cavity resonators. This talk will provide an overview of the recent developmental activities carried out at the Pelletron Accelerator Facility, resulting in enhanced overall performance and uptime of the accelerator. The application oriented programs initiated at Pelletron Accelerator and the current status of the alternate injector system at the Pelletron-Linac facility will also be discussed. (author)

  11. Linacs for Medical Isotope Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pramudita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews efforts on using high energy (25-30 MeV and high power (10-20 kW electron linacs and lower energy (7 MeV proton linacs for medical radioisotope production. Using high energy x-rays from the electron linacs, PET (Positron Emission Tomography radioisotopes are produced through photonuclear reactions such as 19F(γ,n18F, which also allow production of other PET radionuclides 11C, 13N, and 15O. Other mostly used medical radionuclides 99mTc can also be obtained by using the electron linacs, through photofission or photonuclear reactions. Proton linacs for PET have also been recently developed and the product has been available in the market since 2005. The linacs have been tested for 18F production. As a proton accelerator, the target systems and nuclear reactions are similar to the ones used in PET cyclotrons

  12. New analytical calculations of the resonance modes in lens-shaped cavities: applications to the calculations of the energy levels and electronic wavefunctions in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even, J; Loualiche, S

    2003-01-01

    The problem of the energy levels and electronic wavefunctions in quantum dots is studied in the parabolic coordinates system. A conventional effective mass Hamiltonian is written. For an infinite potential barrier, it is related to the more general problem of finding the resonance modes in a cavity. The problem is found to be separable for a biconvex-shaped cavity or quantum dot with an infinite potential barrier. This first shape of quantum dot corresponds to the intersection of two orthogonal confocal parabolas. Then plano-convex lens-shaped cavities or quantum dots are studied. This problem is no more separable in the parabolic coordinates but using symmetry properties, we show that the exact solutions of the problem are simple combinations of the previous solutions. The same approach is used for spherical coordinates and hemispherical quantum dots. It is finally shown that convex lens-shaped quantum dots give a good description of self-organized InAs quantum dots grown on InP

  13. Statistical methods for transverse beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M

    2014-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) can be used to provide beam diagnostics. Here we focus on 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities. In particular we study dipole mode excitation and its application to beam position determinations. In order to extract beam position information, linear regression can be used. Due to a large number of sampling points in the waveforms, statistical methods are used to effectively reduce the dimension of the system, such as singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering. These are compared with the direct linear regression (DLR) on the entire waveforms. A cross-validation technique is used to study the sample independent precisions of the position predictions given by these three methods. A RMS prediction error in the beam position of approximately 50 micron can be achieved by DLR and SVD, while k-means clustering suggests 70 micron.

  14. Tunable waveguide and cavity in a phononic crystal plate by controlling whispering-gallery modes in hollow pillars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Yabin; Fernez, Nicolas; Pennec, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of a phononic crystal plate with hollow pillars and introduce the existence of whispering-gallery modes (WGMs). We show that by tuning the inner radius of the hollow pillar, these modes can merge inside both Bragg and low frequency band gaps, deserving phononic crystal...

  15. High-beta linac structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriber, S.O.

    1979-01-01

    Accelerating structures for high-beta linacs that have been and are in use are reviewed in terms of their performance. Particular emphasis is given to room-temperature structures and the disk-and-washer structure. The disk-and-washer structure has many attractive features that are discussed for pulsed high-gradient linacs, for 100% duty-cycle medium-gradient linacs and for high-current linacs requiring maximal amounts of stored energy in the electric fields available to the beam

  16. Superconducting heavy-ion linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    A summary is given of plans developed by four different groups for the construction of small superconducting linacs to boost the energy of heavy ions from existing tandem electrostatic accelerators. The projects considered are the linac under construction at Argonne and the design efforts at Karlsruhe, at Stanford, and by a Cal Tech-Stony Brook collaboration. The intended uses of the accelerator systems are stated. Beam dynamics of linacs formed of short independently-phased resonators are reviewed, and the implications for performance are discussed. The main parameters of the four linacs are compared, and a brief analysis of accelerating structures is given

  17. Design of high-energy high-current linac with focusing by superconducting solenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batskikh, G.I.; Belugin, V.M.; Bondarev, B.I. [Moscow Radiotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The advancement of MRTI design for 1.5 GeV and 250 mA ion CW linac was presented in a previous report. In this new linac version all the way from input to output the ions are focused by magnetic fields of superconducting solenoids. The ion limit current is far beyond the needed value. The linac focusing channel offers major advantages over the more conventional ones. The acceptance is 1.7 times as large for such focusing channel as for quadrupole one. Concurrently, a random perturbation sensitivity for such channel is one order of magnitude smaller than in quadrupole channel. These focusing channel features allow to decrease beam matched radius and increase a linac radiation purity without aperture growth. {open_quotes}Regotron{close_quotes} is used as high power generator in linac main part. But D&W cavities need not be divided into sections connected by RF-bridges which denuded them of high coupling factor.

  18. SRF and RF systems for LEReC Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fedotov, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McIntyre, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Polizzo, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Than, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tuozzolo, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Veshcherevich, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The Low Energy RHIC electron Cooling (LEReC) is under development at BNL to improve RHIC luminosity at low energies. It will consist of a short electron linac and two cooling sections, one for blue and one for yellow rings. For the first stage of the project, LEReC-I, we will install a 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity and three normal conducting cavities operating at 9 MHz, 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz. The SRF cavity will boost the electron beam energy up to 2 MeV. The warm cavities will be used to correct the energy spread introduced in the SRF cavity. The paper describes layouts of the SRF and RF systems, their parameters and status.

  19. Comparison of symmetric and asymmetric double quantum well extended-cavity diode lasers for broadband passive mode-locking at 780  nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Heike; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V; Wenzel, Hans; Bugge, Frank; Weyers, Markus; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Tränkle, Günther

    2017-07-01

    We present a compact, mode-locked diode laser system designed to emit a frequency comb in the wavelength range around 780 nm. We compare the mode-locking performance of symmetric and asymmetric double quantum well ridge-waveguide diode laser chips in an extended-cavity diode laser configuration. By reverse biasing a short section of the diode laser chip, passive mode-locking at 3.4 GHz is achieved. Employing an asymmetric double quantum well allows for generation of a mode-locked optical spectrum spanning more than 15 nm (full width at -20  dB) while the symmetric double quantum well device only provides a bandwidth of ∼2.7  nm (full width at -20  dB). Analysis of the RF noise characteristics of the pulse repetition rate shows an RF linewidth of about 7 kHz (full width at half-maximum) and of at most 530 Hz (full width at half-maximum) for the asymmetric and symmetric double quantum well devices, respectively. Investigation of the frequency noise power spectral density at the pulse repetition rate shows a white noise floor of approximately 2100  Hz 2 /Hz and of at most 170  Hz 2 /Hz for the diode laser employing the asymmetric and symmetric double quantum well structures, respectively. The pulse width is less than 10 ps for both devices.

  20. Cavity mode enhancement of terahertz emission from equilateral triangular microstrip antennas of the high-Tcsuperconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 + δ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerkoney, Daniel P; Reid, Candy; Doty, Constance M; Gramajo, Ashley; Campbell, Tyler D; Morales, Manuel A; Delfanazari, Kaveh; Tsujimoto, Manabu; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Yamamoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Chiharu; Minami, Hidetoshi; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Klemm, Richard A

    2017-01-11

    We study the transverse magnetic (TM) electromagnetic cavity mode wave functions for an ideal equilateral triangular microstrip antenna (MSA) exhibiting C 3v point group symmetry. When the C 3v operations are imposed upon the antenna, the TM(m,n) modes with wave vectors [Formula: see text] are much less dense than commonly thought. The R 3 operations restrict the integral n and m to satisfy [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] for the modes even and odd under reflections about the three mirror planes, respectively. We calculate the forms of representative wave functions and the angular dependence of the output power when these modes are excited by the uniform and non-uniform ac Josephson current sources in thin, ideally equilateral triangular MSAs employing the intrinsic Josephson junctions in the high transition temperature T c superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 [Formula: see text], and fit the emissions data from an earlier sample for which the C 3v symmetry was apparently broken.

  1. Mechanical Engineering of the Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, N.K.; Chen, Z.; Collier, M.; Erickson, J.L.; Guthrie, A.; Hunter, W.T.; Ilg, T.; Meyer, R.K.; Snodgrass, N.L.

    1999-01-01

    The linac for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project will accelerate an average current of 1 mA of H - ions from 20 MeV to 1GeV for injection into an accumulator ring. The linac will be an intense source of H - ions and as such requires advanced design techniques to meet project technical goals as well as to minimize costs. The DTL, CCDTL and CCL are 466m long and operate at 805 MHz with a maximum H - input current of 28 mA and 7% rf duty factor. The Drift Tube Linac is a copper-plated steel structure using permanent magnetic quadrupoles. The Coupled-Cavity portions are brazed copper structures and use electromagnetic quads. RF losses in the copper are 80 MW, with total rf power supplied by 52 klystrons. Additionally, the linac is to be upgraded to the 2- and 4-MW beam power levels with no increase in duty factor. The authors give an overview of the linac mechanical engineering effort and discuss the special challenges and status of the effort

  2. General expressions for the coupling coefficient, quality and filling factors for a cavity with an insert using energy coupled mode theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaggar, Sameh Y; Tervo, Richard; Mattar, Saba M

    2014-05-01

    A cavity (CV) with a dielectric resonator (DR) insert forms an excellent probe for the use in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers. The probe's coupling coefficient, κ, the quality factor, Q, and the filling factor, η are vital in assessing the EPR spectrometer's performance. Coupled mode theory (CMT) is used to derive general expressions for these parameters. For large permittivity the dominating factor in κ is the ratio of the DR and CV cross sectional areas rather than the dielectric constant. Thus in some cases, resonators with low dielectric constant can couple much stronger with the cavity than do resonators with a high dielectric constant. When the DR and CV frequencies are degenerate, the coupled η is the average of the two uncoupled ones. In practical EPR probes the coupled η is approximately half of that of the DR. The Q of the coupled system generally depends on the eigenvectors, uncoupled frequencies (ω1,ω2) and the individual quality factors (Q1,Q2). It is calculated for different probe configurations and found to agree with the corresponding HFSS® simulations. Provided there is a large difference between the Q1, Q2 pair and the frequencies of DR and CV are degenerate, Q is approximately equal to double the minimum of Q1 and Q2. In general, the signal enhancement ratio, Iwithinsert/Iempty, is obtained from Q and η. For low loss DRs it only depends on η1/η2. However, when the DR has a low Q, the uncoupled Qs are also needed. In EPR spectroscopy it is desirable to excite only a single mode. The separation between the modes, Φ, is calculated as a function of κ and Q. It is found to be significantly greater than five times the average bandwidth. Thus for practical probes, it is possible to excite one of the coupled modes without exciting the other. The CMT expressions derived in this article are quite general and are in excellent agreement with the lumped circuit approach and finite numerical simulations. Hence they can also be

  3. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, G.; Kneisel, P.; Brawley, J.; Bundy, R.; Campisi, I.; Davis, K.; Macha, K.; Machie, D.; Mammosser, J.; Morgan, S.; Sundelin, R.; Turlington, L.; Wilson, K.; Doleans, M.; Kim, S.H.; Barni, D.; Pagani, C.; Pierini, P.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, R.; Schrage, D.; Parodi, R.; Sekutowicz, J.; Ylae-Oijala, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 192 MeV to 1000 MeV, operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical beta - values of beta= 0.61 and beta= 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jlab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four beta= 0.61 cavities and two beta= 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four beta= 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the beta=0.61 cavity and the beta= 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: E acc = 1 0.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10 9 at 2.1K for beta= 0.61 and E acc = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10 9 at 2.1K for beta= 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning will be done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper will describe the cavity design with respect to electrical and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop

  4. Energy Recovery Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolitsa Merminga

    2007-06-01

    The success and continuing progress of the three operating FELs based on Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), the Jefferson Lab IR FEL Upgrade, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) FEL, and the Novosibirsk High Power THz FEL, have inspired multiple future applications of ERLs, which include higher power FELs, synchrotron radiation sources, electron cooling devices, and high luminosity electron-ion colliders. The benefits of using ERLs for these applications are presented. The key accelerator physics and technology challenges of realizing future ERL designs, and recent developments towards resolving these challenges are reviewed.

  5. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  6. NPL superconducting Linac control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, H.E.; Howe, M.A.; Jackson, L.W.; LaCroix, J.M.; Readdy, H.P.; Storm, D.W.; Van Houten, L.P.

    1985-01-01

    The control system for the NPL Linac is based on a Microvax II host computer connected in a star network with 9 satellite computers. These satellites use single board varsions of DEC's PDP 11 processor. The operator's console uses high performance graphics and touch screen technology to display the current linac status and as the means for interactively controlling the operation of the accelerator

  7. Linac4 Technical Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaudon, L; Baylac, M; Bellodi, G; Body, Y; Borburgh, J; Bourquin, P; Broere, J; Brunner, O; Bruno, L; Carli, C; Caspers, Friedhelm; Cousineau, S M; Cuvet, Y; De Almeida Martins, C; Dobers, T; Fowler, T; Garoby, R; Gerigk, F; Goddard, B; Hanke, K; Hori, M; Jones, M; Kahle, K; Kalbreier, Willi; Kroyer, T; Küchler, D; Lombardi, A M; López-Hernandez, L A; Magistris, M; Martini, M; Maury, S; Page, E; Paoluzzi, M; Pasini, M; Raich, U; Rossi, C; Royer, J P; Sargsyan, E; Serrano, J; Scrivens, R; Silari, M; Timmins, M; Venturini-Delsolaro, W; Vretenar, M; Wegner, R; Weterings, W; Zickler, T

    2006-01-01

    Linac4 is an H- linear accelerator, intended to replace Linac2 as injector to the PS Booster (PSB). By delivering to the PSB a beam at 160 MeV energy, Linac4 will provide the conditions to double the brightness and intensity of the beam from the PSB, thus removing the first bottleneck towards higher brightness for the LHC and simplifying operation. Moreover, this new linac constitutes an essential component of any of the envisaged LHC upgrade scenarios and could open the way to future extensions of the CERN accelerator complex towards higher performance. This Technical Design Report presents a detailed technical overview of the Linac4 design as it stands at end 2006.

  8. Design and Construction of the Linac4 Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F; Dallocchio, A; Favre, G; Vretenar, M; Wegner, R; Tirado, P Ugena; Rossi, C; Riffaud, B; Ramberger, S; Polini, M; Gentini, L; Geisser, JM; Giguet, JM; Mathot, S; Naumenko, M; Kendjebulatov, E; Tribendis, A; Kryuchkov, Ya

    2013-01-01

    The Linac4 project at CERN is at an advanced state of construction. Prototypes and/or operational modules of the different types of accelerating structures (RFQ, buncher, DTL, CCDTL, and PIMS) have been built and are presently tested. This paper gives the status of the cavity production and reviews the RF and mechanical design of the various structure types. Furthermore the production experience and the first test results shall be presented.

