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Sample records for mode iii effects

  1. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in Mode III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F. A.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (RB88, 590 MN/m2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) IIIcan be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔKIII for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (˜10-6 to 10-2 mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) III and ΔKIII is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity Γ III, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces. The latter effect is found to be dependent upon the mode of applied loading (i.e., the presence of superimposed axial loads) and the crack length and torque level. Mechanistically, high-torque surfaces were transverse, macroscopically flat, and smeared. Lower torques showed additional axial cracks (longitudinal shear cracking) perpendicular to the main transverse surface. A micro-mechanical model for the main radi l Mode III growth, based on the premise that crack advance results from Mode II coalescence of microcracks initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front, is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (ΔΓIII if local Mode II growth rates are

  2. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in mode III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1982-01-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (R /SUB B/ 88, 590 MN/m 2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) /SUB III/ can be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔK /SUB III/ for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (about 10 -6 to 10 -2 mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) /SUB III/ and ΔK /SUB III/ is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity GAMMA /SUB III/, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces A micro-mechanical model for the main radial Mode III growth is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (ΔGAMMA /SUB III/) if local Mode II growth rates are proportional to the displacements. Such predictions are shown to be in agreement with measured growth rates in AISI 4140 steel from 10 -6 to 10 -2 mm per cycle

  3. Effect of Compressive Mode I on the Mixed Mode I/II Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of 42CrMo4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heirani, Hasan; Farhangdoost, Khalil

    2018-01-01

    Subsurface cracks in mechanical contact loading components are subjected to mixed mode I/II, so it is necessary to evaluate the fatigue behavior of materials under mixed mode loading. For this purpose, fatigue crack propagation tests are performed with compact tension shear specimens for several stress intensity factor (SIF) ratios of mode I and mode II. The effect of compressive mode I loading on mixed mode I/II crack growth rate and fracture surface is investigated. Tests are carried out for the pure mode I, pure mode II, and two different mixed mode loading angles. On the basis of the experimental results, mixed mode crack growth rate parameters are proposed according to Tanaka and Richard with Paris' law. Results show neither Richard's nor Tanaka's equivalent SIFs are very useful because these SIFs depend strongly on the loading angle, but Richard's equivalent SIF formula is more suitable than Tanaka's formula. The compressive mode I causes the crack closure, and the friction force between the crack surfaces resists against the crack growth. In compressive loading with 45° angle, d a/d N increases as K eq decreases.

  4. Effective representation of amide III, II, I, and A modes on local vibrational modes: Analysis of ab initio quantum calculation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Seungsoo

    2016-10-28

    The Hamiltonian matrix for the first excited vibrational states of a protein can be effectively represented by local vibrational modes constituting amide III, II, I, and A modes to simulate various vibrational spectra. Methods for obtaining the Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio quantum calculation results are discussed, where the methods consist of three steps: selection of local vibrational mode coordinates, calculation of a reduced Hessian matrix, and extraction of the Hamiltonian matrix from the Hessian matrix. We introduce several methods for each step. The methods were assessed based on the density functional theory calculation results of 24 oligopeptides with four different peptide lengths and six different secondary structures. The completeness of a Hamiltonian matrix represented in the reduced local mode space is improved by adopting a specific atom group for each amide mode and reducing the effect of ignored local modes. The calculation results are also compared to previous models using C=O stretching vibration and transition dipole couplings. We found that local electric transition dipole moments of the amide modes are mainly bound on the local peptide planes. Their direction and magnitude are well conserved except amide A modes, which show large variation. Contrary to amide I modes, the vibrational coupling constants of amide III, II, and A modes obtained by analysis of a dipeptide are not transferable to oligopeptides with the same secondary conformation because coupling constants are affected by the surrounding atomic environment.

  5. Fatigue crack growth in mixed mode I+III+III non proportional loading conditions in a 316 stainless steel, experimental analysis and modelization of the effects of crack tip plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremy, F.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with fatigue crack growth in non-proportional variable amplitude mixed mode I + II + III loading conditions and analyses the effects of internal stresses stemming from the confinement of the plastic zone in small scale yielding conditions. The tests showed that there are antagonistic long-distance and short-distance effects of the loading history on fatigue crack growth. The shape of loading path, and not only the maximum and minimum values in this path, is crucial and, by comparison, the effects of contact and friction are of lesser importance. Internal stresses play a major role on the fatigue crack growth rate and on the crack path. An approach was developed to analyze the elastic-plastic behavior of a representative section of the crack front using the FEA. A model reduction technic is used to extract the relevant information from the FE results. To do so, the velocity field is partitioned into mode I, II, III elastic and plastic components, each component being characterized by an intensity factor and a fixed spatial distribution. The calculations were used to select seven loading paths in I + II and I + II + III mixed mode conditions, which all have the same amplitudes for each mode, the same maximum, minimum and average values. These paths are supposed to be equivalent in the sense of common failure criteria, but differ significantly when the elastic-plastic behavior of the material is accounted for. The results of finite element simulations and of simulations using a simplified model proposed in this thesis are both in agreement with experimental results. The approach was also used to discuss the role of mode III loading steps. Since the material behavior is nonlinear, the nominal loading direction does not coincide with the plastic flow direction. Adding a mode III loading step in a mode I+II fatigue cycle, may, in some cases, significantly modify the behaviour of the crack (crack growth rate, crack path and plastic flow). (author)

  6. X-ray fractography of fatigue fracture surface under mode I and mode III loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Keisuke; Tsumura, Tsuyoshi

    2001-01-01

    The propagation behavior of a circumferential fatigue crack in cylindrical bars of a carbon steel (JIS SGV410) and a stainless steel (JIS SUS316NG) was investigated under cyclic axial and torsional loadings. The J-integral range was used as a fracture mechanics parameter. When compared at the same J-integral range, the crack propagation rate under mode III was smaller than that under mode I. Parallel markings perpendicular to the crack propagation direction were observed on the fatigue fracture surface obtained under mode III loading. The residual stresses in the radial direction, σ r , and in the tangential direction, σ θ , were measured for both mode I and mode III fatigue fracture surfaces. For mode I fracture surface, σ r was tension, and was almost constant irrespective of the applied J-integral range. σ θ was close to zero for both materials. On the other hand, for mode III, σ r and σ θ were compression. For SUS316NG steel, the compressive stress of σ θ increased with the J-integral range. For SGV410 steel, the change of σ θ with the J-integral range was small. The breadth of diffraction profiles increased with J-integral range for both mode I and III. The breadth was found to be a good parameter to evaluate the applied J-integral range. (author)

  7. Mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huaxin; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    The critical J-integrals of mode I (J IC ), mixed-mode I/III (J MC ), and mode III (J IIIC ) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J MC was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. Results showed that J MC and tearing modulus (T M ) values varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J MC and T M values occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where the load ratio of σ i /σ iii was 1.2 to 0.84. The J min was 240 Kj/M 2 , and ratios of J IC /J min and J IIIC /J min were 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. The morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J MC and T M values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J min remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J min

  8. Heterogeneous Silicon III-V Mode-Locked Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Michael Loehrlein

    Mode-locked lasers are useful for a variety of applications, such as sensing, telecommunication, and surgical instruments. This work focuses on integrated-circuit mode-locked lasers: those that combine multiple optical and electronic functions and are manufactured together on a single chip. While this allows production at high volume and lower cost, the true potential of integration is to open applications for mode-locked laser diodes where solid state lasers cannot fit, either due to size and power consumption constraints, or where small optical or electrical paths are needed for high bandwidth. Unfortunately, most high power and highly stable mode-locked laser diode demonstrations in scientific literature are based on the Fabry-Perot resonator design, with cleaved mirrors, and are unsuitable for use in integrated circuits because of the difficulty of producing integrated Fabry-Perot cavities. We use silicon photonics and heterogeneous integration with III-V gain material to produce the most powerful and lowest noise fully integrated mode-locked laser diode in the 20 GHz frequency range. If low noise and high peak power are required, it is arguably the best performing fully integrated mode-locked laser ever demonstrated. We present the design methodology and experimental pathway to realize a fully integrated mode-locked laser diode. The construction of the device, beginning with the selection of an integration platform, and proceeding through the fabrication process to final optimization, is presented in detail. The dependence of mode-locked laser performance on a wide variety of design parameters is presented. Applications for integrated circuit mode-locked lasers are also discussed, as well as proposed methods for using integration to improve mode-locking performance to beyond the current state of the art.

  9. Effect of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Longxi; Wu Bin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of modes interaction on the resistive wall mode (RWM) stability are studied. When considering the modes interaction effects, the linear growth rate of the most unstable (3, 1) mode decreases. After linear evolution, the RWM saturates at the nonlinear phase. The saturation can be attributed to flux piling up on the resistive wall. When some modes exist, the (3, 1) mode saturates at lower level compared with single mode evolution. Meanwhile, the magnetic energy of the (5, 2) mode increases correspondingly, but the magnetic energy saturation level of the (2, 1) mode changes weakly. (authors)

  10. Position-dependent deuterium isotope effect on photoisomerization of ammineaquarhodium(III) complexes: identification of the excited-state vibronic deactivation mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skibsted, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    cis to trans Photoisomerization quantum yields are increased by a factor of approximately two by deuteriation of co-ordinated water in tetra-amminediaquarhodium, but are almost insensitive to deuteriation of co-ordinated water in tetra-ammineaquachlororhodium and to deuteriation of co-ordinated ammonia in either complex; this identifies the dominating nonradiative deactivation mode (competing with the excited-state rearrangement) as a hydrogen-oxygen vibration in an excited-state intermediate of reduced co-ordination number. (author)

  11. Interaction mode between methylene blue-Sm(III) complex and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spectroscopic and viscosity methods were applied to investigate the interaction between methylene blue (MB)-Sm(III) complex and herring sperm DNA by using acridine orange as a spectral probe in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.40). By means of molar ratio method, the binding ratios between MB-Sm(III)and DNA were determined ...

  12. INTERACTION MODE BETWEEN METHYLENE BLUE-Sm(III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    between methylene blue (MB)-Sm(III) complex and herring sperm DNA by using acridine orange .... the complex was recorded as KBr pellets on Spectrum One FTIR system (PE Company, USA), ..... mechanism of drugs and drug design.

  13. Crack Tip Flipping Under Mode I/III Tearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felter, Christian Lotz; Specht Jensen, Lasse; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    Crack tip flipping, where the fracture surface alternates from side to side in 45° shear bands, seems to be an overlooked propagation mode in Mode I sheet tearing often disregarded as  “transitional” or tied to randomness in the material. In fact, such observations rarely make it to the literature...

  14. Adsorption of Cr (III from aqueous solution by two forms of a superabsorbant polymer : parametric study and effect of activation mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouass A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of chromium ions Cr3+ using two forms of a superabsorbant polymer PANa from aqueous solution was investigated. On one hand the equilibrium pH with the distilled water and the pH of point of zero charge have been studied in order to characterize the acid-base behavior of both of PANa forms. On the other hand, the effect of contact time between PANa and the metallic solution and stirring speed of aqueous solution on the adsorption rate were established to highlight the importance of PANa as an efficient adsorbent of chromium ions Cr3+.

  15. Rock Fracture Toughness Study Under Mixed Mode I/III Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliha, M. R. M.; Bahmani, A.

    2017-07-01

    Fracture growth in underground rock structures occurs under complex stress states, which typically include the in- and out-of-plane sliding deformation of jointed rock masses before catastrophic failure. However, the lack of a comprehensive theoretical and experimental fracture toughness study for rocks under contributions of out-of plane deformations (i.e. mode III) is one of the shortcomings of this field. Therefore, in this research the mixed mode I/III fracture toughness of a typical rock material is investigated experimentally by means of a novel cracked disc specimen subjected to bend loading. It was shown that the specimen can provide full combinations of modes I and III and consequently a complete set of mixed mode I/III fracture toughness data were determined for the tested marble rock. By moving from pure mode I towards pure mode III, fracture load was increased; however, the corresponding fracture toughness value became smaller. The obtained experimental fracture toughness results were finally predicted using theoretical and empirical fracture models.

  16. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B 0 . These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B 0 . The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B 0 are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field topologies. The work

  17. Dynamic fracture initiation in brittle materials under combined mode I/II loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, M.; Kishida, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Sogabe, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A new test method has been developed to measure the resistance of dynamic fracture initiation in brittle materials under combined mode I/II loadings. The Brazilian disks with center-cracks have been fractured under oblique impact loadings in diametral-compression. The dynamic stress intensity factors of mode I and II are evaluated from the superposition integrals of the step response functions for the cracked disk. The experimental results are presented to elucidate the influence of loading rate on the combined mode fracture toughness for ceramics and glasses. (orig.)

  18. Radiative type-III ELMy H-mode in all-tungsten ASDEX Upgrade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; Kallenbach, A.; Neu, R.; Eich, T.; Fischer, R.; Herrmann, A.; Potzel, S.; van Rooij, G. J.; Zielinski, J. J.; ASDEX Upgrade team,

    2012-01-01

    The type-III ELMy H-mode might be the solution for an integrated ITER operation scenario fulfilling the fusion power amplification factor (output fusion power to input heating power) of Q = 10 with simultaneous acceptable steady-state and transient power loads to the plasma-facing components. This

  19. Effect of helium irradiation on fracture modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanamura, T.; Jesser, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the crack opening mode during in-situ HVEM tensile testing and how it is influenced by test temperature and helium irradiation. Most cracks were mixed mode I and II. However, between 250 0 C and room temperature the effect of helium irradiation is to increase the amount of mode I crack propagation. Mode II crack opening was observed as grain boundary sliding initiated by a predominantly mode I crack steeply intersecting the grain boundary. Mode II crack opening was absent in irradiated specimens tested between 250 0 C and room temperature, but could be restored by a post irradiation anneal

  20. PERIOD-LUMINOSITY RELATIONS DERIVED FROM THE OGLE-III FUNDAMENTAL MODE CEPHEIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Neilson, Hilding R.; Nanthakumar, A.; Buonaccorsi, John

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we have derived Cepheid period-luminosity (P-L) relations for the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) fundamental mode Cepheids, based on the data released from OGLE-III. We have applied an extinction map to correct for the extinction of these Cepheids. In addition to the VIW-band P-L relations, we also include JHK and four Spitzer IRAC-band P-L relations, derived by matching the OGLE-III Cepheids to the Two Micron All Sky Survey and SAGE data sets, respectively. We also test the nonlinearity of the Cepheid P-L relations based on extinction-corrected data. Our results (again) show that the LMC P-L relations are nonlinear in VIJH bands and linear in KW and the four IRAC bands, respectively.

  1. High degree modes and instrumental effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzennik, S G [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Rabello-Soares, M C; Schou, J [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)], E-mail: skorzennik@cfa.harvard.edu

    2008-10-15

    Full-disk observations taken with the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, or the upgraded Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) instruments, have enough spatial resolution to resolve modes up to {iota} = 1000 if not {iota} = 1500. The inclusion of such high-degree modes (i.e., {iota} {<=} 1000) improves dramatically inferences near the surface. Unfortunately, observational and instrumental effects cause the characterization of high degree modes to be quite complicated. Indeed, the characteristics of the solar acoustic spectrum are such that, for a given order, mode lifetimes get shorter and spatial leaks get closer in frequency as the degree of a mode increases. A direct consequence of this property is that individual modes are resolved only at low and intermediate degrees. At high degrees the individual modes blend into ridges and the power distribution of the ridge defines the ridge central frequency, masking the underlying mode frequency. An accurate model of the amplitude of the peaks that contribute to the ridge power distribution is needed to recover the underlying mode frequency from fitting the ridge. We present a detailed discussion of the modeling of the ridge power distribution, and the contribution of the various observational and instrumental effects on the spatial leakage, in the context of the MDI instrument. We have constructed a physically motivated model (rather than an ad hoc correction scheme) that results in a methodology that can produce unbiased estimates of high-degree modes. This requires that the instrumental characteristics are well understood, a task that has turned out to pose a major challenge. We also present our latest results, where most of the known instrumental and observational effects that affect specifically high-degree modes were removed. These new results allow us to focus our attention on changes with solar activity. Finally, we present variations of mode

  2. Pedestal Temperature Model for Type III ELMy H-mode Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buangam, W.; Suwanna, S.; Onjun, T.; Poolyarat, N.; Picha, R.; Singhsomroje, W.

    2009-07-01

    Full text: It is widely known that the improved performance of H-mode plasma results mainly from a formation of the pedestal, which is a narrow region of strong pressure gradient near the edge of plasma. A predictive capability for the conditions at the top of the pedestal is important, especially for predictive simulations of future experiments. New models for predicting the temperature values at the top of the pedestal for type III ELMy H-mode plasma are developed by using two different approaches: a theory-based approaches and an empirical approach. For a theory-based approach, a model is developed based on the calculation of thermal energy in the pedestal region and on accepted scaling laws of energy confinement time. For an empirical model, a scaling law for pedestal temperature in terms of plasma controlled parameters, such as plasma current, magnetic field, heating power, is deduced from experimental data. Predictions from these models are compared with experimental data from the Pedestal International Database. Statistical quantities, such as Root-Mean Square Error (RMSE) and offset values, are computed to quantify the predictive capability of the models. It is found that the theory-based model predicts the pedestal temperature values moderately well yielding RMSE between 30% and 40%. The IPB98(y,3) scaling law yields with best agreement with RMSE of 30.4%. The empirical model predicts the pedestal temperature value with better agreement, yield RMSE of 25.9%

  3. Electrostatic effect for the collisionless tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, M.

    1987-01-01

    Electron dynamics has not been self-consistently considered in collisionless tearing mode theories to date because of the mathematical complexity of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. We have found using computer simulations that electrostatic fields play an important role in the tearing mode. Vlasov theory, including the electrostatic field, is investigated for topologies with both antiparallel and nonantiparallel magnetic field lines. The electrostatic field influences the resonant current in the neutral sheet which is a non-MHD effect, and modifies the linear growth rate. At the magnetopause, where the field lines are not antiparallel, the electrostatic effect acts to raise the linear growth rate of the tearing mode. On the other hand, in the magnetotail, where magnetic field lines are antiparallel, the electrostatic effect reduces the tearing mode growth rate. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  4. Thermal effects on tearing mode saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.S.; Chu, M.S.; Greene, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of geometry on tearing modes, saturated states of tearing modes, and the thermal effect on tearing modes are presented. The configuration of current and magnetic fields are quite different in slabs and in Tokamaks. However, for any magnetic island regardless of geometry and heating conditions, at island saturation the product of resistivity and current is the same at magnetic O and X lines. The temperature perturbation effect on the nonlinear development of tearing modes is investigated. Thermal conduction along the field lines is much faster than that in the perpendicular direction, and thus the temperature profile follows the island structure. Utilizing Spitzer's conductivity relation, the temperature perturbation is modelled as helical components of resistivity. For a usual tearing mode unstable Tokamak, where shear is positive, the islands continue to grow to a larger size when the islands are cooled. When they are heated, the island sizes are reduced. The temperature perturbation can induce islands even for equilibria stable with respect to tearing modes. Again, the islands appear when cooling takes place. The equilibria with the cooled islands show enhanced field line stochasticity, thus enhanced heat transport. Therefore, thermal instability can be directly related to pressure disruptions. (author)

  5. Effect of survey mode on response patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    .7%). Marital status, ethnic background and highest completed education were associated with non-response in both modes. Furthermore, sex and age were associated with non-response in the self-administered mode. No significant mode effects were observed for indicators related to use of health services......BACKGROUND: While face-to-face interviews are considered the gold standard of survey modes, self-administered questionnaires are often preferred for cost and convenience. This article examines response patterns in two general population health surveys carried out by face-to-face interview and self......-administered questionnaire, respectively. METHOD: Data derives from a health interview survey in the Region of Southern Denmark (face-to-face interview) and The Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2010 (self-administered questionnaire). Identical questions were used in both surveys. Data on all individuals were obtained from...

  6. Energetic particle effects on global MHD modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of energetic particles on MHD type modes are studied by analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K). In particular we address the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant ''fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral-beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beat space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect (finite ω *i ). On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the n=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 23 refs., 5 figs

  7. An investigation on the fatigue behavior of DCB specimen bonded with aluminum foam at Mode III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Cho, J. U. [Kongju University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Zhao, G [School of Aerospace, Xian Jiaotong University, Xian (China); Cho, C. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Aluminum foam with its excellent physical and mechanical characteristics is a lightweight metallic material used with good quality in vehicle bumpers, internal shock absorbers on planes, as materials for vessel joints etc. On the contrary, when aluminum foam is used without sufficient investigation, there is the likelihood of damage or destruction of the machine or mechanical structure, and in extreme case it may cause to human casualties. This study aims to analyze the characteristics of adhesive structures with aluminum foam for the closed-type aluminum foam used primarily as shock absorbers. The fatigue analyses of the DCB test specimens at mode III with aluminum foam are verified through a fatigue experiment. As the analysis results, test specimen models with the thicknesses (t) of 35 mm, 45 mm and 55 mm showed the peak load occurrence approximately after the progress from 0 to 50 cycles. And afterwards the load gradually decreased as the cycles increased. The peak loads for each DCB test specimens were ±0.80 kN for the specimen thickness(t) of 35 mm, ±0.98 kN for the specimen thickness(t) of 45 mm and ±1.18 kN for the specimen thickness(t) of 55 mm. It is also shown that the peak load occurring on the specimen increased as specimen thickness increased. These study results are compared with the specimen thickness of 35 mm model as the basis. When the specimen thickness is increased as much as 10 mm, the peak load is increased approximately 1.25 times. When the specimen thickness is also increased as much as 20 mm, the peak load is increased 1.5 times. The analysis data and the real experiment data showed similar results each other. Therefore, it can be thought that the analysis data is applicable in real field. And it is estimated that the mechanical characteristics of the DCB test specimen at mode III during the fatigue load conditions can be systematically and efficiently analyzed.

  8. A Mixed-Mode (I-II) Fracture Criterion for AS4/8552 Carbon/Epoxy Composite Laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnati, Sidharth Reddy

    A majority of aerospace structures are subjected to bending and stretching loads that introduce peel and shear stresses between the plies of a composite laminate. These two stress components cause a combination of mode I and II fracture modes in the matrix layer of the composite laminate. The most common failure mode in laminated composites is delamination that affects the structural integrity of composite structures. Damage tolerant designs of structures require two types of materials data: mixed-mode (I-II) delamination fracture toughness that predicts failure and delamination growth rate that predicts the life of the structural component. This research focuses determining mixed-mode (I-II) fracture toughness under a combination of mode I and mode II stress states and then a fracture criterion for AS4/8552 composite laminate, which is widely used in general aviation. The AS4/8552 prepreg was supplied by Hexcel Corporation and autoclave fabricated into a 20-ply unidirectional laminate with an artificial delamination by a Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) film at the mid-plane. Standard split beam specimens were prepared and tested in double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notched flexure modes to determine mode I (GIC) and II (GIIC) fracture toughnesses, respectively. The DCB specimens were also tested in a modified mixed-mode bending apparatus at GIIm /GT ratios of 0.18, 0.37, 0.57 and 0.78, where GT is total and GIIm is the mode II component of energy release rates. The measured fracture toughness, GC, was found to follow the locus a power law equation. The equation was validated for the present and literature experimental data.

  9. Preliminary failure mode and effect analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, J.V.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) was made on the overall 5 Kwe system. A general discussion of the system and failure effect is given in addition to the tabulated FMEA and a primary block diagram of the system. (U.S.)

  10. A direct proofreader-clamp interaction stabilizes the Pol III replicase in the polymerization mode

    KAUST Repository

    Jergic, Slobodan; Horan, Nicholas P.; Elshenawy, Mohamed; Mason, Claire E.; Urathamakul, Thitima; Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Robinson, Andrew J.; Goudsmits, Joris M H; Wang, Yao; Pan, Xuefeng; Beck, Jennifer L.; Van Oijen, Antoine M.; Huber, Thomas L.; Hamdan, Samir; Dixon, Nicholas E.

    2013-01-01

    Processive DNA synthesis by the αÉ"θ core of the Escherichia coli Pol III replicase requires it to be bound to the β 2 clamp via a site in the α polymerase subunit. How the É" proofreading exonuclease subunit influences DNA synthesis by α was not previously understood. In this work, bulk assays of DNA replication were used to uncover a non-proofreading activity of É". Combination of mutagenesis with biophysical studies and single-molecule leading-strand replication assays traced this activity to a novel β-binding site in É" that, in conjunction with the site in α, maintains a closed state of the αÉ"θ-β 2 replicase in the polymerization mode of DNA synthesis. The É"-β interaction, selected during evolution to be weak and thus suited for transient disruption to enable access of alternate polymerases and other clamp binding proteins, therefore makes an important contribution to the network of protein-protein interactions that finely tune stability of the replicase on the DNA template in its various conformational states. © 2013 European Molecular Biology Organization.

  11. A direct proofreader-clamp interaction stabilizes the Pol III replicase in the polymerization mode

    KAUST Repository

    Jergic, Slobodan

    2013-02-22

    Processive DNA synthesis by the αÉ"θ core of the Escherichia coli Pol III replicase requires it to be bound to the β 2 clamp via a site in the α polymerase subunit. How the É" proofreading exonuclease subunit influences DNA synthesis by α was not previously understood. In this work, bulk assays of DNA replication were used to uncover a non-proofreading activity of É". Combination of mutagenesis with biophysical studies and single-molecule leading-strand replication assays traced this activity to a novel β-binding site in É" that, in conjunction with the site in α, maintains a closed state of the αÉ"θ-β 2 replicase in the polymerization mode of DNA synthesis. The É"-β interaction, selected during evolution to be weak and thus suited for transient disruption to enable access of alternate polymerases and other clamp binding proteins, therefore makes an important contribution to the network of protein-protein interactions that finely tune stability of the replicase on the DNA template in its various conformational states. © 2013 European Molecular Biology Organization.

  12. Electrically driven hybrid Si/III-V Fabry-Pérot lasers based on adiabatic mode transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Bakir, B; Descos, A; Olivier, N; Bordel, D; Grosse, P; Augendre, E; Fulbert, L; Fedeli, J M

    2011-05-23

    We report the first demonstration of an electrically driven hybrid silicon/III-V laser based on adiabatic mode transformers. The hybrid structure is formed by two vertically superimposed waveguides separated by a 100-nm-thick SiO2 layer. The top waveguide, fabricated in an InP/InGaAsP-based heterostructure, serves to provide optical gain. The bottom Si-waveguides system, which supports all optical functions, is constituted by two tapered rib-waveguides (mode transformers), two distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and a surface-grating coupler. The supermodes of this hybrid structure are controlled by an appropriate design of the tapers located at the edges of the gain region. In the middle part of the device almost all the field resides in the III-V waveguide so that the optical mode experiences maximal gain, while in regions near the III-V facets, mode transformers ensure an efficient transfer of the power flow towards Si-waveguides. The investigated device operates under quasi-continuous wave regime. The room temperature threshold current is 100 mA, the side-mode suppression ratio is as high as 20 dB, and the fiber-coupled output power is ~7 mW.

  13. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  14. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Eric C., E-mail: eford@uw.edu; Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  15. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Eric C.; Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed

  16. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric C; Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-01

    Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes had RPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  17. Examination of the 'web mode effect'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Sanne Lund; Shamshiri-Petersen, Ditte

    Declining response rates is one of the most significant challenges for survey based research today. Seen in isolation, traditional interviewer based data collection methods are still the most effective but also the most expensive, especially the greater difficulty in gaining responses taken...... into account. As a solution, mixed-mode designs have been employed as a way to achieve higher response rates, while keeping the overall costs low. In particular, the use of web based surveys has expanded considerably during the last few years, both as a single data collection method and as a component in mixed...... with telephone surveys, not enabling determination of a “web mode effect”. In this case, differences might as well be due to differences between self-administered and interviewer-administered collection methods. Other parts of literature on mixed-mode design including a web option are using stratified sampling...

  18. Fracture toughness of the F-82H steel-effect of loading modes, hydrogen, and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.-X.; Jones, R.H.; Hirth, J.P.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of loading mode, hydrogen, and temperature on fracture toughness and tearing modulus were examined for a ferritic/martensitic steel (F-82H). The introduction of a shear load component, mode III, significantly decreased the initiation and propagation resistance of cracks compared to the opening load, mode I, behavior. Mode I crack initiation and propagation exhibited the highest resistance. A minimum resistance occurred when the mode I and mode III loads were nearly equal. The presence of 4 wppm hydrogen decreased the cracking resistance compared to behavior without H regardless of the loading mode. The minimum mixed-mode fracture toughness with the presence of hydrogen was about 30% of the hydrogen-free mode I fracture toughness. The mixed-mode toughness exhibited a lesser sensitivity to temperature than the mode I toughness. The J IC value was 284 kJ/m 2 at room temperature, but only 60 kJ/m 2 at -55 C and 30 kJ/m 2 at -90 C. The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was apparently higher than -55 C. (orig.)

  19. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment on domestic aramid fiber III reinforced bismaleimide composite interfacial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen; Wang, Jing; Chen, Ping; Feng, Jiayue; Cui, Jinyuan; Yang, Faze

    2017-12-01

    Domestic Aramid Fiber III (DAF III) was modified by oxygen plasma treatment. The fiber surface characteristics was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results showed that oxygen plasma treatment changed surface morphologies. The effects of oxygen plasma treatment on DAF III reinforced bismaleimides (BMI) composite bending and interfacial properties were investigated, respectively. The ILSS value increased from 49.3 MPa to 56.0 MPa (by 13.5%) after oxygen plasma treatment. The bending strength changed a little. Furthermore, the composite rupture mode changed from interfacial rupture to fiber or resin bulk rupture.

  20. An assessment of BWR [boiling water reactor] Mark III containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, J.A.; Pafford, D.J.; Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes risk-significant challenges posed to Mark III containment systems by severe accidents as identified for Grand Gulf. Design similarities and differences between the Mark III plants that are important to containment performance are summarized. The accident sequences responsible for the challenges and the postulated containment failure modes associated with each challenge are identified and described. Improvements are discussed that have the potential either to prevent or delay containment failure, or to mitigate the offsite consequences of a fission product release. For each of these potential improvements, a qualitative analysis is provided. A limited quantitative risk analysis is provided for selected potential improvements. 21 refs., 5 figs., 46 tabs

  1. Mode I and mixed I/III crack initiation and propagation behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy at 25{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.X.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture behavior of the production-scale heat (No. 832665) of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated at 25{degrees}C using compact tension (CT) specimens for a mode I crack and modified CT specimens for a mixed-mode I/III crack. The mode III to mode I load ratio was 0.47. Test specimens were vacuum annealed at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h after final machining. Both mode I and mixed-mode I/III specimens were fatigue cracked prior to J-integral testing. It was noticed that the mixed-mode I/III crack angle decreased from an initial 25 degrees to approximately 23 degrees due to crack plane rotation during fatigue cracking. No crack plane rotation occurred in the mode I specimen. The crack initiation and propagation behavior was evaluated by generating J-R curves. Due to the high ductility of this alloy and the limited specimen thickness (6.35 mm), plane strain requirements were not met so valid critical J-integral values were not obtained. However, it was found that the crack initiation and propagation behavior was significantly different between the mode I and the mixed-mode I/III specimens. In the mode I specimen crack initiation did not occur, only extensive crack tip blunting due to plastic deformation. During J-integral testing the mixed-mode crack rotated to an increased crack angle (in contrast to fatigue precracking) by crack blunting. When the crack initiated, the crack angle was about 30 degrees. After crack initiation the crack plane remained at 30 degrees until the test was completed. Mixed-mode crack initiation was difficult, but propagation was easy. The fracture surface of the mixed-mode specimen was characterized by microvoid coalescence.

  2. Effects of multiple modes interaction on the resistive wall mode instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Longxi; Lei, Wenqing; Ma, Zhiwei; Wu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of multiple modes interaction on the resistive wall mode (RWM) are studied in a slab geometry with and without plasma flow. The modes interaction can have a large effect on both the linear growth rate and the nonlinear saturation level of the RWM. We found that modes interaction can suppress the linear growth rate for the most unstable mode. The plasma flow can also help to control the growth of the RWM. The RWM can be stabilized completely by a plasma flow when considering the modes interaction. The effect of modes interaction on the RWM is stronger for the mode rational surface in the vacuum than that in the plasma. The modes interaction results in a substantially lowered saturation level for the most unstable RWM. (paper)

  3. SOLPS5 modelling of the type III ELMing H-mode on TCV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulejova, B.; Pitts, R.A.; Wischmeier, M.; Behn, R.; Coster, D.; Horacek, J.; Marki, J.

    2007-01-01

    Although ohmic H-modes have long been produced on TCV and the effects of ELMs at the divertor target studied in some detail, no attempt has yet been made to model the scrape-off layer (SOL) in these plasmas. This paper describes details of the first such efforts in which simulations of the inter-ELM phases using the coupled fluid-Monte Carlo SOLPS5 code (without drifts) are constrained by careful upstream Thomson scattering and Langmuir probe profiles. Simulated divertor profiles are compared with Langmuir probes and fast IR camera measurements at the targets. To account for the very differing transport rates in the edge pedestal and main SOL regions, radial variation of edge transport coefficients has been introduced in the simulations. Similarly, it is found that transport in the main chamber and divertor regions must be separately adjusted to provide an acceptable code-experiment match

  4. N-Annulated Perylene as a Donor in Cyclopentadithiophene Based Sensitizers: The Effect of Linking Mode

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Jie; Wang, Xingzhu; Fan, Li; Li, Gongqiang; Qi, Qingbiao; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Tam, Teck Lip Dexter; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Qing; Wu, Jishan

    2015-01-01

    Two types of cyclopentadithiophene dyes with different linking modes with an N-annulated perylene (NP) donor were designed and synthesized. These new dyes were applied in Co(II)/(III) based dye-sensitized solar cells and an efficiency up to 7.8% could be obtained for peri-NP linked CPD-1. The effect of the linking mode on the material properties and device performance was discussed.

  5. N-Annulated Perylene as a Donor in Cyclopentadithiophene Based Sensitizers: The Effect of Linking Mode

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Jie

    2015-11-24

    Two types of cyclopentadithiophene dyes with different linking modes with an N-annulated perylene (NP) donor were designed and synthesized. These new dyes were applied in Co(II)/(III) based dye-sensitized solar cells and an efficiency up to 7.8% could be obtained for peri-NP linked CPD-1. The effect of the linking mode on the material properties and device performance was discussed.

  6. [Clinical value of "Kou mode of hepatic hilar anastomosis" in resection of type III or IV hepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-dong; Liu, Wei; Tao, Lian-yuan; Zhang, Zhen-huan; Cai, Lei; Zhang, Shuang-min

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the surgical technique of "Kou mode of hepatic hilar anastomosis" in the treatment for type III or IV hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The clinical data of 89 patients with type III or IV hilar cholangiocarcinoma surgically treated in our department between Jan. 1990 and Jan. 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Since January 2000, "Kou mode of hepatic hilar anastomosis" was performed for some patients with advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The patients were divided into two groups: group A treated between 1990 and 1999, group B between 2000 and 2008. The rate of resection, therapeutic efficacy and complications in these two groups were compared, respectively. Of the 37 cases with hilar cholangiocarcinoma in group A, 4 were surgically treated (10.8%), with 1 (2.7%) radical resection and 3 (8.1%) palliative resection. Among the 52 cases with hilar cholangiocarcinoma in the group B, 35 (67.3%) received surgical resection, of them 15 (28.8%) underwent radical resection and 20 (38.5%) had palliative resection. Twenty-eight of these 35 cases underwent the "Kou mode of hepatic hilar anastomosis". The resection rate of advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma in the group B was significantly higher than that in group A (P anastomosis" developed bile leakage to a varying degree and recovered after drainage and symptomatic treatment. The resection rate of type III or IV advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma can be remarkably improved by using a novel alternative surgical technique called "Kou mode of hepatic hilar anastomosis". However, the long-term outcome still needs to be determined by close follow-up and further observation.

  7. A Novel Procedure for Prediction of Mixed Mode I/II in Fracture Toughness of Laminate Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahmood Shokrieh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Delamination is one of the important modes of failure in laminated composite materials. In this respect, the mixed mode I/II fracture is the most major mode of delamination incidence in laminated composite. In the present research, a relation between the fracture toughness of double cantilever beam (DCB and asymmetric double cantilever beam (ADCB specimens is presented. The DCB and ADCB samples are used for measuring the mode I and mixed mode I/II fracture toughness (G of laminated composite materials, respectively. By considering the diversity of the stacking sequence of lay-ups, the test performance on all different types of lay-ups in order to measure the fracture toughness of laminated composites is a tedious, costly and time consuming task. The purpose of deriving this relation is to estimate the value of the strain energy release rate of laminated composite ADCB specimens by testing a unidirectional DCB. To develop this relationship, the geometry of DCB and ADCB specimens are considered to obtain fracture toughness of multi-directional laminate composites of ADCB samples with arbitrary ply sequence which may be used for design purposes. The procedure presented here reduces the calculation costs of the finite element modeling and its corresponding test significantly. The results obtained by this method are compared with those of experimental and numerical methods. It is shown that the fracture toughness of multi-directional lay-ups can be predicted by measuring the unidirectional ply with an error less than 10% demonstrating the accuracy of the procedure developed in the present research.

  8. Neighborhood crime and transit station access mode choice - phase III of neighborhood crime and travel behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report provides the findings from the third phase of a three-part study about the influences of neighborhood crimes on travel : mode choice. While previous phases found evidence that high levels of neighborhood crime discourage people from choos...

  9. Effects of toroidicity on resistive tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Monticello, D.A.; Manickam, J.; Strauss, H.R.; Grimm, R.; McGuire, K.

    1983-03-01

    A reduced set of resistive MHD equations is solved numerically in three dimensions to study the stability of tokamak plasmas. Toroidal effects are included self-consistently to leading and next order in inverse aspect ratio, epsilon. The equations satisfy an energy integral. In addition, the momentum equation yields the Grad-Shafranov equation correct to all orders in epsilon. Low beta plasma are studied using several different q-profiles. In all cases, the linear growth rates are reduced by finite toroidicity. Excellent agreement with resistive PEST is obtianed. In some cases, toroidal effects lead to complete stabilization of the mode. Nonlinear results show smaller saturated island widths for finite aspect ratio compared to the cylindrical limit. If the current channel is wide enough so as to produce steep gradients towards the outside of the plasma, both the finite aspect ratio cases and cylindrical cases disrupt

  10. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  11. Fracture under mixed-mode I+II of the austenitic stainless steel 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, K.L.

    1993-08-01

    The stability of cracks under mixed-mode l+ll in an aged stainless steel type 316L is investigated using four-points bent specimens. The formulas of the bending moment, the shearing force, the mode mixity, the limit load and the J estimations are established and compared with the numerical results from elastoplastic finite element calculations. From the experimental and numerical tests results, the application and the validation of the R6 method and various local criteria (Beremin, McClintock, Guennouni-Francois and Lemaitre models) are carried out. For the R6 method, it is noted that the FAD (Failure Assessment Diagram) is nearly independent of the loading mode and the specimen geometry. The FAD of the option 1 is conservative for all the test results, but the option 3 seems to be non-conservative, especially in the cases near to the mode I. This apparent non-conservatism is probably due to the different definition of the crack initiation of the CT specimens and the 4-point bend specimens. According to the applied local criteria, the values of the damage variables at crack initiation are sufficiently stable, particularly for the Beremin model and the Guennouni-Francois model but not in the cases nearer to the mode I. The use of these local criteria is questionable in the case of axisymmetric notched specimens because of the influence of the fracture of transformed ferrite. A fractographic investigation is also discussed for different fracture modes. (author). 85 refs., 99 figs., 14 tabs

  12. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgalla, R. J. F., E-mail: reneesgalla@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ∼ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λ{sub r} ∼ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs)

  13. A Modified Edge Crack Torsion Test for Measurement of Mode III Fracture Toughness of Laminated Tape Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Davidson, Barry D.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Modifications to the edge crack torsion (ECT) test are studied to improve the reliability of this test for measuring the mode-III fracture toughness, G (sub IIIc), of laminated tape fiber-reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites. First, the data reduction methods currently used in the ECT test are evaluated and deficiencies in their accuracy are discussed. An alternative data reduction technique, which uses a polynomial form to represent ECT specimen compliance solution, is evaluated and compared to FEA (finite element analysis) results. Second, seven batches of ECT specimens are tested, each batch containing specimens with a preimplanted midplane edge delamination and midplane plies with orientations of plus theta divided by minus theta, with theta ranging from 0 degrees to 90 degrees in 15-degree increments. Tests on these specimens show that intralaminar cracking occurs in specimens from all batches except for which theta = 15 degrees and 30 degrees. Tests on specimens of these two batches are shown to result in mode-III delamination growth at the intended ply interface. The findings from this study are encouraging steps towards the use of the ECT test as a standardized method for measuring G (sub IIIc), although further modification to the data reduction method is required to make it suitable for use as part of a standardized test method.

  14. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  15. Investigation of mixed mode - I/II fracture problems - Part 1: computational and experimental analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, to investigate and understand the nature of fracture behavior properly under in-plane mixed mode (Mode-I/II loading, three-dimensional fracture analyses and experiments of compact tension shear (CTS specimen are performed under different mixed mode loading conditions. Al 7075-T651 aluminum machined from rolled plates in the L-T rolling direction (crack plane is perpendicular to the rolling direction is used in this study. Results from finite element analyses and fracture loads, crack deflection angles obtained from the experiments are presented. To simulate the real conditions in the experiments, contacts are defined between the contact surfaces of the loading devices, specimen and loading pins. Modeling, meshing and the solution of the problem involving the whole assembly, i.e., loading devices, pins and the specimen, with contact mechanics are performed using ANSYSTM. Then, CTS specimen is analyzed separately using a submodeling approach, in which three-dimensional enriched finite elements are used in FRAC3D solver to calculate the resulting stress intensity factors along the crack front. Having performed the detailed computational and experimental studies on the CTS specimen, a new specimen type together with its loading device is also proposed that has smaller dimensions compared to the regular CTS specimen. Experimental results for the new specimen are also presented.

  16. Highly Selective Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase III beta Inhibitors and Structural Insight into Their Mode of Action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mejdrová, Ivana; Chalupská, Dominika; Kögler, Martin; Šála, Michal; Plačková, Pavla; Bäumlová, Adriana; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Procházková, Eliška; Dejmek, Milan; Guillon, Rémi; Strunin, Dmytro; Weber, Jan; Lee, G.; Birkuš, G.; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Bouřa, Evžen; Nencka, Radim

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 9 (2015), s. 3767-3793 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302; GA ČR GA15-09310S; GA ČR GJ15-21030Y EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 333916 - STARPI4K Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III beta * broad-spectrum antiviral agents * positive-sense RNA viruses Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.589, year: 2015

  17. Geometrical effects in X-mode scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretz, N.

    1986-10-01

    One technique to extend microwave scattering as a probe of long wavelength density fluctuations in magnetically confined plasmas is to consider the launching and scattering of extraordinary (X-mode) waves nearly perpendicular to the field. When the incident frequency is less than the electron cyclotron frequency, this mode can penetrate beyond the ordinary mode cutoff at the plasma frequency and avoid significant distortions from density gradients typical of tokamak plasmas. In the more familiar case, where the incident and scattered waves are ordinary, the scattering is isotropic perpendicular to the field. However, because the X-mode polarization depends on the frequency ratios and the ray angle to the magnetic field, the coupling between the incident and scattered waves is complicated. This geometrical form factor must be unfolded from the observed scattering in order to interpret the scattering due to density fluctuations alone. The geometrical factor is calculated here for the special case of scattering perpendicular to the magnetic field. For frequencies above the ordinary mode cutoff the scattering is relatively isotropic, while below cutoff there are minima in the forward and backward directions which go to zero at approximately half the ordinary mode cutoff density

  18. Failure mode and effects analysis: an empirical comparison of failure mode scoring procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Laura; Armitage, Gerry

    2010-12-01

    To empirically compare 2 different commonly used failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) scoring procedures with respect to their resultant failure mode scores and prioritization: a mathematical procedure, where scores are assigned independently by FMEA team members and averaged, and a consensus procedure, where scores are agreed on by the FMEA team via discussion. A multidisciplinary team undertook a Healthcare FMEA of chemotherapy administration. This included mapping the chemotherapy process, identifying and scoring failure modes (potential errors) for each process step, and generating remedial strategies to counteract them. Failure modes were scored using both an independent mathematical procedure and a team consensus procedure. Almost three-fifths of the 30 failure modes generated were scored differently by the 2 procedures, and for just more than one-third of cases, the score discrepancy was substantial. Using the Healthcare FMEA prioritization cutoff score, almost twice as many failure modes were prioritized by the consensus procedure than by the mathematical procedure. This is the first study to empirically demonstrate that different FMEA scoring procedures can score and prioritize failure modes differently. It found considerable variability in individual team members' opinions on scores, which highlights the subjective and qualitative nature of failure mode scoring. A consensus scoring procedure may be most appropriate for FMEA as it allows variability in individuals' scores and rationales to become apparent and to be discussed and resolved by the team. It may also yield team learning and communication benefits unlikely to result from a mathematical procedure.

  19. Generalized effective mode volume for leaky optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Van Vlack, C.; Hughes, S.

    2012-01-01

    We show explicitly how the commonly adopted prescription for calculating effective mode volumes is wrong and leads to uncontrolled errors. Instead, we introduce a generalized mode volume that can be easily evaluated based on the mode calculation methods typically applied in the literature, and wh......, and which allows one to compute the Purcell effect and other interesting optical phenomena in a rigorous and unambiguous way....

  20. Mode and climatic factors effect on energy losses in transient heat modes of transmission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigun, A. Ya; Sidorov, O. A.; Osipov, D. S.; Girshin, S. S.; Goryunov, V. N.; Petrova, E. V.

    2018-01-01

    Electrical energy losses increase in modern grids. The losses are connected with an increase in consumption. Existing models of electric power losses estimation considering climatic factors do not allow estimating the cable temperature in real time. Considering weather and mode factors in real time allows to meet effectively and safely the consumer’s needs to minimize energy losses during transmission, to use electric power equipment effectively. These factors increase an interest in the evaluation of the dynamic thermal mode of overhead transmission lines conductors. The article discusses an approximate analytic solution of the heat balance equation in the transient operation mode of overhead lines based on the least squares method. The accuracy of the results obtained is comparable with the results of solving the heat balance equation of transient thermal mode with the Runge-Kutt method. The analysis of mode and climatic factors effect on the cable temperature in a dynamic thermal mode is presented. The calculation of the maximum permissible current for variation of weather conditions is made. The average electric energy losses during the transient process are calculated with the change of wind, air temperature and solar radiation. The parameters having the greatest effect on the transmission capacity are identified.

  1. Self-rated health assessed by web versus mail modes in a mixed mode survey: the digital divide effect and the genuine survey mode effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae-Mahn; Shin, Eunjung; Johnson, Timothy P

    2013-09-01

    To investigate differences in self-rated health (SRH) between web and mail questionnaires in a mixed mode survey and to provide a model that explains those differences. A total of 15,200 mail respondents and 17,829 web respondents from the 2008 US National Health Survey conducted by the Gallup Panel. Respondents were recruited using random digit dialing and assigned to one of the two survey modes (web or mail). Respondents with household Internet connection and frequent Internet usage were invited to complete the survey through the web mode. Respondents who had no Internet connection or who used the Internet infrequently were invited to the mail mode. Thus, respondents with better Internet access used the web mode. Respondents completed a questionnaire that asked about SRH status, objective health conditions, health behaviors, and other socioeconomic variables. Statistical associations were analyzed with ordered Logit and negative binomial models. Web respondents reported better SRH than mail respondents. This difference is in part reflective of variability in objective health status between these two groups, and in part attributable to the effects of survey mode. These results maintained with age controlled. The alignment between survey mode selection, Internet access, and health disparities, as well as genuine survey mode characteristics, leads to web-mail differences in SRH. Unless the digital divide and its influences on survey mode selection are resolved and differential genuine mode effects are fully comprehended, we recommend that both modes be simultaneously used on a complementary basis.

  2. Clinical risk analysis with failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) model in a dialysis unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfant, Giovanna; Belfanti, Pietro; Paternoster, Giuseppe; Gabrielli, Danila; Gaiter, Alberto M; Manes, Massimo; Molino, Andrea; Pellu, Valentina; Ponzetti, Clemente; Farina, Massimo; Nebiolo, Pier E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of clinical risk management is to improve the quality of care provided by health care organizations and to assure patients' safety. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a tool employed for clinical risk reduction. We applied FMEA to chronic hemodialysis outpatients. FMEA steps: (i) process study: we recorded phases and activities. (ii) Hazard analysis: we listed activity-related failure modes and their effects; described control measures; assigned severity, occurrence and detection scores for each failure mode and calculated the risk priority numbers (RPNs) by multiplying the 3 scores. Total RPN is calculated by adding single failure mode RPN. (iii) Planning: we performed a RPNs prioritization on a priority matrix taking into account the 3 scores, and we analyzed failure modes causes, made recommendations and planned new control measures. (iv) Monitoring: after failure mode elimination or reduction, we compared the resulting RPN with the previous one. Our failure modes with the highest RPN came from communication and organization problems. Two tools have been created to ameliorate information flow: "dialysis agenda" software and nursing datasheets. We scheduled nephrological examinations, and we changed both medical and nursing organization. Total RPN value decreased from 892 to 815 (8.6%) after reorganization. Employing FMEA, we worked on a few critical activities, and we reduced patients' clinical risk. A priority matrix also takes into account the weight of the control measures: we believe this evaluation is quick, because of simple priority selection, and that it decreases action times.

  3. Solvent effects on extraction of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III), with decanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Hisao; Fujii, Yukio; Mizuta, Masateru

    1986-01-01

    Extraction of aluminum(III) and indium(III) with decanoic acid in 1-octanol was carried out at 25 deg C and at an aqueous ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm -3 (NaClO 4 ). Monomeric and tetrameric aluminum(III) decanoates and monomeric indium(III) decanoate are responsible for the extraction. From a comparison of the present results with those obtained from the previous works, the polymerization of the extracted species was found to be more extensive in benzene than in 1-octanol, and the metal decanoates were highly polymerized in the following order in both solvents: Al > Ga > In. (author)

  4. Tearing modes with pressure gradient effect in pair plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Huishan; Li Ding; Zheng Jian

    2009-01-01

    The general dispersion relation of tearing mode with pressure gradient effect in pair plasmas is derived analytically. If the pressure gradients of positron and electron are not identical in pair plasmas, the pressure gradient has significant influence at tearing mode in both collisionless and collisional regimes. In collisionless regime, the effects of pressure gradient depend on its magnitude. For small pressure gradient, the growth rate of tearing mode is enhanced by pressure gradient. For large pressure gradient, the growth rate is reduced by pressure gradient. The tearing mode can even be stabilized if pressure gradient is large enough. In collisional regime, the growth rate of tearing mode is reduced by the pressure gradient. While the positron and electron have equal pressure gradient, tearing mode is not affected by pressure gradient in pair plasmas.

  5. The Moessbauer effect in Fe(III) HEDTA, Fe(III) EDTA, and Fe(III) CDTA compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of Moessbauer spectra with pH value of Fe(III)HEDTA and Fe(III)CDTA compounds is studied. Informations on formation processes of LFe-O-FeL (L=ligand) type dimers by the relation of titration curves of Fe(III)EDTA, Fe(III)HEDTA and Fe(III)CDTA compounds with the series of Moessbauer spectra, are obtained. Some informations on Fe-O-Fe bond structure are also obtained. Comparing the titration curves with the series of Moessbauer spectra, it is concluded that the dimerization process begins when a specie of the form FeXOH α (X = EDTA, HEDTA, CDTA; α = -1, -2) arises. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Effects of Different Student Response Modes on Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Lee Sze; Chen, Chwen Jen

    2017-01-01

    Student response systems (SRSs) are wireless answering devices that enable students to provide simple real-time feedback to instructors. This study aims to evaluate the effects of different SRS interaction modes on elementary school students' science learning. Three interaction modes which include SRS Individual, SRS Collaborative, and Classroom…

  7. Letter report seismic shutdown system failure mode and effect analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KECK, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Supply Ventilation System Seismic Shutdown ensures that the 234-52 building supply fans, the dry air process fans and vertical development calciner are shutdown following a seismic event. This evaluates the failure modes and determines the effects of the failure modes

  8. Passive harmonic mode locking by mode selection in Fabry-Perot diode lasers with patterned effective index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitauld, David; Osborne, Simon; O'Brien, Stephen

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate passive harmonic mode locking of a quantum-well laser diode designed to support a discrete comb of Fabry-Perot modes. Spectral filtering of the mode spectrum was achieved using a nonperiodic patterning of the cavity effective index. By selecting six modes spaced at twice the fundamental mode spacing, near-transform-limited pulsed output with 2 ps pulse duration was obtained at a repetition rate of 100 GHz.

  9. Resistive effect on ion fishbone mode in tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Bingren; Vandam, J.W.; Carrera, R.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    1992-07-01

    A consistent theoretical description of the resistive internal mode is presented to discuss the effect of resistivity on fishbone mode for different parameter regime of bulk and hot components. It is found that the ideal fishbone mode theory ceases to be correct for the low frequency fishbone branch, the so-called ion fishbone mode, which has a real frequency very close to ω *i (the diamagnetic frequency) in marginal state. The stability domain analysis in β h , γ mhd ) space based on the resistive dispersion relation shows that the transition between the stable and unstable region is more complicated than predicted by the ideal limit theory. Another salient feature of the resistive fishbone mode is the existence of a weakly unstable regime. For high frequency fishbone with ω ∼ ω dm (the toroidal precession frequency of the hot ions) resistivity has negligible effect and the ideal theory is correct

  10. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or until...

  11. Effects of oxygen plasma treatment power on Aramid fiber III/BMI composite humidity resistance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Shi, Chen; Feng, Jiayue; Long, Xi; Meng, Lingzhi; Ren, Hang

    2018-01-01

    The effects of oxygen plasma treatment power on Aramid Fiber III chemical structure and its reinforced bismaleimides (BMI) composite humidity resistance properties were investigated in this work. The aramid fiber III chemical structure under different plasma treatment power were measured by FTIR. The composite bending strength and interlinear shear strength with different plasma treatment power before and after absorption water were tested respectively. The composite rupture morphology was observed by SEM. The FTIR results showed that oxygen plasma treatment do not change the fiber bulk chemical structure. The composite humidity resistance of bending strength and interlinear shear strength are similar for untreated and plasma treated samples. The retention rate of composite bending strength and interlinear shear strength are about 75% and 94%, respectively. The composite rupture mode turns to be the fiber failure after water absorption.

