WorldWideScience

Sample records for mochovce final treatment

  1. Mochovce waste treatment centre

    Sedliak, D.; Endrody, J.

    2000-01-01

    The first unit of the Mochovce NPP (WWER 440 MW) was put in a test operation in October 1998. The second unit with the same power output was put in the test operation in March 2000. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic in its Decision No. 318/98 of 28 October 1998, by which an agreement with the operation of the Unit 1 of the Mochovce. Nuclear Power Plant was issued, requires to start the construction of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Centre until January 2004. The subject of this presentation is a system description of the Liquid Radioactive Waste (LRW) management in the Mochovce NPP. The initial part is dedicated to a short description of the radioactive waste management legislation requirements. Then the presentation continues with an information about the LRW production in the Mochovce NPP, LRW sources, chemical and radiochemical attributes, description of storage. The presentation also provides real values of its production in a comparison with the design data. The LRW production minimization principles are also mentioned there. Another part deals with the basic requirements for the technology proposal of the liquid RW treatment, especially concerning the acceptance criteria at the Republic RW Repository Mochovce. The final part is devoted to a short description of the investment procedure principles - design preparation levels and a proposed construction schedule of the centre. (authors)

  2. Mochovce site

    1997-01-01

    In Mochovce site the construction of four units of WWER 440 NPP with V-213 type of reactor is being carried out. The financing of Mochovce units completion was resolved in April 1996. The completion work commenced at the construction site under leadership of SKODA Prague, the general supplier. The completion work on building part and tests of constructional electric distributions and lightning constructors started. The revisions in technological part were finished, and final protocols from revisions are the basis for starting of completion work. The assembly of transport container anchorage,ventilation system in hermetic areas and hermetic coverage of pools for stored spent nuclear fuel is being carried out. The pre-completion tests of instrumentation and control of ventilation systems, individual dosimetric control in medical station, and tests of nuclear programme according to commissioning and assembling work schedule at the equipment for physical protection of the NPP area started. Inspection activities at Mochovce were performed in accordance with inspection plan for 1996. Evaluation of routine inspections was performed by means of quarterly protocols. Main findings from the inspections performed in Mochovce were in the following areas: (a) deficiencies in the knowledge of the respective regulation and conditions from the Resolution of the state regulatory body, concerning selected employees; (b) training of the selected employees; (c) aim of the measures imposes by inspectors is to eliminate deficiencies in preparation of programmes for pre-completion and completion testing. NRA SR assessment activities at Mochovce NPP were focused mainly on approving and inspecting of design modification to approving programmes for pre-completion and completion testing of system s and equipment and on approving quality assurance programmes. The suggestions of international missions, which reviewed Mochovce safety in the years, were taken into consideration in the programme

  3. National radioactive wasterRepository Mochovce

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the scheme of the Mochovce National radioactive waste repository for the Slovak Republic is presented. The National radioactive waste repository in Mochovce is a surface type storage facility. It is intended for final disposal of solid and solidified low and intermediate radioactive waste produced during the operation of nuclear power plants and institutions located within the territory of the Slovak Republic. The Repository site is situated about 2 km northwest to the Mochovce NPP

  4. Final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes

    Svolik, S.

    2004-01-01

    Final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes which are produced by 1 st and 2 nd bloc of the Mochovce NPP, prepares the NPP in its natural range. The purpose of the equipment is liquidation of wastes, which are formed at production. Wastes are warehoused in the building of active auxiliary plants in the present time, where are reservoirs in which they are deposited. Because they are already feeling and in 2006 year they should be filled definitely, it is necessary to treat them in that manner, so as they may be liquidated. Therefore the Board of directors of the Slovenske elektrarne has disposed about construction of final treatment of liquid radioactive wastes in the Mochovce NPP. Because of transport the wastes have to be treated in the locality of power plant. Technically, the final treatment of the wastes will be interconnected with building of active operation by bridges. These bridges will transport the wastes for treatment into processing centre

  5. Mochovce Unit 3 and 4 Completion

    Aquilanti, G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of the Feasibility Study was to define in detail all technical, economic, financial, legal and authorization aspects of Mochovce NPP Unit 3 and 4 completion in order to provide Slovenske Elektrarne, a. s. (SE) and ENEL Top Management with all the necessary information for a final decision on Mochovce Unit 3 and 4. Feasibility study has started in January 2006. SE had the commitment to complete the Feasibility Study within 12 months from Closing of SE acquisition (April 2007). In order not to delay completion of Mochovce Unit 3 and 4, SE has decided to perform, in parallel to the Feasibility study, also all design and permitting activities which are required for the completion of Plant. This has involved anticipation of expenses for approximately 700 MSKK (or approx. 20 MEuro). SE was able to announce the positive decision about completion on Mochovce NPP Unit 3 and 4, two months in advance of the deadline.

  6. Mochovce NPP simulator

    Ziakova, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mochovce NPP simulator basic features and detailed description of its characteristics are presented with its performance, certification and application for training of NPP operators as well as the training scenario

  7. Performance assessment of Mochovce repository

    Mrskova, A; Hanusik, V [Dept. of Accident Management and Risk Assessment, Vyskumny Ustav Jadrovych Elektrarni, Trnava (Slovakia)

    2000-07-01

    The near-surface disposal site at Mochovce is designed for low-level and intermediate level radioactive waste. It is a vault-type concrete structure housing the reinforced concrete containers as the final waste packages. This paper shortly presents the long-term safety analysis methods applied for the post-closure phase of the repository. The main aim of paper is description of the philosophy of analysis, development of the scenarios, their modeling and comparing of the results of normal evolution scenario, alternative scenario and intruders scenario for some radionuclides. (author)

  8. Performance assessment of Mochovce repository

    Mrskova, A.; Hanusik, V.

    2000-01-01

    The near-surface disposal site at Mochovce is designed for low-level and intermediate level radioactive waste. It is a vault-type concrete structure housing the reinforced concrete containers as the final waste packages. This paper shortly presents the long-term safety analysis methods applied for the post-closure phase of the repository. The main aim of paper is description of the philosophy of analysis, development of the scenarios, their modeling and comparing of the results of normal evolution scenario, alternative scenario and intruders scenario for some radionuclides. (author)

  9. National Radwaste Repository Mochovce

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mochovce (Repository) is described. The Mochovce National Radioactive Waste Repository is a surface multi-barrier type storage facility for solid and treated solidified radioactive wastes generated from the Slovak Republic nuclear power plants operation and decommissioning, research institutes, laboratories and hospitals. The Repository comprises a system of single- and double-row storage boxes. The first double-row is enclosed by a steel-structure building. The 18 x 6 x 5.5 m storage boxes are made of reinforced concrete. The wall thickness is 600 mm. Two-double-rows, i.e. 80 storage boxes were built as part of Stage I (1 row = 20 storage boxes). Each storage box has a storage capacity of 90 fibre concrete containers of 3.1 m 3 volume. The total storage capacity is 7200 containers with the overall storage volume of 22320 m 3

  10. The seismic reassessment Mochovce NPP

    Baumeister, P.

    2004-01-01

    The design of Mochovce NPP was based on the Novo-Voronez type WWER-440/213 reactor - twin units. Seismic characteristic of this region is characterized by very low activity. Mochovce NPP site is located on the rock soil with volcanic layer (andesit). Seismic reassessment of Mochovce NPP was done in two steps: deterministic approach up to commissioning confirmed value Horizontal Peak Ground Acceleration HPGA=0.1 g and activities after commissioning as a consequence of the IAEA mission indicate higher hazard values. (author)

  11. Recent history of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    Holy, R.

    1999-01-01

    Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant has been an open project involving a wide international co-operation of numerous organisations of countries stretching from the Atlantic coast up to the Urals that make it a truly European project. The units at Mochovce are the later V-213 type of Soviet-designed WWER-440 reactors. They therefore incorporate a number of improvements over the earlier V-230 type. There are four units at Mochovce site: unit 1 has been in operation since summer 1998, unit 2 is currently in the stage of commissioning tests and scheduled for operation by the end of this year, and unit 3 and 4 are still waiting for the final governmental decision about their completion, currently 40% and 30% completed respectively. Beginning in 1981, the construction works were stopped in early 90's due to the decision on replacement of the original I and C system, as well as lack of funding afterwards. Slovenske elektrarne, a.s. have been working to resuscitate the project focusing initially on completion of the units 1 and 2 with assistance of western companies. one month later the governmental guarantees were given for loans and Slovenske elektrarne signed loan agreements to finance the project completion, as well as construction completion agreements with contractors. (Author)

  12. Radioactive waste handling at the Mochovce NPP, 1998-2008

    Vasickova, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    The radioactive waste management system at the Mochovce NPP is described. The system addresses technical aspects as well as administrative provisions related to radioactive waste generated within the controlled area, from the waste generation phase to waste sorting, packaging, storage, recording, measurement, and transportation to the Bohunice waste processing facility or transfer to the Mochovce liquid radioactive waste treatment facility. The article also addresses conditions for release from the controlled area to the environment for radioactive waste which can be exempt from the institutional administrative control system or released to the environment on the basis of a valid permission issued by the relevant regulatory authority

  13. Safety culture at Mochovce NPP

    Markus, Jozef; Feik, Karol

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the approach of Mochovce NPP to the Safety culture. It presents activities, which have been taken by Mochovce NPP up to date in the area of Safety culture enhancement with the aim of getting the term into the subconscious of each employee, and thus minimising the human factor impact on occurrence of operational events in all safety areas. The article furthermore presents the most essential information on how the elements characterising a continuous progress in reaching the planned Safety culture goals of the company management have been implemented at Mochovce NPP, as well as the management's efforts to get among the best nuclear power plant operators in this area and to be an example for the others. (author)

  14. Safety upgrading program in NPP Mochovce

    Baumeister, P.

    1999-01-01

    EMO interest is to operate only nuclear power plants with high standards of nuclear safety. This aim EMO declare on preparation completion and commissioning of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant. Wide co-operation of our company with International Atomic Energy Agency and west European Inst.ions and companies has been started with aim to fulfil the nuclear safety requirements for Mochovce NPP. Set of 87 safety measures was implemented at Mochovce Unit 1 and is under construction at Unit 2. Mochovce NPP approach to safety upgrading implementation is showed on chosen measures. This presentation is focused on the issues category III.(author)

  15. Slovak Electric, plc, Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    2000-01-01

    In this popular scientific brochure a brief description of history construction of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant is presented. The chart of electricity generation in WWER 440/V-213 nuclear power plant is described. Operation and safety improvements at Mochovce NPP as well as environment protection are presented. Basic data of Mochovce NPP are included

  16. EGP contribution to Mochovce completion, safety enhancement and operation

    Letko, A.; Matula, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Re-Evaluation Programme of Mochovce NPP was created in 1995 as an integral part of the completion of the Unit 1 and Unit 2. This program analyzed the general fulfillment of the principle of nuclear safety in the NPP Mochovce project. The analysis has required new corrections of the project, so that the project met the higher safety requirements when starting production. 87 safety measures represent the 'Program'. The basis for their creation were the international missions from 1992 to 1995 which defined. The final safety aim was represented by 'The Technical Specification of the Safety Measures' supported by The Nuclear Power Plant Research Institute and recommended by The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. The technical specification served as a qualified base for the next steps in the pre-project, project and realization stages. (author)

  17. NPP Mochovce nuclear safety enhancement program

    Cech, J.; Baumester, P.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear power plant Mochovce is currently under construction and an extensive nuclear safety enhancement programme is under way. The upgrading and modifications are based on IAEA documents and on those of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. Based on a contract concluded with Riskaudit from the CEC, safety examinations of the Mochovce design were performed. An extensive list of technical specifications of safety measures is given. (M.D.)

  18. Pavol Rusko brings up Mochovce again

    Janoska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Minister of Economy of the Slovak Republic Pavol Rusko would like to see the power plant in Mochovce finished. Press agency SITA quoted his statement that in case of privatisation of Slovenske elektrarne (SE), a.s., Bratislava investor should be searched that would be willing to complete the third and fourth blocks of the nuclear power plant. Last week a tender for sale of a 49-percent stake in SE was repeatedly launched when a privatisation advertisement was published in local and international press. Through a resolution announced last summer the cabinet allowed other companies to participate in the tender (as a reaction interest shown by Czech CEZ). CEZ would be interested in all areas of SE and not only in its conventional part as the other prospects. It is well possible that the number of prospects interested in nuclear energy may increase. Boss of SE, Miroslav Rapsik shares this view and last week announced that there would be probably at least two or three prospects that may be interested in SE as a whole. Amongst them some Russian companies. General Manager and Chairman of Board of Directors, Jaroslav Mil does not wasn't to speculate on under what conditions CEZ may agree with completing of Mochovce. He adds that building any source of nuclear power anywhere in Europe is very difficult without a clear support of wide political spectrum of the specific country. And he needs another assurance: that the cabinet would guarantee that it would eliminate all political pressure from side of the European Union.' In regards to a semi-finished source, according to J. Mil, it made a difference whether this was offered free or with all the fixed costs. 'First we have to see the figures,' he adds. Works on the third and fourth block were stopped in 1992 due to lack of funds. Based on the advise of privatisation advisor the semi-finished blocks were taken out of the privatisation. According to latest analysis the finalization would cost up to 43 billion Sk (1.04 billion

  19. Final Treatment Center Project for Liquid and Wet Radioactive Waste in Slovakia

    Kravarik, K.; Stubna, M.; Pekar, A.; Krajc, T.; Zatkulak, M.; Holicka, Z.; Slezak, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Final Treatment Center (FTC) for Mochovce nuclear power plant (NPP) is designed for treatment and final conditioning of radioactive liquid and wet waste produced from plant operation. Mochovce NNP uses a Russian VVER-440 type reactor. Treated wastes comprise radioactive concentrates, spent resin and sludge. VUJE Inc. as an experienced company in field of treatment of radioactive waste in Slovakia has been chosen as main contractor for technological part of FTC. This paper describes the capacity, flow chart, overall waste flow and parameters of the main components in the FTC. The initial project was submitted for approval to the Slovak Electric plc. in 2003. The design and manufacture of main components were performed in 2004 and 2005. FTC construction work started early in 2004. Initial non-radioactive testing of the system is planned for summer 2006 and then radioactive tests are to be followed. A one-year trial operation of facility is planned for completion in 2007. SE - VYZ will be operates the FTC during trial operation and after its completion. SE - VYZ is subsidiary company of Slovak Electric plc. and it is responsible for treatment with radioactive waste and spent fuel in the Slovak republic. SE - VYZ has, besides of other significant experience with operation of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. The overall capacity of the FTC is 870 m 3 /year of concentrates and 40 m 3 /year of spent resin and sludge. Bituminization and cementation were provided as main technologies for treatment of these wastes. Treatment of concentrate is performed by bituminization. Concentrate and bitumen are metered into a thin film evaporator with rotating wiping blades. Surplus water is evaporated and concentrate salts are embedded in bitumen. Bitumen product is discharged into 200 l steel drums. Spent resin and sludge are decanted, dried and mixed with bitumen. These mixtures are also discharged into 200 l steel drums. Drums are moved along bituminization line on a roller

  20. Slovakia: Mochovce NPP. Project control. Annex 10

    Bodorik, K.

    1999-01-01

    This annex deals with project control. Mochovce NPP suffered considerable delay primarily due to lack of money. This situation was corrected and construction resumed in 1996. Throughout the 'dormant' period the plant received considerable support from the major contractors, who maintained skeleton staff at site. Significant safety and managerial improvements are being introduced and a strategic plan for the plant has been developed. (author)

  1. Regulatory requirements for demonstration of the achieved safety level at the Mochovce NPP before commissioning

    Lipar, M.

    1997-01-01

    A review of regulatory requirements for demonstration of the achieved safety level at the Mochovce NPP before commissioning is given. It contains licensing steps in Slovakia during commissioning; Status and methodology of Mochovce safety analysis report; Mochovce NPP safety enhancement program; Regulatory body policy towards Mochovce NPP safety enhancement; Recent development in Mochovce pre-operational safety enhancement program review and assessment process; Licensing steps in Slovakia during commissioning

  2. Mochovce NPP safety improvement and completion

    1997-01-01

    6th Nuclear society information meeting dealt with the completion of the Mochovce NPP with regard to implementation of safety measures. It was aimed to next problems: I. 'Survey' presentation on the situation of the nuclear power industry in partner countries; II. Basic technical presentations; III. Presentations of operators of the other VVER 440/213 NPPs on their activities in the field of safety improvement in relation to IAEA recommendations; IV. Technical solutions of safety improvements ranked with IAEA degree 3 (Report SC 108 VVER); V: Technical solutions of selected Safety Measures ranked with IAEA degree 2 and 1 (Report SC 108 VVER)

  3. NPP Mochovce units 1 and 2 diagnostic systems

    Heidenreich, S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the diagnostic systems (leak detection monitoring, vibration monitoring, lose parts monitoring, fatigue monitoring) of NPP Mochovce units 1 and 2 are presented. All of the designed diagnostic systems are personal computer based systems

  4. The confirmation audit in Mochovce nuclear power plant

    Andlova, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Mochovce NPP, as the first plant of the Slovenske elektrarne, a. s., has obtained certificate for the environmental management system (EMS) in September 2002, which was established according to the standard STN ISO 14 001:1996. The Audit EMS was executed by the Det Norske Veritas. Mochovce NPP has obtained the EMS Certificate after compliance of process requests and it is valid for three years. After expire of this period the certification process must be repeated. (author)

  5. Criticality safety analysis of spent fuel storage for NPP Mochovce using MCNP5

    Farkas, G.; Hascik, J.; Lueley, J.; Vrban, B.; Petriska, M.; Slugen, V.; Urban, P.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents results of nuclear criticality safety analysis of spent fuel storage for the first and second unit of NPP Mochovce. The spent fuel storage pool (compact and reserve grid) was modeled using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. Conservative approach was applied and calculation of k eff values was performed for normal and various postulated emergency conditions in order to evaluate the final maximal k eff values. The requirement of current safety regulations to ensure 5% subcriticality was met except one especially conservative case. (Authors)

  6. Experience with drilling and blasting work during construction of Mochovce nuclear power plant

    Mraz, M.; Vojta, A.; Podel, R.

    1986-01-01

    The results are discussed of four years of investigating the technical and economic parameters of drilling and blasting equipment employed on the building site of the Mochovce nuclear power plant. The technical and operating characteristics are given of tested breaking and drilling sets manufactured by various foreign companies. The final choice was based on output, hard currency prices, power demand, operating reliability and number of personnel required for operation. The optimal set consists of two Hausherr HBM 70 drilling systems (holes with a diameter of 130 to 150 mm) and two ROC 601-02 Atlas Copco machines (auxiliary work, breaking foundation holes for nuclear reactors). (J.C.)

  7. Mochovce power plant units 3 and 4

    Cuba, J.

    2003-01-01

    The report gives the basic technical data and history of the construction of the units 3 and 4 of the Mochovce NPP.The current status of the units completion according to the original plan is: civil part - 70%; mechanical part - 30%; electric and IC equipment - 1%. Strategic plan for the preservation of the units 3 and 4 has been developed in accordance with TECDOC-1110. In implementation of the plan preservation activities are performed for the components located and built-in on the site and in storehouses. Preservation with dryers and protective coatings is applied. The factors of possible component degradation are determined. Ventilation components are used for improving the climate conditions in the primary part of the reactor building. Temperature and humidity measurements are done and temperature control is set. Special pre-service inspections beyond the basic scope of preservation and protection works are conducted of steam generator and reactor pressure vessel. The implementation of the design data protection and enhancement is discussed. The feasibility study of units 3 and 4 completion funding has been developed in 2002

  8. Fiddle at financing of Mochovce NPP

    Beer, G.

    2003-01-01

    Slovak police found out and documented racket in financing of third and fourth block of Mochovce NPP. Damage should be 144 millions Slovak crowns. Investigator consequently accused twenty-three Slovaks from foundation, trump up and supporting of criminal group and deception. Two persons are suggested to be taken to custody. Skoda Praha, which was general supplier of construction for 1,5 billions Slovak crowns, in 2001 allowed to create a connection to let the finances between Slovenske elektrarne, a.s., Bratislava as investor and Skoda as subcontractor to be paid through three mediator companies. Companies got authorization to balance the relationship among all interested subjects. Confused network of 118 treaties was created. They invoiced reward from money current based on these treaties. Reward represented up to 70 per cent of transferred resources in some cases. According to Minister of Domestic Affairs Vladimir Palko it will be necessary to find out where is actually the money. For the time being nobody from NPP is among accused. (Author)

  9. The commission of independent experts has labeled Mochovce as safe

    Grujbar, V.

    1998-01-01

    An independent commission of experts, appointed by IAEA, said that it did not find any faults concerning the integrity of the pressure vessel of the reactor in first block of the NPP Mochovce. The commission, comprising experts from the U.S.A., Belgium, Finland, Germany and Russia, was given the same documents as the Austrian mission, appointed by the office of the Austrian Chancellor, in May. The Austrian experts then expressed two serious concerns about the security of the first block in Mochovce.The experts of the IAEA agreed that the real condition of Mochovce is a lot better that shown in the technical documentation and they did not find any faults. IAEA was in this case, for the first time, an arbiter solving an international dispute about security of a NPP

  10. Development and implementation of symptom based EOP for Mochovce NPP

    Zold, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture the history and problems concerning the development and implementation of symptom based emergency operating procedures at the Mochovce NPP are reviewed. In order to increase the safety of nuclear installations and their operation at Mochovce a new programme of Safety measures has been worked out, the core of which are the safety rules administratively labeled as OP-02 introducing the symptom - oriented Emergency operating procedures. Following the selection of partners by the Slovenske Elektrarne power Company a contract was signed with US Westinghouse to work out symptom - based EOPs for the Mochovce power plant to be certified by a letter of approval by Westinghouse in November 1998. Subsequent phases of whole programme for development of EOPs were divided as follows: Phase 1 - Preparation phase; Phase 2 - Emergency operating guideline development and Phase 3 - Emergency operating procedures development and validation

  11. Polish media and public opinion on NPP Mochovce commissioning

    Latek, Stanislaw

    1999-01-01

    The so called 'Mochovce Problem' was one of the major topics in Polish media in the period from May to July 1998. The nuclear power plant commissioning caused an unexpectedly strong reaction, especially in the newspapers, slightly less so in electronic media. Faced with clearly hostile media reaction to Mochovce NPP, the National Atomic Energy Agency representatives, together with atomic and nuclear experts, undertook to change these attitudes. In numerous interviews, letters to the editors and talks with journalists, they attempted to correct the mistakes, explain the true safety situation in the nuclear power plant, by whom it was constructed, who supervised and tested the systems and so on. The completion of Mochovce NPP construction improved significantly the electricity balance in Slovakia, thus decreasing the pressure for continuing the operation of older Bohunice V1 units beyond their design lifetime. For this reason, as well as in view of striving for improvement in environmental factors beyond Polish southern border, especially after Kyoto/97 decisions on greenhouse gases emissions, the public opinion in Poland should support the Mochovce NPP construction. In 1996 Poland has signed with Slovakia a bilateral inter-governmental agreement on the prompt notification on nuclear accidents and on the cooperation in the nuclear safety and radiological protection matters. On the basis of this agreement the experts from Polish National Atomic Energy Agency are in perpetual contact with Slovakian Nuclear Regulatory Body and in each and every moment can obtain full and comprehensive information on the plant parameters iportant for nuclear safety. The experts explanations, together with the NAEA top management visit to the plant itself, brought some results. The media became less aggressive, and Polish public and authorities - contrary to the Austrians - do not protest loudly against the commissioning of this newest European NPP. Now, in December 1998, the tune of

  12. Human reliability analysis approach to level 1 PSA - shutdown and low power operation of Mochovce NPP, Unit 1, Slovakia

    Stojka, Tibor; Holy, Jaroslav

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents general approach, used methods and form of documentation of the results as have been applied within the Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) task of the shutdown and low power PSA (SPSA) study for Mochovce nuclear power plant, Unit 1, Slovakia. The paper describes main goals of the HRA task within the SPSA project, applied methods and data sources. Basic steps of the HRA task and human errors (HE) classification are also specified in its first part. The main part of the paper deals with pre-initiator human errors, human-induced initiators and response to initiator human errors. Since the expert judgment method (SLIM) was used for the last type of human errors probability assessment, also related activities are described including preparation works (performance shaping factors (PSFs) selection, development of PSF classification tables, preparation of aid tools for interview with plant experts), qualitative analysis (sources of information and basic steps) and quantitative analysis itself (human errors classification for final quantification including criteria used for the classification, description of structure of the spreadsheet used for quantification and treatment with dependencies). The last part of the paper describes form of documentation of the final results and provides some findings. (author)

  13. External hazards analysis approach to level 1 PSA of Mochovce NPP - Slovakia

    Stojka, Tibor

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of external events had been first time performed at the design stage of the Mochovce NPP showing sufficiently low contribution of external hazards to core damage frequency. But, based on IAEA document 'Safety problems of WWER-440/213 NPPs and the categorization' (IAEA-EBP-WWER-03, 1996), the need of new reassessment arose due to discrepancy of some origin recommendations in compare with present IAEA ones. Mochovce NPP Nuclear Safety Improvements Program elaborated at the same time included the IAEA recommendations and following improvements were proposed to perform in context of external events. 1. Seismic project and new locality seismic evaluation This safety improvement includes also some 'on site' technical improvements in seismic stability of structures and equipment. 2. Unit specific analyses of extreme meteorologic conditions. This safety improvement focuses on impact of feasible extreme conditions on NPP systems caused by rain, snow and hail storms, frost, winds, low and high temperatures. 3. Analyses of external hazards caused by humans. In this safety improvement were specified: feasible sources of explosions; analyses of hydrogen, gas and propane-calor gas depots; air crash risk. The results of these implemented safety improvements were considered in the PSA study. The External hazards analysis is also part of Level 1 PSA Mochovce NPP performed by PSA Department of VUJE Trnava Inc., Engineering, Design and Research Organization, Slovakia. Some partial analyses are performed in cooperation with following companies DS and S - SAIC, USA and Geophysical Institute Academy of Science, Slovakia Relko, Slovakia. Basic documents are: NUREG/CR-2300 'PRA Procedures Guide - A Guide to the Performance of Probabilistic Risk Assessments for Nuclear Power Plants' and IAEA SS No. 50-P-7 'Treatment of External Hazards in PSA for NPPs. The external hazards analysis consists of following parts: 1. Geography and plant locality; 2. Nearby industry; 3. Extreme

  14. Press travel to the Mochovce power plant in Slovakia

    1998-07-01

    This press dossier gives, first, a general presentation of the Mochovce power plant of the republic of Slovakia (history, technical characteristics, safety aspects, technical particularities of VVER 440/213 reactors (safety analysis, recent improvements), financing of the modernization project). Then, the activities of the Framatome group in central and eastern Europe are presented (partnerships, cooperation agreements and contracts). (J.S.)

  15. Preparation of physics commissioning of Mochovce units 3 and 4

    Sedlacek, M.; Chrapciak, V.

    2010-01-01

    The Project 'Mochovce Units 3 and 4 Completion' started in 2009 and it will be finished in 2013. VUJE, Inc. is one of the five main Project contractors for the Nuclear Island and it is responsible, inter alia, for Mochovce Units 3 and 4 commissioning. The commissioning of Units 3 and 4 includes the stages of Physics Commissioning and Power Commissioning. This paper deals with the preparation of Mochovce Units 3 and 4 Physics Commissioning. In the paper there is presented a preparation of some commissioning documents, e.g. 'Quality Assurance Programme', 'Commissioning Programme', 'Stage Programme for Physics Commissioning', 'Test working programmes', 'Neutron-physics characteristics for Physics and Power Commissioning', etc. The scope of Physics Commissioning is presented by list of tests. For assessment of tests results so-called three-level acceptance criteria will be applied: realization, design and safety criteria. In the paper there are also presented computer codes, which will be used for neutron-physics characteristics calculation and the fuel loading scheme for the reactor core of Mochovce Unit 3. (Authors)

  16. Fire protection at the Mochovce nuclear power plant

    Molnarova, Zuzana; Zeman, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A succinct account is given of current situation in fire prevention at the Mochovce NPP and of past fire events. The fact is stressed that no fire ever occurred at any technological facility of the plant since the startup of the reactor units. Steps required to improve fire safety at a nuclear power plant are highlighted. (orig.)

  17. Radwaste treatment and disposal

    Ehn, L.; Breza, M.; Pekar, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this lecture is given the basic information, that is concerning on the RAW treatment and long term disposal of the treated RAW in repository at Mochovce. Then here is given the basic technical and technological information, that is concerning bituminization, plant, the vitrification unit, center for the RAW-treatment (BSC) and repository at Mochovce. (authors)

  18. EDF Contribution to the Mochovce completion and safety upgrading project

    Norvez, G.

    1997-01-01

    The challenge that SE a.s. took up in April 1996 to start Mochovce units 1 and 2 within a very demanding time frame and in satisfactory conditions is on the way to being wined. EMO managed to put in place an organisation able to ensure the continuity of the design and construction works and to integrate the requirements of modern safety. EDF is proud and happy to contribute to this effort by making available its expertise and experience in building and operating nuclear power plants. The success of Mochovce will not only contribute to the Slovak electricity needs coverage, but will be the first demonstration of a soviet design nuclear power plant brought to international safety standards. (author)

  19. Status of the seismic upgrading programme at Mochovce NPP

    Zajicek, T.; Dolnik, R.; Stevko, M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the seismic characterisation of the Mochovce site in Slovakia. Particularly, emphasis is given to differences between the original siting and design procedures and the re-evaluation approach, much more based on the data from the micro-earthquake monitoring system installed at the site. Details are also provided for the seismic monitoring of the buildings, as confirmation of the design assumptions. (author)

  20. Slovenske elektrarne, a.s., Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    1998-01-01

    In this booklet the uranium atom nucleus fission as well as electricity generation in a nuclear power plant (primary circuit, reactor, reactor pressure vessel, fuel assembly, control rod and reactor power control) are explained. Scheme of electricity generation in nuclear power plant and Cross-section of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant unit are included. In next part a reactor scram, refuelling of fuel, instrumentation and control system as well as principles of nuclear safety and safety improvements are are described

  1. Review of accident analyses performed at Mochovce NPP

    Siko, D.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the review of accident analysis performed in NPP Mochovce V-1 is presented. The scope of these safety measures was defined and development in the T SSM for NPP Mochovce Nuclear Safety Improvements Report' issued in July 1995. The main objectives of these safety measures were the followings: (a) to establish the criteria for selection and classification of accidental events, as well as defining the list of initiating events to be analysed. Accident classification to the individual groups must be performed in accordance with RG 1.70 and IAEA recommendations 'Guidelines for Accidental Analysis of WWER NPP' (IAEA-EBR-WWER-01) to select boundary cases to be calculated from the scope of initiating events; (b ) to elaborate the accident analysis methodology that also includes acceptance criteria for their result evaluation, initial and boundary conditions, assumption related with the application of the single failure criteria, requirements on the analysis quality, used computer codes, as well as NPP models and input data for the accident analysis; (c) to perform the accident analysis for the Pre-operational Safety Report (POSAR); (d) to provide a synthetic report addressing the validity range of codes models and correlations, the assessment against relevant tests results, the evidence of the user qualification, the modernisation and nodding scheme for the plant and the justification of used computer codes. Analyses results showed that all acceptance criteria were met with satisfactory margin and design of the NPP Mochovce is accurate. (author)

  2. Role of the team of scientific and technical commissioning support (TSTCS) during Mochovce NPP unit 3 and 4 commissioning

    Hermansky, J.; Prachar, M.; Sedlacek, M.; Petenyi, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Team of Scientific and Technical Commissioning Support (TSTCS) shall provide an independent support for the Mochovce NPP 3 and 4 Commissioning Department during Mochovce Units 3 and 4 commissioning. This independent support will be in line with the Mochovce NPP 3 and 4 Directive 'Non-active tests and commissioning' and it will be carried out in form of professional and expert works focusing on supervision of fulfilment of requirements for nuclear safety observance. The TSTCS duty to provide for such services during NPP commissioning is specified by Slovak Regulatory Body legislation. The independent TSTCS will supervise; - fulfilment of requirements for nuclear safety during preparation and implementation of commissioning tests; -scientific and technical level of commissioning programmes, and reflection on nuclear safety requirements in commissioning programmes,- commissioning process and test results. Main standpoints of the Team activities for individual unit commissioning stages will be; - assesment of the selected programs of functional tests in installations having an impact on nuclear safety and evaluation of the results of these tests; - assesment of the programs of physics and power commissioning, - assesment of the unit preparedness before fuel loading start; - assesment of the unit preparedness for performing initial criticality and low power commissioning and power commissioning stages; - evaluation of the results of physics and power commissioning stages and sub-stages; - final evaluation of the results from implementing the physics and power commissioning stages. The paper also presents a short description of the Team scope activities, the Team organisation, and a procedure for issuing of standpoints to individual unit commissioning stages. (Authors)

  3. Slovak power stations, Nuclear Power Plants Mochovce (Annual report 1997)

    1998-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear power plants Mochovce in 1997 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Director's foreword; (2) Power plant management; (3) Highlights of 1997; (4) Capital construction; (5) Nuclear safety; (6) Radiation safety; (7) Work safety and health protection at work; (9) Fire protection; (10) Units upgrading - safety measures; (11) Maintenance; (12) Operation; (13) Environmental impacts of operations; (14) List of balances; (15) Human sources; (16) International co-operation; (17) Public relations

  4. Feasibility study for NPP Mochovce Units 3 and 4 completion

    Tomik, L.; Chakraborty, S.; Hoffelner, W.; Stoian, A.

    2004-01-01

    The system dynamic approach presented in this study by modelling the behaviour of Slovak market on the basis of system dynamic model (Forrester model), enables real mix in the extend of 12 years and helps understanding of the market limits. In addition this tool can be used for sensitivity calculations depending on many parameters to develop possible trends in the economic development of the Slovak Republic. If both nuclear power options are maintained then it becomes obvious that electric excess energy is produced and could be exported. This export option remains for the situation that a strong growth of the gross national product is assumed without any increase in energy efficiency. Between these extremes is the scenario that Bohunice 1, 2 off is balanced by Mochovce 3, 4 on and increasing demand this will lead to more moderate but still not negligible potential of CO 2 increase. Switching off Bohunice 1, 2 and not switching on Mochovce 3, 4 leads to energy need which must be counterbalanced either by investments in other power plants or by import energy. As far as domestic production is concerned even assuming 50 % CHP production leads to partly remarkable additional CO 2 -production which might infringe on a long term basis with the Kyoto goals. Assuming additional CO 2 -emissions from increasing traffic real problems can be expected in such a case. To maintain national nuclear capabilities in Slovakia is very important for today and for future of nuclear energy option in enlarged European Union. (authors)

  5. Completion of Mochovce 1 and 2 nuclear power plant project

    Valach, J.

    2000-01-01

    Commissioning of the Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant unit 2 fully completed the Mochovce unit 1 and 2 project. The power plant construction passed through a complicated evolution since early 80's. The genesis started with the change of the plant location due to a seismic resistance requirement raised by the former Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission, change of the design and contractor of the Instrumentation and Control system in early 90's, halt of construction in 1993 till 1996 due to a lack of funding, as well as a series of international reviews of safety aspects. All the obstacles had been overcome in the end, and completion works were re-started in 1996. Looking back to the unit 1 and 2 completion project, I would like to highlight some aspects of the project, particularly the level of safety, technical and organisational conditions, and terms of funding. The most important argument for completion of the plant was that VVER 440/213 reactor units were distinguished with very high level of passive safety, even overcoming Western-type PWR's in some aspects. The replacement of the original I and C system was another important contribution to the initial level of safety. International safety reviews performed at Mochovce NPP between 1990 and 1995 (Siemens, EdF, IAEA, RlSKAUDIT) confirmed the high level of safety of VVER 440/213 reactors, however, pointed out at some safety issues which had not been dealt with in the design. Those included e.g. the 'external risks', primary-to-secondary leaks, qualification of pressurizer safety valves, and others. It is necessary to stress that the Safety Improvement Programme defined for Mochovce NPP to comply with international standards did not become the most important part of the completion project due to external pressures, but based on natural requirements on nuclear power plant safety level generally accepted in 90's. The good example could be the seismic resistance of the plant which, though designed as seismic resistant

  6. Eco information 4. Influence of operation of the plants Jadrova vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s., on the environment, Locality of Mochovce, within April 2014

    2014-05-01

    In this leaflet the results of monitoring of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents into the Hron River as well as of radiation monitoring of Mochovce Liquid RAW Final Treatment Facility (FS KRAO) and Mochovce Radioactive Waste Repository (RU RAO) are presented. The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within February 2014 for the radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within for FS KRAO were: 1.011 GBq of tritium (1.011 for the period January - April 2014 (0.36% of AL)) and summary of gamma-radionuclides 0.479 GBq (0.944 GBq for the period January - April 2014 (24.21% of AL)). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within April 2014 for FS KRAO were: 62 kBq of 90 Sr (62 kBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.003% of AL)), 0.003 kBq of summary alpha (0.003% of AL) and 1847 kBq of 14 C (1847 kBq for the period January - March 2014). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within April 2014 for RU RAO were: 0.568 MBq of tritium (4.544 MBq for the period January - April 2014 (0.024% of AL)); 0.004 MBq of 137 Cs (0.033 MBq for the period January - April 2014 (0.145% of AL)); 0.119 MBq of 90 Sr - the value of the quarterly (0.119 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.049% of AL)); 0.008 MBq of 60 Co (0.031 MBq for the period January - April 2014 (0.138% of AL)); 0.005 MBq of 239 Pu (0.005 MBq for the period January - March (0.892% of AL)). Volume of liquid effluents in April 2014 was 227 m 3 (186 m 3 for the period January - April 2014). The radioactive effluents into atmosphere within April 2014 for FS KRAO were: 0.0005 MBq of gamma radionuclides (0.0018 MBq for the period January - April 2014, that is 0.0023% of annually limit (AL)); 0.022 MBq of alpha radionuclides (0.022 MBq for the period January - March (0.0022% of AL)), and 0.149 MBq of 89 Sr and 90 Sr - the value of the quarterly (0.149 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.0075% of AL)).