  9. Diagnostics for the 400 MeV FNAL Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrory, E.S.; Lee, G.

    1991-02-01

    The last four 201 MHz alvarez tanks of the twenty-year-old, 200 MeV Fermilab Linac are being replaced by seven high-gradient (7 KV/m), high-frequency (805 MHz) side-coupled-cavity structures to produce a 400 MeV beam for injection into the Booster. Good, reliable beam diagnostics are an important factor in the success of this project. This paper discusses the diagnostic systems

  10. Release the beams! - Linac4 ready to hit the 50 MeV mark

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The Linac4 accelerator is now prepared to reach 50 MeV. This milestone energy - expected in the coming weeks - will allow the machine to act as a replacement for the ageing Linac2, four years before it takes over at the head of the accelerator chain in 2020.    Inside the Linac4 tunnel, the final DTL cavities will guide beams to 50 MeV.  (Image: Stephan Russenschuck.) The Linac4 accelerator will bring H- ion beams (hydrogen atoms with an extra electron) up to 160 MeV for injection into the PS Booster. As a key part of the LHC injector upgrade programme, Linac4 will allow the PS Booster to double its beam brightness, which will contribute to increasing the LHC’s luminosity. Linac4 will soon bring beams up to 50 MeV - the current energy delivered by the Linac2 accelerator. This milestone follows on from another recent accomplishment: the installation and commissioning of the final Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tank. Using an innovati...

  11. Phase transitions and Heisenberg limited metrology in an Ising chain interacting with a single-mode cavity field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Mølmer, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    to determine the complete phase diagram of the system. The analysis reveals both first- and second-order Dicke phase transitions into a super-radiant state, and the cavity mean field in this regime acts as an effective magnetic field, which restricts the Ising chain dynamics to parameter ranges away from......We investigate the thermodynamics of a combined Dicke and Ising model that exhibits a rich phenomenology arising from the second-order and quantum phase transitions from the respective models. The partition function is calculated using mean-field theory, and the free energy is analyzed in detail...... the Ising phase transition. Physical systems with first-order phase transitions are natural candidates for metrology and calibration purposes, and we apply filter theory to show that the sensitivity of the physical system to temperature and external fields reaches the 1/N Heisenberg limit....

  12. ANU LINAC upgrade using multi-stub resonators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    drift space between the two legs of the LINAC. 3. Progress in multi-stub resonators modeling. 3.1 Two-stub resonator – mode splitting and tuning. The half wave resonator structure is inspired by the Delayen design [6]. It can be also thought of as a straight inductor version of an SLR (figure 2). The center column has a. 822.

  13. Event Registration System for INR Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grekhov, O.V.; Drugakov, A.N.; Kiselev, Yu.V.

    2006-01-01

    The software of the Event registration system for the linear accelerators is described. This system allows receiving of the information on changes of operating modes of the accelerator and supervising of hundreds of key parameters of various systems of the accelerator. The Event registration system consists of the source and listeners of events. The sources of events are subroutines built in existing ACS Linac. The listeners of events are software Supervisor and Client ERS. They are used for warning the operator about change controlled parameter of the accelerator

  14. High-pulse energy-stabilized passively mode-locked external cavity inverse bow-tie 980nm laser diode for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowski, M.; Resneau, P.; Garcia, M.; Vinet, E.; Robert, Y.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Gerard, B.; Kundermann, S.; Torcheboeuf, N.; Boiko, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    We report on multi-section inverse bow-tie laser producing mode-locked pulses of 90 pJ energy and 6.5 ps width (895 fs after compression) at 1.3 GHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and consuming 2.9 W of electric power. The laser operates in an 80 mm long external cavity. By translation of the output coupling mirror, the PRF was continuously tuned over 37 MHz range without additional adjustments. Active stabilization with a phase lock loop actuating on the driving current has allowed us to reach the PRF relative stability at a 2·10-10 level on 10 s intervals, as required by the European Space Agency (ESA) for inter-satellite long distance measurements.

  15. Investigation of single-mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with graphene-bubble dielectric DBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Baolu; Li, Pengtao; Arafin, Shamsul; Alaskar, Yazeed; Wang, Kang L.

    2018-02-01

    An inter-cavty contact single mode 850 nm VCSEL was fabricated with a graphene assisted self-assembly curved dielectric bubble Bragg mirror for the first time. Taking the advantage of graphene's uniform low surface energy, the low cost dielectric bubble DBR (Si3N4/SiO2) was deposited on top of the graphene/half-VCSEL structure via van der Waals Force (vdWF) without using any additional spacing elements and sacrificial layer release-etch process. The continuous-wave operating VCSELs with an aperture diameter of 7 μm exhibit single-mode output power of more than 1 mW with a slope efficiency of 0.2 W/A. The sidemode suppression ratios are >40 dB. This novel modification into the lasers can also be applied to a variety of other optoelectronic devices, such as resonance photodetecter and super narrow linewidth VCSEL.

  16. The KAERI 10 MeV Electron Linac - Description and Operational Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Cheol; Park, Seong Hee; Jung, Young Uk; Han, Young Hwan; Kang, Hee Young

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this technical report is to guide the right operation and maintenance of the KAERI electron linac system. The KAERI electron linac system consists of 2 MeV injector based on 176 MHz Normal conducting RF (Radio Frequency)cavity and 10 MeV main accelerator based on 352 MHz Superconducting RF cavity, electron beamlines (injection and extraction). Since a electron accelerator generates hazard radiation, this system is located at the shielded room in basement and we can operate the system using the remote control system. It includes the description and the operational manual as well as the detailed technical direction for trouble shooting

  17. The KAERI 10 MeV Electron Linac - Description and Operational Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Cheol; Park, Seong Hee; Jung, Young Uk; Han, Young Hwan; Kang, Hee Young

    2005-06-15

    The objective of this technical report is to guide the right operation and maintenance of the KAERI electron linac system. The KAERI electron linac system consists of 2 MeV injector based on 176 MHz Normal conducting RF (Radio Frequency)cavity and 10 MeV main accelerator based on 352 MHz Superconducting RF cavity, electron beamlines (injection and extraction). Since a electron accelerator generates hazard radiation, this system is located at the shielded room in basement and we can operate the system using the remote control system. It includes the description and the operational manual as well as the detailed technical direction for trouble shooting.

  18. Approach of a failure analysis for the MYRRHA linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro, J.P.; Medeiros-Romao, L.; Salemne, R.; Vandeplassche, D.; Biarotte, J.L.; Bouly, F.; Uriot, D.

    2015-01-01

    The MYRRHA project currently under development at SCK-CEN (Mol, Belgium) is a subcritical research reactor that requires a 600 MeV proton accelerator as a driver. This linac is expected to produce a beam power of 1.5 MW onto a spallation target for the reactor to deliver a thermal power around 70 MW. Thermomechanical considerations of the spallation target set stringent requirements on the beam trip rate which should not exceed 40 trips/year for interruptions longer than three seconds. The 3 underlying principles in the design of the MYRRHA linac are elements redundancy (like the dual-injector), elements operation at de-rated values (like cavities operating at about 30% from their nominal operating points) and the fault tolerance concept, which allows the failure of a beamline component to be compensated by its neighbouring elements. Studies presented in this document show that in the event of a failure of the first cryo-module or the first quadrupole doublet the linac can resume nominal operation with a re-matched lattice. Since the fault tolerance procedure is expected to work more efficiently at higher energies (due to lower space charge effects) we can extrapolate from our studies that the MYRRHA linac is expected to operate with the failure of any cryo-module or quadrupole doublet in the main linac. A virtual accelerator-based control system is mandatory for the operation of the MYRRHA linac to ensure the very fast implementation (<3 seconds) of the fault tolerance procedure. The virtual accelerator uses a beam dynamics code (like TRACEWIN or TRACK) to compute the model of the real accelerator in operation and interacts with this later through the accelerator control command

  19. Review of superconducting ion linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of the technology of superconducting (SC) linacs designed for the acceleration of ions. The emphasis is on the technical issues involved, with only brief descriptions of the numerous linacs now in operation or under construction. Recent developments of special interest are treated in more detail, and remaining technical challenges are outlined. The technology required for the acceleration of ions with velocity β=1 is not discussed because it is almost the same as for relativistic electrons. That is, this paper is mainly about SC linacs for low-velocity heavy ions

  20. Low-charge-state linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kim, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    A design is being developed for a low-charge-state linac suitable for injecting ATLAS with a low-charge-state, radioactive beam. Initial work indicates that the existing ATLAS interdigital superconducting accelerating structures, together with the superconducting quadrupole transverse focussing element discussed above, provides a basis for a high-performance low-charge-state linac. The initial 2 or 3 MV of such a linac could be based on a normally-conducting, low-frequency RFQ, possibly combined with 24-MHz superconducting interdigital structures. Beam dynamics studies of the whole low-charge-state post-accelerator section were carried out in early FY 1995.

  1. Modeling the electromagnetic cavity mode contributions to the THz emission from triangular Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} mesas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, Richard A., E-mail: klemm@physics.ucf.edu [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Delfanazari, Kaveh; Tsujimoto, Manabu; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Kitamura, Takeo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sawamura, Masashi; Ishida, Kazuya [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi Center Building, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); WPI-MANA, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Hattori, Toshiaki [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi Center Building, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kadowaki, Kazuo [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi Center Building, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); WPI-MANA, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► New wave functions for the equilateral triangular patch antenna found. ► Most general wave functions for the equilateral patch antenna found. ► Accurate eigenvalues and wave functions for highly acute isosceles triangular patch antennas found. -- Abstract: In order to understand the radiation observed from the intrinsic Josephson junctions in triangular Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} mesas, we calculate the transverse magnetic (TM) electromagnetic modes for thin equilateral cavities. A new set of distinct but degenerate TM modes coexists with the known modes of Helszajn and James, but are expected to lead to distinct radiation angular distribution patterns. Although we have been unable to solve for the exact TM modes of a thin cavity of general acute isosceles triangular shape, we solved exactly the closely related problems of the TM cavity modes of two thin circumscribing “pie-shaped” wedges, which provide highly accurate approximations to very acute isosceles triangular cavities.

  2. A Study of Beam Position Diagnostics with Beam-excited Dipole Higher Order Modes using a Downconverter Test Electronics in Third Harmonic 3.9 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P. [Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Baboi, N. [DESY; Eddy, N. [Fermilab; Fellenz, B. [Fermilab; Jones, R. M. [Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Lorbeer, B. [DESY; Wamsat, T. [DESY; Wendt, M. [Fermilab

    2012-08-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to define a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 {\\mu}m accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth dipole band, and a global resolution of 20 {\\mu}m over the complete module. Based on these results we decided to build a HOM electronics for the second dipole band and the fifth dipole band, so that we will have both high resolution measurements for the whole module, and localized measurements for individual cavity. The prototype electronics is being built by Fermilab and planned to be tested in FLASH by the end of 2012.

  3. A study of beam position diagnostics with beam-excited dipole higher order modes using a downconverter test electronics in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, N.; Lorbeer, B.; Wamsat, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Jones, R.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to de ne a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 m accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth dipole band, and a global resolution of 20 m over the complete module. Based on these results we decided to build a HOM electronics for the second dipole band and the fifth dipole band, so that we will have both high resolution measurements for the whole module, and localized measurements for individual cavity. The prototype electronics is being built by Fermilab and planned to be tested in FLASH by the end of 2012.

  4. Energy Recovery Linacs

    CERN Document Server

    Merminga, L

    2005-01-01

    Successfully operating, pioneering Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) – based Free Electron Lasers (FELs) have paved the way towards powerful and highly efficient accelerators based on the principle of energy recovery. Pursued and envisioned ERL applications worldwide include high brilliance light sources for the production of both spontaneous and FEL radiation, high-energy electron cooling devices, and electron-ion colliders. The required electron source parameters, average beam current and beam energy of the proposed applications are a significant extrapolation from demonstrated performance. We present an overview of the accelerator physics and technology challenges encountered in the design of the various ERL projects around the world, as well as progress and development plans to achieving the required performance.

  5. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2011-04-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  6. A hot-spare injector for the APS linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewellen, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    Last year a second-generation SSRL-type thermionic cathode rf gun was installed in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac. This gun (referred to as ''gun2'') has been successfully commissioned and now serves as the main injector for the APS linac, essentially replacing the Koontz-type DC gun. To help ensure injector availability, particularly with the advent of top-up mode operation at the APS, a second thermionic-cathode rf gun will be installed in the APS linac to act as a hot-spare beam source. The hot-spare installation includes several unique design features, including a deep-orbit Panofsky-style alpha magnet. Details of the hot-spare beamline design and projected performance are presented, along with some plans for future performance upgrades

  7. Commissioning plans for SSC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurd, J.W.; Aprile, R.L.; Chang, C.R.; Crist, C.E.; Cutler, R.I.; Funk, L.W.; Guy, F.W.; Leifeste, G.T.; Raparia, D.; Saadatmand, K.; Sethi, R.C.; Swenson, D.A.; Tooker, J.; Yao, C.G.

    1992-01-01

    Presented are the general description of the SSC linac and the plans for commissioning. Sections of the linac are installed, tested, and beam commissioned in a serial approach. A specialized set of diagnostics is used to characterize the beam through each section. In addition to the standard diagnostic set, plans call for the use of a bunch shape monitor and x-ray spectrometer. Streak camera and digital imaging diagnostics will be developed. The commissioning plan is folded into the general linac project schedule to show the relation between delivery, staging, installation, conditioning, and actual commissioning with beam. These plans form the basis for coordination between the various organizations responsible for different elements of the linac including the technical components, infrastructure, and temporary staging and operation facilities. (Author) 2 figs., 17 refs

  8. Installation of the Gbar LINAC

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien, Brice

    2017-01-01

    Installation of the GBAR linac in its shielding bunker. The electrons accelerated to 10 MeV toward a target will produce the positrons that are necessary to form anti hydrogen with the antiprotons coming from the ELENA decelerator.

  9. Drift tubes of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1977-01-01

    Being redied for installation, those at the right are for tank 1, those on the left for tank 2. Contrary to Linac 1, which had drift-tubes supported on stems, here the tubes are suspended, for better mechanical stability.

  10. Superconducting linacs used with tandems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1984-01-01

    The main features of superconducting linacs used as post-accelerators of tandems are reviewed. Various aspects of resonators, cryogenics and electronics are discussed, and recent advances in the field are presented. (orig.)

  11. Design of a side coupled standing wave accelerating tube for NSTRI e-Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, S.; Abbasi Davani, F.; Lamehi Rachti, M.; Ghasemi, F.

    2017-09-01

    The design and construction of a 6 MeV electron linear accelerator (e-Linac) was defined in the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (NSTRI) for cargo inspection and medical applications. For this accelerator, a side coupled standing wave tube resonant at a frequency of 2998.5 MHZ in π/2 mode was selected. In this article, the authors provide a step-by-step explanation of the process of the design for this tube. The design and simulation of the accelerating and coupling cavities were carried out in five steps; (1) separate design of the accelerating and coupling cavities, (2) design of the coupling aperture between the cavities, (3) design of the entire structure for resonance at the nominal frequency, (4) design of the buncher, and (5) design of the power coupling port. At all design stages, in addition to finding the dimensions of the cavity, the impact of construction tolerances and simulation errors on the electromagnetic parameters were investigated. The values obtained for the coupling coefficient, coupling constant, quality factor and capture efficiency are 2.11, 0.011, 16203 and 36%, respectively. The results of beam dynamics study of the simulated tube in ASTRA have yielded a value of 5.14 π-mm-mrad for the horizontal emittance, 5.06 π-mm-mrad for the vertical emittance, 1.17 mm for the horizontal beam size, 1.16 mm for the vertical beam size and 1090 keV for the energy spread of the output beam.