  12. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Melissa; Malin, Jane T.

    2013-01-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component s functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  13. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Melissa D.; Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land D.

    2013-09-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component's functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  14. Local effect of equilibrium current on tearing mode stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzani, F.

    1985-12-01

    The local effect of the equilibrium current on the linear stability of low poloidal number tearing modes in tokamaks is investigated analytically. The plasma response inside the tearing layer is derived from fluid theory and the local equilibrium current is shown to couple to the mode dynamics through its gradient, which is proportional to the local electron temperature gradient under the approximations used in the analysis. The relevant eigenmode equations, expressing Ampere's law and the plasma quasineutrality condition, respectively, are suitably combined in a single integral equation, from which a variational principle is formulated to derive the mode dispersion relations for several cases of interest. The local equilibrium current is treated as a small perturbation of the known results for the m greater than or equal to 2 and the m = 1 tearing modes in the collisional regime, and the m greater than or equal to 2 tearing mode in the semicollisional regime; its effect is found to enhance stabilization for the m greater than or equal to 2 drift-tearing mode in the collisional regime, whereas the m = 1 growth rate is very slightly increased and the stabilizing effect of the parallel thermal conduction on the m greater than or equal to 2 mode in the semicollisional regime is slightly reduced

  15. Cumulative effects in inflation with ultra-light entropy modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achúcarro, Ana; Atal, Vicente [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Germani, Cristiano [Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Palma, Gonzalo A., E-mail: achucar@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: vicente.atal@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: germani@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: gpalmaquilod@ing.uchile.cl [Grupo de Cosmología y Astrofísica Teórica, Departamento de Física, FCFM, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile)

    2017-02-01

    In multi-field inflation one or more non-adiabatic modes may become light, potentially inducing large levels of isocurvature perturbations in the cosmic microwave background. If in addition these light modes are coupled to the adiabatic mode, they influence its evolution on super horizon scales. Here we consider the case in which a non-adiabatic mode becomes approximately massless (''ultralight') while still coupled to the adiabatic mode, a typical situation that arises with pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons or moduli. This ultralight mode freezes on super-horizon scales and acts as a constant source for the curvature perturbation, making it grow linearly in time and effectively suppressing the isocurvature component. We identify a Stückelberg-like emergent shift symmetry that underlies this behavior. As inflation lasts for many e -folds, the integrated effect of this source enhances the power spectrum of the adiabatic mode, while keeping the non-adiabatic spectrum approximately untouched. In this case, towards the end of inflation all the fluctuations, adiabatic and non-adiabatic, are dominated by a single degree of freedom.

  16. Survey Mode Effects on Valuation of Environmental Goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Bell

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the effect of the choice of survey recruitment mode on the value of water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams. Four different modes are compared: bringing respondents to one central location after phone recruitment, mall intercepts in two states, national phone-mail survey, and an Internet survey with a national, probability-based panel. The modes differ in terms of the representativeness of the samples, non-response rates, sample selection effects, and consistency of responses. The article also shows that the estimated value of water quality can differ substantially depending on the survey mode. The national Internet panel has the most desirable properties with respect to performance on the four important survey dimensions of interest.

  17. Effects of mode coupling between low-mode radiation flux asymmetry and intermediate-mode ablator roughness on ignition capsule implosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfa Gu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-mode shell asymmetry and high-mode hot spot mixing appear to be the main reasons for the performance degradation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF implosion experiments. The effects of the mode coupling between low-mode P2 radiation flux asymmetry and intermediate-mode L = 24 capsule roughness on the implosion performance of ignition capsule are investigated by two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations. It is shown that the amplitudes of new modes generated by the mode coupling are in good agreement with the second-order mode coupling equation during the acceleration phase. The later flow field not only shows large areal density P2 asymmetry in the main fuel, but also generates large-amplitude spikes and bubbles. In the deceleration phase, the increasing mode coupling generates more new modes, and the perturbation spectrum on the hot spot boundary is mainly from the strong mode interactions rather than the initial perturbation conditions. The combination of the low-mode and high-mode perturbations breaks up the capsule shell, resulting in a significant reduction of the hot spot temperature and implosion performance.

  18. Engineering Design Education: Effect of Mode of Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Kinda Khalaf; Shadi Balawi; George W. Hitt; Mohammad A.M. Siddiqi

    2013-01-01

    This work reports on the gradual transformation from traditional teaching to student-centered, pure problem-based-learning (PBL) in engineering design education. Three different PBL-based modes of delivery with various degrees of modulation or freedom were used in conjunction with the prescriptive design cycle. The aim is to study the effect of the mode of delivery (PBL at various degrees of integration) on engineering design education and design thinking skills, specifically on the developme...

  19. Effect of boundary conditions on radial mode structure of whistlers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boswell, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    The dispersion of the radical eigen modes of a cylindrical m=1 whistler wave with Ωsub(i) << ω << Ωsub(e) << ωsub(pe) are investigated for both conducting and insulating boundaries, where Ωsub(e) and Ωsub(i) are the electron and ion gyro frequencies, Ωsub(pe) is the electron plasma frequency. The effects of electron inertia and resistivity on the modes are discussed

  20. Speciation of Am(III)/Eu(III) sorbed on γ-alumina. Effect of metal ion concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.; Tomar, B.S.; Godbole, S.V.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper describes the speciation of Am(III)/Eu(III) sorbed on γ-alumina, and its evolution with changing metal ion concentration, studied using batch sorption experiment, time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and surface Complexation modeling (SCM). Though numerous studies exist in the literature on the speciation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides on alumina surface, the mechanism of sorption at high metal ion concentrations is not yet fully understood. Batch sorption experiments of Am(III) on γ-alumina under varying condition of pH (3-10), ionic strength (0.005-0.1 M NaClO 4 ) and metal ion concentration (10 -7 -10 -4 M) were performed. Higher metal ion concentration was achieved by the addition of Eu(III) considering it as an analogue of Am(III). Time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) study of Eu(III) sorbed on γ-alumina at the metal ion concentration of 5.0 x 10 -5 M was carried out over pH 4 to 7. TRFS showed the presence of two surface species, with distinctly different fluorescence decay life times. The shorter lifetime value and its changing pattern with pH indicate the surface species corresponding to this component to be monodentate species > AlOAm 2+ and its hydrolyzed forms. The sorbed Eu 3+ species corresponding to the longer lifetime value has 2-3 water molecules in its first coordination sphere and is multidentate in its binding on alumina surface. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurement of Eu:γ-Al 2 O 3 sorption systems at pH 6.18 and 7.15 corroborate the existence of two surface complexes. Further it suggests the edge sharing bidentate binding of Eu on AlO 6 octahedra as the co-ordination mode of the higher lifetime component. Surface Complexation Modeling (SCM) of Am(III)/Eu(III) sorption onto γ-alumina at pH ≤7 has been carried out using these two surface species. 2-pK surface complexation modeling coupled with constant capacitance model

  1. Radiation Effects in III-V Nanowire Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    fabrication of an in-plane nanowire (NW) GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor field- effect transistor (MOSFET) by focused -ion beam (FIB) etching and chemical...8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS 6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-16-94 Radiation Effects in III-V...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY

  2. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro); Spektroskopische Untersuchungen zur Komplexbildung von Cm(III) und Eu(III) mit organischen Modellliganden sowie ihrer chemischen Bindungsform in menschlichem Urin (in vitro)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-10-26

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  3. A quantitative method for Failure Mode and Effects Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan; Meesters, A.J.; Klingenberg, W.; Hicks, C.

    2012-01-01

    Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is commonly used for designing maintenance routines by analysing potential failures, predicting their effect and facilitating preventive action. It is used to make decisions on operational and capital expenditure. The literature has reported that despite its

  4. Effective As(III) Removal by A Multi-Charged Hydroacid Complex Draw Solute Facilitated Forward Osmosis-Membrane Distillation (FO-MD) Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun; Han, Gang; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Effective removal of As(III) from water by an oxalic acid complex with the formula of Na3[Cr(C2O4)3] (Na-Cr-OA) is demonstrated via an forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) hybrid system in this study. Na-Cr-OA first proved its superiority as a draw solute with high water fluxes and negligible reverse fluxes in FO, then a systematic investigation of the Na-Cr-OA promoted FO process was conducted to ascertain the factors in As(III) removal. Relatively high water fluxes of 28 LMH under the FO mode and 74 LMH under the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode were achieved when using a 1000 ppm As(III) solution as the feed and 1.0 M Na-Cr-OA as the draw solution at 60 °C. As(III) removal with a water recovery up to 21.6% (FO mode) and 48.3% (PRO mode) were also achieved in 2 h. An outstanding As(III) rejection with 30-3000 μg/L As(III) in the permeate was accomplished when As(III) feed solutions varied from 5 × 104 to 1 × 106 μg/L, superior to the best FO performance reported for As(III) removal. Incorporating MD into FO not only makes As(III) removal sustainable by reconcentrating the Na-Cr-OA solution simultaneously, but also reduces the As(III) concentration below 10 μg/L in the product water, meeting the WHO standard.

  5. Effective As(III) Removal by A Multi-Charged Hydroacid Complex Draw Solute Facilitated Forward Osmosis-Membrane Distillation (FO-MD) Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qingchun; Han, Gang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-03-01

    Effective removal of As(III) from water by an oxalic acid complex with the formula of Na3[Cr(C2O4)3] (Na-Cr-OA) is demonstrated via an forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) hybrid system in this study. Na-Cr-OA first proved its superiority as a draw solute with high water fluxes and negligible reverse fluxes in FO, then a systematic investigation of the Na-Cr-OA promoted FO process was conducted to ascertain the factors in As(III) removal. Relatively high water fluxes of 28 LMH under the FO mode and 74 LMH under the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode were achieved when using a 1000 ppm As(III) solution as the feed and 1.0 M Na-Cr-OA as the draw solution at 60 °C. As(III) removal with a water recovery up to 21.6% (FO mode) and 48.3% (PRO mode) were also achieved in 2 h. An outstanding As(III) rejection with 30-3000 μg/L As(III) in the permeate was accomplished when As(III) feed solutions varied from 5 × 10(4) to 1 × 10(6) μg/L, superior to the best FO performance reported for As(III) removal. Incorporating MD into FO not only makes As(III) removal sustainable by reconcentrating the Na-Cr-OA solution simultaneously, but also reduces the As(III) concentration below 10 μg/L in the product water, meeting the WHO standard.

  6. Effective As(III) Removal by A Multi-Charged Hydroacid Complex Draw Solute Facilitated Forward Osmosis-Membrane Distillation (FO-MD) Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Qingchun

    2016-01-29

    © 2016 American Chemical Society. Effective removal of As(III) from water by an oxalic acid complex with the formula of Na3[Cr(C2O4)3] (Na-Cr-OA) is demonstrated via an forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) hybrid system in this study. Na-Cr-OA first proved its superiority as a draw solute with high water fluxes and negligible reverse fluxes in FO, then a systematic investigation of the Na-Cr-OA promoted FO process was conducted to ascertain the factors in As(III) removal. Relatively high water fluxes of 28 LMH under the FO mode and 74 LMH under the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode were achieved when using a 1000 ppm As(III) solution as the feed and 1.0 M Na-Cr-OA as the draw solution at 60 °C. As(III) removal with a water recovery up to 21.6% (FO mode) and 48.3% (PRO mode) were also achieved in 2 h. An outstanding As(III) rejection with 30-3000 μg/L As(III) in the permeate was accomplished when As(III) feed solutions varied from 5 × 104 to 1 × 106 μg/L, superior to the best FO performance reported for As(III) removal. Incorporating MD into FO not only makes As(III) removal sustainable by reconcentrating the Na-Cr-OA solution simultaneously, but also reduces the As(III) concentration below 10 μg/L in the product water, meeting the WHO standard.

  7. Effect of sheared flows on neoclassical tearing modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, A [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Chandra, D; Kaw, P [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Bora, M P [Physics Dept., Gauhati University, Guwahati (India); Kruger, S [Tech-X, Boulder, CO (United States); Ramos, J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The influence of toroidal sheared equilibrium flows on the nonlinear evolution of classical and neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) is studied through numerical solutions of a set of reduced generalized MHD equations that include viscous force effects based on neoclassical closures. In general, differential flow is found to have a strong stabilizing influence leading to lower saturated island widths for the classical (m/n = 2/1) mode and reduced growth rates for the (m/n = 3/1) neoclassical mode. Velocity shear on the other hand is seen to make a destabilizing contribution. An analytic model calculation, consisting of a generalized Rutherford island evolution equation that includes shear flow effects is also presented and the numerical results are discussed in the context of this model. (author)

  8. Nonlinear simulations of particle source effects on edge localized mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Chen, S. Y., E-mail: sychen531@163.com [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Key Laboratory of High Energy Density Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Z. H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-12-15

    The effects of particle source (PS) with different intensities and located positions on Edge Localized Mode (ELM) are systematically studied with BOUT++ code. The results show the ELM size strongly decreases with increasing the PS intensity once the PS is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal. The effects of PS on ELM depend on the located position of PS. When it is located at the top of the pedestal, peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes can extract more free energy from the pressure gradient and grow up to be a large filament at the initial crash phase and the broadening of mode spectrum can be suppressed by PS, which leads to more energy loss. When it is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal, the extraction of free energy by P-B modes can be suppressed, and a small filament is generated. During the turbulence transport phase, the broader mode spectrum suppresses the turbulence transport when PS is located in the middle, while the zonal flow plays an important role in damping the turbulence transport when PS is located at the bottom.

  9. Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) for Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Flickinger, John; Arai, Yoshio; Vacsulka, Jonet; Feng, Wenzheng; Monaco, Edward; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2017-11-01

    Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a highly precise and accurate treatment technique for treating brain diseases with low risk of serious error that nevertheless could potentially be reduced. We applied the AAPM Task Group 100 recommended failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) tool to develop a risk-based quality management program for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. A team consisting of medical physicists, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons, radiation safety officers, nurses, operating room technologists, and schedulers at our institution and an external physicist expert on Gamma Knife was formed for the FMEA study. A process tree and a failure mode table were created for the Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedures using the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion and 4C units. Three scores for the probability of occurrence (O), the severity (S), and the probability of no detection for failure mode (D) were assigned to each failure mode by 8 professionals on a scale from 1 to 10. An overall risk priority number (RPN) for each failure mode was then calculated from the averaged O, S, and D scores. The coefficient of variation for each O, S, or D score was also calculated. The failure modes identified were prioritized in terms of both the RPN scores and the severity scores. The established process tree for Gamma Knife radiosurgery consists of 10 subprocesses and 53 steps, including a subprocess for frame placement and 11 steps that are directly related to the frame-based nature of the Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Out of the 86 failure modes identified, 40 Gamma Knife specific failure modes were caused by the potential for inappropriate use of the radiosurgery head frame, the imaging fiducial boxes, the Gamma Knife helmets and plugs, the skull definition tools as well as other features of the GammaPlan treatment planning system. The other 46 failure modes are associated with the registration, imaging, image transfer, contouring processes that are common for all external beam radiation therapy

  10. Friction stress effects on mode I crack growth predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Q.; Deshpande, V.S.; Giessen, E. van der; Needleman, A.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a lattice friction stress on the monotonic growth of a plane strain mode I crack under small-scale yielding conditions is analyzed using discrete dislocation plasticity. When the friction stress is increased from zero to half the dislocation nucleation stress, the crack tip stress

  11. User's proximity effects for talk mode in mobile phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelosi, Mauro; B. Knudsen, Mikael; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    Thanks to a recent grip study, 3D CAD model of the human hand have been generated, investigating user's proximity effects for talk mode in mobile phones. The simulation results show that the human hand exhibits a major contribution in determining the total loss when compared to the phantom head...

  12. Effect of sintering temperature and heating mode on consolidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ratures ranging from 570–630 ◦C. Microwave sintering at a heating rate of as high as 22◦. C/min resulted in ... The effect of heating mode and sintering temperature are discussed .... the compacts. This is attributed to the Zn evaporated from the.

  13. Nonlinear effects on mode-converted lower-hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehl, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlinear ponderomotive force effects on mode-converted lower-hybrid waves are considered. The nonlinear distortion of these waves is shown to be governed by the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The threshold condition for self-focusing and filamentation is derived

  14. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA): A Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a bottom-up analytical process that identifies process hazards, which helps managers understand vulnerabilities of systems, as well as assess and mitigate risk. It is one of several engineering tools and techniques available to program and project managers aimed at increasing the likelihood of safe and successful NASA programs and missions. This bibliography references 465 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts, failure modes or failure analysis, in either the basic index of the major subject terms.

  15. Effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Mahajan, S.

    1985-11-01

    The effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion is examined by treating the wave propagation in an inhomogeneous medium as an eigenvalue problem for ω 2 (m,n),m,n poloidal and toroidal wave numbers. Since the frequency regime near ω 2 = ω/sub LH/ 2 is an accumulation point for the eigenvalue spectrum, the degenerate perturbation technique must be applied. The toroidal eigenmodes are constructed by a zeroth order superposition of monochromatic solutions with different poloidal dependence m, thus they generically exhibit a wide spectrum in k/sub parallel/ for given fixed ω 2 even for small inverse aspect ratio epsilon. In case that the average is in the neighborhood of k/sub min/, the minimum wave number for accessibility of the mode conversion regime, it is expected that excitation of toroidal modes rather than geometric optics will determine the wave coupling to the plasma

  16. Effects of compressibility on the resistive ballooning mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hender, T.C.; Carreras, B.A.; Cooper, W.A.; Holmes, J.A.; Diamond, P.H.; Similon, P.L.

    1983-09-01

    The linear stability of the resistive ballooning mode, as described by the resistive MHD model, is investigated both analytically and numerically. When the pressure evolution is approximated by fluid convection (reduced MHD model), an instability driven by geodesic curvature, with a growth rate γ approx. eta/sup 1/3/β/sub rho//sup 2/3/, is found. For conditions relevant to the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B), it is shown that for modest poloidal beta (β/sub rho/ approx. = 1), high current, and relatively high temperatures, compressibility has a significant stabilizing influence, relative to the pressure convection model, for low toroidal mode number modes. However, at high β/sub rho/ (greater than or equal to 2), low current, and lower temperatures, compressibility has much less effect

  17. Stabilization of kinetic internal kink mode by ion diamagnetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitou, H.; Kuramoto, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Yagi, M.; Tokuda, S.; Matsumoto, T.

    2000-04-01

    Ion diamagnetic effects on the m=1 (poloidal mode number) and n=1 (toroidal mode number) kinetic internal kink mode are studied numerically by the three-field gyro-reduced-MHD code in the cylindrical coordinates, GRM3F-CY. In the derivation of the gryo-reduced-MHD model including the ion diamagnetic effects, finite gyroradius effects of ions are added to the gyrokinetic Poisson equation (quasi-neutral condition) and the convection term of the conservation law of the ion density. It is found that the long wavelength approximation, ksub(perpendicular) ρ ti ti is the thermal ion gyroradius, fails to reproduce the correct dispersion relation; the formulation valid even for ksub(perpendicular) ρ ti >> 1 is necessary. The results of numerical calculation coincide with the theory for |ω *e |+|ω *i | 0 , where the growth rate reduces as the density gradient increases. Here ω *e and ω *i are electron and ion diamagnetic angular frequencies estimated at the rational surface of q=1 (q is a safety factor), respectively, and γ 0 is the growth rate for the uniform density. Very weak instability, however, is observed for |ω *e |+|ω *i | 0 , where the theory predicts the complete stabilization. This residual instability appears since the region with the density gradient is limited in the radial direction and the stabilization by the outgoing drift-wave like mode becomes incomplete. (author)

  18. The effects of Basel III liquidity regulations on banks’ profitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tafirei Mashamba

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The new Basel III Liquidity Coverage Ratio standard which encourages banks to maintain a diversified pool of high-quality liquid assets against their short-term expected net cash outflows although it appears to be noble from a theoretic perspective it may weigh down banks’ performance because liquid assets earn low returns. It is against this background that this study sought to evaluate the impact of the new Basel III liquidity regulations on the profitability of banks in emerging market economies. A sample of 40 banks operating in 11 emerging markets over the period 2011 to 2016 was used in the study. For estimation, system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM estimator was employed. Surprisingly, empirical results demonstrated that regulatory pressure stemming from Liquidity Coverage Ratio requirement increased instead of diminishing the profitability of banks in emerging markets. The plausible explanation given for this evidence was that banks in emerging markets managed their liquidity in a manner that is consistent with Liquidity Coverage Ratio rule hence the regulation had no detrimental effects on banks in emerging economies.

  19. Informed Design of Mixed-Mode Surveys : Evaluating mode effects on measurement and selection error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klausch, Thomas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341427306

    2014-01-01

    “Mixed-mode designs” are innovative types of surveys which combine more than one mode of administration in the same project, such as surveys administered partly on the web (online), on paper, by telephone, or face-to-face. Mixed-mode designs have become increasingly popular in international survey

  20. Mode splitting effect in FEMs with oversized Bragg resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskov, N. Yu.; Sergeev, A. S. [Institute of Applied Physics Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Kaminsky, A. K.; Perelstein, E. A.; Sedykh, S. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kuzikov, S. V. [Institute of Applied Physics Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nizhegorodsky State University, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    Splitting of the fundamental mode in an oversized Bragg resonator with a step of the corrugation phase, which operates over the feedback loop involving the waveguide waves of different transverse structures, was found to be the result of mutual influence of the neighboring zones of the Bragg scattering. Theoretical description of this effect was developed within the framework of the advanced (four-wave) coupled-wave approach. It is shown that mode splitting reduces the selective properties, restricts the output power, and decreases the stability of the narrow-band operating regime in the free-electron maser (FEM) oscillators based on such resonators. The results of the theoretical analysis were confirmed by 3D simulations and “cold” microwave tests. Experimental data on Bragg resonators with different parameters in a 30-GHz FEM are presented. The possibility of reducing the mode splitting by profiling the corrugation parameters is shown. The use of the mode splitting effect for the output power enhancement by passive compression of the double-frequency pulse generated in the FEM with such a resonator is discussed.

  1. Effect of fiber positioning on mixed-mode fracture of interfacial debonding in composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial; Sørensen, Bent F.; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2015-01-01

    along the interface is due to mixed mode I/II fracture. The aim of this study is to explore ways to stabilize the early stage of debonding so that it becomes possible to determine the mixed mode interfacial fracture properties for the entire mode-mixity range by in-situ observations. Therefore...... instead of a single fiber in order to ease the characterization of interfacial properties. [All rights reserved Elsevier]....

  2. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Results: Failures modes with RPN≥125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN<125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software/hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be ∼193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%-3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was ∼35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was ∼3.5 h. Conclusions: FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures efficient allocation

  3. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94394 (United States); Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, California 94394 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Results: Failures modes with RPN{>=}125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN<125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software/hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be {approx}193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%-3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was {approx}35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was {approx}3.5 h. Conclusions: FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures

  4. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul

    2010-12-01

    To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Failures modes with RPN > or = 125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN < 125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software/hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be approximately 193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%-3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was approximately 35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was approximately 3.5 h. FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures efficient allocation

  5. Effect of Eu(III) on the degradation of malic acid by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nankawa, T.; Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Francis, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The transuranic elements, such as Am(III) and Cm(III), are highly toxic because they emit high-energy α particles and have long half-lives. To estimate their long-term environmental behavior, we need to elucidate degradation of actinide-organic complexes by microorganisms. We studied the biodegradation of Eu(III)-malic acid complexes by Pseudomonas fluorescens. Malic acid is ubiquitous in the environment and is one of the microbial metabolites that is part of the tri-carboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Europium(III) is a good analogue for Am(III) and Cm(III). To investigate the effect of Eu(III) on the degradation of malic acid by P. fluorescens, we compared the degradation behavior of Eu(III)-malic acid complexes to that of Fe(III) and Al(III)-malic acid complexes. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0-0.5 mM Fe(III), malic acid was degraded completely. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0.05-0.5 mM Al(III), malic acid was degraded until the concentration of malic acid became equal to that of Al(III), indicating that Al(III)-malic acid complex with 1: 1 molar ratio was recalcitrant to biodegradation. In the medium containing 1 mM malic acid and 0.05-0.5 mM Eu(III), degradation of malic acid was not observed. The effect of metals on degradation of malic acid was in the order of Fe(III) < Al(III) < Eu(III). The stability constants of 1:1 Fe(III)-, Al(III)-, and Eu(III)-malic acid complexes are 7.1, 4.6, and 4.9, respectively. These results indicate that degradability of malic acid does not depend on the stability constants of metal-malic acid complexes. We found that 10 mM malic acid was degraded in the presence of 0.05 and 0.1 mM Eu(III) but 1 mM malic acid was not degraded in the presence of 0.05 and 0.1 mM Eu(III). The degradation rate of malic acid increased with a decreasing ratio of Eu(III) to malic acid. (authors)

  6. Numerical Simulations of Finite-Length Effects in Diocotron Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Grant W.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2000-10-01

    Over a decade ago Driscoll and Fine(C. F. Driscoll and K. S. Fine, Phys. Fluids B 2) (6), 1359, June 1990. reported experimental observations of an exponential instability in the self-shielded m=1 diocotron mode for an electron plasma confined in a Malmberg-Penning trap. More recently, Finn et al(John M. Finn, Diego del-Castillo-Negrete and Daniel C. Barnes, Phys. Plasmas 6) (10), 3744, October 1999. have given a theoretical explanation of the instability as a finite-length end effect patterned after an analogy to theory for shallow water fluid vortices. However, in a test case selected for comparison, the growth rate in the experiment exceeds the theoretical value by a factor of two. We present results from a two-dimensional, finite length drift-kinetic code and a fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell code written to explore details of finite-length effects in diocotron modes.

  7. Advanced approaches to failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vykydal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores advanced approaches to the FMEA method (Failure Mode and Effect Analysis which take into account the costs associated with occurrence of failures during the manufacture of a product. Different approaches are demonstrated using an example FMEA application to production of drawn wire. Their purpose is to determine risk levels, while taking account of the above-mentioned costs. Finally, the resulting priority levels are compared for developing actions mitigating the risks.

  8. Effect of reactive feedback on the transverse mode coupling instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.

    1984-08-01

    An important and realistic test to examine the effect of reactive feedback on the transverse mode coupling instability could be performed at PEP using the existing feedback system with some minor modifications. This test would of necessity take place at low energy and low synchrotron tune. Such an experiment is of great importance for the design of the LEP reactive feedback system and for the ultimate evaluation of LEP performance

  9. Effect of ion viscosity on neoclassical tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shigeki; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi; Azumi, Masafumi

    2004-01-01

    Linear stability analysis of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is performed on the basis of four-field reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model which takes account of fluctuating ion parallel flow and ion neoclassical viscosity. The dependence of the growth rate on the kinetic effects is investigated. It is shown that the linear NTM is stabilized by ion neoclassical viscosity and that the stabilizing effect of ion parallel compressibility is weak in the banana-plateau regime. It is found that not only ion neoclassical viscosity but also both ion and electron diamagnetic effects are important for the stabilization of NTM. (author)

  10. Effects of toroidal coupling on the stability of tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.; Hicks, H.R.; Lee, D.K.

    1980-06-01

    The time evolution of tearing modes in toroidal geometry is studied in the low-β and large aspect ratio limit. An initial value three-dimensional computer code, which numerically advances the reduced set of resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations is employed. Toroidicity has, in general, a destabilizing effect on tearing modes in this limit. A generalization of the Δ' formalism can be used to study the linear regime. The results obtained in this way are in very good agreement with the results from the initial value code. The nonlinear phase of the evolution is also followed numerically. In the case of strong interaction of different helicities, a larger region of stochastic magnetic field lines results than in the cylindrical geometry case

  11. Nonlinear polarization effects in a birefringent single mode optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiekwene, G.C.; Mensah, S.Y.; Brown, C.S.

    2001-04-01

    The nonlinear polarization effects in a birefringent single mode optical fiber is studied using Jacobi elliptic functions. We find that the polarization state of the propagating beam depends on the initial polarization as well as the intensity of the input light in a complicated way. The Stokes polarization parameters are either periodic or aperiodic depending on the value of the Jacobian modulus. Our calculations suggest that the effective beat length of the fiber can become infinite at a higher critical value of the input power when polarization dependent losses are considered. (author)

  12. Atomic physics effects on tokamak edge drift-tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of ionization and charge exchange on the linear stability of drift-tearing modes are analytically investigated. In particular, the linear instability threshold Δ Th , produced by ion sound wave coupling [Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 1500 (1978)] is modified. In the strongly collisional regime, the ionization breaks up the near cancellation of the perturbed electric field and the pressure gradient along the magnetic field, and increases the threshold. In the semicollisional regime, both ionization and charge exchange act as drag on the ion parallel velocity [Phys. Fluids B 4, 2567 (1992)], and consequently decrease the threshold by reducing the effectiveness of ion sound wave propagation

  13. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  14. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L.; Rice, Jarret A.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  15. The Escherichia coli modE gene: effect of modE mutations on molybdate dependent modA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, P M; Chiang, R C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-11-15

    The Escherichia coli modABCD operon, which encodes a high-affinity molybdate uptake system, is transcriptionally regulated in response to molybdate availability by ModE. Here we describe a highly effective enrichment protocol, applicable to any gene with a repressor role, and establish its application in the isolation of transposon mutations in modE. In addition we show that disruption of the ModE C-terminus abolishes derepression in the absence of molybdate, implying this region of ModE controls the repressor activity. Finally, a mutational analysis of a proposed molybdate binding motif indicates that this motif does not function in regulating the repressor activity of ModE.

  16. Failure mode and effects analysis based risk profile assessment for stereotactic radiosurgery programs at three cancer centers in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Flavia C., E-mail: flavitiz@gmail.com [CNEN—Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-901, Brazil and LCR/UERJ—Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas/Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20550-013 (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos E. de [LCR/UERJ—Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas/Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20550-013 (Brazil); Saiful Huq, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and quality management program for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment processes at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil by using three industrial engineering tools (1) process mapping, (2) failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and (3) fault tree analysis. Methods: The recommendations of Task Group 100 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine were followed to apply the three tools described above to create a process tree for SRS procedure for each radiotherapy center and then FMEA was performed. Failure modes were identified for all process steps and values of risk priority number (RPN) were calculated from O, S, and D (RPN = O × S × D) values assigned by a professional team responsible for patient care. Results: The subprocess treatment planning was presented with the highest number of failure modes for all centers. The total number of failure modes were 135, 104, and 131 for centers I, II, and III, respectively. The highest RPN value for each center is as follows: center I (204), center II (372), and center III (370). Failure modes with RPN ≥ 100: center I (22), center II (115), and center III (110). Failure modes characterized by S ≥ 7, represented 68% of the failure modes for center III, 62% for center II, and 45% for center I. Failure modes with RPNs values ≥100 and S ≥ 7, D ≥ 5, and O ≥ 5 were considered as high priority in this study. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the safety risk profiles for the same stereotactic radiotherapy process are different at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil. Although this is the same treatment process, this present study showed that the risk priority is different and it will lead to implementation of different safety interventions among the centers. Therefore, the current practice of applying universal device-centric QA is not adequate to address all possible failures in clinical processes at different

  17. Failure mode and effects analysis based risk profile assessment for stereotactic radiosurgery programs at three cancer centers in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Flavia C.; Almeida, Carlos E. de; Saiful Huq, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and quality management program for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment processes at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil by using three industrial engineering tools (1) process mapping, (2) failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and (3) fault tree analysis. Methods: The recommendations of Task Group 100 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine were followed to apply the three tools described above to create a process tree for SRS procedure for each radiotherapy center and then FMEA was performed. Failure modes were identified for all process steps and values of risk priority number (RPN) were calculated from O, S, and D (RPN = O × S × D) values assigned by a professional team responsible for patient care. Results: The subprocess treatment planning was presented with the highest number of failure modes for all centers. The total number of failure modes were 135, 104, and 131 for centers I, II, and III, respectively. The highest RPN value for each center is as follows: center I (204), center II (372), and center III (370). Failure modes with RPN ≥ 100: center I (22), center II (115), and center III (110). Failure modes characterized by S ≥ 7, represented 68% of the failure modes for center III, 62% for center II, and 45% for center I. Failure modes with RPNs values ≥100 and S ≥ 7, D ≥ 5, and O ≥ 5 were considered as high priority in this study. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the safety risk profiles for the same stereotactic radiotherapy process are different at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil. Although this is the same treatment process, this present study showed that the risk priority is different and it will lead to implementation of different safety interventions among the centers. Therefore, the current practice of applying universal device-centric QA is not adequate to address all possible failures in clinical processes at different

  18. The Emotional Child Witness Effect Survives Presentation Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinder, Annika; Burrell, Lisa; Eriksen, Maria Olaussen; Magnussen, Svein; Wessel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The emotional witness effect - the phenomenon whereby people are affected by the emotional manner in which a witness presents testimony - constitutes a possible source of wrongful decisions in legal contexts. One stereotypical view of abused children is that they should be sad when talking about their experiences of maltreatment, whereas children may in fact express a variety of emotional expressions when talking about abusive events. This raises the question as to whether there is an optimal mode in which to present child victim testimony that could reduce the possible influence of displayed emotions. In the present study, mock police interviews were carried out with female child actors, role-playing the victims of physical abuse by their stepfather, telling the same story with four emotional expressions (neutral, sad, angry, or positive). Laypersons (N = 465) were presented with the interviews as transcripts with the emotional reactions of the child witness noted, audio recordings, or videotaped recordings. Participants then rated the credibility of the victim witness. Replicating previous results, the "sad" expression elicited the highest credibility ratings across all modes of presentations. Presentation mode affected ratings of credibility, with the transcript versions resulting in the highest ratings. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Genotoxic effects of bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles by comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reecep Liman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth oxide is one of the important transition metal oxides and it has been intensively studied due to their peculiar characteristics (semiconductor band gap, high refractive index, high dielectric permittivity, high oxygen conductivity, resistivity, photoconductivity and photoluminescence etc.. Therefore, it is used such as microelectronics, sensor technology, optical coatings, transparent ceramic glass manufacturing, nanoenergetic gas generator, biosensor for DNA hybridization, potential immobilizing platforms for glucose oxidase and polyphenol oxidase, fuel cells, a additive in paints, an astringent in a variety of medical creams and topical ointments, and for the determination of heavy metal ions in drinking water, mineral water and urine. In addition this, Bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles (BONPs are favorable for the biomolecules adsorption than regular sized particles because of their greater advantages and novel characteristics (much higher specific surface, greater surface free energy, and good electrochemical stability etc.. Genotoxic effects of BONPs were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm for 4 h. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5 ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan’s multiple range test was performed. These result indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  20. Effect of Population III Multiplicity on Dark Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    We numerically study the mutual interaction between dark matter (DM) and Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in order to explore the possibility of Pop III dark stars within this physical scenario. We perform a cosmological simulation, initialized at z approx. 100, which follows the evolution of gas and DM. We analyze the formation of the first mini halo at z approx. 20 and the subsequent collapse of the gas to densities of 10(exp 12)/cu cm. We then use this simulation to initialize a set of smaller-scale 'cut-out' simulations in which we further refine the DM to have spatial resolution similar to that of the gas. We test multiple DM density profiles, and we employ the sink particle method to represent the accreting star-forming region. We find that, for a range of DM configurations, the motion of the Pop III star-disk system serves to separate the positions of the protostars with respect to the DM density peak, such that there is insufficient DM to influence the formation and evolution of the protostars for more than approx. 5000 years. In addition, the star-disk system causes gravitational scattering of the central DM to lower densities, further decreasing the influence of DM over time. Any DM-powered phase of Pop III stars will thus be very short-lived for the typical multiple system, and DM will not serve to significantly prolong the life of Pop III stars.

  1. Effects of low and high mode number tearing modes in divertor tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima; Boozer, Allen; Evans, Todd

    2007-01-01

    The topological effects of magnetic perturbations on a divertor tokamak, such as DIII-D, are studied using field-line maps that were developed by Punjabi et al. [A. Punjabi, A. Verma, and A. Boozer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 3322 (1992)]. The studies consider both long-wavelength perturbations, such as those of m=1, n=1 tearing modes, and localized perturbations, which are represented as a magnetic dipole. The parameters of the dipole map are set using DIII-D data from shot 115467 in which the C-coils were activated [J. L. Luxon and L. E. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The long-wavelength perturbations alter the structure of the interception of magnetic field lines with the divertor plates, but the interception is in sharp lines. The dipole perturbations cause a spreading of the interception of the field lines with the divertor plates, which alleviates problems associated with heat deposition. Magnetic field lines are the trajectories of a one-and-a-half degree of freedom Hamiltonian, which strongly constrains the topological features of the lines. Although the field line maps that we use do not accurately represent the trajectories through ordinary space of individual field lines, they do represent their topological structure

  2. Augmenting health care failure modes and effects analysis with simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staub-Nielsen, Ditte Emilie; Dieckmann, Peter; Mohr, Marlene

    2014-01-01

    This study explores whether simulation plays a role in health care failure mode and effects analysis (HFMEA); it does this by evaluating whether additional data are found when a traditional HFMEA is augmented with simulation. Two multidisciplinary teams identified vulnerabilities in a process...... by brainstorming, followed by simulation. Two means of adding simulation were investigated as follows: just simulating the process and interrupting the simulation between substeps of the process. By adding simulation to a traditional HFMEA, both multidisciplinary teams identified additional data that were relevant...

  3. Self-imaging effect of TM modes in photonic crystal multimode waveguides only exhibiting band gaps for TE modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tianbao; Jiang Xiaoqing; Yang Jianyi; Zhou Haifeng; Liao Qinghua; Wang Minghua

    2007-01-01

    This Letter presents the properties of transverse-magnetic (TM) modes in multimode photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs), which only exhibit photonic band gaps for transverse-electric (TE) modes. A good equivalent model is applied to analysis the designed structures on the basis of multimode interference effect and self-imaging principle. The performance shows that the TM modes can also be propagated with high efficiency, and resemble index-guided modes owing to the combination of total internal reflection (TIR) and distribution Bragg reflection. It provides a novel way to realize the components for both TM and TE polarizations by combining PBG and TIR effect in PCWs. As one of potential applications, polarization-insensitive power splitter based on the proposed structures can be designed

  4. Extended recency effect extended: blocking, presentation mode, and retention interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glidden, L M; Pawelski, C; Mar, H; Zigman, W

    1979-07-01

    The effect of blocking of stimulus items on the free recall of EMR adolescents was examined. In Experiment 1 a multitrial free-recall list of 15 pictures was presented either simultaneously in groups of 3, or sequentially, one at a time. Consistent ordering was used in both conditions, so that on each trial, each item in each set of 3 pictures was presented contiguously with the other 2 items from that set. In addition, recall came immediately or after a filled or unfilled delay of 24.5 seconds. Results showed that simultaneous presentation led to higher recall, subjective organization, and clustering than did sequential presentation, but analysis of serial-position curves showed a much reduced extended recency effect in comparison with previous studies. Experiment 2 was designed to determine whether the cause of the reduced extended recency was the use of pictures rather than words as stimuli. Stimuli were presented either as pictures, as pictures with auditory labels, or as words with auditory labels, with both simultaneous and consistent ordering for all conditions. Results indicated a strong extended recency effect for all groups, eliminating presentation mode as a causal factor in the data of Experiment 1. We concluded that blocking leads to increased organization and recall over a variety of presentation modes, rates, and block sizes.

  5. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Wei-Lung; Wang, Chih-Ta; Huang, Kai-Yu

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20 V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30 V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  6. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Wei-Lung, E-mail: wlchou0388@hotmail.com [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, Sha-Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chih-Ta [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan Hsien 717, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kai-Yu [Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, Sha-Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20 V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30 V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  7. Understanding of the mode of action of Fe(III)-EDDHA as iron chlorosis corrector based on its photochemical and redox behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Pellico, Daniel; Ramírez-López, Pedro; Mancheño, María J; Romano, Santiago; de la Torre, María C; Sierra, Miguel A

    2005-10-07

    The very low reduction potential of the chelate Fe(III)-EDDHA (EDDHA = ethylenediamine N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy)phenylacetic acid) makes it unreactive in photochemically or chemically induced electron transfer processes. The lack of reactivity of this complex toward light invalidates photodegradation as an alternative mechanism for environmental elimination. However, in spite of its low reduction potential, the biological reduction of Fe(III)-EDDHA is very effective. Based on electrochemical measurements, it is proposed that Fe(III)-EDDHA itself is not the substrate of the enzyme ferric chelate reductase. Likely, at the more acidic pH in the vicinity of the roots, the ferric chelate in a closed form (FeL-) could generate a vacant coordination site that leads to an open hexacoordinate species (FeHL) where the reduction of the metal by the enzyme takes place.

  8. One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shaofen; Cao, Rui; Lu, Aihua; Zhou, Qing; Lu, Tianhong; Ding, Xiaolan; Li, Chaojun; Huang, Xiaohua

    2008-05-01

    One of the possible mechanisms for the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) treated with Tb(III) was investigated using some biophysical and biochemical methods. Firstly, it was found that a large amount of Tb(III) can be distributed on the cell wall, that some Tb(III) can enter into the horseradish cell, indicating that peroxidase was mainly distributed on cell wall, and thus that Tb(III) would interact with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the plant. In addition, peroxidase bioactivity was decreased in the presence of Tb(III). Secondly, a new peroxidase-containing Tb(III) complex (Tb-HRP) was obtained from horseradish after treatment with Tb(III); the molecular mass of Tb-HRP is near 44 kDa and the pI is about 8.80. Thirdly, the electrocatalytic activity of Tb-HRP is much lower than that of HRP obtained from horseradish without treatment with Tb(III). The decrease in the activity of Tb-HRP is due to the destruction (unfolding) of the conformation in Tb-HRP. The planarity of the heme active center in the Tb-HRP molecule was increased and the extent of exposure of Fe(III) in heme was decreased, leading to inhibition of the electron transfer. The microstructure change in Tb-HRP might be the result of the inhibition effect of Tb(III) on peroxidase activity in horseradish.

  9. Effect of Class III bone anchor treatment on airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tung; De Clerck, Hugo; Wilson, Michael; Golden, Brent

    2015-07-01

    To compare airway volumes and minimum cross-section area changes of Class III patients treated with bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) versus untreated Class III controls. Twenty-eight consecutive skeletal Class III patients between the ages of 10 and 14 years (mean age, 11.9 years) were treated using Class III intermaxillary elastics and bilateral miniplates (two in the infra-zygomatic crests of the maxilla and two in the anterior mandible). The subjects had cone beam computed tomographs (CBCTs) taken before initial loading (T1) and 1 year out (T2). Twenty-eight untreated Class III patients (mean age, 12.4 years) had CBCTs taken and cephalograms generated. The airway volumes and minimum cross-sectional area measurements were performed using Dolphin Imaging 11.7 3D software. The superior border of the airway was defined by a plane that passes through the posterior nasal spine and basion, while the inferior border included the base of the epiglottis to the lower border of C3. From T1 to T2, airway volume from BAMP-treated subjects showed a statistically significant increase (1499.64 mm(3)). The area in the most constricted section of the airway (choke point) increased slightly (15.44 mm(2)). The airway volume of BAMP patients at T2 was 14136.61 mm(3), compared with 14432.98 mm(3) in untreated Class III subjects. Intraexaminer correlation coefficients values and 95% confidence interval values were all greater than .90, showing a high degree of reliability of the measurements. BAMP treatment did not hinder the development of the oropharynx.

  10. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III and As(III/Sb(III-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxin Li

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III]/antimonite [Sb(III]-oxidizing strain. The As(III oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III, ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat.

  11. TU-AB-BRD-02: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huq, M.

    2015-01-01

    Current quality assurance and quality management guidelines provided by various professional organizations are prescriptive in nature, focusing principally on performance characteristics of planning and delivery devices. However, published analyses of events in radiation therapy show that most events are often caused by flaws in clinical processes rather than by device failures. This suggests the need for the development of a quality management program that is based on integrated approaches to process and equipment quality assurance. Industrial engineers have developed various risk assessment tools that are used to identify and eliminate potential failures from a system or a process before a failure impacts a customer. These tools include, but are not limited to, process mapping, failure modes and effects analysis, fault tree analysis. Task Group 100 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has developed these tools and used them to formulate an example risk-based quality management program for intensity-modulated radiotherapy. This is a prospective risk assessment approach that analyzes potential error pathways inherent in a clinical process and then ranks them according to relative risk, typically before implementation, followed by the design of a new process or modification of the existing process. Appropriate controls are then put in place to ensure that failures are less likely to occur and, if they do, they will more likely be detected before they propagate through the process, compromising treatment outcome and causing harm to the patient. Such a prospective approach forms the basis of the work of Task Group 100 that has recently been approved by the AAPM. This session will be devoted to a discussion of these tools and practical examples of how these tools can be used in a given radiotherapy clinic to develop a risk based quality management program. Learning Objectives: Learn how to design a process map for a radiotherapy process Learn how to

  12. TU-AB-BRD-02: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, M. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Current quality assurance and quality management guidelines provided by various professional organizations are prescriptive in nature, focusing principally on performance characteristics of planning and delivery devices. However, published analyses of events in radiation therapy show that most events are often caused by flaws in clinical processes rather than by device failures. This suggests the need for the development of a quality management program that is based on integrated approaches to process and equipment quality assurance. Industrial engineers have developed various risk assessment tools that are used to identify and eliminate potential failures from a system or a process before a failure impacts a customer. These tools include, but are not limited to, process mapping, failure modes and effects analysis, fault tree analysis. Task Group 100 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has developed these tools and used them to formulate an example risk-based quality management program for intensity-modulated radiotherapy. This is a prospective risk assessment approach that analyzes potential error pathways inherent in a clinical process and then ranks them according to relative risk, typically before implementation, followed by the design of a new process or modification of the existing process. Appropriate controls are then put in place to ensure that failures are less likely to occur and, if they do, they will more likely be detected before they propagate through the process, compromising treatment outcome and causing harm to the patient. Such a prospective approach forms the basis of the work of Task Group 100 that has recently been approved by the AAPM. This session will be devoted to a discussion of these tools and practical examples of how these tools can be used in a given radiotherapy clinic to develop a risk based quality management program. Learning Objectives: Learn how to design a process map for a radiotherapy process Learn how to

  13. Retrieval Mode Distinguishes the Testing Effect from the Generation Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D.; Zaromb, Franklin M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of four experiments examined the effects of generation vs. retrieval practice on subsequent retention. Subjects were first exposed to a list of target words. Then the subjects were shown the targets again intact for Read trials or they were shown fragments of the targets. Subjects in Generate conditions were told to complete the fragments…

  14. Predicting the mixed-mode I/II spatial damage propagation along 3D-printed soft interfacial layer via a hyperelastic softening model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yaning

    2018-07-01

    A methodology was developed to use a hyperelastic softening model to predict the constitutive behavior and the spatial damage propagation of nonlinear materials with damage-induced softening under mixed-mode loading. A user subroutine (ABAQUS/VUMAT) was developed for numerical implementation of the model. 3D-printed wavy soft rubbery interfacial layer was used as a material system to verify and validate the methodology. The Arruda - Boyce hyperelastic model is incorporated with the softening model to capture the nonlinear pre-and post- damage behavior of the interfacial layer under mixed Mode I/II loads. To characterize model parameters of the 3D-printed rubbery interfacial layer, a series of scarf-joint specimens were designed, which enabled systematic variation of stress triaxiality via a single geometric parameter, the slant angle. It was found that the important model parameter m is exponentially related to the stress triaxiality. Compact tension specimens of the sinusoidal wavy interfacial layer with different waviness were designed and fabricated via multi-material 3D printing. Finite element (FE) simulations were conducted to predict the spatial damage propagation of the material within the wavy interfacial layer. Compact tension experiments were performed to verify the model prediction. The results show that the model developed is able to accurately predict the damage propagation of the 3D-printed rubbery interfacial layer under complicated stress-state without pre-defined failure criteria.

  15. Evaluation of containment failure modes and fission product releases during core meltdown accidents in a BWR with a Mark III containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Yu, W.S.; Jaung, R.; Pratt, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment is described of potential failure modes and fission product releases for a large number of postulated core meltdown accidents in a BWR with a Mark III containment. For this containment design, the most important failure mode was found to be due to hydrogen related phenomena. A one-dimensional lumped parameter computer code has been developed and used to determine the probability of various hydrogen phenomena for a range of postulated core meltdown sequences. Potential containment loads have been estimated and compared against the containment capacity to determine the probability of containment failure. The fission product release assessment began by using the MARCH/CORRAL system of codes with key input parameters varied over a reasonable range. The parameters relate to primary system retention, re-emission, pool scrubbing, and fission product release in-vessel vs ex-vessel. The final step used more mechanistic calculations based on the system of codes recently developed under sponsorship of the Accident Source Term Program Office, NRC, and compares these predictions with the range of releases calculated in the sensitivity study

  16. Application of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to pretreatment phases in tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, Sara; Cantone, Marie Claire; Chiara, Anna; Di Muzio, Nadia; Longobardi, Barbara; Mangili, Paola; Veronese, Ivan

    2013-09-06

    The aim of this paper was the application of the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) approach to assess the risks for patients undergoing radiotherapy treatments performed by means of a helical tomotherapy unit. FMEA was applied to the preplanning imaging, volume determination, and treatment planning stages of the tomotherapy process and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system; and 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. A total of 74 failure modes were identified: 38 in the stage of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and 36 in the stage of planning. The threshold of 125 for RPN was exceeded in four cases: one case only in the phase of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and three cases in the stage of planning. The most critical failures appeared related to (i) the wrong or missing definition and contouring of the overlapping regions, (ii) the wrong assignment of the overlap priority to each anatomical structure, (iii) the wrong choice of the computed tomography calibration curve for dose calculation, and (iv) the wrong (or not performed) choice of the number of fractions in the planning station. On the basis of these findings, in addition to the safety strategies already adopted in the clinical practice, novel solutions have been proposed for mitigating the risk of these failures and to increase patient safety.

  17. Failure mode and effects analysis on typical reactor trip system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisawy, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    An updated failure mode and effects analysis, FMEA , has been performed on a typical reactor trip system. This upgrade helps to avoid system damage and ,as a result, extends the system service life. It also provides for simplified maintenance and surveillance testing. The operating conditions under which the system is to carry out its function and the operational profile expected for the system have been determined. The results of the FMEA have been given in terms of operating states of the subsystem.The results are given in form of table which is set up such that for a given failure one can read across it and determine which items remain operating in the system. From this data one can identify the number of components operating in the system for monitors pressure exceeds the setpoint pressure.

  18. Electromagnetic controllable surfaces based on trapped-mode effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dmitriev

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present some recent results of our theoretical investigations of electromagnetically controllable surfaces. These surfaces are designed on the basis of periodic arrays made of metallic inclusions of special form which are placed on a thin substrate of active material (magnetized ferrite or optically active semiconductor. The main peculiarity of the studied structures is their capability to support the trapped-mode resonance which is a result of the antiphase current oscillations in the elements of a periodic cell. Several effects, namely: tuning the position of passband and the linear and nonlinear (bistable transmission switching are considered when an external static magnetic field or optical excitation are applied. Our numerical calculations are fulfilled in both microwave and optical regions.

  19. Possible effects of basel III accord on Turkish banking system

    OpenAIRE

    Çölgezen, Petek

    2013-01-01

    138 pages Bu tez Basel Komitesinin Basel I ve Basel II uzlaşılarında görülen eksiklikleri gidermek için Basel III Uzlaşısı adı altında getirdiği yeni düzenlemelere, uygulanmış olan uzlaşıların Türkiye ve bütün dünyada yarattığı pozitif ve negatif etkilere ve henüz uygulanmamış olan Basel III Uzlaşısının olası etkilerine değinmek amacıyla hazırlanmıştır. Bu amaçla akademik araştırma yapılarak Basel I, Basel II, Basel 2.5 ve Basel III uzlaşılarının temel kuralları ve hedefleri ayrıntılı b...

  20. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-07-19

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E x B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies.

  1. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-01-01

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E f- B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies

  2. Physics and performances of III-V nanowire broken-gap heterojunction TFETs using an efficient tight-binding mode-space NEGF model enabling million-atom nanowire simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzalian, A; Vasen, T; Ramvall, P; Shen, T-M; Wu, J; Passlack, M

    2018-06-27

    We report the capability to simulate in a quantum-mechanical atomistic fashion record-large nanowire devices, featuring several hundred to millions of atoms and a diameter up to 18.2 nm. We have employed a tight-binding mode-space NEGF technique demonstrating by far the fastest (up to 10 000  ×  faster) but accurate (error  <  1%) atomistic simulations to date. Such technique and capability opens new avenues to explore and understand the physics of nanoscale and mesoscopic devices dominated by quantum effects. In particular, our method addresses in an unprecedented way the technologically-relevant case of band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in III-V nanowire broken-gap heterojunction tunnel-FETs (HTFETs). We demonstrate an accurate match of simulated BTBT currents to experimental measurements in a 12 nm diameter InAs NW and in an InAs/GaSb Esaki tunneling diode. We apply our TB MS simulations and report the first in-depth atomistic study of the scaling potential of III-V GAA nanowire HTFETs including the effect of electron-phonon scattering and discrete dopant impurity band tails, quantifying the benefits of this technology for low-power low-voltage CMOS applications.

  3. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under either...