  7. Eco information 10. Influence of operation of the plants Jadrova vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s., on the environment, Locality of Mochovce, within October 2014

    2014-11-01

    In this leaflet the results of monitoring of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents into the Hron River as well as of radiation monitoring of Mochovce Liquid RAW Final Treatment Facility (FS KRAO) and Mochovce Radioactive Waste Repository (RU RAO) are presented. The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within October 2014 for the radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within for FS KRAO were: 0.512 GBq of tritium (8.464 GBq for the period January - October 2014 (2.82% of AL)) and summary of gamma-radionuclides 0.147 GBq (2.904 GBq for the period January - October 2014 (64.13% of AL)). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within July - September 2014 for FS KRAO were: 60 kBq of 90 Sr (489 kBq for the period January - September), 0.003 kBq of summary alpha (0.030 kBq of annually value) and 1920 kBq of 14 C for the period July - September (39367 kBq of annually value). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within October 2014 for RU RAO were: 0 MBq of tritium (13.064 MBq for the period January - October 2014 (0.069% of AL)); 0 MBq of 137 Cs in October 2014 (0.092 MBq for the period January - August 2014 (0.404% of AL)); 0.128 MBq of 90 Sr - the value within July - September 2014 (0.324 MBq for the period January - September 2014 (0.13% of AL)); 0 MBq of 60 Co in October 2014 (0.093 MBq for the period January - October 2014 (0.415% of AL)); 0.006 MBq of 239 Pu (0.016 MBq for the period April - June 2014 (2.86% of AL)). Volume of liquid effluents in October 2014 was 0 m 3 (5221 m 3 for the period January - October 2014). The radioactive effluents into atmosphere within October 2014 for FS KRAO were: 0.0007 MBq of gamma radionuclides (0.0055 MBq for the period January - October 2014, that is 0.0068% of annually limit (AL)); 0.025 kBq of alpha radionuclides within July - September 2014 (0.071 kBq for the period July - September 2014 (0.0071% of AL)), and 0.161 kBq of 89 Sr and 90 Sr - the value within July - September 2014 (0.465 kBq for the period January

  8. Eco information 2. Influence of operation of the plants Jadrova vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s., on the environment, Locality of Mochovce, within February 2014

    2014-03-01

    In this leaflet the results of monitoring of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents into the Hron River as well as of radiation monitoring of Mochovce Liquid RAW Final Treatment Facility (FS KRAO) and Mochovce Radioactive Waste Repository (RU RAO) are presented. The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within February 2014 for the radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within for FS KRAO were: 0.0000 GBq of tritium (9.0000 for the period January - February 2014 (0.00% of AL)) and summary of gamma-radionuclides 0.0000 GBq (0.0000 GBq for the period January - February 2014 (0.00% of AL)). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within February 2014 for FS KRAO were: 0.000 kBq of 90 Sr (0.000% of AL)), 0.000 kBq of summary alpha (0.000% of AL) and 0.000 kBq of 14 C (0.000% of AL). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within February 2014 for RU RAO were: 2.272 MBq of tritium (3.976 MBq for the period January - February 2014 (0.021% of AL)); 0.017 MBq of 137 Cs (0.029 MBq for the period January - February 2014 (0.127% of AL)); 0.00 MBq of 90 Sr - the value of the quarterly (0.00 MBq for the period January - March 2013 (0.000% of AL)); 0.014 MBq of 60 Co (0.023 MBq for the period January - February 2014 (0.103% of AL)); 0.000 of 239 Pu (0.000 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.000% of AL)). Volume of liquid effluents in February 2014 was 908 m 3 (1589 m 3 for the period January - February 2014). The radioactive effluents into atmosphere within February 2014 for FS KRAO were: 0.0002 MBq of gamma radionuclides (0.0007 MBq for the period January - February 2014, that is 0.0009% of annually limit (AL)); 0.000 MBq of alpha radionuclides (0.000 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.000% of AL)), and 0.000 MBq of 89 Sr and 90 Sr - the value of the quarterly (0.000 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.000% of AL)).

  9. Eco information 3. Influence of operation of the plants Jadrova vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s., on the environment, Locality of Mochovce, within March 2014

    2014-04-01

    In this leaflet the results of monitoring of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents into the Hron River as well as of radiation monitoring of Mochovce Liquid RAW Final Treatment Facility (FS KRAO) and Mochovce Radioactive Waste Repository (RU RAO) are presented. The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within March 2014 for the radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within for FS KRAO were: 0.056 GBq of tritium (0.056 for the period January - March 2014 (0.2% of AL)) and summary of gamma-radionuclides 0.465 GBq (0.465 GBq for the period January - March 2014 (11.92% of AL)). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within January - March 2014 for FS KRAO were: 0.000 kBq of 90 Sr (0.000% of AL)), 0.000 kBq of summary alpha (0.000% of AL) and 0.000 kBq of 14 C (0.000% of AL). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within March 2014 for RU RAO were: 0.000 MBq of tritium (3.976 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.021% of AL)); 0.000 MBq of 137 Cs (0.029 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.127% of AL)); 0.00 MBq of 90 Sr - the value of the quarterly (0.00 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.000% of AL)); 0.000 MBq of 60 Co (0.023 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.103% of AL)); 0.000 MBq of 239 Pu (0.000 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.000% of AL)). Volume of liquid effluents in March 2014 was 0 m 3 (1589 m 3 for the period January - March 2014). The radioactive effluents into atmosphere within March 2014 for FS KRAO were: 0.0006 MBq of gamma radionuclides (0.0013 MBq for the period January - March 2014, that is 0.0016% of annually limit (AL)); 0.00 MBq of alpha radionuclides (0.000 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.000% of AL)), and 0.000 MBq of 89 Sr and 90 Sr - the value of the quarterly (0.000 MBq for the period January - March 2014 (0.000% of AL)).

  10. Eco information 1. Influence of operation of the plants Jadrova vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s., on the environment, Locality of Mochovce, within January 2014

    2014-02-01

    In this leaflet the results of monitoring of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents into the Hron River as well as of radiation monitoring of Mochovce Liquid RAW Final Treatment Facility (FS KRAO) and Mochovce Radioactive Waste Repository (RU RAO) are presented. The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within January 2014 for the radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within for FS KRAO were: 0.0000 GBq of tritium (0.0000 GBq for the period January - January 2014 (0.000% of AL)) and summary of gamma-radionuclides 0.0000 GBq (0.0000 GBq for the period January - January 2014 (0.000% of AL)). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within January 2014 for FS KRAO were: 1,704 kBq of 90 Sr (0.009% of AL)), 0.012 kBq of summary alpha (0.053% of AL) and 0.000 kBq of 14 C (0.000% of AL). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within January 2014 for RU RAO were: 0.009 MBq of tritium (1.704 MBq for the period January - January 2014 (1.704% of AL)); 0.012 MBq of 137 Cs (0.012 MBq for the period January - January 2014 (0.053% of AL)); 0.000 MBq of 90 Sr - the value of the quarterly (0.000 MBq for the period January - January 2014 (0.000% of AL)); 0.009 MBq of 60 Co (0.009 MBq for the period January - January 2014 (0.04% of AL)); 0.000 MBq of 239 Pu (0.000 MBq for the period January - January 2014 (0.000% of AL)). Volume of liquid effluents in January 2014 was 681 m 3 (4681m 3 for the period January - January 2014). The radioactive effluents into atmosphere within January 2014 for FS KRAO were: 0.0005 MBq of gamma radionuclides (0.0005 MBq for the period January - January 2014, that is 0.0006% of annually limit (AL)); 0.000 MBq of alpha radionuclides (0.000 MBq for the period January - January 2014 (0.000% of AL)), and 0.000 MBq of 89 Sr and 90 Sr - the value of the quarterly (0.000 MBq for the period January - January 2014 (0.000% of AL)).

  11. Eco information 4. Influence of operation of the plants Jadrova vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s., on the environment, Locality of Mochovce, within April 2016

    2016-05-01

    In this leaflet the results of monitoring of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents into the Hron River as well as of radiation monitoring of Mochovce Liquid RAW Final Treatment Facility (FS KRAO) and Mochovce Radioactive Waste Repository (RU RAO) are presented. The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within April 2016 for the radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within for FS KRAO were: 0.642 GBq of tritium (0.649 GBq for the period January - April 2016 (0.213% of AL)) and summary of gamma-radionuclides 0.000 GBq (0.000 GBq for the period January - April 2016 (0.0% of AL)). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within January - January 2016 for FS KRAO were: 0 kBq of 90 Sr (0 kBq for the period January - March 2016), 0.024 kBq of summary alpha (0.024 kBq of annually value) and 10.817 kBq of 14 C for the period January - March 2016 (01.817 kBq of annually value). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within April 2016 for RU RAO were: 0.000 MBq of tritium (2.840 MBq for the period January - April 2016 (0.015% of AL)); 0.000 MBq of 137 Cs in April 2016 (0.026 MBq for the period January - April 2016 (0.114% of AL)); 0.248 MBq of 90 Sr - the value within January - March 2016 (0.248 MBq for the period January - April 2016 (0.102% of AL)); 0.000 MBq of 60 Co in April 2016 (0.018 MBq for the period January - April 2016 (0.080% of AL)); 0.009 MBq of 239 Pu (0.009 MBq for the period January - March 2016 (1.607% of AL)). Volume of liquid effluents in January 2016 was 0 m 3 (1135 m 3 for the period January - April 2016). The radioactive effluents into atmosphere within April 2016 for FS KRAO were: 0.0010 MBq of gamma radionuclides (0.0041 MBq for the period January - April 2016, that is 0.0039% of annually limit (AL)); 0.027 kBq of alpha radionuclides within January - March 2016 (0.027 kBq for the period January - March 2016 (0.0027% of AL)), and 0.179 kBq of 89 Sr and 90 Sr - the value within January - March 2016 (0.179 kBq for the period January - March

  12. Eco information 2 Influence of operation of the plants Jadrova vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s., on the environment, Locality of Mochovce, within February 2016

    2016-03-01

    In this leaflet the results of monitoring of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents into the Hron River as well as of radiation monitoring of Mochovce Liquid RAW Final Treatment Facility (FS KRAO) and Mochovce Radioactive Waste Repository (RU RAO) are presented. The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within February 2016 for the radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within for FS KRAO were: 0.007 GBq of tritium (0.000 GBq for the period January - February 2016 (0.02% of AL)) and summary of gamma-radionuclides 0.215 GBq (0.215 GBq for the period January - February 2016 (5.51% of AL)). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within January - March 2016 for FS KRAO were: 0 kBq of 90 Sr (0 kBq for the period January - March 2016), 0 kBq of summary alpha (0 kBq of annually value) and 0 kBq of 14 C for the period January - March 2016 (0 kBq of annually value). The radioactive effluents into hydrosphere within January 2016 for RU RAO were: 2.272 MBq of tritium (2.272 MBq for the period January - March 2016 (0.012% of AL)); 0.018 MBq of 137 Cs in February 2016 (0.018 MBq for the period January - March 2016 (0.079% of AL)); 0.000 MBq of 90 Sr - the value within January - March 2016 (0.000 MBq for the period January - March 2016 (0.000% of AL)); 0.013 MBq of 60 Co in February 2016 (0.013 MBq for the period January - March 2016 (0.058% of AL)); 0.000 MBq of 239 Pu (0.000 MBq for the period January - March 2016 (0.00% of AL)). Volume of liquid effluents in February 2016 was 908 m 3 (908 m 3 for the period January - February 2016). . The radioactive effluents into atmosphere within February 2016 for FS KRAO were: 0.0009 MBq of gamma radionuclides (0.002 MBq for the period January - February 2016, that is 0.0025% of annually limit (AL)); 0.000 kBq of alpha radionuclides within January - March 2016 (0.000 kBq for the period January - March 2016 (0.000% of AL)), and 0.000 kBq of 89 Sr and 90 Sr - the value within January - March 2016 (0.000 kBq for the period January

  13. Analysis of the methodical component of core power density field calculation error on the basis of Mochovce-1 commissioning tests

    Brik, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the first decade of June 2008, during the power commissioning of the reactor at the Mochovce NPP unit 1, the experiment with reducing the thermal power of core almost to the balance-of-plant (BOP) needs was performed. After the reactor has operated for seven hours at low power (about 200 220 MW (thermal)), its power was increased (at a rate of about 0.25% of N nom /min) to the initial level, close to 107% (1471 MW). During the experiment, core parameters, which were subsequently used for comparing the measured data with the results of experiment simulation calculations, were recorded in the reactor in-core monitoring system database. Calculated and measured levels of critical concentrations of boric acid were compared, along with power density distributions by fuel elements and assemblies obtained both by the KRUIZ in-core monitoring system and on the basis of calculations simulating reactor operation in accordance with the given core power variation schedule. The final stage consisted of assessing the methodical component of power density micro- and macro-fields calculation error in the core of Mochovce-1 reactor operating with varying load. (author)

  14. Analysis of the methodical component of core power density field calculation error on the basis of Mochovce-1 commissioning tests

    Brik, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the first decade of June 2008, during the power commissioning of the reactor at Mochovce NPP unit 1, the experiment with reducing the thermal power of core almost to the balance-of-plant needs was performed. After the reactor has operated for seven hours at low power (about 200 220 MW (thermal)), its power was increased (at a rate of about 0.25% of N nom /min) to the initial level, close to 107% (1471 MW). During the experiment, core parameters, which were subsequently used for comparing the measured data with the results of experiment simulation calculations, were recorded in the reactor in-core monitoring system's database. Calculated and measured levels of critical concentrations of boric acid were compared, along with power density distributions by fuel elements and assemblies obtained both by the KRUIZ in-core monitoring system and on the basis of calculations simulating reactor operation in accordance with the given core power variation schedule. The final stage consisted of assessing the methodical component of power density micro- and macro-fields' calculation error in the core of Mochovce-1 reactor operating with varying load. (Authors)

  15. Natural and artificial radioactivity in the area of the Mochovce regional radioactive waste store

    Bezak, J.; Daniel, J.; Moravek, J.

    2000-01-01

    The results of monitoring of natural and artificial radioactivity in the area of the Mochovce regional radioactive waste store before commission are presented. The concentrations of uranium, thorium, potassium, and cesium, as well as radon volume activity were measured

  16. Actual status of project Mochovce NPP units 3 and 4 completion

    Niznan, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with actual status of project Mochovce NPP units 3 and 4 completion. Present state of Mochovce NPP, Units 3 and 4 enables real assumption to completion. It is expected that such supplier companies can be used which are experienced in field of nuclear projects. Based on budget of 2002, it seems that completion costs of 45 billions SKK are real. These figures were confirmed by study performed by TRACTEBEL in 2004. Based on experience from Bohunice NPP completion as well as from Mochovce NPP, Units 1 and 2 completion and if decision milestone and project start up deadlines will be observed according to modified preliminary schedule of Mochovce NPP Units 3 and 4 completion, it seems as real that Unit 3 will be completed till 06/2011 and Unit 4 - till 12/2011.

  17. Rad-waste treatment

    1996-01-01

    The spent fuel coming from Slovak NPPs have partially been transported to the former Soviet Union, and a part of it is stored in an interim spent fuel wet storage. In compliance with the worldwide practices, further medium-term possibilities of storing in dry storages are under preparation. Disposal of a spent fuel and other high-level active wastes in a deep geological formation repository is the final solution. At present, there are geological investigations of possible sites in progress in Slovakia. Mochovce repository is a factory for a final disposal of compacted low and intermediate level radioactive wastes coming from the Slovak NPPs. This is a near-surface facility of a construction similar to the one used for disposal of radioactive wastes in France, Spain, Japan, Czech Republic, U.S.A, etc. Quality of the design, construction and functioning of the Mochovce's repository was assessed by an international team of experts within a special IAEA programme (WATRP). Having familiarized with the final report of the IAEA mission, Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) issued its position early in 1995, in which NRA SR required additional adjustment of the repository itself. Based on the NRA SR's position, Mochovce NPP invited experts from a number of institutions in September 1995 to discuss the NRA SR's requirements. Following was recommended by the experts: (1) to perform a complementary engineering-geological investigation on the site, (2) to use geophysical methods to verify existence of geological faults. In the next part a radioactive wastes that were treated at radioactive waste treatment lines in 1995 are listed. In 1995, the Chief Inspector of NRA SR issued an instruction that radioactive waste department should start inspections of radioactive waste treatment right in hospitals, research institutes and industries. Therefore, a total of 14 such workplaces were incorporated into a plan of inspections in 1995

  18. Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant. How was it? Starting of the first block by the eyes of participants in the construction operation

    Blaha, M.; Bucha, T.

    2008-01-01

    This book is published at 10 th anniversary of commissioning of Mochovce NPP. It consists of two parts: Part I. Story completion of the first block Mochovce nuclear power plant. Part II. Interviews with interested politicians and managers of Mochovce NPP.

  19. Summary revaluation of energetic start-up of the unit 1 of nuclear power plant Mochovce

    Sarvaic, I.; Miskolci, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document contents stage revaluation of energetic start-up of the unit 1 of nuclear power plant Mochovce. Test results of the stage of energetic start-up are summarized in the document, valuation of important systems and block devices as well as fulfilling the operation limits and conditions has been performed. On that base conclusions and recommendations for start-up the unit 2 and for commercial operation of the unit 1 are elaborated. The valuation has been elaborated by a scientific management for start-up nuclear power plant Mochovce of nuclear safety of nuclear power facilities. Scientific management for start-up of nuclear power plant Mochovce performed continuous valuation of individual power levels after ending of each individual level and it gave its valuation to energy power level with recommendations and conditions for further start-up process and operation. Scientific management finished its activity at the unit 1 of nuclear power plant Mochovce according to a statute of scientific management for start-up after successful completion of conclusive block run. Scientific management group was founded in February 1998 at nuclear power plant Mochovce. Its members are experts from Slovak, Czech, Russian and French organizations which are participating in power plant completion. Members are listed in a supplement No. 2

  20. Computerized information system of the Mochovce nuclear power plant

    Holik, V.

    1986-01-01

    The computer-based information system for the Mochovce nuclear power plant has a hierarchic structure which incorporates SM 1804 microcomputers and SM 1420 minicomputers. With regard to operation it is divided into two levels: the information system at the level of power plant units and the information system t the level of the whole power plant. The information system of a unit provides the collection of information on the technological equipment of each unit for the operative control of the unit and documentation on unit operation. Each unit has its own independent computer information system. The actual nucleus of each unit information system consists of two computer complexes based on SM 1420 twin computers, mutually substitutional. The power plant level information system provides the processing and output of information for personnel in the central control room of the power plant and for other managerial staff. It uses preprocessed information from the unit information systems and direct information from non-unit installations and from dosimetric control rooms of the power plant units. This information system is also based on a computer complex with two SM 1420 computers. (Z.M.)

  1. Completion of Units 3 and 4 at Mochovce NPP

    Aquilanti, G.

    2009-01-01

    After the completion of a feasibility study, SE/ENEL decided to complete Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4 in April 2007. In July 2008, after a revision of the Basic Design that led to the inclusion of additional safety improvements, the European Commission issued a positive viewpoint on the decision. In August 2008 the Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority issued a permit for 'modification of a construction project prior to its completion', approving the Basic Design modifications: the kick-off of site activities was on November 2008. In December 2008, SE initiated the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) procedure aimed at obtaining the Operational License by submitting the EIA intent to the Ministry of Environment. A multi contractual strategy was adopted for the completion works: the total number of foreseen contracts is about 250 (90 main and additional 160 minor). In the following the present status of the project is presented: in particular, the Project Management system implemented by SE/ENEL is described and the progress of the engineering, fabrication and construction activities is analyzed. (author)

  2. Health state of population in vicinity of the Mochovce nuclear power plant. Epidemiologic study

    Celko, M.; Durov, M.; Letkovicova, M.; Holy, R.; Sedliak, D.; Zrubec, M.; Kristufek, P.; Machata, M.; Prikazsky, V.; Rehak, R.; Stehlikova, B.; Vladar, M.

    1999-01-01

    Results of epidemiologic study of health state of population in vicinity of the Mochovce nuclear power plant (Slovak Republic) are presented. This report is reported under the headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Basic information about Mochovce NPP; (3) Assessment of population exposition by environmental factors; (4) Basic conceptions and principles of epidemiologic study; (5) Demography and health state of population; (6) Characterisation of databases and data; (7) Description of demographic and health indicators; (8) Calculation of demographic and health indicators in vicinity of the Mochovce NPP and in control areas; (9) Calculated indicators; (10) Statistical methods and evaluation of calculated indicators; (11) Summary and conclusions; (12) References; Appendixes: Literature review of similar epidemiologic studies; Quantities and units in radiation protection; Definitions of indicators calculation - specification of method

  3. Safety improvement and results of commissioning of Mochovce NPP WWER 440/213

    Lipar, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mochovce NPP is the last one of this kind and compared to its predecessors, it is characterized by several modifications which contribute to the improvement of the safety level. In addition based on Nuclear Regulatory Authority requirements and based on documents: - IAEA - Safety Issues and their ranking for NPP WWER 440/213, - IAEA - Safety Improvement of Mochovce NPP Project Review Mission, - Riskaudit - Evaluation of the Mochovce NPP Safety Improvements. Additional safety measures have been implemented before commissioning. The consortium EUCOM (FRAMATOME - SIEMENS), SKODA Praha, ENERGOPROJEKT Praha, Russian organizations and VUJE Trnava Nuclear Power Plants research institute were selected for design and implementation of the safety measures. The papers summarized, safety requirements, safety measures implemented, results of commissioning and results of safety analysis report evaluation. (author)

  4. Current situation of the project of 3. and 4. block of nuclear power plant Mochovce

    Suchy, L.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution shows the basic information about the crucial milestone of 3. building and the current situation of the project of 3. and 4. block of the nuclear power plant Mochovce. Contribution also shows what activities were realized and what material in area of designation of the technical and safety standard of the project was elaborated in the past, the main activities planned for 2006 have been described, support for Feasibility Study elaborated by ENEL and description of the integrated management system. The basic thesis crucial for the next steps on the project of 3. and 4. block of Nuclear Power Plant Mochovce is presented in the conclusion

  5. Preparation phase of Mochovce NPP unit 3 and 4 construction completion

    Cillik, I.; Tvaroska, V.; Liska, P.; Ziman, V.

    2005-01-01

    In this presentation authors deal with preparation phase of Mochovce NPP unit 3 and 4 construction completion. The preparation phase of the Mochovce unit 3 and 4 construction completion gives following main outputs: (a) Detail Safety Concept gives definitive complex safety and technical improvement of MO34, more precise analysis of the total cost of construction completion, a list of potential suppliers and construction completion time schedule; (b) Appendices of Basic Design Documentation and Preliminary SAR serves as basic documentation for UJD SR decision making according to Law No. 541 for start of Realization Phase; (c) The Preparation Phase represents effective tool for start of MO34 construction completion Realization Phase.

  6. Summary revaluation of cold testing of the first block of nuclear power plant Mochovce

    Miskolci, M.; Sarvaic, I.

    1998-01-01

    The document contents summary revaluation of the stage of cold testing of the first unit of nuclear power plant Mochovce. The valuation is processed in individual systems with safety significance. The process and results of system testing and their conclusions for the block readiness for active testing are summarized in the document. The valuation has been elaborated by a scientific management for start-up of nuclear power plant Mochovce as an independent conductor assistance for activation check from the nuclear safety point of view. The valuation of the activation results of systems in the first unit of nuclear power plant was processed as of 15.3.1998

  7. Evaluation of power commissioning of the Mochovce Unit 1 demonstration run

    Sarvaic, I.; Miskolci, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document contains evaluation of the 144 hour demonstration run of the Mochovce Unit 1. In the document, the courses and results of additional tests in this phase of power commissioning are summarized, evaluation of the performance of important systems and equipment of the unit is carried out, as well as of the compliance with Limits and Conditions in the course of the demonstration run. On this basis, conclusions are drawn and recommendations given for the unit to by ready for trial operation. The evaluation was developed by the scientific management of the Mochovce commissioning providing an independent support for the operators for supervising the commissioning tasks from the point of nuclear safety

  8. Summary revaluation of cold testing of the first block of nuclear power plant Mochovce; Suhrnne zhodnotenie neaktivneho vyskusania 1. bloku jadrovej elektrarne Mochovce

    Miskolci, M; Sarvaic, I [Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute Trnava, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia)

    1998-04-03

    The document contents summary revaluation of the stage of cold testing of the first unit of nuclear power plant Mochovce. The valuation is processed in individual systems with safety significance. The process and results of system testing and their conclusions for the block readiness for active testing are summarized in the document. The valuation has been elaborated by a scientific management for start-up of nuclear power plant Mochovce as an independent conductor assistance for activation check from the nuclear safety point of view. The valuation of the activation results of systems in the first unit of nuclear power plant was processed as of 15.3.1998 61 figs., 44 tabs., `Translation to english is available from OMEGA INFO, Vysehradska 33, SK-84215 Bratislava, Slovak Republic, E-Mail: kuruc at fns.uniba.sk`

  9. Liquid waste treatment system. Final report

    Baker, M.N.; Houston, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Pretreatment of high-level liquid radioactive waste (HLW) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) involved three distinct processing operations: decontamination of liquid HLW in the Supernatant Treatment System (STS); volume reduction of decontaminated liquid in the Liquid Waste Treatment System (LWTS); and encapsulation of resulting concentrates into an approved cement waste form in the Cement Solidification System (CSS). Together, these systems and operations made up the Integrated Radwaste Treatment System (IRTS)

  10. Mochovce NPP experience in the certification and the use of full scope simulator

    Krenicky, L.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents some of the Mochovce NPP experience in the full-scope simulator certification process, simulator training programs development, implementation and evaluation, the use of simulator in the all-plant emergency exercises as well as the experience in validation of plant operational procedures.(author)

  11. Implementation of computer codes for performance assessment of the Republic repository of LLW/ILW Mochovce

    Hanusik, V.; Kopcani, I.; Gedeon, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes selection and adaptation of computer codes required to assess the effects of radionuclide release from Mochovce Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility. The paper also demonstrates how these codes can be integrated into performance assessment methodology. The considered codes include DUST-MS for source term release, MODFLOW for ground-water flow and BS for transport through biosphere and dose assessment. (author)

  12. 'HSE protection through safe work'. Mochovce NPP is the holder of ISO 14001:2004 and CSN OHSAS 18001 certificates

    Molnarova, Zuzana; Torda, Anton

    2009-01-01

    The article provides information on the safety of the Mochovce NPP related to occupational health and safety and environmental protection. The facility has earned EN ISO 140001 and OHSAS 18001 certificates. (orig.)

  13. Theoretical parameter histories of dynamic tests during power commissioning of Mochovce units power level up to 100 % Nnom

    Jagrik, J.; Mraz, M.; Rapant, M.; Stefanovic, P.; Kotasek, J.; Gieci, A.; Macko, J.; Mosny, J.

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical histories of selected parameters for dynamic tests carried out in the course of power commissioning of the Mochovce Unit 1 at the power level 100% N nom are shown in the report. The expected histories given were developed based on calculations performed by means of simulator in Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute Trnava, Inc., simulator in EGU Praha and simulator at the Mochovce plant, as well as based on similar tests at both Bohunice and Dukovany plants

  14. Integrated radwaste treatment system. Final report

    Baker, M.N.; Houston, H.M.

    1997-10-01

    In May 1988, the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) began pretreating liquid high-level radioactive waste (HLW). This HLW was produced during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing operations that took place at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center from 1966 to 1972. Original reprocessing operations used plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) and thorium extraction (THOREX) processes to recover usable isotopes from spent nuclear fuel. The PUREX process produced a nitric acid-based waste stream, which was neutralized by adding sodium hydroxide to it. About two million liters of alkaline liquid HLW produced from PUREX neutralization were stored in an underground carbon steel tank identified as Tank 8D-2. The THOREX process, which was used to reprocess one core of mixed uranium-thorium fuel, resulted in about 31,000 liters of acidic waste. This acidic HLW was stored in an underground stainless steel tank identified as Tank 8D-4. Pretreatment of the HLW was carried out using the Integrated Radwaste Treatment System (IRTS), from May 1988 until May 1995. This system was designed to decontaminate the liquid HLW, remove salts from it, and encapsulate the resulting waste into a cement waste form that achieved US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) criteria for low-level waste (LLW) storage and disposal. A thorough discussion of IRTS operations, including all systems, subsystems, and components, is presented in US Department of Energy (DOE) Topical Report (DOE/NE/44139-68), Integrated Radwaste Treatment System Lessons Learned from 2 1/2 Years of Operation. This document also presents a detailed discussion of lessons learned during the first 2 1/2 years of IRTS operation. This report provides a general discussion of all phases of IRTS operation, and presents additional lessons learned during seven years of IRTS operation

  15. ESTE EMO and ESTE EBO - emergency response system for NPP Mochovce and NPP Bohunice V-2

    Caeny, P.; Chyly, M.; Suchon, D.; Smejkalova, E.; Fabova, V.; Mancikova, M.; Muller, P.

    2009-01-01

    Programs ESTE EMO and ESTE EBO are emergency response systems that help the crisis staff of the NPP in assessing the source term (predicted possible release of radionuclides to the atmosphere ), in assessing the urgent protective measures and sectors under threat, in assessing real release (symptoms of release really detected and observed), in calculating radiological impacts of real release, averted or avertable doses, potential doses and doses during transport or evacuation on specified routes. Both systems serve as instruments in case of severe accident (DBA or BDBA) at NPP Mochovce or NPP Bohunice, accidents with threat of release of radioactivity to the atmosphere. Systems are implemented at emergency centre of Mochovce NPP and Bohunice NPP and connected online to the sources of technological and radiological data from the reactor, primary circuit, confinement, secondary circuit, ventilation stack, from the area of NPP (TDS 1) and from the emergency planning zone (TDS 11). Systems are connected online to the sources of meteorological data, too. (authors)

  16. ESTE EMO and ESTE EBO - emergency response system for NPP Mochovce and NPP Bohunice V-2

    Caeny, P.; Chyly, M.; Suchon, D.; Smejkalova, E.; Fabova, V.; Mancikova, M.; Muller, P.

    2008-01-01

    Programs ESTE EMO and ESTE EBO are emergency response systems that help the crisis staff of the NPP in assessing the source term (predicted possible release of radionuclides to the atmosphere ), in assessing the urgent protective measures and sectors under threat, in assessing real release (symptoms of release really detected and observed), in calculating radiological impacts of real release, averted or avertable doses, potential doses and doses during transport or evacuation on specified routes. Both systems serve as instruments in case of severe accident (DBA or BDBA) at NPP Mochovce or NPP Bohunice, accidents with threat of release of radioactivity to the atmosphere. Systems are implemented at emergency centre of Mochovce NPP and Bohunice NPP and connected online to the sources of technological and radiological data from the reactor, primary circuit, confinement, secondary circuit, ventilation stack, from the area of NPP (TDS 1) and from the emergency planning zone (TDS 11). Systems are connected online to the sources of meteorological data, too. (authors)

  17. Evaluation of power commissioning of the Mochovce Unit 1 power level up to 100 % Nnom

    Sarvaic, I.; Mickolci, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document contains an evaluation of the power phase of power commissioning of the Mochovce Unit 1 in the phase up to the power level of 100 % N nom .In the document, the courses and results of tests in this phase of power commissioning are summarized, evaluation of the performance of important systems and equipment of the unit is carried out, and the compliance with Limits and Conditions in the course of the phase is assessed. On this basis, conclusions are drawn and recommendations for the unit to be ready for subsequent phases of the power commissioning. The evaluation was developed by the scientific management of the Mochovce commissioning providing an independent support for the operators for supervising the commissioning tasks from the point of nuclear safety

  18. Further experience in simulation of rod drop experiments in the Loviisa and Mochovce reactors

    Siltanen, P.; Kaloinen, E.; Tanskanen, A.; Mattila, R.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of reactor scram experiments using the 3-dimensional kinetics code HEXTRAN have been updated for the initial cores of Loviisa-1 and 2 Mochovce-1 and have been extended to burned cores of Loviisa-1. In these simulations, the entire experiment is simulated dynamically, including the behaviour of the core, the signal of the ionization chamber, and the inverse point kinetics of the reactivity meter. The predicted output of the reactivity meter is compared with the output observed during the experiment (Authors)

  19. Mathematical Analysis of Malfunctions Caused by Seepage Water to the Republic Radioactive Waste Dump in Mochovce

    Jozef Kuzma

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The storage of radioactive waste and the problem of assuring the low and medium radioactive waste is an actual interdisciplinary problem. An important factor influencing on a complex approach to solving these problems is also a creation of suitable technical conditions for its long-term storage. In this article we mathematically analyze an influence of the break covering and its effect on the long-term stability and reliable serviceability of the Republic radioactive waste dump in Mochovce.

  20. Start. Slovak power stations, Nuclear Power Plants Mochovce (Annual report 1998)

    1999-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear power plants Mochovce in 1998 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Director's foreword; (2) Power plant management; (3) Highlights of 1998; (4) Quality system; (5) Electricity and heat generation; Maintenance; Capital construction; (6) Radiation safety; Environmental impacts of operations; (7) List of balances; Human resources; (8) International co-operation; Public relations

  1. Some experience from seismic check-ups of components of Mochovce nuclear power plant

    Masopust, R.

    1987-01-01

    The first Czechoslovak nuclear power plant with the so-called partial anti-seismic design will be built in Mochovce. The evaluation of seismic resistance is prescribed only for equipment and systems which secure the safe reactor shutdown, the withdrawal of residual heat and prevent uncontrolled release of radioactivity into the environment. The following variants were compared in the calculation analysis of the primary loop of the WWER-440 reactor for the Mochovce nuclear power plant: the seismically unsecured loop of a usual design for WWER-440 nuclear power plants, the loop provided with mechanical or hydraulic dampers and the loop provided with viscose shock absorbers. The tests showed that technically most suitable is the use of viscose shock absorbers which do not completely block the movement of the system during the earthquake but absorb it intensively. The viscose shock absorbers are also much cheaper than the dampers. Briefly described is experience with the experimental evaluation of the seismic resistance of components of the Mochovce nuclear power plant. Great difficulty was encountered by the non-existence in Czechoslovakia of a seismic table allowing simultaneous excitation in the vertical and horizontal directions. (Z.M.). 18 refs

  2. Level 1 shutdown and low power operation of Mochovce NPP, Unit 1, Slovakia

    Halada, P.; Cillik, I.; Stojka, T.; Kuzma, M.; Prochaska, J.; Vrtik, L.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents general approach, used methods and form of documentation of the results that have been applied within the shutdown and low power PSA (SPSA) study for Mochovce NPP, Unit 1, Slovakia. The SPSA project was realized by VUJE Trnava Inc., Slovakia in 2001-2002 years. The Level 1 SPSA study for Mochovce NPP Unit 1 covers internal events as well as internal (fires, floods and heavy load drop) and external (aircraft crash, extreme meteorological conditions, seismic event and influence of surrounding industry) hazards. Mochovce NPP consists of two operating units equipped with VVER 440/V213 reactors safety upgraded before construction finishing and operation start. 87 safety measures based on VVER 440 operational experience and international mission insights were implemented to enhance its operational and nuclear safety. The SPSA relates to full power PSA (FPSA) as a continuation of the effort to create a harmonized level 1 PSA model for all operational modes of the plant with the goal to use it for further purposes as follows: Real Time Risk Monitor, Maintenance Optimization, Technical Specifications Optimization, Living PSA. (author)

  3. Commissioning of Mochovce 1 - Important achievement of the world's nuclear industry

    Holy, Robert; Petrech, Rastislav

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear power industry has been recently perceived by the general public as a specific industrial branch stretching its activities far beyond the conventional industrial standard. Similarly, the stage of testing and commissioning of a nuclear power plant is perceived as a specific stage in the plant life-cycle. This is a complicated process not only in technical terms, but in the context of nowadays, it is also one of the key periods in terms of public relations and public acceptance. The stage of commissioning unit 1 of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant evoked a real communication media war between defenders and opponents of the nuclear industry started early in 1998 in Slovakia, as well as in other, mostly neighbouring countries. It should be noted, however, that the Mochovce plant has never been a technical problem as confirmed a number of international regulatory missions and audits, even though its construction was stopped in early 90's. The result of the war between the opponents and 'nuclear experts' was more or less clear to a thinking human being - a compromise could have been the only result. The compromise which is in fact a victory of the side of technical development, and loss of those lobbying for a nuclear-reactor-free central Europe. This article brings a review of events that accompanied commissioning activities of Mochovce NPP unit I which were important in terms of public relations

  4. Jevgenij V. Doc: We do not want to build a monument at Mochovce

    Janoska, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the interview with the General Manager of Inter RAO JES - Jevgenij V. Doc is published. Inter RAO JES applies for the privatisation of Slovenske elektrarne (Slovak Electric - SE). According to the General Manager of Inter RAO JES, the company does not need a foreign partner to provide financial support after the privatisation of SE, but rather it requires a political support. Plans about Bohunice NPP and of completion of the Mochovce NPP as well as of privatisation of the SE by the Inter RAO JES are presented

  5. Participation of Skoda Praha a.s. in completion of NPP Mochovce

    Poukar, F.

    1997-01-01

    The history of the construction of the Mochovce nuclear power plant is briefly described. In 1995, after obtaining promises of loans from Czech banks the Slovak government decided that the completion of the mechanical and electrical parts of units 1 and 2 would be placed with Skoda Praha in the position of general supplier; Skoda together with Siemens and Framatome would also be charged with implementing the safety measures necessary to reach European standards. Evaluation of safety studies and risk audits, and elaboration of safety measures are now under way. (M.D.)