  12. A variational computation for coved cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Weimin; Zhou Wenzhen

    1992-01-01

    In order to improve the beam quality and reduce the beam breakup and wake effects caused by the high beam current in electron linac, the coved cavity with big beam hole is used in the world. A variational method is used, and the results are similar to that of Boeing Company

  13. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Cullinan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC requires beam position monitors (BPMs with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3 at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2/3  ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  14. Testing begins on Linac4

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    On 3 August 2012, the Linac4 radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) module was installed at the accelerator test-stand in Building 152. The site will be the module’s home for almost a year, as the linear accelerator enters the assembly and testing stage.   Final module assembly is carried out before installation in Building 152.  Over the next Long Shutdown (LS2), Linac4 will replace the current Linac2 linear accelerator as the first link in CERN’s accelerator chain. It will deliver particles at 160 MeV to the PS Booster, more than triple the energy currently delivered by Linac2. But before the accelerator team can pop the champagne, the various elements of Linac4 will be tested and re-tested in facilities across CERN. “The first Linac4 tests are currently underway, starting with the CERN-built RFQ,” says Carlo Rossi, a physicist in the RF Group of the Beams (BE) Department and the RFQ project coordinator. “It’s an extremely impre...

  15. Inner structure of Linac 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    With the advent of the 800 MeV Booster in 1972, the original injector of the PS, a 50 MeV Alvarez-type proton linac, had reached its limits, in terms of intensity and stability. In 1973 one therefore decided to build a new linac (Linac 2), also with a drift-tube Alvarez structure and an energy of 50 MeV. It had a new Cockcroft-Walton preinjector with 750 keV, instead of the previous one with 500 keV. Linac 2 was put into service in 1980. The old Linac 1 was then used for the study of, and later operation with, various types of ions. This picture shows the inner structure of Linac 2, with drift-tubes hanging on stems under a rigid support structure, soon to be mounted inside tank 1 (750 keV to 10 MeV, the lowest-energy one of 3). Frank Malthouse is standing in the background.

  16. Transverse deflections in a cavity due to the short-range longitudinal wake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K

    2003-01-01

    Consider an ultra-relativistic electron bunch passing through a (cylindrically symmetric) multi-cell linac cavity that is filled with fundamental mode rf. It is well known that this bunch--on entering the cavity--experiences a focusing kick, and--on exiting the cavity--a defocusing kick, even though the mode is cylindrically symmetric. The effects of these kicks in linacs tend to be significant only in low energy regions. Tracking computer programs such as MAD [1] and LIAR [2] include a simple model of these kicks, one based on calculations of W.H. Panofsky [3]. According to this model the effect is represented by two thin lenses positioned at the ends of the cavity, with the strength of the lenses dependent on the accelerating gradient in the cavity. However, a beam will itself excite wakefields that modify its energy gain in a cavity, a modification that depends also on longitudinal position within the bunch. The program LIAR extends Panofsky's rf kick model to include this modification to the effective gradient experienced by different parts of the beam. In this report we investigate how the wakefields affect the rf cavity kicks. In particular, we are interested in the case when the wakefields are a significant perturbation to the problem, such as when, for example, the beam traverses an empty cavity (one with no rf). In this report we have shown that one can calculate the transverse kicks when one knows the time-dependent variation of the longitudinal wake forces on axis. The variation in gradient due to wakefields, however, will in general differ from that due to normal rf acceleration. In particular, transients at the ends of structures, and--for constant gradient structures--an increase in gradient amplitude from beginning to end of the cavity, will mean that the model of focusing/defocusing edges, used for rf acceleration, will be inaccurate. Finally, we conclude that the method LIAR uses to treat the effect of rf focusing in the presence of wakefields on

  17. Mechanical design and fabrication of power feed cavity test setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Dhavle, A.S.; Sharma, Vijay; Sarkar, Shreya; Kumar, Mahendra; Nayak, Susanta; Barnwal, Rajesh; Jayaprakash, D.; Mondal, J.; Nimje, V.T.; Mittal, K.C.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Power feed cavity set up consists of nine number of accelerating cavity and eight numbers of coupling cavity for testing of power feed cavity with coupling flange for 2856 MHz S band standing wave coupled cavity linac. When we are assembling the cavity and applying the pressure, its resonance frequency changes with applied pressure/load. After some critical pressure/load frequency change becomes negligible or zero. This set up will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. Top four cavity or eight half cells as well as bottom four cavity or eight half cells will be brazed separately. Power feed cavity will be sandwiched between this two brazed cavity assemblies. This paper discuss about linear motion bush, linear motion rod, load cell, hydraulic actuator, power pack, stepper motor PLC control, jig boring, alignment, tolerances and assembly procedure for this test setup. (author)

  18. Study on the multi-pass, multi-bunch beam breakup for 9-cell TESLA cavities in ERL

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Si; Huang, Sen-Lin; Li, Yong-Ming; Feng, Li-Wen; Zhu, Feng; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Liu, Ke-Xin; Chen, Jia-Er

    2013-01-01

    Generally, Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) needs special designed high current superconducting RF cavities. In this paper, the threshold current of BBU for compact ERL facilities with 9-cell Tesla type cavities are investigated. The results show that it is feasible to adopt 9-cell Tesla cavity for compact ERL test facilities with just a few cavities and beam current around tens mA.

  19. Design and development of R.F. LINAC accelerator components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhay Kumar; Guha, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Jawale, S.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radio frequency linear accelerator, a high power electron LINAC technology, is being developed at BARC. These accelerators are considered to be the most compact and effective for a given power capacity. Important application areas of this LINAC include medical sterilization, food preservation, pollution control, semiconductor industries, radiation therapy and material science. Center for Design and Manufacture (CDM), BARC has been entrusted with the design, development and manufacturing of various mechanical components of the accelerator. Most critical and precision components out of them are Diagnostic chamber, Faraday cup, Drift tube and R.F. cavities. This paper deals with the design aspects in respect of Ultra high vacuum compatibility and the mechanism of operation. Also this paper discusses the state-of-art technology for machining of intricate contour using specially designed poly crystalline diamond tool and the inspection methodology developed to minimize the measurement errors on the machined contour. Silver brazing technique employed to join the LINAC cavities is also described in detail

  20. Design considerations for a superconducting linac as an option for the ESS

    CERN Document Server

    Bräutigam, W F; Schug, G; Zaplatin, E N; Meads, P F; Senichev, Yu V

    1999-01-01

    An approach for a superconducting high-current proton linac for the ESS has been discussed as an option in the "Proposal for a Next Generation Neutron Source for Europe-the European Spallation Source (ESS)". The following work studies the technical and economic conditions for a superconducting linac at the high-energy end of the proposed accelerator system. The use of superconducting elliptical cavities for the acceleration of high-energetic particles beta =v/c-1 is certainly state of the art. This is documented by many activities (TJNAF, TESLA, LEP, LHC, and KEK). A design study for the cavities is described in another paper on this conference. For low energy particles ( beta <<1) quarter wave type cavities and spoke-type cavities have been discussed. The main motivation for this study is the expectation of significant cost reduction in terms of operational and possibly investment cost. (5 refs).

  1. Conceptual study of high power proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Ouyang Hua Fu; Xu Tao Guang

    2001-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. The ADS accelerator presented by the consists of a 5 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole, a 100 MeV independently phased superconducting cavity linac and a 1 GeV elliptical superconducting cavity linac. The accelerating structures and main parameters are determined and the research and development plan is considered

  2. A new chopper system with low emittance growth for PNC high power CW linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.L.; Toyama, S.; Emoto, T.; Nomura, M.; Sato, I.

    1994-01-01

    A new chopper system is developed for PNC high power CW linac. It has low emittance growth. There is only one RF cavity in the chopper system. When the beam passes through the cavity, there is no field for the part of the beam which will pass through the chopper slit; but there is a deflecting magnetic field for the remainder part of the beam which will be stopped at the chopper slit. (author)

  3. Investigation of alternating-phase focusing for superconducting linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagalovsky, L.; Delayen, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes a new model of alternating-phase focusing (APF) dynamics applicable to ion linacs with short independently controlled superconducting cavities. The equations of motion are derived for a cylindrically symmetric electric field represented by a traveling wave with continuous periodic phase modulation. Solutions are obtained and analyzed for both the linear and nonlinear particle motion. Problems of linear stability and overall longitudinal acceptance are solved using standard mathematical techniques for periodic systems; analytical results are obtained. It is shown that the main beam dynamical aspects of APF are adequately described by four parameters; equilibrium synchronous phase, phase modulation amplitude, length of APF period, and incremental energy gain. The model can be applied to study the feasibility of realizing APF in a low-β section of a proton linac. (author). 9 refs., 3 figs

  4. Minimizing Energy Spread In The REX/HIE-ISOLDE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Yucemoz, Mert

    2017-01-01

    This report tries to minimize the energy spread of the beam at the end of the REX-HIE-ISOLDE Linac using the last RF cavity as a buncher. Beams with very low energy spread are often required by the users of the facility In addition, one of the main reason to have minimum energy spread in longitudinal phase space is that higher beam energy spread translates in to a position spread after interacting with target. This causes an overlap in the position of different particles that makes it difficult to distinguish them. Hence, in order to find the operation settings for minimum energy spread at the end of the REX-HIE-ISOLDE linac and to inspect the ongoing physics, several functions on Matlab were created that runs beam dynamics program called “TRACKV39” that provides some graphs and values as a result for analysis.

  5. Control system by the technological electron Linac KUT-20

    CERN Document Server

    Akchurin, Y I; Gurin, V A; Demidov, N V

    2001-01-01

    The high-power technological electron linac KUT-20 was developed at the Science Research Complex 'Accelerator' of NSC KIPT. The linac consists of two 1.2 m length accelerating structures with a variable geometry and an injector. The latter comprises a diode electron gun,a klystron type buncher and an accelerating cavity.With a RF supply power at accelerating structure entries of 11 MW and with a current at the accelerator exit of 1A,the beam energy will be up to 20 MeV.An average beam power is planned to be 20 kW.All systems of the accelerator are controlled by a computerised control system. The program and technical complex consist of PC equipped with fast ADC control console, synchronization unit, microprocessor-operated complexes.

  6. Physics design of a CW high-power proton Linac for accelerator ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [7] T P Wangler, Principles of RF linear accelerators (John Wiley & Sons Inc., 1998). [8] K Shepard et al, Proceedings of the XIX International Linac Conference (Chicago, Illinois) p. 956. [9] C Pagani et al, Design criteria for elliptical cavities, SRF, 2001. [10] P Singh, S V L S Rao, Rajni Pande, T Basak, Shweta Roy, M Aslam, ...

  7. Tailoring surface plasmon resonance and dipole cavity plasmon modes of scattering cross section spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Lim, Chee Ming; Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Yoong, Voo Nyuk; Lee, Chuanyo; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-01-01

    Tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and dipole cavity plasmon modes of the scattering cross section (SCS) spectra on the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod have been numerically investigated by using the finite element method. Various effects, such as the influence of SCS spectra under x- and y-polarizations on the surface of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod, are discussed in detail. With the single gold-shell nanorod, one can independently tune the relative SCS spectrum width by controlling the rod length and rod diameter, and the surface scattering by varying the shell thickness and polarization direction, as well as the dipole peak energy. These behaviors are consistent with the properties of localized SPRs and offer a way to optically control and produce selected emission wavelengths from the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod. The electric field and magnetic distributions provide us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the single solid-gold/gold-shell nanorod on plasmon resonance.

  8. Improved performance of the control scheme for IUAC superconducting Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, B.K.; Suman, S.K.; Kumar, R.

    2015-01-01

    Since many years energized ion beams from linac are being delivered routinely for scheduled experiments using all the three accelerating modules of linac along with super buncher and rebuncher. Major efforts are dedicated to improve the performance of the control scheme to minimise the down time of the linac during operation. Earlier, a number of developments were carried out to improve the dynamics of the control scheme. The most significant of them is the piezoelectric actuator based tuning mechanism which is implemented in all the operational resonators of second and third accelerating modules of superconducting linac. This has helped us to bridge the gap between the accelerating fields achieved during Q measurement at 6 W of helium power and during phase locking of the resonator during beam operation at a given RF power (∼120W). The piezoelectric actuator based tuner is also instrumental to reduce the unlocking rate of the resonators. Pulse width modulation (PWM) control based helium gas operated tuner is implemented in few resonators to improve phase locking performance. CAMAC based distributed control scheme is upgraded to VME based distributed control without changing the existing client interface to maintain uniformity between the Pelletron and linac control. Python code support has been implemented to protect the resonators against high forward power during unlocking. This is also integrated with the display status of the resonators for monitoring. A frequency to voltage converter is incorporated in control scheme to monitor the frequency error. This has helped us to develop a scheme for automatic phase locking of the cavities using piezoelectric actuator based tuner control. (author)

  9. Conceptual design of a high real-estate gradient cavity for a SRF ERL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Chen; Stony Brook University, NY; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Stony Brook University, NY; Hao, Yue

    2017-01-01

    The term “real-estate gradient” is used to describe the energy gain provided by an accelerating structure per actual length it takes in the accelerator. given that the length of the tunnel available for the accelerator is constrained, the real-estate gradient is an important measure of the efficiency of a given accelerator structure. When designing an accelerating cavity to be efficient in this sense, the unwanted Higher Order Mode (HOM) fields should be reduced by suitable HOM dampers. This is a particularly important consideration for high current operation. The additional RF components might take longitude space and reduce the total accelerating efficiency. We describe a new high efficiency 5-cell cavity with the dampers included. The total length of the cavity is reduced by 13% as compared to a more conventional design without compromising the cavity fundamental-mode performance. In addition, the HOM impedance is reduced for a higher Beam-Break-Up (BBU) threshold of operating current. In this article, we consider an example, a possible application at the eRHIC Energy Recovery Linac (ERL).

  10. Conceptual design of a high real-estate gradient cavity for a SRF ERL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Hao, Yue; Xin, Tianmu; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-10-01

    The term "real-estate gradient" is used to describe the energy gain provided by an accelerating structure per actual length it takes in the accelerator. given that the length of the tunnel available for the accelerator is constrained, the real-estate gradient is an important measure of the efficiency of a given accelerator structure. When designing an accelerating cavity to be efficient in this sense, the unwanted Higher Order Mode (HOM) fields should be reduced by suitable HOM dampers. This is a particularly important consideration for high current operation. The additional RF components might take longitude space and reduce the total accelerating efficiency. We describe a new high efficiency 5-cell cavity with the dampers included. The total length of the cavity is reduced by 13% as compared to a more conventional design without compromising the cavity fundamental-mode performance. In addition, the HOM impedance is reduced for a higher Beam-Break-Up (BBU) threshold of operating current. In this paper, we consider an example, a possible application at the eRHIC Energy Recovery Linac (ERL).

  11. Superconducting LINAC booster for the Mumbai pelletron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LINAC), to boost the energy of heavy ion beams from the 14UD Pelletron accelerator, at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. The accelerating structures in the LINAC are quarter wave resonators (QWR) coated with lead which is ...

  12. 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities with a massively parallel simulation suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kononenko, Oleksiy; Adolphsen, Chris; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Rivetta, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency cavities based on superconducting technology are widely used in particle accelerators for various applications. The cavities usually have high quality factors and hence narrow bandwidths, so the field stability is sensitive to detuning from the Lorentz force and external loads, including vibrations and helium pressure variations. If not properly controlled, the detuning can result in a serious performance degradation of a superconducting accelerator, so an understanding of the underlying detuning mechanisms can be very helpful. Recent advances in the simulation suite ace3p have enabled realistic multiphysics characterization of such complex accelerator systems on supercomputers. In this paper, we present the new capabilities in ace3p for large-scale 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities, in particular, a parallel eigensolver for determining mechanical resonances, a parallel harmonic response solver to calculate the response of a cavity to external vibrations, and a numerical procedure to decompose mechanical loads, such as from the Lorentz force or piezoactuators, into the corresponding mechanical modes. These capabilities have been used to do an extensive rf-mechanical analysis of dressed TESLA-type superconducting cavities. Furthermore, the simulation results and their implications for the operational stability of the Linac Coherent Light Source-II are discussed.