  4. Failure mode and effects analysis: A community practice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Bradley W; Burns, Angi; Ceilley, Elizabeth A; King, Alan; LeTourneau, Joan; Markovic, Alexander; Sterkel, Lynda; Taplin, Brigid; Wanner, Jennifer; Albert, Jeffrey M

    2017-11-01

    To report our early experiences with failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) in a community practice setting. The FMEA facilitator received extensive training at the AAPM Summer School. Early efforts focused on department education and emphasized the need for process evaluation in the context of high profile radiation therapy accidents. A multidisciplinary team was assembled with representation from each of the major department disciplines. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was identified as the most appropriate treatment technique for the first FMEA evaluation, as it is largely self-contained and has the potential to produce high impact failure modes. Process mapping was completed using breakout sessions, and then compiled into a simple electronic format. Weekly sessions were used to complete the FMEA evaluation. Risk priority number (RPN) values > 100 or severity scores of 9 or 10 were considered high risk. The overall time commitment was also tracked. The final SRS process map contained 15 major process steps and 183 subprocess steps. Splitting the process map into individual assignments was a successful strategy for our group. The process map was designed to contain enough detail such that another radiation oncology team would be able to perform our procedures. Continuous facilitator involvement helped maintain consistent scoring during FMEA. Practice changes were made responding to the highest RPN scores, and new resulting RPN scores were below our high-risk threshold. The estimated person-hour equivalent for project completion was 258 hr. This report provides important details on the initial steps we took to complete our first FMEA, providing guidance for community practices seeking to incorporate this process into their quality assurance (QA) program. Determining the feasibility of implementing complex QA processes into different practice settings will take on increasing significance as the field of radiation oncology transitions into the new TG-100 QA

  5. Resonant magnetic perturbation effect on tearing mode dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, K.E.J.; Brunsell, P.R.; Drake, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the tearing mode (TM) dynamics is experimentally studied in the EXTRAP T2R device. EXTRAP T2R is equipped with a set of sensor coils and active coils connected by a digital controller allowing a feedback control of the magnetic instabilities. The recently upgraded feedback algorithm allows the suppression of all the error field harmonics but keeping a selected harmonic to the desired amplitude, therefore opening the possibility of a clear study of the RMP effect on the corresponding TM. The paper shows that the RMP produces two typical effects: (1) a weak oscillation in the TM amplitude and a modulation in the TM velocity or (2) a strong modulation in the TM amplitude and phase jumps. Moreover, the locking mechanism of a TM to a RMP is studied in detail. It is shown that before the locking, the TM dynamics is characterized by velocity modulation followed by phase jumps. Experimental results are reasonably explained by simulations obtained with a model.

  6. Effect of iron(III) ion on moso bamboo pyrolysis under microwave irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qing; Li, Xiangqian; Wang, Zhaoyu; Bi, Yanhong; Yang, Rongling; Zhang, Jinfeng; Luo, Hongzhen; Niu, Miaomiao; Qi, Bo; Lu, Chen

    2017-11-01

    The effect of iron(III) ion on microwave pyrolysis of moso bamboo was investigated. Hydrofluoric acid washing was used as a pilot process to demineralize moso bamboo in order to eliminate the influences of the other inorganics contained in moso bamboo itself. The results indicated that the addition of iron(III) ion increased the maximal reaction temperatures under microwave condition dependent on the amount of the added iron(III) ion. The production of the non-condensable gases was promoted by the addition of iron(III) ion mainly at the expense of liquid products. Iron(III) ion exhibited the positive effect for syngas production and inhibited the formation of CO 2 and CH 4 . The formation of Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 was found during microwave pyrolysis and the mechanism of the two metallic oxides formation was described in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of frequency and environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of SA508 Cl.III RPV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilles, R.D.; Bulloch, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of frequency and environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of SA508 Cl. III RPV steel. The study has shown that the effect of the Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) environment is directly related to the frequency and the level of applied stress intensity of the test; these results further showed that the lower the frequency the greater the environmental effect, especially at low ΔK levels. No such frequency effect was observed in either the laboratory air or ultra-high purity argon environments. At a frequency of 0.1 Hz the PWR water test exhibited characteristic EAC growth, i.e. plateau growth behaviour. Fractographical examination of the fracture surface revealed that the fracture mode during plateau growth was intergranular failure. The experimental results are described and discussed in terms of the hydrogen assisted cracking mechanism. (author)

  8. Failure mode and effects analysis: too little for too much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Franklin, Bryony; Shebl, Nada Atef; Barber, Nick

    2012-07-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a structured prospective risk assessment method that is widely used within healthcare. FMEA involves a multidisciplinary team mapping out a high-risk process of care, identifying the failures that can occur, and then characterising each of these in terms of probability of occurrence, severity of effects and detectability, to give a risk priority number used to identify failures most in need of attention. One might assume that such a widely used tool would have an established evidence base. This paper considers whether or not this is the case, examining the evidence for the reliability and validity of its outputs, the mathematical principles behind the calculation of a risk prioirty number, and variation in how it is used in practice. We also consider the likely advantages of this approach, together with the disadvantages in terms of the healthcare professionals' time involved. We conclude that although FMEA is popular and many published studies have reported its use within healthcare, there is little evidence to support its use for the quantitative prioritisation of process failures. It lacks both reliability and validity, and is very time consuming. We would not recommend its use as a quantitative technique to prioritise, promote or study patient safety interventions. However, the stage of FMEA involving multidisciplinary mapping process seems valuable and work is now needed to identify the best way of converting this into plans for action.

  9. Comparison of dielectric barrier discharge modes fungicidal effect on candida albicans growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slama, J.; Kriha, V.; Fantova, V.; Julak, J.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentary and quasi-homogeneous mode of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was investigated as a plasma source with fungicidal effect on Candida albicans yeast inoculated on Sabouraud agar wafers. As compared with the filamentary DBD mode, the quasi-homogeneous mode had significantly better results: shorter exposition time needed for inhibiting C. albicans yeast, moreover the quasi-homogeneous mode had gentle influence on the agar surface structure.

  10. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of Subsea Multiphase Pump Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatoyin Shobowale Kafayat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Finding oil and gas reserves in deep/harsh environment with challenging reservoir and field conditions, subsea multiphase pumping benefits has found its way to provide solutions to these issues. Challenges such as failure issues that are still surging the industry and with the current practice of information hiding, this issues becomes even more difficult to tackle. Although, there are some joint industry projects which are only accessible to its members, still there is a need to have a clear understanding of these equipment groups so as to know which issues to focus attention on. A failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA is a potential first aid in understanding this equipment groups. A survey questionnaire/interview was conducted with the oil and gas operating company and equipment manufacturer based on the literature review. The results indicates that these equipment’s group are similar with its onshore counterpart, but the difference is the robustness built into the equipment internal subsystems for subsea applications. The results from the manufacturer perspectives indicates that Helico-axial multiphase pump have a mean time to failure of more than 10 years, twin-screw and electrical submersible pumps are still struggling with a mean time to failure of less than 5 years.

  11. [Failure mode and effects analysis on computerized drug prescriptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Atenciano, J A; Roldán-Aviña, J P; González-García, Mercedes; Blanco-Sánchez, M C; Pinto-Melero, M A; Pérez-Ramírez, C; Calvo Rubio-Burgos, Miguel; Osuna-Navarro, F J; Jurado-Carmona, A M

    2015-01-01

    To identify and analyze errors in drug prescriptions of patients treated in a "high resolution" hospital by applying a Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA).Material and methods A multidisciplinary group of medical specialties and nursing analyzed medical records where drug prescriptions were held in free text format. An FMEA was developed in which the risk priority index (RPI) was obtained from a cross-sectional observational study using an audit of the medical records, carried out in 2 phases: 1) Pre-intervention testing, and (2) evaluation of improvement actions after the first analysis. An audit sample size of 679 medical records from a total of 2,096 patients was calculated using stratified sampling and random selection of clinical events. Prescription errors decreased by 22.2% in the second phase. FMEA showed a greater RPI in "unspecified route of administration" and "dosage unspecified", with no significant decreases observed in the second phase, although it did detect, "incorrect dosing time", "contraindication due to drug allergy", "wrong patient" or "duplicate prescription", which resulted in the improvement of prescriptions. Drug prescription errors have been identified and analyzed by FMEA methodology, improving the clinical safety of these prescriptions. This tool allows updates of electronic prescribing to be monitored. To avoid such errors would require the mandatory completion of all sections of a prescription. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Energy consumption and environmental effects of passenger transport modes. A life cycle study on passenger transport modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalenoja, H.

    1996-01-01

    Energy consumption and environmental effects of different passenger transport modes vary on the different stages of the fuel chain and during the production and maintenance of vehicles and infrastructure. Energy consumption and the environmental effects calculated per passenger mileage depend strongly on the vehicle occupancy. The properties of transport modes on urban areas and on the long distance transport have been evaluated in this study. The energy consumption and environmental effects calculated per passenger mileage have been assessed for passenger car, bus, tram, train, airplane and ferry. The emissions have been evaluated during the whole fuel chain. In this study only the airborne emissions have been taken into account. In the energy consumption calculations the energy content of vehicles and the infrastructure, energy consumption during the fuel chain and during the end use have been taken into consideration. (au)

  13. Quantum dynamics through conical intersections in macrosystems: Combining effective modes and time-dependent Hartree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basler, Mathias; Gindensperger, Etienne; Meyer, Hans-Dieter; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2008-01-01

    We address the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics of (macro)systems involving a vast number of nuclear degrees of freedom (modes) in the presence of conical intersections. The macrosystem is first decomposed into a system part carrying a few, strongly coupled modes, and an environment, comprising the remaining modes. By successively transforming the modes of the environment, a hierarchy of effective Hamiltonians for the environment can be constructed. Each effective Hamiltonian depends on a reduced number of effective modes, which carry cumulative effects. The environment is described by a few effective modes augmented by a residual environment. In practice, the effective modes can be added to the system's modes and the quantum dynamics of the entire macrosystem can be accurately calculated on a limited time-interval. For longer times, however, the residual environment plays a role. We investigate the possibility to treat fully quantum mechanically the system plus a few effective environmental modes, augmented by the dynamics of the residual environment treated by the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) approximation. While the TDH approximation is known to fail to correctly reproduce the dynamics in the presence of conical intersections, it is shown that its use on top of the effective-mode formalism leads to much better results. Two numerical examples are presented and discussed; one of them is known to be a critical case for the TDH approximation

  14. Effects of a Deep Mixed Shell on Solar g-Modes, p-Modes, and Neutrino Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Charles L.

    2009-08-01

    A mixed-shell model that reflects g-modes away from the Sun's center is developed further by calibrating its parameters and evaluating a mixing mechanism: buoyancy. The shell roughly doubles g-mode oscillation periods and would explain why there is no definitive detection of their periods. But the shell has only minor effects on most p-modes. The model provides a mechanism for causing short-term fluctuations in neutrino flux and makes plausible the correlations between this flux and solar activity levels. Relations are derived for a shell heated asymmetrically by transient increases in nuclear burning in small "hot spots." The size of these spots and the timing of a heating event are governed by sets(ell) of standing asymptotic g-modes, coupled by a maximal principle that greatly enhances their excitation and concentrates power toward the equator, assisting the detection of higher-ell sets. Signals from all sets, except one, in the range 2 energy to mix the corresponding shell in a standard solar model in Lt107 yr.

  15. Failure mode and effects analysis outputs: are they valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Nada Atef; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Barber, Nick

    2012-06-10

    Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a prospective risk assessment tool that has been widely used within the aerospace and automotive industries and has been utilised within healthcare since the early 1990s. The aim of this study was to explore the validity of FMEA outputs within a hospital setting in the United Kingdom. Two multidisciplinary teams each conducted an FMEA for the use of vancomycin and gentamicin. Four different validity tests were conducted: Face validity: by comparing the FMEA participants' mapped processes with observational work. Content validity: by presenting the FMEA findings to other healthcare professionals. Criterion validity: by comparing the FMEA findings with data reported on the trust's incident report database. Construct validity: by exploring the relevant mathematical theories involved in calculating the FMEA risk priority number. Face validity was positive as the researcher documented the same processes of care as mapped by the FMEA participants. However, other healthcare professionals identified potential failures missed by the FMEA teams. Furthermore, the FMEA groups failed to include failures related to omitted doses; yet these were the failures most commonly reported in the trust's incident database. Calculating the RPN by multiplying severity, probability and detectability scores was deemed invalid because it is based on calculations that breach the mathematical properties of the scales used. There are significant methodological challenges in validating FMEA. It is a useful tool to aid multidisciplinary groups in mapping and understanding a process of care; however, the results of our study cast doubt on its validity. FMEA teams are likely to need different sources of information, besides their personal experience and knowledge, to identify potential failures. As for FMEA's methodology for scoring failures, there were discrepancies between the teams' estimates and similar incidents reported on the trust's incident

  16. The Effect of Excipients on the Permeability of BCS Class III Compounds and Implications for Biowaivers

    OpenAIRE

    Parr, Alan; Hidalgo, Ismael J.; Bode, Chris; Brown, William; Yazdanian, Mehran; Gonzalez, Mario A.; Sagawa, Kazuko; Miller, Kevin; Jiang, Wenlei; Stippler, Erika S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Currently, the FDA allows biowaivers for Class I (high solubility and high permeability) and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Scientific evidence should be provided to support biowaivers for BCS Class I and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds. Methods Data on the effects of excipients on drug permeability are needed to demonstrate that commonly used excipients do not affect the permea...

  17. The Effect of Excipients on the Permeability of BCS Class III Compounds and Implications for Biowaivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Alan; Hidalgo, Ismael J; Bode, Chris; Brown, William; Yazdanian, Mehran; Gonzalez, Mario A; Sagawa, Kazuko; Miller, Kevin; Jiang, Wenlei; Stippler, Erika S

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the FDA allows biowaivers for Class I (high solubility and high permeability) and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). Scientific evidence should be provided to support biowaivers for BCS Class I and Class III (high solubility and low permeability) compounds. Data on the effects of excipients on drug permeability are needed to demonstrate that commonly used excipients do not affect the permeability of BCS Class III compounds, which would support the application of biowaivers to Class III compounds. This study was designed to generate such data by assessing the permeability of four BCS Class III compounds and one Class I compound in the presence and absence of five commonly used excipients. The permeability of each of the compounds was assessed, at three to five concentrations, with each excipient in two different models: Caco-2 cell monolayers, and in situ rat intestinal perfusion. No substantial increases in the permeability of any of the compounds were observed in the presence of any of the tested excipients in either of the models, with the exception of disruption of Caco-2 cell monolayer integrity by sodium lauryl sulfate at 0.1 mg/ml and higher. The results suggest that the absorption of these four BCS Class III compounds would not be greatly affected by the tested excipients. This may have implications in supporting biowaivers for BCS Class III compounds in general.

  18. Effects of ionic strength on the coordination of Eu(III) and Cm(III) to a Gram-negative bacterium, Paracoccus denitrificans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Kimura, T.; Francis, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effect of ionic strength on the interactions of Europium(III) and Curium(III) with a Gram-negative bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans. Bacterial cells grown in 0.5-, 3.5-, and 5.0% NaCl were used in adsorption experiments and laser experiments that were performed at the same ionic strengths as those in the original growth media. The distribution ratio (log K d ) for Eu(III) and Cm(III) was determined at pHs 3-5. To elucidate the coordination environment of Eu(III) adsorbed on P. denitrificans, we estimated the number of water molecules in the inner sphere and strength of the ligand field by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) at pHs 4-6. The log K d of Eu(III) and Cm(III) increased with an increase of pH at all ionic strengths because there was less competition for ligands in cells with H + at higher pHs, wherein less H + was present in solution: cation adsorption generally occurs through an exchange with H + on the functional groups of coordination sites. No significant differences were observed in the log K d of Eu(III) and Cm(III) at each pH in 0.5-, 3.5-, and 5.0% NaCl solutions, though competition for ligands with Na + would be expected to increase at higher NaCl concentrations. The log K d of Eu(III) was almost equivalent to that of Cm(III) under all the experimental conditions. TRLFS showed that the coordination environments of Eu(III) did not differ from each other at 0.5-, 3.5-, and 5.0% NaCl at pHs 4-6. TRLFS also showed that the characteristic of the coordination environment of Eu(III) on P. denitrificans was similar to that on a halophile, Nesterenkonia halobia, while it significantly differed from that on a non-halophile, Pseudomonas putida. These findings indicate that the number of coordination sites for Eu(III) on P. denitrificans, whose cell surface may have similar structures to that of halophiles, increased with increasing ionic strength, though their structure remained unchanged. (orig.)

  19. Effects of Mulching Mode on Canopy Physiological, Ecological Characteristics and Yield of Upland Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-zhu ZHANG; Yang LIU; Xiang ZENG; Kai-lin CHEN; Ze-hui HUANG; Hong-ke XIE

    2011-01-01

    The effects of mulching mode on population physiology and ecology of rice were studied using a combination P88S/1128 as the material under three mulching cultivation modes including plastic film mulching, straw mulching and liquid film mulching, as well as bare cultivation (control). The results indicated that mulching mode had significant effects on micro-meteorological factors and individual growth of rice, as shown by an increase of relative humidity, a better internal micro-meteorological...

  20. Bloch-mode analysis for retrieving effective parameters of metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Ha, Sangwoo; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.

    2012-01-01

    by our method with a high accuracy. We employ both surface and volume averaging of the electromagnetic fields of the dominating (fundamental) Bloch modes to determine the Bloch and wave impedances, respectively. We discuss how this method works for several characteristic examples, and demonstrate...

  1. Knock-on Effects of Mode Change on Academic Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Sheena

    2004-01-01

    Factors such as increases in student numbers and technological developments are threatening the luxury of one-on-one tutorials and bringing changes in modes of academic discourse. This small scale exploratory study identifies characteristics of taped oral, compared to written, feedback that are attributable to its spoken nature (longer, less…

  2. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  3. The effect of initial conditions on the electromagnetic radiation generation in type III solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, H.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas, 18, 052903 (2011)]. The numerical simulations were carried out using different density profiles and fast electron distribution functions. It is shown that electromagnetic L and R modes are excited by the transverse current, initially imposed on the system. In the course of the simulations, no further interaction of the electron beam with the background plasma could be observed

  4. Research on Multiprincipals Selecting Effective Agency Mode in the Student Loan System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective agency mode is the key to solve incentive problems in Chinese student loan system. Principal-agent frameworks are considered in which two principals share one common agent that is performing one single task but each prefers the different aspect of the task. Three models are built and decision mechanisms are given. The studies show that the three modes have different effects. Exclusive dealing mode is not good for long-term effect because sometimes it guides agent ignoring repayment. If effort proportionality coefficient and observability are both unchanged, principals all prefer common agency, but independent contracting mode may be more efficient in reality because not only the total outputs under that mode are larger than those under cooperation one, but also preferring independent contracting mode can stimulate the bank participating in the game.

  5. Failure mode and effects analysis outputs: are they valid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shebl Nada

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA is a prospective risk assessment tool that has been widely used within the aerospace and automotive industries and has been utilised within healthcare since the early 1990s. The aim of this study was to explore the validity of FMEA outputs within a hospital setting in the United Kingdom. Methods Two multidisciplinary teams each conducted an FMEA for the use of vancomycin and gentamicin. Four different validity tests were conducted: · Face validity: by comparing the FMEA participants’ mapped processes with observational work. · Content validity: by presenting the FMEA findings to other healthcare professionals. · Criterion validity: by comparing the FMEA findings with data reported on the trust’s incident report database. · Construct validity: by exploring the relevant mathematical theories involved in calculating the FMEA risk priority number. Results Face validity was positive as the researcher documented the same processes of care as mapped by the FMEA participants. However, other healthcare professionals identified potential failures missed by the FMEA teams. Furthermore, the FMEA groups failed to include failures related to omitted doses; yet these were the failures most commonly reported in the trust’s incident database. Calculating the RPN by multiplying severity, probability and detectability scores was deemed invalid because it is based on calculations that breach the mathematical properties of the scales used. Conclusion There are significant methodological challenges in validating FMEA. It is a useful tool to aid multidisciplinary groups in mapping and understanding a process of care; however, the results of our study cast doubt on its validity. FMEA teams are likely to need different sources of information, besides their personal experience and knowledge, to identify potential failures. As for FMEA’s methodology for scoring failures, there were discrepancies

  6. Distinct Molecular Effects of Angiotensin II and Angiotensin III in Rat Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A. Clark

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is postulated that central effects of angiotensin (Ang II may be indirect due to rapid conversion to Ang III by aminopeptidase A (APA. Previously, we showed that Ang II and Ang III induced mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases ERK1/2 and stress-activated protein kinase/Jun-terminal kinases (SAPK/JNK phosphorylation in cultured rat astrocytes. Most importantly, both peptides were equipotent in causing phosphorylation of these MAP kinases. In these studies, we used brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes to determine whether Ang II’s phosphorylation of these MAP kinases is due to the conversion of the peptide to Ang III. We pretreated astrocytes with 10 μM amastatin A or 100 μM glutamate phosphonate, selective APA inhibitors, prior to stimulating with either Ang II or Ang III. Both peptides were equipotent in stimulating ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. The APA inhibitors failed to prevent Ang II- and Ang III-mediated phosphorylation of the MAP kinases. Further, pretreatment of astrocytes with the APA inhibitors did not affect Ang II- or Ang III-induced astrocyte growth. These findings suggest that both peptides directly induce phosphorylation of these MAP kinases as well as induce astrocyte growth. These studies establish both peptides as biologically active with similar intracellular and physiological effects.

  7. Rotifer neuropharmacology--III. Adrenergic drug effects on Brachionus plicatilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshmirian, J; Nogrady, T

    1987-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) induces three pharmacological effects in Brachionus plicatilis. As a result of excitation the rate of ciliary motion and swimming increases, and the animals flip their foot constantly at a rapid rate. This rapid foot flipping was used as a specific model to measure adrenergic effects in B. plicatilis. Phenylephrine induces the same effect at identical efficacy, while isoproterenol and salbutamol, two beta-agonists, show one-half and one-tenth NE efficacy. The beta blocker propranolol and the alpha blocker tolazoline both antagonize foot flipping induced by NE. However, propranolol shows antagonism because it causes foot paralysis by itself. Timolol, another beta blocker but without the membrane effect of propranolol, does not antagonize the alpha receptor mediated NE effect, nor does it cause foot paralysis. Propranolol, timolol and tolazoline also show agonist activity, inducing foot flipping. NE does not antagonize the foot paralysis induced by propranolol, only its anesthetic effect by delaying its onset. These results indicate that the foot flipping induced by NE is a receptor-mediated alpha adrenergic effect, while the foot paralysis is caused by membrane phenomena.

  8. Faculty Satisfaction with Distance Education: A Comparative Analysis on Effectiveness of Undergraduate Course Delivery Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Higher education faculty can and do teach courses delivered in a variety of ways. But, to date, little research has been done on the effectiveness of different delivery modes. This study sought to fill that void by comparing the effectiveness of three undergraduate course delivery modes: classroom, online, and video conference at a technical…

  9. Oblique propagation of electron thermal modes below the electron plasma frequency without boundary effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, T.; Watanabe, T.; Sanuki, H.

    1981-08-01

    Propagation characteristics and refractive effects of an oblique electron thermal mode without boundary effects below the electron plasma frequency are studied experimentally and theoretically in an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma. The behavior of this mode observed experimentally was confirmed by the theoretical analysis based on a new type of ray theory. (author)

  10. Analytical relation between effective mode field area and waveguide dispersion in microstructure fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenster, Mathias; Steinmeyer, Günter; Iliew, Rumen; Lederer, Falk; Petermann, Klaus

    2006-11-15

    For optical fibers exhibiting a radially symmetric refractive index profile, there exists an analytical relation that connects waveguide dispersion and the Petermann-II mode field radius. We extend the usefulness of this relation to the nonradially symmetric case of microstructure fibers in the anomalous dispersion regime, yielding a simple relation between dispersion and effective mode field area. Assuming a Gaussian mode distribution, we derive a fundamental upper limit for the effective mode field area that is required to obtain a certain amount of anomalous waveguide dispersion. This relation is demonstrated to show excellent agreement for fiber designs suited for supercontinuum generation and soliton lasers in the near infrared.

  11. Antithrombin III prevents deleterious effects of remote ischemia-reperfusion injury on healing of colonic anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Koray; Aytekin, Faruk; Ozden, Akin; Bilgihan, Ayşe; Erdem, Ergün; Sungurtekin, Ugur; Güney, Yildiz

    2002-08-01

    Antithrombin III is known as the most important natural inhibitor of thrombin activity and has been shown to attenuate local harmful effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury in many organs. In recent animal studies, delaying effect of remote organ ischemia-reperfusion injury on healing of intestinal anastomoses has been demonstrated. In this study, we investigated whether antithrombin III reduces deleterious systemic effects of ischemia-reperfusion injury on healing of colonic anastomoses in rats. Anastomosis of the left colon was performed in 24 rats that were divided into three groups: sham operated control (group I, n = 8), 30 minutes of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion by superior mesenteric artery occlusion (group II, n = 8), antithrombin III treated group (250 U/kg before and after the ischemia-reperfusion, group III, n = 8). On postoperative day 6, all animals were sacrificed, and bursting pressure and tissue hydroxyproline content of the anastomoses were assessed and compared. On postoperative day 6 the mean bursting pressures were 149.6 +/- 4.8, 69.8 +/- 13.5, and 121.8 +/- 8.7 mm Hg for groups I, II, and III, respectively (P = 0.000). Mean tissue hydroxyproline concentration values were 389.5 +/- 29.6, 263.1 +/- 10.0, and 376.0 +/- 33.8 microg/mg for groups I, II, III respectively (P = 0.005). This study showed that, antithrombin III treatment significantly prevented the delaying effect of remote organ ischemia-reperfusion injury on anastomotic healing in the colon. Further clinical studies are needed to clarify whether antithrombin may be a useful therapeutic agent to increase the safety of the anastomosis during particular operations where remote organ ischemia-reperfusion injury takes place.

  12. Effect of soft mode on shear viscosity of quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutome, Takahiko; Iwasaki, Masaharu

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the shear viscosity of quark matter at finite temperature and density. If we assume that the quark interacts with the soft mode, which is a collective mode of a quark-antiquark pair, the self-energy of the quark is calculated by quasi-particle random phase approximation. It is shown that its imaginary part is large and its mean free path is short. With the use of the Kubo formula, the shear viscosity of quark matter decreases. The Reynolds number of quark matter is estimated to be about 10. As temperature increases, shear viscosity increases gradually for T>200 MeV. Moreover it is shown that the shear viscosity also increases with the chemical potential for μ>200 MeV. (author)

  13. Metal-poor star formation triggered by the feedback effects from Pop III stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaki, Gen; Susa, Hajime; Hirano, Shingo

    2018-04-01

    Metal enrichment by first-generation (Pop III) stars is the very first step of the matter cycle in structure formation and it is followed by the formation of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. To investigate the enrichment process by Pop III stars, we carry out a series of numerical simulations including the feedback effects of photoionization and supernovae (SNe) of Pop III stars with a range of masses of minihaloes (MHs), Mhalo, and Pop III stars, MPopIII. We find that the metal-rich ejecta reach neighbouring haloes and external enrichment (EE) occurs when the H II region expands before the SN explosion. The neighbouring haloes are only superficially enriched, and the metallicity of the clouds is [Fe/H] < -5. Otherwise, the SN ejecta fall back and recollapse to form an enriched cloud, i.e. an internal-enrichment (IE) process takes place. In the case where a Pop III star explodes as a core-collapse SN (CCSN), the MH undergoes IE, and the metallicity in the recollapsing region is -5 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ -3 in most cases. We conclude that IE from a single CCSN can explain the formation of EMP stars. For pair-instability SNe (PISNe), EE takes place for all relevant mass ranges of MHs, consistent with the lack of observational signs of PISNe among EMP stars.

  14. Effects of reactive Mn(III)-oxalate complexes on structurally intact plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summering, J. A.; Keiluweit, M.; Goni, M. A.; Nico, P. S.; Kleber, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lignin components in the in plant litter are commonly assumed to have longer residence times in soil than many other compounds, which are supposedly, more easily degradable. The supposed resistance of lignin compounds to decomposition is generally attributed to the complex chain of biochemical steps required to create footholds in the non-porous structure of ligno-cellulose in cell walls. Interestingly, Mn(III) complexes have shown the ability to degrade ligno-cellulose. Mn(III) chelated by ligands such as oxalate are soluble oxidizers with a high affinity for lignin structures. Here we determined (i) the formation and decay kinetics of the Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in aqueous solution and (ii) the effects that these complexes have on intact ligno-cellulose. UV/vis spectroscopy and iodometric titrations confirmed the transient nature of Mn(III)-oxalate complexes with decay rates being in the order of hours. Zinnia elegans tracheary elements - a model ligno-cellulose substrate - were treated with Mn(III)-oxalate complexes in a newly developed flow-through reactor. Soluble decomposition products released during the treatment were analyzed by GC/MS and the degree of cell integrity was measured by cell counts, pre- and post-treatment counts indicate a decrease in intact Zinnia elegans as a result of Mn(III)-treatment. GC/MS results showed the release of a multitude of solubilized lignin breakdown products from plant cell walls. We conclude that Mn(III)-oxalate complexes have the ability to lyse intact plant cells and solubilize lignin. Lignin decomposition may thus be seen as resource dependent, with Mn(III) a powerful resource that should be abundant in terrestrial characterized by frequent redox fluctuations.

  15. Effects of Al(III and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Fu Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT modified glass carbon electrode (GCE. The results showed that Al(III and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  16. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  17. Effect of pH on stability constants of Am(III)- and Cm(III)- humate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samadfam, Mohammad; Jintoku, Takashi; Sato, Seichi; Ohashi, Hiroshi; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki; Hara, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Yoshimitsu

    1999-01-01

    The apparent stability constants of Am(III)- and Cm(III)-humate complexes were determined by dialysis method at ionic strength 0.1 in the pH range from 3.3 to 5.7 under N 2 bubbling. The Am(III) and Cm(III) loadings were about 10 -7 and 10 -10 mol/dm 3 . The concentrations of Am-241 and Cm-242 tracers were measured by α-spectrometry. It was found that the apparent stability constants were almost identical for both the Am(III)-humate and Cm(III)-humate complexes. The apparent stability constants showed a small pH-dependence, increasing from 10 4.6 at pH 3.3 to 10 5.1 at pH 5.7. The ionization of acidic functional groups of humic acid is possibly the primary factor. Above pH 6, the dialysis membrane was no langer permeable to Am(III) and Cm(III) ions and the apparent stability constant could not be experimentally obtained. The apparent stability constants between pH 6 and pH 8.5 were evaluated by considering that both binary metal-humate and ternary metal-hydroxo-humate complexes exist at pHs above 6. It was assumed that mono-hydroxo-humate complex Am(OH)HA and Cm(OH)HA are the major ternary complexes that exist below pH 9. The overall stability constants for Am(III)- and Cm(III)-humate complexes increased from 10 5.7 at pH 6 to 10 7.2 at pH 8. This implies that the formation of metal-hydroxo-humate species is preferred over the formation of hydroxide species. The apparent overall stability constants can be easily incorporated into geochemical modeling of trivalent actinide migration. The results of the present study show that the apparent stability constants determined experimentally at pH≤6 do not represent the complexation properties at higher pHs and the formation of ternary complexes should be considered in speciation calculations of radionuclides at terrestrial environment. (J.P.N.)

  18. Intramolecular energy transfer and mode-specific effects in unimolecular reactions of 1,2-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    1989-06-01

    The unimolecular decomposition reactions of 1,2-difluoroethane upon mode-specific excitation to a total internal energy of 7.5 eV are investigated using classical trajectory methods and a previously formulated empirical potential-energy surface. The decomposition channels for 1,2-difluoroethane are, in order of importance, four-center HF elimination, C-C bond rupture, and hydrogen-atom dissociation. This order is found to be independent of the particular vibrational mode excited. Neither fluorine-atom nor F2 elimination reactions are ever observed even though these dissociation channels are energetically open. For four-center HF elimination, the average fraction of the total energy partitioned into internal HF motion varies between 0.115-0.181 depending upon the particular vibrational mode initially excited. The internal energy of the fluoroethylene product lies in the range 0.716-0.776. Comparison of the present results with those previously obtained for a random distribution of the initial 1,2-difluoroethane internal energy [J. Phys. Chem. 92, 5111 (1988)], shows that numerous mode-specific effects are present in these reactions in spite of the fact that intramolecular energy transfer rates for this system are 5.88-25.5 times faster than any of the unimolecular reaction rates. Mode-specific excitation always leads to a total decomposition rate significantly larger than that obtained for a random distribution of the internal energy. Excitation of different 1,2-difluoroethane vibrational modes is found to produce as much as a 51% change in the total decomposition rate. Mode-specific effects are also seen in the product energy partitioning. The rate coefficients for decomposition into the various channels are very sensitive to the particular mode excited. A comparison of the calculated mode-specific effects with the previously determined mode-to-mode energy transfer rate coefficients [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 5680 (1988)] shows that, to some extent, the presence of mode

  19. Finite beta and compressibility effects on stability of resistive modes in toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leboeuf, J-N.G.; Kurita, Gen-ichi.

    1998-03-01

    Linear resistive stability results obtained from the toroidal magnetohydrodynamic codes FAR developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in United States of America and AEOLUS developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are compared for carefully constructed benchmark profiles and parameters. These are unstable to a tearing mode with toroidal mode number n=1. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions calculated with both codes are in close agreement and show that the effect of compressibility is weak for these modes. The effect of finite plasma beta is considered, and the eigenvalues calculated by the FAR and AEOLUS codes also show good agreement. It is shown that the finite beta has a stabilizing effect on the toroidal tearing mode, but that the compressibility also has little effect on finite beta tearing modes. (author)

  20. The glycomic effect of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III overexpression in metastatic melanoma cells. GnT-III modifies highly branched N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link-Lenczowski, Paweł; Bubka, Monika; Balog, Crina I A; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Butters, Terry D; Wuhrer, Manfred; Lityńska, Anna

    2018-04-01

    N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III) is known to catalyze N-glycan "bisection" and thereby modulate the formation of highly branched complex structures within the Golgi apparatus. While active, it inhibits the action of other GlcNAc transferases such as GnT-IV and GnT-V. Moreover, GnT-III is considered as an inhibitor of the metastatic potential of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of GnT-III may be more diverse and depend on the cellular context. We describe the detailed glycomic analysis of the effect of GnT-III overexpression in WM266-4-GnT-III metastatic melanoma cells. We used MALDI-TOF and ESI-ion-trap-MS/MS together with HILIC-HPLC of 2-AA labeled N-glycans to study the N-glycome of membrane-attached and secreted proteins. We found that the overexpression of GnT-III in melanoma leads to the modification of a broad range of N-glycan types by the introduction of the "bisecting" GlcNAc residue with highly branched complex structures among them. The presence of these unusual complex N-glycans resulted in stronger interactions of cellular glycoproteins with the PHA-L. Based on the data presented here we conclude that elevated activity of GnT-III in cancer cells does not necessarily lead to a total abrogation of the formation of highly branched glycans. In addition, the modification of pre-existing N-glycans by the introduction of "bisecting" GlcNAc can modulate their capacity to interact with carbohydrate-binding proteins such as plant lectins. Our results suggest further studies on the biological function of "bisected" oligosaccharides in cancer cell biology and their interactions with carbohydrate-binding proteins.

  1. The Effect of Plasma Shape on H-Mode Pedestal Characteristics on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.H. Osborne; J.R. Ferron; R.J. Groebner; L.L. Lao; A.W. Leonard; R. Maingi; R.L. Miller; A.D. Turnbull; M.R. Wade; J.G. Watkins

    1999-01-01

    The characteristics of the H-mode are studied in discharges with varying triangularity and squareness. The pressure at the top of the H-mode pedestal increases strongly with triangularity primarily due to an increase in the margin by which the edge pressure gradient exceeds the ideal ballooning mode first stability limit. Two models are considered for how the edge may exceed the ballooning mode limit. In one model [1], access to the ballooning mode second stable regime allows the edge pressure gradient and associated bootstrap current to continue to increase until an edge localized, low toroidal mode number, ideal kink mode is destabilized. In the second model [2], the finite width of the H-mode transport barrier, and diamagnetic effects raise the pressure gradient limit above the ballooning mode limit. We observe a weak inverse dependence of the width of the H-mode transport barrier, Δ, on triangularity relative to the previously obtained [3] scaling Δ ∞ (β P PED ) 1/2 . The energy loss for Type I ELMs increases with triangularity in proportion to the pedestal energy increase. The temperature profile is found to respond stiffly to changes in T PED at low temperature, while at high temperature the response is additive. The response of the density profile is also found to play a role in the response of the total stored energy to changes in the W PED

  2. Curvature effect on tearing modes in presence of neoclassical friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maget, Patrick; Mellet, Nicolas; Meshcheriakov, Dmytro; Garbet, Xavier [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lütjens, Hinrich [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS (France)

    2013-11-15

    Neoclassical physics (here associated to the poloidal variation of the magnetic field strength along field lines in a tokamak) is well known for driving self-generated plasma current and nonlinear magnetic islands associated to it in high performance, ITER relevant plasma discharges. It is demonstrated that the neoclassical friction between a magnetic perturbation and plasma flow already impacts magnetic islands in the linear regime, by inducing a weakening of curvature stabilization for tearing modes. This conclusion holds in particular for regimes where convection is influencing the pressure dynamics, as shown using a simple analytical model and confirmed in full Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics simulations.

  3. Study on Communication Mode of Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Effective Result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J F; Zhong, X X; Chen, S

    2006-01-01

    The key challenge in wireless sensor networks is maximizing network lifetime. It will significantly reduce energy consumption of communication and prolong networks lifetime to choose appropriate communication mode. In this paper, energy model and communication topology are proposed, and then from the viewpoint of effective result, expression for communication energy cost of single sensor node and overall system in different communication mode is derived, impact that sensor nodes amount, communication radius and propagation loss exponent pose on communication mode based on simulations is analyzed, and the justification for choosing communication mode is summarized

  4. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Wind Turbine Systems in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiangsheng; Ma, Kuichao; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses a cost based Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) approch for the Wind Turbine (WT) with condition monitoring system in China. Normally, the traditional FMEA uses the Risk Priority Number (RPN) to rank failure modes. But the RPN can be changed with the Condition Monitoring...... Systems (CMS) due to change of the score of detection. The cost of failure mode should also be considered because faults can be detected at an incipient level, and condition-based maintenance can be scheduled. The results show that the proposed failure mode priorities considering their cost consequences...

  5. Effects of resonant magnetic perturbation on the triggering and the evolution of double-tearing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Lin, W. B.; Wang, X. Q.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of resonant magnetic perturbation on the triggering and the evolution of the double-tearing mode are investigated by using nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics simulations in a slab geometry. It is found that the double-tearing mode can be destabilized by boundary magnetic perturbation. Moreover, the mode has three typical development stages before it reaches saturation: the linear stable stage, the linear-growth stage, and the exponential-growth stage. The onset and growth of the double-tearing mode significantly depend on the boundary magnetic perturbations, particularly in the early development stage of the mode. The influences of the magnetic perturbation amplitude on the mode for different separations of the two rational surfaces are also discussed.

  6. Effect of mode–mode competition on atom–atom entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Wu; Mao-Fa, Fang; Jian-Wu, Cai

    2010-01-01

    A system consisting of two atoms interacting with a two-mode vacuum is considered, where each atom is resonant with the two cavity modes through two different competing transitions. The effect of mode–mode competition on the atom–atom entanglement is investigated. We find that the entanglement between the two atoms can be induced by the mode–mode competition. For the initial atomic state |Ψ(0)}, whether the atoms are initially separated or entangled, a large or even maximal entanglement between them can be obtained periodically by introducing the mode–mode competition. For the initial atomic state |Φ(0)}, the strong mode–mode competition can prevent the two atoms entangled initially from suffering entanglement sudden death; besides, it makes them in a more stable and longer-lived entanglement than in the non-competition case. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  7. Effective Communication Modes in Multilingual Encounters: Comparing Alternatives in Computer Mediated Communication (CMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mulken, Margot; Hendriks, Berna

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study investigating alternative communication modes to English as a Lingua Franca. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of different modes of communication and to gain insight in communication strategies used by interlocutors to solve referential conflicts. Findings show that ELF may not necessarily be…

  8. The effect of transverse multi-mode oscillation in passively modelocked solid-state lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, A.; Reali, G. C.; Gabetta, G.

    1992-03-01

    We demonstrate that the pulses from a passively mode-locked flashlamp pumped solid-state laser can be considerably shorter using an antiresonant-ring mirror than using a linear cavity with a standard contacted dye-cell mirror, and we suggest that transverse-mode-filtering effects in the antiresonant ring play an important role in explaining this difference.

  9. Effect of Pressure Anisotropy on the m = 1 Small Wavelength Modes in Z-Pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, M.

    1987-05-01

    A generalization of Freidberg's perpendicular MHD model is used to investigate the effect of pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m = 1) mode instability in a Z-Pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collisionless and cylindrical plasma is performed. The stability criterion is (rΣB2)' = 0.

  10. Effects of radial envelope modulations on the collisionless trapped-electron mode in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao-Tian; Chen, Liu

    2018-05-01

    Adopting the ballooning-mode representation and including the effects of radial envelope modulations, we have derived the corresponding linear eigenmode equation for the collisionless trapped-electron mode in tokamak plasmas. Numerical solutions of the eigenmode equation indicate that finite radial envelope modulations can affect the linear stability properties both quantitatively and qualitatively via the significant modifications in the corresponding eigenmode structures.

  11. Effects of Video Caption Modes on English Listening Comprehension and Vocabulary Acquisition Using Handheld Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of different display modes of video captions on mobile devices, including non-caption, full-caption, and target-word modes, on the English comprehension and vocabulary acquisition of fifth graders. During the one-month experiment, the status of the students' English listening comprehension and vocabulary…

  12. Matrix resin effects in composite delamination - Mode I fracture aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunston, Donald L.; Moulton, Richard J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    A number of thermoset, toughened thermoset, and thermoplastic resin matrix systems were characterized for Mode I critical strain energy release rates, and their composites were tested for interlaminar critical strain energy release rates using the double cantilever beam method. A clear correlation is found between the two sets of data. With brittle resins, the interlaminar critical strain energy release rates are somewhat larger than the neat resin values due to a full transfer of the neat resin toughness to the composite and toughening mechanisms associated with crack growth. With tougher matrices, the higher critical strain energy release rates are only partially transferred to the composites, presumably because the fibers restrict the crack-tip deformation zones.

  13. Measurements of effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilenko, I.A.; Lourie, S.L

    2002-11-25

    The results of measurements of the effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes are presented. In these measurements the fibers were stressed and value of the effective noise temperature was obtained by direct observation of oscillations in the fundamental violin modes of several samples. Measured values indicate that effective noise temperature does not exceed the room temperature significantly. This result is important for the design of the advanced gravitational wave antennae.

  14. Neoclassical effects on the stabilization of tearing mode by current modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoqing, E-mail: inkyang@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Wang, Shaojie; Yang, Weihong [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China)

    2014-02-15

    The neoclassical effects on the stabilization of tearing modes by current modulation have been investigated. Neoclassical effects enhance the resistivity and reduce the resistive diffusion time of the modulation current. Therefore, the oscillating current can penetrate deeper into the plasma. With an oscillating loop voltage, the plasma oscillates radially at the Ware-pinch velocity. These neoclassical effects improve the efficiency of tearing mode stabilization by the current modulation.

  15. Failure modes and effects analysis of fusion magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, M.; Kazimi, M.S.; Siu, N.O.; Thome, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    A failure modes and consequence analysis of fusion magnet system is an important contributor towards enhancing the design by improving the reliability and reducing the risk associated with the operation of magnet systems. In the first part of this study, a failure mode analysis of a superconducting magnet system is performed. Building on the functional breakdown and the fault tree analysis of the Toroidal Field (TF) coils of the Next European Torus (NET), several subsystem levels are added and an overview of potential sources of failures in a magnet system is provided. The failure analysis is extended to the Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of interactions within the fusion device caused by the operation of the PF magnets is presented in the form of an Interaction Matrix. A number of these interactions may have significant consequences for the TF magnet system particularly interactions triggered by electrical failures in the PF magnet system. In the second part of this study, two basic categories of electrical failures in the PF magnet system are examined: short circuits between the terminals of external PF coils, and faults with a constant voltage applied at external PF coil terminals. An electromagnetic model of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is used to examine the mechanical load conditions for the PF and the TF coils resulting from these fault scenarios. It is found that shorts do not pose large threats to the PF coils. Also, the type of plasma disruption has little impact on the net forces on the PF and the TF coils. 39 refs., 30 figs., 12 tabs

  16. Effects of PECS Phase III Application Training on Independent Mands in Young Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jessica June

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of PECS phase III application training on independent mands in young children with autism. Participants were five children with autism ranging from ages 2 to 4 years old. A multiple baseline across participants was used to evaluate acquisition of independent correct mands across baseline and…

  17. Robust integer and fractional helical modes in the quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen, Yuval; Cohen, Yonatan; Banitt, Daniel; Heiblum, Moty; Umansky, Vladimir

    2018-04-01

    Electronic systems harboring one-dimensional helical modes, where spin and momentum are locked, have lately become an important field of their own. When coupled to a conventional superconductor, such systems are expected to manifest topological superconductivity; a unique phase hosting exotic Majorana zero modes. Even more interesting are fractional helical modes, yet to be observed, which open the route for realizing generalized parafermions. Possessing non-Abelian exchange statistics, these quasiparticles may serve as building blocks in topological quantum computing. Here, we present a new approach to form protected one-dimensional helical edge modes in the quantum Hall regime. The novel platform is based on a carefully designed double-quantum-well structure in a GaAs-based system hosting two electronic sub-bands; each tuned to the quantum Hall effect regime. By electrostatic gating of different areas of the structure, counter-propagating integer, as well as fractional, edge modes with opposite spins are formed. We demonstrate that, due to spin protection, these helical modes remain ballistic over large distances. In addition to the formation of helical modes, this platform can serve as a rich playground for artificial induction of compounded fractional edge modes, and for construction of edge-mode-based interferometers.

  18. A study on changes in body surface temperature and thermal effect according to ultrasound mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sung Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsin Christian Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Soo [Dept. of Radiology, University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Recently, as the number of high-risk pregnancies increases, the use of new techniques such as Doppler, which have higher acoustic power than in the past, has been increasingly used in prenatal diagnosis and guidelines have been set up by various organizations to prevent excessive exposure. Therefore, in this study, we tried to investigate the temperature change of the body surface for each test mode according to the long time ultrasound examination and to examine the exposure time which is not influenced by the thermal effect. B mode, C mode, and PD mode according to time, and the temperature difference between exposed and unexposed sites were compared. As a result, the B mode showed a significant difference in the temperature change from 10 minutes, 50 minutes after exposed, 20 minutes from the C mode, and 30 minutes from the PD mode (p<0.01). In all three modes, the temperature difference was different(p<0.000), and PD mode was the most sensitive to temperature change. Also, it was found that the temperature rise time was shortened with the increase of the ultrasonic exposure time. Therefore, it is recommended that ultrasonography to observe the embryo or fetus should be used only for diagnostic purposes, avoiding excessive test time.

  19. Resistive effects on line-tied magnetohydrodynamic modes in cylindrical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Evstatiev, E. G.; Finn, John M.

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of resistivity on the linear stability of line-tied magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes is presented in cylindrical geometry, based on the method recently developed in the paper by Evstatiev et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 072902 (2006)]. The method uses an expansion of the full solution of the problem in one-dimensional radial eigenfunctions. This method is applied to study sausage modes (m=0, m being the poloidal wavenumber), kink modes (m=1), and m=2 modes. All these modes can be resistively unstable. It is found that m≠0 modes can be unstable below the ideal MHD threshold due to resistive diffusion of the field lines, with growth rates proportional to resistivity. For these resistive modes, there is no indication of tearing, i.e., current sheets or boundary layers due to ideal MHD singularities. That is, resistivity acts globally on the whole plasma column and not in layers. Modes with m=0, on the other hand, can exist as tearing modes if the equilibrium axial magnetic field reverses sign within the plasma

  20. Effect of the transverse parasitic mode on beam performance for the ADS driver linac in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Peng; Pei Shilun; Wang Jiuqing; Li Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    The ADS (Accelerator Driven subcritical System) driver linac in China is designed to run in CW (Continuous Wave) mode with 10 mA designed beam current. In this scenario, the beam-induced parasitic modes in the ADS driver linac may make the beam unstable or deteriorate the beam performance. To evaluate the parasitic mode effect on the beam dynamics systematically, simulation studies using the ROOT-based numerical code SMD have been conducted. The longitudinal beam instability induced by the HOMs (High Order Modes) and SOMs (Same Order Modes) has little effect on the longitudinal beam performance for the current ADS driver linac design based on the 10 MeV/325 MHz injector I from previous studies. Here the transverse parasitic mode (i.e., dipole HOM) effect on the transverse beam performance at the ADS driver linac exit is investigated. To more reasonably quantify the dipole mode effect, the multi-bunch effective emittance is introduced in this paper. (authors)

  1. Effects of synchronous versus asynchronous mode of propulsion on wheelchair basketball sprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faupin, Arnaud; Borel, Benoit; Meyer, Christophe; Gorce, Philippe; Watelain, Eric

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to first investigate synchronous (SYN) versus asynchronous (ASY) mode of propulsion and, second, investigate the wheel camber effects on sprinting performance as well as temporal parameters. Seven wheelchair basketball players performed four maximal eight-second sprints on a wheelchair ergometer. They repeated the test according to two modes of propulsion (SYN and ASY) and two wheel cambers (9° and 15°). The mean maximal velocity and push power output was greater in the synchronous mode compared to the asynchronous mode for both camber angles. However, the fluctuation in the velocity profile is inferior for ASY versus SYN mode for both camber angles. Greater push time/cycle time (Pt/Ct) and arm frequency (AF) for synchronous mode versus asynchronous mode and inversely, lesser Ct and rest time (Rt) values for the synchronous mode, for which greater velocity were observed. SYN mode leads to better performance than ASY mode in terms of maximal propulsion velocity. However, ASY propulsion allows greater continuity of the hand-rim force application, reducing fluctuations in the velocity profile. The camber angle had no effect on ASY and SYN mean maximal velocity and push power output. The study of wheelchair propulsion strategies is important for better understanding physiological and biomechanical impacts of wheelchair propulsion for individuals with disabilities. From a kinematical point of view, this study highlights synchronous mode of propulsion to be more efficient, with regards to mean maximal velocity reaching during maximal sprinting exercises. Even if this study focuses on well-trained wheelchair athletes, results from this study could complement the knowledge on the physiological and biomechanical adaptations to wheelchair propulsion and therefore, might be interesting for wheelchair modifications for purposes of rehabilitation.

  2. Strain-effect transistors: Theoretical study on the effects of external strain on III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors on flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shervin, Shahab; Asadirad, Mojtaba [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Kim, Seung-Hwan; Ravipati, Srikanth; Lee, Keon-Hwa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Bulashevich, Kirill [STR Group, Inc., Engels av. 27, P.O. Box 89, 194156, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ryou, Jae-Hyun, E-mail: jryou@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    This paper presents strain-effect transistors (SETs) based on flexible III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through theoretical calculations. We show that the electronic band structures of InAlGaN/GaN thin-film heterostructures on flexible substrates can be modified by external bending with a high degree of freedom using polarization properties of the polar semiconductor materials. Transfer characteristics of the HEMT devices, including threshold voltage and transconductance, are controlled by varied external strain. Equilibrium 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is enhanced with applied tensile strain by bending the flexible structure with the concave-side down (bend-down condition). 2DEG density is reduced and eventually depleted with increasing compressive strain in bend-up conditions. The operation mode of different HEMT structures changes from depletion- to enchantment-mode or vice versa depending on the type and magnitude of external strain. The results suggest that the operation modes and transfer characteristics of HEMTs can be engineered with an optimum external bending strain applied in the device structure, which is expected to be beneficial for both radio frequency and switching applications. In addition, we show that drain currents of transistors based on flexible InAlGaN/GaN can be modulated only by external strain without applying electric field in the gate. The channel conductivity modulation that is obtained by only external strain proposes an extended functional device, gate-free SETs, which can be used in electro-mechanical applications.

  3. The Effect of Answering in a Preferred Versus a Non-Preferred Survey Mode on Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene Smyth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that offering respondents their preferred mode can increase response rates, but the effect of doing so on how respondents process and answer survey questions (i.e., measurement is unclear. In this paper, we evaluate whether changes in question format have different effects on data quality for those responding in their preferred mode than for those responding in a non-preferred mode for three question types (multiple answer, open-ended, and grid. Respondents were asked about their preferred mode in a 2008 survey and were recontacted in 2009. In the recontact survey, respondents were randomly assigned to one of two modes such that some responded in their preferred mode and others did not. They were also randomly assigned to one of two questionnaire forms in which the format of individual questions was varied. On the multiple answer and open-ended items, those who answered in a non-preferred mode seemed to take advantage of opportunities to satisfice when the question format allowed or encouraged it (e.g., selecting fewer items in the check-all than the forced-choice format and being more likely to skip the open-ended item when it had a larger answer box, while those who answered in a preferred mode did not. There was no difference on a grid formatted item across those who did and did not respond by their preferred mode, but results indicate that a fully labeled grid reduced item missing rates vis-à-vis a grid with only column heading labels. Results provide insight into the effect of tailoring to mode preference on commonly used questionnaire design features.

  4. Effects of Tempo, Musical Experience, and Listening Modes on Tempo Modulation Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Deborah A.

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the effects of tempo direction, listening mode, and level of musical experience on speed and accuracy in tempo change among 160 music majors and nonmajors. Finds that music majors more accurately detected tempo changes than did nonmajors. (CFR)

  5. Effect of tetracycline dose and treatment-mode on selection of resistant coliform bacteria in nursery pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This study describes results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on selection of antibiotic resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4-7 weeks of age) were treated...... with oxytetracycline against Lawsonia intracellularis induced diarrhea in five pig herds. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with (i) high (20 mg/kg), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg) and (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dosage, (iv) oral-pen-wise (small group) treatment (10 mg...... significant changes in number or proportion of tetracycline resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant, but not to cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, difference in dose of oxytetracycline...

  6. Non-invasive ventilation effectiveness and the effect of ventilatory mode on survival in ALS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Jesus; Servera, Emilio; Morelot-Panzini, Capucine; Salachas, François; Similowski, Thomas; Gonzalez-Bermejo, Jesus

    2014-03-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) prolongs survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but there are no data with which to compare the effectiveness of the different ventilator modes - volume (Vol-NIV) or pressure-cycled (Pres-NIV) ventilation - in ALS. We aimed to determine whether the ventilatory mode has an effect on ventilation effectiveness and survival of ALS patients using NIV. We used a retrospective study that included all ALS patients for whom NIV was indicated in two referral units: one using Vol-NIV and the other using Pres-NIV. Demographic, functional and nocturnal gas exchange parameters at NIV initiation were recorded. Eighty-two ALS patients ventilated using Pres-NIV and 62 using Vol-NIV were included. No differences were found in survival from NIV initiation between Vol-NIV (median 15.00 (7.48-22.41) months) and Pres-NIV (median 15.00 (10.25-19.75) months, p = 0.533) patients. Effective NIV was achieved in 72.41% Vol-NIV patients and in 48.78% Pres-NIV patients (p NIV. In conclusion, although Vol-NIV provides more effective ventilation, Vol-NIV and Pres-NIV present similar survival in ALS. Effectiveness of NIV is related to the severity of bulbar dysfunction.