  6. Seismic re-evaluation of Mochovce nuclear power plant. Seismic reevaluation of civil structures

    Podrouzek, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this contribution, an overview of seismic design procedures used for reassessment of seismic safety of civil structures at the Mochovce NPP in Slovak Republic presented. As an introduction, the objectives, history, and current status of seismic design of the NPP have been explained. General philosophy of design methods, seismic classification of buildings, seismic data, calculation methods, assumptions on structural behavior under seismic loading and reliability assessment were described in detail in the subsequent section. Examples of calculation models used for dynamic calculations of seismic response are given in the last section. (author)

  7. Ejected control rod and rods drop measurements during Mochovce startup physical tests

    Minarcin, Miroslav; Elko, Marek

    1998-01-01

    Paper deals with measurements of asymmetric reactivity insertion into the reactor core that were carried out during physical startup tests of Mochovce Unit 1 in June 1998. Control rods worth measurements with one and two rods s tucked in upper limit and worth measurement of one control rod from group 6 'ejected' from the reactor core are discussed. During the experiments neutron flux was measured by four ionisation chambers (three of them were placed symmetrically around the reactor core). Results of measurements and influence of asymmetric reactivity influence on ionisation chambers response are presented in the paper. (Authors)

  8. Transport structures and water reservoir for the Mochovce nuclear power plant

    Farkas, J.; Klacansky, T.

    1986-01-01

    The projects are described which were implemented by Doprastav Bratislava within the preparation of the site for the Mochovce nuclear power plant. This includes a railway siding in a length of 11.2 kilometres which includes a railway bridge, two other bridges and the reconstruction of the Kalna nad Vahom railway terminal. Also reconstructed or newly built were road communications in a total length of 23.3 km. The said project included the construction of a road flyover over the railway track and the construction of five other smaller bridges. In order to provide the utility water supply to the Mochovce nuclear power plant, a large reservoir is being built at Velke Kozmalovce. The reservoir will have a total capacity of 2.6 mill. m 3 of water, of this the effective capacity will be 2.1 mill. m 3 on a flooded area of some 90 ha. Part of the reservoir will be a small hydro-power plant, the reservoir will also be used for irrigation on the fields of the neighbouring farms. (Z.M.)

  9. Completion of the VVER 440/213 NPP Mochovce incorporation enhanced safety features

    Charbonneau, S.; Eckert, G.

    1996-01-01

    The cooperation between the western countries and the countries of ex-eastern block in the field of nuclear safety is recent and still limited. The main reasons for this situation are limited or non existent capabilities of these countries for financing as well as non acceptable legal conditions concerning the third party nuclear liability in this part of Europe. Nevertheless, Framatome and Siemens associated in the consortium named EUCOM, have signed in April 1996 the contract of about 100 million US dollars with Slovak electricity company (SLOVENSKE ELEKTRARNE-SE) for upgrading the Units 1 and 2 of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant according to the western safety standards. This is the first important project involving west-european companies in the modernisation of Russian type of pressurized water reactor (VVER 440/213). The consortium will cooperate with other partners involved in the project: Slovak, Czech and Russian. The financing of the project will be provided mainly form Slovak and Czech sources. The safety upgrading will be financed through French and German buyer credits. French company Electricite de France (EDF) will be the consultant for SE. The safety upgrading measures have been elaborated taking into account the recommendation of Vienna International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the evaluation of the safety realised by RISKAUDIT, the common organization of German and French safety authorities (GSR and IPSN). Hence all guaranties have been taken to fulfil the western safety criteria for Nuclear Power Plant Mochovce. (author)

  10. Health state of population in the locality of the Mochovce nuclear power plant after four years of operation

    Letkovicova, M.; Letkovicova, H.; Letkovic, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Mochovce NPP was put into the operation in 1998. Authors monitor the health state of the population in its vicinity since 1993. The authors recorded this health state also in before-operational safety report of Mochovce NPP. The authors show in the presentation the evaluation of nine years, five before putting of Mochovce NPP into the operation and four during its operation. The aim of the authors is to evaluate the state of chosen health indicators in individual villages in whole monitored region and to try to found out the differences between of their size before and after putting the Mochovce NPP into the operation. Authors used the methods of so-called population epidemiology, where they evaluate the health risks by the system of multidimensional mathematical-statistical methods, by using of the theory of fuzzy sets. The Mochovce region belongs for the long period to the regions with very unfavourable health state. Its very general comparison with one year all Slovak values of the relevant indicators in 2000 are following: more newborn on thousand inhabitants (in 12 per cent) (consequence of wholly older population), higher general mortality of population (in 11 per cent), higher premature mortality of population (in 17 per cent), higher mortality from selected causes, thus malignant tumours of digestive tract (in 20 per cent), higher mortality from malignant tumours of lungs (in 25 per cent), higher mortality from malignant tumours of leukaemia (in 25 per cent). However the authors found out very positive findings in the evaluation of the trends: in the case of fifteen most serious health indicators in the vicinity of Mochovce NPP authors state also mathematically visible influence on the surroundings, which is registerable only in positive meaning. There are created the demonstrable clusters of the villages with low general, also premature women mortality. This locality was far off the industrial and cultural centres, there were always historically higher

  11. Study of environmental impact assessment for Mochovce NPP Units 3 and 4. Executive summary. September 2007

    Anon

    2007-09-01

    SE/ENEL, on a voluntary basis, has prepared new EIA Study for the completion of Units 3 and 4 of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant (MO34 NPP) according to International current practices and European Directives. The results of the analysis, according to SE/ENEL Environment and Corporate Social Responsibility policies, will be provided to local Communities and Public Authorities. The Environmental Impact Assessment is performed: - in compliance with appendix 11 of Slovak Act. No. 24/2006 'On the assessment of the effects on the environment and on the modification and enlargement of some laws'; - meeting the requirements of the Exhibit II 'Illustrative list of potential social and environmental issues to be addressed in the Social and Environmental Assessment documentation' as reported in the document 'Equator Principles' of 2006 July developed by the International Finance Corporation (IFC). The area of Mochovce NPP is situated in Central Europe in the south-western region of the Slovak Republic (SR) at the western border of the Levice district. The area lies in the south-western part of the Kozmalovske hills mainly in the Hron highlands. From the point of view of the terrestrial and administrative organization of the SR, Mochovce NPP is situated in the eastern part of the Nitra region, in the north-western part of the Levice district, close to the border with the Nitra and Zlate Moravce districts. Mochovce NPP is approx. 12 km from the district capital Levice, which is the largest town within a 20 km distance from the power plant. Initial site preparation began in August 1983. In April 1998 the first fuel was loaded into Unit 1 of Mochovce NPP. The operation started in August 1998. Unit 2 started operation in January 2000. The original Construction Permit No. Vyst. 2010/86 for MO 34 was issued by the District National Committee in Levice on the basis of the Land Planning Decisions on 12 November 1986. This Permit has been renewed firstly on 5 May 1997 by letter of the

  12. Level 1 PSA study of Mochovce unit 1 NPP (SM AA 10 and 08)

    Cillik, I.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents genesis of Level 1 PSA project preparation for all operational modes of Mochovce NPP unit 1 including the description of its' main objectives, scope and working method. The PSA study which includes full power (FPSA) as well as shutdown and low power conditions (SPSA) Level 1 PSA has to support the nuclear safety improvements of the unit. They evaluate the basic design and the benefits of all improvements, which were found necessary to be incorporated before the start-up of the unit. The study includes internal events (transients and under-loss of coolant accident, LOCAs), internal hazards as fires and floods and selected external hazards as earthquake, influence of external industry, extreme meteorological conditions and aircraft crash.The PSA (both FPSA and SPSA) models is developed using the RISK SPECTRUM PSA code. (author)

  13. Advanced breaking technology on the Mochovce nuclear power plant building site

    Mraz, M.; Podel, R.; Vojta, A.

    1982-01-01

    Observing the given deadlines of the construction of the Mochovce nuclear power plant and the required volumes of breaking to the total value of 6.2 million m 3 of rock, the required output was derived for the 7th five year plan to the value of 200,000 m 3 per month, i.e., 10,000 m 3 per day and 700 m 3 per hour. The basic task is to build a flat building site with an area of 2,300 by 700 m 2 which requires the removal of a masiff of rocks rising to a height of 37 m, and by compacting the mined rock to build heaps to a height of 20 m. The rocks were disintegrated by blasting. Surface blasting was used for mining faces and ribs. POLONIT 2 or PERMON DAP 1 were mainly used for blasting (ammonium nitrate explosives). The Danubit 1 detonator was used in holes flooded with water. For drilling a combination was used of drilling machines HBM 70 Hausherr with a drilling diameter of 130 to 155 mm and Ingersol Rand ECM 350 with a drilling diameter of 80 mm. The compressors used are Atlas Copco XRHS 350 Dd and PTS 900 Dd. As the optimal combination of machines for the removal of disengaged material for the daily output of 15,000 m 3 the combination was used of 6 excavators with a shovel volume of 2.5 m 3 ORENSTEIN-KOPPEL RH 25 with 12 Kockum 445 trucks and 18 ORENSTEIN-KOPPEL RH 40 excavators with a shovel volume of 4 m 3 and a total of 64 Caterpillar 769 C, Belaz 548 A, Tatra T 200 and T 138 S1 trucks. The planned targets are being fulfilled and the work performed up to now on the Mochovce site equals 2.5 million m 3 of excavated and removed rock. (B.S.)

  14. Review of selected contributions of the conference 'Integrated quality management systems in completion of units 3 and 4 Mochovce'

    2009-04-01

    There were 14 contributions presented of the conference focused on the integrated quality management systems in completion EMO34. Contributions were focused both on theoretical problems from the project management area and on the applications in practice in management systems implementation in accordance with the standards: STN EN ISO 9001:2000, STN EN ISO 14 001:2005, and OHSAS 18 001:1999 at the completion of the Nuclear Power Plant Mochovce of units 3 and 4

  15. Radiation exposure of the population from 222Rn and other natural radionuclides around Mochovce nuclear power plant, Slovakia

    Bulko, Martin; Holy, Karol; Mullerova, Monika; Bohm, Radoslav; Pohronska, Zofia; Hola, Olga

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the effective dose to the population from natural sources of ionizing radiation in the vicinity of Mochovce nuclear power plant in Slovakia is presented. All major contributions to the effective dose were taken into account, including the contributions from gamma radiation of soil and rocks, cosmic radiation, and indoor and outdoor radon and thoron. On the basis of recent indoor radon measurements in Slovak cities and publicly available data about radon concentration in the soil air, a roughly linear relationship was found between these variables. Consequently, the annual effective dose from indoor radon and thoron was conservatively estimated. For the area of interest, a map of conservatively estimated potential effective doses was created. For the villages in the vicinity of Mochovce, the conservatively estimated effective dose to the population from natural sources ranged from 5.4 to 14.6 mSv, which is four orders of magnitude higher than the contribution of radioactive discharges from Mochovce nuclear power plant. (authors)

  16. Unit 1 and Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant Mochovce construction finishing from primary contractor of technological part. Skoda Praha a. s. point of view

    Horky, F.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the history of delivery of technological part for NPP V-1 Mochovce as well as of reconstruction and safety improvements by the Skoda Praha a.s. is presented. Primary contractor of technological part Skoda Praha together with its final suppliers proved ability to realize under hard conditions such a complicated work what was indisputedly Units 1 and 2 finishing. Company proved capability to conform itself flexibly in the course of work to requirements of customer for realization of safety measures which means that Units 1 and 2 fully satisfy international standards. By fulfilment of primary contractor of technology obligations and above all by takeover of complex responsibility for both Units putting in operation including responsibility for 'past' Skoda Praha put away one of basic problems which occurred in decision making to whom will be assigned construction finishing contract. These facts fully qualify Skoda Praha to be selected for possible Units 3 and 4 construction finishing as one of chief construction finishing participant

  17. Management, treatment and final disposal of solid hazardous hospital wastes

    Sebiani Serrano, T.

    2000-01-01

    Medical Waste is characterized by its high risk to human health and the environment. The main risk is biological, due to the large amount of biologically contaminated materials present in such waste. However, this does not mean that the chemical and radioactive wastes are less harmful just because they represent a smaller part of the total waste. Hazardous wastes from hospitals can be divided in 3 main categories: Solid Hazardous Hospital Wastes (S.H.H.W.), Liquid Hazardous Hospital Wastes (L.H.H.W.) and Gaseous Hazardous Hospital Wastes (G.H.H.W.) Most gaseous and liquid hazardous wastes are discharged to the environment without treatment. Since this inappropriate disposal practice, however, is not visible to society, there is no societal reaction to such problem. On the contrary, hazardous solid wastes (S.H.H.W.) are visible to society and create worries in the population. As a result, social and political pressures arise, asking for solutions to the disposal problems of such wastes. In response to such pressures and legislation approved by Costa Rica on waste handling and disposal, the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social developed a plan for the handling, treatment, and disposal of hazardous solid wastes at the hospitals and clinics of its system. The objective of the program is to reduce the risk to society of such wastes. In this thesis a cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted to determine the minimum cost at which it is possible to reach a maximum level of reduction in hazardous wastes, transferring to the environment the least possible volume of solid hazardous wastes, and therefore, reducing risk to a minimum. It was found that at the National Children's Hospital the internal handling of hazard solid wastes is conducted with a high level of effectiveness. However, once out of the hospital area, the handling is not effective, because hazardous and common wastes are all mixed together creating a larger amount of S.H.H.W. and reducing the final efficiency

  18. The nuclear regulatory authority of the Slovak Republic and start-up of the Mochovce NPP

    Seliga, Mojmir

    1999-01-01

    The important aspect is testing if the nuclear energy in the Slovak Republic is due to obligatory rules acceptable and its operation is regulated by the state through the independent institution - The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). UJD considers the whole area of public relations an essential component of its activity. UJD intends to serve the public true, systematic, qualified, understandable and independent information regarding nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, as well as regarding methods and results of UJD work. Generally, public information is considered as significant contribution to the creation of confidence into the regulatory work. The public relations are understood as attempts to establish, keep and improve UJD-s good relations to its neighbours through purposeful informing. An Information centre at the offices of UJD was built and opened in October 1995 with IAEA Director General as the first visitor. NPP Mochovee is an example of international co-operation in achieving internationally acceptable safety standards. Companies from France, Germany, USA, Russian Federation, Czech Republic and Slovakia and last, but not least also the IAEA participated significantly on increasing the safety level of this NPP. We have been fully aware of the importance of good communication with press, TV and radio broadcasting in this pre-operation and operation period about nuclear safety, nuclear standard and other nuclear aspects commissioning of the NPP Mochovce in the UJD. The information policy of the UJD was in this period focused on the preparation an actual press releases for general and specialised news- paper and national press agencies. Very important were the frequent presentations the requirement safety stages of the NPP Mochovce inIV and radio broadcasting by headquarters of the UJD. UJD as the state authority provides information related to its competence, namely information on safety of operation of nuclear installations

  19. Advanced breaking technology on the Mochovce nuclear power plant building site

    Mraz, M; Podel, R; Vojta, A [Vyskumny Ustav Inzinierskych Stavieb, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia)

    1982-10-01

    Observing the given deadlines of the construction of the Mochovce nuclear power plant and the required volumes of breaking to the total value of 6.2 million m/sup 3/ of rock, the required output was derived for the 7th five year plan to the value of 200,000 m/sup 3/ per month, i.e., 10,000 m/sup 3/ per day and 700 m/sup 3/ per hour. The basic task is to build a flat building site with an area of 2,300 by 700 m/sup 2/ which requires the removal of a masiff of rocks rising to a height of 37 m, and by compacting the mined rock to build heaps to a height of 20 m. The rocks were disintegrated by blasting. Surface blasting was used for mining faces and ribs. POLONIT 2 or PERMON DAP 1 were mainly used for blasting (ammonium nitrate explosives). The Danubit 1 detonator was used in holes flooded with water. For drilling a combination was used of drilling machines HBM 70 Hausherr with a drilling diameter of 130 to 155 mm and Ingersol Rand ECM 350 with a drilling diameter of 80 mm. The compressors used are Atlas Copco XRHS 350 Dd and PTS 900 Dd. As the optimal combination of machines for the removal of disengaged material for the daily output of 15,000 m/sup 3/ the combination was used of 6 excavators with a shovel volume of 2.5 m/sup 3/ ORENSTEIN-KOPPEL RH 25 with 12 Kockum 445 trucks and 18 ORENSTEIN-KOPPEL RH 40 excavators with a shovel volume of 4 m/sup 3/ and a total of 64 Caterpillar 769 C, Belaz 548 A, Tatra T 200 and T 138 S1 trucks. The planned targets are being fulfilled and the work performed up to now on the Mochovce site equals 2.5 million m/sup 3/ of excavated and removed rock.

  20. Participation of SKODA JS in the construction of the Temelin and Mochovce nuclear power plants

    Svec, A.; Zach, J.; Ruzicka, P.

    2000-01-01

    SKODA JS is the traditional manufacturer of WWER type reactor equipment and also supplier of the primary circuits and of equipment for the transport, refuelling and storage of fuel for Ver type nuclear power plants built in the Czech and Slovak Republics. The paper deals with activities of the company SKODA JS at two power plants whose reactor units are close to completion, viz. the Mochovce NPP in the Slovak Republic (4 x Ver 440 MW; unit 1 was put in operation in 1998, unit 2 is in the stage of commissioning, units 3 and 4 are not to be completed) and the Temelin NPP in the Czech Republic (2 x Ver 1000 MW, commissioning of units 1 and 2 is expected in 2001 and 2002, respectively). The scope of supplies to the two nuclear power plants (detailed design, delivery of equipment, installation, commissioning) and the course of construction from SKODA JS's viewpoint are described. The most important design changes and improvements made during the construction are highlighted. (author)

  1. Mochovce NPP safety measures evaluation from point of view of operational safety enhancement

    Cillik, I.; Vrtik, L.

    2000-01-01

    Mochovce NPP consists of four reactor units of WWER 440/V213 type and it is located in the south-middle part of Slovakia. At present first unit operated and the second one under the construction finishing. As these units represent second generation of WWER reactor design, the additional safety measures (SM) were implemented to enhance operational and nuclear safety according to the recommendations of performed international audits and operational experience based on exploitation of other similar units (as Dukovany and J. Bohunice NPPs). These requirements result into a number of SMs grouped according to their purpose to reach recent international requirements on nuclear and operational safety. The paper presents the bases used for safety measures establishing including their grouping into the comprehensive tasks covering different areas of safety goals as well as structural organization of a project management of including participating companies and work performance. More, results are given regarding contribution of selected SMs to the total core damage frequency decreasing. (author)

  2. PSA analysis focused on Mochovce NPP safety measures evaluation from operational safety point of view

    Cillik, I.; Vrtik, L.

    2001-01-01

    Mochovce NPP consists of four reactor units of WWER 440/V213 type and it is located in the south-middle part of Slovakia. At present first unit operated and the second one under the construction finishing. As these units represent second generation of WWER reactor design, the additional safety measures (SM) were implemented to enhance operational and nuclear safety according to the recommendations of performed international audits and operational experience based on exploitation of other similar units (as Dukovany and J. Bohunice NPPs). These requirements result into a number of SMs grouped according to their purpose to reach recent international requirements on nuclear and operational safety. The paper presents the bases used for safety measures establishing including their grouping into the comprehensive tasks covering different areas of safety goals as well as structural organization of a project management of including participating companies and work performance. More, results are given regarding contribution of selected SMs to the total core damage frequency decreasing.(author)

  3. Hydrobiological survey of some surface waters in the area of Mochovce nuclear power plant and their saprobiological assessment

    Kovacik, L.

    1987-01-01

    The results are presented of a hydrobiological study of three flows and one retention reservoir in the surroundings of the Mochovce nuclear power plant (Western Slovakia) performed in June 1982 and May 1983. The research was aimed at obtaining necessary information on the species composition of the algal flora (include blue-green algae) and selected groups of invertebrate hydrofauna (Sarcodina, Rotatoria, Cladocera, Copepoda, Oligochaeta and Chironomidae) in this territory. Natural waters were classified on the basis of the species composition of water organisms according to saprobiological criteria. (author). 4 refs

  4. Current situation of the project finishing of the building of 3 and 4 block of the nuclear power plant Mochovce

    Niznan, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the contribution there is the basic information mentioned about history of building and the current situation at the finishing of the building of 3 and 4 block of the Nuclear Power Plant Mochovce with the use of project digitization. Further on the contribution shows what kinds of supporting material has been elaborated, what kind of decisions have been issued to the finishing of the building, way of financing and also the assumption of investment return under the defined conditions. An orientation time schedule of the finishing of the building and the crucial steps for its security are presented in the conclusion

  5. The management of safety within the completion of units 3. and 4. in NPP Mochovce

    Ocenas, M.

    2009-01-01

    The contribution defines the way of management of safety and protection of health and protection against the fire during completion of units 3. and 4. in NPP Mochovce. The creation of the management of safety raised from the legal and other requirements applied in the civil activities and mainly from the requirements for coordination of safety on the site. The whole system is methodically managed through the 5 basic documents so-called 'Building rules': 1) Safety-technical conditions of performance in SE, Inc. Bratislava (project MO34); 2) MO34/1/MNA-003.00-02 the elaboration of the integrated safety plan; 3) MO34/1/NA-003.00-03 risks analyse; 4) PNM3460100 Integrated safety plan for completion of Units 3.and 4 in NPP Mochovce; 5) Project of construction organization. The system itself of the management of the safety prevention must by provided by the supplier in compliance with the standard OHSAS 18 001 and ISO 14001, and in compliance with the requirement of the builder applied in the technical specification for the contract. Most of necessary related documentation of Safety plan for the site is usually part of the documentation for quality management of contractor. Therefore it is necessary to put the reference in each chapter of the Safety plan for site and the standpoint how to apply it for the particular specific situation. The coordinator is mandatory to manage the prevention for the part of safety of specified site and to coordinate the activity of suppliers during the works tie in this way, that the each contractor shall meet the safety requirements given by safety plan and also to identify and to eliminate the risks menaced in the particular work places or the suppliers each other. The builder established its own control system and for this purpose he settled the data base so-called 'The system of corrective and precautionary activities'. The system registers in its data base all discrepancies determined during the regular controls of the head workers

  6. Researches of a thermodynamic behaviour of bubbling vacuum system bubble condenser NPP 'Mochovce'

    Rjeznikov, Iu.V.; Lifshitz, E.V.; Kouznetsov, M.V.; Antropov, V. N.; Doulepov, U. N.; Suchanek, M.

    1997-01-01

    During joint development and designing of the bubbling vacuum system (BVS) equipment for localization of under-loss of coolant accident (LOCA) consequences on NPPs with WWER 440/213, a large volume of experimental and calculational activities have been performed by VTI and SverdNIIchimmash for the substantiation of functionality of this system, and in particular, for bubbler-condenser (BC) design, as a part of BVS. However, not looking on broad introduction of BVS on 16-th NPP units with WWER 440/213, its functionality was subjected to a doubt from experts of different countries. Sequentially, that promoted issue of the IAEA, document and OECD document. Therefore, before commissioning of the NPP 'Mochovce' unit 1 it was decided to execute additional experimental and computational researches for Safety Analysis Report preparation. Within the framework of these BVS thermodynamic behavior researches, in particular the following problems were chosen: (1) The check of a capability of valves DN 250 blocking in an opened position, as a result of return pressure differential on BC, during vent clearing process of the hydro-lock, that can sequentially result in an a drop of efficiency of stem condensation in BC pool; (2) To provide by direct measurements the absence of pressure oscillations dangerous for strength of a BC design in different modes of steam condensation in BC and to execute computational researches of instability of steam condensation processes (for such mode as 'chugging'); (3) Study influences of pool swell and water carry over through check valves DN 500 in the air traps on a BVS functionality; (4) To determine by a computational way the maximum pressure in NPP premises during LOCA, with taking into consideration additional failures of the BC equipment: absence of a water on two and more BC plates and DN 250 valves have blocked in an opened position (conservative conditions). (authors)

  7. Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes - FY-98 Final Report for LDRD 2349

    Kessinger, Glen Frank; Nelson, Lee Orville; Grandy, Jon Drue; Zuck, Larry Douglas; Kong, Peter Chuen Sun; Anderson, Gail

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of LDRD #2349, Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes, was to develop a set of tools that would allow the user to, based on the chemical composition of a waste stream to be immobilized, predict the durability (leach behavior) of the final waste form and the phase assemblages present in the final waste form. The objectives of the project were: • investigation, testing and selection of thermochemical code • development of auxiliary thermochemical database • synthesis of materials for leach testing • collection of leach data • using leach data for leach model development • thermochemical modeling The progress toward completion of these objectives and a discussion of work that needs to be completed to arrive at a logical finishing point for this project will be presented.

  8. Treatment and final conditioning of solid radioactive wastes

    Cerre, J.

    1960-01-01

    The storage of solid radioactive wastes on a site is so cumbersome and dangerous that we have developed a method of treatment and conditioning by means of which the volume of waste is considerably reduced and very long-lasting shielding can be provided. This paper describes the techniques adopted at Saclay, where the wastes are sheared, compressed and enveloped in concrete of variable thickness. The main part of the report is devoted to a description of the corresponding remote handling installation. (author) [fr

  9. RTR spent fuel treatment and final waste storage

    Thomasson, J.

    2000-01-01

    A number of RTR operators have chosen in the past to send their spent fuel to the US in the framework of the US take back program. However, this possibility ends as of May 12th, 2006. 3 different strategies are left for managing RTR spent fuel: extended storage, direct disposal and treatment-conditioning through reprocessing. Whilst former strategies raise a number of uncertainties, the latter already offers a management solution. It features two advantages. It benefits from the long experience of existing flexible industrial facilities from countries like France. Secondly, it offers a dramatic volume reduction of the ultimate waste to be stored under well-characterized, stable and durable forms. RTR spent fuel management through reprocessing-conditioning offers a durable management solution that can be fully integrated in whatever global radioactive waste management policy, including ultimate disposal

  10. Final treatment of spent batteries by thermal plasma.

    Cubas, Anelise Leal Vieira; Machado, Marina de Medeiros; Machado, Marília de Medeiros; Dutra, Ana Regina de Aguiar; Moecke, Elisa Helena Siegel; Fiedler, Haidi D; Bueno, Priscila

    2015-08-15

    The growth in the use of wireless devices, notebooks and other electronic products has led to an ever increasing demand for batteries, leading to these products being commonly found in inappropriate locations, with adverse effects on the environment and human health. Due to political pressure and according to the environmental legislation which regulates the destination of spent batteries, in several countries the application of reverse logistics to hazardous waste is required. Thus, some processes have been developed with the aim of providing an appropriate destination for these products. In this context, a method for the treatment of spent batteries using thermal plasma technology is proposed herein. The efficiency of the method was tested through the determination of parameters, such as total organic carbon, moisture content and density, as well as analysis by atomic absorption spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence using samples before and after inertization. The value obtained for the density was 19.15%. The TOC results indicated 8.05% of C in the batteries prior to pyrolisis and according to the XRF analysis Fe, S, Mn and Zn were the most stable elements in the samples (highest peaks). The efficiency of the paste inertization was 97% for zinc and 99.74% for manganese. The results also showed that the most efficient reactor was that with the DC transferred arc plasma torch and quartzite sand positively influenced by the vitrification during the pyrolysis of the electrolyte paste obtain from batteries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Electrokinetic treatment of contaminated soils, sludges, and lagoons. Final report

    Wittle, J.K. [Electro-Petroleum, Inc., Wayne, PA (United States); Pamukcu, S. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-04-01

    The electrokinetic process is an emerging technology for in-situ soil decontamination, in which chemical species, both ionic and nonionic are transported to an electrode site in soil. These products are subsequently removed from the ground via collection systems engineered for each specific application. Electrokinetics refer to movement of water, ions and charged particles relative to one another under the action of an applied direct current electric field. In a porous compact matrix of surface charged particles such as soil, the ion containing pore fluid may be made to flow to collection sites under the applied field. This report describes the effort undertaken to investigate electrokinetically enhanced transport of soil contaminants in synthetic systems. These systems consisted of clay or clay-sand mixtures containing known concentration of a selected heavy metal salt solution or an organic compound. Metals, surrogate radio nuclides and organic compounds evaluated in the program were representatives of those found at a majority of DOE sites. Degree of removal of these metals from soil by the electrokinetic treatment process was assessed through the metal concentration profiles generated across the soil between the electrodes. The best removals, from about 85 to 95% were achieved at the anode side of the soil specimens. Transient pH change had an effect on the metal movement via transient creation of different metal species with different ionic mobilities, as well as changing of the surface characteristics of the soil medium.

  12. Experience gained during commissioning and trial operation of Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    GaL, P.; Adamica, T.; Marosik, V.; Rehak, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper authors describe the experience gained during commissioning and trial operation of Mochovce NPP (EMO). The first year of EMO operation from the point of view of safety and reliability was successful. Evidently we were challenged with certain problems characteristic to this stage of operation which resulted in automatic reactor shutdown. There were 11 automatic shutdowns in 1998 by action of the quick emergency protection AO-1 and two manual shutdowns by the AO-1 key. In 1999, there were 6 automatic shutdowns by action of the quick emergency protection AO-1. Three of them was connected to the falsely activated binary signal of MCP switch of, in two cases the reason came out from the turbo-generator (TG) cooling water system. Very positive trend in the operation of both units shows the fact that during all commissioning period of the second unit there were only three automatic reactor shutdowns by the signal AO-1. All these actions were done in frame of commissioning tests. All causes which activated the automatic unit shutdowns were found out and rectified, the overall tuning of the cooling water system is on the process now. The solution of this problem is possible only power commissioning, and in the stage of the trial operation had no direct impacts on the nuclear, radiation, or technical safety respectively. In 1998 two events according to the INES scale after second unit commissioning because of two unit links of the cooling water system. The operational events during the commissioning tests, start-up tests, physical commissioning, were ranked the category 1 ('Action of SIS U040 p po <8,34 MPa at the system 2 and 3' and 'Breaching the L and C'). In 1999 only events occurred that were ranked in the category safety insignificant events and lower (category 0, or off the scale respectively). In the frame of the safety culture principles adopted, such as critical attitude, exact and careful approach, and communication, these problems were given the

  13. Ecological impacts and damage - comparison of selected components for nuclear and conventional power plants (example of Mochovce nuclear power plant)

    Bucek, M.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison is given of ecological damage for the nuclear power plant in Mochovce and a conventional power plant with the same power. Ecological effects and damage are divided into three groups: comparable damage, ecological damage caused only by conventional power plants and ecological damage caused only by nuclear power plants. In the first group the factors compared are land requisition, consumption of utility water and air consumption. In the second group are enumerated losses of crops (cereals, sugar beet, potatoes, oleaginous plants) and losses caused by increased disease rate owing to polluted environment by conventional power plants. In the third group health hazards are assessed linked with ionizing radiation. Also considered are vent stack escapes. (E.S.)

  14. Requirements and possible upgrading concept for the WWER-440/213: Mochovce NPP structures under seismic conditions

    Freiman, M.

    1993-01-01

    The Mochovce-Nuclear Power Plant is one of the WWER-440/213 plants which has been designed against earthquake. Nevertheless, the design earthquake has not been assessed adequately to the seismic hazard at the site. A new seismic design shall include an increased seismic input and assure an acceptable standard of safety. This contribution is related to some design aspects of civil structures for this nearly finished plant, such as: existing design and its margins with regard to the employed codes; requirements for a new design concept; effects to be expected by an increased design earthquake; applicable design methods; use of inelastic design spectra, behavior factors and capacity design; feasible upgrading measures. (author)

  15. Radwaste Treatment Centre Jaslovske Bohunice

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment Centre (BSC RAO) is presented. BSC RAO is designed to process and treat liquid and solid radwaste, arising from the NPP A-1 decommissioning, from NPPs V-1, V-2, and Mochovce operations, as well as institutional radwaste of diverse institutional (hospitals, research institutes) in the Slovak Republic. Transport, sorting, incineration, compacting, concentration and cementation of radwaste as well as monitoring of emission are described

  16. Treatment and final storage of radioactive wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle

    Krause, H [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-05-01

    Types, amounts and activity concentrations of the radioactive wastes arising from the different sections of the fuel cycle are described as well as the methods of their treatment and final disposal. By conversion to glass products, highly active fission product solutions can be transferred into a form well suited for final disposal. Low and medium level waste waters are purified so far that safe discharge or reuse is possible. The concentrates thus produced are incorporated into concrete or bitumen. Baling lends itself for treatment of non-combustible solid wastes. Combustible wastes can be incinerated, the residues are incorporated into concrete. For final storage of the conditioned wastes, salt formations in the deep underground are chosen in the Federal Republic of Germany. They offer a series of favourable preconditions for this purpose and guarantee the isolation of the radionuclides from the biocycle over secular periods of time.

  17. Final height after gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist treatment for central precocious puberty : The Dutch experience

    Mul, D; Oostdijk, W; Otten, BJ; Rouwe, C; Jansen, M; Delemarre-van de Waal, HA; Waelkens, JJJ; Drop, SLS

    Final height (FH) data of 96 children (87 girls) treated with GnRH agonist for central precocious puberty were studied. In girls mean FH exceeded initial height prediction by 7.4 (5.7) cm (p <0.001); FH was significantly lower than target height, but still in the genetic target range. When treatment

  18. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen (Final)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as par...

  19. Alternatives of Treatment and Final Disposition of the Solid Hospital residuals

    Meza Monge, K.

    1998-01-01

    The current handling, treatment and final disposition of the hospital solid waste in Costa Rica are considered inadequate or at least insufficient. This situation represents a serious danger for the population's health and the environment, because they are exposed to infectious agents, toxic substances and even radioactive products that are generated among the residuals of the centers of health. This work, alternatives propose for the treatment and adequate final disposition of the solid waste produced in the hospitals of the country. They take into consideration the characteristics that present these residuals, the advantages and disadvantages of each one of the existent techniques and the technical and economic possibilities of the country. For this purpose, in first instance, a revision about the properties, the quality and the quantity of the solid waste produced by the national hospital centers was carried out. Also, a diagnostic of the current situation of the treatment and final disposition of these residuals in some of the most important hospitals of the country, as well as of the possibilities of physical space with that they count on was carried out. Then, the existent different treatment techniques and final disposition for the solid waste that comes from the centers of health are described, as well as their advantages and disadvantages and a comparative analysis of the same ones is carried out. The objective is completed, since alternatives of treatment and final disposition that are considered appropriate for this type of residuals are planned. Nevertheless, in the future, more detailed investigations and studies of feasibility, with the purpose of developing handling programs and elimination of the solid waste for each one of the hospital centers in Costa Rica should be carried out. (Author) [es

  20. MASTICATION, PHONETICS AND ESTHETICS AS A FINAL RESULT OF PARTIAL OR COMPLETE DENTURE TREATMENT.

    Kalina Georgieva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Three target groups- dentists/ dental students, dental technicians and patients were asked to fill in an anonymous questionnaire about their satisfaction of the final results after prosthetic treatment with removable dentures using a scale from 1 to 5 (1- completely dissatisfied, 2-dissatisfied, 3-indifferent, 4-satisfied, 5-completely satisfied. The mean results (including colour, shape and size of artificial teeth, arrangement of front teeth, colour of artificial gums, phonetics, mastication, natural smile, enough space for tongue for all three groups of respondents were compared. Dental technicians (4,34 are more satisfied than dentists/dental students (3,62 and patients (3,53. A successful outcome of prosthetic treatment depends on one hand on the professional approach of the dental team and on the other hand on the patient’s motivation and cooperation. The predictive final results and realistic expectations lead to satisfaction of all participants in the treatment process.

  1. The design preparation for radiation monitoring system in the frame of completion NPP Mochovce Units 3 and 4

    Sevecka, S.; Slavik, O.; Kapisovsky, V.

    2009-01-01

    In 1985 a Basic Design of Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) has been elaborated for Mochovce NPP unit 3 and 4 construction. Due to construction interruption in the following years this design solution became obsolete. A new solution of RMS have been developed with conception following that of original Basic Design accommodating also safety measures implemented in RMS of NPP EMO units 1 and 2, and based on modem instrumentation and computer technique. Following the updating of Basic Design documentation the preparation of elaboration of RMS detailed design was carried on. In the frame of this preparation a review of possible suppliers of instrumentation satisfying the conception of radiation monitoring system and the extension of required deliveries has been made. Also criteria on RMS suppliers selection have been determined. The types of monitoring systems and equipment, as well as their quantities, have been specified based on updated Basic Design requirements and production profiles and possibilities of potential suppliers. The required parameters of measurements (including measurement geometry) have been evaluated, as well as requirements of legislation and requirements of proposed RMS architecture. (authors)

  2. Results of physics start-up tests of Mochovce and Bohunice units with 2-nd generation Gd fuel (average enrichment 4.87 %)

    Polakovic, F.

    2015-01-01

    There are presented main features of the fuel and the list of experimental neutron-physical characteristics measured during physics start-up tests.All together there were carried out 14 physics start-ups at Bohunice and Mochovce Units with the new type of fuel. Differences between theoretical and experimental neutron-physical characteristics were statistically processed and compared with the tests acceptance criteria. There are summarized results of reactor physics start-ups with 2-nd generation Gd fuel usage [ru

  3. Request for modification of 200 Area effluent treatment facility final delisting

    BOWMAN, R.C.