  13. 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities with a massively parallel simulation suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, Oleksiy; Adolphsen, Chris; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Rivetta, Claudio

    2017-10-01

    Radiofrequency cavities based on superconducting technology are widely used in particle accelerators for various applications. The cavities usually have high quality factors and hence narrow bandwidths, so the field stability is sensitive to detuning from the Lorentz force and external loads, including vibrations and helium pressure variations. If not properly controlled, the detuning can result in a serious performance degradation of a superconducting accelerator, so an understanding of the underlying detuning mechanisms can be very helpful. Recent advances in the simulation suite ace3p have enabled realistic multiphysics characterization of such complex accelerator systems on supercomputers. In this paper, we present the new capabilities in ace3p for large-scale 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities, in particular, a parallel eigensolver for determining mechanical resonances, a parallel harmonic response solver to calculate the response of a cavity to external vibrations, and a numerical procedure to decompose mechanical loads, such as from the Lorentz force or piezoactuators, into the corresponding mechanical modes. These capabilities have been used to do an extensive rf-mechanical analysis of dressed TESLA-type superconducting cavities. The simulation results and their implications for the operational stability of the Linac Coherent Light Source-II are discussed.

  14. 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities with a massively parallel simulation suite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksiy Kononenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency cavities based on superconducting technology are widely used in particle accelerators for various applications. The cavities usually have high quality factors and hence narrow bandwidths, so the field stability is sensitive to detuning from the Lorentz force and external loads, including vibrations and helium pressure variations. If not properly controlled, the detuning can result in a serious performance degradation of a superconducting accelerator, so an understanding of the underlying detuning mechanisms can be very helpful. Recent advances in the simulation suite ace3p have enabled realistic multiphysics characterization of such complex accelerator systems on supercomputers. In this paper, we present the new capabilities in ace3p for large-scale 3D multiphysics modeling of superconducting cavities, in particular, a parallel eigensolver for determining mechanical resonances, a parallel harmonic response solver to calculate the response of a cavity to external vibrations, and a numerical procedure to decompose mechanical loads, such as from the Lorentz force or piezoactuators, into the corresponding mechanical modes. These capabilities have been used to do an extensive rf-mechanical analysis of dressed TESLA-type superconducting cavities. The simulation results and their implications for the operational stability of the Linac Coherent Light Source-II are discussed.

  15. Simulation of electromagnetic scattering through the E-XFEL third harmonic cavity module

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N.Y; Shiliang, L; Baboi, N

    2017-01-01

    The European XFEL (E-XFEL) is being fabricated in Hamburg to serve as an X-ray Free Electron Laser light source. The electron beam will be accelerated through linacs consisting of 1.3GHz superconducting cavities along a length of 2.1km. In addition, third harmonic cavities will improve the quality of the beam by line arising the field profile and hence reducing the energy spread. There are eight 3.9GHz cavities within a single module AH1 of E-XFEL. The beam-excited electromagnetic(EM) field in these cavities can be decomposed into a series of eigenmodes. These modes are, in general, not cut-off between one cavity and the next, as they are able to couple to each other through out the module. Here for the first time, we evaluate components of the scattering matrix for module AH1. This is a computation ally expensive system, and hence we employ a Generalized Scattering Matrix(GSM)technique to allow rapid computation with reduced memory requirements. Verification is provided on reduced structures, which are...

  16. Upgrading the Fermilab Linac local control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrory, E.S.; Goodwin, R.W.; Shea, M.F.

    1991-02-01

    A new control system for the Fermilab Linac is being designed, built and implemented. First, the nine-year-old linac control system is being replaced. Second, a control system for the new 805 MHz part of the linac is being built. The two systems are essentially identical, so that when the installations are complete, we will still have a single Linac Control System. 8 refs., 5 figs

  17. Status of the RFD Linac Structure Developement

    OpenAIRE

    Swenson, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    The Proof-of-Principle (POP) prototype of the Rf-Focused Drift tube (RFD) linac structure is currently under test at Linac Systems, after years of delay due to a variety of technical problems. A discussion of these technical problems and their solutions will be presented. The status of these tests will be reported. Plans for future development of this linac structure will be revealed. Potential uses of this linac structure for a variety of scientific, medical, and industrial applications will...

  18. Status and performance of PF injector linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Isamu

    1994-01-01

    PF injector linac has been improved on a buncher section for accelerating of intense electron beam, and reinforced a focusing system of the positron generator linac for the expansion of phase space. In this presentation, I shall report present status and performance of PF injector linac, and discuss its upgrade program for B-factory project. (author)

  19. IMPACT simulation and the SNS linac beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-particle tracking simulations for the SNS linac beam dynamics studies are performed with the IMPACT code. Beam measurement results are compared with the computer simulations, including beam longitudinal halo and beam losses in the superconducting linac, transverse beam Courant-Snyder parameters and the longitudinal beam emittance in the linac. In most cases, the simulations show good agreement with the measured results

  20. Compensating microphonics in SRF cavities to ensure beam stability for future free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Axel

    2008-07-21

    In seeded High-Gain-Harmonic-Generation free electron lasers or energy recovery linear accelerators the requirements for the bunch-to-bunch timing and energy jitter of the beam are in the femtosecond and per mill regime. This implies the ability to control the cavity radiofrequency (RF) field to an accuracy of 0.02 in phase and up to 1.10{sup -4} in amplitude. For the planned BESSY-FEL it is envisaged to operate 144 superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities of the 2.3 GeV driver linac in continuous wave mode and at a low beam current. The cavity resonance comprises a very narrow bandwidth of the order of tens of Hertz. Such cavities have been characterized under accelerator like conditions in the HoBiCaT test facility. It was possible to measure the error sources affecting the field stability in continuous wave (CW) operation. Microphonics, the main error source for a mechanical detuning of the cavities, lead to an average fluctuation of the cavity resonance of 1-5 Hz rms. Furthermore, the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning and the helium pressure dependance of the cavity resonance have been measured. Single cavity RF control and linac bunch-to-bunch longitudinal phase space modeling containing the measured properties showed, that it is advisable to find means to minimize the microphonics detuning by mechanical tuning. Thus, several fast tuning systems have been tested for CW operation. These tuners consist of a motor driven lever for slow and coarse tuning and a piezo that is integrated into the tuner support for fast and fine tuning. Regarding the analysis of the detuning spectrum an adaptive feedforward method based on the least-mean-square filter algorithm has been developed for fast cavity tuning. A detuning compensation between a factor of two and up to a factor of seven has been achieved. Modeling the complete system including the fast tuning scheme, showed that the requirements of the BESSY-FEL are attainable. (orig.)

  1. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, William E., E-mail: wewhite@slac.stanford.edu; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    The present status of the Linac Coherent Light Source as a user facility is presented. Opportunities and challenges as well as the scientific impact of X-ray free-electron lasers are discussed. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  2. Threshold behavior for longitudinal stability of induction linac bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, J.; Haber, I.; Smith, L.

    1983-01-01

    The induction linac bunches of heavy ion fusion scenarios are strongly influenced by the longitudinal space charge impedance. This is in distinct contrast to relativistic bunches in storage rings where most of the data on stability have been obtained. Simulation results reveal that when space charge effects are large, the stability requirement of small growth rate relative to the synchrotron frequency for relativistic bunches is replaced by the relaxed condition of small growth rate relative to the frequency spacing of the space charge wave modes on the bunch. Dispersive effects from finite pipe size tend to make the lower frequencies less susceptible to instability than higher frequencies. Since induction modules have a high resistive component only for the lowest bunch modes, stability is better than would occur for a broadband impedance of comparable magnitude. These results indicate that long term longitudinal bunch stability is realizable for induction linac drivers for heavy ion fusion

  3. RIA Superconducting Drift Tube Linac R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popielarski, J.; Bierwagen, J.; Bricker, S.; Compton, C.; DeLauter, J.; Glennon, P.; Grimm, T.; Hartung, W.; Harvell, D.; Hodek, M.; Johnson, M.; Marti, F.; Miller, P.; Moblo, A.; Norton, D.; Popielarski, L.; Wlodarczak, J.; York, R.C.; Zeller, A.

    2009-01-01

    Cavity and cryomodule development work for a superconducting ion linac has been underway for several years at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The original application of the work was the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator. At present, the work is being continued for use with the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The baseline linac for FRIB requires 4 types of superconducting cavities to cover the velocity range needed to accelerate an ion beam to (ge) 200 MeV/u: 2 types of quarter-wave resonator (QWR) and 2 types of half-wave resonator (HWR). Superconducting solenoids are used for focusing. Active and passive shielding is required to ensure that the solenoids field does not degrade the cavity performance. First prototypes of both QWR types and one HWR type have been fabricated and tested. A prototype solenoid has been procured and tested. A test cryomodule has been fabricated and tested. The test cryomodule contains one QWR, one HWR, one solenoid, and one super-ferric quadrupole. This report covers the design, fabrication, and testing of this cryomodule

  4. Status of the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) Cryo-Module

    CERN Document Server

    Parma, V; Capatina, O; Chambrillon, J; Montesinos, E; Schirm, K; Vande Craen, A; Vandoni, G; Van Weelderen, R

    2014-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort conducted by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories, aimed at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art SRF technology. Such an accelerator could serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or radioactive ion beams [1]. Amongst the main objectives of this effort, are the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities (operating at 2 K and providing an accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m) and the test of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryo-module. In an initial phase, only four out of the eight cavities of the SPL cryo-module will be tested in a half-length cryo-module developed for this purpose, which nonetheless preserves the main features of the full size module. This paper presents the final design of the cryo-module and the status of the construction of the main cryostat parts. Preliminary plans for the assembly a...

  5. Compact linac-driven light sources utilizing mm-period RF undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toufexis, F.; Dolgashev, V. A.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Tantawi, S. G.

    2017-08-01

    Conventional synchrotron light sources and Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) utilize permanent magnet undulators with periods on the order of a few centimeters, and to generate X-rays they need GeV scale electron beam energies. Such facilities are very large and expensive. Inverse Compton scattering sources use a laser beam as an undulator with micrometer periods and produce X-ray energies on the order of tens of keV. These sources operate with MeV scale beam energies, and therefore they are much more compact. However, their average photon flux is typically small, especially in the EUV and soft X-ray regime. We present a novel compact linac-driven light source, which could produce both incoherent and FEL radiation depending on its configuration. This source is based on a mm-period RF undulator. The RF undulator is a mm-wave cavity resonating at a deflecting mode. The source operates as follows: a train of electron bunches is generated in a thermionic X-band RF injector. These bunches are accelerated in an X-band linac and then interact with the RF undulator. The RF power that feeds the undulator is extracted from the electron beam in a decelerating RF structure, located downstream of the undulator. As an example, a light source with a 91.392 GHz RF undulator and a 129 MeV electron beam can generate incoherent EUV radiation at 13.5 nm. Such a light source could be less than 6 m long, and potentially be used for EUV mask metrology. Similar approach will enable soft X-Ray imaging.

  6. HOM electronics and code to probe beam centring on 3.9 GHz cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P

    2014-01-01

    The work within sub-task 10.5.1 was aimed at developing electronics for beam position monitoring (BPM) based on Higher-Order Modes (HOM) excited by electron beams in 3.9 GHz cavities in the FLASH linac at DESY, Hamburg, defining realistic specifications and proving that these signals can be used for beam centering. A series of measurements with devices like a fast oscilloscopes and a real-time spectrum analyzer, as well as with specially designed test electronics. These measurements in conjunction with the simulations made by the other 2 sub-tasks have enabled us to find two spectra regions suitable for use as BPM: modes with strong coupling to the beam around 5.4 GHz, enabling precise monitoring (resolution of ca 20 μm rms) within the whole 4-cavity module, and localized modes at ca.9 GHz for localized measurements in each cavity (resolution of ca 50 mm rms). Various data analysis approaches have been studied. Based on the EuCARD work the HOMBPM electronics has been designed and is now being built at FNAL. ...

  7. Status of the LCLS-II Accelerating Cavity Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Ed [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Marhauser, Frank [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Fitzpatrick, Jarrod A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, Ari D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Preble, Joe [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wilson, Katherine M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Grimm, C. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Burrill, Andrew B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gonnella, Daniel [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Cavity serial production for the LCLS-II 4 GeV CM SRF linac has started. A quantity of 266 accelerating cavities has been ordered from two industrial vendors. Jefferson Laboratory leads the cavity procurement activities for the project and has successfully transferred the Nitrogen-Doping process to the industrial partners in the initial phase, which is now being applied for the production cavities. We report on the results from vendor qualification and the status of the cavity production for LCLS-II.

  8. Mechanical features of a 700 MHz bridge-coupled drift tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.; Smith, P.; Carlisle, L.; Larkin, T.; Lawrence, G.; Garnett, R.

    1992-01-01

    Modem linac designs for treating radioactive waste achieve high proton currents through funneling at low energy, typically around 20 MeV. The resulting switch to a high-frequency accelerating structure poses severe performance and fabrication difficulties below 100 MeV. Above 100 MeV, proven coupled-cavity linacs (CCLS) are available. However, at 20 MeV one must choose between a high-frequency drift-tube linac (DTL) or a coupled-cavity linac with very short cells. Potential radiation damage from the CW beam, excessive RF power losses, multipactoring, and fabricability all enter into this decision. At Los Alamos, we have developed designs for a bridge-coupled DTL (BCDTL) that, like a CCL, uses lattice focusing elements and bridge couplers, but that unlike a CCL, accelerates the beam in simple, short, large-aperture DTL modules with no internal quadrupole focusing. Thus, the BCDTL consumes less power than the CCL linac without beam performance and is simpler and cheaper to fabricate in the 20 to 100 MeV range

  9. Mechanical features of a 700-MHz bridge-coupled drift-tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.; Smith, P.; Carlisle, L.; Larkin, T.; Lawrence, G.; Garnett, R.

    1992-01-01

    Modern linac designs for treating radioactive waste achieve high proton currents through funneling at low energy, typically around 20 MeV. The resulting switch to a high-frequency accelerating structure poses severe performance and fabrication difficulties below 100 MeV. Above 100 MeV, proven coupled-cavity linacs (CCLs) are available. However, at 20 MeV one must choose between a high-frequency drift-tube linac (DTL) or a coupled-cavity linac with very short cells. Potential radiation damage from the CW beam, excessive RF power losses, multipactoring, and fabricability all enter into this decision. At Los Alamos, we have developed designs for a bridge-coupled DTL (BCDTL) that, like a CCL, uses lattice focusing elements and bridge couplers, but that unlike a CCL, accelerates the beam in simple, short, large-aperture DTL modules with no internal quadrupole focusing. Thus, the BCDTL consumes less power than the CCL linac without beam performance and is simpler and cheaper to fabricate in the 20 to 100 MeV range. (Author) ref., tab., 3 figs

  10. First heavy ion beam tests with a superconducting multigap CH cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, W.; Aulenbacher, K.; Basten, M.; Busch, M.; Dziuba, F.; Gettmann, V.; Heilmann, M.; Kürzeder, T.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Podlech, H.; Rubin, A.; Schnase, A.; Schwarz, M.; Yaramyshev, S.