  7. Mass effect of redox reactions: A novel mode for surface plasmon resonance-based bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Pei-Xin; Deng, Sheng-Yuan; Xin, Peng; Ji, Xu-Bo; Shan, Dan; Cosnier, Serge

    2015-12-15

    The pursuit of more specific and sensitive response is a perpetual goal for modern bioassays. This work proposed a novel label-free strategy about redox-related mass effect based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique for ultrasensitive determination of DNA. The protocol starts with the modification of SPR gilded disk with the capture DNA (cDNA). After the conjugation of immobilized cDNA with the target DNA (tDNA), the hybridization chain reaction was triggered by the introduction of mutual partial complementary primers to elongate the terminal into a nanoscale duplex. As it is reported that porphyrin could intercalate into the grooves of the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) scaffold, multiple positive-charged Fe(III)meso-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine (FeTMPyP) with symmetric structure were uptaken for in situ formation of porphyrin-dsDNA complex. Given FeTMPyP a highly efficient catalysis for the peroxide reduction, its presence as a biomimetic cofactor was validated via circular dichroism and UV-vis spectroscopy, demonstrating a tight binding as well as high catalytic activity and stability. Using 4-chloro-1-naphthol as a proton donor, the catalytic reduction of H2O2 would oxidize it into insoluble benzo-4-chloro-hexadienone, which simultaneously deposited on the heterogeneous interface, leading to a significant amplification in both SPR response and topological height profile. The signal increment was proportional to the concentration of tDNA, thus an ultrasensitive SPR-based DNA assay was developed with a linear range over four orders of magnitudes and a sub-femtomolar detection limit of 0.73 fM. The developed methodology exemplifies a different way of thinking about mass-sensing modes, extending conventional SPR-based DNA analysis to relevant biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fast particle effects on the internal kink, fishbone and Alfven modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Bernabei, S.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Hill, K.; Kaye, S.; Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.; Park, W.; Kusama, Y.; Shinokhara, K.; Ozeki, T.

    2001-01-01

    The issues of linear stability of low frequency perturbative and nonperturbative modes in advanced tokamak regimes are addressed based on recent developments in theory, computational methods, and progress in experiments. Perturbative codes NOVA and ORBIT are used to calculate the effects of TAEs on fast particle population in spherical tokamak NSTX. Nonperturbative analysis of chirping frequency modes in experiments on TFTR and JT-60U is presented using the kinetic code HINST, which identified such modes as a separate branch of Alfven modes - resonance TAE (R-TAE). Internal kink mode stability in the presence of fast particles is studied using the NOVA code and hybrid kinetic-MHD nonlinear code M3D. (author)

  9. Effect of a certain class of potential common mode failures on the reliability of redundant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolakis, G.E.

    1975-11-01

    This is a theoretical investigation of the importance of common mode failures on the reliability of redundant systems. These failures are assumed to be the result of fatal shocks (e.g., from earthquakes, explosions, etc.) which occur at a constant rate. This formulation makes it possible to predict analytically results obtained in the past which showed that the probability of a common mode failure of the redundant channels of the protection system of a typical nuclear power plant was orders of magnitude larger than the probability of failure from chance failures alone. Furthermore, since most reliability analyses of redundant systems do not include potential common mode failures in the probabilistic calculations, criteria are established which can be used to decide either that the common-mode-failure effects are indeed insignificant or that such calculations are meaningless, and more sophisticated methods of analysis are required, because common mode failures cannot be ignored

  10. Fast Particle Effects on the Internal Kink, Fishbone and Alfven Modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Bernabei, S.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Hill, K.; Kaye, S.; Kramer, G.J.; Kusama, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Nazikian, R.; Ozeki, T.; Park, W.

    2000-01-01

    The issues of linear stability of low frequency perturbative and nonperturbative modes in advanced tokamak regimes are addressed based on recent developments in theory, computational methods, and progress in experiments. Perturbative codes NOVA and ORBIT are used to calculate the effects of TAEs on fast particle population in spherical tokamak NSTX. Nonperturbative analysis of chirping frequency modes in experiments on TFTR and JT-60U is presented using the kinetic code HINST, which identified such modes as a separate branch of Alfven modes - resonance TAE (R-TAE). Internal kink mode stability in the presence of fast particles is studied using the NOVA code and hybrid kinetic-MHD nonlinear code M3D

  11. The effect of partial poloidal wall sections on the wall stabilization of external kink modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.J.

    1996-02-01

    An analysis of the effect on the wall stabilization of external kink modes due to toroidally continuous gaps in the resistive wall is performed. The effects with and without toroidal rotation are studied. For a high-β equilibrium, the mode structure is localized on the outboard side. Therefore, outboard gaps greatly increase the growth rate when there is no rotation. For resistive wall stabilization by toroidal rotation, the presence of gaps has the same effect as moving the wall farther away, i.e. destabilizing for the ideal plasma mode, and stabilizing for the resistive wall mode. The region of stability, in terms of wall position, is reduced in size and moved closer to the plasma. However, complete stabilization becomes possible at considerably reduced rotation frequencies. For a high-β, reverse-shear equilibrium both the resistive wall mode and the ideal plasma mode can be stabilized by close fitting discrete passive plates on the outboard side. The necessary toroidal rotation frequency to stabilize the resistive wall mode using these plates is reduced by a factor of three compared to that for a poloidally continuous and complete wall at the same plasma-wall separation. (author) 15 figs., 24 refs

  12. Quantum interference effects on the intensity of the G modes in double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Huy Nam; Blancon, Jean-Christophe Robert; Arenal, Raul

    2017-01-01

    The effects of quantum interferences on the excitation dependence of the intensity of G modes have been investigated on single-walled carbon nanotubes [Duque et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.108, 117404 (2012)]. In this work, by combining optical absorption spectroscopy and Raman scattering on individual index identified double-walled carbon nanotubes, we examine the experimental excitation dependence of the intensity of longitudinal optical and transverse optical G modes of the constituent inner and outer single-walled carbon nanotubes. The observed striking dependencies are understood in terms of quantum interference effects. Considering such effects, the excitation dependence of the different components of the G modes permit to unambiguously assign each of them as originating from the longitudinal or transverse G modes of inner and outer tubes.

  13. Risk analysis of geothermal power plants using Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feili, Hamid Reza; Akar, Navid; Lotfizadeh, Hossein; Bairampour, Mohammad; Nasiri, Sina

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Using Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to find potential failures in geothermal power plants. • We considered 5 major parts of geothermal power plants for risk analysis. • Risk Priority Number (RPN) is calculated for all failure modes. • Corrective actions are recommended to eliminate or decrease the risk of failure modes. - Abstract: Renewable energy plays a key role in the transition toward a low carbon economy and the provision of a secure supply of energy. Geothermal energy is a versatile source as a form of renewable energy that meets popular demand. Since some Geothermal Power Plants (GPPs) face various failures, the requirement of a technique for team engineering to eliminate or decrease potential failures is considerable. Because no specific published record of considering an FMEA applied to GPPs with common failure modes have been found already, in this paper, the utilization of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) as a convenient technique for determining, classifying and analyzing common failures in typical GPPs is considered. As a result, an appropriate risk scoring of occurrence, detection and severity of failure modes and computing the Risk Priority Number (RPN) for detecting high potential failures is achieved. In order to expedite accuracy and ability to analyze the process, XFMEA software is utilized. Moreover, 5 major parts of a GPP is studied to propose a suitable approach for developing GPPs and increasing reliability by recommending corrective actions for each failure mode

  14. Histopathological effects of Chromium (III Sulfate on Liver and Kidney of Swiss Albino Mice (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Fatima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (III sulfate has various industrial applications and is widely used in leather industry due to its high tanning properties. Cr (III is required for efficient metabolism of fats and carbohydrates in traces. Various studies have reported that its constant exposure may lead to severe health problems in both animals and humans. In this study, histopathological effect of dietary Cr (III was evaluated on liver and kidneys of rodents. For this purpose, adult Swiss albino mice (n=25 were divided into different treatment and control groups (n=5/group after sufficient acclimatization. After 3 weeks of treatment, animals were sacrificed and observations regarding histopathology of liver and kidneys were made in all treatment groups and compared to control. Microscopy and photography was performed after processing the tissues according to standard protocol of sectioning and staining. Liver cross sections of treated animals showed signs of fibrosis in portal area, and congestion of sinusoid and central vein. Whereas, more pronounced effects of Cr (III toxicity were observed in kidneys. These include mononuclear cell infiltration, necrosis and contraction of glomerulus within Bowman’s capsule. However, No pathological changes were observed in control group. These results support the hypothesis that enhanced level of Cr (III contamination of food can induce both hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. These basic findings prove that currently increasing levels of trivalent chromium in environment are hazardous to living organisms. Therefore, to avoid health risks to both animals and humans, conversion of toxic chromium waste to less toxic compounds is required. Moreover, exposure level through any route should also be minimized.

  15. Theory of energetic/alpha particle effects on magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rewoldt, G.; Colestock, P.; Rutherford, P.H.; Chen, Y.P.; Ke, F.J.; Tsai, S.T.; Bussac, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of energetic particles is shown to qualitatively modify the stability properties of ideal as well as resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in tokamaks. Specifically, we demonstrate that, consistent with highpower ICRF heating experiments in JET, high energy trapped particles can effectively stabilize the sawtooth mode, providing a possible route to stable high current tokamak operation. An alternative stabilization scheme employing barely circulating energetic particles is also proposed. Finally, we present analytical and numerical studies on the excitations of high-n MHD modes via transit resonances with circulating alpha particles. 14 refs., 3 figs

  16. Flow Velocity Effects on Fe(III Clogging during Managed Aquifer Recharge Using Urban Storm Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinqiang Du

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Storm water harvesting and storage has been employed for nearly a hundred years, and using storm water to recharge aquifers is one of the most important ways to relieve water scarcity in arid and semi-arid regions. However, it cannot be widely adopted because of clogging problems. The risk of chemical clogging is mostly associated with iron oxyhydroxide precipitation; anhydrous ferric oxide (HFO clogging remains a problem in many wellfields. This paper investigates Fe(III clogging levels at three flow velocities (Darcy velocities, 0.46, 1.62 and 4.55 m/d. The results indicate that clogging increases with flow velocity, and is mostly affected by the first 0–3 cm of the column. The highest water velocity caused full clogging in 35 h, whereas the lowest took 53 h to reach an stable 60% reduction in hydraulic conductivity. For the high flow velocity, over 90% of the HFO was deposited in the 0–1 cm section. In contrast, the lowest flow velocity deposited only 75% in this section. Fe(III deposition was used as an approximation for Fe(OH3. High flow velocity may promote Fe(OH3 flocculent precipitate, thus increasing Fe(III deposition. The main mechanism for a porous matrix interception of Fe(III colloidal particles was surface filtration. Thus, the effects of deposition, clogging phenomena, and physicochemical mechanisms, are more significant at higher velocities.

  17. Media Presentation Mode, English Listening Comprehension and Cognitive Load in Ubiquitous Learning Environments: Modality Effect or Redundancy Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Lei, Hao; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2011-01-01

    Although ubiquitous learning enhances students' access to learning materials, it is crucial to find out which media presentation modes produce the best results for English listening comprehension. The present study examined the effect of media presentation mode (sound and text versus sound) on English listening comprehension and cognitive load.…

  18. Strong toroidal effects on tokamak tearing mode stability in the hybrid and conventional scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, C J; Connor, J W; Cowley, S C; Gimblett, C G; Hastie, R J; Hender, T C; Martin, T J

    2012-01-01

    The hybrid scenario is thought to be an important mode of operation for the ITER tokamak. Analytic and numerical calculations demonstrate that toroidal effects at finite β have a strong influence on tearing mode stability of hybrid modes. Indeed, they persist in the large aspect ratio limit, R/a → ∞. A similar strong coupling effect is found between the m = 1, n = 1 harmonic and the m = 2, n = 1 harmonic if the minimum safety factor is less than unity. In both cases the tearing stability index, Δ′ increases rapidly as β approaches ideal marginal stability, providing a potential explanation for the onset of linearly unstable tearing modes. The numerical calculations have used an improved version of the T7 code (Fitzpatrick et al 1993 Nucl. Fusion 33 1533), and complete agreement is obtained with the analytic theory for this demanding test of the code. (paper)

  19. Failure mode and effects analysis applied to the administration of liquid medication by oral syringes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva María Guerra-Alia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To carry out a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA to the use of oral syringes. Methods: A multidisciplinary team was assembled within the Safety Committee. The stages of oral administration process of liquid medication were analysed, identifying the most critical and establishing the potential modes of failure that can cause errors. The impact associated with each mode of failure was calculated using the Risk Priority Number (RPN. Preventive actions were proposed. Results: Five failure modes were identified, all classified as high risk (RPN> 100. Seven of the eight preventive actions were implemented. Conclusions: The FMEA methodology was a useful tool. It has allowed to know the risks, analyse the causes that cause them, their effects on patient safety and the measures to reduce them

  20. Bi-fluid and neoclassical effect on a Double-Tearing mode in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maget, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.maget@cea.fr; Garbet, Xavier; Février, Olivier; Ségui, Jean-Luc [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lütjens, Hinrich; Luciani, Jean-François [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS (France)

    2014-06-15

    Tearing modes associated to hollow current profiles are prone to grow in moderate performance plasmas and often constrain the realization of non-inductive discharges in the Tore Supra tokamak, where long pulse duration is performed using Lower Hybrid waves for providing most of the plasma current. The prediction of MHD boundaries in such scenarios is complicated by the importance of diamagnetic effects, combined with curvature stabilization, which determine the stability of these modes. We show that diamagnetic effects, as well as neoclassical forces, are playing a key role in the linear and nonlinear regimes of Double-Tearing Modes on q = 5/3 and q = 2 in these experimental conditions. Detailed comparison with experimental measurements, combined with a scaling in plasma resistivity, give constraints about the experimental equilibrium. Resistive-Interchange Modes destabilized by diamagnetic rotation could also play a role in degrading the energy confinement in the negative magnetic shear region.

  1. Two-fluid effects on pressure-driven modes in a heliotron device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, H.; Ito, A.; Sato, M.; Goto, R.; Hatori, T.

    2014-10-01

    Two-fluid effects on the ballooning or pressure-driven unstable modes are studied numerically to understand physics in linear and nonlinear evolution of them in a heliotron device. Full 3D simulations for β 0 = 5% unstable magnetic configuration of the large helical device show that the introduction of the two-fluid term brings about broader radial profile and higher growth rate in the linear stage of the evolution, weakened parallel heat conduction, and lead to a saturation profile worse than that in the single-fluid MHD simulation. The numerical results show that suppression of high wave-number modes enhance the growth of low wave-number modes. The two-fluid effects and a plausible mild saturation of ballooning modes is discussed. (author)

  2. Impurity effect of iron(III) on the growth of potassium sulfate crystal in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Noriaki; Katagiri, Ken-ichi; Yokota, Masaaki; Sato, Akira; Yashiro, Hitoshi; Itai, Kazuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Growth rates of the {1 1 0} faces of a potassium sulfate crystal were measured in a flow cell in the presence of traces of impurity Fe(III) (up to 2 ppm) over the range of pH=2.5-6.0. The growth rate was significantly suppressed by the impurity. The effect became stronger as the impurity concentration was increased and at pH5 it finally disappeared completely. The concentration and supersaturation effects on the impurity action were reasonably explained with a model proposed by Kubota and Mullin [J. Crystal Growth, 152 (1995) 203]. The surface coverage of the active sites by Fe(III) is estimated to increase linearly on increasing its concentration in solution in the range examined by growth experiments. The impurity effectiveness factor is confirmed to increase inversely proportional to the supersaturation as predicted by the model. Apart from the discussion based on the model, the pH effect on the impurity action is qualitatively explained by assuming that the first hydrolysis product of aqua Fe(III) complex compound, [Fe(H 2O) 5(OH)] 2+, is both growth suppression and adsorption active, but the second hydrolysis product, [Fe(H 2O) 4(OH) 2] +, is only adsorption active.

  3. Treatment and posttreatment effects of mandibular cervical headgear followed by fixed appliances in Class III malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Diego; Angel, David; Oberti, Giovanni; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-03-01

    In this cephalometric investigation, we compared the treatment and posttreatment effects on patients undergoing an initial phase of mandibular cervical headgear (MCH) therapy followed later by comprehensive edgewise therapy with untreated Class III controls. The treated sample consisted of 21 patients treated consecutively with MCH before the pubertal growth spurt (average age, 10 years 2 months at the beginning of treatment). At the final observation period (average age, 15 years 3 months), all patients were in decelerative growth phases as determined by the cervical vertebral maturation method. Active treatment and posttreatment effects were evaluated in the treated group with nonparametric statistical analysis for paired samples. The treated sample was compared with a nonparametric statistical test for independent samples with 20 untreated Class III subjects who were matched for malocclusion, sex, and stage of cervical vertebral maturation to the treatment group. MCH therapy followed by fixed appliances was shown to be an effective treatment for the correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion at postpubertal observation. The favorable skeletal effects consisted mainly of smaller increases in mandibular length and advancement with respect to the controls, with the final outcome of significant improvements in the sagittal skeletal (+4 mm for the Wits appraisal) and dental (+2.7 mm for overjet, -4.4 mm for molar relationship) parameters. This treatment protocol also induced significant downward rotation of the mandible (2.8 degrees ).

  4. A model of spin crossover in manganese(III) compounds: effects of intra- and intercenter interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klokishner, Sophia I; Roman, Marianna A; Reu, Oleg S

    2011-11-21

    A microscopic approach to the problem of cooperative spin crossover in the [MnL2]NO3 crystal, which contains Mn(III) ions as structural units, is elaborated on, and the main mechanisms governing this effect are revealed. The proposed model also takes into account the splitting of the low-spin 3T1 (t(2)(4)) and high-spin 5E (t(2)(3)e) terms by the low-symmetry crystal field. The low-spin → high-spin transition has been considered as a cooperative phenomenon driven by interaction of the electronic shells of the Mn(III) ions with the all-around full-symmetric deformation that is extended over the crystal lattice via the acoustic phonon field. The model well explains the observed thermal dependencies of the magnetic susceptibility and the effective magnetic moment.

  5. Assessment of the transition strip effect in the transonic flow over the sounding rocket Sonda III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filho, J B P Falcão; Reis, M L C C; Francisco, C P F; Silva, L M

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of normalized pressure distribution are carried out over a 1:8 scale half-model of the Sonda III sounding rocket. The objective is to analyze the effect of the implementation of transition devices on the flow over the vehicle. Measurements show that the presence of the transition devices affect pressure distributions in different Mach numbers around the inter-stage region of Sonda III depending on its location and independently of the turbulent transition method employed. The study of these effects plays a significant role for future developments, since transition phenomena and the modification of the boundary layer behaviour due to the expansion can alter the load distributions and the turbulent structures of the flow. Furthermore, the experimental verification of such phenomena is crucial for the correct implementation of computational fluid dynamics calculations, as they might be able to capture the correct flow behaviour in these regions. (paper)

  6. Effects of geometry and temperature on mode I interlaminar fracture ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    explanation of the toughening mechanisms were made by comparing the impact properties with ... characteristics of this material are suitable for common ... qualitatively fine dispersion of the nanofiller within the ... may be too small to effectively interact with the propa- ... failure is examined by studying the structural changes.

  7. Mode-Specific Effects among Three Treatments for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, Stanley D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Randomly assigned 250 depressed outpatients to interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, imipramine plus clinical management, or pill placebo plus clinical management treatments. All treatments demonstrated significant symptom reduction with few differences in general outcomes. None of the therapies produced consistent effects on…

  8. Relative Effectiveness of Three Modes of Treatment on English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the effectiveness of Study Skill Counselling (SSC), Rational Emotive Therapy (RET), and a combined treatment of SSC & RET in improving the performance of students in English Language. Forty students in SS II class were randomly selected and assigned to the three experimental groups and control ...

  9. Effect of garlic's mode of administration on erythrocytes and plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With regard to erythrocytes parameters, p.o. garlic treatment was found to have beneficial effects as it increased hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Garlic i.p. treatment showed detrimental activity as it decreased these parameters. Our results reveal that garlic administered by p.o. does not involve any significant variation on ...

  10. The reform of the teaching mode of Applied Optics curriculum and analysis of teaching effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yu; Xu, Zhongjie; Li, Dun; Chen, Zilun; Cheng, Xiangai; Zhong, Hairong

    2017-08-01

    Military academies have two distinctive characteristics on talent training: Firstly, we must teach facing actual combat and connecting with academic frontier. Secondly, the bachelor's degree education and the military education should be balanced. The teaching mode of basic curriculum in military academies must be reformed and optimized on the basis of the traditional teaching mode, so as to ensure the high quality of teaching and provide enough guidance and help for students to support their academic burden. In this paper, our main work on "Applied Optics" teaching mode reform is introduced: First of all, we research extensively and learn fully from advanced teaching modes of the well-known universities at home and abroad, a whole design is made for the teaching mode of the core curriculum of optical engineering in our school "Applied Optics", building a new teaching mode which takes the methods of teaching basic parts as details, teaching application parts as emphases, teaching frontier parts as topics and teaching actual combat parts on site. Then combining with the questionnaire survey of students and opinions proposed by relevant experts in the teaching seminar, teaching effect and generalizability of the new teaching mode are analyzed and evaluated.

  11. The growth of the tearing mode - Boundary and scaling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical model of resistive magnetic tearing is developed in order to verify and relate the results of the principal approximations used in analytic analyses and to investigate the solutions and their growth-rate scalings over a large range of primary parameters which include parametric values applicable to the solar atmosphere. The computations cover the linear behavior for a variety of boundary conditions, emphasizing effects which differentiate magnetic tearing in astrophysical situations from that in laboratory devices. Eigenfunction profiles for long and short wavelengths are computed and the applicability of the 'constant psi' approximation is investigated. The growth rate is computed for values of the magnetic Reynolds number up to a trillion and of the dimensionless wavelength parameter down to 0.001. The analysis predicts significant effects due to differing values of the magnetic Reynolds number.

  12. Effects of Pop III to PopII transition on the lowest metallicity stars in dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimiao; Keres, Dusan; FIRE Team

    2018-01-01

    We examine the effects of the enrichments from Population III (Pop III) stars on the formation and properties of the first generation of the Population II (Pop II) stars. Pop III stars begin to transition towards Pop II stars when the metals dispersed in Pop III supernovae pollute the nearby gas. However, details of this transition are still largely unknown. We use dwarf galaxy simulations from the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project to identify the star-forming gas that is likely to be pre-enriched by Pop III supernovae and follow the stars that form in such gas. This pre-enrichment will leave the signature in the lowest metallicity stars that can be used to better constrain the details of the Pop III-to-Pop II transition.

  13. The Effects of Internal Waves on Acoustic Normal Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    thatp HTp HTv + CvS(!!)(..)(25 The hydrodynamic equations appropriate to an ocean are Du p b + p(fxuL) + Vp - = V-A + F (2.6a) Do + pv.u 0(2.6b) pT Ln+ V...Payne, "User’s Manual for NEMESIS and PLMODE," Applied Research Laboratories Technical Memorandum No. 80-6 . (ARL-TM-80-6), Applied Research Laboratories...1, 6th edition, Reference Manual , 1979. 56. 3. Turner, Buoyancy Effects in Fluids (Cambridqe University Press, Cambridge, London, 1972) Chap. 8. 57. W

  14. Effects of the safety factor on ion temperature gradient modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.K.; Dong, J.Q.; Sanuki, H.; Itoh, K.

    2003-01-01

    A model for the ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven instability is derived from Braginskii magnetohydrodynamic equations of ions. The safety factor q in a toroidal plasma is introduced into the model through the current density J parallel . The effects of q or J parallel on both the ITG instability in k perpendicular and k parallel spectra and the critical stability thresholds are studied. It is shown that the current density // J or the safety factor q plays an important role in stabilizing the ITG instability. (author)

  15. Irradiation: An effective mode of processing food for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossel, D.A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Markedly improved measures of hygiene, including those attaining generally accepted GMP, are effective in reducing the contamination rate markedly, without completely eliminating the pathogens concerned though. Attempts to identify contaminated consignments by sampling examination were demonstrated to be unsuccessful, even when linked to certification by producing countries. The only practicable solution of this serious health problem has to rely on terminal processing for safety, as introduced in the twenties in the dairy industry and somewhat later in the manufacture of egg products. Gamma irradiation (radicidation) at a level of <= 4 kGy was found to be most effective for a more than adequate degree of elimination of pathogens as judged by Risk Analysis. Radicidation for this purpose did not entail immediate flora changes or even shifts in the microbial community structure secondary to slight temperature abuse, that presented any health risk. Neither were organisms isolated that could not be identified with types customarily encountered in fresh or processed food. Consequently, health authorities and the food industry alike henceforth have means available to protect consumers against the perennial food-transmitted enteric infectious diseases by the application of low amounts of ionizing energy. They should not postpone these or similar measures of intervention unnecessarily because otherwise they risk being blamed by history for being reprehensibly over-anxious

  16. WE-G-BRA-08: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Bednarz, G; Flickinger, J; Arai, Y; Huq, M Saiful; Vacsulka, J; Monaco, E; Niranjan, A; Lunsford, L Dade; Feng, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) study for Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery processes at our institution based on our experience with the treatment of more than 13,000 patients. Methods: A team consisting of medical physicists, nurses, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and an external physicist expert was formed for the FMEA study. A process tree and a failure mode table were created for the GK procedures using the Leksell GK Perfexion and 4C units. Three scores for the probability of occurrence (O), the severity (S), and the probability of no detection (D) for failure modes were assigned to each failure mode by each professional on a scale from 1 to 10. The risk priority number (RPN) for each failure mode was then calculated (RPN = OxSxD) as the average scores from all data sets collected. Results: The established process tree for GK radiosurgery consists of 10 sub-processes and 53 steps, including a sub-process for frame placement and 11 steps that are directly related to the frame-based nature of the GK radiosurgery. Out of the 86 failure modes identified, 40 failure modes are GK specific, caused by the potential for inappropriate use of the radiosurgery head frame, the imaging fiducial boxes, the GK helmets and plugs, and the GammaPlan treatment planning system. The other 46 failure modes are associated with the registration, imaging, image transfer, contouring processes that are common for all radiation therapy techniques. The failure modes with the highest hazard scores are related to imperfect frame adaptor attachment, bad fiducial box assembly, overlooked target areas, inaccurate previous treatment information and excessive patient movement during MRI scan. Conclusion: The implementation of the FMEA approach for Gamma Knife radiosurgery enabled deeper understanding of the overall process among all professionals involved in the care of the patient and helped identify potential

  17. Instabilities in a nonstationary model of self-gravitating disks. III. The phenomenon of lopsidedness and a comparison of perturbation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtadjieva, K. T.; Nuritdinov, S. N.; Ruzibaev, J. K.; Khalid, Muhammad

    2011-06-01

    This is an examination of the gravitational instability of the major large-scale perturbation modes for a fixed value of the azimuthal wave number m = 1 in nonlinearly nonstationary disk models with isotropic and anisotropic velocity diagrams for the purpose of explaining the displacement of the nucleus away from the geometric center (lopsidedness) in spiral galaxies. Nonstationary analogs of the dispersion relations for these perturbation modes are obtained. Critical diagrams of the initial virial ratio are constructed from the rotation parameters for the models in each case. A comparative analysis is made of the instability growth rates for the major horizontal perturbation modes in terms of two models, and it is found that, on the average, the instability growth rate for the m = 1 mode with a radial wave number N = 3 almost always has a clear advantage relative to the other modes. An analysis of these results shows that if the initial total kinetic energy in an isotropic model is no more than 12.4% of the initial potential energy, then, regardless of the value of the rotation parameter Ω, an instability of the radial motions always occurs and causes the nucleus to shift away from the geometrical center. This instability is aperiodic when Ω = 0 and is oscillatory when Ω ≠ 0 . For the anisotropic model, this kind of structure involving the nucleus develops when the initial total kinetic energy in the model is no more than 30.6% of the initial potential energy.

  18. Effect of parallel electric fields on the whistler mode wave propagation in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, G.P.; Singh, R.N.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of parallel electric fields on whistler mode wave propagation has been studied. To account for the parallel electric fields, the dispersion equation has been analyzed, and refractive index surfaces for magnetospheric plasma have been constructed. The presence of parallel electric fields deforms the refractive index surfaces which diffuse the energy flow and produce defocusing of the whistler mode waves. The parallel electric field induces an instability in the whistler mode waves propagating through the magnetosphere. The growth or decay of whistler mode instability depends on the direction of parallel electric fields. It is concluded that the analyses of whistler wave records received on the ground should account for the role of parallel electric fields

  19. Evaluation of Safety in a Radiation Oncology Setting Using Failure Mode and Effects Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Eric C.; Gaudette, Ray; Myers, Lee; Vanderver, Bruce; Engineer, Lilly; Zellars, Richard; Song, Danny Y.; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool for prospectively evaluating safety and reliability. We report our experiences in applying FMEA in the setting of radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: We performed an FMEA analysis for our external beam radiation therapy service, which consisted of the following tasks: (1) create a visual map of the process, (2) identify possible failure modes; assign risk probability numbers (RPN) to each failure mode based on tabulated scores for the severity, frequency of occurrence, and detectability, each on a scale of 1 to 10; and (3) identify improvements that are both feasible and effective. The RPN scores can span a range of 1 to 1000, with higher scores indicating the relative importance of a given failure mode. Results: Our process map consisted of 269 different nodes. We identified 127 possible failure modes with RPN scores ranging from 2 to 160. Fifteen of the top-ranked failure modes were considered for process improvements, representing RPN scores of 75 and more. These specific improvement suggestions were incorporated into our practice with a review and implementation by each department team responsible for the process. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for finding vulnerabilities in a process before they result in an error. The FMEA framework can naturally incorporate further quantification and monitoring. A general-use system for incident and near miss reporting would be useful in this regard.

  20. Preliminary failure modes and effects analysis on Korean HCCR TBS to be tested in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Mu-Young; Cho, Seungyon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Dong Won; Park, Yi-Hyun; Lee, Youngmin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Postulated initiating events are identified through failure modes and effects analysis on the current HCCR TBS design. • A set of postulated initiating events are selected for consideration of deterministic analysis. • Accident evolutions on the selected postualted initiating events are qualitatively described for deterministic analysis. - Abstract: Korean Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) Test blanket system (TBS), which comprises Test blanket module (TBM) and ancillary systems in various locations of ITER building, is operated at high temperature and pressure with decay heat. Therefore, safety is utmost concern in design process and it is required to demonstrate that the HCCR TBS is designed to comply with the safety requirements and guidelines of ITER. Due to complexity of the system with many interfaces with ITER, a systematic approach is necessary for safety analysis. This paper presents preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) study performed for the HCCR TBS. FMEA is a systematic methodology in which failure modes for components in the system and their consequences are studied from the bottom-up. Over eighty failure modes have been investigated on the HCCR TBS. The failure modes that have similar consequences are grouped as postulated initiating events (PIEs) and total seven reference accident scenarios are derived from FMEA study for deterministic accident analysis. Failure modes not covered here due to evolving design of the HCCR TBS and uncertainty in maintenance procedures will be studied further in near future.

  1. Preliminary failure modes and effects analysis on Korean HCCR TBS to be tested in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Mu-Young, E-mail: myahn74@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun; Lee, Youngmin [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Postulated initiating events are identified through failure modes and effects analysis on the current HCCR TBS design. • A set of postulated initiating events are selected for consideration of deterministic analysis. • Accident evolutions on the selected postualted initiating events are qualitatively described for deterministic analysis. - Abstract: Korean Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) Test blanket system (TBS), which comprises Test blanket module (TBM) and ancillary systems in various locations of ITER building, is operated at high temperature and pressure with decay heat. Therefore, safety is utmost concern in design process and it is required to demonstrate that the HCCR TBS is designed to comply with the safety requirements and guidelines of ITER. Due to complexity of the system with many interfaces with ITER, a systematic approach is necessary for safety analysis. This paper presents preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) study performed for the HCCR TBS. FMEA is a systematic methodology in which failure modes for components in the system and their consequences are studied from the bottom-up. Over eighty failure modes have been investigated on the HCCR TBS. The failure modes that have similar consequences are grouped as postulated initiating events (PIEs) and total seven reference accident scenarios are derived from FMEA study for deterministic accident analysis. Failure modes not covered here due to evolving design of the HCCR TBS and uncertainty in maintenance procedures will be studied further in near future.

  2. Mean E×B shear effect on geodesic acoustic modes in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rameswar; Gurcan, Ozgur D.

    2015-01-01

    E × B shearing effect on geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is investigated for the first time both as an initial value problem in the shearing frame and as an eigenvalue value problem in the lab frame. The nontrivial effects are that E × B shearing couples the standard GAM perturbations to their complimentary poloidal parities. The resulting GAM acquires an effective inertia increasing in time leading to GAM damping. Eigenmode analysis shows that GAMs are radially localized by E × B shearing with the mode width being inversely proportional and radial wave number directly proportional to the shearing rate for weak shear. (author)

  3. 75 FR 11530 - Crystal Lake Wind III, LLC, et al.; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Crystal Lake Wind III, LLC, et al.; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status March 4, 2010. Docket Nos. Crystal Lake Wind III, LLC EG10-6-000 GardenGarden Wind, LLC EG10-7-000 Star Point Wind Project LLC EG10-8-000...

  4. THE NEW BASEL III REGULATIONS ON LIQUIDITY AND ITS POSSIBLE EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APĂTĂCHIOAE Adina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The global financial crisis determined a series of proposals to reform the regulatory framework that govern the banking sector in order to strengthen its resilience in poor circumstances. For this purpose, the provisions of Basel III regulatory package is reflected on the issues and risks that have caused the financial crisis, including those related to liquidity. The aim of this article is to present the new Basel III on liquidity rules, their implementation need to ensure financial stability and their possible effects. The objectives of Basel III in terms of liquidity are formulated to determine the increase in liquid assets and the reduction of the short-term funding. However, all measures taken through the new regulations can reduce the risks, but can not exclude the emergence of vulnerabilities affecting the banking system in the future. We believe that the new regulations have caused a series of reforms to the banking system, but the compliance degree of their implementation and the effects of new laws differs depending on the degree of development of each country, the main implications are differentiated by monetary transmission channels.

  5. [Comparison of the effects of phosphodiesterase III inhibitors, milrinone and olprinone, in infant corrective cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimura, Shotaro; Yoshino, Jun; Izumi, Kaoru; Jimi, Nobuo; Sumiyoshi, Rieko; Mizuno, Keiichiro

    2013-05-01

    Clinical characteristics of phosphodiesterase (PDE) III inhibitors, milrinone and olprinone, is not fully understood in infants. We therefore retrospectively examined the hemodynamics, metabolism, and oxygenation of two different PDE III inhibitors in infants undergoing radical correction of ventricular septal defect with pulmonary hypertension. Twenty-six infants with pulmonary hypertension undergoing ventricular septum defect repair were retrospectively allocated to milrinone group (n= 13)and olprinone group(n=13). Hemodynamic parameters, acid-base balance, oxygenation and postoperative mechanical ventilation period were compared between the two groups at induction of anesthesia, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass and the end of the surgery. The patients' mean age was 4.4 +/- 2.5 months. Demographic data were almost similar between the two groups. Milrinone and olprinone were administered at the rates of 0.5 and 0.3 microg x kg-1 x min-1 at the end of surgery, respectively. Hemodynamic variables, acid-base balance, Pao2 /FIo2 ratio and mechanical ventilation period were not significantly different between the two groups. No adverse side effects were observed during the study period. The effects of the PDE III inhibitors, milrinone and olprinone, on hemodynamic parameters, acid-base balance and oxygenation were similar in these infants. Both milrinone and olprinone could be used safely in infant cardiac surgery.

  6. Effect of heterogeneity and assumed mode of inheritance on lod scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, M; Greenberg, D A

    1992-02-01

    Heterogeneity is a major factor in many common, complex diseases and can confound linkage analysis. Using computer-simulated heterogeneous data we tested what effect unlinked families have on a linkage analysis when heterogeneity is not taken into account. We created 60 data sets of 40 nuclear families each with different proportions of linked and unlinked families and with different modes of inheritance. The ascertainment probability was 0.05, the disease had a penetrance of 0.6, and the recombination fraction for the linked families was zero. For the analysis we used a variety of assumed modes of inheritance and penetrances. Under these conditions we looked at the effect of the unlinked families on the lod score, the evaluation of the mode of inheritance, and the estimate of penetrance and of the recombination fraction in the linked families. 1. When the analysis was done under the correct mode of inheritance for the linked families, we found that the mode of inheritance of the unlinked families had minimal influence on the highest maximum lod score (MMLS) (i.e., we maximized the maximum lod score with respect to penetrance). Adding sporadic families decreased the MMLS less than adding recessive or dominant unlinked families. 2. The mixtures of dominant linked families with unlinked families always led to a higher MMLS when analyzed under the correct (dominant) mode of inheritance than when analyzed under the incorrect mode of inheritance. In the mixtures with recessive linked families, assuming the correct mode of inheritance generally led to a higher MMLS, but we observed broad variation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Research on Effective Supply Mode of Rural Public Goods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of definition and classification of rural public goods, this paper analyses the status quo of public goods supply in vast rural areas of China, and it indicates that the electricity and communication facility in rural areas have not yet been popularized; the culture and education facility is critically backward; the medical care and social warfare institutions are short. It points out the rational supply model of public goods as follows: the government plays dominant role in the public goods supply with a large amount of investments, related to the quality of living and production of multitudinous farmers; small wieldy quasi-public goods that can be easily supplied and marginalized public goods can introduce multiplex supply main body under the framework of government guidance. According to this model, corresponding policy suggestions are put forward as follows: increase financial inputs, and perfect local financial system; actively encourage the majority of farmers in rural areas to participate in public goods supply mechanism, so that the supply has pertinence; vigorously develop multiplex supply system of rural public goods, to ensure effective supply.

  8. Failure mode and effects analysis and fault tree analysis of surface image guided cranial radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, Ryan P; Paxton, Adam B; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya

    2015-05-01

    Surface image guided, Linac-based radiosurgery (SIG-RS) is a modern approach for delivering radiosurgery that utilizes optical stereoscopic imaging to monitor the surface of the patient during treatment in lieu of using a head frame for patient immobilization. Considering the novelty of the SIG-RS approach and the severity of errors associated with delivery of large doses per fraction, a risk assessment should be conducted to identify potential hazards, determine their causes, and formulate mitigation strategies. The purpose of this work is to investigate SIG-RS using the combined application of failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) and fault tree analysis (FTA), report on the effort required to complete the analysis, and evaluate the use of FTA in conjunction with FMEA. A multidisciplinary team was assembled to conduct the FMEA on the SIG-RS process. A process map detailing the steps of the SIG-RS was created to guide the FMEA. Failure modes were determined for each step in the SIG-RS process, and risk priority numbers (RPNs) were estimated for each failure mode to facilitate risk stratification. The failure modes were ranked by RPN, and FTA was used to determine the root factors contributing to the riskiest failure modes. Using the FTA, mitigation strategies were formulated to address the root factors and reduce the risk of the process. The RPNs were re-estimated based on the mitigation strategies to determine the margin of risk reduction. The FMEA and FTAs for the top two failure modes required an effort of 36 person-hours (30 person-hours for the FMEA and 6 person-hours for two FTAs). The SIG-RS process consisted of 13 major subprocesses and 91 steps, which amounted to 167 failure modes. Of the 91 steps, 16 were directly related to surface imaging. Twenty-five failure modes resulted in a RPN of 100 or greater. Only one of these top 25 failure modes was specific to surface imaging. The riskiest surface imaging failure mode had an overall RPN-rank of eighth

  9. Effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the stability boundary of the MHD modes in the tokamak edge pedestal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiba, N.; Tokuda, S.; Oyama, N.; Ozeki, T.; Furukawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of a sheared toroidal rotation are investigated numerically on the stability of the MHD modes in the tokamak edge pedestal, which relate to the type-I edge-localized mode. A linear MHD stability code MINERVA is newly developed for solving the Frieman-Rotenberg equation that is the linear ideal MHD equation with flow. Numerical stability analyses with this code reveal that the sheared toroidal rotation destabilizes edge localized MHD modes for rotation frequencies which are experimentally achievable, though the ballooning mode stability changes little by rotation. This rotation effect on the edge MHD stability becomes stronger as the toroidal mode number of the unstable MHD mode increases when the stability analysis was performed for MHD modes with toroidal mode numbers smaller than 40. The toroidal mode number of the unstable MHD mode depends on the stabilization of the current-driven mode and the ballooning mode by increasing the safety factor. This dependence of the toroidal mode number of the unstable mode on the safety factor is considered to be the reason that the destabilization by toroidal rotation is stronger for smaller edge safety factors.

  10. Effect of Equilibrium Current Profiles on External Kink Modes in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chao; Liu Yue; Ma Zhaoshuai

    2014-01-01

    Based on a linearized MHD model, the effect of equilibrium current profiles on external kink modes in tokamaks is studied by MARS code. Three types of equilibrium current profiles are adopted in this work. Firstly, a set of parabolic equilibrium current profiles are chosen. In these profiles the maximum current values in the center of the plasma are fixed, and the currents have different gradient and jump at the plasma boundary. The effects of the current gradient and jump on the growth rate of external kink mode are investigated. It is found that the current jump which causes the q profiles to change plays an important role in the external kink modes in tokamaks. Secondly, a set of step equilibrium current profiles with different jump positions are chosen. The effect of jump position on external kink modes is discussed. Thirdly, a set of parabolic equilibrium current profiles with current bumps are chosen for the case of off-axis heating. The effects of height, width and position of the current bumps on external kink modes are analyzed. The flat equilibrium current profiles are disadvantageous for the MHD stabilities of tokamaks, because of the large current jump at the plasma edge. The peaked equilibrium current profiles and a large and localized current bump near the plasma edge benefit the MHD stabilities of tokamaks

  11. Modeling thermo-optic effect in large mode area double cladding photonic crystal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2014-02-01

    The impact of thermally-induced refractive index changes on the single-mode (SM) properties of large mode area (LMA) photonic crystal fibers are thoroughly investigated by means of a full-vector modal solver with integrated thermal model. Three photonic crystal fiber designs are taken into account, namely the 19-cell core fiber, the large-pitch fiber (LPF) and the distributed modal filtering (DMF) fiber, to assess the effects of the interplay between thermal effects and the high-order mode (HOM) suppression mechanisms exploited in order to obtain effectively SM guiding. The results have shown significant differences in the way the SM regime is changed by the increase of heat load, providing useful hints for the design of LMA fibers for high power lasers.

  12. Incremental Validity of the WJ III COG: Limited Predictive Effects beyond the GIA-E

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Ryan J.; Busse, R. T.

    2015-01-01

    This study is an examination of the incremental validity of Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) broad clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ III ACH). The participants were children and adolescents, ages 6-18 (n = 4,722), drawn from the WJ…

  13. WE-H-BRC-02: Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, I; Thomas, T; Roeske, J; Price, J; Perino, C; Surucu, M; Mescioglu, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify areas of improvement in our liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) program, using failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA). Methods: A multidisciplinary group consisting of one physician, three physicists, one dosimetrist and two therapists was formed. A process map covering 10 major stages of the liver SBRT program from the initial diagnosis to post treatment follow-up was generated. A total of 102 failure modes, together with their causes and effects, were identified. The occurrence (O), severity (S) and lack of detectability (D) were independently scored. The ranking was done using the risk probability number (RPN) defined as the product of average O, S and D numbers for each mode. The scores were normalized to remove inter-observer variability, while preserving individual ranking order. Further, a correlation analysis on the overall agreement on rank order of all failure modes resulted in positive values for successive pairs of evaluators. The failure modes with the highest RPN value were considered for further investigation. Results: The average normalized RPN values for all modes were 39 with a range of 9 to 103. The FMEA analysis resulted in the identification of the top 10 critical failures modes as: Incorrect CT-MR registration, MR scan not performed in treatment position, patient movement between CBCT acquisition and treatment, daily IGRT QA not verified, incorrect or incomplete ITV delineation, OAR contours not verified, inaccurate normal liver effective dose (Veff) calculation, failure of bolus tracking for 4D CT scan, setup instructions not followed for treatment and plan evaluation metrics missed. Conclusion: The application of FMEA to our liver SBRT program led to the identification and possible improvement of areas affecting patient safety.

  14. WE-H-BRC-02: Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusu, I; Thomas, T; Roeske, J; Price, J; Perino, C; Surucu, M [Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States); Mescioglu, I [Lewis University, Romeoville, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To identify areas of improvement in our liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) program, using failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA). Methods: A multidisciplinary group consisting of one physician, three physicists, one dosimetrist and two therapists was formed. A process map covering 10 major stages of the liver SBRT program from the initial diagnosis to post treatment follow-up was generated. A total of 102 failure modes, together with their causes and effects, were identified. The occurrence (O), severity (S) and lack of detectability (D) were independently scored. The ranking was done using the risk probability number (RPN) defined as the product of average O, S and D numbers for each mode. The scores were normalized to remove inter-observer variability, while preserving individual ranking order. Further, a correlation analysis on the overall agreement on rank order of all failure modes resulted in positive values for successive pairs of evaluators. The failure modes with the highest RPN value were considered for further investigation. Results: The average normalized RPN values for all modes were 39 with a range of 9 to 103. The FMEA analysis resulted in the identification of the top 10 critical failures modes as: Incorrect CT-MR registration, MR scan not performed in treatment position, patient movement between CBCT acquisition and treatment, daily IGRT QA not verified, incorrect or incomplete ITV delineation, OAR contours not verified, inaccurate normal liver effective dose (Veff) calculation, failure of bolus tracking for 4D CT scan, setup instructions not followed for treatment and plan evaluation metrics missed. Conclusion: The application of FMEA to our liver SBRT program led to the identification and possible improvement of areas affecting patient safety.

  15. Effects of load voltage on voltage breakdown modes of electrical exploding aluminum wires in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen, E-mail: xwli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Kun; Chao, Youchuang; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The effects of the load voltage on the breakdown modes are investigated in exploding aluminum wires driven by a 1 kA, 0.1 kA/ns pulsed current in air. From laser probing images taken by laser shadowgraphy, schlieren imaging, and interferometry, the position of the shockwave front, the plasma channel, and the wire core edge of the exploding product can be determined. The breakdown mode makes a transition from the internal mode, which involves breakdown inside the wire core, to the shunting mode, which involves breakdown in the compressed air, with decreasing charging voltage. The breakdown electrical field for a gaseous aluminum wire core of nearly solid density is estimated to be more than 20 kV/cm, while the value for gaseous aluminum of approximately 0.2% solid density decreases to 15–20 kV/cm. The breakdown field in shunting mode is less than 20 kV/cm and is strongly affected by the vaporized aluminum, the desorbed gas, and the electrons emitted from the wire core during the current pause. Ohmic heating during voltage collapses will induce further energy deposition in the current channel and thus will result in different expansion speeds for both the wire core and the shockwave front in the different modes.

  16. Effects of the finite pressure of plasma on internal kink mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, G.M.G. de.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the stability of the Internal Kink and Central Kink modes in ideal MHD cylindrical plasma due to the pressure variations and the different current profiles. It was used the σ Euler equation derived by Goedbloed and Sakanaka. Its analysis is based on the boundary layer method, where the effects due to the plasma inertia are only considered in a boundary layer in the neighborhood of the surface where the perturbation is parallel to the field lines. For the internal Kink mode a numerical analysis is also done by integrating the Euler equation. It was calculated the growth rate of the two modes for the different pressure ans current profiles. It was verified that for both, the Internal Kink and Central Kink modes, the growth rate becomes larger as the derivative of these profiles increases. However, for the Internal Kink mode, one obtains a reduction of up to 50% in the growth rate calculated by Rosenbluth et al. For the Central Kink mode, one notices that the growth rate is proportional to β of the plasma and to the derivatives of the pressure and current. (author) [pt

  17. Spraying mode effect on droplet formation and ion chemistry in electrosprays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Peter; Marginean, Ioan; Vertes, Akos

    2007-04-15

    Depending on the spraying conditions and fluid properties, a variety of electrospray regimes exists. Here we explore the changes in ion production that accompany the transitions among the three axial spraying modes, the burst mode, the pulsating Taylor cone mode, and the cone-jet mode. Spray current oscillation and phase Doppler anemometry measurements, fast imaging of the electrified meniscus, and mass spectrometry are utilized to study the formation, size, velocity, and chemical composition of droplets produced in the three modes. High-speed images indicate that the primary droplets are produced by varicose waves and lateral kink instabilities on the liquid jet emerging from the Taylor cone, whereas secondary droplets are formed by fission. Dramatic changes in the droplet size distributions result from the various production and breakup mechanisms observed at different emitter voltages and liquid flow rates. We demonstrate that droplet fission can be facilitated by space charge effects along the liquid jet and in the plume. Compared to the other two regimes, a significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, a lower degree of analyte oxidation, and milder fragmentation are observed for the cone-jet mode.

  18. Effect of nonlinear energy transport on neoclassical tearing mode stability in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2017-05-01

    An investigation is made into the effect of the reduction in anomalous perpendicular electron heat transport inside the separatrix of a magnetic island chain associated with a neoclassical tearing mode in a tokamak plasma, due to the flattening of the electron temperature profile in this region, on the overall stability of the mode. The onset of the neoclassical tearing mode is governed by the ratio of the divergences of the parallel and perpendicular electron heat fluxes in the vicinity of the island chain. By increasing the degree of transport reduction, the onset of the mode, as the divergence ratio is gradually increased, can be made more and more abrupt. Eventually, when the degree of transport reduction passes a certain critical value, the onset of the neoclassical tearing mode becomes discontinuous. In other words, when some critical value of the divergence ratio is reached, there is a sudden bifurcation to a branch of neoclassical tearing mode solutions. Moreover, once this bifurcation has been triggered, the divergence ratio must be reduced by a substantial factor to trigger the inverse bifurcation.

  19. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in an assisted reproduction technology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intra, Giulia; Alteri, Alessandra; Corti, Laura; Rabellotti, Elisa; Papaleo, Enrico; Restelli, Liliana; Biondo, Stefania; Garancini, Maria Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Viganò, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Assisted reproduction technology laboratories have a very high degree of complexity. Mismatches of gametes or embryos can occur, with catastrophic consequences for patients. To minimize the risk of error, a multi-institutional working group applied failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to each critical activity/step as a method of risk assessment. This analysis led to the identification of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk priority number (RPN) scoring system. In total, 11 individual steps and 68 different potential failure modes were identified. The highest ranked failure modes, with an RPN score of 25, encompassed 17 failures and pertained to "patient mismatch" and "biological sample mismatch". The maximum reduction in risk, with RPN reduced from 25 to 5, was mostly related to the introduction of witnessing. The critical failure modes in sample processing were improved by 50% in the RPN by focusing on staff training. Three indicators of FMEA success, based on technical skill, competence and traceability, have been evaluated after FMEA implementation. Witnessing by a second human operator should be introduced in the laboratory to avoid sample mix-ups. These findings confirm that FMEA can effectively reduce errors in assisted reproduction technology laboratories. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Failure mode and effects analysis in a dual-product microsphere brachytherapy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younge, Kelly Cooper; Lee, Choonik; Moran, Jean M; Feng, Mary; Novelli, Paula; Prisciandaro, Joann I

    We performed a failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) during the addition of a new microspheres product into our existing microsphere brachytherapy program to identify areas for safety improvements. A diverse group of team members from the microsphere program participated in the project to create a process map, identify and score failure modes, and discuss programmatic changes to address the highest ranking items. We developed custom severity ranking scales for staff- and institution-related failure modes to encompass possible risks that may exist outside of patient-based effects. Between both types of microsphere products, 173 failure mode/effect pairs were identified: 90 for patients, 35 for staff, and 48 for the institution. The SIR-Spheres program was ranked separately from the TheraSphere program because of significant differences in workflow during dose calculation, preparation, and delivery. High-ranking failure modes in each category were addressed with programmatic changes. The FMEA aided in identifying potential risk factors in our microsphere program and allowed a theoretically safer and more efficient design of the workflow and quality assurance for both our new SIR-Spheres program and our existing TheraSphere program. As new guidelines are made available, and our experience with the SIR-Spheres program increases, we will update the FMEA as an efficient starting point for future improvements. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Two-dimensional effects in the problem of tearing modes control by electron cyclotron current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comisso, L.; Lazzaro, E.

    2010-01-01

    The design of means to counteract robustly the classical and neoclassical tearing modes in a tokamak by localized injection of an external control current requires an ever growing understanding of the physical process, beyond the Rutherford-type zero-dimensional models. Here a set of extended magnetohydrodynamic nonlinear equations for four continuum fields is used to investigate the two-dimensional effects in the response of the reconnecting modes to specific inputs of the localized external current. New information is gained on the space- and time-dependent effects of the external action on the two-dimensional structure of magnetic islands, which is very important to formulate applicable control strategies.

  2. SU-F-T-246: Evaluation of Healthcare Failure Mode And Effect Analysis For Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, T; Manger, R; Cervino, L; Pawlicki, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the differences between the Veteran Affairs Healthcare Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (HFMEA) and the AAPM Task Group 100 Failure and Effect Analysis (FMEA) risk assessment techniques in the setting of a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedure were compared respectively. Understanding the differences in the techniques methodologies and outcomes will provide further insight into the applicability and utility of risk assessments exercises in radiation therapy. Methods: HFMEA risk assessment analysis was performed on a stereotactic radiosurgery procedure. A previous study from our institution completed a FMEA of our SRS procedure and the process map generated from this work was used for the HFMEA. The process of performing the HFMEA scoring was analyzed, and the results from both analyses were compared. Results: The key differences between the two risk assessments are the scoring criteria for failure modes and identifying critical failure modes for potential hazards. The general consensus among the team performing the analyses was that scoring for the HFMEA was simpler and more intuitive then the FMEA. The FMEA identified 25 critical failure modes while the HFMEA identified 39. Seven of the FMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the HFMEA and 21 of the HFMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the FMEA. HFMEA as described by the Veteran Affairs provides guidelines on which failure modes to address first. Conclusion: HFMEA is a more efficient model for identifying gross risks in a process than FMEA. Clinics with minimal staff, time and resources can benefit from this type of risk assessment to eliminate or mitigate high risk hazards with nominal effort. FMEA can provide more in depth details but at the cost of elevated effort.