    1998-11-19

    A Delisting Petition submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in August 1993 addressed effluent to be generated at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility from treating Hanford Facility waste streams. This Delisting Petition requested that 71.9 million liters per year of treated effluent, bearing the designation 'F001' through 'F005', and/or 'F039' that is derived from 'F001' through 'F005' waste, be delisted. On June 13, 1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency published the final rule (Final Delisting), which formally excluded 71.9 million liters per year of 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility effluent from ''being listed as hazardous wastes'' (60 FR 31115 now promulgated in 40 CFR 261). Given the limited scope, it is necessary to request a modification of the Final Delisting to address the management of a more diverse multi-source leachate (F039) at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. From past operations and current cleanup activities on the Hanford Facility, a considerable amount of both liquid and solid Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 regulated mixed waste has been and continues to be generated. Ultimately this waste will be treated as necessary to meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The disposal of this waste will be in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act--compliant permitted lined trenches equipped with leachate collection systems. These operations will result in the generation of what is referred to as multi-source leachate. This newly generated waste will receive the listed waste designation of F039. This waste also must be managed in compliance with the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  4. Request for modification of 200 Area effluent treatment facility final delisting

    Bowman, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    A Delisting Petition submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in August 1993 addressed effluent to be generated at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility from treating Hanford Facility waste streams. This Delisting Petition requested that 71.9 million liters per year of treated effluent, bearing the designation 'F001' through 'F005', and/or 'F039' that is derived from 'F001' through 'F005' waste, be delisted. On June 13, 1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency published the final rule (Final Delisting), which formally excluded 71.9 million liters per year of 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility effluent from ''being listed as hazardous wastes'' (60 FR 31115 now promulgated in 40 CFR 261). Given the limited scope, it is necessary to request a modification of the Final Delisting to address the management of a more diverse multi-source leachate (F039) at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. From past operations and current cleanup activities on the Hanford Facility, a considerable amount of both liquid and solid Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 regulated mixed waste has been and continues to be generated. Ultimately this waste will be treated as necessary to meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The disposal of this waste will be in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act--compliant permitted lined trenches equipped with leachate collection systems. These operations will result in the generation of what is referred to as multi-source leachate. This newly generated waste will receive the listed waste designation of F039. This waste also must be managed in compliance with the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

  5. Final height and body mass index after treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Tadej Battelino

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Newer and more agressive forms of chemotherapy and newer protocols in the treatment have increased the survival rate of children with malignancies. Improved survival rates in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia have focused attention on late effects including disorders of growth and puberty, and development of overweight or obesity.Methods: The height and weight expressed as body mass index (BMI of 47 patients (29 girls, 18 boys long-term survivors of childhood lymphoblastic leukemia was retrospectively analyzed. Height standard deviation score (HSDS according to Tanner and body mass index standard deviation scores (BMISDS before treatment and at follow-up were calculated. At the time of analysis all patients remained in first remission. Twenty-eight patients had cranial radiation with 12–18 Gy and 15 with 20–30 Gy. Four patients had no radiotherapy. All patients were treated with standard chemotherapy including intrathecal Methotrexat. Mean age (SD at the diagnosis was 5 5/12 (3 2/12 years, range (5/12 – 12 5/12 and at the time of evaluation 17 11/12 (3 9/12 years, range (10 1/12 – 31 6/12.Results: We observed significant decrease in HSDS from diagnosis to the final height in both radiation groups (p < 0.01 but the decrement in final height was similar with both radiation dose regimens. The decrement in final height SDS was greater in patients treated at a younger age (Pearson, p < 0.01. Girls treated with higher radiation dose (20–30 Gy were more severely affected than boys. In both radiation dose treatment groups there was a significant increase in BMISDS between diagnosis and final height (p < 0.0001 with no significant difference between treatment groups. Menarche occurred earlier in girls than normal with no significant difference between both radiation dose regimens.Conclusions: We observed significant deterioration in HSDS and increment in BMISDS regardless to the radiation dose.

  6. Comparative analysis of rationale used by dentists and patient for final esthetic outcome of dental treatment.

    Reddy, S Varalakshmi; Madineni, Praveen Kumar; Sudheer, A; Gujjarlapudi, Manmohan Choudary; Sreedevi, B; Reddy, Patelu Sunil Kumar

    2013-05-01

    To compare and evaluate the perceptions of esthetics among dentists and patients regarding the final esthetic outcome of a dental treatment. Esthetics is a matter of perception and is associated with the way different people look at an object. What constitutes esthetic for a particular person may not be acceptable for another. Hence it is subjective in nature. This becomes more obvious during the post-treatment evaluation of esthetics by dentist and the concerned patient. Opinion seldom matches. Hence, the study is a necessary part of the process of understanding the mind of dentist and patient regarding what constitutes esthetics. A survey has been conducted by means of a questionnaire consisting of 10 questions, on two groups of people. First group consists of 100 dentists picked at random in Kanyakumari district of Tamil Nadu, India. Second group consisted of 100 patients who required complete denture prosthesis. The second group was divided into two subgroups A and B. Subgroup A consisting of 50 men and subgroup B consisting of 50 women. In each subgroup 25 patients were selected in age group of 40 to 50 and 25 patients were selected in the age group of 50 to 60. The questionnaire was given to both the groups and asked to fill up, which was then statistically analyzed to look for patterns of thought process among them. Results were subjected to statistical analysis by Student's t-test. Perceptions of esthetics differs from dentist who is educated regarding esthetic principles of treatment and a patient who is not subjected to such education. Since, the questions were formulated such that patients could better understand the underlying problem, the final outcome of survey is a proof that dentists need to take into account what the patient regards as esthetics in order to provide a satisfactory treatment. CLINICAL AND ACADEMIC SIGNIFICANCE: The current study helps the dentist to better educate the patient regarding esthetics so that patient appreciates the final

  7. Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS)/Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR). Otis Air National Guard Base, Wastewater Treatment Facility

    1990-06-01

    and G.E. Ness, 1982, Survival of Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli in Estuarine Water and Sediments, Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 43...and publications in areas of water and wastewater treatment. David Tomasko, Ph.D., 1985. University of New Mexico . Staff Hydrogeologist. Research...Reserve in California. We are working on EIS’s for the U.S. Air Force Base Closings in realignment in California, New Mexico and Washington, and a very

  8. Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

    Warner, C.L. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described.

  9. Transuranic-contaminated solid waste Treatment Development Facility. Final safety analysis report

    Warner, C.L.

    1979-07-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid-Waste Treatment Facility has been prepared in compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0531, Safety of Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities. The Treatment Development Facility (TDF) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the study of radioactive-waste-management processes. This analysis addresses site assessment, facility design and construction, and the design and operating characteristics of the first study process, controlled air incineration and aqueous scrub off-gas treatment with respect to both normal and accident conditions. The credible accidents having potentially serious consequences relative to the operation of the facility and the first process have been analyzed and the consequences of each postulated credible accident are presented. Descriptions of the control systems, engineered safeguards, and administrative and operational features designed to prevent or mitigate the consequences of such accidents are presented. The essential features of the operating and emergency procedures, environmental protection and monitoring programs, as well as the health and safety, quality assurance, and employee training programs are described

  10. A treatment of the final-state interaction for photonuclear reactions

    Eden, J.A.; Thompson, M.N.

    1991-01-01

    The final state interaction is considered for the Gottfried factorized cross section. Numerical examples are presented for the 40 Ca(γ,pn) and 40 Ca(γ,n) reactions. The surface refraction process, allowing photonucleons to refract as they emerge from the nuclear potential well, cannot change the magnitude of the total cross section, but may redistribute the strength in the angular dependence of the differential cross section. The absorption process accounts for the loss of photonucleons as a result of inelastic collisions while escaping the nucleus. The surface refraction correction is calculated in a plane-wave Born approximation and the absorption correction is presented as a simple development of earlier phenomenological treatments. 12 refs., 7 figs

  11. Finalizing a measurement framework for the burden of treatment in complex patients with chronic conditions

    Eton DT

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available David T Eton,1,2 Jennifer L Ridgeway,1,2 Jason S Egginton,1,2 Kristina Tiedje,3 Mark Linzer,4,5 Deborah H Boehm,4 Sara Poplau,6 Djenane Ramalho de Oliveira,7 Laura Odell,8 Victor M Montori,1,9 Carl R May,10 Roger T Anderson11 1Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Robert D and Patricia E Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Université Lumière Lyon 2, Lyon, France; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 5University of Minnesota Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 6Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 7Department of Social Pharmacy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil; 8Pharmacy Services, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 9Knowledge and Evaluation Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 10Faculty of Health Sciences and NIHR CLAHRC Wessex, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK; 11School of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA Purpose: The workload of health care and its impact on patient functioning and well-being is known as treatment burden. The purpose of this study was to finalize a conceptual framework of treatment burden that will be used to inform a new patient-reported measure of this construct. Patients and methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 50 chronically ill patients from a large academic medical center (n=32 and an urban safety-net hospital (n=18. We coded themes identifying treatment burden, with the themes harmonized through discussion between multiple coders. Four focus groups, each with five to eight participants with chronic illness, were subsequently held to confirm the thematic structure that emerged from the interviews. Results: Most interviewed patients (98

  12. Alternatives of Treatment and Final Disposition of the Solid Hospital residuals; Alternativas de Tratamiento y Disposicion Final de los Residuos Solidos Hospitalarios

    Meza Monge, K

    1998-07-01

    The current handling, treatment and final disposition of the hospital solid waste in Costa Rica are considered inadequate or at least insufficient. This situation represents a serious danger for the population's health and the environment, because they are exposed to infectious agents, toxic substances and even radioactive products that are generated among the residuals of the centers of health. This work, alternatives propose for the treatment and adequate final disposition of the solid waste produced in the hospitals of the country. They take into consideration the characteristics that present these residuals, the advantages and disadvantages of each one of the existent techniques and the technical and economic possibilities of the country. For this purpose, in first instance, a revision about the properties, the quality and the quantity of the solid waste produced by the national hospital centers was carried out. Also, a diagnostic of the current situation of the treatment and final disposition of these residuals in some of the most important hospitals of the country, as well as of the possibilities of physical space with that they count on was carried out. Then, the existent different treatment techniques and final disposition for the solid waste that comes from the centers of health are described, as well as their advantages and disadvantages and a comparative analysis of the same ones is carried out. The objective is completed, since alternatives of treatment and final disposition that are considered appropriate for this type of residuals are planned. Nevertheless, in the future, more detailed investigations and studies of feasibility, with the purpose of developing handling programs and elimination of the solid waste for each one of the hospital centers in Costa Rica should be carried out. (Author) [Spanish] El actual manejo, tratamiento y disposicion final de los desechos solidos hospitalarios en Costa Rica se considera inadecuado o cuando menos

  13. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1–2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85–6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins.

  14. The experience from operation of electronic personal dosimetry system at Dukovany, Temelin and Mochovce NPPs after repair of Siemens dosemeters eliminating false doses

    Malysak, J.; Kocvara, S.; Jurochova, B.; Zelenka, Z.; Schacherl, M.; Zrubec, M.; Kaiser, H.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the operational experience of the Electronic Personal Dosimetry Systems installed at Dukovany, Temelin and Mochovce NPPs. The system consists of three basic parts: Electronic personal dosemeters (EPD); Physical layer (HW); Logical layer (SW). Number of false doses before and after correction is presented. This presentation has demonstrated the possibilities of SEOD system and the possibility of easy dose comparison between the individual NPPs after introducing this electronic dosimetry system. Basically, the results of film and electronic dosimetry systems are according to our findings nearly identical. Electronic dosemeter sensitivity to interfering electromagnetic fields is a problem which is easily re-movable. In addition, if we know this problem, these false doses in the SEOD system can be easily revealed (e.g. by investigation of histograms) and repaired

  15. Megavoltage conebeam CT cine as final verification of treatment plan in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Kudithipudi, Vijay; Gayou, Olivier; Colonias, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    To analyse the clinical impact of megavoltage conebeam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) cine on internal target volume (ITV) coverage in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). One hundred and six patients received lung SBRT. All underwent 4D computed tomography simulation followed by treatment via image guided 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiation. Prior to SBRT, all patients underwent MV-CBCT cine, in which raw projections are displayed as beam's-eye-view fluoroscopic series with the planning target volume (PTV) projected onto each image, enabling verification of tumour motion relative to the PTV and assessment of adequacy of treatment margin. Megavoltage conebeam computed tomography cine was completed 1-2 days prior to SBRT. Four patients (3.8%) had insufficient ITV coverage inferiorly at cine review. All four plans were changed by adding 5 mm on the PTV margin inferiorly. The mean change in PTV volumes was 3.9 cubic centimetres (cc) (range 1.85-6.32 cc). Repeat cine was performed after plan modification to ensure adequate PTV coverage in the modified plans. PTV margin was adequate in the majority of patients with this technique. MV-CBCT cine did show insufficient coverage in a small subset of patients. Insufficient PTV margins may be a function of 4D CT simulation inadequacies or deficiencies in visualizing the ITV inferior border in the full-inhale phase. MV-CBCT cine is a valuable tool for final verification of PTV margins. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  16. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  17. Tax treatment of cafeteria plans. Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. Final regulations.

    2000-03-23

    This document contains final regulations relating to section 125 cafeteria plans. The final regulations clarify the circumstances under which a section 125 cafeteria plan election may be changed. The final regulations permit an employer to allow a section 125 cafeteria plan participant to revoke an existing election and make a new election during a period of coverage for accident or health coverage or group-term life insurance coverage.

  18. A pilot study for the extraction and treatment of groundwater from a manufactured gas plant site. Final report

    1997-12-01

    This report describes a pilot study involving treatment of contaminated groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site on the eastern seaboard of the US. The work was performed in order to provide the design basis for a full-scale groundwater extraction and treatment system at the site, as well as to develop a generic approach to selection of groundwater treatment sequences at other MGP sites. It included three main components: hydrogeologic investigations, bench-scale treatability studies, and pilot-scale treatability studies. Technologies evaluated in bench-scale work included gravity settling, filtration, and dissolved air flotation (DAF) for primary treatment of nonaqueous phase materials; biological degradation, air stripping, and carbon adsorption for secondary treatment of dissolved organics; and carbon adsorption as tertiary treatment of remaining dissolved contaminants. Pilot-scale studies focused on collecting system performance data fore three distinct levels of contamination. Two treatment trains were evaluated. One consisted of DAF, fluidized-bed biotreatment, and filtration plus carbon adsorption; the other used the same steps except to substitute air stripping for fluidized bed treatment. The final effluents produced by both treatment sequences were similar and demonstrated complete treatment of the groundwater. Besides detailing system design and performance for the treatability studies, the report includes an analysis of groundwater treatment applications to MGP sites in general, including a discussion of capital and operating costs

  19. Evaluation of effects of phenol recovery on biooxidation and tertiary treatment of SRC-I wastewater. Final technical report

    Mitchell, J.W.; Watt, J.C.; Cowan, W.F.; Schuyler, S.E.

    1983-09-01

    Addition of phenol recovery to the wastewater treatment scheme in the Baseline Design for the SRC-I Demonstration Plant was evaluated as a major post-Baseline effort. Phenol recovery affects many downstream processes, but this study was designed to assess primarily its effects on biooxidation and subsequent tertiary treatment. Two parallel treatment schemes were set up, one to treat dephenolated wastewaters and the other for processed nondephenolated wastewaters, a simulation of the Baseline Design. The study focused on comparisons of five areas: effluent quality; system stability; the need for continuous, high-dose powdered activated carbon (PAC) augmentation to the bioreactor; minimum bioreactor hydraulic residence time (HRT); and tertiary treatment requirements. The results show that phenol recovery improves the quality of the bioreactor effluent in terms of residual organics and color. With phenol recovery, PAC augmentation is not required; without phenol recovery, PAC is needed to produce a comparable effluent. Dephenolization also enhances the stability of biooxidation, and reduces the minimum HRT required. With tertiary treatment, both schemes can meet the effluent concentrations published in the SRC-I Final Envivornmental Impact Statement, as well as the anticipated effluent limits. However, phenol recovery does provide a wider safety margin and could eliminate the need for some of the tertiary treatment steps. Based solely on the technical merits observed in this study, phenol recovery is recommended. The final selection should, however, also consider economic tradeoffs and results of other studies such as toxicology testing of the effluents. 34 references, 30 figures and 26 tables.

  20. Sewage Treatment Plants: Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources 1977 Final Rule (42 FR 58520)

    This document includes a copy of the Federal Register publication of the November 10, 1977 Final Rule for the Standards of Performance of New Stationary Sources for 40 CFR 60 Subparts O. This document is provided curtesy of HeinOnline.

  1. Ex situ bioremediation of mineral oil in soils: Aerated pile treatment. Final report

    Graves, D.

    1998-04-01

    Under a contract with Southern Company Services, a pilot-scale evaluation of mineral oil biodegradation was conducted at Plant Mitchell. The evaluation consisted of two demonstrations to examine land treatment and aerated pile treatment of soil contaminated with the mineral insulating oil used in electrical transformers. Treatment of mineral oil contaminated soil is problematic in the State of Georgia and throughout the US because current practice is to excavate and landfill the contaminated soil. In many cases, the cost associated with these activities far exceeds the environmental risk of mineral oil in soil. This project was designed to evaluate the performance of bioremediation for the treatment of mineral oil in soil. Testing was carried out in a demonstration facility prepared by Georgia Power Company. The facility consisted of 12 independent treatment cells constructed on a concrete pad and covered with a roof

  2. Combined methods for liquid radioactive waste treatment. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    The report contains 13 papers presented at the final research co-ordination meeting of the CRP. The subjects covered include processes and technologies for treatment and conditioning of liquid radioactive wastes. It quite often includes the application of several steps, such as filtration, precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, evaporation and/or membrane separation to meet the requirements both for the release of decontaminated effluents into the environment and the conditioning of waste concentrates for disposal. Combination of the processes and their consecutive or simultaneous application is also described. It results in an improved decontamination, waste volume reduction, safety and overall cost effectiveness in the treatment, conditioning and disposal of these wastes.

  3. Combined methods for liquid radioactive waste treatment. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2001

    2003-02-01

    The report contains 13 papers presented at the final research co-ordination meeting of the CRP. The subjects covered include processes and technologies for treatment and conditioning of liquid radioactive wastes. It quite often includes the application of several steps, such as filtration, precipitation, sorption, ion exchange, evaporation and/or membrane separation to meet the requirements both for the release of decontaminated effluents into the environment and the conditioning of waste concentrates for disposal. Combination of the processes and their consecutive or simultaneous application is also described. It results in an improved decontamination, waste volume reduction, safety and overall cost effectiveness in the treatment, conditioning and disposal of these wastes

  4. Expedited demonstration of molten salt mixed waste treatment technology. Final report

    1995-01-01

    This final report discusses the molten salt mixed waste project in terms of the various subtasks established. Subtask 1: Carbon monoxide emissions; Establish a salt recycle schedule and/or a strategy for off-gas control for MWMF that keeps carbon monoxide emission below 100 ppm on an hourly averaged basis. Subtask 2: Salt melt viscosity; Experiments are conducted to determine salt viscosity as a function of ash composition, ash concentration, temperature, and time. Subtask 3: Determine that the amount of sodium carbonate entrained in the off-gas is minimal, and that any deposited salt can easily be removed form the piping using a soot blower or other means. Subtask 4: The provision of at least one final waste form that meets the waste acceptance criteria of a landfill that will take the waste. This report discusses the progress made in each of these areas

  5. Treatment and final disposal of nuclear waste. Siting of a deep repository

    1992-09-01

    Systems and facilities in the program for demonstration deposition of nuclear waste are presented. The siting process is described, from the general studies to the ultimate goal, where a permit to start demonstration deposition has been obtained. National and foreign experiences of siting issues are accounted for. Finally, the structure and plan for work for 1993-98 are outlined. 46 refs, 15 figs, 5 tabs

  6. Historical performance evaluation of Iowa pavement treatments using data analytics : final report.

    2016-11-01

    The pavement network in Iowa has reached a mature state making maintenance and rehabilitation activities more important than new construction. As such, a need exists to evaluate the performance of the pavement treatments and estimate their performanc...

  7. Ozone/UV treatment to enhance biodegradation of surfactants in industrial wastewater. CRADA final report

    Cline, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sullivan, P.F. [Specialty Industrial Products, Inc., Spartanburg, SC (United States); Lovejoy, M.A.; Collier, J. [Sun River Innovations, Ltd., Lexington, KY (United States); Adams, C.D. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The new owners of a surfactant manufacturing plant wanted to triple production but were limited by the plant`s wastewater treatment capacity. Mass balance calculations indicated that little aerobic biodegradation was occurring in the plant`s wastewater treatment system. Literature reviews and laboratory tests confirmed that as much as 60% of the plant`s products might resist aerobic biodegradation. Overall chemical losses, both solid and aqueous, were estimated at 3.8% of theoretical. Organic loadings to the wastewater treatment system were 170 kg/d of which 50 kg/d reached the biological treatment system. Pollution prevention measures have allowed a > 20% increase in production levels with a > 30% decrease in effluent volume and no increase in discharge of chemical oxygen demand (COD). A new dissolved air flotation (DAF) system removes 70% of the organic loading. Sludge volumes are lower by an order of magnitude than with the clarifier/drum-filter process it replaced.

  8. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  9. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering

  10. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Treatment and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel

    2000-01-01

    DOE is responsible for the safe and efficient management of its sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel. This fuel contains metallic sodium, a highly reactive material; metallic uranium, which is also reactive; and in some cases, highly enriched uranium. The presence of reactive materials could complicate the process of qualifying and licensing DOE's sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel inventory for disposal in a geologic repository. Currently, more than 98 percent of this inventory is located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), near Idaho Falls, Idaho. In addition, in a 1995 agreement with the State of Idaho, DOE committed to remove all spent nuclear fuel from Idaho by 2035. This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with the treatment and management of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel in one or more facilities located at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) at INEEL and either the F-Canyon or Building 105-L at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE has identified and assessed six proposed action alternatives in this EIS. These are: (1) electrometallurgical treatment of all fuel at ANL-W, (2) direct disposal of blanket fuel in high-integrity cans with the sodium removed at ANL-W, (3) plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) processing of blanket fuel at SRS, (4) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at ANL-W, (5) melt and dilute processing of blanket fuel at SRS, and (6) melt and dilute processing of all fuel at ANL-W. In addition, Alternatives 2 through 5 include the electrometallurgical treatment of driver fuel at ANL-W. Under the No Action Alternative, the EIS evaluates both the continued storage of sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel until the development of a new treatment technology or direct disposal without treatment. Under all of the alternatives, the affected environment is primarily within 80 kilometers (50 miles) of spent nuclear fuel treatment facilities. Analyses indicate

  11. Curve identification for high friction surface treatment (HFST) installation recommendation : final report.

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study are to develop and deploy a means for cost-effectively extracting curve information using the widely available GPS and GIS data to support high friction surface treatment (HFST) installation recommendations (i.e., start a...

  12. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R.

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiation significantly reduced the growth response. Twenty-eight hGH-treated patients reached final heights which were compared to those of 2 untreated irradiated groups, one with GHD (n=27) and the other with normal GH secretion (n=17). The height SD score changes observed in hGH therapy were +0.3 in the cranial (n=10) and -1.2 SD in the craniospinal (n=18) groups. GH deficiency had contributed to a mean height loss of 1 SD and spinal irradiation to a loss of 1.4SD. The small effect of hGH therapy on final height is probably linked to the small bone age retardation at onset of hGH therapy and to the fact that irradiated children entered puberty at a younger age in terms of chronological age and bone age than the idiopathic GHD patients. These data suggest that the results of gGH therapy in irradiated children might be improved with higher and more fractionated hGH doses and, in some patients, by delaying puberty using luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs

  13. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R. (Hospital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France). Pediatric Endocrinology Unit and INSERM U30)

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiation significantly reduced the growth response. Twenty-eight hGH-treated patients reached final heights which were compared to those of 2 untreated irradiated groups, one with GHD (n=27) and the other with normal GH secretion (n=17). The height SD score changes observed in hGH therapy were +0.3 in the cranial (n=10) and -1.2 SD in the craniospinal (n=18) groups. GH deficiency had contributed to a mean height loss of 1 SD and spinal irradiation to a loss of 1.4SD. The small effect of hGH therapy on final height is probably linked to the small bone age retardation at onset of hGH therapy and to the fact that irradiated children entered puberty at a younger age in terms of chronological age and bone age than the idiopathic GHD patients. These data suggest that the results of gGH therapy in irradiated children might be improved with higher and more fractionated hGH doses and, in some patients, by delaying puberty using luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs.

  14. Nevada Test Site site treatment plan. Final annual update. Revision 1

    1998-04-01

    A Site Treatment Plan (STP) is required for facilities at which the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) generates or stores mixed waste (MW), defined by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCAct) as waste containing both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and a radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act. This STP was written to identify specific treatment facilities for treating DOE/NV generated MW and provides proposed implementation schedules. This STP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and provided the basis for the negotiation and issuance of the FFCAct Consent Order (CO) dated March 6, 1996. The FFCAct CO sets forth stringent regulatory requirements to comply with the implementation of the STP

  15. BNL Building 650 lead decontamination and treatment feasibility study. Final report

    Kalb, P.D.; Cowgill, M.G.; Milian, L.W.

    1995-10-01

    Lead has been used extensively at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for radiation shielding in numerous reactor, accelerator and other research programs. A large inventory of excess lead (estimated at 410,000 kg) in many shapes and sizes is currently being stored. Due to it's toxicity, lead and soluble lead compounds are considered hazardous waste by the Environmental Protection Agency. Through use at BNL, some of the lead has become radioactive, either by contamination of the surface or through activation by neutrons or deuterons. This study was conducted at BNL's Environmental and Waste Technology Center for the BNL Safety and Environmental Protection Division to evaluate feasibility of various treatment options for excess lead currently being stored. The objectives of this effort included investigating potential treatment methods by conducting a review of the literature, developing a means of screening lead waste to determine the radioactive characteristics, examining the feasibility of chemical and physical decontamination technologies, and demonstrating BNL polyethylene macro-encapsulation as a means of treating hazardous or mixed waste lead for disposal. A review and evaluation of the literature indicated that a number of physical and chemical methods are available for decontamination of lead. Many of these techniques have been applied for this purpose with varying degrees of success. Methods that apply mechanical techniques are more appropriate for lead bricks and sheet which contain large smooth surfaces amenable to physical abrasion. Lead wool, turnings, and small irregularly shaped pieces would be treated more effectively by chemical decontamination techniques. Either dry abrasion or wet chemical methods result in production of a secondary mixed waste stream that requires treatment prior to disposal

  16. Soil treatment to remove uranium and related mixed radioactive contaminants. Final report September 1992--October 1995

    1996-07-01

    A research and development project to remove uranium and related radioactive contaminants from soil by an ultrasonically-aided chemical leaching process began in 1993. The project objective was to develop and design, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale experimental studies, a cost-effective soil decontamination process to produce a treated soil containing less than 35 pCi/g. The project, to cover a period of about thirty months, was designed to include bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to remove primarily uranium from the Incinerator Area soil, at Fernald, Ohio, as well as strontium-90, cobalt-60 and cesium-137 from a Chalk River soil, at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario. The project goal was to develop, design and cost estimate, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale ex-situ soil treatment studies, a process to remove radionuclides form the soils to a residual level of 35 pCi/g of soil or less, and to provide a dischargeable water effluent as a result of soil leaching and a concentrate that can be recovered for reuse or solidified as a waste for disposal. In addition, a supplementary goal was to test the effectiveness of in-situ soil treatment through a field study using the Chalk River soil

  17. Mucosal Perforation During Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy Has No Influence on Final Treatment Outcome.

    Salvador, Renato; Spadotto, Lorenzo; Capovilla, Giovanni; Voltarel, Guerrino; Pesenti, Elisa; Longo, Cristina; Cavallin, Francesco; Nicoletti, Loredana; Ruol, Alberto; Valmasoni, Michele; Merigliano, Stefano; Costantini, Mario

    2016-12-01

    The aims of the study were (a) to examine the final outcome in patients experiencing accidental mucosal perforation during laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication (LHD) and (b) to evaluate whether perforation episodes might influence the way in which surgeons subsequently approached the LHD procedure. We studied all consecutive patients that underwent LHD between 1992 and 2015. Patients were divided into two main groups: those who experienced an intraoperative mucosal perforation (group P) and those whose LHD was uneventful (group NP). Two additional groups were compared: group A, which consisted of patients operated by a given surgeon immediately before a perforation episode occurred, and group B, which included those operated immediately afterwards. Eight hundred seventy-five patients underwent LHD; a mucosal perforation was detected in 25 patients (2.9 %), which was found unrelated to patients' symptom's score and age, radiological stage, manometric pattern, or the surgeon's experience. The median postoperative symptom score was similar for the two groups as the failure rate: 92 failures in group NP (10.8 %) and 4 in group P (16 %) (p = 0.34); moreover, symptoms recurred in 2 patients of group A (10 %) and 3 patients of group B (15 %) (p = 0.9). Accidental perforation during LHD is infrequent and impossible to predict on the grounds of preoperative therapy or the surgeon's personal experience. Despite a longer surgical procedure and hospital stay, the outcome of LHD is much the same as for patients undergoing uneventful myotomy. A recent mucosal perforation does not influence the surgeon's subsequent performance.

  18. Final Report: Conceptual Design of an Electron Accelerator for Bio-Solid Waste Treatment

    Cooper, Charles [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-09-20

    Several studies have identified electron beam (EB) irradiation of municipal wastewater and bio-solids as an effective and promising approach to the environmental remediation of the enormous quantities of human waste created by a growing world-wide population and increased urbanization. However, despite the technical success of experimental and pilot programs over the last several decades, the technique is still not in commercial use anywhere in the world. In addition, the report also identifies the need for “Financial and infrastructure participation from a utility for demonstration project” and “Education and awareness of safety of utilizing electron beam technology” as two additional roadblocks preventing technology adoption of EB treatment for bio-solids. In this concept design, we begin to address these barriers by working with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD) and by the applying the latest accelerator technologies developed at Fermilab and within the DOE Office of Science laboratory complex.

  19. Treatment techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. Final report of the TENAWA project

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T.

    2000-01-01

    TENAWA project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water) was carried out on a cost-shared basic with the European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of Directorate-General XII, Radiation Protection Unit. TENAWA project was started because in several European countries ground water supplies may contain high amounts of natural radionuclides. During the project both laboratory and field research was performed in order to test the applicability of different equipment and techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. The measurable objectives of the project were: to give recommendations on the most suitable methods for removing radon ( 222 Rn), uranium ( 238,234 U), radium ( 226 , 228 Ra), lead ( 210 Pb) and polonium ( 210 Po) from drinking water of different qualities (i.e. soft, hard, iron-, manganese- and humus-rich, acidic) to test commercially available equipment for its ability to remove radionuclides; to find new materials, absorbents and membranes effective in the removal of radionuclides and to issue guidelines for the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in water treatment. Radon could be removed efficiently (>95%) from domestic water supplies by both aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Defects in technical reliability or radon removal efficiency were observed in some aerators. The significant drawback of GAC filtration was the elevated gamma dose rates (up to 120 μSv/h) near the filter and the radioactivity of spent GAC. Aeration was found to be a suitable method for removing radon at waterworks, too. The removal efficiencies at waterworks where the aeration process was designed to remove radon or carbon dioxide were 67-99%. If the aeration process was properly designed, removal efficiencies higher than 95% could be attained. Uranium could best be removed (>95%) with strong basic anion exchange resins and radium by applying strong acidic cation exchange resins

  20. Treatment techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. Final report of the TENAWA project

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T. [eds.

    2000-01-01

    TENAWA project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water) was carried out on a cost-shared basic with the European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of Directorate-General XII, Radiation Protection Unit. TENAWA project was started because in several European countries ground water supplies may contain high amounts of natural radionuclides. During the project both laboratory and field research was performed in order to test the applicability of different equipment and techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. The measurable objectives of the project were: to give recommendations on the most suitable methods for removing radon ({sup 222}Rn), uranium ({sup 238,234}U), radium ({sup 226}, {sup 228}Ra), lead ({sup 210}Pb) and polonium ({sup 210}Po) from drinking water of different qualities (i.e. soft, hard, iron-, manganese- and humus-rich, acidic) to test commercially available equipment for its ability to remove radionuclides; to find new materials, absorbents and membranes effective in the removal of radionuclides and to issue guidelines for the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in water treatment. Radon could be removed efficiently (>95%) from domestic water supplies by both aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Defects in technical reliability or radon removal efficiency were observed in some aerators. The significant drawback of GAC filtration was the elevated gamma dose rates (up to 120 {mu}Sv/h) near the filter and the radioactivity of spent GAC. Aeration was found to be a suitable method for removing radon at waterworks, too. The removal efficiencies at waterworks where the aeration process was designed to remove radon or carbon dioxide were 67-99%. If the aeration process was properly designed, removal efficiencies higher than 95% could be attained. Uranium could best be removed (>95%) with strong basic anion exchange resins and radium by applying strong

  1. Water Treatment Using Advanced Ultraviolet Light Sources Final Report CRADA No. TC02089.0

    Hoppes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oster, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Teknichal Services, LLC (TkS), to develop water treatment systems using advanced ultraviolet light sources. The Russian institutes involved with this project were The High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) and Russian Institute of Technical Physics-Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). HCEI and VNIIEF developed and demonstrated the potential commercial viability of short-wavelength ultraviolet excimer lamps under a Thrust 1 Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) Program. The goals of this collaboration were to demonstrate both the commercial viability of excilampbased water disinfection and achieve further substantial operational improvement in the lamps themselves; particularly in the area of energy efficiency.

  2. Irradiation as a phytosanitary treatment of food and agricultural commodities. Proceedings of a final research coordination meeting

    2004-11-01

    World trade in fresh horticultural produce, durables and ornamentals continues to grow. Accompanying increased trade in agricultural products is the increased risk for inadvertently transporting quarantine pests to countries or regions where they do not occur. Quarantined pests, including insects such as fruit flies, beetles, moths, scales, mealybugs, thrips, and mites, can seriously disrupt marketing of fresh agricultural products not only between countries, but also between geographical areas within countries (e.g. Florida to California; Hawaii to mainland USA; Queensland to Victoria, Australia; Okinawa to Japan) unless accepted postharvest quarantine treatments are available. Quarantine or phytosanitary treatments (such as fumigation, heat, cold or irradiation) disinfest host commodities of insect pests before they are moved through market channels to areas where the pests do not occur. Among the phytosanitary treatments, irradiation is recognized as a versatile treatment with broadspectrum activity against arthropod pests at dose levels that have minimal adverse effects on the quality of most commodities. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, initiated in 1998 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Irradiation as a Phytosanitary Treatment of Food and Agricultural Commodities. This CRP included 16 participants from Australia, Brazil, Chile, China (2), India, Islamic Republic of Iran, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Poland, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Turkey and the USA (2). Research coordination meetings were held in Bangkok, Thailand, 29 March - 2 April 1999; Fresno, California, 13-16 November 2001; and Vienna, 2-4 November 2002. This CRP built on the achievements of two previous CRPs on Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, (1986-1990), and Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Mites, Nematodes and Insects other than Fruit Flies(1992-1997). This publication presents the research results

  3. Electrochemical Processes for In-Situ Treatment of Contaminated Soils - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 01/31/2001

    Huang, Chin-Pao

    2001-05-31

    This project will study electrochemical processes for the in situ treatment of soils contaminated by mixed wastes, i.e., organic and inorganic. Soil samples collected form selected DOE waste sites will be characterized for specific organic and metal contaminants and hydraulic permeability. The soil samples are then subject to desorption experiments under various physical-chemical conditions such as pH and the presence of surfactants. Batch electro-osmosis experiments will be conducted to study the transport of contaminants in the soil-water systems. Organic contaminants that are released from the soil substrate will be treated by an advanced oxidation process, i.e., electron-Fantan. Finally, laboratory reactor integrating the elector-osmosis and elector-Fantan processes will be used to study the treatment of contaminated soil in situ.

  4. Fresh Kills leachate treatment and minimization study: Volume 2, Modeling, monitoring and evaluation. Final report

    Fillos, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    1993-09-01

    The New York City Department of Sanitation is developing a comprehensive landfill leachate management plan for the Fresh Kills landfill, located on the western shore of Staten Island, New York. The 3000-acre facility, owned and operated by the City of New York, has been developed into four distinct mounds that correspond to areas designated as Sections 1/9, 2/8, 3/4 and 6/7. In developing a comprehensive leachate management plan, the estimating leachate flow rates is important in designing appropriate treatment alternatives to reduce the offsite migration that pollutes both surface water and groundwater resources.Estimating the leachate flow rates from Sections 1/9 and 6/7 was given priority using an available model, hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance (HELP), and a new model, flow investigation for landfill leachate (FILL). The field-scale analysis for leachate flow included data collection of the leachate mound-level from piezometers and monitoring wells installed on-site, for six months period. From the leachate mound-head contours and flow-gradients, Leachate flow rates were computed using Darcy`s Law.

  5. Treatment and final conditioning of solid radioactive wastes; Traitement et conditionnement definitif des dechets radioactifs solides

    Cerre, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The storage of solid radioactive wastes on a site is so cumbersome and dangerous that we have developed a method of treatment and conditioning by means of which the volume of waste is considerably reduced and very long-lasting shielding can be provided. This paper describes the techniques adopted at Saclay, where the wastes are sheared, compressed and enveloped in concrete of variable thickness. The main part of the report is devoted to a description of the corresponding remote handling installation. (author) [French] L'encombrement et le danger que presentent sur un site le stockage de dechets radioactifs solides nous ont amenes a etudier un mode de traitement et de conditionnement permettant une sensible reduction du volume des dechets et une protection de tres longue duree. La presente communication expose les techniques adoptees a Saclay ou les dechets sont cisailles, comprimes et enrobes dans du beton d'epaisseur variable. La description de l'installation telecommandee correspondante fait l'objet principal de cette communication. (auteur)

  6. Predictive Model and Methodology for Heat Treatment Distortion Final Report CRADA No. TC-298-92

    Nikkel, D. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCabe, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    This project was a multi-lab, multi-partner CRADA involving LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Martin Marietta Energy Systems and the industrial partner, The National Center of Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS). A number of member companies of NCMS participated including General Motors Corporation, Ford Motor Company, The Torrington Company, Gear Research, the Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute, and Deformation Control Technology •. LLNL was the lead laboratory for metrology technology used for validation of the computational tool/methodology. LLNL was also the lead laboratory for the development of the software user interface , for the computational tool. This report focuses on the participation of LLNL and NCMS. The purpose of the project was to develop a computational tool/methodology that engineers would use to predict the effects of heat treatment on the _size and shape of industrial parts made of quench hardenable alloys. Initially, the target application of the tool was gears for automotive power trains.