    2018-02-01

    Very compact accelerating-focusing structures, as well as short focusing periods, high accelerating gradients and short drift spaces are strongly required for superconducting (sc) accelerator sections operating at low and medium energies for continuous wave (cw) heavy ion beams. To keep the GSI-super heavy element (SHE) program competitive on a high level and even beyond, a standalone sc cw linac (Helmholtz linear accelerator) in combination with the GSI high charge state injector (HLI), upgraded for cw operation, is envisaged. Recently the first linac section (financed by Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM) and GSI) as a demonstration of the capability of 217 MHz multigap crossbar H-mode structures (CH) has been commissioned and extensively tested with heavy ion beam from the HLI. The demonstrator setup reached acceleration of heavy ions up to the design beam energy. The required acceleration gain was achieved with heavy ion beams even above the design mass to charge ratio at high beam intensity and full beam transmission. This paper presents systematic beam measurements with varying rf amplitudes and phases of the CH cavity, as well as phase space measurements for heavy ion beams with different mass to charge ratio. The worldwide first and successful beam test with a superconducting multigap CH cavity is a milestone of the R&D work of HIM and GSI in collaboration with IAP in preparation of the HELIAC project and other cw-ion beam applications.

  11. Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1

    CERN Document Server

    Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

    2014-01-01

    Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

  12. Development of the low energy linac systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sub; Kwon, H. J.; Kim, Y. H.

    2005-08-01

    The project 'Development of the Low Energy Linac System' is aiming to develop the 20 MeV proton linac system. This consists of a 50 keV proton injector, a 3 MeV RFQ, and a 20 MeV DTL. We obtained the first beam signal after the 20 MeV linac. The high power switch installed in the ion source supplies the pulsed beam into the following LEBT. The pulse operation was successfully tested. The main role of the LEBT is to match the beam into the 3 MeV RFQ. The total length of the four-vane type RFQ is about 3.26m. For the field stabilization, we used the resonant coupling scheme and dipole stabilizer rods. An 1 MW klystron supplies the RF power into the RFQ. After tuning, the field deviation of the quadrupole mode is less than 2% of the design value and the dipole fraction is less than 5% of the operating mode. The following accelerating structure is DTL which accelerate 20 mA proton beams up to 20 MeV. It consists of 4 tanks and the length of each tank is less than 5 m. The lattice is FFDD type and the integrated fields of the quadrupole magnets are 1.75 T. The inner walls of the tanks are copper-plated by PR plating method. The thickness is 100m with the roughness of 0.3m. Each drift tube consists of 6 parts and assembled by e-beam welding. The tanks and drift tubes are aligned under the installation limit of 50m by using the laser-tracker. The tuning by the slug tuners and post couplers results in the field uniformity of 2% and field sensitivity of 100%/MHz. In order to detect the beam signal, we installed the Faraday cup after the RFQ or the DTL. For the RFQ, we observed the beam of 12 A under the forward RF power of 450 kW. The beam current after DTL is about 0.5 A when RF power of 150 kW was fed into each tank

  13. The new Linac moves mountains

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The civil engineering work has started for Linac 4, one of the major renovation projects for the CERN accelerator complex. The work will be completed at the end of 2010 and the new linear accelerator is scheduled to be commissioned in 2013.

  14. Heavy-ion superconducting linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of the superconducting heavy-ion accelerators. Most of them are linacs used as boosters for tandem electrostatic accelerators, although the technology is being extended to very low velocity to eliminate the need for an injector. The characteristics and features of the various superconducting heavy-ion accelerators are discussed. 45 refs

  15. Emittance growth in rf linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    As the space-charge limit is approached, the current that can be accelerated in an rf linac and the output emittance that can be expected are discussed. The role of the envelope equations to estimate limits is outlined. The results of numerical experiments to explore general properties of emittance growth are given.

  16. Linac boosters for electrostatic machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY

    1990-01-01

    A survey of linacs which are used as boosters to electrostatic accelerators is presented. Machines both operating and under construction, copper and superconducting, are reviewed. The review includes data on the accelerating structures, performance, rf and control, beam optics, budget, vacuum and cryogenics. (orig.)

  17. BNCT with linac, feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfuraih, A.; Ma, A.; Spyrou, N.M.; Awotwi-Pratt, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    High energy photon beams from Medical Linear Accelerators (linacs) which are used in radiotherapy produce undesirable neutrons, beside the clinically useful electron and photon beams. Neutrons are produced from the photonuclear reaction (γ,n) of high energy photons with high Z-materials which compose the accelerator head. In this paper the possible use of these undesirable neutrons for BNCT is investigated, making use of high energy linacs already installed in hospitals, primarily for high energy electron and photon therapy and applying them in the context of BNCT. The photoneutron components emitted by the accelerator is the source for Monte Carlo simulations of the interactions that take place within the head of a voxel-based phantom. The neutron flux across the phantom head is calculated using different moderator arrangements and different techniques in the aim of increasing the thermal neutron flux at the targeted site. Also, we shall test different configurations of the linac head to maximize the exposure of high-Z materials to the photon beam, including the removal of the flattening filter, so as to boost the photoneutron production in the linac head. Experimental work will be conducted in hospitals to validate the Monte Carlo simulations. To make use of linacs for BNCT will be advantageous in the sense that the setting in a hospital department is much more acceptable by the public than a reactor installation. This will mean less complications regarding patient positioning and movement with respect to the beams, additional patient transportation and management will be more cost effective. (author)

  18. Dark current and radiation shielding studies for the ILC main linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, Nikolai V. [Fermilab; Rakhno, I. L. [Fermilab; Solyak, N. A. [Fermilab; Sukhanov, A. [Fermilab; Tropin, I. S. [Fermilab

    2016-12-05

    Electrons of dark current (DC), generated in high-gradient superconducting RF cavities (SRF) due to field emission, can be accelerated up to very high energies—19 GeV in the case of the International Linear Collider (ILC) main linac—before they are removed by focusing and steering magnets. Electromagnetic and hadron showers generated by such electrons can represent a significant radiation threat to the linac equipment and personnel. In our study, an operational scenario is analysed which is believed can be considered as the worst case scenario for the main linac regarding the DC contribution to the radiation environment in the main linac tunnel. A detailed modelling is performed for the DC electrons which are emitted from the surface of the SRF cavities and can be repeatedly accelerated in the high-gradient fields in many SRF cavities. Results of MARS15 Monte Carlo calculations, performed for the current main linac tunnel design, reveal that the prompt dose design level of 25 μSv/hr in the service tunnel can be provided by a 2.3-m thick concrete wall between the main and service ls.

  19. Waveguide based external cavity semiconductor lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Klein, E.J.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Lee, Christopher James; Verhaegen, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress of the project waveguide based external cavity semiconductor laser (WECSL) arrays. Here we present the latest results on our efforts to mode lock an array of tunable, external cavity semiconductor lasers.

  20. Multiple-linac approach for tritium production and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes an approach to tritium production based on the use of multiple proton linear accelerators. Features of a single APTT Linac as proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory are presented and discussed. An alternative approach to the attainment of the same total proton beam power of 200 MW with several lower-performance superconducting Linacs is proposed and discussed. Although each of these accelerators are considerable extrapolations of present technology, the latter can nevertheless be built at less technical risk when compared to the single high-current APT Linac, particularly concerning the design and the performance of the low-energy front-end. The use of superconducting cavities is also proposed as a way of optimizing the accelerating gradient, the overall length, and the operational costs. The superconducting technology has already been successfully demonstrated in a number of large-size projects and should be seriously considered for the acceleration of intense low-energy beams of protons. Finally, each linear accelerator would represent an ideal source of very intense beams of protons for a variety of applications, such as: weapons and waste actinide transmutation processes, isotopes for medical application, spallation neutron sources, and the generation of intense beams of neutrinos and muons for nuclear and high-energy physics research. The research community at large has obviously an interest in providing expertise for, and in having access to, the demonstration, the construction, the operation, and the exploitation of these top-performance accelerators

  1. Bulk filling of Class II cavities with a dual-cure composite: Effect of curing mode and enamel etching on marginal adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Bahillo, Jose; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Roig, Miguel; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study attempted to find a simple adhesive restorative technique for class I and II cavities on posterior teeth. Study Design: The tested materials were a self-etching adhesive (Parabond, Colt?ne/Whaledent) and a dual-cure composite (Paracore, Colt?ne/Whaledent) used in bulk to restore the cavities. Class II MO cavities were performed and assigned to 4 groups depending on the orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) conditioning of enamel and polymerization method used (chemical or dual)....

  2. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids in plaque damage the enamel covering your teeth. It also creates holes in the tooth called cavities. Cavities usually do not hurt, unless they grow very large and affect nerves or cause a tooth fracture. An untreated cavity can lead to an infection ...

  3. Beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerigk, F.

    2006-01-01

    This document aims to cover the most relevant mechanisms for the development of beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs. The introduction outlines the various applications of high-intensity linacs and it will explain why, in the case of the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) study a linac was chosen to provide a high-power beam, rather than a different kind of accelerator. The basic equations, needed for the understanding of halo development are derived and employed to study the effects of initial and distributed mismatch on high-current beams. The basic concepts of the particle-core model, envelope modes, parametric resonances, the free-energy approach, and the idea of core-core resonances are introduced and extended to study beams in realistic linac lattices. The approach taken is to study the behavior of beams not only in simplified theoretical focusing structures but to highlight the beam dynamics in realistic accelerators. All effects which are described and derived with simplified analytic models, are tested in realistic lattices and are thus related to observable effects in linear accelerators. This approach involves the use of high-performance particle tracking codes, which are needed to simulate the behavior of the outermost particles in distributions of up to 100 million macro particles. In the end a set of design rules are established and their impact on the design of a typical high-intensity machine, the CERN SPL, is shown. The examples given in this document refer to two different design evolutions of the SPL study: the first conceptual design report (SPL I) and the second conceptual design report (SPL II). (orig.)

  4. Beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerigk, F.

    2006-12-21

    This document aims to cover the most relevant mechanisms for the development of beam halo in high-intensity hadron linacs. The introduction outlines the various applications of high-intensity linacs and it will explain why, in the case of the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) study a linac was chosen to provide a high-power beam, rather than a different kind of accelerator. The basic equations, needed for the understanding of halo development are derived and employed to study the effects of initial and distributed mismatch on high-current beams. The basic concepts of the particle-core model, envelope modes, parametric resonances, the free-energy approach, and the idea of core-core resonances are introduced and extended to study beams in realistic linac lattices. The approach taken is to study the behavior of beams not only in simplified theoretical focusing structures but to highlight the beam dynamics in realistic accelerators. All effects which are described and derived with simplified analytic models, are tested in realistic lattices and are thus related to observable effects in linear accelerators. This approach involves the use of high-performance particle tracking codes, which are needed to simulate the behavior of the outermost particles in distributions of up to 100 million macro particles. In the end a set of design rules are established and their impact on the design of a typical high-intensity machine, the CERN SPL, is shown. The examples given in this document refer to two different design evolutions of the SPL study: the first conceptual design report (SPL I) and the second conceptual design report (SPL II). (orig.)

  5. Cavity-cavity conditional logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Gao, Yvonne Y.; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    In a superconducting circuit architecture, the highest coherence times are typically offered by 3D cavities. Moreover, these cavities offer a hardware-efficient way of redundantly encoding quantum information. While single-qubit control on a cavity has already been demonstrated, there is a need for a universal two-qubit gate between such cavities. In this talk, we demonstrate a cavity-cavity gate by parametric pumping on a fixed-frequency transmon interacting with the two cavities. Every gate application lowers the state fidelity by only 1%, while maintaining an entangling rate on-off ratio of 29dB. Additionally, we show that the gate is applicable not only to qubits consisting of single photons, but also to more complex encodings. These results illustrate the usefulness of cavities beyond the mere storage of quantum information, and pave the way towards gates between error-corrected logical qubits.

  6. Status of RF photoinjector and PWT linac at UCLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.; Barov, N.; Hartman, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Tran, P.; Travish, G.; Zhang, R.; Davis, P.; Hairapetian, G.; Joshi, C.; Luhmann, N.

    1992-01-01

    We report the present status of the rf photoinjector and plane wave transformer (PWT) linac for the production of 20 MeV/c electron beams. The photoinjector is a 1 1/2 cell π-mode standing wave structure operating at 2.856 GHz with photoelectrons generated on a copper cathode by a 4 ps long laser pulse at 266 nm. Measurements of the beam of photoelectrons are underway at various experimental parameters. The PWT has been tested at low power to investigate its mode structure. An overview of the system, latest data, and future directions are presented here. (Author) 3 figs., 5 refs

  7. 3lambda/4 post coupler for drift-tube linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billen, J.H.; Garcia, J.A.; Potter, J.M.; Spalek, G.

    1985-01-01

    New permanent magnets for quadrupole focusing make possible smaller drift tubes in drift-tube linacs (DTLs), resulting in higher shunt impedance. However, ordinary post couplers cannot stabilize a DTL whose drift-tube-to-wall spacing exceeds one-quarter wavelength (lambda/4) by more than a few per cent for the accelerating mode frequency. We have built and tested post couplers that operate in the 3lambda/4 mode. These 3lambda/4 post couplers, when substituted for lambda/4 couplers, had similar stabilization properties. In addition, the coupling between post and drift tube, and the post's resonant frequency can be independently adjusted. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Frequency to digital converter for IUAC Linac control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Mamta; Subramaiam, E.T.; Sahu, B.K.

    2015-01-01

    A frequency to digital converter CAMAC module has been designed and developed for LINAC control systems. This module is used to see the frequency difference of master clock and the resonator frequency digitally without using the oscilloscope. Later on this can be used for automatic tuning and locking of the cavities using piezoelectric actuator based tunner control. This module has eight independent channels to fulfill the need of all the eight cavities of the cryostat. A Schmitt trigger along with level converaccepts almost any form of pulse train, with 30 Vp-p. The time period is measured by counters clocked from a high resolution clock (10 MHz +/- 250 ps). The counter values are cross checked at both the input levels. Frequency is obtained from the computed time period by a special divisor core implemented inside the FPGA. The major task was the implementation of eight individual divisor cores and routing inside one Spartan 3s500E FPGA chip

  9. Linac coherent light source (LCLS) undulator RF BPM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, R.; Waldschmidt, G.; Morrison, L.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T; Li, Z.; Johnson, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  10. Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator RF BPM System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; /Argonne; Johnson, R.; Li, Z.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; /SLAC

    2007-04-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  11. Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator RF BPM System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; Argonne; Johnson, R.; Li, Z.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results

  12. Linac coherent light source (LCLS) undulator RF BPM system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, R.; Waldschmidt, G.; Morrison, L.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T; Li, Z.; Johnson, R.; SLAC

    2006-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will be the world's first x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) when it becomes operational in 2009. The LCLS is currently in the construction phase. The beam position monitor (BPM) system planned for the LCLS undulator will incorporate a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM system described in this paper. The BPM system will provide high-resolution measurements of the electron beam trajectory on a pulse-to-pulse basis and over many shots. The X-band cavity BPM size, simple fabrication, and high resolution make it an ideal choice for LCLS beam position detection. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  13. Industrial RF Linac Experiences and Laboratory Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Peiniger, M

    2004-01-01

    Since more than two decades ACCEL Instruments GmbH at Bergisch Gladbach (formerly Siemens/Interatom) is supplying the worldwide accelerator labs with key components like rf cavities and power couplers, s.c. magnets, insertion devices, vacuum chambers and x-ray beamline equipment. Starting with the design and production of turn key SRF accelerating modules in the late 80th, meanwhile ACCEL is engineering, manufacturing, on site commissioning and servicing complete accelerators with guaranteed beam performance. Today, with a staff of more than 100 physicists and engineers and about the same number of manufacturing specialists in our dedicated production facilities, ACCEL's know how and sales volume in this field has accumulated to more than 2000 man years and several hundred Mio €, respectively. Basis of our steady development is a cooperative partnership with the world leading research labs in the respective fields. As an example, for the supply of a turn key 100 MeV injector linac for the Swiss Ligh...