  3. SU-F-T-246: Evaluation of Healthcare Failure Mode And Effect Analysis For Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry, T [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Manger, R; Cervino, L; Pawlicki, T [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the differences between the Veteran Affairs Healthcare Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (HFMEA) and the AAPM Task Group 100 Failure and Effect Analysis (FMEA) risk assessment techniques in the setting of a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) procedure were compared respectively. Understanding the differences in the techniques methodologies and outcomes will provide further insight into the applicability and utility of risk assessments exercises in radiation therapy. Methods: HFMEA risk assessment analysis was performed on a stereotactic radiosurgery procedure. A previous study from our institution completed a FMEA of our SRS procedure and the process map generated from this work was used for the HFMEA. The process of performing the HFMEA scoring was analyzed, and the results from both analyses were compared. Results: The key differences between the two risk assessments are the scoring criteria for failure modes and identifying critical failure modes for potential hazards. The general consensus among the team performing the analyses was that scoring for the HFMEA was simpler and more intuitive then the FMEA. The FMEA identified 25 critical failure modes while the HFMEA identified 39. Seven of the FMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the HFMEA and 21 of the HFMEA critical failure modes were not identified by the FMEA. HFMEA as described by the Veteran Affairs provides guidelines on which failure modes to address first. Conclusion: HFMEA is a more efficient model for identifying gross risks in a process than FMEA. Clinics with minimal staff, time and resources can benefit from this type of risk assessment to eliminate or mitigate high risk hazards with nominal effort. FMEA can provide more in depth details but at the cost of elevated effort.

  4. Effects of Forming Process on Composite mode I Interlaminar Fracture Toughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Xingyi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to compare and analyse the effect of two different kinds of forming process on composite mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, the DCB specimens were tested by using hypothesis inspeetion method.A finite element model was also used to simulate the crack propagation process.The results demonstrate that the average of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness from silicon rubber flexible mold forming is a bit higher than that from metal rigid mold forming.Howevers the variance of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness from the two groups shows no significant difference.The crack propagation process of the two forming process is similar. The established finite element model, which is identical to the test results, can predict the process of the crack expansion effectively.

  5. Recognizing the Effects of Language Mode on the Cognitive Advantages of Bilingualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziying Yu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available For bilinguals, it is argued that a cognitive advantage can be linked to the constant management and need for conflict resolution that occurs when the two languages are co-activated (Bialystok, 2015. Language mode (Grosjean, 1998, 2001 is a significant variable that defines and shapes the language experiences of bilinguals and consequently, the cognitive advantages of bilingualism. Previous work, however, has not sufficiently tested the effects of language mode on the bilingual experience. In this brief conceptual analysis, we discuss the significance of language mode in bilingual work on speech perception, production, and reading. We offer possible explanations for conflicting findings and ways in which future work should control for its modulating effects.

  6. Recognizing the Effects of Language Mode on the Cognitive Advantages of Bilingualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ziying; Schwieter, John W.

    2018-01-01

    For bilinguals, it is argued that a cognitive advantage can be linked to the constant management and need for conflict resolution that occurs when the two languages are co-activated (Bialystok, 2015). Language mode (Grosjean, 1998, 2001) is a significant variable that defines and shapes the language experiences of bilinguals and consequently, the cognitive advantages of bilingualism. Previous work, however, has not sufficiently tested the effects of language mode on the bilingual experience. In this brief conceptual analysis, we discuss the significance of language mode in bilingual work on speech perception, production, and reading. We offer possible explanations for conflicting findings and ways in which future work should control for its modulating effects. PMID:29615949

  7. Recognizing the Effects of Language Mode on the Cognitive Advantages of Bilingualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ziying; Schwieter, John W

    2018-01-01

    For bilinguals, it is argued that a cognitive advantage can be linked to the constant management and need for conflict resolution that occurs when the two languages are co-activated (Bialystok, 2015). Language mode (Grosjean, 1998, 2001) is a significant variable that defines and shapes the language experiences of bilinguals and consequently, the cognitive advantages of bilingualism. Previous work, however, has not sufficiently tested the effects of language mode on the bilingual experience. In this brief conceptual analysis, we discuss the significance of language mode in bilingual work on speech perception, production, and reading. We offer possible explanations for conflicting findings and ways in which future work should control for its modulating effects.

  8. Tuning of "antenna effect" of Eu(III) in ternary systems in aqueous medium through binding with protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorai, Shyamal Kr; Samanta, Swarna Kamal; Mukherjee, Manini; Saha Sardar, Pinki; Ghosh, Sanjib

    2013-02-04

    A simple ternary system containing a protein [human serum albumin (HSA)/bovine serum albumin (BSA)], tetracycline hydrochloride (TC), and Eu(III) in suitable aqueous buffer medium at physiological pH (= 7.2) has been shown to exhibit highly efficient "antenna effect" compared to the binary complex of TC with Eu(III) (Eu(3)TC). The ternary system containing E. coli alkaline phosphatase (AP), TC, and Eu(III), however, shows a slight enhancement of Eu(III) emission, although the binding constant of AP with TC is 2 orders of magnitude greater than with BSA/HSA. The enhanced emission of bound TC in the binary systems containing proteins and TC gets quenched in the ternary systems containing HSA/BSA, showing the efficient energy transfer (ET) from TC to Eu(III). Steady state and time-resolved emission studies of each component in all the ternary systems in H(2)O and in D(2)O medium reveal that Eu(III) is very well protected from the O-H oscillator in the ternary system containing HSA/BSA compared to that containing AP. The docking studies locating the binding site of TC in the proteins suggest that TC binds near the surface of AP. In the case of HSA/BSA, TC resides in the interior of the protein resulting in a large shielding effect of Eu(III). The rotational correlation time (θ(c)) determined from the anisotropy decay of bound TC in the complexes and the accessible surface area (ASA) of the ligand in the complexes obtained from the docking studies also support the contention that Eu(3)TC is more exposed to solvent in the case of the ternary system consisting of AP, TC, and Eu(III). The calculated radiative lifetime and the sensitization efficiency ratio of Eu(III) in all the systems clearly demonstrate the protein mediated tuning of "antenna effect" in Eu(III).

  9. Effective electron mass and phonon modes in n-type hexagonal InN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasic, A.; Schubert, M.; Saito, Y.; Nanishi, Y.; Wagner, G.

    2002-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry and micro-Raman scattering are used to study vibrational and electronic properties of high-quality hexagonal InN. The 0.22-μm-thick highly n-conductive InN film was grown on c-plane sapphire by radio-frequency molecular-beam epitaxy. Combining our results from the ellipsometry data analysis with Hall-effect measurements, the isotropically averaged effective electron mass in InN is determined as 0.14m0. The resonantly excited zone center E1 (TO) phonon mode is observed at 477 cm-1 in the ellipsometry spectra. Despite the high electron concentration in the film, a strong Raman mode occurs in the spectral range of the unscreened A1(LO) phonon. Because an extended carrier-depleted region at the sample surface can be excluded from the ellipsometry-model analysis, we assign this mode to the lower branch of the large-wave-vector LO-phonon-plasmon coupled modes arising from nonconserving wave-vector scattering processes. The spectral position of this mode at 590 cm-1 constitutes a lower limit for the unscreened A1(LO) phonon frequency.

  10. Polarization-maintaining performance of large effective area, higher order modes fiber in a coiled configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Raja; Nicholson, Jeffrey W.; Abedin, Kazi S.; Westbrook, Paul S.; Headley, Clifford; Wisk, Patrick W.; Monberg, Eric M.; Yan, Man F.; DiGiovanni, David J.

    2018-02-01

    Scaling the power-level of fiber sources has many practical advantages, while also enabling fundamental studies on the light-matter interaction in amorphous guiding media. In order to scale the power-level of fiber-sources without encountering nonlinear impairments, a strategy is to increase the effective-area of the guided optical-mode. Increasing the effective-area of the fundamental mode in a fiber, however, presents the challenges of increased susceptibility to mode-distortion and effective-area-reduction under the influence of bends. Therefore, higher-order-mode (HOM) fibers, which guide light in large effective-area (Aeff) Bessel-like modes, are a good candidate for scaling the power-level of robust fiber-sources. Many applications of high-power fiber-sources also demand a deterministic control on the polarization-state of light. Furthermore, a polarization-maintaining (PM)-type HOM fiber can afford the added possibility of coherent-beam combination and polarization multiplexing of high-power fiber-lasers. Previously, we reported polarization-maintaining operation in a 1.3 m length of PM-HOM fiber that was held straight. The PM-HOM fiber guided Bessel-like modes with Aeff ranging from 1200-2800 μm2. In this work, we report, for the first time, that the polarization-extinction-ratio (PER) of the HOM exceeds 10 dB in an 8 m long fiber that is coiled down to a diameter of 40 cm. This opens a path towards compact and polarization-controlled high-power fiber-systems.

  11. Risk assessment of the emergency processes: Healthcare failure mode and effect analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleghani, Yasamin Molavi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Sheikhbardsiri, Hojat

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring about the patient's safety is the first vital step in improving the quality of care and the emergency ward is known as a high-risk area in treatment health care. The present study was conducted to evaluate the selected risk processes of emergency surgery department of a treatment-educational Qaem center in Mashhad by using analysis method of the conditions and failure effects in health care. In this study, in combination (qualitative action research and quantitative cross-sectional), failure modes and effects of 5 high-risk procedures of the emergency surgery department were identified and analyzed according to Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA). To classify the failure modes from the "nursing errors in clinical management model (NECM)", the classification of the effective causes of error from "Eindhoven model" and determination of the strategies to improve from the "theory of solving problem by an inventive method" were used. To analyze the quantitative data of descriptive statistics (total points) and to analyze the qualitative data, content analysis and agreement of comments of the members were used. In 5 selected processes by "voting method using rating", 23 steps, 61 sub-processes and 217 potential failure modes were identified by HFMEA. 25 (11.5%) failure modes as the high risk errors were detected and transferred to the decision tree. The most and the least failure modes were placed in the categories of care errors (54.7%) and knowledge and skill (9.5%), respectively. Also, 29.4% of preventive measures were in the category of human resource management strategy. "Revision and re-engineering of processes", "continuous monitoring of the works", "preparation and revision of operating procedures and policies", "developing the criteria for evaluating the performance of the personnel", "designing a suitable educational content for needs of employee", "training patients", "reducing the workload and power shortage", "improving team

  12. Failure modes and effects criticality analysis and accelerated life testing of LEDs for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, M.; Christou, A.

    2012-12-01

    While use of LEDs in Fiber Optics and lighting applications is common, their use in medical diagnostic applications is not very extensive. Since the precise value of light intensity will be used to interpret patient results, understanding failure modes [1-4] is very important. We used the Failure Modes and Effects Criticality Analysis (FMECA) tool to identify the critical failure modes of the LEDs. FMECA involves identification of various failure modes, their effects on the system (LED optical output in this context), their frequency of occurrence, severity and the criticality of the failure modes. The competing failure modes/mechanisms were degradation of: active layer (where electron-hole recombination occurs to emit light), electrodes (provides electrical contact to the semiconductor chip), Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) surface layer (used to improve current spreading and light extraction), plastic encapsulation (protective polymer layer) and packaging failures (bond wires, heat sink separation). A FMECA table is constructed and the criticality is calculated by estimating the failure effect probability (β), failure mode ratio (α), failure rate (λ) and the operating time. Once the critical failure modes were identified, the next steps were generation of prior time to failure distribution and comparing with our accelerated life test data. To generate the prior distributions, data and results from previous investigations were utilized [5-33] where reliability test results of similar LEDs were reported. From the graphs or tabular data, we extracted the time required for the optical power output to reach 80% of its initial value. This is our failure criterion for the medical diagnostic application. Analysis of published data for different LED materials (AlGaInP, GaN, AlGaAs), the Semiconductor Structures (DH, MQW) and the mode of testing (DC, Pulsed) was carried out. The data was categorized according to the materials system and LED structure such as AlGaInP-DH-DC, Al

  13. Effects of phosphodiesterase III inhibition on length-dependent regulation of myocardial function in coronary surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, S. G.; ten Broecke, P. W.; Mertens, E.; Rodrigus, I. E.; Stockman, B. A.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phosphodiesterase III inhibitors increase myocardial contractility and decrease left ventricular (LV) afterload. We studied whether these effects altered LV response to an increase in cardiac load and affected length-dependent regulation of myocardial function. METHODS: Before the start

  14. Combined effects of Lanthanum(III) and elevated Ultraviolet-B radiation on root nitrogen nutrient in soybean seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangrong; Wang, Lihong; Sun, Zhaoguo; Li, Xiaodong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Rare earth element pollution and elevated ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation occur simultaneously in some regions, but the combined effects of these two factors on plants have not attracted enough attention. Nitrogen nutrient is vital to plant growth. In this study, the combined effects of lanthanum(III) and elevated UV-B radiation on nitrate reduction and ammonia assimilation in soybean (Glycine max L.) roots were investigated. Treatment with 0.08 mmol L(-1) La(III) did not change the effects of elevated UV-B radiation on nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), nitrate, ammonium, amino acids, or soluble protein in the roots. Treatment with 0.24 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation synergistically decreased the NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities as well as the nitrate, amino acid, and soluble protein levels, except for the GDH activity and ammonium content. Combined treatment with 1.20 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation produced severely deleterious effects on all test indices, and these effects were stronger than those induced by La(III) or elevated UV-B radiation treatment alone. Following the withdrawal of La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation, all test indices for the combined treatments with 0.08/0.24 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation recovered to a certain extent, but they could not recover for treatments with 1.20 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation. In summary, combined treatment with La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation seriously affected nitrogen nutrition in soybean roots through the inhibition of nitrate reduction and ammonia assimilation.

  15. Rhodium(III) as a potentiator of the effects of X-rays on cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, R C; Centilli, M A; Cross, M H; Powers, E L

    1986-08-01

    A rhodium compound, Rh(NH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Cl/sub 3/, does not sensitize the spores of Bacillus megaterium to X-rays. However, it is a very effective sensitizer of vegetative cells of Staphylococcus aureus, raising the sensitivity four times in O/sub 2/ and over 100 times in anoxia. The inhibition by oxygen of the sensitizing action of Rh(III), which operates over a wide range of (O/sub 2/), is noteworthy. These experiments were performed in saline-phosphate buffer using 50 kVp X-rays. The results are discussed in terms of the known radiation chemistry of this compound.

  16. On the influence of drag effect on acoustic modes in two-condensate relativistic superfluid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vil'chinskij, S.I.

    1999-01-01

    Equations of velocities of acoustic excitations in a relativistic two-condensate superfluid system are derived with due account of reciprocal drag of superfluid motion (drag effect). The influence of the drag effect on acoustic modes in the system is considered. It is shown that the effect does not influence the nature of acoustic excitation oscillations but produces changes in the velocities of the second, third and fourth sounds

  17. Effectiveness and cost of failure mode and effects analysis methodology to reduce neurosurgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hover, Alexander R; Sistrunk, William W; Cavagnol, Robert M; Scarrow, Alan; Finley, Phillip J; Kroencke, Audrey D; Walker, Judith L

    2014-01-01

    Mercy Hospital Springfield is a tertiary care facility with 32 000 discharges and 15 000 inpatient surgeries in 2011. From June 2009 through January 2011, a stable inpatient elective neurosurgery infection rate of 2.15% was observed. The failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) methodology to reduce inpatient neurosurgery infections was utilized. Following FMEA implementation, overall elective neurosurgery infection rates were reduced to 1.51% and sustained through May 2012. Compared with baseline, the post-FMEA deep-space and organ infection rate was reduced by 41% (P = .052). Overall hospital inpatient clean surgery infection rates for the same time frame did not decrease to the same extent, suggesting a specific effect of the FMEA. The study team believes that the FMEA interventions resulted in 14 fewer expected infections, $270 270 in savings, a 168-day reduction in expected length of stay, and 22 fewer readmissions. Given the serious morbidity and cost of health care-associated infections, the study team concludes that FMEA implementation was clinically cost-effective. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  18. Split resonance modes of a AuBRC plasmonic nanosystem caused by the coupling effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Yuan; Kan, Caixia; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Changshun

    2016-01-01

    A plasmonic nanosystem can give rise to particular optical responses due to a coupling effect. In this work, we investigate the optical properties and field distributions of a novel ‘matrioska’ nanocavity structure composed of a Au nanorod (AuNR) within a nanobox (AuNB) via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. This nanocavity can be fabricated by a two-step wet-chemical method. The multiple SPR modes of optical spectrum for nanocavity are caused by the strong interaction between the AuNR-core and AuNB-shell when the incident light is perpendicular or parallel to the long axis of the Au box/rod nanocavity (AuBRC). The SPR modes are known as the dipole–dipole bonding resonance mode in the lower-energy region and the antibonding resonance mode in the higher-energy region. It is proposed that AuBRC can escape the orientation confinement of AuNR because the multiple modes occur and provide a potential application for the enhancement of the photoluminescence signal. Additionally, the SPR modes red-shift with increasing the offset of the AuNR-core, whereas the SPR mode dramatically blue-shifts when the conductive coupling is formed. The intense ‘hot-spot’ could be induced within a small interaction region in the conductive coupled system. The SPR line-shape of high quality would also be promoted. The SPR is highly sensitive to the medium, which is promising in the sensing and detecting devices. (paper)

  19. Gamma irradiation effects of 51Cr(III) isotope exchange in doped magnesium chromate - zinc chromate mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahfouz, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Gamma irradiation effects of 51 Cr(III) isotope exchange in magnesium chromate - zinc chromate mixtures doped with 51 Cr(III) were investigated. It was found that γ irradiation has an oxidation effect and the percentage of exchanged 51 Cr(VI) increases with the increasing γ-ray dose. The data are explained in terms of mechanistic model involving metal and ligand vacancies exchange and substitution reactions. (author)

  20. Implications of the Differential Toxicological Effects of III-V Ionic and Particulate Materials for Hazard Assessment of Semiconductor Slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ruibin; Pon, Nanetta; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-12-22

    Because of tunable band gaps, high carrier mobility, and low-energy consumption rates, III-V materials are attractive for use in semiconductor wafers. However, these wafers require chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) for polishing, which leads to the generation of large quantities of hazardous waste including particulate and ionic III-V debris. Although the toxic effects of micron-sized III-V materials have been studied in vivo, no comprehensive assessment has been undertaken to elucidate the hazardous effects of submicron particulates and released III-V ionic components. Since III-V materials may contribute disproportionately to the hazard of CMP slurries, we obtained GaP, InP, GaAs, and InAs as micron- (0.2-3 μm) and nanoscale (particles for comparative studies of their cytotoxic potential in macrophage (THP-1) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines. We found that nanosized III-V arsenides, including GaAs and InAs, could induce significantly more cytotoxicity over a 24-72 h observation period. In contrast, GaP and InP particulates of all sizes as well as ionic GaCl3 and InCl3 were substantially less hazardous. The principal mechanism of III-V arsenide nanoparticle toxicity is dissolution and shedding of toxic As(III) and, to a lesser extent, As(V) ions. GaAs dissolves in the cell culture medium as well as in acidifying intracellular compartments, while InAs dissolves (more slowly) inside cells. Chelation of released As by 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid interfered in GaAs toxicity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that III-V arsenides, GaAs and InAs nanoparticles, contribute in a major way to the toxicity of III-V materials that could appear in slurries. This finding is of importance for considering how to deal with the hazard potential of CMP slurries.

  1. Soft modes at the critical end point in the chiral effective models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hirotsugu; Ohtani, Munehisa

    2004-01-01

    At the critical end point in QCD phase diagram, the scalar, vector and entropy susceptibilities are known to diverge. The dynamic origin of this divergence is identified within the chiral effective models as softening of a hydrodynamic mode of the particle-hole-type motion, which is a consequence of the conservation law of the baryon number and the energy. (author)

  2. Fault tree and failure mode and effects analysis of a digital safety function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskuniitty, M.; Pulkkinen, U.

    1995-01-01

    The principles of fault tree and failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) for the analysis of digital safety functions of nuclear power plants are discussed. Based on experiences from a case study, a proposal for a full scale analysis is presented. The feasibility and applicability the above mentioned reliability engineering methods are discussed. (author). 13 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. The Relative Effects of Explicit Correction and Recasts on Two Target Structures via Two Communication Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Yucel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of negative feedback type (i.e., explicit correction vs. recasts), communication mode (i.e., face-to-face communication vs. synchronous computer-mediated communication), and target structure salience (i.e., salient vs. nonsalient) on the acquisition of two Turkish morphemes. Forty-eight native speakers of…

  4. Failure mode and effect analysis in asset maintenance : a multiple case study in the process industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, Jan; Klingenberg, W.; Veldman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is an important method for designing and prioritising preventive maintenance activities and is often used as the basis for preventive maintenance planning. Although FMEA was studied extensively, most of the published work so far covers FMEA concept design.

  5. Failure mode and effect analysis in asset maintenance: a multiple case study in the process industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, Anne Johannes Jan; Klingenberg, W.; Veldman, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is an important method for designing and prioritising preventive maintenance activities and is often used as the basis for preventive maintenance planning. Although FMEA was studied extensively, most of the published work so far covers FMEA concept design.

  6. Antenna Proximity Effects for Talk and Data Modes in Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelosi, Mauro; Franek, Ondrej; Knudsen, Miakel Bergholz

    2010-01-01

    Based on a recent study of the ways a phone is held (a grip study), CAD models of the human hand have been generated, and antenna proximity effects for both talk and data modes in mobile phones have been investigated using an FDTD code. The simulation results showed that the hand, and especially...

  7. Effects of nitrogen seeding on core ion thermal transport in JET ILW L-mode plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, N.; Mantica, P.; Citrin, J.; Giroud, C.; Lerche, E.; Sozzi, C.; Taylor, D.; Tsalas, M.; Van Eester, D.; JET Contributors,

    2018-01-01

    A set of experiments was carried out in JET ILW (Joint European Torus with ITER-Like Wall) L-mode plasmas in order to study the effects of light impurities on core ion thermal transport. N was puffed into some discharges and its profile was measured by active Charge Exchange diagnostics, while ICRH

  8. The Effects of Communication Mode on Negotiation of Meaning and Its Noticing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Dogan; Inan, Banu

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of communication mode ("i.e.", face to face versus computer mediated communication) on the instances of negotiation of meaning (NofM) and its level of noticing by learners. Sixty-four participants (32 dyads) completed two jigsaw tasks in two different mediums (one in each) and four days after the tasks…

  9. Risk Assessment Planning for Airborne Systems: An Information Assurance Failure Mode, Effects and Criticality Analysis Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Visa Investigate Data Breach March 30, 2012 Visa and MasterCard are investigating whether a data security breach at one of the main companies that...30). MasterCard and Visa Investigate Data Breach . New York Times . Stamatis, D. (2003). Failure Mode Effect Analysis: FMEA from Theory to Execution

  10. Extending Failure Modes and Effects Analysis Approach for Reliability Analysis at the Software Architecture Design Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sözer, Hasan; Tekinerdogan, B.; Aksit, Mehmet; de Lemos, Rogerio; Gacek, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Several reliability engineering approaches have been proposed to identify and recover from failures. A well-known and mature approach is the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) method that is usually utilized together with Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) to analyze and diagnose the causes of failures.

  11. Transition to chaos for ballooning modes stabilized by finite Larmor radius effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, J; Wilhelmsson, H [Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Goeteborg (Sweden). Institutionen foer Elektromagnetisk Faeltteori

    1983-08-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of interacting ballooning modes, stabilized by finite Larmor radius effects is analyzed in terms of a set of equations, which exhibit stochastic properties. These are explicitly shown to depend on the balance between shear and driving pressure force. The onset of bifurcations and chaotic behaviour are directly identified with certain values of parameters characterizing the physical system.

  12. Cost-effective, compact and high-speed integrable multi-mode interference modulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenstra, Daan; Yao, Weiming; Cardarelli, Simone; Mink, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of the modulation performance of this wave-guide device shows great potential when combined with a single-mode laser on a monolithic optical chip. On the basis of the reversed-bias electro-optic effect, modulation speeds surmounting 25 Gbit/s with 10 dB extinction ratio are

  13. The effect of through-thickness compressive stress on mode II interlaminar fracture toughness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catalanotti, G.; Furtado, C.; Scalici, T.; Pitarresi, G.; van der Meer, F.P.; Camanho, PP

    2017-01-01

    The effect of through-thickness compressive stress on mode II interlaminar fracture toughness is investigated experimentally and replicated numerically. The modified Transverse Crack Tensile specimen recently proposed by the authors is used, together with an experimental device designed to apply

  14. Effect of Tutorial Mode of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of Tutorial Mode of Computer- Assisted Instruction (CAI) on students' academic performance in practical geography in Nigeria, However, the sample population of eighty (80) Senior Secondary School Two geography students that were randomly selected from two privately owned secondary ...

  15. Effect of oscillation mode on the free-molecule squeeze-film air damping

    KAUST Repository

    Gang Hong,; Wenjing Ye,

    2010-01-01

    A 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulation approach is developed and employed to study the effect of the oscillation mode on the squeeze-film air damping in the free-molecule regime. By tracking individual gas molecule's motion and its interaction

  16. Human health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: the BEIR III controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Controversy in the BEIR III Subcommittee on Somatic Effects concerning human health effects of low doses of low-LET radiation has centered on (a) the appropriate dose-response relationship by which extrapolation to low doses of data obtained at relatively high doses should be governed, and (b) the appropriate human evidence which should be the basis of estimation of lifetime cancer risk from radiation exposure. It is shown that the use of the linear no-threshold dose-response relationship for extrapolation purposes is an excellent approximation that is in agreement with widely accepted fundamental radiobiological principles. The appropriate human data for derivation of cancer risks are the composite age-specific risks derived from all epidemiologic studies of human cancer resulting from partial-body and whole-body radiation exposure; this composite is in good agreement with the currently available cancer incidence dose-response data obtained from the Nagasaki Tumor Registry. The current version of BEIR III significantly underestimates the radiation-induced cancer risk because it ignores the effect of high-dose-rate, low-LET radiation on cell survival in relation to cancer induction probability, and because it emphasizes cancer mortality rather than cancer incidence. The controversy and the way in which it was resolved raises important questions about how the public and its representatives can in the future obtain objective scientific evaluations of issues that may have significant economic, social, and political implications

  17. Effect of pressure anisotropy on the m=1 small wavelength modes in Z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, M. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm, Sweden. Dept. of Plasma Physics and Fusion Research)

    1987-05-01

    A generalization of Freidberg's perpendicular MHD model is used to investigate the effect of pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m=1) mode instability in a Z-Pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collisionless and cylindrical plasma is performed. The stability criterion is (r{SIGMA}B{sup 2})' {le} 0, where {SIGMA} = 1 - (P{sub parallel} - P{sub perpendicular} {sub to})/B/sup 2/. It cannot be fulfilled without violation of the fire hose stability condition {SIGMA} {ge} 0.

  18. Effects of pressure anisotropy on the M=1 small wavelength modes in Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, M.

    1986-05-01

    A new model is used to investigate the effect of the pressure anisotropy on the internal kink (m=1) mode instability in a Z-pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collision- less and cylindrical plasma is performed. A comparison of the derived stability criterion with that of ideal MHD is made. The conclusion is that the stability criterion (rSigmaB/sp2/) ' 0, where Sigma=1-(P/sb/(parall)-P/sb/(perpend)/ B/sp/2. (author)

  19. Effect of pressure anisotropy on the m=1 small wavelength modes in Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A generalization of Freidberg's perpendicular MHD model is used to investigate the effect of pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m=1) mode instability in a Z-Pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collisionless and cylindrical plasma is performed. The stability criterion is (rΣB 2 )' ≤ 0, where Σ = 1 - (P parallel - P perpendicular to )/B 2 . It cannot be fulfilled without violation of the fire hose stability condition Σ ≥ 0. (orig.)

  20. Effects of underwater turbulence on laser beam propagation and coupling into single-mode optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Frank; Lasher, Mark

    2010-06-01

    We characterize and compare the effects of turbulence on underwater laser propagation with theory. Measurements of the coupling efficiency of the focused beam into a single-mode fiber are reported. A simple tip-tilt control system, based on the position of the image centroid in the focal plane, was shown to maintain good coupling efficiency for a beam radius equal to the transverse coherence length, r(0). These results are relevant to high bandwidth communication technology that requires good spatial mode quality.

  1. Effect of surface modes on coupling to fast waves in the LHRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsker, R.I.; Colestock, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of surface modes of propagation on coupling to fast waves in the LHRF is studied theoretically and experimentally. The previously reported 'up-down' poloidal phasing asymmetry for coupling to a uniform plasma is shown to be due to the properties of a mode which carries energy along the plasma-conducting wall interface. Comparison of the theory with coupling experiments performed on the PLT tokamak with a phased array of twelve dielectric-loaded waveguides at 800 MHz shows that the observed dependence of the net reflection coefficient on toroidal phase angle can be explained only if the surface wave is taken into account. 43 refs., 10 figs

  2. An improved method for risk evaluation in failure modes and effects analysis of CNC lathe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachieru, N.; Belu, N.; Anghel, D. C.

    2015-11-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is one of the most popular reliability analysis tools for identifying, assessing and eliminating potential failure modes in a wide range of industries. In general, failure modes in FMEA are evaluated and ranked through the risk priority number (RPN), which is obtained by the multiplication of crisp values of the risk factors, such as the occurrence (O), severity (S), and detection (D) of each failure mode. However, the crisp RPN method has been criticized to have several deficiencies. In this paper, linguistic variables, expressed in Gaussian, trapezoidal or triangular fuzzy numbers, are used to assess the ratings and weights for the risk factors S, O and D. A new risk assessment system based on the fuzzy set theory and fuzzy rule base theory is to be applied to assess and rank risks associated to failure modes that could appear in the functioning of Turn 55 Lathe CNC. Two case studies have been shown to demonstrate the methodology thus developed. It is illustrated a parallel between the results obtained by the traditional method and fuzzy logic for determining the RPNs. The results show that the proposed approach can reduce duplicated RPN numbers and get a more accurate, reasonable risk assessment. As a result, the stability of product and process can be assured.

  3. Coupling effect of piezoelectric wafer transducers in distortions of primary Lamb wave modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijudas, C R; Mitra, M; Mujumdar, P M

    2013-01-01

    Piezoelectric wafer transducers (PWT) are widely used for Lamb wave based damage detection schemes. The size of the damage that can be detected is dependent on the wavelength of the Lamb wave employed. Thus it is essential to explore the higher frequency range within the (fundamental) bandwidth of S 0 and A 0 modes, however below the cut-off frequencies of A 1 and S 1 . It is observed that the Lamb wave modes S 0 and A 0 generated using PWT undergo distortion within this fundamental bandwidth. This behavior is experimentally observed for different PWT sizes and types. The nature of this observed distortion is very different from the distortion of wave modes due to dispersion. In addition, the distortion, in many cases, tends towards the appearance of new wave modes close to the S 0 and A 0 modes. To understand this experimental observation, a theoretical study is performed. First, finite element (FE) simulations of Lamb waves considering pin-force, thermal analogy, and couple field models of surface mounted PWT are carried out. These simulation studies reveal that the wavepacket distortion can be attributed mostly to electro-mechanical coupling effect of the PWT. Next, the dispersion plot of piezoelectric layer considering electro-mechanical coupling is obtained using spectral finite element (SFE) method. These dispersion characteristics of the PWT are found to be significantly different from the conventional Lamb wave dispersion characteristics and may explain the experimental observation. (paper)

  4. Non-Markovian reduced dynamics based upon a hierarchical effective-mode representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-14

    A reduced dynamics representation is introduced which is tailored to a hierarchical, Mori-chain type representation of a bath of harmonic oscillators which are linearly coupled to a subsystem. We consider a spin-boson system where a single effective mode is constructed so as to absorb all system-environment interactions, while the residual bath modes are coupled bilinearly to the primary mode and among each other. Using a cumulant expansion of the memory kernel, correlation functions for the primary mode are obtained, which can be suitably approximated by truncated chains representing the primary-residual mode interactions. A series of reduced-dimensional bath correlation functions is thus obtained, which can be expressed as Fourier-Laplace transforms of spectral densities that are given in truncated continued-fraction form. For a master equation which is second order in the system-bath coupling, the memory kernel is re-expressed in terms of local-in-time equations involving auxiliary densities and auxiliary operators.

  5. Safety Management in an Oil Company through Failure Mode Effects and Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedictus Rahardjo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to apply Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA to improve the safety of a production system, specifically the production process of an oil company. Since food processing is a worldwide issue and self-management of a food company is more important than relying on government regulations, therefore this study focused on that matter. The initial step of this study is to identify and analyze the criticality of the potential failure modes of the production process. Furthermore, take corrective action to minimize the probability of repeating the same failure mode, followed by a re-analysis of its criticality. The results of corrective actions were compared with those before improvement conditions by testing the significance of the difference using two sample t-test. The final measured result is the Criticality Priority Number (CPN, which refers to the severity category of the failure mode and the probability of occurrence of the same failure mode. The recommended actions proposed by the FMECA significantly reduce the CPN compared with the value before improvement, with increases of 38.46% for the palm olein case study.

  6. Evaluating the operational risks of biomedical waste using failure mode and effects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chu; Tsai, Pei-Yi

    2017-06-01

    The potential problems and risks of biomedical waste generation have become increasingly apparent in recent years. This study applied a failure mode and effects analysis to evaluate the operational problems and risks of biomedical waste. The microbiological contamination of biomedical waste seldom receives the attention of researchers. In this study, the biomedical waste lifecycle was divided into seven processes: Production, classification, packaging, sterilisation, weighing, storage, and transportation. Twenty main failure modes were identified in these phases and risks were assessed based on their risk priority numbers. The failure modes in the production phase accounted for the highest proportion of the risk priority number score (27.7%). In the packaging phase, the failure mode 'sharp articles not placed in solid containers' had the highest risk priority number score, mainly owing to its high severity rating. The sterilisation process is the main difference in the treatment of infectious and non-infectious biomedical waste. The failure modes in the sterilisation phase were mainly owing to human factors (mostly related to operators). This study increases the understanding of the potential problems and risks associated with biomedical waste, thereby increasing awareness of how to improve the management of biomedical waste to better protect workers, the public, and the environment.

  7. [Effects of different trophic modes on growth characteristics, metabolism and cellular components of Chlorella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weibao; Wang, Yang; Yang, Hong; Xi, Yuqin; Han, Rui; Niu, Shiquan

    2015-03-04

    We studied the effects of trophic modes related to glucose and light (photoautotrophy, mixotrophy and heterotrophy) on growth, cellular components and carbon metabolic pathway of Chlorella vulgaris. The parameters about growth of algal cells were investigated by using spectroscopy and chromatography techniques. When trophic mode changed from photoautotrophy to mixotrophy and to heterotrophy successively, the concentrations of soluble sugar, lipid and saturated C16/C18 fatty acids in C. vulgaris increased, whereas the concentrations of unsaturated C16, C18 fatty acids, proteins, photosynthetic pigments and 18 relative amino acids decreased. Light and glucose affect the growth, metabolism and the biochemical components biosynthesis of C. vulgaris. Addition of glucose can promote algal biomass accumulation, stimulate the synthesis of carbonaceous components, but inhibit nitrogenous components. Under illumination cultivation, concentration and consumption level of glucose decided the main trophic modes of C. vulgaris. Mixotrophic and heterotrophic cultivation could promote the growth of algal cells.

  8. Communication: Effects of thermionic-gun parameters on operating modes in ultrafast electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Kieft

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron microscopes with thermionic guns and LaB6 sources can be operated in both the nanosecond, single-shot and femtosecond, single-electron modes. This has been demonstrated with conventional Wehnelt electrodes and absent any applied bias. Here, by conducting simulations using the General Particle Tracer code, we define the electron-gun parameter space within which various modes may be optimized. The properties of interest include electron collection efficiency, temporal and energy spreads, and effects of laser-pulse duration incident on the LaB6 source. We find that collection efficiencies can reach 100% for all modes, despite there being no bias applied to the electrode.

  9. Failure mode, effect and criticality analysis (FMECA) on mechanical subsystems of diesel generator at NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Woon; Singh, Brijendra; Sung, Tae Yong; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoon Hwan

    1996-06-01

    Largely, the RCM approach can be divided in three phases; (1) Functional failure analysis (FFA) on the selected system or subsystem, (2) Failure mode, effect and criticality analysis (FMECA) to identify the impact of failure to plant safety or economics, (3) Logical tree analysis (LTA) to select appropriate preventive maintenance and surveillance tasks. This report presents FMECA results for six mechanical subsystems of the diesel generators of nuclear power plants. The six mechanical subsystems are Starting air, Lub oil, Governor, Jacket water cooling, Fuel, and Engine subsystems. Generic and plant-specific failure and maintenance records are reviewed to identify critical components/failure modes. FMECA was performed for these critical component/failure modes. After reviewing current preventive maintenance activities of Wolsung unit 1, draft RCM recommendations are developed. 6 tabs., 16 refs. (Author)

  10. Failure mode, effect and criticality analysis (FMECA) on mechanical subsystems of diesel generator at NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Woon; Singh, Brijendra; Sung, Tae Yong; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoon Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    Largely, the RCM approach can be divided in three phases; (1) Functional failure analysis (FFA) on the selected system or subsystem, (2) Failure mode, effect and criticality analysis (FMECA) to identify the impact of failure to plant safety or economics, (3) Logical tree analysis (LTA) to select appropriate preventive maintenance and surveillance tasks. This report presents FMECA results for six mechanical subsystems of the diesel generators of nuclear power plants. The six mechanical subsystems are Starting air, Lub oil, Governor, Jacket water cooling, Fuel, and Engine subsystems. Generic and plant-specific failure and maintenance records are reviewed to identify critical components/failure modes. FMECA was performed for these critical component/failure modes. After reviewing current preventive maintenance activities of Wolsung unit 1, draft RCM recommendations are developed. 6 tabs., 16 refs. (Author).

  11. ANALISIS TOTAL PRODUCTIVE MAINTENANCE DENGAN METODE OVERALL EQUIPMENT EFFECTIVENESS DAN FUZZY FAILURE MODE AND EFFECTS ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyadi Supriyadi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ash Handling System merupakan suatu bagian dari pembangkit listrik tenaga uap dengan bahan bakar batu bara yang berfungsi untuk menyalurkan limbah pembuangan sisa hasil proses pembakaran batu bara pada boiler. Sisa pembakaran terbagi menjadi fly ash dan bottom ash. Untuk sisa pembakaran fly ash akan disalurkan menuju ke Electrostatic Precipitator untuk ditangkap  dengan metode corona dan ditransfer menuju penampungan fly ash dengan cara dimampatkan bersama udara dari kompresor yang melalui pipa-pipa dan tabung transporter. Sedangkan untuk sisa pembakaran bottom ash akan disalurkan dengan alat yang disebut SSC (Submerged Scraper Conveyor. Gangguan pada SSC dapat terjadi mulai dari belt putus, masalah pada penggerak, hingga masalah pada kelistrikan dan instrumennya. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui nilai OEE, mengetahui dampak gangguan belt sobek, mengetahui penyebab terjadinya belt conveyor sobek dan melakukan estimasi hasil perbaikan dari sisi biaya. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE dan Fuzzy Failure Mode and Effects Analysis. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa rata-rata nilai OEE pada tahun 2015 sekitar 52,05%, masih di bawah standar nilai OEE sebesar 85%. Penyebab utamanya adalah adanya gangguan belt sobek karena gesekan belt dengan support return ketika belt conveyor mengalami jogging yang berdampak pada terganggunya penyaluran abu. Modifikasi dapat menghindari kerugian perusahaan sebesar Rp. 582.548.800,00.

  12. FAILURE MODE AND EFFECT ANALYSIS (FMEA OF BUTTERFLY VALVE IN OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHAMMAD AMIRUL BIN YUSOF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Butterfly valves are mostly used in various industries such as oil and gas plant. This valve operates with rotating motion using pneumatic system. Rotating actuator turns the disc either parallel or perpendicular to the flow. When the valve is fully open, the disc is rotated a quarter turn so that it allows free passage of the fluid and when fully closed, the disc rotated a quarter turns to block the fluid. The primary failure modes for valves are the valve leaks to environment through flanges, seals on the valve body, valve stem packing not properly protected, over tightened packing nuts, the valve cracks and leaks over the seat. To identify the failure of valve Failure Mode and Effects Analysis has been chosen. FMEA is the one of technique to perform failure analysis. It involves reviewing as many components to identify failure modes, and their causes and effects. For each component, the failure modes and their resulting effects on the rest of the system are recorded in a specific FMEA form. Risk priority number, severity, detection, occurrence are the factor determined in this studies. Risk priority number helps to find out the highest hazardous activities which need more attention than the other activity. The highest score of risk priority number in this research is seat. Action plan was proposed to reduce the risk priority number and so that potential failures also will be reduced.

  13. Vortex Laser based on III-V semiconductor metasurface: direct generation of coherent Laguerre-Gauss modes carrying controlled orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghilani, Mohamed S; Myara, Mikhael; Sellahi, Mohamed; Legratiet, Luc; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Lalanne, Philippe; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-12-05

    The generation of a coherent state, supporting a large photon number, with controlled orbital-angular-momentum L = ħl (of charge l per photon) presents both fundamental and technological challenges: we demonstrate a surface-emitting laser, based on III-V semiconductor technology with an integrated metasurface, generating vortex-like coherent state in the Laguerre-Gauss basis. We use a first order phase perturbation to lift orbital degeneracy of wavefunctions, by introducing a weak anisotropy called here "orbital birefringence", based on a dielectric metasurface. The azimuthal symmetry breakdown and non-linear laser dynamics create "orbital gain dichroism" allowing selecting vortex handedness. This coherent photonic device was characterized and studied, experimentally and theoretically. It exhibits a low divergence (50 dB vortex purity), and single frequency operation in a stable low noise regime (0.1% rms). Such high performance laser opens the path to widespread new photonic applications.

  14. [Positive inotropic and lusitropic effect of RP 62719, a new class III antiarrhythmia agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beregi, J P; Escande, D; Coudray, N; Chemla, D; Mestre, M; Péry, N; Lecarpentier, Y

    1994-02-01

    Antiarrhythmic drugs, especially the Class I family, exert a negative inotropic effect on the myocardium which is particularly undesirable in patients with depressed left ventricular function. Therefore, research has been directed to the development of new, more specific molecules of the Class III family. The authors studies the mechanical effects of RP 62719 on guinea pig left ventricular papillary muscle. This new molecule is a pure Class III antiarrhythmic, known to lengthen the duration of the cardiac action potential by selectively blocking the potassium current iK1 (inward rectifier K+ current). The mechanical parameters were determined during the phases of contraction and relaxation under isotonic and isometric conditions. At 0.2 and 2 microM concentrations, RP 62719 improved cardiac contraction under both isotonic and isometric conditions with an increase of about 30% of Vmax (p delta 1 (p force normalized per cross-sectional area [AF/S (p actions could provide significant therapeutic advantages especially in patients cardiac failure.

  15. Distinct Effects of Type I and III Interferons on Enteric Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshad Ingle

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are key host cytokines in the innate immune response to viral infection, and recent work has identified unique roles for IFN subtypes in regulating different aspects of infection. Currently emerging is a common theme that type III IFNs are critical in localized control of infection at mucosal barrier sites, while type I IFNs are important for broad systemic control of infections. The intestine is a particular site of interest for exploring these effects, as in addition to being the port of entry for a multitude of pathogens, it is a complex tissue with a variety of cell types as well as the presence of the intestinal microbiota. Here we focus on the roles of type I and III IFNs in control of enteric viruses, discussing what is known about signaling downstream from these cytokines, including induction of specific IFN-stimulated genes. We review viral strategies to evade IFN responses, effects of IFNs on the intestine, interactions between IFNs and the microbiota, and briefly discuss the role of IFNs in controlling viral infections at other barrier sites. Enhanced understanding of the coordinate roles of IFNs in control of viral infections may facilitate development of antiviral therapeutic strategies; here we highlight potential avenues for future exploration.

  16. Effect of different curing modes on the degree of conversion and the microhardness of different composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Ali Ajaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different curing units and modes on the degree of conversion (DC and microhardness (MH of two different resin composites [ESTELITE ∑ QUICK (EQ, and Z350 XT (Z3]. Materials and Methods: One hundred (100 discs of each tested material were made and divided into two subgroups (n = 50 according to the discs′ dimensions: 5 mm diameter × 2 mm thickness, and 2 mm diameter × 2 mm thickness. Each subgroup was further subdivided into the following five classes (n = 10: I cured with halogen light curing-unit; II cured with light-emitting diode (LED unit; III cured with argon laser; IV cured with halogen light-curing unit for 5 s, 10 s rest followed by 20 s curing; and V cured with halogen light-curing unit for 10 s, then 10 s rest, followed by 10 s curing. The first subgroup was tested for MH using the Vickers Microhardness tester and the second subgroup was tested for DC using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s post hoc test P < 0.05. Results: Specimens in class IV showed the highest mean DC and MH, followed by class III, then class II. Class I showed significantly lower mean values for both DC and MH. On the other hand, Z3 showed statistically significantly higher mean DC and MH than EQ. Conclusion: Although the two tested composites did not perform similarly under the test conditions, curing with halogen unit for 5 s, then 10 s rest, followed by 10 s curing improved the DC and the MH of both the tested materials.

  17. Effect of using heat-inactivated serum with the Abbott human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III antibody test.

    OpenAIRE

    Jungkind, D L; DiRenzo, S A; Young, S J

    1986-01-01

    The Abbott enzyme immunoassay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) antibody was evaluated to determine the effect of using heat-inactivated (56 degrees C for 30 min) serum as the sample. Each of 58 nonreactive serum samples gave a higher A492 value when tested after heat inactivation. Ten of the samples became reactive after heating. Heat-inactivated serum should not be used in the current Abbott HTLV-III antibody test, because thi...

  18. Combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability bubble growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Rahul; Mandal, Labakanta; Roy, S.; Khan, M.; Gupta, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on the growth rate of the bubble associated with single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is shown that the effect of viscosity on the motion of the lighter fluid associated with vorticity accumulated inside the bubble due to mass ablation may be such as to reduce the net viscous drag on the bubble exerted by the upper heavier fluid as the former rises through it.

  19. Hemodynamic effects of various support modes of continuous flow LVADs on the cardiovascular system: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhiming; Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Wan, Feng; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the hemodynamic effects of various support modes of continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) on the cardiovascular system using a numerical cardiovascular system model. Material/Methods Three support modes were selected for controlling the CF-LVAD: constant flow mode, constant speed mode, and constant pressure head mode of CF-LVAD. The CF-LVAD is established between the left ventricular apex and the ascending aorta, and was incorporated into the numerical model. Various parameters were evaluated, including the blood assist index (BAI), the left ventricular external work (LVEW), the energy of blood flow (EBF), pulsatility index (PI), and surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE). Results The results show that the constant flow mode, when compared to the constant speed mode and the constant pressure head mode, increases LVEW by 31% and 14%, and EBF by 21% and 15%, respectively, indicating that this mode achieved the best ventricular unloading among the 3 support modes. As BAI is increased, PI and SHE are gradually decreased, whereas PI of the constant pressure head reaches the maximum value. Conclusions The study demonstrates that the continuous flow control mode of the CF-LVAD may achieve the highest ventricular unloading. In contrast, the constant rotational speed mode permits the optimal blood perfusion. Finally, the constant pressure head strategy, permitting optimal pulsatility, should optimize the vascular function. PMID:24793178

  20. Clinical effects of Angelica dahurica dressing on patients with I-II phase pressure sores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Fen; Niu, Junzhi; Pei, Xing

    2016-11-02

    Angelica dahurica is a well-known traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), while little information is available about its effects on pressure sores. We aimed to investigate the clinical effect of Angelica dahurica on patients with I-II phase pressure sores, as well as the underlying mechanism. Patients (n = 98) with phase I and phase II pressure sores were enrolled and randomly assigned to control and treated groups. In addition to holistic nursing, patients in the control group received compound clotrimazole cream, while patients in the treated group received continuous 4 weeks of external application of Angelica dahurica dressing. Therapeutic effect was recorded, along with the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Besides, HaCaT cells were cultured with different concentrations of Angelica dahurica, and then cell viability, clone formation numbers, cell cycle, and levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 were determined. The total effective rate in the treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Levels of IL-8, EGF, TGF-β, and VEGF were statistically increased by Angelica dahurica. In addition, the cell viability and clone formation numbers were significantly upregulated by Angelica dahurica in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase, and levels of cyclin D1 and CDK2 were significantly elevated. Our results suggest that Angelica dahurica may provide an effective clinical treatment for I-II phase pressure sores.

  1. Narrow-linewidth Si/III-V lasers: A study of laser dynamics and nonlinear effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilenchik, Yaakov Yasha

    Narrow-linewidth lasers play an important role in a wide variety of applications, from sensing and spectroscopy to optical communication and on-chip clocks. Current narrow-linewidth systems are usually implemented in doped fibers and are big, expensive, and power-hungry. Semiconductor lasers compete favorably in size, cost, and power consumption, but their linewidth is historically limited to the sub-MHz regime. However, it has been recently demonstrated that a new design paradigm, in which the optical energy is stored away from the active region in a composite high-Q resonator, has the potential to dramatically improve the coherence of the laser. This work explores this design paradigm, as applied on the hybrid Si/III-V platform. It demonstrates a record sub-KHz white-noise-floor linewidth. It further shows, both theoretically and experimentally, that this strategy practically eliminates Henry's linewidth enhancement by positioning a damped relaxation resonance at frequencies as low as 70 MHz, yielding truly quantum limited devices at frequencies of interest. In addition to this empirical contribution, this work explores the limits of performance of this platform. Here, the effect of two-photon-absorption and free-carrier-absorption are analyzed, using modified rate equations and Langevin force approach. The analysis predicts that as the intra-cavity field intensity builds up in the high-Q resonator, non-linear effects cause a new domain of performance-limiting factors. Steady-state behavior, laser dynamics, and frequency noise performance are examined in the context of this unique platform, pointing at the importance of nonlinear effects. This work offers a theoretical model predicting laser performance in light of nonlinear effects, obtaining a good agreement with experimental results from fabricated high-Q Si/III-V lasers. In addition to demonstrating unprecedented semiconductor laser performance, this work establishes a first attempt to predict and demonstrate

  2. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis using Soft Set Theory and COPRAS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Ling Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA is a risk management technique frequently applied to enhance the system performance and safety. In recent years, many researchers have shown an intense interest in improving FMEA due to inherent weaknesses associated with the classical risk priority number (RPN method. In this study, we develop a new risk ranking model for FMEA based on soft set theory and COPRAS method, which can deal with the limitations and enhance the performance of the conventional FMEA. First, trapezoidal fuzzy soft set is adopted to manage FMEA team membersr linguistic assessments on failure modes. Then, a modified COPRAS method is utilized for determining the ranking order of the failure modes recognized in FMEA. Especially, we treat the risk factors as interdependent and employ the Choquet integral to obtain the aggregate risk of failures in the new FMEA approach. Finally, a practical FMEA problem is analyzed via the proposed approach to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. The result shows that the FMEA model developed in this study outperforms the traditional RPN method and provides a more reasonable risk assessment of failure modes.

  3. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana; Folkesson, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2017-06-15

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis -induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in livestock

  4. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis-induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in

  5. Addition effect of erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate in the homopolymerization kinetics of a DGEBA resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, S.J.; Ramis, X.; Serra, A.; Suay, J.

    2006-01-01

    Solid bisphenol-A epoxy resin of medium molecular weight was cured using a Lewis acid initiator (erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate) in three different proportions (0.5, 1 and 2 phr). A kinetic study was performed in a differential scanning calorimeter. The complete kinetic triplet was determined (activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and integral function of the deg.ree of conversion) for each system. A kinetic analysis was performed with an integral isoconversional procedure (model-free), and the kinetic model was determined both with the Coats-Redfern method (the obtained isoconversional E value being accepted as the effective activation energy) and through the compensation effect. All the systems followed the same isothermal curing model simulated from non-isothermal ones. The 'nucleation and growth' Avrami kinetic model A 3/2 has been proposed as the polymerization kinetic model. The addition of initiator accelerated the reaction having higher influence when low temperatures were applied

  6. Effect of heptadentate (N{sub 4}O{sub 3}) tripodal Schiff base ligand and its yttrium(III) complex on the luminescence and extraction of tris({beta}-diketonato)europium(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)], E-mail: yhasegaw@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp; Saitou, S.; Nagaoka, D.; Yajima, H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Kanesato, M. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2008-02-28

    In order to learn the effect of a Schiff base and the complex of Y{sup III} on the extraction of Eu{sup III} with {beta}-diketones and on the luminescence of the extracted species, the extraction of Eu{sup III} with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) and/or these Schiff bases, tris(5-t-butyl)salicylidenaminoethyl amine (H{sub 3}L{sup 1}), and its Y{sup III} complex ([YL{sup 1}]) prepared, into CHCl{sub 3} was examined. Further, the luminescence and excited spectra of CHCl{sub 3} phases extracted Eu{sup III} complexes and the solutions containing tris({beta}-diketonato)Eu{sup III} and/or the Schiff bases were measured. On the measurement of the luminescence spectra, tris(pivaloyltrifluoroacetonato)Eu{sup III} (Eu(pta){sub 3}) as well as Eu(tta){sub 3} was used. Synergistic effect with Htta and these Schiff bases was observed. However, proper effect of Y{sup III} was not observed. The luminescence intensity of Eu(tta){sub 3} at 613 nm decreased with increasing concentration of H{sub 3}L{sup 1} or [YL{sup 1}], whereas that of Eu(pta){sub 3} increased with increasing concentration of the ligands, but no difference between both Schiff bases was observed, because of picking up of Y{sup III} from [YL{sup 1}] with the interaction between [YL{sup 1}] and water.

  7. Plasma Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    This chapter explores several aspects of the linear electrostatic normal modes of oscillation for a single-species non-neutral plasma in a Penning trap. Linearized fluid equations of motion are developed, assuming the plasma is cold but collisionless, which allow derivation of the cold plasma dielectric tensor and the electrostatic wave equation. Upper hybrid and magnetized plasma waves in an infinite uniform plasma are described. The effect of the plasma surface in a bounded plasma system is considered, and the properties of surface plasma waves are characterized. The normal modes of a cylindrical plasma column are discussed, and finally, modes of spheroidal plasmas, and finite temperature effects on the modes, are briefly described.