  7. Final analysis of survival outcomes in the phase 3 FIRST trial of up-front treatment for multiple myeloma.

    Facon, Thierry; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Dispenzieri, Angela; Catalano, John V; Belch, Andrew; Cavo, Michele; Pinto, Antonello; Weisel, Katja; Ludwig, Heinz; Bahlis, Nizar J; Banos, Anne; Tiab, Mourad; Delforge, Michel; Cavenagh, Jamie D; Geraldes, Catarina; Lee, Je-Jung; Chen, Christine; Oriol, Albert; De La Rubia, Javier; White, Darrell; Binder, Daniel; Lu, Jin; Anderson, Kenneth C; Moreau, Philippe; Attal, Michel; Perrot, Aurore; Arnulf, Bertrand; Qiu, Lugui; Roussel, Murielle; Boyle, Eileen; Manier, Salomon; Mohty, Mohamad; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Leleu, Xavier; Ervin-Haynes, Annette; Chen, Guang; Houck, Vanessa; Benboubker, Lotfi; Hulin, Cyrille

    2018-01-18

    This FIRST trial final analysis examined survival outcomes in patients with transplant-ineligible newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) treated with lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone until disease progression (Rd continuous), Rd for 72 weeks (18 cycles; Rd18), or melphalan, prednisone, and thalidomide (MPT; 72 weeks). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS; primary comparison: Rd continuous vs MPT). Overall survival (OS) was a key secondary endpoint (final analysis prespecified ≥60 months' follow-up). Patients were randomized to Rd continuous (n = 535), Rd18 (n = 541), or MPT (n = 547). At a median follow-up of 67 months, PFS was significantly longer with Rd continuous vs MPT (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59-0.79; P < .00001) and was similarly extended vs Rd18. Median OS was 10 months longer with Rd continuous vs MPT (59.1 vs 49.1 months; HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.92; P = .0023), and similar with Rd18 (62.3 months). In patients achieving complete or very good partial responses, Rd continuous had an ≈30-month longer median time to next treatment vs Rd18 (69.5 vs 39.9 months). Over half of all patients who received second-line treatment were given a bortezomib-based therapy. Second-line outcomes were improved in patients receiving bortezomib after Rd continuous and Rd18 vs after MPT. No new safety concerns, including risk for secondary malignancies, were observed. Treatment with Rd continuous significantly improved survival outcomes vs MPT, supporting Rd continuous as a standard of care for patients with transplant-ineligible NDMM. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00689936 and EudraCT as 2007-004823-39. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. Comparative study of the methods used for treatment and final disposal of sewage sludge in European countries.

    Kelessidis, Alexandros; Stasinakis, Athanasios S

    2012-06-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment results to the production of large quantities of sewage sludge, which requires proper and environmentally accepted management before final disposal. In European Union, sludge management remains an open and challenging issue for the Member States as the relative European legislation is fragmentary and quite old, while the published data concerning sludge treatment and disposal in different European countries are often incomplete and inhomogeneous. The main objective of the current study was to outline the current situation and discuss future perspectives for sludge treatment and disposal in EU countries. According to the results, specific sludge production is differentiated significantly between European countries, ranging from 0.1 kg per population equivalent (p.e.) and year (Malta) to 30.8 kg per p.e. and year (Austria). More stringent legislations comparing to European Directive 86/278/EC have been adopted for sludge disposal in soil by several European countries, setting lower limit values for heavy metals as well as limit values for pathogens and organic micropollutants. A great variety of sludge treatment technologies are used in EU countries, while differences are observed between Member States. Anaerobic and aerobic digestion seems to be the most popular stabilization methods, applying in 24 and 20 countries, respectively. Mechanical sludge dewatering is preferred comparing to the use of drying beds, while thermal drying is mainly applied in EU-15 countries (old Member States) and especially in Germany, Italy, France and UK. Regarding sludge final disposal, sludge reuse (including direct agricultural application and composting) seems to be the predominant choice for sludge management in EU-15 (53% of produced sludge), following by incineration (21% of produced sludge). On the other hand, the most common disposal method in EU-12 countries (new Member States that joined EU after 2004) is still landfilling. Due to the obligations

  9. Presence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia exhibiting high genetic similarity to clinical isolates in final effluents of pig farm wastewater treatment plants.

    Kim, Young-Ji; Park, Jin-Hyeong; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2018-03-01

    Although the prevalence of community-acquired Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infections is sharply increasing, the sources and likely transmission routes of this bacterium are poorly understood. We studied the significance of the presence of S. maltophilia in final effluents and receiving rivers of pig farm wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The loads and antibiotic resistance profiles of S. maltophilia in final effluents were assessed. Antibiotic resistance determinants and biofilm formation genes were detected by PCR, and genetic similarity to clinical isolates was investigated using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). S. maltophilia was recovered from final effluents at two of three farms and one corresponding receiving river. Tests of resistance to antibiotics recommended for S. maltophilia infection revealed that for each agent, at least one isolate was classified as resistant or intermediate, with the exception of minocycline. Furthermore, multidrug resistant S. maltophilia susceptible to antibiotics of only two categories was isolated and found to carry the sul2 gene, conferring trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance. All isolates carried spgM, encoding a major factor in biofilm formation. MLST revealed that isolates of the same sequence type (ST; ST189) were present in both effluent and receiving river samples, and phylogenetic analysis showed that all of the STs identified in this study clustered with clinical isolates. Moreover, one isolate (ST192) recovered in this investigation demonstrated 99.61% sequence identity with a clinical isolate (ST98) associated with a fatal infection in South Korea. Thus, the pathogenicity of the isolates reported here is likely similar to that of those from clinical environments, and WWTPs may play a role as a source of S. maltophilia from which this bacterium spreads to human communities. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first report of S. maltophilia in pig farm WWTPs. Our results indicate that

  10. Final waste management programmatic environmental impact statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposl of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume II

    1997-01-01

    The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic management alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. The five waste types are low-level mixed waste, low-level waste, transuranic waste, high-level waste, and hazardous waste. The WM PEIS provides information on the impacts of various siting alternatives which the Department of Energy (DOE) will use to decide at which sites to locate additional treatment, storage, and disposal capacity for each waste type.Volume II is an integral part of the Office of Environmental Management''s (EM''s) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS), which portrays the impacts of EM''s waste management activities at each of the 17 major DOE sites evaluated in the WM PEIS

  11. Efficacy of chlorhexidine as a final irrigant in one-visit root canal treatment: a prospective comparative study.

    Miçooğullar Kurt, S; Çalışkan, M K

    2018-03-30

    To evaluate postoperative pain and radiographic evidence of periapical healing in teeth with apical periodontitis treated in one visit with an additional final irrigation using 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and to compare the results with conventional two-visit root canal treatment (RCT) with an intracanal calcium hydroxide (CH) dressing as a control group. Ninety asymptomatic maxillary anterior teeth with periapical lesions were treated by a single operator. Root canals were prepared using the step-back technique with manual instrumentation with 2.5% NaOCl and 5% EDTA as irrigants. Half of the teeth were randomly assigned to the one-visit (OV) group and received an additional final rinse with 2% CHX before canal filling. The other teeth were treated in two visits (TV) with a CH paste made by mixing CH powder and distilled water as an interappointment dressing. All patients were recalled and investigated clinically and radiographically for 24 months. Postoperative pain at 24-48 h and changes in apical bone density indicating radiographic healing were evaluated statistically using the Mann-Whitney U-test followed by the Friedman and the Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). There were no significant differences between two groups regarding the incidence of postoperative pain at 24 h (OV group 50% no pain, 47.6% mild, 2.4% moderate pain/TV group 55% no pain, 42.5% mild, 2.5% moderate pain) and at 48 h (OV group 95% no pain, 5% mild pain/TV group 98% no pain, 2% mild pain). None of the patients reported severe postoperative pain, swelling and/or flare-ups during the follow-up period. There was no significant difference in the radiographic healing rates (OV group 97.6% PAI 1 and/or PAI 2 and 2.4% PAI 3/TV group 95% PAI 1 and/or PAI 2 and 5% PAI 3; P > 0.05). Both groups provided favourable and similar postoperative pain and periapical healing rates at 24 months. Thus, one-visit RCT with a final rinse with 2% CHX is an acceptable alternative to two-visit RCT with CH as

  12. Solid waste containing persistent organic pollutants in Serbia: From precautionary measures to the final treatment (case study).

    Stevanovic-Carapina, Hristina; Milic, Jelena; Curcic, Marijana; Randjelovic, Jasminka; Krinulovic, Katarina; Jovovic, Aleksandar; Brnjas, Zvonko

    2016-07-01

    Sustainable solid waste management needs more dedicated attention in respect of environmental and human health protection. Solid waste containing persistent organic pollutants is of special concern, since persistent organic pollutants are persistent, toxic and of high risk to human health and the environment. The objective of this investigation was to identify critical points in the Serbian system of solid waste and persistent organic pollutants management, to assure the life cycle management of persistent organic pollutants and products containing these chemicals, including prevention and final destruction. Data were collected from the Serbian competent authorities, and led us to identify preventive actions for solid waste management that should reduce or minimise release of persistent organic pollutants into the environment, and to propose actions necessary for persistent organic pollutants solid waste. The adverse impact of persistent organic pollutants is multidimensional. Owing to the lack of treatment or disposal plants for hazardous waste in Serbia, the only option at the moment to manage persistent organic pollutants waste is to keep it in temporary storage and when conditions are created (primarily financial), such waste should be exported for destruction in hazardous waste incinerators. Meanwhile, it needs to be assured that any persistent organic pollutants management activity does not negatively impact recycling flows or disturb progress towards a more circular economy in Serbia. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment of arthropod pests. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    Fresh horticultural produce from tropical and sub-tropical areas often harbours insects and mites and are quarantined by importing countries. Such commodities cannot gain access to countries which have strict quarantine regulations such as Australia, Japan, New Zealand and the United States of America unless treated by an approved method/procedure to eliminate such pests. Current approved methods include fumigation by methyl bromide, hot water dip, vapour heat, dried heat and irradiation. Methyl bromide is being phased out globally under the Montreal Protocol in view of its strong ozone depleting properties. Countries such as the USA and those of the European Union are required to phase out the production of this chemical by the year 2005. Among other phytosanitary treatments, irradiation appears to have an edge as it is more versatile in controlling various pests and causes insignificant changes in quality of the treated products. The CRP on Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Mites, Nematodes and Insects other than Fruit Flies, in operation between 1992 and 1997, attempted to fill the gap of information on the effectiveness of irradiation against other quarantine pests. Significant data were generated by this CRP to demonstrate that a minimum dose of between 200 and 400 Gy would render a number of non-fruit fly insects and mites sterile, thus meeting quarantine requirements. However, only a limited species of insects and mites were studied. Additional data are required to provide conclusive evidence that such a dose would render most, if not all, species of non-fruit fly insects and mites sterile. Plant parasitic nematodes appear to be resistant to irradiation as the dose required to render them sterile would cause damage to fresh horticultural commodities. Irradiation would be a useful quarantine treatment against this pest only for durable commodities such as pot soil, wood products, etc. This publication presents the research results of the CRP presented

  14. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment of arthropod pests. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    1999-05-01

    Fresh horticultural produce from tropical and sub-tropical areas often harbours insects and mites and are quarantined by importing countries. Such commodities cannot gain access to countries which have strict quarantine regulations such as Australia, Japan, New Zealand and the United States of America unless treated by an approved method/procedure to eliminate such pests. Current approved methods include fumigation by methyl bromide, hot water dip, vapour heat, dried heat and irradiation. Methyl bromide is being phased out globally under the Montreal Protocol in view of its strong ozone depleting properties. Countries such as the USA and those of the European Union are required to phase out the production of this chemical by the year 2005. Among other phytosanitary treatments, irradiation appears to have an edge as it is more versatile in controlling various pests and causes insignificant changes in quality of the treated products. The CRP on Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Mites, Nematodes and Insects other than Fruit Flies, in operation between 1992 and 1997, attempted to fill the gap of information on the effectiveness of irradiation against other quarantine pests. Significant data were generated by this CRP to demonstrate that a minimum dose of between 200 and 400 Gy would render a number of non-fruit fly insects and mites sterile, thus meeting quarantine requirements. However, only a limited species of insects and mites were studied. Additional data are required to provide conclusive evidence that such a dose would render most, if not all, species of non-fruit fly insects and mites sterile. Plant parasitic nematodes appear to be resistant to irradiation as the dose required to render them sterile would cause damage to fresh horticultural commodities. Irradiation would be a useful quarantine treatment against this pest only for durable commodities such as pot soil, wood products, etc. This publication presents the research results of the CRP presented

  15. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices. Volume 6. Appendix VI-X

    1994-09-01

    This final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils dated September 1994 contains LEFPC Appendices, Volume 6, Appendix VI - X. These appendices cover the following areas: chain of custody, miscellaneous process calculations (residence time and orifice plate calculations), waste management (mercury and radiation confirmatory testing before and after final verification run), health and safety (training, respirator fit test and radiation work permits), and transportation (soil receipt documentation)

  16. Change in contrast enhancement of HCC on 1-month follow-up CT after local radiotherapy: An early predictor of final treatment response

    Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Yoo, Byung Chul; Paik, Seung Woon

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the change in contrast enhancement of HCC on 1-month follow-up CT after local radiotherapy (RT) as an early predictor of final treatment response. Materials: Fifty patients who underwent local RT for HCCs had both pre-RT and post-RT CT scans including 1-month follow-up CT. We assessed the final treatment response by using the change in maximal tumor size on 6-12-month follow-up CT scan after RT. We also evaluated the change in tumor enhancement between pre-RT and 1-month follow-up CT scans. Results: A final treatment response was achieved in 27 (54%) of 50 patients, who showed either a complete response (n = 11) or a partial response (n = 16). Compared with non-responsive patients (n = 23), responsive patients showed a significant decrease in tumor enhancement on 1-month follow-up CT after RT in both objective and subjective analyses (each P < 0.001). Conclusion: The change in contrast enhancement of HCC seen on the 1-month follow-up CT in patients after local RT may be used as an early predictor of final treatment response.

  17. Contribution of Mochovce Units completion

    Burdova, J.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the on-going economic crisis in Europe, Slovakia is still showing economic growth. Slovenske elektrarne belong to the key companies within the Slovak economy. Not only because of its position in the electricity market, basis for the operation of companies and homes, but also because of its influence on the social and economic development of the country. (author)

  18. Treatment and conditioning of solid and liquid raw

    Jakubec, R.

    2015-01-01

    Jadrova a vyradovacia spolocnost, a.s. (JAVYS) implements activities within the processes of treatment and conditioning of radioactive waste (RAW) at two nuclear facilities, one of them located in Bohunice - Technologies for treatment and conditioning of RAW. This nuclear facility includes: Bohunice RAW treatment centre, bituminization lines, waste water purification station and technologies for sorting, fragmentation and decontamination of metallic RAW. The Bohunice RAW treatment centre (BRTC) in Bohunice processes and conditions liquid and solid radioactive waste produced during the A1 NPP and V1 NPP decommissioning, waste from the operation of V2 NPP in Bohunice as well as from the operation of NPP EMO 1,2 in Mochovce. The BRTC includes the following technological facilities: sorting, high-pressure compaction, incineration, concentration and cementation. Treatment of radioactive wastes in the BRTC is described. (authors)

  19. Final height in central precocious puberty after long term treatment with a slow release GnRH agonist

    Oostdijk, W; Rikken, B; Schreuder, S; Otten, Barto; Odink, R; Rouwe, C; Jansen, M; Gerver, WJ; Waelkens, J; Drop, S

    1996-01-01

    Objective-To study the resumption of puberty and the final height achieved in children with central precocious puberty (CPP) treated with the GnRH agonist triptorelin. Patients-31 girls and five boys with CPP who were treated with triptorelin 3.75 mg intramuscularly every four weeks. Girls were

  20. Waste treatment and immobilization technologies involving inorganic sorbents. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1992-1996

    1997-06-01

    A Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) for the application of inorganic sorbents in liquid waste treatment and immobilization was initiated by the IAEA in 1992. The results of this CRP are presented in this report. Fifteen institutions from fourteen countries were involved in this programme. The framework of this CRP was: (1) to conduct fundamental studies on sorbent structure and sorption mechanism; (2) to obtain thermodynamic and kinetic data of the treatment process; (3) to define sorption mechanism of radionuclides on different soils; (4) to identify sorbents appropriate for treatment of liquid waste streams; (5) to develop standard tests to be able to compare results of different groups of investigations. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Mechanical properties of nickel-titanium archwire used in the final treatment phase of Tip-Edge Plus technique: an in vitro study.

    Shen, Xiao; Sun, Xin-hua; Tian, Hua; Zhang, Chun-bo; Yan, Kuo; Guo, Yong-liang

    2013-01-01

    As the only active component in final treatment phase of Tip-Edge Plus technique, the activation of nickel-titanium orthodontic archwires is one of the factors that affect the torque expression. It is necessary to evaluate the mechanical properties of the nickel-titanium wire used in the final treatment phase in simulated oral environments to forecast the treatment outcomes. The mechanical properties of 171 thermal nickel-titanium wires of 0.35 mm (0.014-in) in diameters with different deflection of 40 mm in length were investigated with three-point bending test. The samples were divided into 2 groups: as-received and bended groups. In the bended group, samples were divided into 7 subgroups according to the amounts of deflection and named by the canine angulations (-25°, -19°, -13°, -7°, -1°, +5°, +11°). The deflection of wires was made by inserting the wires into the deep tunnel of Tip-Edge Plus brackets positioned in plaster casts with different canine angulations to mimic the use of nickel-titanium wires in the final treatment phase. Immersed the bended group in artificial saliva (pH 6.8) and preserved at 37.0°C. Eight durations of incubation were tested: 1 to 8 weeks. Three analogous samples of each group and subgroups were tested per week. Stiffness (YS:E) and the load-deflection characteristics of unloading plateau section were obtained. Significant changes in specific mechanical properties were observed in long-term immersed and large deflected wires compared with as-received groups. Both immersion time and deflection affected the mechanical properties of wires in the simulated oral environment, and the two factors had synergistic effect. In groups -25°, -19° and -13°, stiffness (YS:E) increased then decreased and average plateau force and ratio of variance decreased then increased correspondingly at specific time. In the final treatment phase of Tip-Edge Plus technique, the mechanical properties of nickel-titanium wire are associated with the

  2. A process for treatment of residues from dry/semidry APC systems at municipal solid waste incinerators. Final report

    Hjelmar, O. [VKI, Hoersholm (Denmark)] Holland, D. [FLS miljoe a/s, Valby (Denmark)] Poulsen, B. [KARA, Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    The main objective of the project has been to establish and test a process for treatment of residues from the semidry (and dry) lime injection based APC processes at MSWIs, which will ensure that the residues can be managed in an environmentally safe manner. In pursuit of this goal, the following activities have been carried out: Performance of pilot scale extractions (approximately 50 kg of residue per batch) at the KARA MSWI in Roskilde of semidry APC system residues in order to establish and optimize process conditions. The optimization includes consideration of the possibilities for subsequent treatment/stabilization of the extracted solid phase as well as the possibility of treatment and safe discharge/utilization of the extract; Performance of chemical characterization, hydrogeochemical model calculations and experimental work in order to improve the understanding of the mechanisms and factors which for several contaminants control the equilibrium between the solid and liquid phases, both in the short and the long germ, and to use this information to obtain an environmentally acceptable method for stabilization/treatment of the extracted residues while at the same time minimizing the necessary amount of additives; production of treated residues and performance of leaching tests on these to assess and demonstrate the effectiveness of the entire process (extraction + stabilization/treatment); Evaluation of the technical, economical and environmental consequences of full scale implementation of the process. (EG) EFP-94. 19 refs.

  3. Developing statistical wildlife habitat relationships for assessing cumulative effects of fuels treatments: Final Report for Joint Fire Science Program Project

    Samuel A. Cushman; Kevin S. McKelvey

    2006-01-01

    The primary weakness in our current ability to evaluate future landscapes in terms of wildlife lies in the lack of quantitative models linking wildlife to forest stand conditions, including fuels treatments. This project focuses on 1) developing statistical wildlife habitat relationships models (WHR) utilizing Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) and National Vegetation...

  4. Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981

    Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

    1981-06-01

    The results of the feasibility study for utilizing low temperature geothermal heat in the City of San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant are summarized. The study is presented in terms of preliminary engineering design, economic analysis, institutional issues, environmental impacts, resource development, and system implementation.

  5. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development's VOC's in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry

  6. Proof-of-Principle of Onchocerciasis Elimination with Ivermectin Treatment in Endemic Foci in Africa: Final Results of a Study in Mali and Senegal

    Traore, Mamadou O.; Sarr, Moussa D.; Badji, Alioune; Bissan, Yiriba; Diawara, Lamine; Doumbia, Konimba; Goita, Soula F.; Konate, Lassana; Mounkoro, Kalifa; Seck, Amadou F.; Toe, Laurent; Toure, Seyni; Remme, Jan H. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mass treatment with ivermectin controls onchocerciasis as a public health problem, but it was not known if it could also interrupt transmission and eliminate the parasite in endemic foci in Africa where vectors are highly efficient. A longitudinal study was undertaken in three hyperendemic foci in Mali and Senegal with 15 to 17 years of annual or six-monthly ivermectin treatment in order to assess residual levels of infection and transmission, and test whether treatment could be safely stopped. This article reports the results of the final evaluations up to 5 years after the last treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Skin snip surveys were undertaken in 131 villages where 29,753 people were examined and 492,600 blackflies were analyzed for the presence of Onchocerca volvulus larva using a specific DNA probe. There was a declining trend in infection and transmission levels after the last treatment. In two sites the prevalence of microfilaria and vector infectivity rate were zero 3 to 4 years after the last treatment. In the third site, where infection levels were comparatively high before stopping treatment, there was also a consistent decline in infection and transmission to very low levels 3 to 5 years after stopping treatment. All infection and transmission indicators were below postulated thresholds for elimination. Conclusion/Significance The study has established the proof of principle that onchocerciasis elimination with ivermectin treatment is feasible in at least some endemic foci in Africa. The study results have been instrumental for the current evolution from onchocerciasis control to elimination in Africa. PMID:23029586

  7. Compression Molding and Novel Sintering Treatments for Alnico Type-8 Permanent Magnets in Near-Final Shape with Preferred Orientation

    Kassen, Aaron G.; White, Emma M. H.; Tang, Wei; Hu, Liangfa; Palasyuk, Andriy; Zhou, Lin; Anderson, Iver E.

    2017-09-01

    Economic uncertainty in the rare earth (RE) permanent magnet marketplace, as well as in an expanding electric drive vehicle market that favors permanent magnet alternating current synchronous drive motors, motivated renewed research in RE-free permanent magnets like "alnico," an Al-Ni-Co-Fe alloy. Thus, high-pressure, gas-atomized isotropic type-8H pre-alloyed alnico powder was compression molded with a clean burn- out binder to near-final shape and sintered to density >99% of cast alnico 8 (full density of 7.3 g/cm3). To produce aligned sintered alnico magnets for improved energy product and magnetic remanence, uniaxial stress was attempted to promote controlled grain growth, avoiding directional solidification that provides alignment in alnico 9. Successful development of solid-state powder processing may enable anisotropically aligned alnico magnets with enhanced energy density to be mass-produced.

  8. Secular, Spiritual, and Religious Existential Concerns of Women with Ovarian Cancer during Final Diagnostics and Start of Treatment

    Seibæk, Lene; Hounsgaard, Lise; Hvidt, Niels Christian

    2013-01-01

    resources of comfort and meaning. Conclusion. Hope and courage to face life represent significant personal resources that are created not only in the interplay between body and mind but also between patients and their healthcare professionals. The women dealt with this in a dialectical manner, so that hope...... a woman with ovarian cancer during her first treatment period. Although the women experienced their health to be seriously threatened, they also felt hope, will, and courage. The diagnostic procedures and treatment had comprehensive impact on their lives. However, hope and spirituality were important...... and despair could be present simultaneously. In this process secular, spiritual, and religious existential meaning orientations assisted the women in creating new narratives and obtain new orientations in life....

  9. Pre-treatment of biofuels for power production. Final report (1998). K. Joule 3 - OPTEB, Task: No. 19/20

    Jensen, P.A.; Sander, B.; Dam-Johansen, K.

    1999-10-01

    Co-firing of straw and coal on existing pulverised coal fired power plants may cause problems with deposition, corrosion, deactivation of SCR catalysts and impedes the utilisation of the fly ash, because of the high chlorine and potassium content of straw. Experiments with co-combustion of straw and coal on boilers plants have shown, that when maximal 20% of straw on a thermal basis is applied the most serious problems is the deactivation of high dust SCR catalysts and the deterioration of fly ash quality. The objective of this work was to evaluate a large-scale pre-treatment process for straw. The process applies pyrolysis at a moderate temperature, where the alkaline is retained in the char. The char is then washed and char and pyrolysis gasses can be co-fired with coal without causing serious problems. Fundamental laboratory studies as well as technical investigations were conducted to evaluate the pre-treatment concept. The laboratory studies were mainly done to improve the understanding of potassium and chlorine release during pyrolysis and the extraction of char with water. Some work were also done with respect to particle characterisation, straw pyrolysis kinetic and straw char combustion. The technical evaluation of a plant with 20 tons/hour capacity included investigations of possible reactor technologies, waste water handling, power efficiency and investment costs. Based on the laboratory experiments a pyrolysis temperature of 500 to 600 deg. C is recommended for the pre-treatment process. A high degree of pyrolysis is obtained without a significant release of potassium to the gas, but a release of 30 to 60% of the chlorine can not be avoided. Extraction of potassium from char with water is a two-step process, where the first step is a fast dissolution of potassium salts and the second step is a slow release of potassium from the interior of the char particle. A high potassium removal during char wash could not be obtained for all types of char within

  10. Treatment of coke-oven wastewater with the powdered activated carbon-contact stabilization activated sludge process. Final report

    Suidan, M.T.; Deady, M.A.; Gee, C.S.

    1983-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine optimum parameters for the operation of an innovative process train used in the treatment of coke-over wastewater. The treatment process train consisted of a contact-stabilization activated sludge system with powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition, followed by activated sludge nitrification, followed by denitrification in an anoxic filter. The control and operating parameters evaluated during the study were: (a) the average mixed-liquor PAC concentration maintained in the contact-stabilization system, (b) the solids retention time practiced in the contact-stabilization system, and (c) the hydraulic detention time maintained in the contact aeration tank. Three identical treatement process trains were constructed and employed in this study. The coke-oven wastewater used for this investigation was fed to the treatment units at 30% strength. The first part of the study was devoted to determining the interactions between the mixed liquor PAC concentration and the solids retention time in the contact-stabilization tanks. Results showed that optimum overall system performance is attainable when the highest sludge age (30 day) and highest mixed liquor PAC concentration were practiced. During the second phase of the study, all three systems were operated at a 30 day solids retention time while different detention times of 1, 2/3 and 1/3 day were evaluated in the contact tank. PAC addition rates were maintained at the former levels and, consequently, reduced contact times entailed higher mixed liquor carbon concentrations. Once again, the system receiving the highest PAC addition rate of PAC exhibited the best overall performance. This system exhibited no deterioration in process performance as a result of decreased contact detention time. 72 references, 41 figures, 24 tables.

  11. Feasibility of geothermal heat use in the San Bernardino Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report, September 1980-June 1981

    Racine, W.C.; Larson, T.C.; Stewart, C.A.; Wessel, H.B.

    1981-06-01

    A system was developed for utilizing nearby low temperature geothermal energy to heat two high-rate primary anaerobic digesters at the San Bernardino Wastewater Treatment Plant. The geothermal fluid would replace the methane currently burned to fuel the digesters. A summary of the work accomplished on the feasibility study is presented. The design and operation of the facility are examined and potentially viable applications selected for additional study. Results of these investigations and system descriptions and equipment specifications for utilizing geothermal energy in the selected processes are presented. The economic analyses conducted on the six engineering design cases are discussed. The environmental setting of the project and an analysis of the environmental impacts that will result from construction and operation of the geothermal heating system are discussed. A Resource Development Plan describes the steps that the San Bernardino Municipal Water Department could follow in order to utilize the resource. A preliminary well program and rough cost estimates for the production and injection wells also are included. The Water Department is provided with a program and schedule for implementing a geothermal system to serve the wastewater treatment plant. Regulatory, financial, and legal issues that will impact the project are presented in the Appendix. An outline of a Public Awareness Program is included.

  12. Leachate treatment system using constructed wetlands, Town of Fenton sanitary landfill, Broome County, New York. Final report

    1993-11-01

    Municipal sanitary landfills generate leachate that New York State regulations require to be collected and treated to avoid contaminating surface water and groundwater. One option for treating leachate is to haul it to municipal wastewater treatment facility. This option may be expensive, may require excessive energy for transportation, and may require pretreatment to protect the receiving facility`s processes. An alternative is on-site treatment and discharge. Personnel from the Town of Fenton, New York; Hawk Engineering, P.C.; Cornell University; and Ithaca College designed, built, and operated a pilot constructed wetland for treating leachate at the Town of Fenton`s municipal landfill. The system, consisting of two overland flow beds and two subsurface flow beds has been effective for 18 months in reducing levels of ammonia (averaging 85% removal by volatilization and denitrification) and total iron (averaging 95% removal by precipitation and sedimentation), two key constituents of the Fenton landfill`s leachate. The system effects these reductions with zero chemical and energy inputs and minimal maintenance. A third key constituent of the leachate, manganese, apparently passes through the beds with minimal removal. Details and wetland considerations are described.

  13. Final waste management programmatic environmental impact statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume III of V

    1997-01-01

    The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic management alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. The five waste types are low-level mixed waste, low-level waste, transuranic waste, high-level waste, and hazardous waste. The WM PEIS provides information on the impacts of various siting alternatives which the Department of Energy (DOE) will use to decide at which sites to locate additional treatment, storage, and disposal capacity for each waste type

  14. Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Improvements Project and Geysers Effluent Pipeline Project. Final EIR/EIS

    1994-01-01

    On May 26, 1994, the Lake County Sanitation District and the US Bureau of Land Management released for public review a Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) on the proposed Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant Facilities Improvements Project and Geysers Effluent Pipeline Project. A minimum 45-day review and comment period began on that date and notices were published in the Federal Register. The public review and comment period closed on July 26, 1994. Public hearings on the Draft EIMIS were held in Lakeport, CA, on June 30 and July 14, 1994. The first part of this document contains copies of the written comments submitted on the Draft EIR/EIS. It also contains summary paraphrased comments of the public hearings. The second part of this document contains responses to the comments

  15. Application of the ecosystem diagnosis and treatment method to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed project. Final report

    Mobrand, L.; Lestelle, L.

    1997-01-01

    In the spring of 1994 a technical planning support project was initiated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Board of Directors (Board) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration. The project was motivated by a need for a science based method for prioritizing restoration actions in the basin that would promote effectiveness and accountability. In this section the authors recall the premises for the project. The authors also present a set of recommendations for implementing a watershed planning process that incorporates a science-based framework to help guide decision making. This process is intended to assist the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Board in its effort to plan and implement watershed improvement measures. The process would also assist the Board in coordinating its efforts with other entities in the region. The planning process is based on an approach for developing an ecosystem management strategy referred to as the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method (Lichatowich et al. 1995, Lestelle et al. 1996). The process consists of an on-going planning cycle. Included in this cycle is an assessment of the ability of the watershed to support and sustain natural resources and other economic and societal values. This step in the process, which the authors refer to as the diagnosis, helps guide the development of actions (also referred to as treatments) aimed at improving the conditions of the watershed to achieve long-term objectives. The planning cycle calls for routinely reviewing and updating, as necessary, the basis for the diagnosis and other analyses used by the Board in adopting actions for implementation. The recommendations offered here address this critical need to habitually update the information used in setting priorities for action

  16. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Final report, August 1992--August 1996

    Boysen, J.E.; Walker, K.L.; Mefford, J.L.; Kirsch, J.R. [Resource Technology Corp., Laramie, WY (United States); Harju, J.A. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

    1996-06-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is becoming increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The climates typical of Colorado`s San Juan Basin and eastern slope, as well as the oil and gas producing regions of Wyoming, are well suited for application of these processes in combination. Specifically, the objectives of this research are related to the development of a commercially-economic FTE (freeze-thaw/evaporation) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and natural gas. The research required for development of this process consists of three tasks: (1) a literature survey and process modeling and economic analysis; (2) laboratory-scale process evaluation; and (3) field demonstration of the process. Results of research conducted for the completion of these three tasks indicate that produced water treatment and disposal costs for commercial application of the process, would be in the range of $0.20 to $0.30/bbl in the Rocky Mountain region. FTE field demonstration results from northwestern New Mexico during the winter of 1995--96 indicate significant and simultaneous removal of salts, metals, and organics from produced water. Despite the unusually warm winter, process yields demonstrate disposal volume reductions on the order of 80% and confirm the potential for economic production of water suitable for various beneficial uses. The total dissolved solids concentrations of the FTE demonstration streams were 11,600 mg/L (feed), 56,900 mg/L (brine), and 940 mg/L (ice melt).

  17. Application of the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed project : Final Report.

    Mobrand, Lars Erik; Lestelle, Lawrence C.

    1997-01-01

    In the spring of 1994 a technical planning support project was initiated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Board of Directors (Board) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration. The project was motivated by a need for a science based method for prioritizing restoration actions in the basin that would promote effectiveness and accountability. In this section the authors recall the premises for the project. The authors also present a set of recommendations for implementing a watershed planning process that incorporates a science-based framework to help guide decision making. This process is intended to assist the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Board in its effort to plan and implement watershed improvement measures. The process would also assist the Board in coordinating its efforts with other entities in the region. The planning process is based on an approach for developing an ecosystem management strategy referred to as the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method (Lichatowich et al. 1995, Lestelle et al. 1996). The process consists of an on-going planning cycle. Included in this cycle is an assessment of the ability of the watershed to support and sustain natural resources and other economic and societal values. This step in the process, which the authors refer to as the diagnosis, helps guide the development of actions (also referred to as treatments) aimed at improving the conditions of the watershed to achieve long-term objectives. The planning cycle calls for routinely reviewing and updating, as necessary, the basis for the diagnosis and other analyses used by the Board in adopting actions for implementation. The recommendations offered here address this critical need to habitually update the information used in setting priorities for action.

  18. Molecular classification of endometrial carcinoma on diagnostic specimens is highly concordant with final hysterectomy: Earlier prognostic information to guide treatment.

    Talhouk, Aline; Hoang, Lien N; McConechy, Melissa K; Nakonechny, Quentin; Leo, Joyce; Cheng, Angela; Leung, Samuel; Yang, Winnie; Lum, Amy; Köbel, Martin; Lee, Cheng-Han; Soslow, Robert A; Huntsman, David G; Gilks, C Blake; McAlpine, Jessica N

    2016-10-01

    predicts the molecular features in the final hysterectomy specimens, demonstrating concordance superior to grade and histotype. This biologically relevant information, available at initial diagnosis, has the potential to inform management (surgery, adjuvant therapy) from the earliest time point in cancer care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Report on the evaluation under the Act No 24/2006 of Coll. Environmental Impact Assessment Law Extension of National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mochovce for disposal low-level radioactive waste and construction of very low-level radioactive waste repository

    Hanusik, V.; Moravek, J.; Kusovska, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The report elaborated assessment of the environmental impact of extension of the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mochovce for disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. Within this repository also the premises for very low level radioactive waste deposition should be built. The assessment report was prepared according to the Act no. 24/2006 Coll, as amended 'On the assessment of environmental impacts' Annex No. 11 upon The scope of assessment issued by the competent authority on the basis of assessment of Intent for this action. The report was prepared in VUJE, Inc. Trnava for Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, Inc. Bratislava (JAVYS).

  20. Final waste management programmatic environmental impact statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume V of V

    1997-01-01

    The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic management alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear energy research and the development, production, and testing of nuclear weapons at a variety of sites around the United States. The five waste types are low-level mixed waste, low-level waste, transuranic waste, high-level waste, and hazardous waste. The WM PEIS provides information on the impacts of various siting alternatives, which the Department of Energy (DOE) will use to decide at which sites to locate additional treatment, storage, and disposal capacity for each waste type. This information includes the cumulative impacts of combining future siting configurations for the five waste types and the collective impacts of other past, present, and reasonably foreseeable future activities. The selected waste management facilities being considered for these different waste types are treatment and disposal facilities for low-level mixed waste; treatment and disposal facilities for low-level waste; treatment and storage facilities for transuranic waste in the event that treatment is required before disposal; storage facilities for created (vitrified) high-level waste canisters; and treatment of nonwastewater hazardous waste by DOE and commercial vendors. In addition to the No Action Alternative, which includes only existing of approved waste management facilities, the alternatives for each of the waste-type configurations include Decentralized, Regionalized, and Centralized Alternatives for using existing and operating new waste management facilities. However, the siting, construction, and operations of any new facility at a selected site will not be decided until completion of a sitewide or project-specific environmental impact review

  1. Final waste management programmatic environmental impact statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume I of V

    1997-05-01

    The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic management alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. The five waste types are low-level mixed waste, low-level waste, transuranic waste, high-level waste, and hazardous waste. The WM PEIS provides information on the impacts of various siting alternatives which the Department of Energy (DOE) will use to decide at which sites to locate additional treatment, storage, and disposal capacity for each waste type. This information includes the cumulative impacts of combining future siting configurations for the five waste types and the collective impacts of other past, present, and reasonably foreseeable future activities. The selected waste management facilities being considered for these different waste types are treatment and disposal facilities for low-level mixed waste; treatment and disposal facilities for low-level waste; treatment and storage facilities for transuranic waste in the event that treatment is required before disposal; storage facilities for treated (vitrified) high-level waste canisters; and treatment of nonwastewater hazardous waste by DOE and commercial vendors. In addition to the no action alternative, which includes only existing or approved waste management facilities, the alternatives for each of the waste type configurations include decentralized, regionalized, and centralized alternatives for using existing and operating new waste management facilities. However, the siting, construction and operations of any new facility at a selected site will not be decided until completion of a sitewide or project-specific environmental impact review

  2. Defibrotide for the Treatment of Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease: Final Results From the International Compassionate-Use Program.