  14. An Alignment of J-PARC Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Morishita, Takatoshi; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ikegami, Masanori; Ito, Takashi; Kubota, Chikashi; Naito, Fujio; Takasaki, Eiichi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Ueno, Akira; Yoshino, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    J-PARC linear accelerator components are now being installed in the accelerator tunnel, whose total length is more than 400 m including the beam transport line to RCS (Rapid Cycling Synchrotron). A precise alignment of accelerator components is essential for a high quality beam acceleration. In this paper, planned alignment schemes for the installation of linac components, the fine alignment before beam acceleration, and watching the long term motion of the building are described. Guide points are placed on the floor, which acts as a reference for the initial alignment at the installation and also as a relay point for the long surveying network linking at the fine alignment. For a straight line alignment, the wire position sensor is placed on the offset position with respect to the beam center by a target holder, then a single wire can cover the accelerator cavities and the focusing magnets at the DTL-SDTL section (120m). The hydrostatic levering system (HLS) is used for watching the floor elevation (changes)...

  15. first tank of Linac 1

    CERN Multimedia

    This was the first tank of the linear accelerator Linac1, the injection system for the Proton Synchrotron, It ran for 34 years (1958 - 1992). Protons entered at the far end and were accelerated between the copper drift tubes by an oscillating electromagnetic field. The field flipped 200 million times a second (200 MHz) so the protons spent 5 nanoseconds crossing a drift tube and a gap. Moving down the tank, the tubes and gaps had to get longer as the protons gained speed. The tank accelerated protons from 500 KeV to 10 MeV. Linac1 was also used to accelerate deutrons and alpha particles for the Intersecting Storage Rings and oxygen and sulpher ions for the Super Proton Synchrotron heavy ion programme.

  16. The BATES linac control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russ, T.; Radouch, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The Bates linac control system (LCS), a distributed processing architecture, is described. Due to the historic evolution of the system, a mix of different hardware, operating systems and programming languages are used throughout. However, a standardized interface at the network level enables a smooth system integration. In particular, a multicasting scheme for data transmission over the network permits simultaneous database updates on more than one workstation. This allows for true distribution of data processing power. 3 figs

  17. Important aspects of linac beams for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeown, J.; Jones, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Linac based irradiators will require careful design before they can be routinely adopted for the radiation processing of food. The transverse emittance and energy spread from simple injectors provide a significant challenge to the design of a beam delivery system which must handle high power especially in photon mode. Any nonuniform current distribution at the plane of the product is further complicated by large dose variations near the air/product interface, even with simple geometries. The paper describes the use of methods developed at AECL to control and monitor linac behaviour as well as electron interactions at the product surface. It also reports on activation cross-section measurements and particularly on neutron yields from composite targets, designed to monitor the energy of accelerators used in food applications. (orig.)

  18. Experience with a radio frequency gun on the SSRL Injector Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J.N.; Genin, R.D.; Golceff, P.; Morales, H.; Sebek, J.

    1993-04-01

    A-SSRL/Varian-Associates-built, one-and-a-half cavity microwave, thermionic-cathode gun has operated on the SSRL Injector Linac reliably without changing the cathode for over 10,000 hours, with no significant decrease in emission. Thus, for a pulsed electron beam, with a maximum of 0.5 A peak at 2 to 3 MeV from a 3.5 MW peak rf pulse of 2 μs pulse width at 10 pps, the apparent but small amount of back bombardment of the cathode has been tolerable. Use of a bunch-compression alpha magnet and a stripline chopper after the gun produces the required S-band 3 to 5 microbunches of electrons for injection into a standard 10-m-long linac and on into a booster synchrotron, which in turn is used to fill SPEAR. Component limitations and operating characteristics of the gun and the linac's rf system are discussed

  19. First operation of the XFEL linac with the 2 K cryogenic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, T.; Petersen, B.; Schnautz, T.; Ueresin, C.; Zajac, J.

    2017-12-01

    The RF operation of the about 800 superconducting 1.3 GHz 9-cell cavities of the XFEL linac requires helium II bath cooling at 2 K, corresponding to a vapor pressure of 3100 Pa. After the first cool-down of the XFEL linac to 4 K in December, 27th 2016 the operation of the 2 K cryogenic system was started in January, 2nd 2017. The 2 K cryogenic system consist of a 4-stage set of cold compressors to compress helium vapor at a mass flow of up to 100 g/s from 2400 Pa to about 110 kPa and a full flow bypass with an arrangement of heat exchangers and control valves. This paper describes the XFEL refrigerating plant, especially the 2 K cryogenic system, the tuning of the cold compressor regulation to adapt to the XFEL linac static and dynamic heat loads and experience of about 6 months of operation.

  20. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (<Linac Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  1. Wakefields in SLAC linac collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Novokhatski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available When a beam travels near collimator jaws, it gets an energy loss and a transverse kick due to the backreaction of the beam field diffracted from the jaws. The effect becomes very important for an intense short bunch when a tight collimation of the background beam halo is required. In the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC a collimation system is used to protect the undulators from radiation due to particles in the beam halo. The halo is most likely formed from gun dark current or dark current in some of the accelerating sections. However, collimators are also responsible for the generation of wake fields. The wake field effect from the collimators not only brings an additional energy jitter and change in the trajectory of the beam, but it also rotates the beam on the phase plane, which consequently leads to a degradation of the performance of the Free Electron Laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source. In this paper, we describe a model of the wake field radiation in the SLAC linac collimators. We use the results of a numerical simulation to illustrate the model. Based on the model, we derive simple formulas for the bunch energy loss and the average kick. We also present results from experimental measurements that confirm our model.

  2. Linacs for medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Linear accelerators for medical and industrial applications have become an important commercial business. Microwave electron linacs for cancer radiation therapy and high-energy industrial radiography form the bulk of this market, but these, as well as induction linacs, are now being offered for radiation processing applications such as sterilization of disposable medical products, food preservation and material modifications. The radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac has now made the ion linac also practical for commercial applications in medicine and industry, including radiation therapy, isotope production, neutron production, materials modification, and energy transfer processes. Ion linacs for several of these applications will soon be commercially available. The market for both ion and electron linacs is expected to significantly grow in several exciting and important areas

  3. Diagnostic expert system in the PF LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Isamu; Nakahara, Kazuo; Kitamura, Masaharu.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype diagnostic expert system (ES) was developed for the Photon Factory 2.5-GeV electron/positron LINAC injector system. The ES has been on-lined with the conventional linac computer network for receiving real data. This project was undertaken in an attempt to reduce the linac operator's mental workload, diagnosis duties, and to explore Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies. The outlook for ES and its problems, and what has been achieved are outlined in this presentation. (author)

  4. Heavy-ion-linac post-accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1979-01-01

    The main features of the tandem-linac system for heavy-ion acceleration are reviewed and illustrated in terms of the technology and performance of the superconducting heavy-ion energy booster at Argonne. This technology is compared briefly with the corresponding technologies of the superconducting linac at Stony Brook and the room-temperature linac at Heidelberg. The performance possibilities for the near-term future are illustrated in terms of the proposed extension of the Argonne booster to form ATLAS

  5. Status of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galayda, John N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a free electron laser facility in construction at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is designed to operate in the wavelength range 0.15-1.5 nanometers. At the time of this conference, civil construction of new tunnels and buildings is complete, the necessary modifications to the SLAC linac are complete, and the undulator system and x-ray optics/diagnostics are being installed. The electron gun, 135 MeV injector linac and 250 MeV bunch compressor were commissioned in 2007. Accelerator commissioning activities are presently devoted to the achievement of performance goals for the completed 14 GeV linac.

  6. Post-accelerator LINAC design for the VECC RIB project

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    accelerator LINAC design for the VECC RIB project. Arup Bandyopadhyay. Volume 59 Issue 6 December ... and LINAC modules for the post-acceleration. The design aspects of these postaccelerator LINAC modules will be discussed in this paper.

  7. Wakefield Band Partitioning in LINAC Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Roger M

    2003-01-01

    In the NLC project multiple bunches of electrons and positrons will be accelerated initially to a centre of mass of 500 GeV and later to 1 TeV or more. In the process of accelerating 192 bunches within a pulse train, wakefields are excited which kick the trailing bunches off axis and can cause luminosity dilution and BBU (Beam Break Up). Several structures to damp the wakefield have been designed and tested at SLAC and KEK and these have been found to successfully damp the wakefield [1]. However, these 2π/3 structures suffered from electrical breakdown and this has prompted us to explore lower group velocity structures operating at higher fundamental mode phase advances. The wakefield partitioning amongst the bands has been found to change markedly with increased phase advance. Here we report on general trends in the kick factor and associated wakefield band partitioning in dipole bands as a function of phase advance of the synchronous mode in linacs. These results are applicable to both TW (travelling wave) and SW (standing wave) structures

  8. Transverse Field Perturbation For PIP-II SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrutti, Paolo [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, Timergali N. [Fermilab; Lebedev, Valeri [Fermilab; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II) consists in a plan for upgrading the Fermilab proton accelerator complex to a beam power capability of at least 1 MW delivered to the neutrino production target. A room temperature section accelerates H⁻ ions to 2.1 MeV and creates the desired bunch structure for injection into the superconducting (SC) linac. Five cavity types, operating at three different frequencies 162.5, 325 and 650 MHz, provide acceleration to 800 MeV. This paper presents the studies on transverse field perturbation on particle dynamic for all the superconducting cavities in the linac. The effects studied include quadrupole defocusing for coaxial resonators, and dipole kick due to couplers for elliptical cavities. A multipole expansion has been performed for each of the cavity designs including effects up to octupole.

  9. Smooth transverse and longitudinal focusing in high-intensity ion linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, J.H.; Takeda, Harunori; Young, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    We examine ion linac designs that start with a high energy radio- frequency quadrupole (RFQ) followed by either a drift-tube linac (DTL) or a coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL). For high energies a conventional CCL follows the CCDTL. High RFQ output energy allows tailoring the transverse and longitudinal focusing strengths to match into the following structure. When the RFQ beam enters a higher frequency structure, the DTL or CCDTL starts with a low accelerating gradient and large negative synchronous phase. The gradient and phase both ramp up gradually to higher values. Other changes later in the machine are also gradual. Beam dynamics simulations show that these linacs require no separate matching sections. Applications include a cw 100 mA H + beam from a 350-MHz, 6.7 MeV RFQ injecting a 700 MHz CCDTL and CCL; a 7% duty 28 mA H - beam from a 402.5 MHz RFQ and DTL injecting 805 MHz structures; a cw 135 mA D + beam produced by a 175 MHz, 8 MeV RFQ and DTL; and a 2.4% duty, 80 mA H + beam using a 433 MHz 10 MeV RFQ and a 1300 MHz CCDTL. The machines take advantage of the considerable flexibility of the CCDTL. Designs can use a variety of different transverse focusing lattices. Use of two coupling cavity orientations permits a constant period even when the number of drift tubes per cavity changes along the linac

  10. Hybrid III-V/SOI single-mode vertical-cavity laser with in-plane emission into a silicon waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Gyeong Cheol; Xue, Weiqi; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2015-01-01

    We report a III-V-on-SOI vertical-cavity laser emitting into an in-plane Si waveguide fabricated by using CMOS-compatible processes. The fabricated laser operates at 1.54 µm with a SMSR of 33 dB and a low threshold.......We report a III-V-on-SOI vertical-cavity laser emitting into an in-plane Si waveguide fabricated by using CMOS-compatible processes. The fabricated laser operates at 1.54 µm with a SMSR of 33 dB and a low threshold....

  11. Beam dynamics and commissioning of low and medium energy H- beam at Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Satri, Masoomeh Yarmohammadi; Lombardi, Alessandra; Lamehi-Rachti , Mohammad

    The First step of the CERN Large Hadron Collider injectors upgrade (LIU) project is Linac4. It accelerates H- ions to 160 MeV in an 80 m long accelerator housed in a tunnel 12 m underground, presently under construction. It will replace the present 50 MeV proton Linac2 as injector of the proton accelerator complex to increase the LHC luminosity. It consists of a 45 keV RF volume source, a twosolenoid Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT), a 352.2 MHz Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerating the beam to 3 MeV, a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) line. The MEBT houses a fast chopper to selectively remove unwanted micro-bunches in the 352 MHz sequence and avoid losses at capture in the CERN PSB (1 MHz). After chopping, the beam acceleration continues by a 50 MeV Drift Tube Linac (DTL), a 100 MeV Cell-Coupled Drift Tube Linac and a Pi-Mode Structure bringing the beam to the final energy of 160 MeV. Linac4 has been commissioned with a temporary source up to 12 MeV. The beam commissioning stages of Linac4 in LEBT...

  12. Influence of a distribution of deflecting-mode frequencies on the transient dynamics of cumulative beam breakup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, C.L.; Delayen, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    A distribution of deflecting-mode frequencies in the constituent cavities of a linear accelerator can lead to Q-independent damping of cumulative beam breakup. A probability density for the deflecting-mode frequencies generates an effective transverse wake function. The effective wake function can be used to calculate the transient dynamics of cumulative beam breakup within the framework of a continuum approximation provided the transverse beam displacement changes little over the correlation length of the deflecting-mode frequencies as the beam moves down the linac. We adopt this approach to show that the damping induced by the effective wake function causes the rate of approach to the steady state to depend strongly on the operative probability density for the deflecting-mode frequencies

  13. CERN Developments for 704 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Aviles Santillana, I; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Bonomi, R; Calatroni, S; Chambrillon, J; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Guinchard, M; Junginger, T; Malabaila, M; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Mikulas, S; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Renaglia, T; Schirm, K; Tardy, T; Therasse, M; Vacca, A; Valverde Alonso, N; Vande Craen, A

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort coordinated by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories. It is aiming at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art RF superconducting technology, which would serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB). Amongst the main objectives of this R&D effort, is the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities, operating at 2 K with a maximum accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m, and the testing of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryomodule. The cavity together with its helium tank had to be carefully designed in coherence with the innovative design of the cryomodule. New fabrication methods have also been explored. Five such niobium cavities and two copper cavities are in fabrication. The key design aspects are discussed, the results of the alternative fabrication methods presented and the stat...

  14. Linac design for intense hadron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chuan

    2009-12-14

    Based on the RFQ and H-type DTL structures, this dissertation is dedicated to study the beam dynamics in the presence of significantly strong space-charge effects while accelerating intense hadron beams in the low- and medium-{beta} region. Besides the 5 mA/30 mA, 17 MeV proton injector (RFQ+DTL) and the 125 mA, 40 MeV deuteron DTL of the EUROTRANS and IFMIF facilities, a 200 mA, 700 keV proton RFQ has been also intensively studied for a small-scale but ultra-intense neutron source FRANZ planned at Frankfurt University. The most remarkable properties of the FRANZ RFQ and the IFMIF DTL are the design beam intensities, 200 mA and 125 mA. A new design approach, which can provide a balanced and accelerated beam bunching at low energy, has been developed for intense beams. To design the IFMIF DTL and the injector DTL part of the EUROTRANS driver linac, which have been foreseen as the first real applications of the novel superconducting CH-DTL structure, intensive attempts have been made to fulfill the design goals under the new conditions. For the IFMIF DTL, the preliminary IAP design has been considerably improved with respect to the linac layout as well as the beam dynamics. By reserving sufficient drift spaces for the cryosystem, diagnostic devices, tuner and steerer, introducing SC solenoid lenses and adjusting the accelerating gradients and accordingly other configurations of the cavities, a more realistic, reliable and efficient linac system has been designed. On the other hand, the specifications and positions of the transverse focusing elements as well as the phase- and energy-differences between the bunch-center particle and the synchronous particle at the beginning of the {phi}{sub s}=0 sections have been totally redesigned. For the EUROTRANS injector DTL, in addition to the above-mentioned procedures, extra optimization concepts to coordinate the beam dynamics between two intensities have been applied. In the beam transport simulations for both DTL designs

  15. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  16. Upgraded cavities for the positron accumulator ring of the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Jiang, X.; Mangra, D.