  8. Safety analysis of RA reactor operation, I-III, Part III - Environmental effect of the maximum credible accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.

    1963-02-01

    Maximum credible accident at the RA reactor would consider release of fission products into the environment. This would result from fuel elements failure or meltdown due to loss of coolant. The analysis presented in this report assumes that the reactor was operating at nominal power at the moment of maximum possible accident. The report includes calculations of fission products activity at the moment of accident, total activity release during the accident, concentration of radioactive material in the air in the reactor neighbourhood, and the analysis of accident environmental effects

  9. Compressibility effects on ideal and kinetic ballooning modes and elimination of finite Larmor radius stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, M.

    1985-07-01

    The dynamics of ideal and kinetic ballooning modes are considered analytically including parallel ion dynamics, but without electron dissipation. For ideal modes, parallel dynamics predominantly determine the growth rate when β is within approx.30% of the ideal threshold, resulting in a substantial reduction in growth rate. Compressibility also eliminates the stabilization effects of finite Larmor radius (FLR); FLR effects (when temperature gradients are neglected) can even increase the growth rate above the MHD value. Temperature gradients accentuate this by adding a new source of free energy independent of the MHD drive, in this region of ballooning coordinate corresponding in MHD to the continuum. Analytic dispersion relations are derived demonstrating the effects above; the formalism emphasizes the similarities between the ideal MHD and kinetic cases

  10. Cytogenotoxic effects of two potential anticancer Ruthenium(III Schiff Bases complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izet Eminovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of cancer has been subject of great interest. Researchers are continuously searching for new medicines. In this sense, ruthenium complexes have big potential. Some evidences suggest that ruthenium compounds possess anticancer activities. We synthesized two recently published ruthenium(III complexes with bidentate O,N and tridentate O,O,N Schiff bases derived from 5-substituted salicylaldehyde and aminophenol or anilineare. These compounds showed affinity for binding to the DNA molecule, however, insufficient data are available regarding their possible toxic effects on biological systems.Methods: In the present study we evaluated genotoxic, cytotoxic, and cytostatic effects of Na[RuCl2(L12] and Na[Ru(L22], using the Allium cepa assay.Results: Different toxic effects were observed depending on the substance, tested concentration, and endpoint measured. In general, the tested compounds significantly lowered the root growth and mitotic index values as compared to the control group. Additionally, a wide range of abnormal mitotic stages, both clastogenic and non-clastogenic were observed in the treated cells. Na[RuCl2(L12] significantly increased the frequency of sticky metaphases, chromosome bridges, micronuclei, impaired chromosome segregation, as well as number of apoptotic and necrotic cells over the controls. In contrast, Na[Ru(L22] did not show significant evidence of genotoxicity with regard to chromosome aberrations and micronuclei, however, significant differences were detected in the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells when the highest concentration was applied.Conclusions: In this study we demonstrated antiproliferative effects of Na[RuCl2(L12] and Na[Ru(L22]. At clinical level, these results could be interesting for further studies on anticancer potential of the ruthenium(III complexes using animal models.

  11. In situ synthesized and embedded silver nanoclusters into poly vinyl alcohol-borax hydrogel as a novel dual mode "on and off" fluorescence sensor for Fe (III) and thiosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourreza, Nahid; Ghomi, Matineh

    2018-03-01

    Herein, a novel method has been developed for in situ synthesis and embedding of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) into polyvinyl alcohol and borax hydrogel (PBH) without adding any reducing agent. A three-dimensional network of polyvinyl alcohol and borax is formed, and at the same time the silver ions penetrate into the hydrogel, reduced to silver and trapped into the hydrogel bed. The characteristics of this hydrogel nanocomposite were investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was also observed that the fluorescence intensity of embedded AgNCs into polyvinyl alcohol and borax hydrogel (AgNCs-PBH) was enhanced and quenched in the presence of Fe (III) and thiosulfate, respectively. Therefore a novel dual on-off fluorescence sensor was developed based on polyvinyl alcohol-borax hydrogel for the first time. After preparing this new probe, the effect of Fe (III) and thiosulfate was investigated. The size- depending of label free AgNCs was found to be responsible for the enhancing and quenching of the fluorescence as well as obvious color changing. Under the approved condition, the linear ranges were validated over the concentration of 0.14-27.0µmolL -1 and 0.1-1.0µmolL -1 for Fe (III) and thiosulfate, respectively. The limit of detection based on three times the standard deviation of the blank was 0.045 and 0.060µmolL -1 for Fe (III) and thiosulfate, respectively. The relative standard deviation for intra-day and inter-day determinations of both Fe (III) and thiosulfate were in the range of 3.23-5.17% (n = 10). This sensing probe was used for Fe (III) detection in some food samples and thiosulfate in water samples with acceptable results and good recoveries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of electron cyclotron current drive on the evolution of double tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Guanglan; Dong, Chunying; Duan, Longfang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the double tearing mode (DTM) in slab geometry are investigated by using two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. It is found that, mainly, the double tearing mode is suppressed by the emergence of the secondary island, due to the deposition of driven current on the X-point of magnetic island at one rational surface, which forms a new non-complete symmetric magnetic topology structure (defined as a non-complete symmetric structure, NSS). The effects of driven current with different parameters (magnitude, initial time of deposition, duration time, and location of deposition) on the evolution of DTM are analyzed elaborately. The optimal magnitude or optimal deposition duration of driven current is the one which makes the duration of NSS the longest, which depends on the mutual effect between ECCD and the background plasma. Moreover, driven current introduced at the early Sweet-Parker phase has the best suppression effect; and the optimal moment also exists, depending on the duration of the NSS. Finally, the effects varied by the driven current disposition location are studied. It is verified that the favorable location of driven current is the X-point which is completely different from the result of single tearing mode

  13. Effects of electron cyclotron current drive on the evolution of double tearing mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Guanglan, E-mail: sunguanglan@nciae.edu.cn; Dong, Chunying [Basic Science Section, North China Institute of Aerospace Engineering, Langfang 065000 (China); Duan, Longfang [School of Computer and Remote Sensing Information Technology, North China Institute of Aerospace Engineering, Langfang 065000 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the double tearing mode (DTM) in slab geometry are investigated by using two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. It is found that, mainly, the double tearing mode is suppressed by the emergence of the secondary island, due to the deposition of driven current on the X-point of magnetic island at one rational surface, which forms a new non-complete symmetric magnetic topology structure (defined as a non-complete symmetric structure, NSS). The effects of driven current with different parameters (magnitude, initial time of deposition, duration time, and location of deposition) on the evolution of DTM are analyzed elaborately. The optimal magnitude or optimal deposition duration of driven current is the one which makes the duration of NSS the longest, which depends on the mutual effect between ECCD and the background plasma. Moreover, driven current introduced at the early Sweet-Parker phase has the best suppression effect; and the optimal moment also exists, depending on the duration of the NSS. Finally, the effects varied by the driven current disposition location are studied. It is verified that the favorable location of driven current is the X-point which is completely different from the result of single tearing mode.

  14. Spectral Analysis of Non-ideal MRI Modes: The Effect of Hall Diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandas, Gopakumar; Pessah, Martin E., E-mail: gopakumar@nbi.ku.dk, E-mail: mpessah@nbi.ku.dk [Niels Bohr International Academy, Niels Bohr Institute, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100, Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

    2017-03-20

    The effect of magnetic field diffusion on the stability of accretion disks is a problem that has attracted considerable interest of late. In particular, the Hall effect has the potential to bring about remarkable changes in the dynamical behavior of disks that are without parallel. In this paper, we conduct a systematic examination of the linear eigenmodes in a weakly magnetized differentially rotating gas with a special focus on Hall diffusion. We first develop a geometrical representation of the eigenmodes and provide a detailed quantitative description of the polarization properties of the oscillatory modes under the combined influence of the Coriolis and Hall effects. We also analyze the effects of magnetic diffusion on the structure of the unstable modes and derive analytical expressions for the kinetic and magnetic stresses and energy densities associated with the non-ideal magnetorotational instability (MRI). Our analysis explicitly demonstrates that, if the dissipative effects are relatively weak, the kinetic stresses and energies make up the dominant contribution to the total stress and energy density when the equilibrium angular momentum and magnetic field vectors are anti-parallel. This is in sharp contrast to what is observed in the case of the ideal or dissipative MRI. We conduct shearing box simulations and find very good agreement with the results derived from linear theory. Because the modes under consideration are also exact solutions of the nonlinear equations, the unconventional nature of the kinetic and magnetic stresses may have significant implications for the nonlinear evolution in some regions of protoplanetary disks.

  15. Study of matrix effects on the direct trace analysis of acidic pesticides in water using various liquid chromatographic modes coupled to tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkman, E; Mooibroek, D; Hoogerbrugge, R; Hogendoorn, E; Sancho, J V; Pozo, O; Hernández, F

    2001-08-10

    This study investigated the effects of matrix interferences on the analytical performance of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometric (MS-MS) detector coupled to various reversed-phase liquid chromatographic (LC) modes for the on-line determination of various types of acidic herbicides in water using external calibration for quantification of the analytes tested at a level of 0.4 microg/l. The LC modes included (i) a single-column configuration (LC), (ii) precolumn switching (PC-LC) and (iii) coupled-column LC (LC-LC). As regards detection, electrospray (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in both positive (PI) and negative (NI) ionization modes were examined. Salinity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were selected as interferences to study matrix effects in this type of analysis. Therefore, Milli-Q and tap water samples both fortified with 12 mg/l DOC and spiked with sulfometuron-methyl, bentazone, bromoxynil, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxypropionic acid at a level of about 0.4 microg/l were analyzed with the various LC-MS approaches. Direct sample injection was performed with volumes of 0.25 ml or 2.0 ml on a column of 2.1 mm I.D. or 4.6 mm I.D. for the ESI and APCI modes, respectively. The recovery data were used to compare and evaluate the analytical performance of the various LC approaches. As regards matrix effects, the salinity provided a dramatic decrease in response for early eluting analytes (k value of about 1) when using the LC mode. Both PC-LC and LC-LC efficiently eliminated this problem. The high DOC content hardly effected the responses of analytes in the ESI mode, while in most cases the responses increased when using APCI-MS-MS detection. Of all the tested configurations, LC-LC-ESI-MS-MS with the column combination Discovery C18/ABZ+ was the most favorable as regards elimination of matrix effects and provided reliable quantification of all compounds using external calibration at the tested

  16. Assessment of the effects of As(III) treatment on cyanobacteria lipidomic profiles by LC-MS and MCR-ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Aline S; Bedia, Carmen; Lima, Kássio M G; Tauler, Romà

    2016-08-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria present in a wide variety of habitats such as freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. In this work, the effects of As(III), a major toxic environmental pollutant, on the lipidomic profiles of two cyanobacteria species (Anabaena and Planktothrix agardhii) were assessed by means of a recently proposed method based on the concept of regions of interest (ROI) in liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) together with multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). Cyanobacteria were exposed to two concentrations of As(III) for a week, and lipid extracts were analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in full scan mode. The data obtained were compressed by means of the ROI strategy, and the resulting LC-MS data sets were analyzed by the MCR-ALS method. Comparison of profile peak areas resolved by MCR-ALS in control and exposed samples allowed the discrimination of lipids whose concentrations were changed due to As(III) treatment. The tentative identification of these lipids revealed an important reduction of the levels of some galactolipids such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, the pigment chlorophyll a and its degradation product, pheophytin a, as well as carotene compounds such as 3-hydroxycarotene and carotene-3,3'-dione, all of these compounds being essential in the photosynthetic process. These results suggested that As(III) induced important changes in the composition of lipids of cyanobacteria, which were able to compromise their energy production processes. Graphical abstract Steps of the proposed LC-MS + MCR-ALS procedure.

  17. Finite Larmor radius effects on the stability properties of internal modes of a z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakerstedt, H.O.

    1987-01-01

    From the Vlasov-fluid model a set of approximate stability equations describing the stability of a cylindrically symmetric z-pinch is derived. The equations are derived in the limit of small gyroradius and include first order kinetic effects such as finite ion Larmor radius effects and resonant ion effects. Neglecting the resonant ion terms, we explicitly solve this set of equations for a constant current density profile leading to a dispersion relation. FLR effects are shown for the case of m=1 internal mode to be stabilizing and for large wavenumbers k, using a trial function approach, absolute stabilization is found. (author)

  18. The effect of holes in the dispersion relation of propagative surface plasmon modes of nanoperforated semitransparent metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kekesi, R., E-mail: renata.kekesi@csic.es; Meneses-Rodríguez, D.; García-Pérez, F.; González, M. U.; García-Martín, A.; Cebollada, A.; Armelles, G., E-mail: gaspar@imm.cnm.csic.es [IMM-Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (CNM-CSIC), Isaac Newton 8, PTM, E-28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-07

    We have analysed the effect that holes have on the properties of propagative surface plasmon modes in semitransparent nanoperforated Au films. The modes have been excited in Kretschmann configuration. Contrary to continuous films, where only one mode is excited, two modes are observed in Au nanohole array. The origin of this different behavior is discussed using effective optical properties for the nanoperforated films. The presence of the holes affects the effective optical constants of the membranes in two ways: it changes the contribution of the free electrons, and it gives rise to a localized transition due to a hole induced plasmon resonance. This localized transition interacts with the propagative surface plasmon modes, originating the two detected modes.

  19. The effect of holes in the dispersion relation of propagative surface plasmon modes of nanoperforated semitransparent metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kekesi, R.; Meneses-Rodríguez, D.; García-Pérez, F.; González, M. U.; García-Martín, A.; Cebollada, A.; Armelles, G.

    2014-01-01

    We have analysed the effect that holes have on the properties of propagative surface plasmon modes in semitransparent nanoperforated Au films. The modes have been excited in Kretschmann configuration. Contrary to continuous films, where only one mode is excited, two modes are observed in Au nanohole array. The origin of this different behavior is discussed using effective optical properties for the nanoperforated films. The presence of the holes affects the effective optical constants of the membranes in two ways: it changes the contribution of the free electrons, and it gives rise to a localized transition due to a hole induced plasmon resonance. This localized transition interacts with the propagative surface plasmon modes, originating the two detected modes.

  20. Failure mode and effects analysis of software-based automation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Helminen, A.

    2002-08-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is one of the well-known analysis methods having an established position in the traditional reliability analysis. The purpose of FMEA is to identify possible failure modes of the system components, evaluate their influences on system behaviour and propose proper countermeasures to suppress these effects. The generic nature of FMEA has enabled its wide use in various branches of industry reaching from business management to the design of spaceships. The popularity and diverse use of the analysis method has led to multiple interpretations, practices and standards presenting the same analysis method. FMEA is well understood at the systems and hardware levels, where the potential failure modes usually are known and the task is to analyse their effects on system behaviour. Nowadays, more and more system functions are realised on software level, which has aroused the urge to apply the FMEA methodology also on software based systems. Software failure modes generally are unknown - 'software modules do not fail, they only display incorrect behaviour' - and depend on dynamic behaviour of the application. These facts set special requirements on the FMEA of software based systems and make it difficult to realise. In this report the failure mode and effects analysis is studied for the use of reliability analysis of software-based systems. More precisely, the target system of FMEA is defined to be a safety-critical software-based automation application in a nuclear power plant, implemented on an industrial automation system platform. Through a literature study the report tries to clarify the intriguing questions related to the practical use of software failure mode and effects analysis. The study is a part of the research project 'Programmable Automation System Safety Integrity assessment (PASSI)', belonging to the Finnish Nuclear Safety Research Programme (FINNUS, 1999-2002). In the project various safety assessment methods and tools for

  1. Studies of. gamma. -ray irradiation effects on tris(. beta. -diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) coordination compounds by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Y.; Endo, K.; Sano, H. (Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science)

    1981-06-01

    Both absorption Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements on tris(..beta..-diketonato)iron(III) and cobalt(III) compounds indicate that ligands which have phenyl group as a substituent are more stable to ..gamma..-ray radiolysis, in accordance with previous results of emission Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of /sup 57/Co-labelled tris (..beta..-diketonato)cobalt(III) compounds.

  2. SU-E-T-420: Failure Effects Mode Analysis for Trigeminal Neuralgia Frameless Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, J [Associates In Medical Physics, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Functional radiosurgery has been used successfully in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia but presents significant challenges to ensuring the high prescription dose is delivered accurately. A review of existing practice should help direct the focus of quality improvement for this treatment regime. Method: Failure modes and effects analysis was used to identify the processes in preparing radiosurgery treatment for TN. The map was developed by a multidisciplinary team including: neurosurgeon, radiation oncology, physicist and therapist. Potential failure modes were identified for each step in the process map as well as potential causes and end effect. A risk priority number was assigned to each cause. Results: The process map identified 66 individual steps (see attached supporting document). Corrective actions were developed for areas of high risk priority number. Wrong site treatment is at higher risk for trigeminal neuralgia treatment due to the lack of site specific pathologic imaging on MR and CT – additional site specific checks were implemented to minimize the risk of wrong site treatment. Failed collision checks resulted from an insufficient collision model in the treatment planning system and a plan template was developed to address this problem. Conclusion: Failure modes and effects analysis is an effective tool for developing quality improvement in high risk radiotherapy procedures such as functional radiosurgery.

  3. Effects of Bifidobacterium Breve Feeding Strategy and Delivery Modes on Experimental Allergic Rhinitis Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-jun Ren

    Full Text Available Different delivery modes may affect the susceptibility to allergic diseases. It is still unknown whether early intervention with probiotics would counteract this effect.The effect of different delivery modes on immune status and nasal symptoms was investigated on established allergic rhinitis (AR mouse model. In addition, the immunoregulatory effects and mechanisms of different feeding manners with Bifidobacterium breve(B. breve were examined.Live lyophilized B. breve was orally administered to BALB/c mice born via vaginal delivery(VD or cesarean delivery (CD for 8 consecutive weeks, after which they were sensitized by ovalbumin(OVA to establish experimental AR. Nasal symptoms, serum immunoglobulins, cytokines, splenic percentages of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T(Treg cells and nasal eosinophil infiltration were evaluated.Compared with VD mice, mice delivered via CD demonstrated more serious nasal symptoms, higher concentrations of OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig E, more nasal eosinophils and lower percentages of splenic CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+Treg cells after establishing experimental AR. These parameters were reversed by administering B. breves hortly after birth. However, the effect of B. breve did not differ between different delivery modes.CD aggravates the nasal symptoms of AR mice compared to VD. This is the first report that oral administration of B. breve shortly after birth can significantly alleviate the symptoms of AR mice born via both deliveries, probably via activation of the regulatory capacity of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+Treg cells.

  4. Effects of Bifidobacterium Breve Feeding Strategy and Delivery Modes on Experimental Allergic Rhinitis Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian-jun; Yu, Zhao; Yang, Feng-Ling; Lv, Dan; Hung, Shi; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Ping; Liu, Shi-Xi; Zhang, Nan; Bachert, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Different delivery modes may affect the susceptibility to allergic diseases. It is still unknown whether early intervention with probiotics would counteract this effect. The effect of different delivery modes on immune status and nasal symptoms was investigated on established allergic rhinitis (AR) mouse model. In addition, the immunoregulatory effects and mechanisms of different feeding manners with Bifidobacterium breve(B. breve) were examined. Live lyophilized B. breve was orally administered to BALB/c mice born via vaginal delivery(VD) or cesarean delivery (CD) for 8 consecutive weeks, after which they were sensitized by ovalbumin(OVA) to establish experimental AR. Nasal symptoms, serum immunoglobulins, cytokines, splenic percentages of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T(Treg) cells and nasal eosinophil infiltration were evaluated. Compared with VD mice, mice delivered via CD demonstrated more serious nasal symptoms, higher concentrations of OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E, more nasal eosinophils and lower percentages of splenic CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Treg cells after establishing experimental AR. These parameters were reversed by administering B. breves hortly after birth. However, the effect of B. breve did not differ between different delivery modes. CD aggravates the nasal symptoms of AR mice compared to VD. This is the first report that oral administration of B. breve shortly after birth can significantly alleviate the symptoms of AR mice born via both deliveries, probably via activation of the regulatory capacity of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Treg cells.

  5. SU-E-T-420: Failure Effects Mode Analysis for Trigeminal Neuralgia Frameless Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Functional radiosurgery has been used successfully in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia but presents significant challenges to ensuring the high prescription dose is delivered accurately. A review of existing practice should help direct the focus of quality improvement for this treatment regime. Method: Failure modes and effects analysis was used to identify the processes in preparing radiosurgery treatment for TN. The map was developed by a multidisciplinary team including: neurosurgeon, radiation oncology, physicist and therapist. Potential failure modes were identified for each step in the process map as well as potential causes and end effect. A risk priority number was assigned to each cause. Results: The process map identified 66 individual steps (see attached supporting document). Corrective actions were developed for areas of high risk priority number. Wrong site treatment is at higher risk for trigeminal neuralgia treatment due to the lack of site specific pathologic imaging on MR and CT – additional site specific checks were implemented to minimize the risk of wrong site treatment. Failed collision checks resulted from an insufficient collision model in the treatment planning system and a plan template was developed to address this problem. Conclusion: Failure modes and effects analysis is an effective tool for developing quality improvement in high risk radiotherapy procedures such as functional radiosurgery

  6. Systematic Analysis of the Effects of Mode Conversion on Thermal Radiation from Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, Akihiro; Yamada, Shoichi

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we systematically calculate the polarization in soft X-rays emitted from magnetized neutron stars, which are expected to be observed by next-generation X-ray satellites. Magnetars are one of the targets for these observations. This is because thermal radiation is normally observed in the soft X-ray band, and it is thought to be linearly polarized because of different opacities for two polarization modes of photons in the magnetized atmosphere of neutron stars and the dielectric properties of the vacuum in strong magnetic fields. In their study, Taverna et al. illustrated how strong magnetic fields influence the behavior of the polarization observables for radiation propagating in vacuo without addressing a precise, physical emission model. In this paper, we pay attention to the conversion of photon polarization modes that can occur in the presence of an atmospheric layer above the neutron star surface, computing the polarization angle and fraction and systematically changing the magnetic field strength, radii of the emission region, temperature, mass, and radii of the neutron stars. We confirmed that if plasma is present, the effects of mode conversion cannot be neglected when the magnetic field is relatively weak, B∼ {10}13 {{G}}. Our results indicate that strongly magnetized (B≳ {10}14 {{G}}) neutron stars are suitable to detect polarizations, but not-so-strongly magnetized (B∼ {10}13 {{G}}) neutron stars will be the ones to confirm the mode conversion.

  7. Effect of a neutron skin on collective dipoles modes in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, D.D.; Van Isacker, P.; Nagarajan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the principal motivations for accelerated radioactive beams is to probe nuclear structure at the limits of nuclear stability. For neutron-rich nuclei, an indication of the new phenomena which may occur has already appeared, in the guise of the neutron halo discovered in very light nuclei. More generally, a steadily increasing neutron skin thickness is expected as the neutron excess increases. The presence of such a mantle of dominantly neutron matter will then particularly affect the properties of collective modes involving the out-of-phase motion of neutrons and protons. This paper explores the effect of the neutron skin thickness on the isovector M1 and E1 modes in medium and heavy mass nuclei. A simple model is used, couched in terms of classical oscillations of neutron and proton densities. The treatment includes the open-quotes pygmyclose quotes E1 mode, which corresponds to motion of the core against the loosely-bound neutrons in the mantle and predicts a significant lowering of this mode, even at relatively modest values of the skin thickness

  8. Test-retest reliability and practice effects of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ada H Y; Humphreys, Michael; Byrne, Gerard J; Pachana, Nancy A

    2012-09-01

    Although serial administration of cognitive tests is increasingly common, there is a paucity of research on test-retest reliabilities and practice effects, both of which are important for evaluating changes in functioning. Reliability is generally conceptualized as involving short-lasting changes in performance. However, when repeated testing occurs over a period of years, there will be some longer lasting effects. The implications of these longer lasting effects and practice effects on reliability were examined in the context of repeated administrations of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III in 339 community-dwelling women aged 40-79 years over 2 to 7 years. The results showed that Logical Memory and Verbal Paired Associates subtests were consistently the most reliable subtests across the age cohorts. The magnitude of practice effects varied as a function of subtests and age. The largest practice effects were found in the youngest age cohort, especially on the Faces, Logical Memory, and Verbal Paired Associates subtests. ©2012 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Skin effect modifications of the Resistive Wall Mode dynamics in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villone, Fabio, E-mail: villone@unicas.it [Ass. Euratom/ENEA/CREATE, DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Pustovitov, Vladimir D. [Institute of Tokamak Physics, National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Pl. Kurchatova 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-22

    We present the first evidence of the skin-effect modification of the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) dynamics in a tokamak. The computations are performed with the CarMa code, using its unique ability of treating volumetric 3D conducting structures. The results prove that conventional thin-wall models and codes, assuming the thin equivalent wall located on the inner side of a real (thick) wall, may fail to get accurate estimates of RWM growth rates, since the inclusion of the skin effect makes the growth rates always larger than otherwise. The difference is noticeable even for the conventional slow RWMs and becomes substantial for faster modes. Some possible equivalent thin-wall modeling approaches are also discussed.

  10. Effect of the oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, John M.; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  11. Effect of different modes of therapy on vestibular and balance dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    El-Kholy, Wafaa Abdel-Hay; Taha, Hesham Mohamed; Hamada, Soha Mohamed; Sayed, Mona Abdel-Fattah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have difficulties in performing various motor tasks such as walking, writing and speaking, together with significant balance dysfunction. Despite gains made in the field of pharmacotherapy and deep brain stimulation, dopaminergic medications may produce a limited improvement in postural stability. Sustained improvement in motor skills can be achieved through physiotherapy. Aim of the work: To measure the effect of different modes of therap...

  12. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  13. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2007-08-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  14. Prevention is better: the case of the underutilized failure mode effect analysis in patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Goodrum

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prospective hazard analysis methodologies, like failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA, have been tried and tested in the engineering industry and are more recently gaining momentum in healthcare. Considering FMEA’s evidence based successes, this commentary makes the case that healthcare is underutilizing the methodology by relying on retrospective hazard analysis. Healthcare leaders should determine where prospective hazard analysis principles could be better built into care delivery planning and processes that will enhance patient safety.

  15. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with 'generic' component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance

  16. Failure modes and effects analysis as a design tool for nuclear safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashjian, B.M.

    1975-01-01

    The activities of nuclear power plant designers are monitored by government and industry to an unprecedented degree. This involves not only rigid design and quality assurance criteria, but extensive documentation and reporting. The failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a technique for checking designs and assuring quality. Included in the FMEA is a system of documentation. A simplified example of the reactor protective system (RPS) is used to illustrate the method. (U.S.)

  17. Analisis Potensi Kecelakaan Kerja Pada CV. Automotive Workshop Dengan Metode Failure Mode and Effect Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Syauqi, Qiqi Azwani; Susanty, Aries

    2016-01-01

    [Potential Analysis of Work Accidents at CV. Automotive Workshop using Failure Mode and Effect Analysis Method] Nowadays the global automotive industry, especially in developing countries has increased along with the increasing number of internet users and mobile penetration, the GDP rate increase of the developing countries and the growth of middle class-society, which makes the car sales in these countries increased anually. According to Carmudi, Semarang was the second-highest of the car l...

  18. Synergic effect of tribenzylamine on the extraction of Fe(III) with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone in chloroform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheema, M.N.; Saeed, M.M.; Qureshi, I.H.

    1980-01-01

    Synergic effect of tribenzylamine (TBA) on the solvent extraction of Fe(III), Co(II) and Cu(II), by thenoyltrifluoracetone (HTTA) in chloroform from aqueous medium of ionic strength 0.33 M (H + ,NaClO 4 ) has been studied. For trivalent iron an enhanced extraction > 98% was observed at pH 2.5 and the equilibrium was attained within 5 minutes. Extraction parameters such as concentrations of HTTA, TBA and pH were optimised by a triangular co-ordinate graph. The stoichiometry of the extractable adduct Fe (TTA) 3 TBA was established by slope analysis. Extraction and formation constants of extractable species were computed. (orig.) [de

  19. Influence of transverse mode on retinal spot size and retinal injury effect: A theoretical analysis on 532-nm laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Rui Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental transverse mode (TEM00 is preferable for experimental and theoretical study on the laser-induced retinal injury effect, for it can produce the minimal retinal image and establish the most strict laser safety standards. But actually lasers with higher order mode were frequently used in both earlier and recent studies. Generally higher order mode leads to larger retinal spot size and so higher damage threshold, but there are few quantitative analyses on this problem. In this paper, a four-surface schematic eye model is established for human and macaque. The propagation of 532-nm laser in schematic eye is analyzed by the ABCD law of Gaussian optics. It is shown that retinal spot size increases with laser transverse mode order. For relative lower mode order, the retinal spot diameter will not exceed the minimum laser-induced retinal lesion (25 ~ 30 μm in diameter, and so has little effect on retinal damage threshold. While for higher order mode, the larger retinal spot requires more energy to induce injury and so the damage threshold increases. When beam divergence is lowered, the retinal spot size decreases correspondingly, so the effect of mode order can be compensated. The retinal spot size of macaque is slightly smaller than that of human and the ratio between them is independent of mode order. We conclude that the laser mode order has significant influence on retinal spot size but limited influence on the retinal injury effect.

  20. Thermal Effects on the Single-Mode Regime of Distributed Modal Filtering Rod Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2012-01-01

    Power scaling of fiber laser systems requires the development of innovative active fibers, capable of providing high pump absorption, ultralarge effective area, high-order mode suppression, and resilience to thermal effects. Thermally induced refractive index change has been recently appointed...... as one major limitation to the achievable power, causing degradation of the modal properties and preventing to obtain stable diffraction-limited output beam. In this paper, the effects of thermally induced refractive index change on the guiding properties of a double-cladding distributed modal filtering...

  1. The effect of deformation mode on the sensitisation of partially martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briant, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The metallurgical process by which austenitic stainless steels become susceptible to corrosion is defined as sensitisation. It is now well established that if the austenite is partially transformed to martensite by deformation, the kinetics of sensitisation will be accelerated. In this paper the effects of martensite induced by various deformation modes on sensitisation are examined. It will be shown that in all cases the martensite accelerates sensitisation which in turn leads to rapid corrosion. This effect is independent of the way the martensite is induced. The results also show that this effect is observed over a wide range of martensite content. (author)

  2. Neutron flux effect on the fracture toughness behavior of Tihange-III RPV material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.; Bertolis, D.

    2015-01-01

    The question whether material test reactor (MTR) data can be used to supplement power reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance data is still debated in the international community and its implications are particularly important in the perspective of long term operation (LTO). However, addressing the flux effect can be confusing if specific material and irradiation variables are not taken into account. This means that the answer to whether there is flux effect or not is neither 'no' nor 'yes' without specifying the application range. Indeed, neutron flux effect was recognized to occur in high Cu-containing steels in the low fluence range. But at high fluence, relevant for long term operation, it becomes difficult to clearly distinguish the differences between high flux and low flux. In this work, we irradiated the low Cu base metal and weld of the Tihange-III surveillance coupon in the BR2 reactor at high flux. The BR2 flux is about two orders of magnitude higher than the flux in the surveillance position. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests were performed on both the surveillance and MTR specimens and compared to assess the neutron flux effect. The results confirm that, at high fluence levels, the flux effect on mechanical properties is not significant, offering therefore the possibility of accelerated irradiation to investigate RPV embrittlement in the high fluence regime relevant for long term operation. (authors)

  3. Failure mode and effects analysis of witnessing protocols for ensuring traceability during IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienzi, Laura; Bariani, Fiorenza; Dalla Zorza, Michela; Romano, Stefania; Scarica, Catello; Maggiulli, Roberta; Nanni Costa, Alessandro; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria

    2015-10-01

    Traceability of cells during IVF is a fundamental aspect of treatment, and involves witnessing protocols. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a method of identifying real or potential breakdowns in processes, and allows strategies to mitigate risks to be developed. To examine the risks associated with witnessing protocols, an FMEA was carried out in a busy IVF centre, before and after implementation of an electronic witnessing system (EWS). A multidisciplinary team was formed and moderated by human factors specialists. Possible causes of failures, and their potential effects, were identified and risk priority number (RPN) for each failure calculated. A second FMEA analysis was carried out after implementation of an EWS. The IVF team identified seven main process phases, 19 associated process steps and 32 possible failure modes. The highest RPN was 30, confirming the relatively low risk that mismatches may occur in IVF when a manual witnessing system is used. The introduction of the EWS allowed a reduction in the moderate-risk failure mode by two-thirds (highest RPN = 10). In our experience, FMEA is effective in supporting multidisciplinary IVF groups to understand the witnessing process, identifying critical steps and planning changes in practice to enable safety to be enhanced. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The relieving effects of shelter modes on physiological stress of traffic police in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, G. Z.; Wang, Y. J.; Bu, W. T.; Lu, Y. Z.; Li, Ke; Li, Z. H.

    2018-03-01

    In summer, high temperature and strong sun radiation last for a long time. However, traffic police still stick to their positions to ensure normal traffic order. Therefore, the health and safety of traffic police are challenged by the high temperature weather. To protect the safety of the traffic police in the outdoor high temperature environment, some shelter modes, such as sun hat and sun umbrella are selected for duty traffic police. The relieving effects on the physiological stress of the shelter modes are analyzed by comparison of the physiological parameters in these shelter modes. The results show that sun umbrella has a good effect on relieving physiological stress. And sun hat has no effect on relieving physiological stress, although it avoids the direct sunlight on the face. However, it causes the increase of the thermal sensation. This study can provide important methods for health protecting of traffic police in the outdoor high temperature environment. It also provides a theoretical support for the revision of the outdoor high temperature labour protection standard.

  5. Effect of cobratoxin binding on the normal mode vibration within acetylcholine binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaccini, Edward J; Lindahl, Erik; Sixma, Titia; Trudell, James R

    2008-04-01

    Recent crystal structures of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) have revealed surprisingly small structural alterations upon ligand binding. Here we investigate the extent to which ligand binding may affect receptor dynamics. AChBP is a homologue of the extracellular component of ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs). We have previously used an elastic network normal-mode analysis to propose a gating mechanism for the LGICs and to suggest the effects of various ligands on such motions. However, the difficulties with elastic network methods lie in their inability to account for the modest effects of a small ligand or mutation on ion channel motion. Here, we report the successful application of an elastic network normal mode technique to measure the effects of large ligand binding on receptor dynamics. The present calculations demonstrate a clear alteration in the native symmetric motions of a protein due to the presence of large protein cobratoxin ligands. In particular, normal-mode analysis revealed that cobratoxin binding to this protein significantly dampened the axially symmetric motion of the AChBP that may be associated with channel gating in the full nAChR. The results suggest that alterations in receptor dynamics could be a general feature of ligand binding.

  6. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-07-28

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study.

  7. Application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Using Mobile Electron Linear Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocca, Mario; Cantone, Marie-Claire; Veronese, Ivan; Cattani, Federica; Pedroli, Guido; Molinelli, Silvia; Vitolo, Viviana; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) represents a prospective approach for risk assessment. A multidisciplinary working group of the Italian Association for Medical Physics applied FMEA to electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) delivered using mobile linear accelerators, aiming at preventing accidental exposures to the patient. Methods and Materials: FMEA was applied to the IORT process, for the stages of the treatment delivery and verification, and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system, based on the product of three parameters (severity, frequency of occurrence and detectability, each ranging from 1 to 10); 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. Results: Twenty-four subprocesses were identified. Ten potential failure modes were found and scored, in terms of RPN, in the range of 42–216. The most critical failure modes consisted of internal shield misalignment, wrong Monitor Unit calculation and incorrect data entry at treatment console. Potential causes of failure included shield displacement, human errors, such as underestimation of CTV extension, mainly because of lack of adequate training and time pressures, failure in the communication between operators, and machine malfunctioning. The main effects of failure were represented by CTV underdose, wrong dose distribution and/or delivery, unintended normal tissue irradiation. As additional safety measures, the utilization of a dedicated staff for IORT, double-checking of MU calculation and data entry and finally implementation of in vivo dosimetry were suggested. Conclusions: FMEA appeared as a useful tool for prospective evaluation of patient safety in radiotherapy

  8. Optical Spring Effect in Micro-Bubble Resonators and Its Application for the Effective Mass Measurement of Optomechanical Resonant Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenmin Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a novel approach for obtaining the effective mass of mechanical vibration mode in micro-bubble resonators (MBRs. To be specific, the effective mass is deduced from the measurement of optical spring effect (OSE in MBRs. This approach is demonstrated and applied to analyze the effective mass of hollow MBRs and liquid-filled MBRs, respectively. It is found that the liquid-filled MBRs has significantly stronger OSE and a less effective mass than hollow MBRs, both of the extraordinary behaviors can be beneficial for applications such as mass sensing. Larger OSE from higher order harmonics of the mechanical modes is also observed. Our work paves a way towards the developing of OSE-based high sensitive mass sensor in MBRs.

  9. Optical Spring Effect in Micro-Bubble Resonators and Its Application for the Effective Mass Measurement of Optomechanical Resonant Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenmin; Wu, Xiang; Liu, Liying; Xu, Lei

    2017-09-30

    In this work, we present a novel approach for obtaining the effective mass of mechanical vibration mode in micro-bubble resonators (MBRs). To be specific, the effective mass is deduced from the measurement of optical spring effect (OSE) in MBRs. This approach is demonstrated and applied to analyze the effective mass of hollow MBRs and liquid-filled MBRs, respectively. It is found that the liquid-filled MBRs has significantly stronger OSE and a less effective mass than hollow MBRs, both of the extraordinary behaviors can be beneficial for applications such as mass sensing. Larger OSE from higher order harmonics of the mechanical modes is also observed. Our work paves a way towards the developing of OSE-based high sensitive mass sensor in MBRs.

  10. Application of failure mode and effects analysis in a clinical chemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hongmin; Ding, Siyi; Liu, Qin

    2015-08-25

    Timely delivery of correct results has long been considered as the goal of quality management in clinical laboratory. With increasing workload as well as complexities of laboratory testing and patient care, the traditional technical adopted like internal quality control (IQC) and external quality assessment (EQA) may not enough to cope with quality management problems for clinical laboratories. We applied failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), a proactive tool, to reduce errors associated with the process beginning with sample collection and ending with a test report in a clinical chemistry laboratory. Our main objection was to investigate the feasibility of FMEA in a real-world situation, namely the working environment of hospital. A team of 8 people (3 laboratory workers, 2 couriers, 2 nurses, and 1 physician) from different departments who were involved in the testing process were recruited and trained. Their main responsibility was to analyze and score all possible clinical chemistry laboratory failures based on three aspects: the severity of the outcome (S), the likeliness of occurrence (O), and the probability of being detected (D). These three parameters were multiplied to calculate risk priority numbers (RPNs), which were used to prioritize remedial measures. Failure modes with RPN≥200 were deemed as high risk, meaning that they needed immediate corrective action. After modifications that were put, we compared the resulting RPN with the previous one. A total of 33 failure modes were identified. Many of the failure modes, including the one with the highest RPN (specimen hemolysis) appeared in the pre-analytic phase, whereas no high-risk failure modes (RPN≥200) were found during the analytic phase. High-priority risks were "sample hemolysis" (RPN, 336), "sample delivery delay" (RPN, 225), "sample volume error" (RPN, 210), "failure to release results in a timely manner" (RPN, 210), and "failure to identify or report critical results" (RPN, 200). The

  11. Effect of metal ion Fe(III on the performance of chlorophyll as photosensitizers on dye sensitized solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsasi Setyawati

    Full Text Available The energy crisis is a major problem facing the world today and will need a renewable energy source that is environmentally friendly; one of these is the dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC. DSSC is photochemical electric cell that can convert solar energy into electrical energy. This research aims to study the characteristics of chlorophyll compounds with the addition of metal ions Fe(III and to determine the effect of Fe(III on the performance of chlorophyll as a photosensitizer in the DSSC. The formation of complex compounds of Fe(III-chlorophyll is shown by the phenomenon of metal ligand charge transfer (MLCT at a wavelength of 263.00 nm and absorption transition d-d at 745.00 nm. Fourier transform infrared characterization of the binding of Fe-O complex compounds appears at 486.06 cm−1. The complex compound of Fe(III-chlorophyll has a magnetic moment value of 9.62 Bohr Magneton (BM. The existence of ion Fe(III in chlorophyll can improve the performance of chlorophyll as a dye sensitizer with a maximum current of 4.00 mA/cm2, maximum voltage of 0.18 volts and efficiency values of 1.35%. Keywords: Fe(III-chlorophyll, Dye sensitized solar cell, Metal ligand charge transfer, Photosensitizer

  12. Minimizing the trend effect on detrended cross-correlation analysis with empirical mode decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaojun; Shang Pengjian; Zhao Chuang; Wang Jing; Tao Rui

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Investigate the effects of linear, exponential and periodic trends on DCCA. ► Apply empirical mode decomposition to extract trend term. ► Strong and monotonic trends are successfully eliminated. ► Get the cross-correlation exponent in a persistent behavior without crossover. - Abstract: Detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) is a scaling method commonly used to estimate long-range power law cross-correlation in non-stationary signals. However, the susceptibility of DCCA to trends makes the scaling results difficult to analyze due to spurious crossovers. We artificially generate long-range cross-correlated signals and systematically investigate the effect of linear, exponential and periodic trends. Specifically to the crossovers raised by trends, we apply empirical mode decomposition method which decomposes underlying signals into several intrinsic mode functions (IMF) and a residual trend. After the removal of residual term, strong and monotonic trends such as linear and exponential trends are successfully eliminated. But periodic trend cannot be separated out according to the criterion of IMF, which can be eliminated by Fourier transform. As a special case of DCCA, detrended fluctuation analysis presents similar results.

  13. Effects of a Combination Therapy of Sclerostin Antibody III and Raloxifene on Bone Formation Markers in Ovariectomized Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, H. I. G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the systemic effect of sclerostin monoclonal antibody (Scl-AbIII) administration on markers of bone formation and compare it with a combination of sclerostin antibody and raloxifene. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical College Animal House at King Khaled University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January to November 2014. Methodology: Forty-five female rats were divided into 5 groups equally; 1 control group and 4 groups of ovariectomized (OVX) rats: control OVX rats and OVX rats treated by Scl-AbIII, raloxifene or Scl-AbIII+raloxifene one month after ovariectomy, continued for 4 weeks. At the end of treatment, serum levels of Bone Specific Alkaline Phosphatase (BSAP), alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1), Parathyroid Hormone (PTH), Ca/sup 2+/ and phosphorus were measured. Uterus was weighed and body weight change was calculated. Results: Scl-AbIII or raloxifene treatment produced significant increase of serum BSAP, osteocalcin, IGF-1, PTH and Ca/sup 2+/ levels. Raloxifene, either alone or combined with Scl-AbIII attenuated the decrease in uterus wet weight, and the increase in body weight seen in OVX rats. Combination therapy of Scl-AbIII, and raloxifene produced significant increase of serum alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and IGF-1 levels than treatment with either Scl-AbIII or raloxifene alone. Conclusion: Combination therapy of Scl-AbIII and raloxifene is an attractive strategy to enhance bone formation and can offer better gain over treatment with either one of them alone. Confirmation of these preliminary observations must await careful long-term studies. (author)

  14. The Effect of Mode of Delivery on Postpartum Sexual Functioning in Primiparous Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Dabiri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of mode of delivery on postpartum sexual functioning in primiparous women. Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 150 primiparous women in postpartum period, who attended the family planning or vaccination clinics, were enrolled for the study. Eighty-one had vaginal delivery with episiotomy and 69 had experienced cesarean section. Sexual function was evaluated by the Female Sexual Function Index within 3 and 6 months postpartum. Results: About 29% in vaginal delivery group and 37% in cesarean delivery group had resumed their sexual intercourses four weeks after delivery (p=0.280.There were no significant differences between mode of delivery and sexual functioning, including desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain. Conclusion: The present study showed that postpartum sexual functioning was not associated with the type of delivery.

  15. The effect of viscosity on the resistive tearing mode with the presence of shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.L.; Morrison, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of small isotropic viscosity on the ''constant ψ'' tearing mode in the presence of shear flow, is analyzed by the boundary layer approach. It is found that the influence of viscosity depends upon the parameter (G'(0)/F'(0)), where G'(0) and F'(0) denote that shear and magnetic field shear at the magnetic null plane, respectively. When |(G'(0)/F'(0))| much-lt 1, the tearing mode growth rate is suppressed by the viscosity, but not completely stabilized. When |(G'(0)/F'(0))| ∼ in the order of (1) and the viscosity is comparable with the resistivity, the growth rate vanishes as ((1 - G'(0) 2 /F'(0) 2 ) 1/3 ), when G'(0) 2 → F'(0) 2 from below. In the case where (1 - G'(0) 2 /F'(0) 2 ) < 0 matching cannot be achieved. 8 refs

  16. Effect of oscillation mode on the free-molecule squeeze-film air damping

    KAUST Repository

    Gang Hong,

    2010-01-01

    A 3D Monte Carlo (MC) simulation approach is developed and employed to study the effect of the oscillation mode on the squeeze-film air damping in the free-molecule regime. By tracking individual gas molecule\\'s motion and its interaction with the resonator, the MC approach is by far the most accurate modeling approach for the modeling of squeeze-film damping in the free-molecule regime. The accuracy of this approach is demonstrated on several cases in which either analytical solutions or experimental measurements are available. It has been found that unlike the case when resonators oscillate in an unbounded domain, squeeze film damping is very sensitive to the mode shape, which implies that some of the existing modeling approaches based on rigid-resonator assumption may not be accurate when applied to model resonators oscillating at their deformed shape. ©2010 IEEE.

  17. Effects of plasma current on nonlinear interactions of ITG turbulence, zonal flows and geodesic acoustic modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelino, P; Bottino, A; Hatzky, R; Jolliet, S; Sauter, O; Tran, T M; Villard, L

    2006-01-01

    The mutual interactions of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven modes, zonal flows and geodesic acoustic modes (GAM) in tokamak plasmas are investigated using a global nonlinear gyrokinetic formulation with totally unconstrained evolution of temperature gradient and profile. A series of numerical simulations with the same initial temperature and density profile specifications is performed using a sequence of ideal MHD equilibria differing only in the value of the total plasma current, in particular with identical magnetic shear profiles and shapes of magnetic surfaces. On top of a bursty or quasi-steady state behaviour the zonal flows oscillate at the GAM frequency. The amplitude of these oscillations increases with the value of the safety factor q, resulting in a less effective suppression of ITG turbulence by zonal flows at a lower plasma current. The turbulence-driven volume-averaged radial heat transport is found to scale inversely with the total plasma current

  18. Incorporating Plutonium Particle Size Effects in the Assessment of Active Mode Measurement Uncertainty in Passive-Active Neutron Radioassay Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, Larry G.; Harker, Yale D.

    2002-01-01

    Assessment of active mode measurement uncertainty in passive-active neutron radioassay systems used to measure Pu content in nuclear waste is severely hampered by lack of knowledge of the waste Pu particle size distribution, which is a major factor in determining bias in active mode measurements. The sensitivity of active mode measurements to particle size precludes using simulations or surrogate waste forms to estimate uncertainty in active mode measurements when the particle size distribution is not precisely known or inadequately reproduced. An alternative approach is based on a statistical comparison of active and passive mode results in the mass range for which both active and passive mode analyses produce useable measurements. Because passive mode measurements are not particularly sensitive to particle size effects, their uncertainty can be more easily assessed. Once bias corrected, passive mode measurements can serve as confirmatory measurements for the estimation of active mode bias. Further statistical analysis of the errors in measurements leads to precision estimates for the active mode

  19. Minimizing treatment planning errors in proton therapy using failure mode and effects analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yuanshui, E-mail: yuanshui.zheng@okc.procure.com [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 W Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 and Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); Johnson, Randall; Larson, Gary [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 W Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool to evaluate safety or reliability in conventional photon radiation therapy. However, reports about FMEA application in proton therapy are scarce. The purpose of this study is to apply FMEA in safety improvement of proton treatment planning at their center. Methods: The authors performed an FMEA analysis of their proton therapy treatment planning process using uniform scanning proton beams. The authors identified possible failure modes in various planning processes, including image fusion, contouring, beam arrangement, dose calculation, plan export, documents, billing, and so on. For each error, the authors estimated the frequency of occurrence, the likelihood of being undetected, and the severity of the error if it went undetected and calculated the risk priority number (RPN). The FMEA results were used to design their quality management program. In addition, the authors created a database to track the identified dosimetric errors. Periodically, the authors reevaluated the risk of errors by reviewing the internal error database and improved their quality assurance program as needed. Results: In total, the authors identified over 36 possible treatment planning related failure modes and estimated the associated occurrence, detectability, and severity to calculate the overall risk priority number. Based on the FMEA, the authors implemented various safety improvement procedures into their practice, such as education, peer review, and automatic check tools. The ongoing error tracking database provided realistic data on the frequency of occurrence with which to reevaluate the RPNs for various failure modes. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for identifying and evaluating potential errors in proton treatment planning before they result in an error in patient dose delivery. The application of FMEA framework and the implementation of an ongoing error tracking system at their

  20. Using the failure mode and effects analysis model to improve parathyroid hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnezi R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Racheli Magnezi,1 Asaf Hemi,1 Rina Hemi2 1Department of Management, Public Health and Health Systems Management Program, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan, 2Endocrine Service Unit, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel Background: Risk management in health care systems applies to all hospital employees and directors as they deal with human life and emergency routines. There is a constant need to decrease risk and increase patient safety in the hospital environment. The purpose of this article is to review the laboratory testing procedures for parathyroid hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (which are characterized by short half-lives and to track failure modes and risks, and offer solutions to prevent them. During a routine quality improvement review at the Endocrine Laboratory in Tel Hashomer Hospital, we discovered these tests are frequently repeated unnecessarily due to multiple failures. The repetition of the tests inconveniences patients and leads to extra work for the laboratory and logistics personnel as well as the nurses and doctors who have to perform many tasks with limited resources.Methods: A team of eight staff members accompanied by the Head of the Endocrine Laboratory formed the team for analysis. The failure mode and effects analysis model (FMEA was used to analyze the laboratory testing procedure and was designed to simplify the process steps and indicate and rank possible failures.Results: A total of 23 failure modes were found within the process, 19 of which were ranked by level of severity. The FMEA model prioritizes failures by their risk priority number (RPN. For example, the most serious failure was the delay after the samples were collected from the department (RPN =226.1.Conclusion: This model helped us to visualize the process in a simple way. After analyzing the information, solutions were proposed to prevent failures, and a method to completely avoid the top four problems was also developed. Keywords: failure mode

  1. Minimizing treatment planning errors in proton therapy using failure mode and effects analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Johnson, Randall; Larson, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool to evaluate safety or reliability in conventional photon radiation therapy. However, reports about FMEA application in proton therapy are scarce. The purpose of this study is to apply FMEA in safety improvement of proton treatment planning at their center. Methods: The authors performed an FMEA analysis of their proton therapy treatment planning process using uniform scanning proton beams. The authors identified possible failure modes in various planning processes, including image fusion, contouring, beam arrangement, dose calculation, plan export, documents, billing, and so on. For each error, the authors estimated the frequency of occurrence, the likelihood of being undetected, and the severity of the error if it went undetected and calculated the risk priority number (RPN). The FMEA results were used to design their quality management program. In addition, the authors created a database to track the identified dosimetric errors. Periodically, the authors reevaluated the risk of errors by reviewing the internal error database and improved their quality assurance program as needed. Results: In total, the authors identified over 36 possible treatment planning related failure modes and estimated the associated occurrence, detectability, and severity to calculate the overall risk priority number. Based on the FMEA, the authors implemented various safety improvement procedures into their practice, such as education, peer review, and automatic check tools. The ongoing error tracking database provided realistic data on the frequency of occurrence with which to reevaluate the RPNs for various failure modes. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for identifying and evaluating potential errors in proton treatment planning before they result in an error in patient dose delivery. The application of FMEA framework and the implementation of an ongoing error tracking system at their

  2. Effects of three-mode field interactions in laser instabilities and in beat-frequency spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herdow, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    Population pulsations are fluctuations in the population difference (of a two level system) due to the presence of two or more coherent waves interfering in the medium. In this work, the author shows that population pulsations generated by three waves, a central wave and two mode-locked sidebands, are responsible for both the multiwavelength and the single-wavelength instabilities of single-mode lasers containing homgeneously-broadened media. The role of the population pulsations in establishing these instabilities, however, diminish as the central mode is detuned away from the atomic resonance frequency. For homogeneously-broadened lasers, the author finds two regions of single-wavelength instability. The first is at line center, for which population pulsations are solely responsible, and the second is off line center where the unsaturated medium provides the required gain and anomalous dispersion. For the case of inhomogeneously-broadened lasers, the author shows that population pulsations significantly increase the instability range over that predicted by Casperson for single-mode bad-cavity lasers. Both the unidirectional ring and the standing-wave cavities are treated. The Fourier expansion technique, used in this work, for treating three-frequency operation in saturation spectroscopy is shown to be equivalent (in appropriate limits) to the linear stability analysis in laser theory and optical bistability. The author also shows, in single-sideband saturation spectroscopy, that for long interaction lengths propagation effects can significantly influence the absorption and dispersion coefficients of the medium. Finally, the author shows that under certain conditions the pronounced splitting effects of the population pulsations develop into regions of intense absorption

  3. The H-mode pedestal, ELMs and TF ripple effects in JT-60U/JET dimensionless identity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibene, G.; Oyama, N.; Loennroth, J.; Andrew, Y.; Luna, E. de la; Giroud, C.; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Kamada, Y.; Kempenaars, M.A.H.; Loarte, A.; Donald, D. Mc; Nave, M.M.F.; Meiggs, A.; Parail, V.; Sartori, R.; Sharapov, S.; Stober, J.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Toi, K.; Urano, H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of dimensionless identity experiments in JT-60U and JET, aimed at the comparison of the H-mode pedestal and ELM behaviour in the two devices. Given their similar size, dimensionless matched plasmas are also similar in their dimensional parameters (in particular, the plasma minor radius a is the same in JET and JT-60U). Power and density scans were carried out at two values of I p , providing a q scan (q 95 = 3.1 and 5.1) with fixed (and matched) toroidal field. Contrary to initial expectations, a dimensionless match between the two devices was quite difficult to achieve. In general, p ped in JT-60U is lower than in JET and, at low q, the pedestal pressure of JT-60U with a Type I ELMy edge is matched in JET only in the Type III ELM regime. At q 95 = 5.1, a dimensionless match in ρ*, ν* and β p,ped is obtained with Type I ELMs, but only with low power JET H-modes. These results motivated a closer investigation of experimental conditions in the two devices, to identify possible 'hidden' physics that prevents obtaining a good match of pedestal values over a large range of plasmas parameters. Ripple-induced ion losses of the medium bore plasma used in JT-60U for the similarity experiments are identified as the main difference with JET. The magnitude of the JT-60U ripple losses is sufficient to induce counter-toroidal rotation in co-injected plasma. The influence of ripple losses was demonstrated at q 95 = 5.1: reducing ripple losses by ∼2 (from 4.3 to 1.9 MW) by replacing positive with negative neutral beam injection at approximately constant P in resulted in an increased p ped in JT-60U, providing a good match to full power JET H-modes. At the same time, the counter-toroidal rotation decreased. Physics mechanisms relating ripple losses to pedestal performance are not yet identified, and the possible role of velocity shear in the pedestal stability, as well as the possible influence of ripple on thermal ion transport are briefly

  4. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of the Residual Heat Removal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleston, F.T.