    Corbacioglu, Selim; Carreras, Enric; Mohty, Mohamad; Pagliuca, Antonio; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Damaj, Gandhi; Iacobelli, Massimo; Niederwieser, Dietger; Olavarría, Eduardo; Suarez, Felipe; Ruutu, Tapani; Verdonck, Leo; Hume, Robin; Nejadnik, Bijan; Lai, Chinglin; Finetto, Giorgia; Richardson, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease, also called sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS), is an unpredictable and potentially fatal complication of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) or nontransplantation-associated chemotherapy/radiotherapy. In cases of severe hepatic VOD/SOS, typically defined by associated multiorgan failure (MOF, also known as multiorgan dysfunction), mortality exceeds 80%. Preclinical and early clinical data have provided a rationale for defibrotide treatment in hepatic VOD/SOS. Based on this evidence and in recognition of the dismal prognosis for these patients, defibrotide was made available through an international multicenter compassionate-use program conducted from December 1998 to March 2009. Physicians participating in the program voluntarily provided demographic and outcome data for patients given defibrotide. Efficacy and safety analyses were performed using the data received for 710 treated patients. Defibrotide was given at 10, 25, 40, 60, or 80 mg/kg/day for a median of 15 days (range, 1 to 119 days). By Kaplan-Meier analysis, the estimated overall day +100 survival was 54% (58% in the 25 mg/kg/day dose group). Adverse events (AEs) were reported in 53% of patients. The most common AEs were MOF, progression of hepatic VOD/SOS, sepsis, and graft-versus-host disease, which were consistent with the AEs expected for this patient population. No clinically meaningful trends in AEs were identified by gender, age, or dose group. Safety and efficacy resultswere consistent with prior studies of defibrotide in hepatic VOD/SOS, and subgroup analyses lend support to the use of the 25 mg/kg/day dose. Copyright © 2016 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. GH treatment to final height produces similar height gains in patients with SHOX deficiency and Turner syndrome: results of a multicenter trial.

    Blum, Werner F; Ross, Judith L; Zimmermann, Alan G; Quigley, Charmian A; Child, Christopher J; Kalifa, Gabriel; Deal, Cheri; Drop, Stenvert L S; Rappold, Gudrun; Cutler, Gordon B

    2013-08-01

    Growth impairment in short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX) deficiency and Turner syndrome share a similar etiology. Because of the established effect of GH treatment on height in patients with Turner syndrome, we hypothesized that GH therapy would also stimulate growth in patients with SHOX deficiency. Our objectives were to evaluate long-term efficacy of GH treatment in short patients with SHOX deficiency and to compare the effect on final (adult) height (FH) in patients with SHOX deficiency and Turner syndrome. A prospective, multinational, open-label, randomized 3-arm study consisting of a 2-year control period and a subsequent extension period to FH. The treatment groups were 1) SHOX-D-C/GH (untreated during the control period, GH-treated during the extension), 2) SHOX-D-GH/GH, and 3) Turner-GH/GH (GH-treated during both study periods). Short-statured prepubertal patients with genetically confirmed SHOX deficiency (n = 49) or Turner syndrome (n = 24) who participated in the extension. Depending on the study arm, patients received a daily sc injection of 0.05 mg/kg recombinant human GH from start of the study or start of the extension until attainment of FH or study closure. Height SD score gain from start of GH treatment to FH was similar between the combined SHOX-deficient groups (n = 28, 1.34 ± 0.18 [least-squares mean ± SE]) and the Turner group (n = 19, 1.32 ± 0.22). In this FH population, 57% of the patients with SHOX deficiency and 32% of the patients with Turner syndrome achieved a FH greater than -2 SD score. GH treatment in short children with SHOX deficiency showed similar long-term efficacy as seen in girls with Turner syndrome.

  4. Occurrence of Vibrio Pathotypes in the Final Effluents of Five Wastewater Treatment Plants in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa

    Vuyokazi Nongogo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the occurrence of Vibrio pathogens in the final effluents of five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs located in Amathole and Chris Hani District Municipalities in South Africa over a 12 months period between September 2012 and August 2013 using standard membrane filtration technique followed by cultivation on thiosulphate citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS agar. The identities of the presumptive Vibrio isolates were confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR including delineation into V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. fluvialis pathotypes. The counts of Vibrio spp. varied with months in all the study sites and ranged in the order of 101 and 104 CFU/100mL. Vibrio distribution also showed seasonality with high counts being obtained in autumn and spring (p < 0.05. Prevalence of Vibrio spp. among the five WWTPs also differed significantly (p < 0.05. Of the 300 isolates that were confirmed as belonging to the Vibrio genus, 29% (86 were V. fluvialis, 28% (84 were V. vulnificus and 12% (35 were V. parahaemolyticus. The isolation of Vibrio pathogens from the final effluent suggests that this pathogen is in circulation in some pockets of the population and that the WWTPs under study do not efficiently remove bacterial pathogens from the wastewater and consequently are threats to public health.

  5. Prevalence of Multiple Antibiotics Resistant (MAR) Pseudomonas Species in the Final Effluents of Three Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities in South Africa

    Odjadjare, Emmanuel E.; Igbinosa, Etinosa O.; Mordi, Raphael; Igere, Bright; Igeleke, Clara L.; Okoh, Anthony I.

    2012-01-01

    The final effluents of three (Alice, Dimbaza, and East London) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were evaluated to determine their physicochemical quality and prevalence of multiple antibiotics resistant (MAR) Pseudomonas species, between August 2007 and July 2008. The annual mean total Pseudomonas count (TPC) was 1.20 × 104 (cfu/100 mL), 1.08 × 104 (cfu/100 mL), and 2.66 × 104 (cfu/100 mL), for the Alice, Dimbaza, and East London WWTPs respectively. The effluents were generally compliant with recommended limits for pH, temperature, TDS, DO, nitrite and nitrate; but fell short of target standards for turbidity, COD, and phosphate. The tested isolates were highly sensitive to gentamicin (100%), ofloxacin (100%), clindamycin (90%), erythromycin (90%) and nitrofurantoin (80%); whereas high resistance was observed against the penicillins (90–100%), rifampin (90%), sulphamethoxazole (90%) and the cephems (70%). MAR index ranged between 0.26 and 0.58. The study demonstrated that MAR Pseudomonas species were quite prevalent in the final effluents of WWTPs in South Africa; and this can lead to serious health risk for communities that depend on the effluent-receiving waters for sundry purposes. PMID:22829792

  6. Pavement Edge Treatment Final Report

    2018-01-01

    The New York City Connected Vehicle Pilot aims to improve the safety of travelers and pedestrians in the city through the deployment of connected vehicle technologies. This objective directly aligns with the city's Vision Zero initiative, which began...

  7. Final waste management programmatic environmental impact statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume IV of V

    1997-01-01

    The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) examines the potential environmental and cost impacts of strategic management alternatives for managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes that have resulted and will continue to result from nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites around the United States. The five waste types are low-level mixed waste, low-level waste, transuranic waste, high-level waste, and hazardous waste. The WM PEIS provides information on the impacts of various siting alternatives which the Department of Energy (DOE) will use to decide at which sites to locate additional treatment, storage, and disposal capacity for each waste type.Transportation is an integral component of the alternatives being considered for each type of radioactive waste in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The types of radioactive waste considered in Part I are high-level waste (HLW), low-level waste (LLW), transuranic waste (TRUW), and low-level mixed waste (LLMW). For some alternatives, radioactive waste would be shipped among the DOE sites at various stages of the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) process. The magnitude of the transportation-related activities varies with each alternative, ranging from minimal transportation for decentralized approaches to significant transportation for some centralized approaches. The human health risks associated with transporting various waste materials were assessed to ensure a complete appraisal of the impacts of each PEIS alternative being considered

  8. Final 5-Year Study Results of DASISION: The Dasatinib Versus Imatinib Study in Treatment-Naïve Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients Trial.

    Cortes, Jorge E; Saglio, Giuseppe; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Baccarani, Michele; Mayer, Jiří; Boqué, Concepción; Shah, Neil P; Chuah, Charles; Casanova, Luis; Bradley-Garelik, Brigid; Manos, George; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2016-07-10

    We report the 5-year analysis from the phase III Dasatinib Versus Imatinib Study in Treatment-Naïve Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patients (DASISION) trial, evaluating long-term efficacy and safety outcomes of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP) treated with dasatinib or imatinib. Patients with newly diagnosed CML-CP were randomly assigned to receive dasatinib 100 mg once daily (n = 259) or imatinib 400 mg once daily (n = 260). At the time of study closure, 61% and 63% of dasatinib- and imatinib-treated patients remained on initial therapy, respectively. Cumulative rates of major molecular response and molecular responses with a 4.0- or 4.5-log reduction in BCR-ABL1 transcripts from baseline by 5 years remained statistically significantly higher for dasatinib compared with imatinib. Rates for progression-free and overall survival at 5 years remained high and similar across treatment arms. In patients who achieved BCR-ABL1 ≤ 10% at 3 months (dasatinib, 84%; imatinib, 64%), improvements in progression-free and overall survival and lower rates of transformation to accelerated/blast phase were reported compared with patients with BCR-ABL1 greater than 10% at 3 months. Transformation to accelerated/blast phase occurred in 5% and 7% of patients in the dasatinib and imatinib arms, respectively. Fifteen dasatinib-treated and 19 imatinib-treated patients had BCR-ABL1 mutations identified at discontinuation. There were no new or unexpected adverse events identified in either treatment arm, and pleural effusion was the only drug-related, nonhematologic adverse event reported more frequently with dasatinib (28% v 0.8% with imatinib). First occurrences of pleural effusion were reported with dasatinib, with the highest incidence in year 1. Arterial ischemic events were uncommon in both treatment arms. These final results from the DASISION trial continue to support dasatinib 100 mg once daily as a safe and effective first-line therapy for the long

  9. Confidence level in performing endodontic treatment among final year undergraduate dental students from the University of Medical Science and Technology, Sudan (2014

    Elhadi Mohieldin Awooda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study is aimed to evaluate the confidence level of undergraduate final year dental students in performing root canal treatment (RCT and how it may affect their performance and perception regarding endodontics. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to the final year dental students, at the University of Medical Sciences and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan (2013–2014. A total of 21 students were requested to participate voluntary and were asked to score their level of confidence using a 5-point Likert's scale. Results: Response rate was 100%, all the students (100% stated that the requirements set were enough, and 66.7% rated endodontic as average in terms of difficulty. When rating the mean of self-confidence for performing RCT in the dentition, maxillary teeth (2.43 ± 0.51 followed by mandibular teeth (2.71 ± 0.64 were higher, whereas the molars were the least. Higher scores of self-confidence were in administrating local anesthesia (4.24 ± 0.70, followed by root canal shaping by hand instrument (3.76 ± 0.54. No association was found between overall confidence level and the number of performed RCT (P = 0.721. No association was found between overall confidence level of students who were subjected to instrument fracture and their frequency of fracture (P = 0.507, supervisor' reaction (P = 0.587, and willingness to specialize in endodontics (P = 0.530. Conclusion: Students displayed high confidence in performing basic endodontic and treating single-rooted teeth. More exposure is recommended to enhance the students' self-confidence.

  10. Lifetime and 12-month prevalence, severity and unmet need for treatment of common mental disorders in Japan: results from the final dataset of World Mental Health Japan Survey

    Ishikawa, H.; Kawakami, N.; Kessler, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to estimate the lifetime and 12-month prevalence, severity, and treatment of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th ed. (DSM-IV) mental disorders in Japan based on the final data set of the World Mental Health Japan Survey conducted in 2002–2006. Methods Face-to-face household interviews of 4,130 respondents who were randomly selected from Japanese-speaking residents aged 20 years or older were conducted from 2002 to 2006 in 11 community populations in Japan (overall response rate, 56%). The World Mental Health version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI), a fully structured lay administered psychiatric diagnostic interview, was used for diagnostic assessment. Results Lifetime/12-month prevalence of any DSM-IV common mental disorders in Japan was estimated to be 20.3/7.6%. Rank-order of four classes of mental disorders was anxiety disorders (8.1/4.9%), substance disorders (7.4/1.0%), mood disorders (6.5/2.3%), and impulse control disorders (2.0/0.7%). The most common individual disorders were alcohol abuse/dependence (7.3/0.9%), major depressive disorder (6.1/2.2%), specific phobia (3.4/2.3%), and generalized anxiety disorder (2.6/1.3%). While the lifetime prevalence of any mental disorder was greater for males and the middle-aged, the persistence (proportion of 12-month cases among lifetime cases) of any mental disorder was greater for females and younger respondents. Among those with any 12-month disorder, 15.3% were classified as severe, 44.1% moderate, and 40.6% mild. Although a strong association between severity and service use was found, only 21.9% of respondents with any 12-month disorder sought treatment within the last 12 months; only 37.0% of severe cases received medical care. The mental health specialty sector was the most common resource used in Japan. Although the prevalence of mental disorders were quite low, mental disorders were the second

  11. Critical modeling parameters identified for 3D CFD modeling of rectangular final settling tanks for New York City wastewater treatment plants.

    Ramalingam, K; Xanthos, S; Gong, M; Fillos, J; Beckmann, K; Deur, A; McCorquodale, J A

    2012-01-01

    New York City Environmental Protection is in the process of incorporating biological nitrogen removal (BNR) in its wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) which entails operating the aeration tanks with higher levels of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) than a conventional activated sludge process. The objective of this paper is to discuss two of the important parameters introduced in the 3D CFD model that has been developed by the City College of New York (CCNY) group: (a) the development of the 'discrete particle' measurement technique to carry out the fractionation of the solids in the final settling tank (FST) which has critical implications in the prediction of the effluent quality; and (b) the modification of the floc aggregation (K(A)) and floc break-up (K(B)) coefficients that are found in Parker's flocculation equation (Parker et al. 1970, 1971) used in the CFD model. The dependence of these parameters on the predictions of the CFD model will be illustrated with simulation results on one of the FSTs at the 26th Ward WWTP in Brooklyn, NY.

  12. Final Report

    Gurney, Kevin R. [Arizona Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  13. Final Report

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  14. Narrative Finality

    Armine Kotin Mortimer

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The cloturai device of narration as salvation represents the lack of finality in three novels. In De Beauvoir's Tous les hommes sont mortels an immortal character turns his story to account, but the novel makes a mockery of the historical sense by which men define themselves. In the closing pages of Butor's La Modification , the hero plans to write a book to save himself. Through the thrice-considered portrayal of the Paris-Rome relationship, the ending shows the reader how to bring about closure, but this collective critique written by readers will always be a future book. Simon's La Bataille de Pharsale , the most radical attempt to destroy finality, is an infinite text. No new text can be written. This extreme of perversion guarantees bliss (jouissance . If the ending of De Beauvoir's novel transfers the burden of non-final world onto a new victim, Butor's non-finality lies in the deferral to a future writing, while Simon's writer is stuck in a writing loop, in which writing has become its own end and hence can have no end. The deconstructive and tragic form of contemporary novels proclaims the loss of belief in a finality inherent in the written text, to the profit of writing itself.

  15. Final Report

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  16. Rebuttal Finale

    Howells, John; Katznelson, Ron D

    2011-01-01

    asserts that our critique engaged in ad hominem attack. Our critique notes that he “neglected” to mention critical facts, that “his scholarship is unreliable,” and that “no reader should take his radical proposals for new patent law seriously.” We regret that Lemley regards this treatment of his treatment...

  17. Final Report

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  18. Report on the evaluation under the Act No 24/2006 of Coll. Environmental Impact Assessment Law Extension of National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mochovce for disposal low-level radioactive waste and construction of very low-level radioactive waste repository; Sprava o hodnoteni v zmysle zakona NR SR c.24/2006 o posudzovani vplyvov na ZP. Rozsirenie RU RAO v Mochovciach pre ukladanie NSAO a vybudovanie uloziska pre VNAO

    Hanusik, V; Moravek, J; Kusovska, Z [VUJE, a.s., 91864 Trnava (Slovakia)

    2011-11-30

    The report elaborated assessment of the environmental impact of extension of the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mochovce for disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. Within this repository also the premises for very low level radioactive waste deposition should be built. The assessment report was prepared according to the Act no. 24/2006 Coll, as amended 'On the assessment of environmental impacts' Annex No. 11 upon The scope of assessment issued by the competent authority on the basis of assessment of Intent for this action. The report was prepared in VUJE, Inc. Trnava for Nuclear and Decommissioning Company, Inc. Bratislava (JAVYS).

  19. Final Quick-Reaction Report on the Audit of Wastewater Treatment Plants at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms, CA

    1992-01-01

    On April 10, 1991, we announced an audit of DoD Wastewater Treatment Plants (Project No. lCG-0042). The objectives of the audit included evaluating DOD Components' plans to replace, expand, or upgrade wastewater treatment plants...

  20. NPP Mochovce - a project of extraordinay significance

    Chwolik, I.; Debru, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper and in this presentation the reactor safety upgrading of two blocks of the NPP V-1 Bohunice, some results of participation on safety upgrading by the German-French consortium EUCOM (Framatome and Siemens-KWU) are presented. (author)

  1. Slovak Electric, plc, Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    1999-01-01

    In this popular scientific brochure a brief description of construction scheme of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant is presented. Electricity generation in a nuclear power plant is described. Instrumentation and control system as well as nuclear safety principles applied on the NPP are presented

  2. Safety measures for NPP Mochovce - Skoda contribution

    Svec, P.

    1997-01-01

    Brief technical descriptions are given of the following issues involved in safety measures: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and its monitoring; non-destructive testing; integrity of the steam generator primary collector; integrity of steam generator heat exchanging tubes; distribution of feedwater in the steam generator; the hazard of plugging water collectors located on the steam generator room floor; steam generator level control valves; primary circuit venting under emergency conditions; diagnostic systems installed in the primary circuit; monitoring of reactor pressure vessel head leaks; severity of containment leaks; turbine missiles; seismic design; procedures for normal operation; and operation limits and conditions. (M.D.)

  3. Final report

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TI-based electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  4. Final Report

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  5. Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils: LEFPC appendices, volume 1, appendix I-IV

    1994-09-01

    This document contains Appendix I-IV for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. Included are calibration records; quality assurance; soils characterization; pilot scale trial runs

  6. Effectiveness of various public private partnership pavement rehabilitation treatments: A big data informatics survival analysis of pavement service life : final report.

    2017-09-29

    Past research efforts have used a wide variety of methodological approaches to analyze pavement performance indicators, pavement rehabilitation treatments, and pavement service life. Using big data informatics methods, the intent of this study is to ...

  7. Substance management in thermal waste treatment plants. Final report; Stoffmanagement in thermischen Abfallbehandlungsanlagen. Stand und Perspektiven der thermischen Abfallbehandlung in Europa. Schlussbericht

    Leclaire, T; Meyer, B; Neumann, P; Schiemann, J; Schmidt, K G [Institut fuer Umwelttechnologie und Umweltanalytik e.V. (IUTA), Duisburg (Germany); Mast, P G [TAUW Umwelt GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    The report gives a general view of the actual state of development of the thermal waste treatment and the further need of research. It mentions the importance of the standarization of legal framework in the european waste management and the problems, that result from the internationalization of waste management and the conversion of European guidelines into national law. In 19 lectures with following discussions, which results are written down summed up together with the lectures, - the situation of the (thermal) waste treatment in different european states - the technologies of - municipal waste incineration - alternative thermal treatment methods - mechanical-biological waste treatment (in integrated treatment conceptions) - technical and organizational pretreatment methods and - posttreatment methods for residues mainly in the field of substance management - the present development, results of actual R and D plans and new trends are described. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Bericht bietet einen Ueberblick ueber den aktuellen Entwicklungsstand der thermischen Abfallbehandlung und den weiteren Forschungsbedarf. Er nennt die Bedeutung der Vereinheitlichung rechtlicher Rahmenbedingungen in der europaeischen Abfallwirtschaft und Probleme, die aus der Internationalisierung der Abfallwirtschaft und der Umsetzung europaeischer Vorgaben in nationales Recht entstehen. In 19 Vortraegen und anschliessenden Diskussionen, deren Ergebnisse zusammengefasst gemeinsam mit den Vortragsmanuskripten dargestellt sind, werden - die Situation der (thermischen) Abfallbehandlung mehrerer europaeischer Staaten - die Technologien der - Siedlungsabfallverbrennung - alternativen thermischen Behandlungsverfahren - mechanisch-biologischen Restabfallbehandlung (in integrierten Behandlungskonzepten) - technischen und organisatorischen Vorbehandlungsmassnahmen und - Nachbehandlungsverfahren fuer Verbrennungsrueckstaende mit Schwerpunkt im Bereich des Stoffmanagements - die derzeitige Entwicklung

  8. R and D for an off-gas treatment system for a slagging pyrolysis radioactive waste incinerator. Final report for Phase I

    Christian, J.D.; Kirstein, B.E.; Pence, D.T.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary evaluations were made of off-gas treatment needs for a slagging pyrolysis incinerator (SPI) of Andco--Torrax design for the treatment of radioactive waste at the INEL. Approximate decontamination factors (DFs) for particulates of 10 7 and for volatilized radionuclides of 10 3 will be required across the off-gas system. If lead is present in the waste at concentrations greater than 25-to-120 g/metric ton, volatilized lead will result in formation of substantial deposits in the off-gas system and regenerative towers. A review was made of radioactive incinerator development. Particulate and volatile component removal mechanisms and devices were reviewed. Three off-gas treatment systems were proposed for the SPI which will provide DFs for particulates of 10 8 . 9 figures, 7 tables

  9. Joint stabilization of sewage sludge and separated manure fluid. Treatment and utilization of manure. Final report; Gemeinsame Stabilisierung von Klaerschlamm und separierter Guellefluessigkeit. Guellebehandlung und -verwertung. Schlussbericht

    Geiger, W.F.; Kolisch, G.

    1994-12-01

    As an alternative to separate manure processing, anaerobic stabilization of surplus manure and sewage sludge in combination is possible at municipal sewage treatment plants. Subsequently to the removal of solids, pig manure is fed into existing digesters. The process concept comprises the following partial steps: preliminary treatment of crude manure, anarobic stabilization of the separated manure fluid, biological nitrogen elimination from the digested mixture of sewage sludge and manure, and dewatering of the mixed sludge in the dewatering systems of the sewage treatment plant. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Eine Alternative zu den Verfahren einer separaten Guelleaufbereitung stellt die gemeinsame anaerobe Stabilisierung von Ueberschussguelle und Klaerschlamm auf kommunalen Klaeranlagen dar, die eine Einspeisung feststoffseparierter Schweineguelle in bereits vorhandene Faulbehaelter vorsieht. Das Verfahrenskonzept besteht aus den Teilschritten Vorseparierung der Rohguelle, anaerobe Stabiliserung der separierten Guellefluessigkeit, biologische Stickstoffelimination aus dem ausgefaulten Klaerschlamm-Guelle-Gemisch sowie Entwaesserung der Mischschlaemme auf den Entwaesserungsaggregaten der Klaeranlage. (orig./SR)

  10. Treatment

    Safaa M. Raghab

    2013-08-01

    The main goal of this study is to utilize a natural low cost material “as an accelerator additive to enhance the chemical treatment process using Alum coagulant and the accelerator substances were Perlite and Bentonite. The performance of the chemical treatment was enhanced using the accelerator substances with 90 mg/l Alum as a constant dose. Perlite gave better performance than the Bentonite effluent. The removal ratio for conductivity, turbidity, BOD and COD for Perlite was 86.7%, 87.4%, 89.9% and 92.8% respectively, and for Bentonite was 83.5%, 85.0%, 86.5% and 85.0% respectively at the same concentration of 40 mg/l for each.

  11. A Field Study in the Application of CONSULT-I to the Problem of Inconsistency in Diagnosis and Treatment of Reading Difficulties. Proffitt Grant Final Report.

    Newman, Anabel P.; Metz, Elizabeth

    A field study tested the application of the CONSULT-I (R) program, which uses artificial intelligence with statistical pattern recognition in constructing a diagnosis and recommending treatment of reading difficulties. Participants in the field study came from 10 southern and central Indiana school districts, both public and parochial, and one…

  12. GH treatment to final height produces similar height gains in patients with SHOX deficiency and turner syndrome: Results of a multicenter trial

    W.F. Blum (Werner); J.L. Ross (J.); A.G. Zimmermann (Alan); C.A. Quigley (Charmian); C.J. Child (Christopher); G. Kalifa (Gabriel); C.L. Deal (Cheri Lynn); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); G. Rappold (G.); G. Cutler (Gordon)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractContext: Growth impairment in short stature homeobox-containing gene (SHOX) deficiency and Turner syndrome share a similar etiology. Because of the established effect of GH treatment on height in patients with Turner syndrome, we hypothesized that GH therapy would also stimulate growth

  13. Parenteral estrogen versus combined androgen deprivation in the treatment of metastatic prostatic cancer: part 2. Final evaluation of the Scandinavian Prostatic Cancer Group (SPCG) Study No. 5

    Hedlund, P.O.; Damber, J.E.; Hagerman, I.

    2008-01-01

    To compare parenteral estrogen therapy in the form of high-dose polyestradiol phosphate (PEP; Estradurin) with combined androgen deprivation (CAD) in the treatment of prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastases. The aim of the study was to compare anticancer efficacy and adverse events...

  14. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue in the primary treatment of metastatic and pelvic osteosarcoma: final results of the ISG/SSG II study.

    Boye, Kjetil; Del Prever, Adalberto Brach; Eriksson, Mikael; Saeter, Gunnar; Tienghi, Amelia; Lindholm, Paula; Fagioli, Franca; Skjeldal, Sigmund; Ferrari, Stefano; Hall, Kirsten Sundby

    2014-05-01

    Patients with metastatic osteosarcoma at diagnosis or axial primary tumors have a poor prognosis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of intensified treatment with high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell rescue in this group. From May 1996 to August 2004, 71 patients were included in a Scandinavian-Italian single arm phase II study. Preoperative chemotherapy included methotrexate, doxorubicin, cisplatin and ifosfamide, and postoperative treatment consisted of two cycles of doxorubicin, one cycle of cyclophosphamide and etoposide and two courses of high-dose etoposide and carboplatin with stem cell rescue. Twenty-nine patients (43%) received two courses and 10 patients (15%) received one course of HDCT. HDCT was associated with significant toxicity, but no treatment-related deaths were recorded. Fourteen patients (20%) had disease progression before completion of the study protocol, and only 29/71 patients (41%) received the full planned treatment. Median event-free survival (EFS) was 18 months, and estimated 5-year EFS was 27%. Median overall survival (OS) was 34 months, and estimated 5-year OS was 31%. When patients who did not receive HDCT due to disease progression were excluded, there was no difference in EFS (P = 0.72) or OS (P = 0.49) between patients who did or did not receive HDCT. The administration of high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue was feasible, but associated with significant toxicity. Patient outcome seemed comparable to previous studies using conventional chemotherapy. We conclude that HDCT with carboplatin and etoposide should not be further explored as a treatment strategy in high-risk osteosarcoma. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Final results from a defibrotide treatment-IND study for patients with hepatic veno-occlusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome.

    Kernan, Nancy A; Grupp, Stephan; Smith, Angela R; Arai, Sally; Triplett, Brandon; Antin, Joseph H; Lehmann, Leslie; Shore, Tsiporah; Ho, Vincent T; Bunin, Nancy; Iacobelli, Massimo; Liang, Wei; Hume, Robin; Tappe, William; Soiffer, Robert; Richardson, Paul

    2018-05-16

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease/sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (VOD/SOS) is a potentially life-threatening complication of haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) conditioning and chemotherapy. Defibrotide is approved for treatment of hepatic VOD/SOS with pulmonary or renal dysfunction [i.e., multi-organ dysfunction (MOD)] after HSCT in the United States and severe VOD/SOS after HSCT in patients aged older than 1 month in the European Union. Defibrotide was available as an investigational drug by an expanded-access treatment programme (T-IND; NCT00628498). In the completed T-IND, the Kaplan-Meier estimated Day +100 survival for 1000 patients with documented defibrotide treatment after HSCT was 58·9% [95% confidence interval (CI), 55·7-61·9%]. Day +100 survival was also analysed by age and MOD status, and post hoc analyses were performed to determine Day +100 survival by transplant type, timing of VOD/SOS onset (≤21 or >21 days) and timing of defibrotide treatment initiation after VOD/SOS diagnosis. Day +100 survival in paediatric patients was 67·9% (95% CI, 63·8-71·6%) and 47·1% (95% CI, 42·3-51·8%) in adults. All patient subgroups without MOD had higher Day +100 survival than those with MOD; earlier defibrotide initiation was also associated with higher Day +100 survival. The safety profile of defibrotide in the completed T-IND study was similar to previous reports. © 2018 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Final environmental assessment for a refinement of the power delivery component of the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) is designing and constructing a system of regional water supply facilities to meet current and projected water demands and increase system reliability. The existing Southern Nevada Water system is being upgraded with a number of improvements to increase the capacity of the system. However, even the expanded system is expected to be unable to meet projected peak daily water demands by the year 1999. As a result, new facilities are being designed and constructed to operate in conjunction with the upgraded Southern Nevada Water system. These new facilities, known as the Southern Nevada Water Authority Treatment and Transmission Facility (SNWA-TTF), include four primary components: a new raw water intake; new transmission facilities including below ground pipelines, tunnels, and above ground pumping stations; a water treatment facility; and new power supply facilities. Because existing power supplies would not be adequate for the new water treatment facilities, new power facilities, consisting of two new 230 kV-69 kV substations and new 69 and 230 kV power lines, are being constructed. This environmental assessment is specifically on the new power facilities

  17. Disposal of radioactive waste arising from water treatment: Recommendations for the EC. Final report of the WP 8 of the TENAWA project

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T.; Jungclas, H.; Rausse, Ch.

    2000-04-01

    Ground water, especially bedrock water, may contain high amounts of natural radioactivity. Elevated levels of natural radionuclides in ground water are mainly associated with uranium and thorium rich soil and rocks. Various processes based on different principles can be applied to the removal of radioactivity from water. Aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration are used to remove radon from household water. Ion exchangers are applied to the removal of uranium and radium. Lead and polonium may sometimes be removed by ion exchange technology as well. Membrane techniques are applied to the removal of uranium, radium, lead and polonium. Radionuclide removal can also be carried out using adsorptive materials. When different kinds of treatment methods are used to remove natural radioactivity from drinking water, wastes containing natural radioactivity will be produced. The wastes are in liquid or solid form. Liquid wastes are produced when materials used to accumulate radioactivity are regenerated or backwashed. Solid wastes are formed in cases where regeneration or backwashing are not used or cannot be used, and when the materials are taken out of service. GAC filters emit gamma radiation when they are in service. To gather information on existing national regulations and guidelines on the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced by various water treatment methods, a questionnaire was sent to all the Member Countries of the European Union. (orig.)

  18. Treatment technologies for low and intermediate level waste from nuclear applications. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1996

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive waste is generated from the use of radioactive materials in industrial applications, research and medicine. The waste management programmes and activities in many developing Member States have been reviewed through a Waste Management Advisory Programme (WAMAP) implemented by the IAEA in 1987-1995. One of the WAMAP objectives was to assist in practical development and implementation of safe and efficient waste treatment methods. In this context the IAEA has initiated a co-ordinated research programme on treatment technologies for institutional wastes covering the most important recurring problems in developing Member States. The programme was intended to cover the research and development required for reliable waste treatment operations, including the likely variations in institutional waste inputs using simple low cost processes. This co-ordinated research programme was initiated in 1991 and brought together 14 participants from 13 countries. The results of the studies were discussed at three research co-ordination meetings. This report summarizes the salient features and results obtained during five year investigations and provides recommendations for future work in this area. Refs, figs, tabs.

  19. Treatment technologies for low and intermediate level waste from nuclear applications. Final report of a co-ordinated research programme 1991-1996

    1997-02-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive waste is generated from the use of radioactive materials in industrial applications, research and medicine. The waste management programmes and activities in many developing Member States have been reviewed through a Waste Management Advisory Programme (WAMAP) implemented by the IAEA in 1987-1995. One of the WAMAP objectives was to assist in practical development and implementation of safe and efficient waste treatment methods. In this context the IAEA has initiated a co-ordinated research programme on treatment technologies for institutional wastes covering the most important recurring problems in developing Member States. The programme was intended to cover the research and development required for reliable waste treatment operations, including the likely variations in institutional waste inputs using simple low cost processes. This co-ordinated research programme was initiated in 1991 and brought together 14 participants from 13 countries. The results of the studies were discussed at three research co-ordination meetings. This report summarizes the salient features and results obtained during five year investigations and provides recommendations for future work in this area. Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Final closure plan for the high-explosives open burn treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site 300

    Mathews, S.

    1997-04-01

    This document addresses the interim status closure of the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility, as detailed by Title 22, Division 4.5, Chapter 15, Article 7 of the Califonia Code of Regulations (CCR) and by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, Subpart G, ``Closure and Post Closure.`` The Closure Plan (Chapter 1) and the Post- Closure Plan (Chapter 2) address the concept of long-term hazard elimination. The Closure Plan provides for capping and grading the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility and revegetating the immediate area in accordance with applicable requirements. The Closure Plan also reflects careful consideration of site location and topography, geologic and hydrologic factors, climate, cover characteristics, type and amount of wastes, and the potential for contaminant migration. The Post-Closure Plan is designed to allow LLNL to monitor the movement, if any, of pollutants from the treatment area. In addition, quarterly inspections will ensure that all surfaces of the closed facility, including the cover and diversion ditches, remain in good repair, thus precluding the potential for contaminant migration.

  1. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline

  2. Radioactive Demonstration Of Final Mineralized Waste Forms For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste By Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Using The Bench Scale Reformer Platform

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137 Cs, 129 I, 99 Tc, Cl, F, and SO 4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form

  3. Effective endovascular treatment of calcified femoropopliteal disease with directional atherectomy and distal embolic protection: final results of the DEFINITIVE Ca⁺⁺ trial.

    Roberts, David; Niazi, Khusrow; Miller, William; Krishnan, Prakash; Gammon, Roger; Schreiber, Theodore; Shammas, Nicolas W; Clair, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the DEFINITIVE Ca(++) study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of directional atherectomy and distal embolic protection, used together to treat moderate to severely calcified femoropopliteal lesions. Despite advances in endovascular treatment modalities, treatment of calcified lesions remains a challenge. A total of 133 subjects with 168 moderate to severely calcified lesions were enrolled. Lesions were treated with directional atherectomy devices, coupled with distal embolic protection. The 30-day freedom from MAE rate was 93.1%. Per angiographic core laboratory assessment, the primary effectiveness endpoint (≤50% residual diameter stenosis) was achieved in 92.0% (lower confidence bound of 87.6%) of lesions. By core lab analysis, these results did not achieve the success criteria (90%) for the primary effectiveness objective. Per site assessment, the objective was met with the endpoint being achieved in 97.0% (lower confidence bound 93.8%). A mean residual diameter stenosis of 33.3% was achieved with the directional atherectomy device. This was further decreased to 24.1% with the use of adjunctive therapy. The proportion of asymptomatic subjects [Rutherford Clinical Category (RCC) = 0] increased from 0% at baseline to 52.3% at the 30-day follow-up visit. In total, 88.5% of subjects experienced an improvement of one or more Rutherford categories. The results of the DEFINITIVE Ca++ study demonstrate that the SilverHawk and TurboHawk atherectomy devices are safe and effective in the endovascular treatment of moderate to severely calcified lesions in the superficial femoral and/or popliteal arteries when used with the SpiderFX distal embolic protection device. © 2014 The Authors. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effective Endovascular Treatment of Calcified Femoropopliteal Disease With Directional Atherectomy and Distal Embolic Protection: Final Results of the DEFINITIVE Ca++ Trial

    Roberts, David; Niazi, Khusrow; Miller, William; Krishnan, Prakash; Gammon, Roger; Schreiber, Theodore; Shammas, Nicolas W; Clair, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the DEFINITIVE Ca++ study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of directional atherectomy and distal embolic protection, used together to treat moderate to severely calcified femoropopliteal lesions. Background Despite advances in endovascular treatment modalities, treatment of calcified lesions remains a challenge. Methods A total of 133 subjects with 168 moderate to severely calcified lesions were enrolled. Lesions were treated with directional atherectomy devices, coupled with distal embolic protection. Results The 30-day freedom from MAE rate was 93.1%. Per angiographic core laboratory assessment, the primary effectiveness endpoint (≤50% residual diameter stenosis) was achieved in 92.0% (lower confidence bound of 87.6%) of lesions. By core lab analysis, these results did not achieve the success criteria (90%) for the primary effectiveness objective. Per site assessment, the objective was met with the endpoint being achieved in 97.0% (lower confidence bound 93.8%). A mean residual diameter stenosis of 33.3% was achieved with the directional atherectomy device. This was further decreased to 24.1% with the use of adjunctive therapy. The proportion of asymptomatic subjects [Rutherford Clinical Category (RCC) = 0] increased from 0% at baseline to 52.3% at the 30-day follow-up visit. In total, 88.5% of subjects experienced an improvement of one or more Rutherford categories. Conclusions The results of the DEFINITIVE Ca++ study demonstrate that the SilverHawk™ and TurboHawk™ atherectomy devices are safe and effective in the endovascular treatment of moderate to severely calcified lesions in the superficial femoral and/or popliteal arteries when used with the SpiderFX™ distal embolic protection device. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24402764

  5. Round-year treatment of runoff from peat extraction areas. Final report of the TuKos project; Turvetuotannon valumavesien ympaerivuotinen kaesittely. TuKos-hankkeen loppuraportti

    Postila, H.; Heikkinen, K.; Saukkoriipi, J.; Karjalainen, S.M.; Kuoppala, M.; Haerkoenen, J.; Visuri, M.; Ihme, R.; Kloeve, B.