    1997-01-01

    Upgraded versions of cavities for the APS positron accumulator ring (PAR) have been built and are being tested. Two cavities are in the PAR: a fundamental 9.8-MHz cavity and a twelfth harmonic 117.3-MHz cavity. Both cavities have been manufactured for higher voltage operation with improved Q-factors, reliability, and tuning capability. Both cavities employ current-controlled ferrite tuners for control of the resonant frequency. The harmonic cavity can be operated in either a pulsed mode or a CW mode. The rf properties of the cavities are presented

  17. Microleakage of Self-Etch Adhesive System in Class V Cavities Prepared by Using Er:YAG Laser with Different Pulse Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanombualert, Jutipond; Chimtim, Pijitta; Heebthamai, Thitirat; Weera-Archakul, Wilawan

    2015-09-01

    In vitro studies evaluated cementum surface morphology and microleakage of three different energy density parameters of Erbium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser compared with diamond bur preparation on class V cavities with self-etch adhesive system and composite resin restoration. Standard class V cavities were prepared at cervical area below the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) in 80 extracted premolars, by using a diamond bur on the buccal surface. All teeth were randomly allocated into four groups: Group 1, diamond bur; Group 2, Er:YAG 50 mJ/15 Hz, 3.77 J/cm(2); Group 3, Er:YAG 75 mJ/15 Hz, 5.65 J/cm(2); and Group 4, Er:YAG 100 mJ/15 Hz, 7.53 J/cm(2). Five cavities from each group were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 15 remaining cavities from each group were restored with self-etch adhesive and nano-hybrid composite. After thermocycling, all sample teeth were immersed in 0.2% methylene blue dye and sectioned buccolingually. Statistics were analyzed using the one way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U tests with Bonferroni correction. The morphology showed micro-irregularities in the cementum surface of the laser group with the absence of a smear layer. The microstructure characteristics were increased surface roughness followed by increasing laser energy transmission. The Er:YAG laser groups were statistically significant, with less microleakage than the diamond bur group (pself-etch adhesive system. Therefore, the microleakage of Er:YAG laser irradiation was significantly decreased compared with diamond bur cavities.

  18. Optimization of the RF cavity heat load and trip rates for CEBAF at 12 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Freyberger, Arne P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Terzic, Balsa P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at JLab has 200 RF cavities in the north linac and the south linac respectively after the 12 GeV upgrade. The purpose of this work is to simultaneously optimize the heat load and the trip rate for the cavities and to reconstruct the pareto-optimal front in a timely manner when some of the cavities are turned down. By choosing an efficient optimizer and strategically creating the initial gradients, the pareto-optimal front for no more than 15 cavities down can be re-established within 20 seconds.

  19. Overview of superconducting RF technology and its application to high-current linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as copious neutron production like that needed for transmutation of radioactive waste. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs. However, cost effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement

  20. Linac postaccelerators for tandem machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeschke, E.

    1984-01-01

    Linear accelerators as postaccelerators have become an accepted total for increasing the final energy of tandem accelerators. This special application of linacs requires an extreme flexibility to cope with a wide velocity and specific charge range of ions while maintaining the excellent beam quality of the electrostatic machines. These requirements can best be fulfilled by choosing independently phased accelerator resonators of the spiral, splitring or quarter wave type in either normal or superconducting technology. Basic design considerations for postaccelerators are discussed and a survey about the major projects, operational or planned, is given. (orig.)

  1. An Induction Linac Test Stand

    CERN Document Server

    De Hope, William; Kihara, Ron; Ong, Mike; Vogtlin, George; Zentler, Jan-Mark

    2005-01-01

    A single-cell test stand has been constructed to facilitate study and guide improvements of the induction electron linac at the FXR radiographic facility at LLNL.* This paper will discuss how modifications in pulse compression and shaping, pulse power transmission, initial ferrite state, and accelerator cell loading have been performed on the test stand and can be applied to the entire accelerator. Some of the specialized diagnostics being used will be described. Finally, the paper will discuss how computer modeling and judicious timing control can be used to optimize accelerator performance by making only selective changes that can be accomplished at minimal cost.

  2. Induction linacs and pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Progress in electronic power conversion technology is making possible a new class of induction linacs that can operate at extremely high repetition rates. Advances in insulator technology, pulse forming line design and switching may also lead to a new type of high current accelerator with accelerating gradients at least an order of magnitude greater than those attainable today. The evolution of the induction accelerator pulsed power system will be discussed along with some details of these emerging technologies which are at the frontiers of accelerator technology

  3. Present status of the ETL LINAC facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Mikado, Tomohisa; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    1993-01-01

    The ETL LINAC has been operated for the beam injection to the storage rings NIJI-II, III, IV, and TERAS, and for the generation of an intense slow positron beam. The status of the ETL LINAC on the operations, the maintenances, and the improvements is described. (author)

  4. Status Of the ILC Main Linac Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Arun [Fermilab; Kapin, Valery [Fermilab; Solyak, Nikolay [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    International Linear collider (ILC) is a proposed accelerator facility which is primarily based on two 11-km long superconducting main linacs. In this paper we present recent updates on the main linac design and discuss changes made in order to meet specification outlined in the technical design report (TDR).

  5. Linac design for the European spallation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, H. [Universitaet Postfach, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    A study group has started to develop a conceptual design for a European Spallation Source (ESS). This pulsed 5 MW source presently consists of a 1.334 GeV linac and two compressor rings. In the following mainly the high intensity linac part will be discussed, which has some features of interest for accelerators for transmutation of radioactive waste too.

  6. Funneling in LANL high intensity linac designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, Subrata

    1995-01-01

    The Los Alamos design approach to Accelerator driven transmutation applications is based on high power proton linacs. Most of the accelerators that have been studied have one important element in common. That component is a funnel, where beams from two separate but identical front end linac systems are merged to form a collinear beam of twice the initial beam intensity. The nominal linac design for Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) consists of an ion source-injector/Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ)/Drift Tube Linac (DTL) combination operating at 350 MHz. The output beam at 20 MeV from each of the DTLs is then funneled to a single high energy linac operating at 700 MHz which accelerates the beam to 800 MeV. In this paper, we present the rationale behind the choice of funneling to achieve higher beam intensity, a beam dynamics design, and simulation results through the funnel section, together with the present experimental status of funneling

  7. High gradient linac for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, S.; Grudiev, A.; Latina, A.

    2017-04-01

    Proposed for the first time almost 30 years ago, the research on radio frequency linacs for hadron therapy experienced a sparkling interest in the past decade. The different projects found a common ground on a relatively high rf operating frequency of 3 GHz, taking advantage of the availability of affordable and reliable commercial klystrons at this frequency. This article presents for the first time the design of a proton therapy linac, called TULIP all-linac, from the source up to 230 MeV. In the first part, we will review the rationale of linacs for hadron therapy. We then divided this paper in two main sections: first, we will discuss the rf design of the different accelerating structures that compose TULIP; second, we will present the beam dynamics design of the different linac sections.

  8. Funneling in LANL high intensity linac designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Los Alamos design approach to Accelerator driven transmutation applications is based on high power proton linacs. Most of the accelerators that have been studied have one important element in common. That component is a funnel, where beams from two separate but identical front end linac systems are merged to form a collinear beam of twice the initial beam intensity. The nominal linac design for Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) consists of an ion source-injector/Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ)/Drift Tube Linac (DTL) combination operating at 350 MHz. The output beam at 20 MeV from each of the DTLs is then funneled to a single high energy linac operating at 700 MHz which achieve higher beam intensity, a beam dynamics design, and simulation results through the funnel section, together with the present experimental status of funneling

  9. CERN Linac4 - The space charge challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, Lutz Matthias [CERN, Genf (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The achievement of a higher proton flux to go beyond the current LHC design luminosity parameters is conditional on an upgrade of the injector chain. Presently the major limitation is given by space charge effects at injection from Linac2 into the PS Booster. These will be overcome by increasing the injection energy from 50 MeV to 160 MeV with the planned replacement of Linac2 with Linac4, a new normal conducting H-linear accelerator presently under construction. Due to the high charge density of the Linac4 bunches space charge will still dominate the beam dynamics in the low energy 3 MeV frontend. In this presentation a short, theoretical introduction to space charge effects is given, and their impact on the beam is illustrated with simulations. Moreover, the latest results of the commissioning of the low energy front end of Linac4 are shown and discussed.

  10. High gradient linac for proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Benedetti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proposed for the first time almost 30 years ago, the research on radio frequency linacs for hadron therapy experienced a sparkling interest in the past decade. The different projects found a common ground on a relatively high rf operating frequency of 3 GHz, taking advantage of the availability of affordable and reliable commercial klystrons at this frequency. This article presents for the first time the design of a proton therapy linac, called TULIP all-linac, from the source up to 230 MeV. In the first part, we will review the rationale of linacs for hadron therapy. We then divided this paper in two main sections: first, we will discuss the rf design of the different accelerating structures that compose TULIP; second, we will present the beam dynamics design of the different linac sections.

  11. Ultrafast harmonic rf kicker design and beam dynamics analysis for an energy recovery linac based electron circulator cooler ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulu Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrafast kicker system is being developed for the energy recovery linac (ERL based electron circulator cooler ring (CCR in the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC, previously named MEIC. In the CCR, the injected electron bunches can be recirculated while performing ion cooling for 10–30 turns before the extraction, thus reducing the recirculation beam current in the ERL to 1/10−1/30 (150  mA-50  mA of the cooling beam current (up to 1.5 A. Assuming a bunch repetition rate of 476.3 MHz and a recirculating factor of 10 in the CCR, the kicker is required to operate at a pulse repetition rate of 47.63 MHz with pulse width of around 2 ns, so that only every 10th bunch in the CCR will experience a transverse kick while the rest of the bunches will not be disturbed. Such a kicker pulse can be synthesized by ten harmonic modes of the 47.63 MHz kicker pulse repetition frequency, using up to four quarter wavelength resonator (QWR based deflecting cavities. In this paper, several methods to synthesize such a kicker waveform will be discussed and a comparison of their beam dynamics performance is made using ELEGANT. Four QWR cavities are envisaged with high transverse shunt impedance requiring less than 100 W of total rf power for a Flat-Top kick pulse. Multipole fields due to the asymmetry of this type of cavity are analyzed. The transverse emittance growth due to the sextupole component is simulated in ELEGANT. Off-axis injection and extraction issues and beam optics using a multicavity kick-drift scheme will also be discussed.

  12. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, Valentin; Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    The computer program LFSC ( ) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output

  13. Mode-locking of an InAs Quantum Dot Based Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Using Atomic Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-16

    Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers). 2)! Installation of a FTIR based temperature dependent reflectivity setup for characterizing VECSELs...and SESAMs (Semiconductor Saturable Absorber Mirrors). 3)! Demonstration of up to 6 Watts CW with InAs QD (Quantum Dot) VECSELs (1250 nm) and 15...AFRL and at other university collaborators such as the University of Arizona. 2.#Installation#of#a# FTIR #based#temperature#dependent#reflectivity

  14. Recent results from digital INGA at BARC–TIFR Pelletron Linac ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-11-01

    Nov 1, 2014 ... triaxial nuclear shapes, antimagnetic rotation, tetrahedral nuclear shapes, shell model. Pramana – J. Phys. ... coexistence, magnetic/antimagnetic rotation, chiral rotations, coupling of gamma vibra- tion with other modes, ..... The author thanks the Pelletron and Linac staff for providing excellent beam during.

  15. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  16. F-18 production with the TOP linac injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfarani, Cesidio; Cisbani, Evaristo; Orlandi, Gianluca; Frullani, Salvatore; Picardi, Luigi; Ronsivalle, Concetta

    2006-06-01

    ENEA and ISS (Italian National Institute of Health), are collaborating to develop a dedicated proton medical accelerator, TOP (Oncological Therapy with Protons) linac, consisting of a sequence of three pulsed linear accelerators. The 7 MeV injector can be used in three operating modes: Protontherapy and Radiobiology Mode—injecting low current proton beam into the TOP linac accelerating sections; Radioisotope Mode—generating an intense proton beam (8-10 mA, 50-100 μs, 30-100 Hz) to produce the positron-emitting radionuclide F18 for PET analyses. In the high current mode, at the exit of the injector the beam is guided through a magnetic quadrupoles channel to a target composed by a thin chamber (0.5 mm thick and 1 in. diameter) containing water enriched with O18. Production yield as well as total activity similar to these achieved with higher energy cyclotrons have been obtained. Environmental doses measured give indications on the shielding required for operation under current radioprotection regulations. Improvements are foreseen to optimize the production yield, the useful beam current and to better characterize gamma and neutron dose rates in the different operational modes.

  17. Delta undulator for Cornell energy recovery linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B. Temnykh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In anticipation of a new era of synchrotron radiation sources based on energy recovery linac techniques, we designed, built, and tested a short undulator magnet prototype whose features make optimum use of the unique conditions expected in these facilities. The prototype has pure permanent magnet (PPM structure with 24 mm period, 5 mm diameter round gap, and is 30 cm long. In comparison with conventional undulator magnets it has the following: (i full x-ray polarization control.—It may generate varying linear polarized as well as left and right circular polarized x rays with photon flux much higher than existing Apple-II–type devices. (ii 40% stronger magnetic field in linear and approximately 2 times stronger in circular polarization modes. This advantage translates into higher x-ray flux. (iii Compactness.—The prototype can be enclosed in a ∼20  cm diameter cylindrical vacuum vessel. These advantages were achieved through a number of unconventional approaches. Among them is control of the magnetic field strength via longitudinal motion of the magnet arrays. The moving mechanism is also used for x-ray polarization control. The compactness is achieved using a recently developed permanent magnet soldering technique for fastening PM blocks. We call this device a “Delta” undulator after the shape of its PM blocks. The presented article describes the design study, various aspects of the construction, and presents some test results.

  18. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  19. 25th anniversary for Linac-2

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On Friday, 3 October 2003, the Linac team celebrated a quarter century of successful operation of one of its linear accelerators: Linac-2, the proton workhorse of the CERN accelerator complex. Linac-2, CERN's linear proton accelerator, has now been running for 25 years - ample reason for a small celebration. About 30 members of the original team (10 of the initially more than 50 are still working at CERN), and other CERN personnel met on 3 October 2003. Linac-2 is the first link in the accelerator chain Linac-2 - PS Booster - PS - SPS and eventually LHC. Beams from Linac-2 are used after further acceleration in the CERN complex for SPS fixed target physics; for antiproton production for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD); for test beams in the East Experimental Hall and in the PS; for nuclear physics at ISOLDE; for LHC test beams and in the past for both ISR physics and Antiproton production (AA/AC) and test beams in LEAR. Linac-2 was built to obtain higher intensities and better stability than with ...