    1976-01-01

    The Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) transfer heat from the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) to the reactor plant Component Cooling System (CCS) to reduce the temperature of the RCS at a controlled rate during the second part of normal plant cooldown and maintains the desired temperature until the plant is restarted. By the use of an analytic tool, the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, it is shown that the RHRS, because of its redundant two train design, is able to accommodate any credible component single failure with the only effect being an extension in the required cooldown time, thus demonstrating the reliability of the RHRS to perform its intended function

  5. Effect of Fadama III programme on poverty status of rice farming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on findings of the study, it was recommended that farming households especially women should be given increased access to programmes such as the National fadama III programme to improve their welfare and increase agricultural production in the country. Keywords: Fadama III; poverty; Tobit; Beneficiaries; Patigi ...

  6. BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes

  7. Type I and III procollagen propeptides in growth hormone-deficient patients: effects of increasing doses of GH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L T; Jørgensen, J O; Risteli, J

    1991-01-01

    The effect of increasing doses of growth hormone on collagen synthesis in GH-treated GH-deficient patients was determined in a short-term study. The synthesis of type I and III collagen was estimated by measurements of the carboxyterminal propeptide of type I procollagen and the aminoterminal...... procollagen propeptide increased twice as much as type I procollagen propeptide, by 47 vs 25%, at a GH dose of 6 IU/day compared with 2 IU/day. The differences between the effects on type I and type III collagen may reflect differences in secretion or turn-over rate of collagen in bone and loose connective...

  8. Tablet-Based Functional MRI of the Trail Making Test: Effect of Tablet Interaction Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahta Karimpoor

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Trail Making Test (TMT is widely used for assessing executive function, frontal lobe abilities, and visual motor skills. Part A of this pen-and-paper test (TMT-A involves linking numbers randomly distributed in space, in ascending order. Part B (TMT-B alternates between linking numbers and letters. TMT-B is more demanding than TMT-A, but the mental processing that supports the performance of this test remains incompletely understood. Functional MRI (fMRI may help to clarify the relationship between TMT performance and brain activity, but providing an environment that supports real-world pen-and-paper interactions during fMRI is challenging. Previously, an fMRI-compatible tablet system was developed for writing and drawing with two modes of interaction: the original cursor-based, proprioceptive approach, and a new mode involving augmented reality to provide visual feedback of hand position (VFHP for enhanced user interaction. This study characterizes the use of the tablet during fMRI of young healthy adults (n = 22, with half of the subjects performing TMT with VFHP and the other half performing TMT without VFHP. Activation maps for both TMT-A and TMT-B performance showed considerable overlap between the two tablet modes, and no statistically differences in brain activity were detected when contrasting TMT-B vs. TMT-A for the two tablet modes. Behavioral results also showed no statistically different interaction effects for TMT-B vs. TMT-A for the two tablet modes. Tablet-based TMT scores showed reasonable convergent validity with those obtained by administering the standard pen-and-paper TMT to the same subjects. Overall, the results suggest that despite the slightly different mechanisms involved for the two modes of tablet interaction, both are suitable for use in fMRI studies involving TMT performance. This study provides information for using tablet-based TMT methods appropriately in future fMRI studies involving patients and healthy

  9. Optical Spring Effect in Micro-Bubble Resonators and Its Application for the Effective Mass Measurement of Optomechanical Resonant Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenmin Chen; Xiang Wu; Liying Liu; Lei Xu

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present a novel approach for obtaining the effective mass of mechanical vibration mode in micro-bubble resonators (MBRs). To be specific, the effective mass is deduced from the measurement of optical spring effect (OSE) in MBRs. This approach is demonstrated and applied to analyze the effective mass of hollow MBRs and liquid-filled MBRs, respectively. It is found that the liquid-filled MBRs has significantly stronger OSE and a less effective mass than hollow MBRs, both of the...

  10. Heritability of the Effective Connectivity in the Resting-State Default Mode Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junhai; Yin, Xuntao; Ge, Haitao; Han, Yan; Pang, Zengchang; Liu, Baolin; Liu, Shuwei; Friston, Karl

    2017-12-01

    The default mode network (DMN) is thought to reflect endogenous neural activity, which is considered as one of the most intriguing phenomena in cognitive neuroscience. Previous studies have found that key regions within the DMN are highly interconnected. Here, we characterized the genetic influences on causal or directed information flow within the DMN during the resting state. In this study, we recruited 46 pairs of twins and collected fMRI imaging data using a 3.0 T scanner. Dynamic causal modeling was conducted for each participant, and a structural equation model was used to calculate the heritability of DMN in terms of its effective connectivity. Model comparison favored a full-connected model. Structural equal modeling was used to estimate the additive genetics (A), common environment (C) and unique environment (E) contributions to variance for the DMN effective connectivity. The ACE model was preferred in the comparison of structural equation models. Heritability of DMN effective connectivity was 0.54, suggesting that the genetic made a greater contribution to the effective connectivity within DMN. Establishing the heritability of default-mode effective connectivity endorses the use of resting-state networks as endophenotypes or intermediate phenotypes in the search for the genetic basis of psychiatric or neurological illnesses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y; Liao, Li; Zhu, Ronald X; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D; Lim, Gino; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-02-01

    To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Despite the presence of interplay effect, the

  12. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  13. Effect of tidal triggering on seismicity in Taiwan revealed by the empirical mode decomposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-J. Chen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of tidal triggering on earthquake occurrence has been controversial for many years. This study considered earthquakes that occurred near Taiwan between 1973 and 2008. Because earthquake data are nonlinear and non-stationary, we applied the empirical mode decomposition (EMD method to analyze the temporal variations in the number of daily earthquakes to investigate the effect of tidal triggering. We compared the results obtained from the non-declustered catalog with those from two kinds of declustered catalogs and discuss the aftershock effect on the EMD-based analysis. We also investigated stacking the data based on in-phase phenomena of theoretical Earth tides with statistical significance tests. Our results show that the effects of tidal triggering, particularly the lunar tidal effect, can be extracted from the raw seismicity data using the approach proposed here. Our results suggest that the lunar tidal force is likely a factor in the triggering of earthquakes.

  14. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface.

  15. The effects of the mode of delivery on oxidative-antioxidative balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Birgul; Aksoy, Nurten; Cakir, Hale; Celik, Hakim; Erel, Ozcan

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the mode of delivery on the oxidant and antioxidant systems in mothers and infants and to demonstrate which mode leads more oxidative stress. The participants were divided into two groups according to the mode of their labour and delivery: group 1 (n = 33) women with normal labour and delivery and group 2 (n = 33) with scheduled caesarean section (C/S) and delivery. The maternal, cord, and infant blood samples in both groups were collected. The serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and the total oxidant status (TOS) were evaluated by using an automated colorimetric measurement method. The parameters indicating oxidative stress (TOS, oxidative stress index, and lipid hydroperoxide) in maternal, cord, and newborn blood samples were higher in patients delivering with C/S than those normal spontaneous vaginal deliveries (NSVD) patient group, while it was vice versa for TAC. It may be concluded that both the mothers and neonates in C/S group are exposed to higher oxidative stress as compared with those in NSVD group and the antioxidant mechanisms are insufficient to cope with this stress during C/S. This result indicates that the normal delivery through the physiological route is healthier for the bodies of mothers and infants.

  16. Resolving the effects of toroidal and poloidal coupling on resistive modes in Heliotron E and LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, B.F.; Dewar, R.L.; Storer, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    In general, stellarators are less subject than axisymmetric configurations to the most dangerous of instabilities, which lead to disruption of the plasma. For example, the LHD experiment has been shown to be remarkably stable to large scale instabilities, even where analysis suggests the presence of (unstable) ballooning modes. This may not be the case for configurations which contain large parallel currents, where possible kink and tearing modes might lead to unfavourable confinement or even disruptions. These effects can only be approximately modelled while averaging over poloidal and/or toroidal angles, so a complete study would include both a full 3D resistive linear stability analysis and a determination of the non-linear behaviour of the plasma. We have developed a linear, fully 3D resistive MHD code, Spector3D, to examine the stable and unstable wavemodes in a plasma. As verification of the applicability and correctness of the code, we have checked our results against resistive codes of lower dimensionality, and we present here a comparsion with published ideal MHD results for LHD and Heliotron E. As an application of the code, we then determine the stability of current-carrying Heliotron E plasmas against resistive tearing modes under the variation of plasma current and pressure. (orig.)

  17. The effects of sloshing energetic particles on ballooning modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; Berk, H.L.

    1986-10-01

    Distributions that give rise to energetic trapped particle pressures peaked in the ''good curvature'' region of a tokamak (sloshing distributions) are examined in an attempt to find stable regimes for both the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and precessional modes. It is the precessional drift destabilization of ballooning modes that inhibits bridging the unstable gap to second stability by the use of deeply-trapped energetic particles unless the hot particles have an extremely large energy (∼0.35 MeV for a tokamak like PDX). Unfortunately, our calculations indicate that the sloshing particles do not have a significant stabilizing effect. An analytic treatment shows that complete stability can be found only if the sign of the energetic particle magnetic drift-frequency can be reversed from its value in vacuum bad curvature without hot species diamagnetism. This is difficult to do in a tokamak because of the destabilizing contribution of the geodesic curvature to the drift frequency. Furthermore, for each of the two sloshing distributions employed (one contains only trapped particles; the other includes trapped and passing particles), a new ''continuum instability'' (where asymptotically along the field line the mode is a propagating plane wave) is found to be driven by geodesic curvature. These results indicate that energetic sloshing particles are not able to bridge the unstable gap to second stability

  18. Effects of Density and Impurity on Edge Localized Modes in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping

    2017-10-01

    Plasma density and impurity concentration are believed to be two of the key elements governing the edge tokamak plasma conditions. Optimal levels of plasma density and impurity concentration in the edge region have been searched for in order to achieve the desired fusion gain and divertor heat/particle load mitigation. However, how plasma density or impurity would affect the edge pedestal stability may have not been well known. Our recent MHD theory modeling and simulations using the NIMROD code have found novel effects of density and impurity on the dynamics of edge-localized modes (ELMs) in tokamaks. First, previous MHD analyses often predict merely a weak stabilizing effect of toroidal flow on ELMs in experimentally relevant regimes. We find that the stabilizing effects on the high- n ELMs from toroidal flow can be significantly enhanced with the increased edge plasma density. Here n denotes the toroidal mode number. Second, the stabilizing effects of the enhanced edge resistivity due to lithium-conditioning on the low- n ELMs in the high confinement (H-mode) discharges in NSTX have been identified. Linear stability analysis of the experimentally constrained equilibrium suggests that the change in the equilibrium plasma density and pressure profiles alone due to lithium-conditioning may not be sufficient for a complete suppression of the low- n ELMs. The enhanced resistivity due to the increased effective electric charge number Zeff after lithium-conditioning provides additional stabilization of the low- n ELMs. These new effects revealed in our theory analyses may help further understand recent ELM experiments and suggest new control schemes for ELM suppression and mitigation in future experiments. They may also pose additional constraints on the optimal levels of plasma density and impurity concentration in the edge region for H-mode tokamak operation. Supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grants 2014GB124002 and 2015GB

  19. Effect of universal adhesive etching modes on bond strength to dual-polymerizing composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-Luc; Brown, Matthew

    2018-04-01

    Information is lacking as to the effect on bond strength of the etching modes of universal adhesives when they are used to bond dual-polymerizing composite resins to dentin. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the bonding of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins to dentin when universal bonding agents are used in self-etch or etch-and-rinse modes. Sixty caries-free, extracted third molar teeth were sectioned transversely in the apical third of the crown and allocated to 12 groups (n=5). Three different bonding agents (Scotchbond Universal, OptiBond XTR, All-Bond Universal) were used to bond 2 different dual-polymerizing composite resins (CompCore AF or CoreFlo DC) to dentin, using 2 different etching approaches (etch-and-rinse or self-etch). The specimens were sectioned into sticks (1×1×8 mm) with a precision saw. The bond strength of the specimens was tested under microtensile force at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed using a 3-way ANOVA, a Games-Howell post hoc comparisons model, and Student t tests with Bonferroni corrections (α=.05). In the overall model, the composite resin used had no effect on bond strength (P=.830). The etching protocol by itself also did not have a significant effect (P=.059), although a trend was present. The bonding agent, however, did have an effect (Pcomposite resins to dentin, no single etching protocol is better than another. Depending on which bonding agent is being used, one etching mode may perform better. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dentofacial effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction: a controlled study of consecutively treated Class III patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clerck, Hugo; Cevidanes, Lucia; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-11-01

    In this cephalometric investigation, we analyzed the treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) with miniplates in the maxilla and mandible connected by Class III elastics in patients with Class III malocclusion. The treated sample consisted of 21 Class III patients consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol before the pubertal growth spurt (mean age, 11.10 ± 1.8 years) and reevaluated after BAMP therapy, about 1 year later. The treated group was compared with a matched control group of 18 untreated Class III subjects. Significant differences between the treated and control groups were assessed with independent-sample t tests (P <0.05). Sagittal measurements of the maxilla showed highly significant improvements during active treatment (about 4 mm more than the untreated controls), with significant protraction effects at orbitale and pterygomaxillare. Significant improvements of overjet and molar relationship were recorded, as well as in the mandibular skeletal measures at Point B and pogonion. Vertical skeletal changes and modifications in incisor inclination were negligible, except for a significant proclination of the mandibular incisors in the treated group. Significant soft-tissue changes reflected the underlying skeletal modifications. Compared with growth of the untreated Class III subjects, the BAMP protocol induced an average increment on skeletal and soft-tissue advancement of maxillary structures of about 4 mm, and favorable mandibular changes exceeded 2 mm. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Antimicrobial Effects of Helix D-derived Peptides of Human Antithrombin III*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K. V.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a key antiproteinase involved in blood coagulation. Previous investigations have shown that ATIII is degraded by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, leading to release of heparin binding fragments derived from its D helix. As heparin binding and antimicrobial activity of peptides frequently overlap, we here set out to explore possible antibacterial effects of intact and degraded ATIII. In contrast to intact ATIII, the results showed that extensive degradation of the molecule yielded fragments with antimicrobial activity. Correspondingly, the heparin-binding, helix d-derived, peptide FFFAKLNCRLYRKANKSSKLV (FFF21) of human ATIII, was found to be antimicrobial against particularly the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy studies demonstrated that FFF21 binds to and permeabilizes bacterial membranes. Analogously, FFF21 was found to induce membrane leakage of model anionic liposomes. In vivo, FFF21 significantly reduced P. aeruginosa infection in mice. Additionally, FFF21 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest novel roles for ATIII-derived peptide fragments in host defense. PMID:25202017

  2. Antimicrobial effects of helix D-derived peptides of human antithrombin III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-10-24

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a key antiproteinase involved in blood coagulation. Previous investigations have shown that ATIII is degraded by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, leading to release of heparin binding fragments derived from its D helix. As heparin binding and antimicrobial activity of peptides frequently overlap, we here set out to explore possible antibacterial effects of intact and degraded ATIII. In contrast to intact ATIII, the results showed that extensive degradation of the molecule yielded fragments with antimicrobial activity. Correspondingly, the heparin-binding, helix D-derived, peptide FFFAKLNCRLYRKANKSSKLV (FFF21) of human ATIII, was found to be antimicrobial against particularly the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy studies demonstrated that FFF21 binds to and permeabilizes bacterial membranes. Analogously, FFF21 was found to induce membrane leakage of model anionic liposomes. In vivo, FFF21 significantly reduced P. aeruginosa infection in mice. Additionally, FFF21 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest novel roles for ATIII-derived peptide fragments in host defense. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Addition effect of erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate in the homopolymerization kinetics of a DGEBA resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, S.J. [Area de Ciencia de los Materiales, Departament d' Enginyeria de Sistemes Industrials i Disseny, Universitat Jaume I, Avda. Vicent Sos Baynat s/n, 12071 Castellon (Spain)]. E-mail: espallar@sg.uji.es; Ramis, X. [Laboratori de Termodinamica, Escola Tecnica Superior Enginyeria Industrial Barcelona, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Serra, A. [Departament de Q. Analitica i Q. Organica, Facultat de Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, C/Marcel.li Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Suay, J. [Centro de Biomateriales, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2006-02-01

    Solid bisphenol-A epoxy resin of medium molecular weight was cured using a Lewis acid initiator (erbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate) in three different proportions (0.5, 1 and 2 phr). A kinetic study was performed in a differential scanning calorimeter. The complete kinetic triplet was determined (activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and integral function of the deg.ree of conversion) for each system. A kinetic analysis was performed with an integral isoconversional procedure (model-free), and the kinetic model was determined both with the Coats-Redfern method (the obtained isoconversional E value being accepted as the effective activation energy) and through the compensation effect. All the systems followed the same isothermal curing model simulated from non-isothermal ones. The 'nucleation and growth' Avrami kinetic model A {sub 3/2} has been proposed as the polymerization kinetic model. The addition of initiator accelerated the reaction having higher influence when low temperatures were applied.

  4. Theory of magnetoelectric effect in multilayer nanocomposites on a substrate: Resonant bending-mode response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias C. Krantz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Resonant bending-mode magnetoelectric (ME coefficients of magnetostrictive-piezoelectric multilayer cantilevers are calculated analytically using a model developed for arbitrary multilayers on a substrate. Without quality factor effects the ME coefficient maxima in the four-dimensional parameter space of layer numbers, layer sequences, piezoelectric volume fractions, and substrate thicknesses are found to be essentially constant for nonzero substrate thickness. Global maxima occur for bilayers without substrates. Vanishing magnetoelectric response regions result from voltage cancellation in piezoelectric layers or absence of bending-mode excitation. They are determined by the neutral plane position in the multilayer stack. With Q-factor effects dominated by viscous air damping ME coefficients strongly increase with cantilever thickness primarily due to increasing resonance frequencies. The results yield a layer specific prediction of ME coefficients, resonance frequencies, and Q-factors in arbitrary multilayers and thus distinction of linear-coupling and Q-factor effects from exchange interaction, interface, or nonlinear ME effects.

  5. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in a radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Eavan; Brook, Olga R; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Hallett, Donna T; Kruskal, Jonathan B

    2011-01-01

    With increasing deployment, complexity, and sophistication of equipment and related processes within the clinical imaging environment, system failures are more likely to occur. These failures may have varying effects on the patient, ranging from no harm to devastating harm. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a tool that permits the proactive identification of possible failures in complex processes and provides a basis for continuous improvement. This overview of the basic principles and methodology of FMEA provides an explanation of how FMEA can be applied to clinical operations in a radiology department to reduce, predict, or prevent errors. The six sequential steps in the FMEA process are explained, and clinical magnetic resonance imaging services are used as an example for which FMEA is particularly applicable. A modified version of traditional FMEA called Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis, which was introduced by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Patient Safety, is briefly reviewed. In conclusion, FMEA is an effective and reliable method to proactively examine complex processes in the radiology department. FMEA can be used to highlight the high-risk subprocesses and allows these to be targeted to minimize the future occurrence of failures, thus improving patient safety and streamlining the efficiency of the radiology department. RSNA, 2010

  6. Numerical linear analysis of the effects of diamagnetic and shear flow on ballooning modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanqing, HUANG; Tianyang, XIA; Bin, GUI

    2018-04-01

    The linear analysis of the influence of diamagnetic effect and toroidal rotation at the edge of tokamak plasmas with BOUT++ is discussed in this paper. This analysis is done by solving the dispersion relation, which is calculated through the numerical integration of the terms with different physics. This method is able to reveal the contributions of the different terms to the total growth rate. The diamagnetic effect stabilizes the ideal ballooning modes through inhibiting the contribution of curvature. The toroidal rotation effect is also able to suppress the curvature-driving term, and the stronger shearing rate leads to a stronger stabilization effect. In addition, through linear analysis using the energy form, the curvature-driving term provides the free energy absorbed by the line-bending term, diamagnetic term and convective term.

  7. Investigation of the Hall Effect Thruster Breathing Mode and Spoke Mode Instabilities in the Very Near Field

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the most practical forms of electric propulsion is the Hall Effect Thruster (HET), which makes use of electric and magnetic fields to create and eject a...

  8. Effects of commuting mode on air pollution exposure and cardiovascular health among young adults in Taipei, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Te; Ma, Chih-Ming; Liu, I-Jung; Han, Bor-Cheng; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2015-05-01

    The association between traffic-related air pollution and adverse cardiovascular effects has been well documented; however, little is known about whether different commuting modes can modify the effects of air pollution on the cardiovascular system in human subjects in urban areas with heavy traffic. We recruited 120 young, healthy subjects in Taipei, Taiwan. Each participant was classified with different commuting modes according to his/her own commuting style. Three repeated measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) indices {standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN) and the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals (r-MSSD)}, particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), temperature, humidity and noise level were conducted for each subject during 1-h morning commutes (0900-1000 h) in four different commuting modes, including an electrically powered subway, a gas-powered bus, a gasoline-powered car, and walking. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate the association of PM2.5 with HRV indices. The results showed that decreases in the HRV indices were associated with increased levels of PM2.5. The personal exposure levels to PM2.5 were the highest in the walking mode. The effects of PM2.5 on cardiovascular endpoints were the lowest in the subway mode compared to the effects in the walking mode. The participants in the car and bus modes had reduced effects on their cardiovascular endpoints compared to the participants in the walking mode. We concluded that traffic-related PM2.5 is associated with autonomic alteration. Commuting modes can modify the effects of PM2.5 on HRV indices among young, healthy subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Software Tool for Automated Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecki, J. S.; Conrad, Finn; Oh, B.

    2002-01-01

    Offshore, marine,aircraft and other complex engineering systems operate in harsh environmental and operational conditions and must meet stringent requirements of reliability, safety and maintability. To reduce the hight costs of development of new systems in these fields improved the design...... management techniques and a vast array of computer aided techniques are applied during design and testing stages. The paper present and discusses the research and development of a software tool for automated failure mode and effects analysis - FMEA - of hydraulic systems. The paper explains the underlying...

  10. Degradation mode analysis: An approach to establish effective predictive maintenance tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnett, D.E.; Douglass, P.T.; Barnard, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    A significant number of nuclear generating stations have been employing Reliability Centered Maintenance methodology to arrive at applicable and effective maintenance tasks for their plant equipment. The resultant endpoint of most programs has been an increased emphasis on predictive maintenance as the task of choice for monitoring and trending plant equipment condition to address failure mechanisms of the analyses. Many of these plants have spent several years conducting reliability centered analysis before they seriously begin implementing predictive program improvements. In this paper we present another methodology, entitled Degradation Mode Analysis, which provides a more direct method to quickly and economically achieve the major benefit of reliability centered analysis, namely predictive maintenance. (author)

  11. High #betta# and toroidal effects on the internal kink mode in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, R.

    1982-09-01

    The inclusion of high-#betta# and first-order toroidal terms in the reduced set of (resistive) MHD equations affords the possibility of improving the study of tokamak plasma behaviour by three-dimensional numerical simulation. A new code, GALA, based on the reduced equations is developed. It is used to analyse the linear and nonlinear behaviour of the internal kink mode in equilibria which are generated by a simple relaxation procedure. We find that the inclusion of toroidal effects in high-#betta# equilibria provides considerable stabilization. (orig.)

  12. Effect of tetracycline dose and treatment mode on selection of resistant coliform bacteria in nursery pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig...... by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracyclineresistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated...

  13. Effect of toroidal plasma flow and flow shear on global MHD modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, M.S.; Greene, J.M.; Jensen, T.H.; Miller, R.L.; Bondeson, A.; Johnson, R.W.; Mauel, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of a subsonic toroidal flow on the linear magnetohydrodynamic stability of a tokamak plasma surrounded by an external resistive wall is studied. A complex non-self-adjoint eigenvalue problem for the stability of general kink and tearing modes is formulated, solved numerically, and applied to high β tokamaks. Results indicate that toroidal plasma flow, in conjunction with dissipation in the plasma, can open a window of stability for the position of the external wall. In this window, stable plasma beta values can significantly exceed those predicted by the Troyon scaling law with no wall. Computations utilizing experimental data indicate good agreement with observations

  14. U(SMes*)n, (n=3, 4) and Ln(SMes*)3 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd): Lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation in agostic interactions and an unprecedented eta(3) Ligation mode of the aryl-thiolate ligand, from X-ray diffraction and DFT analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roger, Mathieu; Barros, Noemi; Arliguie, Therese; Thuery, Pierre; Maron, Laurent; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Reaction of U(NEt 2 ) 4 with HS-2,4,6- t Bu 3 C 6 H 2 (HSMes*) gave U(SMes*) 3 (NEt 2 )(py) (1), whereas similar treatment of U[N(SiMe 3 )SiMe 2 CH 2 ][N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 2 afforded U(SMes*)[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 (2) and U(SMes*) 3 [N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ]. The first neutral homoleptic uranium(IV) thiolate to have been crystallographically characterized, U(SMes*) 4 (4), was isolated from the reaction of U(BH 4 ) 4 and KSMes*. The first homoleptic thiolate complex of uranium(III), U(SMes*) 3 (5), was synthesized by proton-lysis of U[N(SiMe 3 ) 2 ] 3 with HSMes* in cyclohexane. The crystal structure of 5 exhibits the novel η 3 ligation mode for the aryl-thiolate ligand. Comparison of the crystal structure of 5 with those of the isomorphous lanthanide congeners Ln(SMes*) 3 (Ln) La, Ce, Pr, and Nd) indicates that the U-S, U-C ipso , and U-C ortho bond lengths are shorter than the corresponding ones in the 4f-element analogues, when taking into account the variation in the ionic radii of the metals. The distance between the uranium and the carbon atoms involved in the U center dot center dot center dot H-C ε agostic interaction of each thiolate ligand is shorter, by ∼ 0.05 angstrom, than that expected from a purely ionic bonding model. The lanthanide( III)/actinide(III) differentiation was analyzed by density functional theory (DFT). The nature of the M-S bond is shown to be ionic strongly polarized at the sulfur for M) U and ion-covalent (i.e. strongly ionic with low orbital interaction), for M) Ln. The strength of the U center dot center dot center dot H-C ε agostic interaction is proposed to be controlled by the maximization of the interaction between U + and S - under steric constraints. The η 3 ligation mode of the aryl-thiolate ligand is also obtained from DFT. (authors)

  15. U(SMes*)n, (n = 3, 4) and Ln(SMes*)3 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd): lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation in agostic interactions and an unprecedented eta3 ligation mode of the arylthiolate ligand, from X-ray diffraction and DFT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Mathieu; Barros, Noémi; Arliguie, Thérèse; Thuéry, Pierre; Maron, Laurent; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2006-07-12

    Reaction of U(NEt(2))(4) with HS-2,4,6-(t)Bu(3)C(6)H(2) (HSMes) gave U(SMes)(3)(NEt(2))(py) (1), whereas similar treatment of U[N(SiMe(3))SiMe(2)CH(2)][N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) afforded U(SMes)[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) (2) and U(SMes)(3)[N(SiMe(3))(2)]. The first neutral homoleptic uranium(IV) thiolate to have been crystallographically characterized, U(SMes)(4) (4), was isolated from the reaction of U(BH(4))(4) and KSMes. The first homoleptic thiolate complex of uranium(III), U(SMes)(3) (5), was synthesized by protonolysis of U[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) with HSMes in cyclohexane. The crystal structure of 5 exhibits the novel eta(3) ligation mode for the arylthiolate ligand. Comparison of the crystal structure of 5 with those of the isomorphous lanthanide congeners Ln(SMes)(3) (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, and Nd) indicates that the U-S, U-C(ipso)(), and U-C(ortho)() bond lengths are shorter than the corresponding ones in the 4f-element analogues, when taking into account the variation in the ionic radii of the metals. The distance between the uranium and the carbon atoms involved in the U...H-C epsilon agostic interaction of each thiolate ligand is shorter, by approximately 0.05 A, than that expected from a purely ionic bonding model. The lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation was analyzed by density functional theory (DFT). The nature of the M-S bond is shown to be ionic strongly polarized at the sulfur for M = U and iono-covalent (i.e. strongly ionic with low orbital interaction), for M = Ln. The strength of the U...H-C epsilon agostic interaction is proposed to be controlled by the maximization of the interaction between U(+) and S(-) under steric constraints. The eta(3) ligation mode of the arylthiolate ligand is also obtained from DFT.

  16. Privacy effects on self-reported drug use: interactions with survey mode and respondent characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, W S

    1997-01-01

    This chapter examines the impact of interview privacy on self-reported illicit drug use. In 1991, interviews were completed with an urban-suburban sample of 2,417 adults aged 18 to 45. Results show that the presence of third parties during the interview significantly influences respondents' willingness to reveal illicit drug use. Among married respondents, presence of a spouse resulted in higher reporting of illicit drug use, while the presence of adults other than the spouse had a consistent negative effect on drug use reports. A parent's presence during the interview significantly reduced respondents' willingness to report illicit drug use. The pattern of findings suggests that the direction of effects due to third party presence is linked to two factors: the extent of the third party's knowledge of the information requested, and the degree of personal stake the third party may have in the respondent's answers. The differential impact of privacy by interview mode was also examined. Tests of interactions between privacy and interview mode failed to support the hypothesis that the use of self-administered answer sheets reduces privacy effects compared with interviewer-administered interviews.

  17. Usage of Failure Mode & EffectAnalysis Method (FMEA forsafety assessment in a drug manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Nazari

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study was hold in purpose of recognizing and controlling workplacehazards in production units of a drag ManufactureMethod:So for recognition and assessment of hazards, FMEA Method was used. FMEASystematically investigates the effects of equipment and system failures leading often toequipment design improvements. At first the level of the study defined as system. Then accordingto observations, accident statistic, and interview with managers, supervisory, and workers highrisk system were determiner. So the boundaries of the system established and informationregarding the relevant Components, their function and interactions gathered. To preventConfusion between Similar pieces of equipment, a unique system identifier developed. After thatall failure modes and their causes for each equipment or system listed, the immediate effects ofeach failure mode and interactive effect on other equipment or system was described too. Riskpriority number was determined according to global and local criteriaResults: After all some actions and solution proposed to reduce the likelihood and severity offailures and raise their delectability.Conclusion :This study illustrated that although of the first step drug manufacture may seem safe,but there are still many hazardous condition that could cause serious accidents, The result proposedit is necessary: (1 to develop comprehensive manual for periodical and regular inspection ofinstruments of workplaces in purpose of recognize unknown failures and their causes, (2 developa comprehensive program for systems maintenance and repair, and (3 conduct worker training.

  18. Influence of the nuclear Zeeman effect on mode locking in pulsed semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugeling, Wouter; Uhrig, Götz S.; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2017-09-01

    The coherence of the electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is strongly enhanced by mode locking through nuclear focusing, where the synchronization of the electron spin to periodic pulsing is slowly transferred to the nuclear spins of the semiconductor material, mediated by the hyperfine interaction between these. The external magnetic field that drives the Larmor oscillations of the electron spin also subjects the nuclear spins to a Zeeman-like coupling, albeit a much weaker one. For typical magnetic fields used in experiments, the energy scale of the nuclear Zeeman effect is comparable to that of the hyperfine interaction, so that it is not negligible. In this work, we analyze the influence of the nuclear Zeeman effect on mode locking quantitatively. Within a perturbative framework, we calculate the Overhauser-field distribution after a prolonged period of pulsing. We find that the nuclear Zeeman effect can exchange resonant and nonresonant frequencies. We distinguish between models with a single type and with multiple types of nuclei. For the latter case, the positions of the resonances depend on the individual g factors, rather than on the average value.

  19. Combinative effects of a bacterial type-III effector and a biocontrol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    defense responses toward salinity and infection by pathogens in rice. ... it is interesting to study mechanisms that underlie interactions involving biocontrol bacteria, type-III ... depending on the response speed and magnitude in contrast.

  20. Study of the effect of anions and mixed solvents on the kinetics of reduction of Eu(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, V.R.; Sundaram, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of reduction of Eu(III) to Eu(II) in aqueous solutions of perchlorate, chloride, sulphate, acetate and lactate anions and water-methanol and water-acetone mixtures containing potassium chloride as the inert electrolyte is reported and the effect of anions and solvent on the kinetics is studied. (author)

  1. Effect of chelate ring sizes and their substitution on intensities of hypersensitive transitions of lanthanoids (Ln(III)) ions and j (total quantum number profiles)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, J.; Pandey, P.; Yadav, A.; Limaye, S.N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Electronic spectral studies of Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III) Dy(III), Eu(III) and Tm(III) complexes with some aliphatic and aromatic O-O donor ligands viz., Glycolic (gly), Malonic (main) Succinic (suc), Glutaric (glut), Salicylic (sal), Phthalic acids and Catechol (cat) having varied chelate ring sizes and different substitutions as side chains have been carried out with a view to study the effect of chelate ring sizes on the intensities of hypersensitive and pseudo-hypersensitive transitions in lanthanoids. The intensities of these HST transitions have also been correlated with the total quantum number (J) of the lanthanoid metal ions in order to seek a probable mechanism for the phenomenon hypersensitivity. A comparison of the spectral and nephelauxetic parameters for Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III) with Dy(III) Er(III) and Tm(III) exhibit a variation in the bonding pattern from electrostatic to covalo-electrostatic from pre-Gd elements to post-Gd elements. The J-(total) quantum number profiles of the oscillator strength values for the specific HST transitions have also been examined

  2. Effects of a random spatial variation of the plasma density on the mode conversion in cold, unmagnetized, and stratified plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung Yu, Dae [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kihong [Department of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We study the effects of a random spatial variation of the plasma density on the mode conversion of electromagnetic waves into electrostatic oscillations in cold, unmagnetized, and stratified plasmas. Using the invariant imbedding method, we calculate precisely the electromagnetic field distribution and the mode conversion coefficient, which is defined to be the fraction of the incident wave power converted into electrostatic oscillations, for the configuration where a numerically generated random density variation is added to the background linear density profile. We repeat similar calculations for a large number of random configurations and take an average of the results. We obtain a peculiar nonmonotonic dependence of the mode conversion coefficient on the strength of randomness. As the disorder increases from zero, the maximum value of the mode conversion coefficient decreases initially, then increases to a maximum, and finally decreases towards zero. The range of the incident angle in which mode conversion occurs increases monotonically as the disorder increases. We present numerical results suggesting that the decrease of mode conversion mainly results from the increased reflection due to the Anderson localization effect originating from disorder, whereas the increase of mode conversion of the intermediate disorder regime comes from the appearance of many resonance points and the enhanced tunneling between the resonance points and the cutoff point. We also find a very large local enhancement of the magnetic field intensity for particular random configurations. In order to obtain high mode conversion efficiency, it is desirable to restrict the randomness close to the resonance region.

  3. Effects of a random spatial variation of the plasma density on the mode conversion in cold, unmagnetized, and stratified plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung Yu, Dae; Kim, Kihong

    2013-01-01

    We study the effects of a random spatial variation of the plasma density on the mode conversion of electromagnetic waves into electrostatic oscillations in cold, unmagnetized, and stratified plasmas. Using the invariant imbedding method, we calculate precisely the electromagnetic field distribution and the mode conversion coefficient, which is defined to be the fraction of the incident wave power converted into electrostatic oscillations, for the configuration where a numerically generated random density variation is added to the background linear density profile. We repeat similar calculations for a large number of random configurations and take an average of the results. We obtain a peculiar nonmonotonic dependence of the mode conversion coefficient on the strength of randomness. As the disorder increases from zero, the maximum value of the mode conversion coefficient decreases initially, then increases to a maximum, and finally decreases towards zero. The range of the incident angle in which mode conversion occurs increases monotonically as the disorder increases. We present numerical results suggesting that the decrease of mode conversion mainly results from the increased reflection due to the Anderson localization effect originating from disorder, whereas the increase of mode conversion of the intermediate disorder regime comes from the appearance of many resonance points and the enhanced tunneling between the resonance points and the cutoff point. We also find a very large local enhancement of the magnetic field intensity for particular random configurations. In order to obtain high mode conversion efficiency, it is desirable to restrict the randomness close to the resonance region

  4. Thinking outside the box: effects of modes larger than the survey on matter power spectrum covariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putter, Roland de; Wagner, Christian; Verde, Licia; Mena, Olga; Percival, Will J.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate power spectrum (or correlation function) covariance matrices are a crucial requirement for cosmological parameter estimation from large scale structure surveys. In order to minimize reliance on computationally expensive mock catalogs, it is important to have a solid analytic understanding of the different components that make up a covariance matrix. Considering the matter power spectrum covariance matrix, it has recently been found that there is a potentially dominant effect on mildly non-linear scales due to power in modes of size equal to and larger than the survey volume. This beat coupling effect has been derived analytically in perturbation theory and while it has been tested with simulations, some questions remain unanswered. Moreover, there is an additional effect of these large modes, which has so far not been included in analytic studies, namely the effect on the estimated average density which enters the power spectrum estimate. In this article, we work out analytic, perturbation theory based expressions including both the beat coupling and this local average effect and we show that while, when isolated, beat coupling indeed causes large excess covariance in agreement with the literature, in a realistic scenario this is compensated almost entirely by the local average effect, leaving only ∼ 10% of the excess. We test our analytic expressions by comparison to a suite of large N-body simulations, using both full simulation boxes and subboxes thereof to study cases without beat coupling, with beat coupling and with both beat coupling and the local average effect. For the variances, we find excellent agreement with the analytic expressions for k −1 at z = 0.5, while the correlation coefficients agree to beyond k = 0.4 hMpc −1 . As expected, the range of agreement increases towards higher redshift and decreases slightly towards z = 0. We finish by including the large-mode effects in a full covariance matrix description for arbitrary survey

  5. The sorption of inorganic arsenic on modified sepiolite: Effect of hydrated iron(III-oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Nikola I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of inorganic arsenic species, As(III and As(V, from water by sepiolite modified with hydrated iron(III oxide was investigated at 25 °C through batch studies. The influence of the initial pH value, the initial As concentrations, the contact time and types of water on the sorption capacity was investigated. Two types of water were used, deionized and groundwater. The maximal sorption capacity for As(III from deionized water was observed at initial and final pH value 7.0, while the bonding of As(V was observed to be almost pH independent for pH value in the range from 2.0 to 7.0, and the significant decrease in the sorption capacity was observed at pH values above 7.0. The sorption capacity at initial pH 7.0 was about 10 mg gˉ1 for As(III and 4.2 mg gˉ1 for As(V in deionized water. The capacity in groundwater was decreased by 40 % for As(III and by 20 % for As(V. The Langmuir model and pseudo-second order kinetic model revealed good agreement with the experimental results. The results show that Fe(III-modified sepiolite exhibits significant affinity for arsenic removal and it has a potential for the application in water purification processes. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019, III 43009 i TR 37010

  6. EGFR and EGFRvIII Promote Angiogenesis and Cell Invasion in Glioblastoma: Combination Therapies for an Effective Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Keller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and the mutant EGFRvIII are major focal points in current concepts of targeted cancer therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most malignant primary brain tumor. The receptors participate in the key processes of tumor cell invasion and tumor-related angiogenesis and their upregulation correlates with the poor prognosis of glioma patients. Glioma cell invasion and increased angiogenesis share mechanisms of the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM through upregulation of ECM-degrading proteases as well as the activation of aberrant signaling pathways. This review describes the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII in those mechanisms which might offer new combined therapeutic approaches targeting EGFR or EGFRvIII together with drug treatments against proteases of the ECM or downstream signaling to increase the inhibitory effects of mono-therapies.

  7. Use of failure mode effect analysis (FMEA) to improve medication management process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Khushboo

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Medication management is a complex process, at high risk of error with life threatening consequences. The focus should be on devising strategies to avoid errors and make the process self-reliable by ensuring prevention of errors and/or error detection at subsequent stages. The purpose of this paper is to use failure mode effect analysis (FMEA), a systematic proactive tool, to identify the likelihood and the causes for the process to fail at various steps and prioritise them to devise risk reduction strategies to improve patient safety. Design/methodology/approach The study was designed as an observational analytical study of medication management process in the inpatient area of a multi-speciality hospital in Gurgaon, Haryana, India. A team was made to study the complex process of medication management in the hospital. FMEA tool was used. Corrective actions were developed based on the prioritised failure modes which were implemented and monitored. Findings The percentage distribution of medication errors as per the observation made by the team was found to be maximum of transcription errors (37 per cent) followed by administration errors (29 per cent) indicating the need to identify the causes and effects of their occurrence. In all, 11 failure modes were identified out of which major five were prioritised based on the risk priority number (RPN). The process was repeated after corrective actions were taken which resulted in about 40 per cent (average) and around 60 per cent reduction in the RPN of prioritised failure modes. Research limitations/implications FMEA is a time consuming process and requires a multidisciplinary team which has good understanding of the process being analysed. FMEA only helps in identifying the possibilities of a process to fail, it does not eliminate them, additional efforts are required to develop action plans and implement them. Frank discussion and agreement among the team members is required not only for successfully conducing

  8. Effect of the X-point on the stability of the edge-current-driven MHD mode in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Ohjin

    2010-01-01

    Quasi-periodic bursts of edge magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities, called edge localized modes (ELMs), have been observed in many tokamaks during the H-mode. The high level of heat and particle transport associated with ELMs may cause serious damage to divertors or plasma facing components. It is therefore important to understand the underlying physics of ELMs. We have numerically investigated the effect of the X-point on the stability of the peeling mode, which is thought to be one of the MHD instabilities responsible for small ELMs. Equilibria with pressure and current profiles, which are unstable to the pure peeling mode for moderately elongated plasma, have been used. The X-point in a diverted plasma has been simulated by introducing of a hump in the plasma boundary. The position, depth and width of the X-point have been varied, and their effect on the stability of the peeling mode has been investigated. We have shown that the peeling mode growth rate decreases as the depth increases. This effect is greater for smaller widths for all positions of the X-point considered. Therefore, a sharper X-point is more efficient in stabilizing the peeling mode. Increasing the depth acts to increase the magnetic shear, the stabilizing effect of which has been shown to have very little dependence on the position or the width of the X-point.

  9. RA reactor safety analysis I-III, Part III - Environmental effect of the maximum credible accident; Analiza sigurnosti rada Reaktora RA I-III, III deo - Posledica maksimalno moguceg akcidenta na okolinu reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    The objective of the maximum credible accident analysis was to determine the integral radiation doses in the vicinity of the reactor and in the environment. In case of RA reactor the maximum credible accident, meaning release of the fission products, would be caused by fuel elements meltdown. This analysis includes the following calculation results: activity of the fission products, volatility of the fission products, concentration of radioactive materials in the air, analysis of the accident environmental effects.

  10. Zero-range effective field theory for resonant wino dark matter. Part III. Annihilation effects

    OpenAIRE

    Braaten, Eric; Johnson, Evan; Zhang, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Near a critical value of the wino mass where there is a zero-energy S-wave resonance at the neutral-wino-pair threshold, low-energy winos can be described by a zero-range effective field theory (ZREFT) in which the winos interact nonperturbatively through a contact interaction and through Coulomb interactions. The effects of wino-pair annihilation into electroweak gauge bosons are taken into account through the analytic continuation of the real parameters for the contact interaction to comple...

  11. Tailoring the mode of information presentation: Effects on younger and older adults’ attention and recall of online information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, M.H.; van Weert, J.C.M.; Bol, N.; Loos, E.F.; Tytgat, K.M.A.J.; van de Ven, A.W.H.; Smets, E.M.A.

    Previous studies have mainly focused on tailoring message content to match individual characteristics and preferences. Additional strategies, such as tailoring to individual preferences for the mode of information presentation, are proposed to increase message effectiveness. This study investigates

  12. The environmental effect on the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, M. J.; Quirke, N.

    2006-06-01

    We investigate, using molecular dynamics, the effect on the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency of immersion in water for a range of single-walled carbon nanotubes. We find that nanotube-water interactions are responsible for an upshift in the RBM frequency of the order of 4-10 wave numbers. The upshift is comprised of two components: increased hydrostatic pressure on the nanotube due to curvature effects, and the dynamic coupling of the RBM with its solvation shell. In contrast to much of the current literature, we find that the latter of the two effects is dominant. This could serve as an innovative tool for determining the interaction potential between nanotubes/graphitic surfaces and fluids.

  13. Mode shift strategies in intercity transportation and their effect on energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolsky, S.

    1975-01-01

    Policies are examined which, if implemented, could lead to significant energy savings in intercity travel in the northeast corridor arena, without restricting the traveler's freedom of mode choice. The effects on arena energy consumption of introducing new, more energy-efficient aircraft are investigated; and several strategies unrelated to the implementation of new aircraft are introduced to yield reductions in overall intercity energy use. In both parts of this analysis, resulting changes in patronage (modal share) and energy use are demonstrated, leading to new insights into the effectiveness of different potential policies for achieving energy conservation. Some observations on induced demand trends that could be associated with certain strategies and the resultant potential effect on energy conservation are provided.

  14. Environmental context effects on episodic memory are dependent on retrieval mode and modulated by neuropsychological status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Ohr; Vakil, Eli; Levy, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Contextual change or constancy between occasions of memory formation and retrieval are commonly assumed to affect retrieval success, yet such effects may be inconsistent, and the processes leading to the pattern of effects are still not well understood. We conducted a systematic investigation of environmental context effects on memory, using a range of materials (common objects, pictures of familiar and unfamiliar faces, words, and sentences), and four types of retrieval (free recall, cued recall, recognition, and order memory), all assessed within participants. Additionally, we examined the influence of mnemonic challenge on context effects by examining both healthy participants and a group of patients in rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We found no effects of contextual factors on tests of recognition for either group of participants, but effects did emerge for cued and free recall, with the most prominent effects being on memory for objects. Furthermore, while patients' memory abilities in general were impaired relative to the comparison group, they exhibited greater influences of contextual reinstatement on several recall tasks. These results support suggestions that environmental context effects on memory are dependent on retrieval mode and on the extent to which retrieval is challenging because of neurocognitive status. Additionally, findings of environmental context effects in memory-impaired TBI patients suggest that by harnessing such preserved indirect memory (e.g., using reminder technologies), it may be possible to ameliorate TBI patients' difficulties in explicit remembering.

  15. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) for confectionery manufacturing in developing countries: Turkish delight production as a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Ozilgen,Sibel

    2012-01-01

    The Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) was applied for risk assessment of confectionary manufacturing, in whichthe traditional methods and equipment were intensively used in the production. Potential failure modes and effects as well as their possible causes were identified in the process flow. Processing stages that involve intensive handling of food by workers had the highest risk priority numbers (RPN = 216 and 189), followed by chemical contamination risks in different stages of the ...

  16. Consigned regulatory control and effect of the owner's welding quality under the EPC mode in Fangjiashan nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qun; Gu Tao; Wei Lianfeng; Li Hongjun

    2012-01-01

    Under EPC management mode, how to optimize resources allocation and realize effective management and control over key control points is a big difficulty facing the owner. From the owner's point of view, and through summary of practices, the paper introduces and analyses the mode and effect of consigned regulatory control over the weld quality of Fangjiashan nuclear power project. And some recognitions and point of views on popularization of specialized and consigned regulatory control are put forward. (authors)

  17. Safety analysis of RA reactor operation, I-III, Part III - Environmental effect of the maximum credible accident; Analiza sigurnosti rada reaktora RA - I-III, III deo - Posledica maksimalno moguceg akcidenta na okolinu reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    Maximum credible accident at the RA reactor would consider release of fission products into the environment. This would result from fuel elements failure or meltdown due to loss of coolant. The analysis presented in this report assumes that the reactor was operating at nominal power at the moment of maximum possible accident. The report includes calculations of fission products activity at the moment of accident, total activity release during the accident, concentration of radioactive material in the air in the reactor neighbourhood, and the analysis of accident environmental effects.

  18. Stabilization of ideal plasma resistive wall modes in cylindrical geometry: The effect of resistive layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    A cylindrical model with finite beta having an external resonant ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability has been constructed. This resonant mode has a mode rational surface, where the safety factor q equals m/n, within the plasma. In this model, the perturbed radial magnetic field for the ideal mode is nonzero between the mode rational surface and the wall, even though it must vanish at the mode rational surface. This property of the mode is in common with the toroidal external kink. Results are presented showing that in the parameter range for which this ideal mode is stable with a conducting wall but unstable with the wall at infinity, a resistive wall mode persists. However, in the presence of plasma resistivity in a resistive layer about the mode rational surface, this resistive wall mode can be stabilized by a plasma rotation frequency of order a nominal resistive instability growth rate. Furthermore, the stabilization occurs in a large gap in wall position or beta. It is also shown that for the ideal resonant mode, as well as resistive plasma modes and nonresonant ideal plasma modes, there is a maximum value of plasma rotation above which there is no stability gap. Discussions are presented suggesting that these properties may hold for the toroidal external kink. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  19. Quantitative Approach to Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Linear Accelerator Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Daniel, Jennifer C., E-mail: jennifer.odaniel@duke.edu; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To determine clinic-specific linear accelerator quality assurance (QA) TG-142 test frequencies, to maximize physicist time efficiency and patient treatment quality. Methods and Materials: A novel quantitative approach to failure mode and effect analysis is proposed. Nine linear accelerator-years of QA records provided data on failure occurrence rates. The severity of test failure was modeled by introducing corresponding errors into head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans. The relative risk of daily linear accelerator QA was calculated as a function of frequency of test performance. Results: Although the failure severity was greatest for daily imaging QA (imaging vs treatment isocenter and imaging positioning/repositioning), the failure occurrence rate was greatest for output and laser testing. The composite ranking results suggest that performing output and lasers tests daily, imaging versus treatment isocenter and imaging positioning/repositioning tests weekly, and optical distance indicator and jaws versus light field tests biweekly would be acceptable for non-stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic body radiation therapy linear accelerators. Conclusions: Failure mode and effect analysis is a useful tool to determine the relative importance of QA tests from TG-142. Because there are practical time limitations on how many QA tests can be performed, this analysis highlights which tests are the most important and suggests the frequency of testing based on each test's risk priority number.

  20. Risk management for outsourcing biomedical waste disposal – Using the failure mode and effects analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Ching-Jong; Ho, Chao Chung

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • This study is based on a real case in hospital in Taiwan. • We use Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) as the evaluation method. • We successfully identify the evaluation factors of bio-medical waste disposal risk. - Abstract: Using the failure mode and effects analysis, this study examined biomedical waste companies through risk assessment. Moreover, it evaluated the supervisors of biomedical waste units in hospitals, and factors relating to the outsourcing risk assessment of biomedical waste in hospitals by referring to waste disposal acts. An expert questionnaire survey was conducted on the personnel involved in waste disposal units in hospitals, in order to identify important factors relating to the outsourcing risk of biomedical waste in hospitals. This study calculated the risk priority number (RPN) and selected items with an RPN value higher than 80 for improvement. These items included “availability of freezing devices”, “availability of containers for sharp items”, “disposal frequency”, “disposal volume”, “disposal method”, “vehicles meeting the regulations”, and “declaration of three lists”. This study also aimed to identify important selection factors of biomedical waste disposal companies by hospitals in terms of risk. These findings can serve as references for hospitals in the selection of outsourcing companies for biomedical waste disposal

  1. Using failure mode and effect analysis in identification of components sensitive to ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitoi, Mirela; Turcu, Ilie; Apostol, Minodora; Farcasiu, Mita; Popa, Adrian; Florescu, Gheorghe; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2008-01-01

    Ageing represents a phenomenon of concern since any degradation that may occur in time could lower a component performance and so reduce its reliability. If the phenomenon is left unchecked and unmitigated, the ageing could increase the risk associated with the facility operation. To understand the ageing degradation of a component, it is first necessary to identify and understand the ageing processes. Since these processes involve constituent materials, parts and the service conditions of components, it is necessary to know the design, materials, service conditions, performance requirements, operating experience (operation, surveillance and maintenance histories) and relevant research results for the component of interest. The purpose of the Ageing Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (AFMEA) is to study the results or effects of item failure caused by ageing, on system operation and to classify each potential failure according to its severity The paper will present the advantages of using AFMEA in identification of most sensitive to ageing components, as the results obtained for a particular case. For each component analyzed, the stressors will be established, the corresponding ageing mechanisms will be identified, as the failure modes induced by the ageing mechanisms. (authors)

  2. Risk management for outsourcing biomedical waste disposal – Using the failure mode and effects analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Ching-Jong; Ho, Chao Chung, E-mail: ho919@pchome.com.tw

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • This study is based on a real case in hospital in Taiwan. • We use Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) as the evaluation method. • We successfully identify the evaluation factors of bio-medical waste disposal risk. - Abstract: Using the failure mode and effects analysis, this study examined biomedical waste companies through risk assessment. Moreover, it evaluated the supervisors of biomedical waste units in hospitals, and factors relating to the outsourcing risk assessment of biomedical waste in hospitals by referring to waste disposal acts. An expert questionnaire survey was conducted on the personnel involved in waste disposal units in hospitals, in order to identify important factors relating to the outsourcing risk of biomedical waste in hospitals. This study calculated the risk priority number (RPN) and selected items with an RPN value higher than 80 for improvement. These items included “availability of freezing devices”, “availability of containers for sharp items”, “disposal frequency”, “disposal volume”, “disposal method”, “vehicles meeting the regulations”, and “declaration of three lists”. This study also aimed to identify important selection factors of biomedical waste disposal companies by hospitals in terms of risk. These findings can serve as references for hospitals in the selection of outsourcing companies for biomedical waste disposal.