    2011-12-15

    The aim of the study was to develop new water pollution control methods for treating the runoff from peat extraction areas in ditched peatlands. The aim of the project was to discover important constructional and biogeochemical parameters to develop effective treatment wetlands to ditched peatlands. In addition, different sorption materials were tested to improve phosphorus retention of studied wetlands. Pumping and water distribution constructions were also studied for the round-year treatment of runoff from peat extraction areas. The study included six drained wetlands, which were examined for e.g. the hydraulic properties of peat, vegetation, peat thickness, the degree of humification of peat and the mineral soil content of peat. The wetlands were also monitored for their capability to remove e.g. nutrients, iron and suspended solids from the runoff and input and output water volume. In addition five other drained wetlands were examined for e.g. vegetation, the mineral soil contents of peat and monitored for their capability to remove e.g. nutrients. Dimensioning and planning instructions for constructed wetlands on ditched peatlands were then suggested based on the results. The efficiencies of different sorption materials were tested in laboratory by batch and column tests. Potential sorption materials were found during the laboratory work. Their suitability for the field use should however be tested in wetland scale. Also 21 round-year treatment wetlands from Northern and Western Finland were studied. Some of the studied wetlands purified runoff from peat extraction areas also in wintertime, some however leached e.g. dissolved organic matter (DOM), phosphorus, nitrogen and iron. (orig.)

  6. Stabilization and reuse of heavy metal contaminated soils by means of quicklime sulfate salt treatment. Final report, September 1992--February 1995

    Dermatas, D.

    1995-08-01

    Capillary and hydraulic flows of water in porous media contaminated by heavy metal species often result in severe aquifer contamination. In the present study a chemical admixture stabilization approach is proposed, where heavy metal stabilization/immobilization is achieved by means of quicklime-based treatment. Both in-situ treatment by injection and on-site stabilization by excavation, mixing, and compaction will be investigated. In addition, the potential to reuse the resulting stabilized material as readily available construction material will also be investigated. The heavy metals under study include: arsenic, chromium, lead, and mercury. The proposed technical approach consists of three separate phases. During phase A, both artificial and naturally occurring contaminated soil mixes were treated, and then tested for stress-strain properties, leachability, micromorphology, mineralogical composition, permeability, setting time, and durability. In such a way, the effectiveness of the proposed remediation technology was verified, the treatment approach was optimized, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for stabilization were established. During phase B, the proposed technology will be tested for two DOE-site subscale systems, involving naturally occurring contaminated soil, using the same testing methodology as the one outlined for phase A. Provided that the proposed technology is proven effective for the subscale systems, a field application will be demonstrated. Again process quality monitoring will be performed by testing undisturbed samples collected from the treated sites, in the same fashion as for the previous phases. Following completion of the proposed study, a set of comprehensive guidelines for field applications will be developed. 42 refs., 196 figs., 26 tabs

  7. Final Report: Fiscal Year 1997 demonstration of omnivorous non-thermal mixed waste treatment: Direct chemical oxidation of organic solids and liquids using peroxydisulfate

    Cooper, J.F.; Ballazs G.B.

    1998-01-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment, chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992. The process uses solutions of the peroxydisulfate ion (typically sodium or ammonium salts) to completely mineralize the organics to carbon dioxide and water. The expended oxidant may be electrolytically regenerated to minimize secondary waste. The paper briefly describes: free radical and secondary oxidant formation; electrochemical regeneration; offgas stream; and throughput

  8. Final Report for Emergency Stabilization and Rehabilitation Treatment Monitoring of the Keeney Pass, Cow Hollow, Double Mountain, and Farewell Bend Fires

    Wirth, Troy A.; Pyke, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A strategy for monitoring post-fire seedings in the sagebrush steppe of the Intermountain West was developed and used to monitor four example fires in the Vale, Oregon District of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). We began to develop a potential approach by (1) reviewing previous vegetation monitoring manuals produced by the Federal government to determine what techniques and approaches had been approved for use, and (2) monitoring a set of example fire rehabilitation projects from 2006 through 2008. We reviewed seven vegetation monitoring manuals approved for use by the Federal government. From these seven manuals, we derived a set of design elements appropriate for monitoring post-fire rehabilitation and stabilization projects. These design elements consisted of objectives, stratification, control plots, random sampling, data quality, and statistical analysis. Additionally, we chose three quantitative vegetation field procedures that were objective and repeatable to be used in conjunction with these six design elements. During the spring and summer of 2006 to 2008, U.S. Geological Survey personnel monitored vegetation in seven post-fire seeding treatments in four burned areas in the Vale district of the BLM in eastern Oregon. Treatments monitored included a native and non-native seeding in each of the Farewell Bend, Double Mountain, and Keeney Pass fires, and a native seeding at the Cow Hollow fire. All fires occurred in 2005. There generally was a low level of plant establishment for all seedings by 2008. The quantitative objective established by the BLM was to achieve 5 seeded grass plants/m2 by the end of 3 years as a result of the seeding. There was an estimated 3.97 and 6.28 plants/m2 in 2006 and 1.06 and 0.85 plants/m2 seeded perennial grasses in 2008 from the Keeney Pass non-native and native seeding, respectively. The Cow Hollow seeding resulted in the lowest establishment of perennial seeded grasses of the four project areas with 0.69 plants/m2 in

  9. Final Report: Fiscal Year 1997 demonstration of omnivorous non-thermal mixed waste treatment: Direct chemical oxidation of organic solids and liquids using peroxydisulfate

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment, chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992. The process uses solutions of the peroxydisulfate ion (typically sodium or ammonium salts) to completely mineralize the organics to carbon dioxide and water. The expended oxidant may be electrolytically regenerated to minimize secondary waste. The paper briefly describes: free radical and secondary oxidant formation; electrochemical regeneration; offgas stream; and throughput.

  10. Study of toxicity of Samarium-153-EDTMP in the treatment of painful skeletal metastasis. Final report for the period 15 December 1996 - 14 December 1997

    Zhu Shoupeng

    1998-02-01

    Favourable characteristics of Sm-153 EDTMP make it an effective agent for use in the palliative treatment of metastatic bone pain. It has also been postulated that Sm-153 might have some tumoricidal effect. But until today its mechanism of action in the treatment of skeletal metastasis is not known. This experimental study has been designed to study the cellular and molecular changes occurring in the bone tumour cells (osteosarcoma of femur of wister rats) following irradiation with different doses of Sm-153 EDTMP. Experimental osteosarcorna tumour cells were harvested and treated with Sm-153 EDTMP over different periods of time ranging from 1-24 hours. Electron microscope, fluorescence microscope, MTI assay and 3 HTdR release assay studies were conducted to observe for effects of radiation. Sm-153 EDTMP irradiation of bone tumour cells resulted in significant nuclear fragmentation, margination of condensed chromatin, marked pyknosis and increased formation of membrane bounded apoptotic bodies formation. The quantification analysis of fragmented DNA for bone tumour cells induced by Sm-153 EDTMP showed that the DNA fragmentation was enhanced with prolongation of irradiation time. The inhibition rate of proliferation of bone tumour cells as well as DNA fragmentation in bone tumour cells after irradiation with Sm-153 EDTMP increased significantly and progressively with prolongation of irradiation time, reaching levels of 63% and 78% respectively by 24 hours. (author)

  11. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head-and-Neck Cancer: Final Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    Kankaanranta, Leena [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Boneca Corporation, Helsinki (Finland); Saarilahti, Kauko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Atula, Timo [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Collan, Juhani [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika [Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Uusi-Simola, Jouni [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Vaelimaeki, Petteri [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Boneca Corporation, Helsinki (Finland); Maekitie, Antti [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Seppaenen, Marko [Turku PET Centre, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Minn, Heikki [Department of Oncology, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku (Finland); Revitzer, Hannu [Aalto University School of Science and Technology, Esopo (Finland); Kouri, Mauri [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Savolainen, Sauli [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Joensuu, Heikki, E-mail: heikki.joensuu@hus.fi [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy and safety of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of inoperable head-and-neck cancers that recur locally after conventional photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this prospective, single-center Phase I/II study, 30 patients with inoperable, locally recurred head-and-neck cancer (29 carcinomas and 1 sarcoma) were treated with BNCT. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 50 to 98 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed by use of the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and adverse effects by use of the National Cancer Institute common terminology criteria version 3.0. Intravenously administered L-boronophenylalanine-fructose (400 mg/kg) was administered as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Twenty-six patients received BNCT twice; four were treated once. Of the 29 evaluable patients, 22 (76%) responded to BNCT, 6 (21%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.1 and 20.3 months, and 1 (3%) progressed. The median progression-free survival time was 7.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.4-9.6 months). Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 20% and 30%, respectively, and 27% of the patients survived for 2 years without locoregional recurrence. The most common acute Grade 3 adverse effects were mucositis (54% of patients), oral pain (54%), and fatigue (32%). Three patients were diagnosed with osteoradionecrosis (each Grade 3) and one patient with soft-tissue necrosis (Grade 4). Late Grade 3 xerostomia was present in 3 of the 15 evaluable patients (20%). Conclusions: Most patients who have inoperable, locally advanced head-and-neck carcinoma that has recurred at a previously irradiated site respond to boronophenylalanine-mediated BNCT, but cancer recurrence after BNCT remains frequent. Toxicity was

  12. Degradation of organic pollutants in sewage sludge by aerobic-thermophilic sludge treatment. Final report; Abbau organischer Schadstoffe im Klaerschlamm durch aerob-thermophile Schlammbehandlung. Abschlussbericht

    Prechtl, S.

    1999-07-01

    A process for reduction of organic polllutants in sewage sludge was to be developed and optimized. The organic fraction of the solid matter in sewage sludge containes more than 300 different pollutant. Apart from the substances classified in the Sewage Sludge Ordinance (dioxins/furans, PCB), there are others that have been considered relevant as well but for which no sufficient data base is available. The research project investigated whether aerobic-thermophilic treatment (AT) would improve the sewage sludge quality with regard to phthalates (di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, DEHP), PAH and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP, a degradation product of nonionic tensides). Pollutants were analzyed by HPLC and GC/MS. The concentration of DEHP and 4-NP was reduced by 70% resp. 50% in laboratory experiments with doped sludges and by 61% resp. 53% in undoped sludges. In semi-industrial tests, a 14% reduction was achieved for DEHP and a 68% reduction for 4-NP. In the case of pyrene, the degradation was up to 57% in the laboratory experiments and 22% in semi-industrial tests. A combined process of short-term anaerobic digestion and AT resulted in a 60% reduction in the case of DEHP. Up to anthracene, PAH were reduced as well. In the case of higher-condensed PAH (basic load in the ppb range) there was no clear result. In the case of 4-NP, the degradation effect was counterbalanced by the formation of new 4-NP from alkylphenol ethoxylates in both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The results prove the correlation between sewage sludge hygienisation and the time of residue in the reactor system. No enterobacteriaceae were found after a treatment of 96 h, both in the semi-industrial and the laboratory reactors. In activated sludge, a phenol-degrading mixed bacteria culture could be isolated which was also capable of degrading 4-NP in thermophilic conditions. [German] Das Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens war die Entwicklung/Optimierung eines Verfahrens zur Reduktion organischer Schadstoffe im

  13. Final report for the Central Mercury Treatment System in Building 9623 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    1997-02-01

    This document discusses the construction of the Central Mercury Treatment System (CMTS) in Building 9623 at the Y-12 Plant, the remediation activities involved, waste generated from the project, and the monitoring schedule of the CMTS. As part of the Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluent Program, the project treats groundwater contaminated with mercury from Buildings 9201-4, 9201-5, and 9204-4 at the Y-12 Plant to meet National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit limits for discharge to East Fork Poplar Creek. The CMTS, located in Building 9623, will treat water from the sumps of buildings in which mercury was used in operations and which have been shown to be significant contributors to the overall levels of mercury in plant effluents. This project was anticipated when the NPDES Permit was issued, and the contamination limits and frequency of monitoring for the system discharge are detailed in the permit as Outfall 551. This project was performed as an Incentive Task Order and included the advance procurement of the carbon columns, removal of existing equipment in Building 9623, and system installation and checkout. Construction activities for installing the system started in January 1996 after the area in Building 9623 had been cleared of existing, obsolete equipment. The CMTS became operational on November 26, 1996, well ahead of the permit start date of January 1, 1998. The early completion date allows Hg concentrations in EFPC to be evaluated to determine whether further actions are required to meet NPDES permit limits for reduced Hg loading to the creek

  14. Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project, Treatment Definitions and Descriptions, and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, Final Report 1999

    Hager, Robert C.; Costello, Ronald J.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions)

  15. Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.

    Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

  16. Treatment and final disposal of nuclear waste

    1992-09-01

    The present background report to RD and D-programme 93 'Detailed R and D-programme 1993-1998' gives a detailed description of the state-of-the-art and future plans for safety assessments and supportive research. The technical development that is required for the construction of the encapsulation station and the deep repository for demonstration deposition is described. The report describes the need for performance and safety assessments occasioned by the above plans for activities. Against the background of the time schedule for safety reports etc., an account is given of the state-of-the-art, goals and planned work during the period with regard to the engineered barriers of spent nuclear fuel, canister material and buffer and backfill material. State-of-the-art, goals and planned work within the geosciences for groundwater movements, bedrock stability and geohydrological and rock mechanical calculation models are presented as well as the situation within the chemistry programme, with separate sections on groundwater and geochemistry, radionuclide chemistry and validation of processes in transport model and radionuclide migration. The study of such natural conditions as constitute analogues in certain respects to important chemical sorption and transport processes in a deep repository is presented. The state of knowledge concerning radionuclide transport in the biosphere and modelling of the same, as well as resulting doese to man, are described. R and D efforts associated with the development of technology that is required for repository construction, excavation of tunnels, deposition of waste and possibly necessary retrieval of canisters, as well as backfilling and sealing of the repository are presented

  17. Planejamento e aspectos ambientais envolvidos na disposição final de lodos das estações de tratamento de água da Região Metropolitana de São Paulo Planning and environmental aspects involved in the final disposal of sludge from water treatment plants in the Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo

    Gladys Fernandes Januário

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A disposição de lodos de estações de tratamento de água (ETAs de forma ambientalmente correta configura-se em mais um desafio a ser enfrentado pelas companhias de saneamento e tem recebido maior atenção no Brasil e na Região Metropolitana de São Paulo (RMSP nos últimos anos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi apresentar alternativas existentes de uso e disposição final dos lodos das ETAs da RMSP e, assim sendo, foram pesquisadas várias técnicas de uso e disposição de lodos praticados no Brasil e no mundo e suas condições técnicas e ambientais. Foram avaliadas a quantidade de lodos gerados na RMSP e a existência ou previsão de implantação de sistemas de adensamento e desidratação e, a partir destas informações, foram identificadas alternativas de uso e disposição tecnicamente e ambientalmente exeqüíveis para os lodos das ETAs da RMSP.The disposal of sludge produced by water treatment plants in an environmentally safe manner is one more challenge to be faced by the sanitation companies and has been given more attention in Brazil and in the Metropolitan Area of Sao Paulo (MASP. The purpose of this work is to present the existing alternatives for use and final disposal of sludge produced by the Water Treatment Plants (WTP of the MASP. In this respect, several techniques for use and disposal of sludge performed in Brazil and worldwide have been investigated, and their technical and environmental conditions. The amount of sludge generated in the MASP and the existence of or the forecast to establish sludge thickening and dewatering systems have been evaluated and based on this information alternatives have been identified for use and disposal which are technically and environmentally feasible for sludge produced by the WTP in the MASP.

  18. Ethical aspects of final disposal. Final report

    Baltes, B.; Leder, W.; Achenbach, G.B.; Spaemann, R.; Gerhardt, V.

    2003-01-01

    In fulfilment of this task the Federal Environmental Ministry has commissioned GRS to summarise the current national and international status of ethical aspects of the final disposal of radioactive wastes as part of the project titled ''Final disposal of radioactive wastes as seen from the viewpoint of ethical objectives''. The questions arising from the opinions, positions and publications presented in the report by GRS were to serve as a basis for an expert discussion or an interdisciplinary discussion forum for all concerned with the ethical aspects of an answerable approach to the final disposal of radioactive wastes. In April 2001 GRS held a one-day seminar at which leading ethicists and philosophers offered statements on the questions referred to above and joined in a discussion with experts on issues of final disposal. This report documents the questions that arose ahead of the workshop, the specialist lectures held there and a summary of the discussion results [de

  19. Intermediate treatments

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate treatments are those applied after a new stand is successfully established and before the final harvest. These include not only intermediate cuttings - primarily thinning - but also fertilization, irrigation, and protection of the stand from damaging agents.

  20. Assessment of the Physicochemical Qualities and Prevalence of Escherichia coli and Vibrios in the Final Effluents of Two Wastewater Treatment Plants in South Africa: Ecological and Public Health Implications

    Olayinka Osuolale

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The final effluents of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa were evaluated for their physicochemical and microbiological qualities over a period of 12 months. The physicochemical parameters assessed ranged as follows both plants. The ranges of values for the physicochemical are: pH (3.9–8.6, total dissolved solids (86.50–336.3 mg/L, electrical conductivity (13.57–52.50 mS/m, temperature (13–28 °C, nitrate (0–21.73 mg/L, nitrite (0.01–0.60 mg/L, orthophosphate (1.29–20.57 mg/L, turbidity (4.02–43.20 NTU, free chlorine (0.05–7.18 mg/L, dissolve oxygen (3.91–9.60 mg/L, biochemical oxygen demand (0.1–9.0 mg/L and chemical oxygen demand (4.67–211 mg/L. The microbiological assessment for both WWTPs revealed the presence of E. coli in counts ranging between 0 and 1.86 × 104 CFU/100 mL and Vibrio counts ranging between 0 and 9.93 × 103 CFU/100 mL. We conclude that these WWTPs are important point sources of pollution in surface water with potential public health and ecological risks.

  1. Assessment of the Physicochemical Qualities and Prevalence of Escherichia coli and Vibrios in the Final Effluents of Two Wastewater Treatment Plants in South Africa: Ecological and Public Health Implications

    Osuolale, Olayinka; Okoh, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The final effluents of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa were evaluated for their physicochemical and microbiological qualities over a period of 12 months. The physicochemical parameters assessed ranged as follows both plants. The ranges of values for the physicochemical are: pH (3.9–8.6), total dissolved solids (86.50–336.3 mg/L), electrical conductivity (13.57–52.50 mS/m), temperature (13–28 °C), nitrate (0–21.73 mg/L), nitrite (0.01–0.60 mg/L), orthophosphate (1.29–20.57 mg/L), turbidity (4.02–43.20 NTU), free chlorine (0.05–7.18 mg/L), dissolve oxygen (3.91–9.60 mg/L), biochemical oxygen demand (0.1–9.0 mg/L) and chemical oxygen demand (4.67–211 mg/L). The microbiological assessment for both WWTPs revealed the presence of E. coli in counts ranging between 0 and 1.86 × 104 CFU/100 mL and Vibrio counts ranging between 0 and 9.93 × 103 CFU/100 mL. We conclude that these WWTPs are important point sources of pollution in surface water with potential public health and ecological risks. PMID:26512686

  2. Final Technical Report

    Schuur, Edward [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Luo, Yiqi [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This final grant report is a continuation of the final grant report submitted for DE-SC0006982 as the Principle Investigator (Schuur) relocated from the University of Florida to Northern Arizona University. This report summarizes the original project goals, as well as includes new project activities that were completed in the final period of the project.

  3. Drug-eluting versus plain balloon angioplasty for the treatment of failing dialysis access: Final results and cost-effectiveness analysis from a prospective randomized controlled trial (NCT01174472)

    Kitrou, Panagiotis M., E-mail: panoskitrou@gmail.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Rion 26504 (Greece); Katsanos, Konstantinos [Department of Interventional Radiology, Guy' s and St. Thomas’ Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, King' s Health Partners, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Siablis, Dimitris [Department of Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Rion 26504 (Greece)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •1-Year target lesion primary patency significantly higher after PCB application compared to plain balloon angioplasty in the failing dialysis access. •Significant difference in favor of PCB in cumulative primary patency of AVGs at 1 year. •No significant difference in cumulative primary patency of AVFs treated with PCB at 1 year. •Cost effectiveness analysis performed. •Paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty proves to be a cost-effective option for treating dialysis access. -- Abstract: Objective: To report the final results and cost-effectiveness analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial investigating drug-eluting balloon (DEB) versus plain balloon angioplasty (BA) for the treatment of failing dialysis access ( (NCT01174472)). Methods: 40 patients were randomized to angioplasty with either DEB (n = 20) or BA (n = 20) for treatment of significant venous stenosis causing a failing dialysis access. Both arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) and synthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVG) were included. Angiographic follow up was scheduled every two months. Primary endpoints were technical success and target lesion primary patency at 1 year. Cumulative and survival analysis was performed. Incremental net benefit (INB) and incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated and the cost-effectiveness acceptability curve (CEAC) was drawn. Results: Baseline variables were equally distributed between the two groups. At 1 year, cumulative target lesion primary patency was significantly higher after DEB application (35% vs. 5% after BA, p < 0.001). Overall, median primary patency was 0.64 years in case of DEB vs. 0.36 years in case of BA (p = 0.0007; unadjusted HR = 0.27 [95%CI: 0.13–0.58]; Cox adjusted HR = 0.23 [95%CI: 0.10–0.50]). ICER was 2198 Euros (€) per primary patency year of dialysis access gained. INB was 1068€ (95%CI: 31–2105€) for a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of 5000€ (corresponding acceptability probability >97

  4. DIMEC - Final Report

    Conrad, Finn

    1997-01-01

    Final report of the research project DIMEC - Danish InfoMechatronic Control supported by the Danish Technical Research Council, STVF.......Final report of the research project DIMEC - Danish InfoMechatronic Control supported by the Danish Technical Research Council, STVF....

  5. Final Technical Report

    Glasser, Alan H. [Fusion Theory and Computation Inc., Kingston, WA (United States)

    2018-02-02

    Final technical report on DE-SC0016106. This is the final technical report for a portion of the multi-institutional CEMM project. This report is centered around 3 publications and a seminar presentation, which have been submitted to E-Link.

  6. Final focus nomenclature

    Erickson, R.

    1986-01-01

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number

  7. Final focus test beam

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration

  8. WMO Marine Final Reports

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Final reports of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Marine Meteorology, Commission for Synoptic Meteorology, and Commission for Basic...

  9. Transacsys PLC - Final Results

    2002-01-01

    Final results from Transacsys PLC. A subsidary of this company was set up to develop the CERN EDH system into a commercial product but incurred too much financial loss so the project was cancelled (1/2 page).

  10. Final focus nomenclature

    Erickson, R.

    1986-08-08

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number. (LEW)

  11. Data breaches. Final rule.

    2008-04-11

    This document adopts, without change, the interim final rule that was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2007, addressing data breaches of sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). This final rule implements certain provisions of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006. The regulations prescribe the mechanisms for taking action in response to a data breach of sensitive personal information.

  12. Chapter 7. Radioactive wastes

    2000-01-01

    The inspection and assessment activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) focused on minimization of activity and the quantity of produced radioactive waste (RAW), and on increasing safety of waste management. The general scheme of rad-waste management in the Slovak Republic is presented. The radioactive wastes produced during the operation of NPP V-1, NPP V-2 and NPP Mochovce in 1999 are listed.Liquid RAW was treated and conditioned into a solid form at the nuclear facility Technology for treatment and conditioning of RAW. In 1999 combustible solid waste was treated at the nuclear facility Incinerator of VUJE Trnava. Produced liquid and solid RAW are stored at designed equipment at individual nuclear installations (in case of NPP V-1, NPP V-2 Bohunice and NPP Mochovce in compliance with the Regulation No. 67/1987 Coll. law).The status of free capacity of these storages as of 31.121999 is presented. Storage solidified product built the SE-VYZ was fully filled at the end of 1999. In 1999 there was a significant improvement in the process of radioactive waste management by: (A) issuing approval for commissioning the National Repository for RAW, (B) issuing approval for commissioning the Treatment and Conditioning Center for RAW, (C) having the application for approval to transport conditioned RAW to the National repository Mochovce in the final stage of evaluation. At the beginning of 2000 it is realistic to expect that RAW conditioned in the Conditioning center of RAW will start to be disposed at the National repository of RAW in Mochovce

  13. Sequential Treatment of Severe Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Following Teriparatide: Final Results of the Randomized, Controlled European Study of Forsteo (EUROFORS): Trial registration: clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00191425 (Trial registration date: 12 September 2005)

    Eastell, Richard; Nickelsen, Thomas; Marin, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Abstract It is unclear which treatment should be given after stopping teriparatide therapy for severe osteoporosis. In a prospective, randomized, controlled, 2-yr study, we compared bone mineral density (BMD) effects and clinical safety of 3 follow-up treatments (anabolic with teriparatide, antir...

  14. Slovenske elektrarne, Mochovce nuclear power plant. Safety strategy

    1999-01-01

    In this leaflet the Management's declaration is presented. This declaration contains: operation management and quality assurance, plant commissioning, maintenance and repairs, reactor physics, radiation protection, surveillance programmes, events analyses and experience feed-back, accident management procedures and training, emergency planning and preparedness review of safety performance, human resources, and personnel responsibility

  15. Public Discussion about Completion of Mochovce Units 3 and 4

    Anon

    2014-01-01

    After the introduction of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) reopened NRA, the participants familiarised themselves with the history of M.I.5 (1980-2008), with the decisions of the NRA issued in 2008, with the law-suit and the judgement of the Supreme Court of the Slovak Republic, with the course of the procedure after the judgement, and with the comments, proposals and suggestions of the procedure participants delivered to the Authority within the specified period. The public hearing of the comments was followed by technical comments of the procedure participants focused on events at one unit that can affect the neighbouring unit, containment concept, seismic threat and accidents with fuel melting, which were fully answered by the competent persons. The hearing ended with a discussion.

  16. Final Technical Report

    John Ross

    2003-04-30

    The Final Technical Report summarizes research accomplishments and Publications in the period of 5/1/99 to 4/30/03 done on the grant. Extensive progress was made in the period covered by this report in the areas of chemical kinetics of non-linear systems; spatial structures, reaction - diffusion systems, and thermodynamic and stochastic theory of electrochemical and general systems.

  17. Regional final energy consumptions

    2011-01-01

    This report comments the differences observed between the French regions and also between these regions and national data in terms of final energy consumption per inhabitant, per GDP unit, and per sector (housing and office building, transport, industry, agriculture). It also comments the evolutions during the last decades, identifies the most recent trends

  18. Deep inelastic final states

    Girardi, G.

    1980-11-01

    In these lectures we attempt to describe the final states of deep inelastic scattering as given by QCD. In the first section we shall briefly comment on the parton model and give the main properties of decay functions which are of interest for the study of semi-inclusive leptoproduction. The second section is devoted to the QCD approach to single hadron leptoproduction. First we recall basic facts on QCD log's and derive after that the evolution equations for the fragmentation functions. For this purpose we make a short detour in e + e - annihilation. The rest of the section is a study of the factorization of long distance effects associated with the initial and final states. We then show how when one includes next to leading QCD corrections one induces factorization breaking and describe the double moments useful for testing such effects. The next section contains a review on the QCD jets in the hadronic final state. We begin by introducing the notion of infrared safe variable and defining a few useful examples. Distributions in these variables are studied to first order in QCD, with some comments on the resummation of logs encountered in higher orders. Finally the last section is a 'gaullimaufry' of jet studies

  19. The 'final order' problem

    Teunter, RH; Haneveld, WKK

    1998-01-01

    When the service department of a company selling machines stops producing and supplying spare parts for certain machines, customers are offered an opportunity to place a so-called final order for these spare parts. We focus on one customer with one machine. The customer plans to use this machine up

  20. Development of a treatment process for the removal of heavy metals from raw water for drinking water supply using chelating ion exchange resins. Subproject 1. Final report; Entwicklung der Verfahrenstechnik zur Eliminierung von Schwermetallen aus Rohwaessern zur Trinkwassergewinnung mit chelatbildenden Kationenaustauscherharzen zur technischen Reife. Teilprojekt 1. Abschlussbericht

    Overath, H.; Stetter, D.; Doerdelmann, O.

    2002-07-01

    Chelating cation exchange resins with iminodiacetic acid group (Lewatit TP 207 and Amberlite IRC 748) were tested for the removal of heavy metals in a drinking water treatment plant. The pilot scale filtration experiments were conducted by varying the operating conditions, such as flow rate and feed concentrations. Heavy metal concentrations (nickel, lead, cadmium, zinc) in the feed were adjusted between 20 and 200 {mu}g/L. Different methods for regeneration and conditioning of the resins were developed and investigated. Finally the ion exchange resins were tested according to German health regulations for ion exchangers in drinking water treatment. (orig.)

  1. Final Site-Specific Technical Report for the Evaluation of Thermatrix GS Series Flameless Thermal Oxidzer for Off-Gas Treatment of Trichloroethene Vapors at Building 181 Air Force Plant 4, Texas

    Archabal, Steven

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) has sponsored an ongoing program to promote the use of cost-effective soil vapor treatment technologies in conjunction with soil vapor extraction (SVE...

  2. Cassini's Grand Finale Overview

    Spilker, L. J.

    2017-12-01

    After 13 years in orbit, the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn ended in a science-rich blaze of glory. Cassini sent back its final bits of unique science data on September 15, 2017, as it plunged into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Cassini's final phase covered roughly ten months and ended with the first time exploration of the region between the rings and planet. In late 2016 Cassini transitioned to a series of 20 Ring Grazing orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring, providing close flybys of tiny ring moons, including Pan, Daphnis and Atlas, and high-resolution views of Saturn's A and F rings. A final Titan flyby in late April 2017 propelled Cassini across Saturn's main rings and into its Grand Finale orbits. Comprised of 22 orbits, Cassini repeatedly dove between Saturn's innermost rings and upper atmosphere to answer fundamental questions unattainable earlier in the mission. The last orbit turned the spacecraft into the first Saturn atmosphere probe. The Grand Finale orbits provided highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and in-situ sampling of the ring particle composition, Saturn's atmosphere, plasma, and innermost radiation belts. The gravitational field was measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet, winds in the deeper atmosphere, and mass of the rings. The magnetic field provided insight into the physical nature of the magnetic dynamo and structure of the internal magnetic field. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer sampled the upper atmosphere for molecules that escape the atmosphere in addition to molecules originating from the rings. The cosmic dust analyzer directly sampled the composition from different parts of the main rings for the first time. Fields and particles instruments directly measured the plasma environment between the rings and planet. Science highlights and new mysteries collected in the Grand

  3. CMS Is Finally Completed

    2008-01-01

    Yet another step in the completion of the Large Hadron Collider was taken yesterday morning, as the final element of the Compact Muon Solenoid was lowered nearly 100 meters bellow ground. After more than eight years of work at the world's most powerful particle accelerator, scientists hope that they will be able to start initial experiments with the LHC until the end of this year.

  4. Radioactive demonstration of final mineralized waste forms for Hanford waste treatment plant secondary waste (WTP-SW) by fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) using the bench scale reformer platform

    Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Missimer, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford’s tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as 137Cs, 129I, 99Tc, Cl, F, and SO4 that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150°C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW.

  5. Catarse e Final Feliz

    Myriam Ávila

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: É a certeza de que nada mais – ou nada importante – pode acontecer após o final de um conto que permite o acontecimento da catarse. Se na maioria das narrativas existe algum tipo de dénouement, em algumas delas isso acontece de maneira especialmente satisfatória e afirmativa. O conto de fadas é uma dessas formas narrativas onde o efeito catártico é extremo e preenche objetivos específicos, de acordo com Bruno Bettelheim. Hollywood mimetizou essa forma como estratégia de sedução, iniciando a tradição do final feliz no cinema. A partir do conto de fadas Cinderela, em diferentes versões, juntamente com a animação homônima da Disney e ainda duas versões do filme Sabrina, será traçada aqui uma relação entre a catarse e o final feliz nos contos de fada, bem como seu uso pela indústria cultural. Palavras-chave: catarse, contos de fada, Hollywood

  6. UMTRA project: Canonsburg final design

    Thiers, G.R.; Guros, F.B.; Smith, E.S.

    1984-01-01

    Final design for on-site stabilization of over 300,000 cubic yards of abandoned mill tailings in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, is being completed this Fall. This paper describes design criteria, design procedures, and difficulties encountered for the following required elements: 1. Encapsulation cell; 2. Durability of erosion protection material; 3. Flood control berm; 4. Sedimentation pond; 5. Wastewater treatment plant. The 70,000 cubic yards of the tailings for which radiation levels exceed 100 picocuries per gram will be placed on a 2-ft-thick compacted clay liner and encased by a 3-ft-thick compacted clay cover. The remaining tailings will be covered with at least two feet of clay to prevent radon escape and to reduce rainfall infiltration. Erosion protection will be provided for the encapsulation cell, the drainage swales, and from potential meandering of nearby Chartiers Creek

  7. Pre-study for the development of R and D-program for the plant DEPRA (demonstration and testing of technologies for wastewater and sludge treatment). Final report; Voruntersuchung zur Ausarbeitung der F und E-Konzeption der DEPRA. Abschlussbericht

    Raebiger, N.

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of the planned demonstration and testing plant (DEPRA) in Bremerhaven is to have a possibility to demonstrate and test new or further developed wastewater and sludge treatments in industrial scale. With that DEPRA will contribute to transfer attained results of research and development as soon as possible in to practice. The plant DEPRA will provide extensive possibilities of process control of different stages of wastewater and sludge treatment as well as the operation of additional process stages. The demonstration and testing plant should be open for research institutes and commercial users in Germany as well as for European countries in order to offer a possibility for projects concerning water purification. The aim of this study was to compile the framework of research projects for DEPRA. This report indicates trends of development for purification of municipal and industrial wastewater and sludge treatment whereas the potential of innovation for short, middle and long time implementation is considered. (orig.)

  8. DANAERO MW: Final Report

    Troldborg, Niels; Bak, Christian; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    This report describes the results of the EUDP funded DANAERO MW II project carried out by DTU Wind Energy (formerly Risø DTU) and the industrial partners, LM Wind Power, Vestas Wind Systems A/S and Siemens Wind Power. An overview of the data available from the project as well as the results from...... analysis of the data is given with the main objective to explore in detail the influence of atmospheric and wake turbulence on MW turbine performance, loading and stability. Finally, validation and demonstration of simulation codes are carried out....

  9. The final cool down

    Thursday 29th May, the cool-down of the final sector (sector 4-5) of LHC has begun, one week after the start of the cool-down of sector 1-2. It will take five weeks for the sectors to be cooled from room temperature to 5 K and a further two weeks to complete the cool down to 1.9 K and the commissioning of cryogenic instrumentation, as well as to fine tune the cryogenic plants and the cooling loops of cryostats.Nearly a year and half has passed since sector 7-8 was cooled for the first time in January 2007. For Laurent Tavian, AT/CRG Group Leader, reaching the final phase of the cool down is an important milestone, confirming the basic design of the cryogenic system and the ability to operate complete sectors. “All the sectors have to operate at the same time otherwise we cannot inject the beam into the machine. The stability and reliability of the cryogenic system and its utilities are now very important. That will be the new challenge for the coming months,” he explains. The status of the cool down of ...

  10. Cosmology Without Finality

    Mahootian, F.

    2009-12-01

    The rapid convergence of advancing sensor technology, computational power, and knowledge discovery techniques over the past decade has brought unprecedented volumes of astronomical data together with unprecedented capabilities of data assimilation and analysis. A key result is that a new, data-driven "observational-inductive'' framework for scientific inquiry is taking shape and proving viable. The anticipated rise in data flow and processing power will have profound effects, e.g., confirmations and disconfirmations of existing theoretical claims both for and against the big bang model. But beyond enabling new discoveries can new data-driven frameworks of scientific inquiry reshape the epistemic ideals of science? The history of physics offers a comparison. The Bohr-Einstein debate over the "completeness'' of quantum mechanics centered on a question of ideals: what counts as science? We briefly examine lessons from that episode and pose questions about their applicability to cosmology. If the history of 20th century physics is any indication, the abandonment of absolutes (e.g., space, time, simultaneity, continuity, determinacy) can produce fundamental changes in understanding. The classical ideal of science, operative in both physics and cosmology, descends from the European Enlightenment. This ideal has for over 200 years guided science to seek the ultimate order of nature, to pursue the absolute theory, the "theory of everything.'' But now that we have new models of scientific inquiry powered by new technologies and driven more by data than by theory, it is time, finally, to relinquish dreams of a "final'' theory.

  11. Waste incineration. Final report

    Egede Rasmussen, Anja

    2004-06-15

    This prepatory thesis is a literature study on the incineration of waste. It deals with the concepts of municipal solid waste, the composition and combustion of it. A main focus is on the European emission regulations and the formation of dioxins, as well as a big effort is put into the treatment of solid residues from municipal solid waste incineration. In the latter area, concepts of treatment, such as physical and chemical separations, solidification and stabilization techniques, thermal methods, and extraction methods have been discussed. Evaluation of possible methods of treatment has been done, but no conclusions made of which is the best. Though, indications exist that especially two methods have shown positive qualities and must be further investigated. These methods are the acid extraction and sulfide stabilization (AES) process and the phosphate stabilization method of WES-PHix. Economic potentials of the two methods have been evaluated, and with the information obtained, it seems that the price for treatment and later landfilling of a material with improved leaching characteristics, will be approximately the same as the presently most used solution of export to Norway. However, more tests, investigations and economic evaluations are necessary in order for support of the findings in this work. (au)

  12. Njv Magazine 3 final

    En-Joy

    local wound treatment followed by vaccine ... Africa accounts for approximately 24,200 deaths. (WHO, 2004). The first human rabies case in Nigeria was ... reported dog rabies outbreaks as early as .... follow-up protocols in patients is likely the ... CHUKWUKERE, S., ABECHI, A.S., ... prevention of rabies and brucellosis.

  13. Development of an exhaust sensor for control of internal combustion engines and exhaust treatment systems - CatSens. Final report; Entwicklung eines Abgassensors zur Regelung von Verbrennungsmotoren und Abgasnachbehandlungssystemen - CatSens. Abschlussbericht

    Lepperhoff, G.; Milanovic, I.