  20. The superconducting linac booster at the ANU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisser, D.C.

    1995-02-01

    This report outlines the progress of the installation of the superconducting Linac booster at the Australian National University. The Linac is based upon four modules, three of which contain three split-loop resonators. The fourth cryostat was intended to be a superbuncher and so houses only one resonator. The first stage of Linac operation will employ only three modules with 2 MV/m from each resonator. It is expected that the implementation of all nine modules, in subsequent stages, would boost beams by 18 MV/q. The project has fostered productive international collaboration between UK and Australian scientists. 1 tab., 6 figs

  1. Overview of the Pelletron Linac facility, Mumbai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillay, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    The Pelletron LINAC Facility at TIFR, Mumbai, comprising the 14 MV Pelletron and the superconducting LINAC booster caters to a variety of experiments in basic and applied Sciences. The Liquid Helium Refrigeration plant for the LINAC has been upgraded to enhance the refrigeration capacity. New instrumentation and interface for control and monitor of the cryogenic parameters, beam diagnostics and beam transport devices have been developed and installed. Digital implementation of the LLRF control has been demonstrated. All seven beam lines in new user halls have been commissioned and several new experimental setups have been added. (author)

  2. Study on design of proton linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingchang

    2000-01-01

    Two important directions in the development of proton linacs are high-current proton linacs (mainly applied in nuclear power field) and compact proton linacs (for proton therapy). There are some common characteristics in them: (1) Employment of the novel accelerating structures, which are combination and evolution of the conventional ones; (2) Accelerating beam with small emittance; (3) Requirement for high reliability. The construction of the former is, however, much more difficult because it still needs low beam lose rate and as high power transformation efficiency as possible. Some important problems in the design of these accelerators are discussed and some schemes designed are presented

  3. Upgrade of the AGS H- linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessi, J.G.; Buxton, W.; Kponou, A.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.J.; Raparia, D.

    1994-01-01

    The AGS linac presently accelerates 25 mA of H - to 200 MeV at a 5 Hz rep-rate and 500 μs pulse width. The Booster takes 4 pulses every 3.8 seconds, and the remaining pulses are used for isotope production. The authors are in the process of upgrading the linac to increase the average current delivered for isotope production by more than a factor of two, while at the same time expecting to decrease linac downtime. Various aspects of this upgrade are discussed, including the upgrade of the control system, new high power transmission line, transport line vacuum, and rf power supply system upgrades

  4. Mechanical considerations in cw linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    An 80-MHz radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac has been designed, fabricated and operated at 100% duty factor (cw) for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project at Los Alamos. This paper describes the design features, fabrication techniques, and operational problems of the device. The RFQ is an assembly of heavy steel, copper-plated weldments. It measures about 15 ft (4.5 m) long by 5 ft (1.5 m) in diameter and weighs over 12 t. Major components are two pair of diametrically orthogonal vanes mounted in a core cylinder. The core is assembled into a manifold cylinder that couples rf power into the vane quadrants. The design features discussed include assembly of hollow wall, flood-cooled components; high-conductivity rf seals; removable and adjustable vanes; and tuning devices. Fabrication challenges such as close-tolerance weldments, vane-tip-contour machining and large-component plating requirements are covered

  5. Source and LINAC3 studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bellodi, G

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC Ion Injector Upgrade pro-gramme (LIU), several activities have been carried out in2016 to improve the ion source and Linac3 performance,with the goal to increase the beam current routinely deliv-ered to LEIR. The extraction region of the GTS-LHC ionsource was upgraded with enlarged vacuum chamber aper-tures and the addition of an einzel lens, yielding highertransmission through the rest of the machine. Also, a seriesof experiments have been performed to study the effects ofdouble frequency mixing on the afterglow performance ofthe source after installation of a Travelling Wave Tube Am-plifier (TWTA) as secondary microwave source at variablefrequency. Measurements have been carried out at a dedi-cated oven test stand for better understanding of the ionsource performance. Finally, several MD sessions werededicated to the study and characterization of the strippingfoils, after evidence of degradation in time was discoveredin the 2015 run.

  6. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guimei [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam

  7. Beam Diagnostics for the BNL Energy Recovery Linac Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Peter; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Michael; Connolly, Roger; Dawson, William; Degen, Chris; DellaPenna, Al; Gassner, David; Kesselman, Martin; Kewish, Jorg; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Mead, Joseph; Oerter, Brian; Russo, Tom; Vetter, Kurt; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2004-01-01

    An Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) test facility is presently under construction at BNL. The goals of this test facility are first to demonstrate stable intense CW electron beam with parameters typical for the RHIC e-cooling project (and potentially for eRHIC), second to test novel elements of the ERL (high current CW photo-cathode, superconducting RF cavity with HOM dampers, and feedback systems), and finally to test lattice dependence of stability criteria. Planned diagnostics include position monitors, loss monitors, transverse profile monitors (both optical and wires), scrapers/halo monitors, a high resolution differential current monitor, phase monitors, an energy spread monitor, and a fast transverse monitor (for beam break-up studies and the energy feedback system). We discuss diagnostics challenges that are unique to this project, and present preliminary system specifications. In addition, we include a brief discussion of the timing system

  8. Fast ferroelectric phase shifters for energy recovery linacs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu Kazakov

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Fast phase shifters are described that use a novel barium strontium titanate ceramic that can rapidly change its dielectric constant as an external bias voltage is changed. These phase shifters promise to reduce by ∼10 times the power requirements for the rf source needed to drive an energy recovery linac (ERL. Such phase shifters will be coupled with superconducting radiofrequency cavities so as to tune them to compensate for phase instabilities, whether beam-driven or those caused by microphonics. The most promising design is presented, which was successfully cold tested and demonstrated a switching speed of ∼30  ns for 77 deg, corresponding to <0.5  ns per deg of rf phase. Other crucial issues (losses, phase shift values, etc. are discussed.

  9. Automation of the control scheme for IUAC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, B.K.; Dutt, R.N.; Antony, J.; Mathuria, D.S.; Pandey, A.; Singh, K.; Ahuja, R.; Chowdhury, G.K.; Rai, A.; Patra, P.; Ghosh, S.; Ajithkumar, B.P.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of the Linac control scheme is undertaken for automation with minimum human intervention during beam acceleration. Python language interface with the present control scheme is used in writing automation routines to monitor the status of the phase/amplitude lock during operation and shut-down the locking mechanism to reduce the RF power, if required. Simultaneous pulse conditioning of the resonators is made possible by using dedicated hardware interfaced and Python based client interface. Movement of the drive coupler is enabled from operation console with position read back. The manual control of the slow-tuner electronics module to bring the frequency close to reference during phase locking is interfaced with the present control scheme for remote operation. Monitoring of amplitude and absolute phase of each cavity is made possible from operation console. An alternate tuning mechanism using piezoelectric actuator and stepper motor combination has been successfully tested in the test cryostat. (author)

  10. Improved temperature regulation of APS linac RF components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dortwegt, R.

    1998-01-01

    The temperature of the APS S-Band linac's high-power rf components is regulated by water from individual closed-loop deionized (DI) water systems. The rf components are all made of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper and respond quickly to temperature changes. The SLED cavities are especially temperature-sensitive and cause beam energy instabilities when the temperature is not well regulated. Temperature regulation better than ± 0.1 F is required to achieve good energy stability. Improvements in the closed-loop water systems have enabled them to achieve a regulation of ± 0.05 F over long periods. Regulation philosophy and equipment are discussed and numerical results are presented

  11. Development of an RFQ linac for unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, S.; Imanishi, A.; Morimoto, T.; Shibuya, S.; Tojyo, E.; Tokuda, N.

    1990-05-01

    A split coaxial RFQ (SCRFQ) is being developed for accelerating unstable nuclei with a charge-to-mass ratio larger than 1/60 from 1 to 170 keV/u in the JHP heavy-ion linac. The SCRFQ is equipped with modulated vanes to generate ideal quadrupole and accelerating fields. The fundamental problems on the SCRFQ have been clarified and solved through studies on a cold model, and the excellent accelerating performance has been confirmed by using a proton accelerating model working at 50 MHz. A 25.5-MHz prototype for the JHP SCRFQ is now under development. The prototype, 2.1 m in length and 0.9 m in diameter, will accelerate ions with a charge-to-mass ratio larger than 1/30 from 1 to 45 keV/u. Low-power tests conducted so far show that the prototype cavity has good rf characteristics. (author)

  12. Status of SCRF cavity and ADS development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira

    2011-01-01

    SCRF cavity technology has progressed with high-energy particle accelerator programs in Japan. It was first applied for TRISTAN program at KEK, in early 1980s, and it is expected to be a key technology to realize the next energy-frontier lepton collider such as ILC, and/or intensity-frontier proton accelerators hopefully to be realized in Japan. The JPARC project as a joint program between JAEA and KEK is scoping to realize ADS program with the linac upgrade using a superconducting cavity system, as a future program. The talk will cover an overview of the SCRF cavity development and the ADS development in Japan. (author)

  13. Thermionic RF Gun and Linac Pre-Injector for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.

    2003-08-11

    Preparations are underway to upgrade the Spear2 to the third generation light source. Installation of all the subsystems will start in April 2003. Although the Spear3 RF system is entirely different from the present form, the pre-injector gun/linac and booster synchrotron will remain the same even after the upgrade. The thermionic rf gun reliability and stability are to be improved to inject 500 mA of stored current in shortest possible time. When a top-up mode is enforced, where the stored beam decay is replenished to maintain the constant current and thus constant light intensity, the Spear3 will take injection every few minutes. In that case the gun, linac, and booster must stay on at all times. In this report we will describe some improvements made on the gun and linac in the recent past, as well as their present performance and future upgrade to be made.

  14. Analysis of Beam-Beam Kink Instability in a Linac-Ring Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Lebedev; J. Bisognano; R. Li; B. Yunn

    2001-01-01

    A linac-ring collision scheme was considered in recent proposals of electron-gold colliders (eRHIC) and polarized-electron light-ion colliders (EPIC). The advantages of using an energy-recovered linac for the electron beam is that it avoids the limitation of beam-beam tune shift inherent in a storage ring, pertains good beam quality and easy manipulation of polarization. However, the interaction of the ion beam in the storage ring with the electron beam from the linac acts analogously to a transverse impedance, and can induce unstable behavior of the ion beam similar to the strong head-tail instability. In this paper, this beam-beam kink instability with head-tail effect is analyzed using the linearized Vlasov equation, and the threshold of transverse mode coupling instability is obtained

  15. A hospital-based proton linac for neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, A.J.

    1988-10-01

    Fermilab's Alvarez proton linac has been used routinely for neutron therapy since 1976. The Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF) operates in a mode parasitic to the laboratory's high energy physics program, which uses the linac as an injector for a synchrotron. Parasitic operation is possible because the linac delivers /approximately/1.2 /times/ 10 13 protons per pulse at a 15 Hz rate, while the high energy physics program requires beam at a rate not greater than 0.5 Hz. Protons not needed for physics experiments strike a beryllium target to produce neutrons for neutron therapy. Encouraging clinical results from NTF have led to a study of the issues involved in providing hospitals with a neutron beam of the type available at Fermilab. This paper describes the issues addressed by that study. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Dark currents for CEBAF linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunn, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    Continuing on our numerical study of field emitted electrons from a superconducting CEBAF cavity we have identified all possible emission sites, magnitudes, and the energy profile of dark currents expected at CEBAF under nominal operating conditions. We find that most electrons do not survive beyond a single cryomodule which includes eight 5-cell superconducting cavities. However, some electrons can be accelerated through many cryomodules, ending up with an energy close to 100 MeV. However, no field emitted electrons can be recirculated along with an electron beam generated at the gun, due to the limited energy acceptance of CEBAF recirculation arcs. 4 refs., 4 figs

  17. Energy-Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland Paul [Muplus, Inc., Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-11-19

    Most radioisotopes are produced by nuclear reactors or positive ion accelerators, which are expensive to construct and to operate. Photonuclear reactions using bremsstrahlung photon beams from less-expensive electron linacs can generate isotopes of critical interest, but much of the beam energy in a conventional electron linac is dumped at high energy, making unwanted radioactivation. The largest part of this radioactivation may be completely eliminated by applying energy recovery linac technology to the problem with an additional benefit that the energy cost to produce a given amount of isotope is reduced. Consequently, a Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes at a cost lower than that of isotopes produced by reactors or positive-ion accelerators. A Jefferson Lab approach to this problem involves a thin photon production radiator, which allows the electron beam to recirculate through rf cavities so the beam energy can be recovered while the spent electrons are extracted and absorbed at a low enough energy to minimize unwanted radioactivation. The thicker isotope photoproduction target is not in the beam. MuPlus, with Jefferson Lab and Niowave, proposed to extend this ERL technology to the commercial world of radioisotope production. In Phase I we demonstrated that 1) the ERL advantage for producing radioisotopes is at high energies (~100 MeV), 2) the range of acceptable radiator thickness is narrow (too thin and there is no advantage relative to other methods and too thick means energy recovery is too difficult), 3) using optics techniques developed under an earlier STTR for collider low beta designs greatly improves the fraction of beam energy that can be recovered (patent pending), 4) many potentially useful radioisotopes can be made with this ERL technique that have never before been available in significant commercial quantities

  18. Energy-Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Rolland Paul

    2016-01-01

    Most radioisotopes are produced by nuclear reactors or positive ion accelerators, which are expensive to construct and to operate. Photonuclear reactions using bremsstrahlung photon beams from less-expensive electron linacs can generate isotopes of critical interest, but much of the beam energy in a conventional electron linac is dumped at high energy, making unwanted radioactivation. The largest part of this radioactivation may be completely eliminated by applying energy recovery linac technology to the problem with an additional benefit that the energy cost to produce a given amount of isotope is reduced. Consequently, a Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes at a cost lower than that of isotopes produced by reactors or positive-ion accelerators. A Jefferson Lab approach to this problem involves a thin photon production radiator, which allows the electron beam to recirculate through rf cavities so the beam energy can be recovered while the spent electrons are extracted and absorbed at a low enough energy to minimize unwanted radioactivation. The thicker isotope photoproduction target is not in the beam. MuPlus, with Jefferson Lab and Niowave, proposed to extend this ERL technology to the commercial world of radioisotope production. In Phase I we demonstrated that 1) the ERL advantage for producing radioisotopes is at high energies (~100 MeV), 2) the range of acceptable radiator thickness is narrow (too thin and there is no advantage relative to other methods and too thick means energy recovery is too difficult), 3) using optics techniques developed under an earlier STTR for collider low beta designs greatly improves the fraction of beam energy that can be recovered (patent pending), 4) many potentially useful radioisotopes can be made with this ERL technique that have never before been available in significant commercial quantities

  19. Operational experience with the CERN hadron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmot, H.; Dutriat, C.; Hill, C.E.; Langbein, K.; Lombardi, A.M.; O'Neil, M.; Tanke, E.; Vretenar, M.

    1996-01-01

    The present CERN proton linac (Linac2) was commissioned in 1978 and since that date has been the primary source of protons to the CERN accelerator complex. During the past 18 years, the machine has had a very good reliability record in spite of the demands made upon it. Modifications have been made with the view of maintaining this reliability with reduced resources and new requirements from the users. Further demands will be made in the future for LHC operation. In 1994, a new linac for heavy ion production was put into service replacing the original CERN proton linac. As this machine was built within an international collaboration, operation had to take into account the novelty of the techniques used and the variety of equipment supplied by outside collaborators. Even so, the new machine has also had very good reliability. (author)

  20. System engineering in the SSC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tooker, J.F.; Chang, C.R.; Cutler, R.I.; Funk, L.W.; Guy, F.W.; Hale, R.; Leifeste, G.T.; Nonte, J.; Prichard, B.; Raparia, D.; Saadatmand, K.; Sethi, R.C.; Yao, C.G.

    1992-01-01

    The design and construction of the SSC Linac involves various departments within the SSCL and many outside vendors. The adaptive incorporation of system engineering principles into the SSC Linac is described. This involves the development of specification trees with the breakdown and flow of functional and physical requirements from the top level system specifications to the lower level component specifications. Interfaces are defined, which specify and control the interconnections between the various components. Review cycles are presented during which the requirements, evolution of the design, and test plans are reviewed, monitored, and finalized. The Linac specification tree, interface definition, and reviews of the Linac are presented, including typical examples. (Author) 2 refs., 3 tabs