  3. Quantitative Approach to Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for Linear Accelerator Quality Assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2017-05-01

    To determine clinic-specific linear accelerator quality assurance (QA) TG-142 test frequencies, to maximize physicist time efficiency and patient treatment quality. A novel quantitative approach to failure mode and effect analysis is proposed. Nine linear accelerator-years of QA records provided data on failure occurrence rates. The severity of test failure was modeled by introducing corresponding errors into head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment plans. The relative risk of daily linear accelerator QA was calculated as a function of frequency of test performance. Although the failure severity was greatest for daily imaging QA (imaging vs treatment isocenter and imaging positioning/repositioning), the failure occurrence rate was greatest for output and laser testing. The composite ranking results suggest that performing output and lasers tests daily, imaging versus treatment isocenter and imaging positioning/repositioning tests weekly, and optical distance indicator and jaws versus light field tests biweekly would be acceptable for non-stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic body radiation therapy linear accelerators. Failure mode and effect analysis is a useful tool to determine the relative importance of QA tests from TG-142. Because there are practical time limitations on how many QA tests can be performed, this analysis highlights which tests are the most important and suggests the frequency of testing based on each test's risk priority number. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of airflow rates and aeration mode on the respiration activity of four organic wastes: Implications on the composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, Laura; Komilis, Dimitrios; Gea, Teresa; Sánchez, Antoni

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the airflow and of the aeration mode on the composting process of non-urban organic wastes that are found in large quantities worldwide, namely: (i) a fresh, non-digested, sewage sludge (FSS), (ii) an anaerobically digested sewage sludge (ADSS), (iii) cow manure (CM) and (iv) pig sludge (PS). This assessment was done using respirometric indices. Two aeration modes were tested, namely: (a) a constant air flowrate set at three different initial fixed airflow rates, and (b) an oxygen uptake rate (OUR)-controlled airflow rate. The four wastes displayed the same behaviour namely a limited biological activity at low aeration, while, beyond a threshold value, the increase of the airflow did not significantly increase the dynamic respiration indices (DRI 1 max , DRI 24 max and AT 4 ). The threshold airflow rate varied among wastes and ranged from 42NL air kg -1 DMh -1 for CM and from 67 to 77NL air kg -1 DMh -1 for FSS, ADSS and PS. Comparing the two aeration modes tested (constant air flow, OUR controlled air flow), no statistically significant differences were calculated between the respiration activity indices obtained at those two aeration modes. The results can be considered representative for urban and non-urban organic wastes and establish a general procedure to measure the respiration activity without limitations by airflow. This will permit other researchers to provide consistent results during the measurement of the respiration activity. Results indicate that high airflows are not required to establish the maximum respiration activity. This can result in energy savings and the prevention of off-gas treatment problems due to the excessive aeration rate in full scale composting plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effective cancer vaccine platform based on attenuated salmonella and a type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Hegazy, Wael A H; Guo, Linjie; Gao, Xiuhua; Courtney, Amy N; Kurbanov, Suhrab; Liu, Daofeng; Tian, Gengwen; Manuel, Edwin R; Diamond, Don J; Hensel, Michael; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2014-11-01

    Vaccines explored for cancer therapy have been based generally on injectable vector systems used to control foreign infectious pathogens, to which the immune system evolved to respond naturally. However, these vectors may not be effective at presenting tumor-associated antigens (TAA) to the immune system in a manner that is sufficient to engender antitumor responses. We addressed this issue with a novel orally administered Salmonella-based vector that exploits a type III secretion system to deliver selected TAA in the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells in situ. A systematic comparison of candidate genes from the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) locus was conducted in the vaccine design, using model antigens and a codon-optimized form of the human TAA survivin (coSVN), an oncoprotein that is overexpressed in most human cancers. In a screen of 20 SPI2 promoter:effector combinations, a PsifB::sseJ combination exhibited maximal potency for antigen translocation into the APC cytosol, presentation to CD8 T cells, and murine immunogenicity. In the CT26 mouse model of colon carcinoma, therapeutic vaccination with a lead PsifB::sseJ-coSVN construct (p8032) produced CXCR3-dependent infiltration of tumors by CD8 T cells, reversed the CD8:Treg ratio at the tumor site, and triggered potent antitumor activity. Vaccine immunogenicity and antitumor potency were enhanced by coadministration of the natural killer T-cell ligand 7DW8-5, which heightened the production of IL12 and IFNγ. Furthermore, combined treatment with p8032 and 7DW8-5 resulted in complete tumor regression in A20 lymphoma-bearing mice, where protective memory was demonstrated. Taken together, our results demonstrate how antigen delivery using an oral Salmonella vector can provide an effective platform for the development of cancer vaccines. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Effect of Fadama III program on dry-season vegetable growers in Kwara State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunde Michael Matanmi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effect of the Fadama III program on dry-season vegetable growers in Kwara State, Nigeria. The study emanated from the need to know how well agricultural programs have achieved their targets. Data collected from 200 beneficiaries selected through a combination of purposive and random sampling techniques were used for the study. The data obtained were analyzed with descriptive statistics, a five-point Likert scale, and a t test. The results showed that the beneficiaries were mainly female, married, and relatively old, with farming as their primary occupation. The benefits accrued from the program by the farmers were a knapsack sprayer, training on record keeping, agro-chemicals, fertilizer, improved seeds, a watering can, pest and disease management, conflict resolution, and the construction of a well, borehole, cooling shed and market stall. The mean farm size of the farmers before and after participating in the program was 1.15 and 2.15 ha, respectively, with a corresponding average monthly income of NGN 6,833.75 and NGN 16,137.50, respectively (USD 1 = NGN 165. The study further revealed a positive effect of the program on the farmers' livelihoods. The major problems faced by the farmers were inadequate credit, conflict with herdsmen, land ownership problems, inadequate labor, and poor market linkage. Therefore, the study recommends the provision of credit facilities by relevant stakeholders, putting lasting conflict resolution measures in place, encouraging youths to practice agriculture, and training farmers on market linkage.

  7. SU-E-T-627: Failure Modes and Effect Analysis for Monthly Quality Assurance of Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, J; Xiao, Y; Wang, J; Peng, J; Lu, S; Hu, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) on routine monthly Quality Assurance (QA) tests (physical tests part) of linear accelerator. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis method was performed for monthly QA procedures. A detailed process tree of monthly QA was created and potential failure modes were defined. Each failure mode may have many influencing factors. For each factor, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of probability of occurrence (O), the severity of effect (S), and detectability of the failure (D). The RPN scores are in a range of 1 to 1000, with higher scores indicating stronger correlation to a given influencing factor of a failure mode. Five medical physicists in our institution were responsible to discuss and to define the O, S, D values. Results: 15 possible failure modes were identified and all RPN scores of all influencing factors of these 15 failue modes were from 8 to 150, and the checklist of FMEA in monthly QA was drawn. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Conclusion: The influencing factors of RPN greater than 50 were considered as highly-correlated factors of a certain out-oftolerance monthly QA test. FMEA is a fast and flexible tool to develop an implement a quality management (QM) frame work of monthly QA, which improved the QA efficiency of our QA team. The FMEA work may incorporate more quantification and monitoring fuctions in future

  8. Effect of alternative modes of application on microleakage of one-step self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Ulker

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Alternative modes of application did not adversely affect the sealing ability of one-step self-etch adhesives. Depending on the type of adhesive, alternative modes of application may contribute to low microleakage values.

  9. Effects of adding a virtual reality environment to different modes of treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloot, L H; van der Krogt, M M; Harlaar, J

    2014-03-01

    Differences in gait between overground and treadmill walking are suggested to result from imposed treadmill speed and lack of visual flow. To counteract this effect, feedback-controlled treadmills that allow the subject to control the belt speed along with an immersive virtual reality (VR) have recently been developed. We studied the effect of adding a VR during both fixed speed (FS) and self-paced (SP) treadmill walking. Nineteen subjects walked on a dual-belt instrumented treadmill with a simple endless road projected on a 180° circular screen. A main effect of VR was found for hip flexion offset, peak hip extension, peak knee extension moment, knee flexion moment gain and ankle power during push off. A consistent interaction effect between VR and treadmill mode was found for 12 out of 30 parameters, although the differences were small and did not exceed 50% of the within subject stride variance. At FS, the VR seemed to slightly improve the walking pattern towards overground walking, with for example a 6.5mm increase in stride length. At SP, gait became slightly more cautious by adding a VR, with a 9.1mm decrease in stride length. Irrespective of treadmill mode, subjects rated walking with the VR as more similar to overground walking. In the context of clinical gait analysis, the effects of VR are too small to be relevant and are outweighed by the gains of adding a VR, such as a more stimulating experience and possibility of augmenting it by real-time feedback. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of interview mode on assessments of erectile and ejaculatory dysfunction among men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, Joseph A; Oakley, Lisa P; Rosen, Raymond; Pollack, Lance M

    2013-01-01

    In a randomized experiment (N = 249; age 50 + years), this study examined if self-reports of erectile dysfunction (ED) and ejaculatory dysfunction (EjD) symptomatology were influenced by the mode of interview administration (computer-assisted self-interview [CASI], audio computer-assisted self-interview [ACASI], or computer-assisted personal interview [CAPI; involving an interviewer]). This study also examined if mode moderated person variables hypothesized to impact self-reports (social desirability, age, or depressive mood). No main or moderating effects of mode were found for self-reports of EjD symptoms. However, mode effects on reports of ED symptoms were observed, and these moderated age and social desirability effects on self-reports. Significantly more older (relative to younger) men reported high levels of ED symptoms when interview administration was by a live interviewer (CAPI) than with self-administration. Alternatively, significantly more younger men reported high levels of ED symptoms when administration was by an interviewer (CAPI) or by ACASI (vs. CASI). The Mode × Social Desirability effects were complex (see the Discussion section), showing hypothesized effects under ACASI and CAPI conditions, but an opposite effect under the CASI condition. The stability of self-reported ED symptoms did not vary by mode (based on test-retest comparisons); test-retest was significantly higher for EjD symptoms within the ACASI condition. The impact of mode of administration on self-reports of ED/EjD symptoms is less predictable and dramatic than one might conclude from prior research with other types of self-report outcomes. The findings are consistent with a small, but growing, body of studies that illustrate highly situational effects of interviewing, which may depend on a complex interplay between modes, person variables, and the interview topic/target items. Self-administered methods, in particular, may not be a universal solution to response bias.

  11. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  12. Noncanonical Effects of IRF9 in Intestinal Inflammation: More than Type I and Type III Interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Isabella; Rosebrock, Felix; Hainzl, Eva; Heider, Susanne; Majoros, Andrea; Wienerroither, Sebastian; Strobl, Birgit; Stockinger, Silvia; Kenner, Lukas; Müller, Mathias; Decker, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription factor with its Stat1, Stat2, and interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) subunits is employed for transcriptional responses downstream of receptors for type I interferons (IFN-I) that include IFN-α and IFN-β and type III interferons (IFN-III), also called IFN-λ. Here, we show in a murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis that IRF9 deficiency protects animals, whereas the combined loss of IFN-I and IFN-III receptors worsens their condition. We explain the different phenotypes by demonstrating a function of IRF9 in a noncanonical transcriptional complex with Stat1, apart from IFN-I and IFN-III signaling. Together, Stat1 and IRF9 produce a proinflammatory activity that overrides the benefits of the IFN-III response on intestinal epithelial cells. Our results further suggest that the CXCL10 chemokine gene is an important mediator of this proinflammatory activity. We thus establish IFN-λ as a potentially anticolitogenic cytokine and propose an important role for IRF9 as a component of noncanonical Stat complexes in the development of colitis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Developmental changes in memorial comparisons: the effects of stimulus presentation mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K P; Berch, D B

    1992-06-01

    First graders, fifth graders, and college students made comparative size judgments of either pictures (line drawings) or names (spoken words) of common objects by designating the "bigger" item in real life. Care was taken to equate the picture and word conditions on a number of critical parameters including method of item-pair presentation and activation of response-time intervals. All groups exhibited a symbolic distance effect. While judgments were faster with pictures than words, the magnitude of the difference did not change with age. Previous research suggesting a marked developmental decline in the magnitude of the "pictorial superiority effect" may have confounded reduced memory demands with stimulus presentation mode for young children. Finally, slopes of the symbolic distance functions were found to decrease with increasing grade level, at least from first to fifth grade. This is the first demonstration of an age-related decline in slopes for magnitude comparisons of concrete objects.

  14. Effect of loading mode on lattice strain measurements via neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skippon, T.; Clausen, B.; Daymond, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    The study of lattice strain evolution during uniaxial deformation via in situ neutron diffraction is a well established technique for characterizing the deformation behavior of metals. However, the relatively low flux of neutron facilities results in count times on the order of several minutes, requiring experimenters to choose between either applying a very slow strain rate, or loading the sample incrementally rather than continuously. Here we investigate the effects on lattice strain data obtained by using stress, strain, and position controlled incremental loading, as well as continuous loading, on samples of Zircaloy-2 under uniaxial compression. It was found that both qualitative and quantitative differences arise in the lattice strain behavior of certain grain families, particularly {101 ¯ 0} and {112 ¯ 0}, while other grain families show no discernible effect. The differences in lattice strain evolution brought on by the variation in loading modes are believed to be the result of thermally activated dislocation motion

  15. Random safety auditing, root cause analysis, failure mode and effects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursprung, Robert; Gray, James

    2010-03-01

    Improving quality and safety in health care is a major concern for health care providers, the general public, and policy makers. Errors and quality issues are leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the health care industry. There is evidence that patients in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are at high risk for serious medical errors. To facilitate compliance with safe practices, many institutions have established quality-assurance monitoring procedures. Three techniques that have been found useful in the health care setting are failure mode and effects analysis, root cause analysis, and random safety auditing. When used together, these techniques are effective tools for system analysis and redesign focused on providing safe delivery of care in the complex NICU system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of 3d-4f magnetic exchange interactions on the dynamics of the magnetization of Dy(III)-M(II)-Dy(III) trinuclear clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointillart, Fabrice; Bernot, Kevin; Sessoli, Roberta; Gatteschi, Dante

    2007-01-01

    [{Dy(hfac)(3)}(2){Fe(bpca)(2)}] x CHCl(3) ([Dy(2)Fe]) and [{Dy(hfac)(3)}(2){Ni(bpca)(2)}]CHCl(3) ([Dy(2)Ni]) (in which hfac(-)=1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetonate and bpca(-)=bis(2-pyridylcarbonyl)amine anion) were synthesized and characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction shows that [Dy(2)Fe] and [Dy(2)Ni] are linear trinuclear complexes. Static magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal a weak ferromagnetic exchange interaction between Ni(II) and Dy(III) ions in [Dy(2)Ni], whereas the use of the diamagnetic Fe(II) ion leads to the absence of magnetic exchange interaction in [Dy(2)Fe]. Dynamic susceptibility measurements show a thermally activated behavior with the energy barrier of 9.7 and 4.9 K for the [Dy(2)Fe] and [Dy(2)Ni] complexes, respectively. A surprising negative effect of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction has been found and has been attributed to the structural conformation of these trinuclear complexes.

  17. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Philip M., E-mail: philip.campbell@gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Electronic Systems Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Vogel, Eric M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Ready, W. Jud [Electronic Systems Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  18. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Ready, W. Jud; Vogel, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  19. The Effective Dynamic Ranges for Glaucomatous Visual Field Progression With Standard Automated Perimetry and Stimulus Sizes III and V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael; Zamba, Gideon K D; Artes, Paul H

    2018-01-01

    It has been shown that threshold estimates below approximately 20 dB have little effect on the ability to detect visual field progression in glaucoma. We aimed to compare stimulus size V to stimulus size III, in areas of visual damage, to confirm these findings by using (1) a different dataset, (2) different techniques of progression analysis, and (3) an analysis to evaluate the effect of censoring on mean deviation (MD). In the Iowa Variability in Perimetry Study, 120 glaucoma subjects were tested every 6 months for 4 years with size III SITA Standard and size V Full Threshold. Progression was determined with three complementary techniques: pointwise linear regression (PLR), permutation of PLR, and linear regression of the MD index. All analyses were repeated on "censored'' datasets in which threshold estimates below a given criterion value were set to equal the criterion value. Our analyses confirmed previous observations that threshold estimates below 20 dB contribute much less to visual field progression than estimates above this range. These findings were broadly similar with stimulus sizes III and V. Censoring of threshold values < 20 dB has relatively little impact on the rates of visual field progression in patients with mild to moderate glaucoma. Size V, which has lower retest variability, performs at least as well as size III for longitudinal glaucoma progression analysis and appears to have a larger useful dynamic range owing to the upper sensitivity limit being higher.

  20. Effect of dynamical phase on the resonant interaction among tsunami edge wave modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.

    2018-01-01

    Different modes of tsunami edge waves can interact through nonlinear resonance. During this process, edge waves that have very small initial amplitude can grow to be as large or larger than the initially dominant edge wave modes. In this study, the effects of dynamical phase are established for a single triad of edge waves that participate in resonant interactions. In previous studies, Jacobi elliptic functions were used to describe the slow variation in amplitude associated with the interaction. This analytical approach assumes that one of the edge waves in the triad has zero initial amplitude and that the combined phase of the three waves φ = θ1 + θ2 − θ3 is constant at the value for maximum energy exchange (φ = 0). To obtain a more general solution, dynamical phase effects and non-zero initial amplitudes for all three waves are incorporated using numerical methods for the governing differential equations. Results were obtained using initial conditions calculated from a subduction zone, inter-plate thrust fault geometry and a stochastic earthquake slip model. The effect of dynamical phase is most apparent when the initial amplitudes and frequencies of the three waves are within an order of magnitude. In this case, non-zero initial phase results in a marked decrease in energy exchange and a slight decrease in the period of the interaction. When there are large differences in frequency and/or initial amplitude, dynamical phase has less of an effect and typically one wave of the triad has very little energy exchange with the other two waves. Results from this study help elucidate under what conditions edge waves might be implicated in late, large-amplitude arrivals.

  1. Effect of Dynamical Phase on the Resonant Interaction Among Tsunami Edge Wave Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.

    2018-04-01

    Different modes of tsunami edge waves can interact through nonlinear resonance. During this process, edge waves that have very small initial amplitude can grow to be as large or larger than the initially dominant edge wave modes. In this study, the effects of dynamical phase are established for a single triad of edge waves that participate in resonant interactions. In previous studies, Jacobi elliptic functions were used to describe the slow variation in amplitude associated with the interaction. This analytical approach assumes that one of the edge waves in the triad has zero initial amplitude and that the combined phase of the three waves φ = θ 1 + θ 2 - θ 3 is constant at the value for maximum energy exchange ( φ = 0). To obtain a more general solution, dynamical phase effects and non-zero initial amplitudes for all three waves are incorporated using numerical methods for the governing differential equations. Results were obtained using initial conditions calculated from a subduction zone, inter-plate thrust fault geometry and a stochastic earthquake slip model. The effect of dynamical phase is most apparent when the initial amplitudes and frequencies of the three waves are within an order of magnitude. In this case, non-zero initial phase results in a marked decrease in energy exchange and a slight decrease in the period of the interaction. When there are large differences in frequency and/or initial amplitude, dynamical phase has less of an effect and typically one wave of the triad has very little energy exchange with the other two waves. Results from this study help elucidate under what conditions edge waves might be implicated in late, large-amplitude arrivals.

  2. Effect of Dynamical Phase on the Resonant Interaction Among Tsunami Edge Wave Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.

    2018-02-01

    Different modes of tsunami edge waves can interact through nonlinear resonance. During this process, edge waves that have very small initial amplitude can grow to be as large or larger than the initially dominant edge wave modes. In this study, the effects of dynamical phase are established for a single triad of edge waves that participate in resonant interactions. In previous studies, Jacobi elliptic functions were used to describe the slow variation in amplitude associated with the interaction. This analytical approach assumes that one of the edge waves in the triad has zero initial amplitude and that the combined phase of the three waves φ = θ 1 + θ 2 - θ 3 is constant at the value for maximum energy exchange (φ = 0). To obtain a more general solution, dynamical phase effects and non-zero initial amplitudes for all three waves are incorporated using numerical methods for the governing differential equations. Results were obtained using initial conditions calculated from a subduction zone, inter-plate thrust fault geometry and a stochastic earthquake slip model. The effect of dynamical phase is most apparent when the initial amplitudes and frequencies of the three waves are within an order of magnitude. In this case, non-zero initial phase results in a marked decrease in energy exchange and a slight decrease in the period of the interaction. When there are large differences in frequency and/or initial amplitude, dynamical phase has less of an effect and typically one wave of the triad has very little energy exchange with the other two waves. Results from this study help elucidate under what conditions edge waves might be implicated in late, large-amplitude arrivals.

  3. The effect of a single blade limiter on energetic neutral beam particles in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, T.W.; Armentrout, C.; Burrell, K.H.; Hino, T.; Kahn, C.; Kim, J.; Lohr, J.; Rottler, L.; Schissel, D.; St John, H.

    1984-01-01

    Energetic beam ion collisions with the main limiter can be a significant power loss process under certain operating conditions in Doublet III. Futhermore, these collisions may cause measurable damage to the limiter itself. Under low current and low toroidal field conditions (e.g., Isub(p) = 290 kA and Bsub(T) = 6.3 kG), 20-38% of the inferred absorbed beam power may be deposited directly on the ion drift side of the limiter by the beam ions. However, for higher plasma current and toroidal fields (e.g., Isub(p) = 480 kA and Bsub(t) = 15 kG), the fraction of inferred absorbed beam power deposited on the limiter is reduced to < 10%. Monte Carlo code simulations show that this loss of beam power is primarily a result of the large poloidal and toroidal gyro-orbits of the energetic beam ions. Other factors which may enhance beam ion losses to the limiter are (1) large separation distances between the primary limiter and the (outboard) vacuum vessel wall, and (2) plasma density buildup near the plasma edge during high gas puff operation. In addition, our data suggests enhanced plasma density and recycling near the limiter. This localized density can cause appreciable premature ionizations of the incoming beam neutrals and thus reduce the effective plasma heating of the beamline which is immediately upcurrent of the limiter. The prematurely-ionized beam particles from this adjacent beamline are responsible for much of the damage to the ion drift side of the limiter. We have found that under certain operating conditions (1) the direct beam heating of the limiter is 50% greater and (2) the stored plasma energy is 10% less when the beamline immediately upcurrent of the limiter heats the plasma. Thus, the relative positions of the limiters to the beamlines are important in designing future tokamaks. (orig.)

  4. Fuzzy logic prioritization of failures in a system failure mode, effects and criticality analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, John B.; Pelaez, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique, based on fuzzy logic, for prioritizing failures for corrective actions in a Failure Mode, Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA). As in a traditional criticality analysis, the assessment is based on the severity, frequency of occurrence, and detectability of an item failure. However, these parameters are here represented as members of a fuzzy set, combined by matching them against rules in a rule base, evaluated with min-max inferencing, and then defuzzified to assess the riskiness of the failure. This approach resolves some of the problems in traditional methods of evaluation and it has several advantages compared to strictly numerical methods: 1) it allows the analyst to evaluate the risk associated with item failure modes directly using the linguistic terms that are employed in making the criticality assessment; 2) ambiguous, qualitative, or imprecise information, as well as quantitative data, can be used in the assessment and they are handled in a consistent manner; and 3) it gives a more flexible structure for combining the severity, occurrence, and detectability parameters. Two fuzzy logic based approaches for assessing criticality are presented. The first is based on the numerical rankings used in a conventional Risk Priority Number (RPN) calculation and uses crisp inputs gathered from the user or extracted from a reliability analysis. The second, which can be used early in the design process when less detailed information is available, allows fuzzy inputs and also illustrates the direct use of the linguistic rankings defined for the RPN calculations

  5. Outcomes of a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis for medication errors in pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lizabeth D; Grigg, Eliot B; Verma, Shilpa; Latham, Gregory J; Rampersad, Sally E; Martin, Lynn D

    2017-06-01

    The Institute of Medicine has called for development of strategies to prevent medication errors, which are one important cause of preventable harm. Although the field of anesthesiology is considered a leader in patient safety, recent data suggest high medication error rates in anesthesia practice. Unfortunately, few error prevention strategies for anesthesia providers have been implemented. Using Toyota Production System quality improvement methodology, a multidisciplinary team observed 133 h of medication practice in the operating room at a tertiary care freestanding children's hospital. A failure mode and effects analysis was conducted to systematically deconstruct and evaluate each medication handling process step and score possible failure modes to quantify areas of risk. A bundle of five targeted countermeasures were identified and implemented over 12 months. Improvements in syringe labeling (73 to 96%), standardization of medication organization in the anesthesia workspace (0 to 100%), and two-provider infusion checks (23 to 59%) were observed. Medication error reporting improved during the project and was subsequently maintained. After intervention, the median medication error rate decreased from 1.56 to 0.95 per 1000 anesthetics. The frequency of medication error harm events reaching the patient also decreased. Systematic evaluation and standardization of medication handling processes by anesthesia providers in the operating room can decrease medication errors and improve patient safety. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis for remote handling transfer systems of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinna, T.; Caporali, R.; Tesini, A.

    2008-01-01

    A Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) at component level was done to study safety-relevant implications arising from possible failures in performing remote handling (RH) operations at ITER facility . Autonomous air cushion transporter, pallet, sealed casks and tractor movers needed for port plug mounting/dismantling operation were analysed. For each sub-system, the breakdown of significant components was outlined and, for each component, possible failure modes have been investigated pointing out possible causes, possible actions to prevent the causes, consequences and actions to prevent or mitigate consequences. Off-normal events which may result in hazardous consequences to the public and the environment have been defined as Postulated Initiating Events (PIEs). Two safety-relevant PIEs have been defined by assessing elementary failures related to the analysed system. Each PIE has been discussed in order to qualitatively identify accident sequences arising from each of them. As an output of this FMEA study, possible incidental scenarios, where the intervention of rescue RH equipments is required to overcome critical situations determined by fault of RH components, were defined as well. Being rescue scenarios of main concern for ITER remote handling activities, such families could be helpful in defining the design requirements of port handling systems in general and on RH transfer system in particular. Furthermore, they could be useful in defining casks and vehicles to be used for rescue activities

  7. Potential failure mode and effects analysis for the ITER NB injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldrin, M.; De Lorenzi, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Grando, L.; Marcuzzi, D.; Peruzzo, S.; Pomaro, N.; Rigato, W.; Serianni, G.

    2009-01-01

    The failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used analytical technique that helps in identifying and reducing the risks of failure in a system, component or process. The application of a systematic method like the FMEA was deemed necessary and adequate to support the design process of the ITER NBI (neutral beam injector). The approach adopted was to develop a FMEA at a general 'system level', focusing the study on the main functions of the system and ensuring that all the interfaces and interactions are covered among the various subsystems. The FMEA was extended to the whole NBI system taking into account the present design status. The FMEA procedure will be then applied to the detailed design phase at the component level, in particular to identify (or define) the ITER Class of Risk. Several important failure modes were evidenced, and estimates of subsystems and components reliability are now available. FMEA procedure resulted essential to identify and confirm the diagnostic systems required for protection and control, and the outcome of this analysis will represent the baseline document for the design of the NBI and NBTF integrated protection system. In the paper, rationale and background of the FMEA for ITER NBI are presented, methods employed are described and most interesting results are reported and discussed.

  8. Broadband non-polarizing beam splitter based on guided mode resonance effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jian-Yong; Xu Cheng; Qiang Ying-Huai; Zhu Ya-Bo

    2011-01-01

    A broadband non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) operating in the telecommunication C+L band is designed by using the guided mode resonance effect of periodic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) elements. It is shown that this double layer SOI structure can provide ∼50/50 beam ratio with the maximum divergences between reflection and transmission being less than 8% over the spectrum of 1.4 μm∼1.7 μm and 1% in the telecommunication band for both TE and TM polarizations. The physical basis of this broadband non-polarizing property is on the simultaneous excitation of the TE and TM strong modulation waveguide modes near the designed spectrum band. Meanwhile, the electric field distributions for both TE and TM polarizations verify the resonant origin of spectrum in the periodic SOI structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated with our calculations that the beam splitter proposed here is tolerant to the deviations of incident angle and structure parameters, which make it very easy to be fabricated with current IC technology. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  9. Broadband non-polarizing beam splitter based on guided mode resonance effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-Yong; Xu, Cheng; Qiang, Ying-Huai; Zhu, Ya-Bo

    2011-10-01

    A broadband non-polarizing beam splitter (NPBS) operating in the telecommunication C+L band is designed by using the guided mode resonance effect of periodic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) elements. It is shown that this double layer SOI structure can provide ~50/50 beam ratio with the maximum divergences between reflection and transmission being less than 8% over the spectrum of 1.4 μm~1.7 μm and 1% in the telecommunication band for both TE and TM polarizations. The physical basis of this broadband non-polarizing property is on the simultaneous excitation of the TE and TM strong modulation waveguide modes near the designed spectrum band. Meanwhile, the electric field distributions for both TE and TM polarizations verify the resonant origin of spectrum in the periodic SOI structure. Furthermore, it is demonstrated with our calculations that the beam splitter proposed here is tolerant to the deviations of incident angle and structure parameters, which make it very easy to be fabricated with current IC technology.

  10. The effect of dust charge inhomogeneity on low-frequency modes in a strongly coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, T.; Mamun, A.A.; Shukla, P.K.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of low-frequency modes accounting for dust grain charge fluctuation and equilibrium grain charge inhomogeneity in a strongly coupled dusty plasma is presented. The existence of an extremely low frequency mode, which is due to the inhomogeneity in the equilibrium dust grain charge, is reported. Besides, the equilibrium dust grain charge inhomogeneity makes the dust-acoustic mode unstable. The strong correlations in the dust fluid significantly drive a new mode as well as the existing dust-acoustic mode. The applications of these results to recent experimental and to some space and astrophysical situations are discussed

  11. Effects of ion temperature fluctuations on the stability of resistive ballooning modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Nordman, H.; Jarmen, A.; Weiland, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of ion temperature fluctuations on the stability of resistive drift- and ballooning-modes is investigated using a two-fluid model. The Eigenmode equations are derived and solved analytically in a low beta model equilibrium. Parameters relevant to L-mode edge plasmas from the Texas Experimental Tokamak are used. The resistive modes are found to be destabilized by ion temperature fluctuations over a broad range of mode numbers. The scaling of the growth rate with magnetic shear and mode number is elucidated. 13 refs, 4 figs

  12. Neoclassical tearing modes in DIII-D and calculations of the stabilizing effects of localized electron cyclotron current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prater, R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Lohr, J.; Perkins, F. W.; Bernabei, S.; Wong, K.-L.; Harvey, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes are found to limit the achievable beta in many high performance discharges in DIII-D. Electron cyclotron current drive within the magnetic islands formed as the tearing mode grows has been proposed as a means of stabilizing these modes or reducing their amplitude, thereby increasing the beta limit by a factor around 1.5. Some experimental success has been obtained previously on Asdex-U. Here we examine the parameter range in DIII-D in which this effect can best be studied

  13. Failure mode and effect analysis: improving intensive care unit risk management processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Roohollah; Shafii, Milad; Rafiei, Sima; Abolhassani, Mohammad Sadegh; Salarikhah, Elaheh

    2017-04-18

    Purpose Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a practical tool to evaluate risks, discover failures in a proactive manner and propose corrective actions to reduce or eliminate potential risks. The purpose of this paper is to apply FMEA technique to examine the hazards associated with the process of service delivery in intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital in Yazd, Iran. Design/methodology/approach This was a before-after study conducted between March 2013 and December 2014. By forming a FMEA team, all potential hazards associated with ICU services - their frequency and severity - were identified. Then risk priority number was calculated for each activity as an indicator representing high priority areas that need special attention and resource allocation. Findings Eight failure modes with highest priority scores including endotracheal tube defect, wrong placement of endotracheal tube, EVD interface, aspiration failure during suctioning, chest tube failure, tissue injury and deep vein thrombosis were selected for improvement. Findings affirmed that improvement strategies were generally satisfying and significantly decreased total failures. Practical implications Application of FMEA in ICUs proved to be effective in proactively decreasing the risk of failures and corrected the control measures up to acceptable levels in all eight areas of function. Originality/value Using a prospective risk assessment approach, such as FMEA, could be beneficial in dealing with potential failures through proposing preventive actions in a proactive manner. The method could be used as a tool for healthcare continuous quality improvement so that the method identifies both systemic and human errors, and offers practical advice to deal effectively with them.

  14. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis in Increasing the Revenue of Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Rahmati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Successful performance of emergency department(ED is one of the important indications of increasing the satisfaction among referees. The insurance of such successful performance is fiscal discipline and avoiding from non-beneficial activities in this department. Therefore, the increasing revenue of emergency department is one of the interested goals of hospital management system. According to above-mentioned, the researchers assessed problems lead to loss the revenue of ED and eliminate them by using failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA.Methods: This was the prospective cohort study performed during 18 months, set in 6 phases. In the first phase, the failures were determined and some solutions suggested to eliminate them. During 2-5 phases, based on the prioritizing the problems, solutions were performed. In the sixth phase, final assessment of the study was done. Finally, the feedback of system’s revenue was evaluated and data analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA.Results: Lack of recording the consuming instrument and attribution of separate codes for emergency services of hospitalized patients were the most important failures that lead to decrease the revenue of ED. Such elimination caused to 75.9% increase in revenue within a month (df = 1.6; F = 84.0; p<0.0001.  Totally, 18 months following the eliminating of failures caused to 328.2% increase in the revenue of ED (df = 15.9; F = 215; p<0.0001.Conclusion: The findings of the present study shows that failure mode and effect analysis, can be used as a safe and effected method to reduce the expenses of ED and increase its revenue.

  15. A preliminary survey on mode choice and its effect in users’ satisfaction on their journey to the railway station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nur Fahriza Mohd; Sadullah, Ahmad Farhan Mohd; Zulkiple, Adnan

    2018-04-01

    This paper focuses on two lines of investigation with regard to mode choice to Klang Komuter Station. Firstly, the profile of the access modes on journeys to the railway station is analysed. Secondly, the relationship of users’ mode choice towards overall perception on traveling from home to the railway station is estimated. The data collection was conducted via Revealed Preferences / Stated Preferences (RP/SP) Survey. Meanwhile, the analysis that was implemented in this study was correspondence analysis. This paper discussed more on journey purposes and the effects of distances from home to the railway, users’ trip purposes and travel time between car and bus that was found to have an important effect on the users’ mode choice and their satisfaction on their journey to the railway station. The results show that users were more satisfied to reach the station by car instead of the bus.

  16. THE BLUESHIFTING AND BALDWIN EFFECTS FOR THE [O III] λ5007 EMISSION LINE IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kai; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Tinggui; Gaskell, C. Martin

    2011-01-01

    We use homogeneous samples of radio-quiet Seyfert 1 galaxies and QSOs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to investigate the connection between the velocity shift and the equivalent width (EW) of the [O III] λ5007 emission line, and their correlations with physical parameters of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find a significant and negative correlation between the EW of the core component, EW(core), and the blueshift of either the core (the peak), the wing, or the total profile of [O III] emission; it is fairly strong for the blueshift of the total profile in particular. However, both quantities (EW and velocity shift) generally have only weak, if any, correlations with fundamental AGN parameters such as the nuclear continuum luminosity at 5100 A ( 5100 ), black hole mass (M BH ), and the Eddington ratio (L/L Edd ); these correlations include the classical Baldwin effect of EW(core), an inverse Baldwin effect of EW(wing), and the relationship between velocity shifts and L/L Edd . Our findings suggest that both the large object-to-object variation in the strength of [O III] emission and the blueshift-EW(core) connection are not governed primarily by fundamental AGN parameters such as L 5100 , M BH , and L/L Edd . We propose that the interstellar medium conditions of the host galaxies play a major role instead in the diversity of the [O III] properties in active galaxies. This suggests that the use of [O III] λ5007 luminosity as a proxy of AGN luminosity does not depend strongly on the above-mentioned fundamental AGN parameters.

  17. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  18. Bio-production of Baccatin III, an Important Precursor of Paclitaxel by a Cost-Effective Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Ling; Wei, Tao; Lin, Jun-Fang; Guo, Li-Qiong; Wu, Guang-Pei; Wei, Jun-Bin; Huang, Jia-Jun; Ouyang, Ping-Lan

    2018-07-01

    Natural production of anti-cancer drug taxol from Taxus has proved to be environmentally unsustainable and economically unfeasible. Currently, bioengineering the biosynthetic pathway of taxol is an attractive alternative production approach. 10-deacetylbaccatin III-10-O-acetyl transferase (DBAT) was previously characterized as an acyltransferase, using 10-deacetylbaccatin III (10-DAB) and acetyl CoA as natural substrates, to form baccatin III in the taxol biosynthesis. Here, we report that other than the natural acetyl CoA (Ac-CoA) substrate, DBAT can also utilize vinyl acetate (VA), which is commercially available at very low cost, acylate quickly and irreversibly, as acetyl donor in the acyl transfer reaction to produce baccatin III. Furthermore, mutants were prepared via a semi-rational design in this work. A double mutant, I43S/D390R was constructed to combine the positive effects of the different single mutations on catalytic activity, and its catalytic efficiency towards 10-DAB and VA was successfully improved by 3.30-fold, compared to that of wild-type DBAT, while 2.99-fold higher than the catalytic efficiency of WT DBAT towards 10-DAB and Ac-CoA. These findings can provide a promising economically and environmentally friendly method for exploring novel acyl donors to engineer natural product pathways.

  19. Treatment and post-treatment effects of facemask therapy on the sagittal pharyngeal dimensions in Class III subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Mucedero, Manuela; Cozza, Paola

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this cephalometric study was to analyse the treatment and post-treatment craniofacial effects of a facemask (FM) combined with a bite block (BB) with specific regard to the sagittal pharyngeal dimensions in subjects with a Class III malocclusion when compared with an untreated Class III control group. The FM/BB group (22 subjects, 12 females and 10 males) had a mean age pre-treatment (T1) of 8.9 +/- 1.5 years, at the end of active treatment (T2) of 10.5 +/- 1.3 years, and post-treatment (T3) of 12.6 +/- 1.9 years. The treated group was compared with a control group of 14 subjects (6 females and 8 males) with untreated Class III malocclusions that matched the FM/BB group as to age at T1, T2, and T3, observation periods and skeletal maturation. Comparisons of the T2-T1 and T3-T1 changes between the two groups were analysed with the Mann-Whitney test. Significant favourable skeletal changes in the maxilla and mandible were observed in the treated group both after Ts2 and T3. No significant short- or long-term changes in the sagittal oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal airway dimensions were induced by maxillary protraction in subjects with a Class III malocclusion when compared with untreated controls.

  20. Through-Space Paramagnetic NMR Effects in Host-Guest Complexes: Potential Ruthenium(III) Metallodrugs with Macrocyclic Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyba, Jan; Novák, Martin; Munzarová, Petra; Novotný, Jan; Marek, Radek

    2018-04-05

    The potential of paramagnetic ruthenium(III) compounds for use as anticancer metallodrugs has been investigated extensively during the past several decades. However, the means by which these ruthenium compounds are transported and distributed in living bodies remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we prepared several novel ruthenium(III) compounds with the general structure Na + [ trans-Ru III Cl 4 (DMSO)(L)] - (DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide), where L stands for pyridine or imidazole linked with adamantane, a hydrophobic chemophore. The supramolecular interactions of these compounds with macrocyclic carriers of the cyclodextrin (CD) and cucurbit[ n]uril (CB) families were investigated by NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and relativistic DFT methods. The long-range hyperfine NMR effects of the paramagnetic guest on the host macrocycle are related to the distance between them and their relative orientation in the host-guest complex. The CD and CB macrocyclic carriers being studied in this account can be attached to a vector that attracts the drug-carrier system to a specific biological target and our investigation thus introduces a new possibility in the field of targeted delivery of anticancer metallodrugs based on ruthenium(III) compounds.

  1. Rethinking anaerobic As(III) oxidation in filters: Effect of indigenous nitrate respirers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jinli; Du, Jingjing; Tian, Haixia; Chan, Tingshan; Jing, Chuanyong

    2018-04-01

    Microorganisms play a key role in the redox transformation of arsenic (As) in aquifers. In this study, the impact of indigenous bacteria, especially the prevailing nitrate respirers, on arsenite (As(III)) oxidation was explored during groundwater filtration using granular TiO 2 and subsequent spent TiO 2 anaerobic landfill. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy analysis showed As(III) oxidation (46% in 10 days) in the presence of nitrate in the simulated anaerobic landfills. Meanwhile, iron (Fe) species on the spent TiO 2 were dominated by amorphous ferric arsenate, ferrihydrite and goethite. The Fe phase showed no change during the anaerobic landfill incubation. Batch incubation experiments implied that the indigenous bacteria completely oxidized As(III) to arsenate (As(V)) in 10 days using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. The bacterial community analysis indicated that various kinds of microbial species exist in groundwater matrix. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum, with Hydrogenophaga (34%), Limnohabitans (16%), and Simplicispira (7%) as the major bacterial genera. The nitrate respirers especially from the Hydrogenophaga genus anaerobically oxidized As(III) using nitrate as an electron acceptor instead of oxygen. Our study implied that microbes can facilitate the groundwater As oxidation using nitrate on the adsorptive media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intramedullary rodding in type III osteogenesis imperfecta. Effects on neuromotor development in 10 children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, R. H.; Helders, P. J.; Keessen, W.; Pruijs, H. E.; Gooskens, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    We studied retrospectively gross motor development and the impact of intramedullary rodding in 10 children with type III osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). There was a pronounced delay in motor development and the order in achieving gross motor milestones differed from the normal developmental sequence.

  3. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  4. Effect of thermomechanical treatment of the stress corrosion cracking of metastable beta III titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seats, J.H.; Condit, D.O.

    1974-01-01

    Results of studies on the relations of microstructural changes with stress corrosion of Ti--11.5 Mo--6 Zr--4.5 Sn (Beta III) alloys are presented. It was found that this alloy is virtually immune to stress corrosion cracking if no imperfections in the surface are present. Specimens that had not been cold worked showed surface deterioration, but it was not serious enough to cause any marked reduction in yield strengths. The alloy is, however, susceptible to SCC if the surface contains an imperfection such as a fatigue crack where high stresses can concentrate during testing. These high stress levels at the crack tip may cause mechanical destruction of the passivating oxide and allow a higher concentration of chloride ions near the fresh metal surfaces. However, even with precracked specimens, crack propagation is slow as evidenced by no failures within the 720 hour test period. The extreme notch sensitivity of Beta III prevented initiation of fatigue cracks in the sections of the alloy with 20 and 50 percent cold work. More research must be done to test Beta III in this condition. However, on the basis of the research conducted thus far, SCC susceptibility of Beta III titanium alloy appears to be independent of thermomechanical pretreatment. (U.S.)

  5. Revisiting The First Galaxies: The effects of Population III stars on their host galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muratov, Alexander L. [U. Michigan, Dept. Astron.; Gnedin, Oleg Y. [U. Michigan, Dept. Astron.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Zemp, Marcel [Beijing, KITPC

    2013-07-12

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H2 formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 108 years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 × 106 M re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  6. Optimisation of shock absorber process parameters using failure mode and effect analysis and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariajayaprakash, Arokiasamy; Senthilvelan, Thiyagarajan; Vivekananthan, Krishnapillai Ponnambal

    2013-07-01

    The various process parameters affecting the quality characteristics of the shock absorber during the process were identified using the Ishikawa diagram and by failure mode and effect analysis. The identified process parameters are welding process parameters (squeeze, heat control, wheel speed, and air pressure), damper sealing process parameters (load, hydraulic pressure, air pressure, and fixture height), washing process parameters (total alkalinity, temperature, pH value of rinsing water, and timing), and painting process parameters (flowability, coating thickness, pointage, and temperature). In this paper, the process parameters, namely, painting and washing process parameters, are optimized by Taguchi method. Though the defects are reasonably minimized by Taguchi method, in order to achieve zero defects during the processes, genetic algorithm technique is applied on the optimized parameters obtained by Taguchi method.

  7. Failure mode and effect analysis on safety critical components of space travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouroush Jenab

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sending men to space has never been an ordinary activity, it requires years of planning and preparation in order to have a chance of success. The payoffs of reliable and repeatable space flight are many, including both Commercial and Military opportunities. In order for reliable and repeatable space flight to become a reality, catastrophic failures need to be detected and mitigated before they occur. It can be shown that small pieces of a design which seem ordinary can create devastating impacts if not designed and tested properly. This paper will address the use of a Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA with modified Risk Priority Number (RPN and its application to safety critical design components of shuttle liftoff. An example will be presented here which specifically focuses on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs to illustrate the FMECA approach to reliable space travel.

  8. Three-dimensional photodissociation in strong laser fields: Memory-kernel effective-mode expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xuan; Thanopulos, Ioannis; Shapiro, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a method for the efficient computation of non-Markovian quantum dynamics for strong (and time-dependent) system-bath interactions. The past history of the system dynamics is incorporated by expanding the memory kernel in exponential functions thereby transforming in an exact fashion the non-Markovian integrodifferential equations into a (larger) set of ''effective modes'' differential equations (EMDE). We have devised a method which easily diagonalizes the EMDE, thereby allowing for the efficient construction of an adiabatic basis and the fast propagation of the EMDE in time. We have applied this method to three-dimensional photodissociation of the H 2 + molecule by strong laser fields. Our calculations properly include resonance-Raman scattering via the continuum, resulting in extensive rotational and vibrational excitations. The calculated final kinetic and angular distribution of the photofragments are in overall excellent agreement with experiments, both when transform-limited pulses and when chirped pulses are used.

  9. Selection and Mode Effects in Risk Preference Elicitation Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Gaudecker, Hans-Martin; van Soest, Arthur; Wengström, Erik Roland

    2008-01-01

    experiment is drastically below that of the representative sample in the Internet experiment, and average risk aversion is also lower. Considering the student-like subsample of the Internet subjects and comparing a traditional lab design with an Internet-like design in the lab gives two ways to decompose......We combine data from a risk preference elicitation experiment conducted on a representative sample via the Internet with laboratory data on students for the same experiment to investigate effects of implementation mode and of subject pool selection. We find that the frequency of errors in the lab...... shows that these processes are selective in selecting subjects who make fewer errors, but do not lead to biased conclusions on risk preferences. These findings point at the usefulness of the Internet survey as an alternative to a student pool in the laboratory if the ambition is to use the experiments...

  10. Failure mode effect analysis and fault tree analysis as a combined methodology in risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessiani, N. A.; Yoshio, F.

    2018-04-01

    There have been many studies reported the implementation of Failure Mode Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) as a method in risk management. However, most of the studies usually only choose one of these two methods in their risk management methodology. On the other side, combining these two methods will reduce the drawbacks of each methods when implemented separately. This paper aims to combine the methodology of FMEA and FTA in assessing risk. A case study in the metal company will illustrate how this methodology can be implemented. In the case study, this combined methodology will assess the internal risks that occur in the production process. Further, those internal risks should be mitigated based on their level of risks.

  11. Effect of step function-like perturbation on intermittent contact mode sensors: a response analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokavecz, Janos; Heszler, Peter; Toth, Zsolt; Mechler, Adam

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the intermittent contact mode (ICM) probe was investigated. In the experimental study we applied a step function signal to the Z piezo drive and recorded the amplitude signal of the probe while the probe was engaged with the surface. Transient overshoots appear at the edges of the steps. These transients are absent from the control contact force measurements, that is, they are proper to the ICM operation. The phenomenon was investigated by numerical calculations, focused on the effect of change of the drive frequency and the quality factor. We concluded, that the low value of the quality factor results in small transients and short settling time, which are necessary for fast atomic force microscopic operation. Simultaneously, the interaction force increases. Our calculations indicate that the tip-sample force can be lowered by setting the drive frequency slightly below the resonance

  12. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) for the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, D. L.; Blacklock, K.; Langhenry, M. T.

    1988-01-01

    The recertification of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) has included an extensive rewriting of the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL). The evolution of the groundrules and methodology used in the analysis is discussed and compared to standard FMEA techniques. Especially highlighted are aspects of the FMEA/CIL which are unique to the analysis of an SRM. The criticality category definitions are presented and the rationale for assigning criticality is presented. The various data required by the CIL and contribution of this data to the retention rationale is also presented. As an example, the FMEA and CIL for the SRM nozzle assembly is discussed in detail. This highlights some of the difficulties associated with the analysis of a system with the unique mission requirements of the Space Shuttle.

  13. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis on ITER DFLL-TBM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Liqin; Yuan Run; Chen Hongli; Bai Yunqing

    2012-01-01

    As required for licensing process, accident analyses of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) accounting for site specifications and design changes will be updated. Chinese Dual-Functional Lithium-Lead-Test Blanket Module (DFLL-TBM) system is a key safety-related component of ITER, its detailed safety analysis, which was designated to demonstrate the integrated technologies of both Helium single coolant (SLL) blanket and Helium-LiPb dual coolant (DLL) blanket, was performed. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) was applied to perform the safety analysis of DFLL-TBM. This study described the process of FMEA studies on DFLL-TBM system. All safety-related Postulated Initiating Events (PIEs) was identified. And a set of PIEs recommended to be taken into account in the further deterministic transient analyses were defined for both SLL and DLL blanket concepts separately.

  14. Effect of heating on the suppression of tearing modes in tokamaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, I G J; Westerhof, E; Domier, C W; Donné, A J H; Jaspers, R J E; Luhmann, N C; Park, H K; van de Pol, M J; Spakman, G W; Jakubowski, M W

    2007-01-19

    The suppression of (neoclassical) tearing modes is of great importance for the success of future fusion reactors like ITER. Electron cyclotron waves can suppress islands, both by driving noninductive current in the island region and by heating the island, causing a perturbation to the Ohmic plasma current. This Letter reports on experiments on the TEXTOR tokamak, investigating the effect of heating, which is usually neglected. The unique set of tools available on TEXTOR, notably the dynamic ergodic divertor to create islands with a fully known driving term, and the electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic to provide detailed 2D electron temperature information, enables a detailed study of the suppression process and a comparison with theory.

  15. Development of an Automated Technique for Failure Modes and Effect Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, M.; Borch, Ole; Allasia, G.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in automation have provided integration of monitoring and control functions to enhance the operator's overview and ability to take remedy actions when faults occur. Automation in plant supervision is technically possible with integrated automation systems as platforms, but new design...... methods are needed to cope efficiently with the complexity and to ensure that the functionality of a supervisor is correct and consistent. In particular these methods are expected to significantly improve fault tolerance of the designed systems. The purpose of this work is to develop a software module...... implementing an automated technique for Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA). This technique is based on the matrix formulation of FMEA for the investigation of failure propagation through a system. As main result, this technique will provide the design engineer with decision tables for fault handling...

  16. Development of an automated technique for failure modes and effect analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Borch, Ole; Bagnoli, F.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in automation have provided integration of monitoring and control functions to enhance the operator's overview and ability to take remedy actions when faults occur. Automation in plant supervision is technically possible with integrated automation systems as platforms, but new design...... methods are needed to cope efficiently with the complexity and to ensure that the functionality of a supervisor is correct and consistent. In particular these methods are expected to significantly improve fault tolerance of the designed systems. The purpose of this work is to develop a software module...... implementing an automated technique for Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA). This technique is based on the matrix formulation of FMEA for the investigation of failure propagation through a system. As main result, this technique will provide the design engineer with decision tables for fault handling...

  17. An Evaluation of the Low-Carbon Effects of Urban Rail Based on Mode Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Urban rail is widely considered to be a form of low-carbon green transportation, but there is a lack of specific quantitative research to support this. By comparing the mode, distance, and corresponding energy consumption of residents before and after the opening of rail transit, this paper establishes a carbon reduction method for rail transit. A measurement model takes the passenger carbon emissions before the line is opened as the baseline and compares them with the standard after the opening, determining the carbon emissions reduction. The model requires a combination of a large amount of research data, transit smart card data, and GIS network measurement tools as measured data and parameters. The model is then applied to rail transit lines that have opened in Beijing in recent years. The emissions reductions of four different routes are estimated and the carbon emissions reduction effect of rail transit is evaluated.

  18. The Effect of Displacement Mode of Rigid Retaining Walls on Shearing Bands by Active Earth Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sekkel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work treats the physical modeling of failure mechanisms by active earth pressure. This last is developed by retaining wall movement. A lot of research showed that wall displacement has a significant effect on active earth pressure. A good comprehension of active earth pressure phenomenon and its failure mechanisms help us to better conceive retaining walls. The conception of a small-scale model allowed the realization of active earth pressure tests, while displacing the mobile wall toward the outside of the massif. The studied material is that of Schneebeli; light two-dimensional material made of cylindrical plastic rollers, simulating granular non-cohesive soil. The evolution of shearing zones under continuous and discontinuous displacement modes of mobile walls by correlation pictures allows the investigation of the localization of deformations and failure mechanisms.

  19. Excellent polarization-independent reflector based on guided mode resonance effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Cheng; Xu Lin-Min; Qiang Ying-Huai; Zhu Ya-Bo; Liu Jiong-Tian; Ma Jian-Yong

    2011-01-01

    A broad band polarization-independent reflector working in the telecommunication C+L band is proposed using the guided mode resonance effect of a periodic surface relief element deposited by a layer of silicon medium. It is shown that this structure can provide high reflection (R > 99.5%) and wide angular bandwidth (θ ≈ 20°, R > 98%) for both TE and TM polarizations over a wide spectrum band 1.5 μm∼1.6 μm. Furthermore, it is found by rigorous coupled wave analysis that the polarization-independent reflector proposed here is tolerant of a deviation of grating thickness, which makes it very easy to fabricate in experiments. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  20. GHz-bandwidth upconversion detector using a unidirectional ring cavity to reduce multilongitudinal mode pump effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lichun; Høgstedt, Lasse; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient upconversion of modulated infrared (IR) signals over a wide bandwidth (up to frequencies in excess of 1 GHz) via cavity-enhanced sum-frequency generation (SFG) in a periodically poled LiNbO3. Intensity modulated IR signal is produced by combining beams from two 1547 nm...... narrow-linewidth lasers in a fiber coupler while tuning their wavelength difference down to 10 pm or less. The SFG crystal is placed inside an Nd:YVO4 ring cavity that provides 1064 nm circulating pump powers of up to 150 W in unidirectional operation. Measured Fabry-Perot spectrum at 1064 nm confirms...... the enhanced spectral stability from multiple to single longitudinal mode pumping condition. We describe analytically and demonstrate experimentally the deleterious effects of using a multimode pump to the high-bandwidth RF spectrum of the 630 nm SFG output. Offering enhanced sensitivity without the need...