    2002-05-01

    A sensor system for controlling combustion processes in small-scale furnaces and internal combustion engines and for on-board diagnosis of exhaust treatment systems, e.g. NO{sub x} adsorber catalytic converters in motor cars, was developed. [German] Im Rahmen des Verbundprojektes soll ein Sensorsystem zur Regelung der Verbrennungsprozesse in Kleinfeuerungsanlagen und Verbrennungsmotoren sowie zur Regelung und Ueberwachung (On-Board Diagnose) von Abgasnachbehandlungseinrichtungen wie z.B. NO{sub x}-Adsorberkatalysatoren in Kraftfahrzeugen, entwickelt werden. (orig.)

  14. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  15. AIPM Final Report

    John Mookken

    2006-06-30

    The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

  16. Chernobyl: the final warning

    Gale, R.P.; Hauser, Thomas.

    1988-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, a book has been written with firstly an introduction to the basic principles and development of nuclear power, followed by a brief review of previous nuclear power plant accidents and then a short account of the Chernobyl accident itself. The main text of the book however contains the personal story of Dr. Robert Peter Yale, head of the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles who travelled to Russia six times to help the victims of the Chernobyl accident. The final part of the book discusses the safety of nuclear power and the dangers of the proliferation of nuclear weapons. (U.K.)

  17. Cosmological Final Focus Systems

    Irwin, J

    2004-01-01

    We develop the many striking parallels between the dynamics of light streams from distant galaxies and particle beams in accelerator final focus systems. Notably the deflections of light by mass clumps are identical to the kicks arising from the long-range beam-beam interactions of two counter-rotating particle beams (known as parasitic crossings). These deflections have sextupolar as well as quadrupolar components. We estimate the strength of such distortions for a variety of circumstances and argue that the sextupolar distortions from clumping within clusters may be observable. This possibility is enhanced by the facts that (1) the sextupolar distortions of background galaxies is a factor of 5 smaller than the quadrupolar distortion, (2) the angular orientation of the sextupolar and quadrupolar distortions from a mass distribution would be correlated, appearing as a slightly curved image, (3) these effects should be spatially clumped on the sky

  18. Multimuon final states

    Crespo, J.-M.

    1980-04-01

    Multimuon final states have been detected by 3 experiments in the interactions of the muon beams of CERN (280 GeV) and FNAL (210 GeV) with heavy targets. For the first time production of J/PSI (3100) by space-like photons has been observed and its dependence on ν, Q 2 and t compared to Vector Dominance and photon-gluon fusion models. Also a clear signal has been seen for 3μ above QED tridents (outside J/PSI mass range) and 2μ events which are well described by charm production. An upper limit for the production of the T by high energy muons has been set

  19. Stardust Final Conference

    Minisci, Edmondo; Summerer, Leopold; McGinty, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Space debris and asteroid impacts pose a very real, very near-term threat to Earth. In order to help study and mitigate these risks, the Stardust program was formed in 2013. This training and research network was devoted to developing and mastering techniques such as removal, deflection, exploitation, and tracking. This book is a collection of many of the topics addressed at the Final Stardust Conference, describing the latest in asteroid monitoring and how engineering efforts can help us reduce space debris. It is a selection of studies bringing together specialists from universities, research institutions, and industry, tasked with the mission of pushing the boundaries of space research with innovative ideas and visionary concepts. Topics covered by the Symposium: Orbital and Attitude Dynamics Modeling Long Term Orbit and Attitude Evolution Particle Cloud Modeling and Simulation Collision and Impact Modelling and Simulation, Re-entry Modeling and Simulation Asteroid Origins and Characterization Orbit and A...

  20. Final technical report

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    gas jet chamber and laser beam path from the final focusing mirror. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1: Fundamental studies of cutting front mechanisms, beam propagation, nozzle design and chemical reactions in the cut kerf with special emphasize on high laser powers and thick sections...... cutting nozzle which can be adjusted independently to the laser beam has been developed. The position of the focus relative the workpiece can be adjusted to cutting applications with relatively large processing windows, i.e. both mild and stainless steels, and of a broad thickness range. A build-in auto......This project entails research with the goal to extend laser cutting of steel based metals to thickness above 20 mm and laser powers in the 10 kW range, with adequate accuracy and economically viable cutting speeds. The technical approach is to develop mirror based cutting heads with truly coaxial...

  1. Full scale application of the autotrophic denitrification in trickling filters for treatment of rejection water with high ammonia concentrations from sludge dewatering. Final report; Untersuchungen zur autotrophen Stickstoffentfernung aus ammoniumreichem Filtratwasser der Schlammentwaesserung mit grosstechnischer Realisierung in Tropfkoerpern. Abschlussbericht

    Neumueller, B.; Metzger, J.W.; Pinnekamp, J.

    2003-07-01

    At many municipal wastewater treatment plants a considerable fraction of nitrogen is recirculated from the anaerobic sludge dewatering. This amounts up to 20% of the total influent nitrogen load of the wastewater treatment plant. The separate treatment of this sludge liquor creates new capacities for the treatment plant and improves effluent quality. A new process for treatment of this sludge liquor with ammonium-nitrogen concentrations above 600 mg/l is the autotrophic denitrification after partial nitritation. At the University of Stuttgart the first semi-technical trickling filter plant was built by which autotrophic denitrification was achieved. At the wastewater treatment plant of Sindelfingen the first full-scale implementation of the autotrophic denitrification in trickling filters has been designed and built. In a first trickling filter 60% of ammonia is transformed to nitrite. The investigations showed, that a few mg/l of free ammonia in this trickling filter were sufficient to inhibit the nitratation but not the nitritation. To achieve this, operating conditions as pH and temperature are of great importance. The concentration of free ammonia should be kept constant because there is an adaption of the microorganisms to free ammonia. After a decrease of the free ammonia concentration the inhibition of the nitratation declines. By thermally killing the biomass and restarting the process, can guarantee a total inhibition of the nitratation, while the concentration of free ammonia is low. In the second, closed trickling filter (anoxic conditions) ammonium is converted autotrophically to nitrogen with nitrite as electron acceptor. It was possible to set up the anoxic ammonium oxidation in full scale without inoculating the process. The very slow growth of the anammox-bacteria leads to a long adaptation phase of the process. All operating conditions such as anoxic conditions, high temperature and a concentration of nitrite below 70 mg/l have to be observed

  2. A European randomised controlled trial of the addition of etoposide to standard vincristine and carboplatin induction as part of an 18-month treatment programme for childhood (≤16 years) low grade glioma - A final report.

    Gnekow, Astrid K; Walker, David A; Kandels, Daniela; Picton, Susan; Giorgio Perilongo; Grill, Jacques; Stokland, Tore; Sandstrom, Per Eric; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Pietsch, Torsten; Giangaspero, Felice; Schmidt, René; Faldum, Andreas; Kilmartin, Denise; De Paoli, Angela; De Salvo, Gian Luca

    2017-08-01

    The use of chemotherapy to manage newly diagnosed low grade glioma (LGG) was first introduced in the 1980s. One randomised trial has studied two- versus four-drug regimens with a duration of 12 months of treatment after resection. Within the European comprehensive treatment strategy for childhood LGG, the International Society of Paediatric Oncology-Low Grade Glioma (SIOP LGG) Committee launched a randomised trial involving 118 institutions and 11 countries to investigate the addition of etoposide (100 mg/m 2 , days 1, 2 & 3) to a four-course induction of vincristine (1.5 mg/m 2  × 10 wkly) and carboplatin (550 mg/m 2 q 3 weekly) as part of 18-month continuing treatment programme. Patients were recruited after imaging diagnosis, resection or biopsy with progressive disease/symptoms. Some 497 newly diagnosed patients (M/F 231/266; median age 4.26 years (interquartile range (IQR) 2.02-7.06)) were randomised to receive vincristine carboplatin (VC) (n = 249) or VC plus etoposide (VCE) during induction (n = 248), stratified by age and tumour site. No differences between the two arms were found in term of survival and radiological response. Response and non-progression rates at 24 weeks for VC and VCE, were 46% versus 41%, and 93% versus 91% respectively; 5-year Progression-Free Survival (PFS) and Overall Survival (OS) were 46% (StDev 3.5) versus 45% (StDev 3.5) and 89% (StDev 2.1) versus 89% (StDev 2.1) respectively. Age and diencephalic syndrome are adverse clinical risk factors for PFS and OS. 5-year OS for patients in early progression at week 24 were 46% (StDev 13.8) and 49% (StDev 16.5) in the two arms, respectively. The addition of etoposide to VC did not improve PFS or OS. High non-progression rates at 24 weeks justify retaining VC as standard first-line therapy. Infants with diencephalic syndrome and early progression need new treatments to be tested. Future trials should use neurological/visual and toxicity outcomes and be designed to

  3. Final Technical Report

    Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

    2007-10-01

    The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest

  4. Clinical outcomes of brain metastases treated with gamma knife radiosurgery with 3.0 T versus 1.5 T MRI-based treatment planning: have we finally optimised detection of occult brain metastases?

    Loganathan, Amritraj G.; Alphonse, Natalie; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if clinically relevant endpoints were changed by improved MRI resolution during radiosurgical treatment planning. Between 2003 and 2008, 200 consecutive patients with brain metastases treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) using either 1.5 T or 3.0 T MRI for radiosurgical treatment planning were retrospectively analysed. The number of previously undetected metastases at time of radiosurgery, distant brain failures, time delay to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT), overall survival and likelihood of neurological death were determined. Additional metastases were detected in 31.3% and 24.5% of patients at time of radiosurgery with 3.0 T and 1.5 T MRI, respectively (P = 0.27). Patients with multiple metastases at diagnostic scan were more likely to have additional metastases detected by 3.0 T MRI (P < 0.1). Median time to distant brain failure was 4.87 months and 5.43 months for the 3.0 T and 1.5 T cohorts, respectively (P = 0.44). Median time to WBRT was 5.8 months and 5.3 months for the 3.0 T and 1.5 T cohorts, respectively (P = 0.87). Median survival was 6.4 months for the 3.0 T cohort, and 6.1 months for the 1.5 T cohort (P = 0.71). Likelihood of neurological death was 25.3% and 16.7% for the 3.0 and 1.5 T populations, respectively (P = 0.26). The 3.0 T MRI-based treatment planning for GKRS did not appear to affect the likelihood of distant brain failure, the need for WBRT or the likelihood of neurological death in this series.

  5. The Predictive Value of Interim and Final [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography after Rituximab-Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Meta-Analysis

    Yuyuan Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. The aim of this study is to determine the prognostic value of interim and final FDG-PET in major histotypes of B-cell NHL patients treated with rituximab containing-chemotherapy. Methods. We searched for articles published in English, limited to lymphoma, rituximab, and FDG-PET, and dedicated to deal with the impact on progression and survival. The log hazard ratios (HR and their variances were estimated. Results. A PubMed and Scopus review of published trials identified 13 studies of Progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS which were set as the main outcome measures. The combined HRs of I-PET for PFS and OS in DLBCL were 4.4 (P=0.11 and 3.99 (P=0.46, respectively. The combined HRs of F-PET for PFS and OS in DLBCL were 5.91 (P=0.39 and 6.75 (P=0.92, respectively. Regarding to non-DLBCL with F-PET, the combined HRs of F-PET for PFS and OS were 4.05 (P=0.79 and 5.1 (P=0.51, respectively. No publication bias existed. Conclusion. In DLBCL, both I-PET and F-PET can be performed for survival and progression analysis. But in other B-cell subtypes such as follicular lymphoma (FL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL, it would be necessary to perform F-PET for predictive purposes.

  6. Final Technical Report

    Held, Isaac [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fueglistaler, Stephan [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-09-19

    We have constructed and analyzed a series of idealized models of tropical convection interacting with large-scale circulations, with 25-50km resolution and with 1-2km cloud resolving resolution to set the stage for rigorous tests of convection closure schemes in high resolution global climate models. Much of the focus has been on the climatology of tropical cyclogenesis in rotating systems and the related problem of the spontaneous aggregation of convection in non-rotating systems. The PI (Held) will be delivering the honorary Bjerknes lecture at the Fall 2016 AGU meeting in December on this work. We have also provided new analyses of long-standing issues related to the interaction between convection and the large-scale circulation: Kelvin waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, water vapor transport into the stratosphere, and upper tropospheric temperature trends. The results of these analyses help to improve our understanding of processes, and provide tests for future high resolution global modeling. Our final goal of testing new convections schemes in next-generation global atmospheric models at GFDL has been left for future work due to the complexity of the idealized model results meant as tests for these models uncovered in this work and to computational resource limitations. 11 papers have been published with support from this grant, 2 are in review, and another major summary paper is in preparation.

  7. Final Technical Report

    Velasco, Mayda [Northwestern University

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the design and construction of novel beam diagnostic and instrumentation for charged particle accelerators required for the next generation of linear colliders. Our main interest is in non-invasive techniques. The Northwestern group of Velasco has been a member of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) collaboration since 2003, and the beam instrumentation work is developed mostly at this facility1. This 4 kW electron beam facility has a 25-170 MeV electron LINAC. CTF3 performed a set of dedicated measurements to finalize the development of our RF-Pickup bunch length detectors. The RF-pickup based on mixers was fully commissioned in 2009 and the RF-pickup based on diodes was finished in time for the 2010-11 data taking. The analysis of all the data taken in by the summer of 2010 was finish in time and presented at the main conference of the year, LINAC 2010 in Japan.

  8. Acoustic Separation Technology; FINAL

    Fred Ahrens; Tim Patterson

    2002-01-01

    Today's restrictive environmental regulations encourage paper mills to close their water systems. Closed water systems increase the level of contaminants significantly. Accumulations of solid suspensions are detrimental to both the papermaking process and the final products. To remove these solids, technologies such as flotation using dissolved air (DAF), centrifuging, and screening have been developed. Dissolved Air Flotation systems are commonly used to clarify whitewater. These passive systems use high pressure to dissolve air into whitewater. When the pressure is released, air micro-bubbles form and attach themselves to fibers and particles, which then float to the surface where they are mechanically skimmed off. There is an economic incentive to explore alternatives to the DAF technology to drive down the cost of whitewater processing and minimize the use of chemicals. The installed capital cost for a DAF system is significant and a typical DAF system takes up considerable space. An alternative approach, which is the subject of this project, involves a dual method combining the advantages of chemical flocculation and in-line ultrasonic clarification to efficiently remove flocculated contaminants from a water stream

  9. AIMES Final Technical Report

    Katz, Daniel S [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA); Jha, Shantenu [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Weissman, Jon [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Turilli, Matteo [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2017-01-31

    This is the final technical report for the AIMES project. Many important advances in science and engineering are due to large-scale distributed computing. Notwithstanding this reliance, we are still learning how to design and deploy large-scale production Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI). This is evidenced by missing design principles for DCI, and an absence of generally acceptable and usable distributed computing abstractions. The AIMES project was conceived against this backdrop, following on the heels of a comprehensive survey of scientific distributed applications. AIMES laid the foundations to address the tripartite challenge of dynamic resource management, integrating information, and portable and interoperable distributed applications. Four abstractions were defined and implemented: skeleton, resource bundle, pilot, and execution strategy. The four abstractions were implemented into software modules and then aggregated into the AIMES middleware. This middleware successfully integrates information across the application layer (skeletons) and resource layer (Bundles), derives a suitable execution strategy for the given skeleton and enacts its execution by means of pilots on one or more resources, depending on the application requirements, and resource availabilities and capabilities.

  10. Schedulability Analysis for Java Finalizers

    Bøgholm, Thomas; Hansen, Rene Rydhof; Søndergaard, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Java finalizers perform clean-up and finalisation of objects at garbage collection time. In real-time Java profiles the use of finalizers is either discouraged (RTSJ, Ravenscar Java) or even disallowed (JSR-302), mainly because of the unpredictability of finalizers and in particular their impact...... on the schedulability analysis. In this paper we show that a controlled scoped memory model results in a structured and predictable execution of finalizers, more reminiscent of C++ destructors than Java finalizers. Furthermore, we incorporate finalizers into a (conservative) schedulability analysis for Predictable Java...... programs. Finally, we extend the SARTS tool for automated schedulability analysis of Java bytecode programs to handle finalizers in a fully automated way....

  11. Closing loops for material flows in surface treatment processes. Pt. 14: ecological and economic assessment and optimization. Final report and appendix; Stoffkreislaufschliessung bei abtragenden Verfahren in Prozessloesungen. Teilprojekt 14: Oekologische und oekonomische Beurteilung und Optimierung. Endbericht und Anhang

    Fleischer, G.; Ackermann, R.; Scholz, C. [and others

    2001-09-01

    The industrial surface treatment of metallic and non-metallic materials is a relevant area in environmental protection. The surface-treatment industry causes polluted waste water and in addition sludges contaminated with heavy metals, which often have to be deposited as hazardous waste. Improvement of process techniques of the surface treatment is therefore an effective possibility decreasing the environmental impact. Target of this section of the research project was the ecological and economic evaluation of potential optimization possibilities for the involved enterprises and the co-operation during the optimization. For this research assignment it was determined to operate with a bottom-up methodology as in the systems analysis. The general instrument results thus as a derivative from the analysis of the methodologies with the special examples, which are processed as sample solutions. Within the framework of the work took place a use of methodical items from the LCI and the business administration. Additionally methods of process engineering and of systems analysis were applied. For the fulfillment of the target within this research assignment an objective evaluation and optimization instrument was developed and tested. With the help of this instrument it is possible to judge whether modifications on system actually reduce the ecological and economic impacts within the total system boundaries. For the support of the instrument several software-programs were used and developed. In addition, generalizable process models were elaborated and algorithms for determination and conversion to flow of material-minimizing technologies were derived and represented in generally. (orig.) [German] Die industrielle Oberflaechenbehandlung mit den zahlreichen Moeglichkeiten der Beschichtung und Abtragung von vorwiegend metallischen Werkstoffen ist ein relevanter Bereich im Umweltschutz. Es fallen neben belasteten Abwaessern auch schwermetallhaltige Schlaemme an, die oft als

  12. World Cup Final

    2006-01-01

    On July 9, hundreds of millions of fans worldwide will be glued to their television sets watching the final match of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, played in Berlin's Olympic stadium (Olympiastadion). The stadium was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics. The Olympic Stadium seats 76,000,; its roof rises 68 meters over the seats and is made up of transparent panels that allow sunlight to stream in during the day. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Size: 12.1 by 15.9 kilometers (7.5 by 9.5 miles) Location: 52.5 degrees North latitude, 13.3 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 15, 2005

  13. MTX final report

    Hooper, E.B. [ed.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K. [and others

    1994-01-01

    The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

  14. MTX final report

    Hooper, E.B.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K.

    1994-01-01

    The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)

  15. Final Report Technetium Monitor

    Spencer, W.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is required by the current contract to remove radioactive technetium FR-om stored caustic nuclear waste solutions. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has worked with typical envelopes of these wastes to optimize the removal process. To support the studies, SRTC developed a rapid on-line remote analyzer to monitor technetium and rhenium levels in solutions as well as track other metals in the solutions through the process operations. Rhenium was used as a non-radioactive substitute for technetium in process development studies. The remote monitor was based on inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Fiber optic cable and extended RF cabling removed the plasma source FR-om the spectrometer and instrument electronics

  16. COSTECH - HURIA JOURNAL VOL. 24 (2) COSTECH FINAL_NEW

    Prof Kigadye

    consecutive days; finally 6 animals were randomly picked from each treatment and slaughtered ... Organoleptic test was conducted and samples of the mutton, goat meat and ..... Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 27(1): 55 –. 60.

  17. Final Technical Report

    Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

    2007-10-26

    Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks

  18. Final report. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics

    Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    This is a final report on the research activities carried out under the above grant at Dartmouth. During the period considered, the grant was identified as being for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, considered as the most tractable theoretical framework in which the plasma problems associated with magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas could be studied. During the first part of the grant's lifetime, the author was associated with Los Alamos National Laboratory as a consultant and the work was motivated by the reversed-field pinch. Later, when that program was killed at Los Alamos, the problems became ones that could be motivated by their relation to tokamaks. Throughout the work, the interest was always on questions that were as fundamental as possible, compatible with those motivations. The intent was always to contribute to plasma physics as a science, as well as to the understanding of mission-oriented confined fusion plasmas. Twelve Ph.D. theses were supervised during this period and a comparable number of postdoctoral research associates were temporarily supported. Many of these have gone on to distinguished careers, though few have done so in the context of the controlled fusion program. Their work was a combination of theory and numerical computation, in gradually less and less idealized settings, moving from rectangular periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions, through periodic straight cylinders and eventually, before the grant was withdrawn, to toroids, with a gradually more prominent role for electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. The author never had access to a situation where he could initiate experiments and relate directly to the laboratory data he wanted. Computers were the laboratory. Most of the work was reported in referred publications in the open literature, copies of which were transmitted one by one to DOE at the time they appeared. The Appendix to this report is a bibliography of published work which was carried out under the

  19. Development of a process for a better biological degradation of dangerous substance by using tensid in the wastewater treatment. Final report; Tensideinsatz - Entwicklung eines Verfahrens zum verbesserten biologischen Abbau gefaehrlicher Stoffe bei der Abwasserreinigung durch Tensideinsatz. Abschlussbericht

    Raebiger, N.; Fischer, U.; Leibfritz, D.

    2001-07-01

    In this Project in an interdisciplinary cooperation the influence of tensides on the performance improvement of biochemical decomposition of persistent substances has been investigated. During the first part of the project (Prof. Raebiger) two continously supplied experimental plants were built. These two plants, using activated sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, were run simultaneously with and without tensides respectively. The investigations show, that the results in regard to the decomposition rate are better from the plant operated with tenside. Also, the decomposition rate in relation to the total solids content has shown to be better in the plant run with tenside in comparison to the plant without tenside. This was especially relevant during simulated malfunctions. In project part II (Prof. Dr. U. Fischer) further investigations into the influence of tensids on the microbial decomposition of pollutants have been conducted using the adapted microorganism cultures taken from the experimental reactors. Investigations using activated sludge flakes and a monoculture in a batchprocess have shown an increased growth in the presence of the investigated tensids. A variation in the pollutant concentration as well as the addition of the tensid Bioversal to the nutrient medias yielded hints for the optimization of the culture conditions. In Part III of the project (Prof. Leibfritz) an extraction process was optimized in order to meet the requirements of the bacteria cultures and the objective of the project. Among other things, the influence of the tensids on the decomposition speed of the pollutants has been demonstrated in the course of this examinations. The findings gathered from this joint project regarding the use of tensids for improved decomposition of persistent substances, particularly during malfunctions and strong changes in the concentration, can be transposed into technical application in the future. (orig.)

  20. Prevalence and characterisation of non-cholerae Vibrio spp. in final effluents of wastewater treatment facilities in two districts of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa: implications for public health.

    Okoh, Anthony I; Sibanda, Timothy; Nongogo, Vuyokazi; Adefisoye, Martins; Olayemi, Osuolale O; Nontongana, Nolonwabo

    2015-02-01

    Vibrios and other enteric pathogens can be found in wastewater effluents of a healthy population. We assessed the prevalence of three non-cholerae vibrios in wastewater effluents of 14 wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Chris Hani and Amathole district municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa for a period of 12 months. With the exception of WWTP10 where presumptive vibrios were not detected in summer and spring, presumptive vibrios were detected in all seasons in other WWTP effluents. When a sample of 1,000 presumptive Vibrio isolates taken from across all sampling sites were subjected to molecular confirmation for Vibrio, 668 were confirmed to belong to the genus Vibrio, giving a prevalence rate of 66.8 %. Further, molecular characterisation of 300 confirmed Vibrio isolates revealed that 11.6 % (35) were Vibrio parahaemolyticus, 28.6 % (86) were Vibrio fluvialis and 28 % (84) were Vibrio vulnificus while 31.8 % (95) belonged to other Vibrio spp. not assayed for in this study. Antibiogram profiling of the three Vibrio species showed that V. parahaemolyticus was ≥50 % susceptible to 8 of the test antibiotics and ≥50 % resistant to only 5 of the 13 test antibiotics, while V. vulnificus showed a susceptibility profile of ≥50 % to 7 of the test antibiotics and a resistance profile of ≥50 % to 6 of the 13 test antibiotics. V. fluvialis showed ≥50 % resistance to 8 of the 13 antibiotics used while showing ≥50 % susceptibility to only 4 antibiotics used. All three Vibrio species were susceptible to gentamycin, cefuroxime, meropenem and imipenem. Multiple antibiotic resistance patterns were also evident especially against such antibiotics as tetracyclin, polymixin B, penicillin G, sulfamethazole and erythromycin against which all Vibrio species were resistant. These results indicate a significant threat to public health, more so in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa which is characterised by widespread poverty, with more than a

  1. Final Performance Progress Report

    Houldin, Joseph [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Saboor, Veronica [Delaware Valley Industrial Resource Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    about assessing a company’s technical assets, broadening our view of the business to go beyond what they make or what NAICS code they have…to better understand their capacity, capability, and expertise, and to learn more about THEIR customers. Knowing more about the markets they serve can often provide insight into their level of technical knowledge and sophistication. Finally, in the spirit of realizing the intent of the Accelerator we strove to align and integrate the work and activities supported by the five funding agencies to leverage each effort. To that end, we include in the Integrated Work Plan a graphic that illustrates that integration. What follows is our summary report of the project, aggregated from prior reports.

  2. Final Technical Report

    Jacquelyn Yanch

    2006-05-22

    This project involved the development of a method for in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the investigation of Boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee. The overall objective of this work was a robust approach for rapid screening of new {sup 10}B-labelled compounds to determine their suitability for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis via Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). For BNCS it is essential to obtain a compound showing high uptake levels in the synovium and long residence time in the joints. Previously the in vivo uptake behavior of potential compounds was evaluated in the arthritic knee joints of rabbits via extensive dissection studies. These studies are very labor-intensive and involve sacrificing large numbers of animals. An in vivo {sup 10}B screening approach was developed to provide initial evaluation of potential compounds. Only those compounds showing positive uptake and retention characteristics will be evaluated further via dissection studies. No further studies will be performed with compounds showing rapid clearance and/or low synovial uptake. Two approaches to in vivo screening were investigated using both simulation methods and experimentation. Both make use of neutron beams generated at the MIT Research Reactor. The first, Transmission Computed Tomography (TCT) was developed and tested but was eventually rejected due to very limited spatial resolution using existing reactor beams. The second, in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (IVPGNAA) was much more promising. IVPGNAA was developed using computer simulation and physical measurement coupled with image reconstruction techniques. The method was tested in arthritic New Zealand rabbits previously injected intra-articularly with three boron labeled compounds and shown to be effective in providing information regarding uptake level and residence time of {sup 10}B in the joint.

  3. CZT DTRA final report

    Voss, L. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the project is to understand the physical origin of electronic noise injected by the electrical contacts in CZT and CdTe, and moreover to understand how it impacts the current- voltage (IV) relationships of these materials. This understanding is critical to enabling the next crucial enhancement in the performance of CZT radiation detectors, as there have recently been impressive advancements in the growth of CZT crystals, particularly at our commercial partner Redlen Technologies. Redlen scientists have successfully reduced the size of the transport-inhibiting tellurium precipitates to be <3 micrometers, such that, with sufficiently high fields, it is possible to achieve resolution of <1% at 662 keV using suitable electrode geometries. In contrast to the excellent progress in crystal growth, practitioners in the field of radiation detection have been fabricating rather routine contacts on CZT for nearly two decades; there is no basic understanding of the semiconductor physics of the contacts, and consequently no breakthrough progress in this area. Our objective is to resolve this inadequacy in CZT diode fabrication on the basis of a science-based study, such that CZT detectors can achieve their full promise in performance as superior contacts will enable use of higher fields with lower leakage current – thereby enhancing the resolution that is possible while eliminating the well-known “tailing” effect suffered by the photopeak. Our approach is to develop methods that reduce or eliminate leakage currents in CZT devices through “engineering” the surfaces with novel treatments and structures. This includes using high density plasma etching, doping via ion implantation and metal diffusion, rapid thermal annealing, amorphous semiconductor and dielectric films, and controlled oxide growth. Using these methods, sources of injected and generated noise at the surface can be eliminated via plasma etching and film deposition or oxide growth, while

  4. Systems study 'Alternative Entsorgung'. Final report. Technical annex 6

    1984-08-01

    In the conditioning plant, fuel elements which have been stored for ten years are loaded into transport containers, unloaded, identified and welded into a dry storage box. The dry store barrel is introduced into a final storage container, which, after being closed, is packed in lost shielding. This so-called final storage barrel is finally placed in a transport container and leaves the conditioning plant in this form by rail for transport to the final storage mine. The fuel element method of treatment 'packing of three complete fuel elements' was used as the reference process. In addition, the method of treatment 'fuel elements dismantled into fuel rods' was also examined. The handling of fuel elements and secondary waste treatment in the reference process are described in detail. (orig./HP) [de

  5. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Loren F. Goodrich

    2011-05-31

    arena and to meet the aggressive performance goals. The latest high-performance Nb{sub 3}Sn wires are being designed with higher current densities, larger effective filament diameter, less Cu stabilizer, and, in some cases, larger wire diameters than ever before. In addition, some of the conductor designs and heat treatments cause the residual resistivity ratio (RRR, ratio of room temperature resistivity to the resistivity at 20 K) of the stabilizer to be less than 20. These parameters are pushing the conductors towards less intrinsic stability, into a region we call marginally stable. These parameters also create a whole series of challenges for routine I{sub c} testing on short-samples, even when tested with the sample immersed in liquid helium. High-current, variable-temperature I{sub c} measurements are even more difficult than those made in liquid helium because the sample is only cooled by flowing helium gas. Providing accurate I{sub c} results under these conditions requires a complex system that provide adequate cooling as well as uniform sample temperature. We have been make variable-temperature measurements for about 15 years, but we started to design the first high-current (at least 500 A), variable-temperature, variable-strain apparatus in late 2006. Our first critical-current measurements as a function of strain, temperature, and magnetic field, I{sub c}(B,T,{var_epsilon}), in a new single, unified apparatus (full matrix characterization) were made in the summer of 2008. This is the only such facility in the U.S. and it has some unique components that are not duplicated anywhere in the world. The compounding of all three variables (H, T, {var_epsilon}) makes an already labor and time intensive characterization very formidable; however, the results cannot be generated any other way and are needed to answer key questions about strain and temperature safety margins and about the reliability of using scaling laws based on small data sets to predict performance

  6. TARGET 2 and Settlement Finality

    Ivan MANGATCHEV

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how TARGET 2 as system implements the idea of settlement finality regulated by Directive 98/26 EC of the European parliament and of the Council of 19 May 1998 on settlement finality in payment and securities settlement systems (Settlement Finality Directive and Directive 2009/44/EC of the European parliament and of the Council of 6 May 2009 amending Directive 98/26/EC on settlement finality in payment and securities settlement systems and Directive 2002/47/EC on financial collateral arrangements as regards linked systems and credit claims (Directive 2009/44/EC. As the title of the arti and finality of the settlement in this system.

  7. Cyclic microwave treatment of pressed garments. Final report

    Miller, Alan E. [PRESSET, Inc. (United States)

    2001-01-31

    In the early 1990's there was a resurgence in what was called "wrinkle free" garments. It had been popular in the 1960's. As cotton products gained a larger share of the fiber market in apparel, "wrinkle free" became a very strong marketing effort. Because we were very knowledgeable in this market we investigated the problem that had plagued it in the 60's, namely product quality. To make "wrinkle free" garments one had to either buy a fabric that was treated with chemicals, called resins, that when "cured" would impart the "wrinkle free" qualities to the garment permanently.

  8. Final focus system for TLC

    Oide, K.

    1988-11-01

    A limit of the chromaticity correction for the final focus system of a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) is investigated. As the result, it becomes possible to increase the aperture of the final doublet with a small increase of the horizontal β function. The new optics design uses a final doublet of 0.5 mm half-aperture and 1.4 T pole-tip field. The length of the system is reduced from 400 m to 200 m by several optics changes. Tolerances for various machine errors with this optics are also studied. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Finally

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Broadband in Rural India is not just about connectivity. Broadband in Rural India is not just about connectivity. It is about transforming rural areas of S. Asia.

  10. HINTS Puerto Rico: Final Report

    This final report describes HINTS implementation in Puerto Rico. The report addresses sampling; staffing, training and management of data collection; calling protocol; findings from the CATI Operations, and sample weights.

  11. Smart roadside initiative : final report.

    2015-09-01

    This is the Final Report for the Smart Roadside Initiative (SRI) prototype system deployment project. The SRI prototype was implemented at weigh stations in Grass Lake, Michigan and West Friendship, Maryland. The prototype was developed to integrate ...

  12. SE-VYZ - Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations, Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management

    Anon

    2004-01-01

    In this presentations processes of radioactive waste treatment in the Bohunice Radioactive Waste Processing Center (SE-VYZ), Jaslovske Bohunice are presented. Decommissioning of the A-1 NPP is also presented. Disposal of conditioned radioactive waste in fibre concrete containers (FCC) are transported to Mochovce from Jaslovske Bohunice by the transport truck where are reposited in the National radioactive waste repository Mochovce. The Interim spent fuel storage facility (ISFSF) is included into this presentation

  13. Cassini's Grand Finale Science Highlights

    Spilker, Linda

    2017-10-01

    After 13 years in orbit, the Cassini-Huygens Mission to Saturn ended in a science-rich blaze of glory. Cassini returned its final bits of unique science data on September 15, 2017, as it plunged into Saturn's atmosphere satisfying planetary protection requirements. Cassini's Grand Finale covered a period of roughly five months and ended with the first time exploration of the region between the rings and planet.The final close flyby of Titan in late April 2017 propelled Cassini across Saturn’s main rings and into its Grand Finale orbits; 22 orbits that repeatedly dove between Saturn’s innermost rings and upper atmosphere making Cassini the first spacecraft to explore this region. The last orbit turned the spacecraft into the first Saturn upper atmospheric probe.The Grand Finale orbits provided highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and in-situ sampling of the ring particle composition, Saturn's atmosphere, plasma, and innermost radiation belts. The gravitational field was measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet, winds in the deeper atmosphere, and mass of the rings. The magnetic field provided insight into the physical nature of the magnetic dynamo and structure of the internal magnetic field. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer sampled the upper atmosphere for molecules that escape the atmosphere in addition to molecules originating from the rings. The cosmic dust analyzer directly sampled the composition from different parts of the main rings for the first time. Fields and particles instruments directly measured the plasma environment between the rings and planet.Science highlights and new mysteries gleaned to date from the Grand Finale orbits will be discussed.The research described in this paper was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Copyright 2017

  14. Final disposal of radioactive wastes

    Kroebel, R [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Projekt Wiederaufarbeitung und Abfallbehandlung; Krause, H [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. zur Behandlung Radioaktiver Abfaelle

    1978-08-01

    This paper discusses the final disposal possibilities for radioactive wastes in the Federal Republic of Germany and the related questions of waste conditioning, storage methods and safety. The programs in progress in neighbouring CEC countries and in the USA are also mentioned briefly. The autors conclude that the existing final disposal possibilities are sufficiently well known and safe, but that they could be improved still further by future development work. The residual hazard potential of radioactive wastes from fuel reprocessing after about 1000 years of storage is lower that of known inorganic core deposits.

  15. Bisphenol A; Final Test Rule

    EPA is issuing a final rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requiring manufacturers and processors of bisphenol A, hereinafter BPA, (4.4’-isopropylidenediphenol, CAS No. 80-05—7) to conduct a 90-day inhalation study.

  16. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    Lee, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate

  17. SLC Final Performance and Lessons

    Phinney, Nan

    2000-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was the first prototype of a new type of accelerator, the electron-positron linear collider. Many years of dedicated effort were required to understand the physics of this new technology and to develop the techniques for maximizing performance. Key issues were emittance dilution, stability, final beam optimization and background control. Precision, non-invasive diagnostics were required to measure and monitor the beams throughout the machine. Beam-based feedback systems were needed to stabilize energy, trajectory, intensity and the final beam size at the interaction point. variety of new tuning techniques were developed to correct for residual optical or alignment errors. The final focus system underwent a series of refinements in order to deliver sub-micron size beams. It also took many iterations to understand the sources of backgrounds and develop the methods to control them. The benefit from this accumulated experience was seen in the performance of the SLC during its final run in 1997-98. The luminosity increased by a factor of three to 3*10 30 and the 350,000 Z data sample delivered was nearly double that from all previous runs combined

  18. Final storage of radioactive waste

    Ziehm, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    As explained in the present article, operators of nuclear power plants are responsible for the safe final disposal of the radioactive wastes they produce on the strength of the polluter pays principle. To shift the burden of responsibility for safe disposal to society as a whole would violate this principle and is therefore not possible. The polluter pays principle follows from more general principles of the fair distribution of benefits and burdens. Instances of its implementation are to be found in the national Atomic Energy Law as well as in the European Radioactive Waste and Spent Fuel Management Directive. The polluters in this case are in particular responsible for financing the installation and operation of final disposal sites. The reserves accumulated so far for the decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plants and disposal of radioactive wastes, including the installation and operation of final disposal sites, should be transferred to a public-law fund. This fund should be supplemented by the polluters to cover further foreseeable costs not covered by the reserves accumulated so far, including a realistic cost increase factor, appropriate risk reserves as well as the costs of the site selection procedure and a share in the costs for the safe closure of the final disposal sites of Morsleben and Asse II. This would merely be implementing in the sphere of atomic law that has long been standard practice in other areas of environmental law involving environmental hazards.

  19. FINAL REPORT: Transformational electrode drying process

    Claus Daniel, C.; Wixom, M.(A123 Systems, Inc.)

    2013-12-19

    This report includes major findings and outlook from the transformational electrode drying project performance period from January 6, 2012 to August 1, 2012. Electrode drying before cell assembly is an operational bottleneck in battery manufacturing due to long drying times and batch processing. Water taken up during shipment and other manufacturing steps needs to be removed before final battery assembly. Conventional vacuum ovens are limited in drying speed due to a temperature threshold needed to avoid damaging polymer components in the composite electrode. Roll to roll operation and alternative treatments can increase the water desorption and removal rate without overheating and damaging other components in the composite electrode, thus considerably reducing drying time and energy use. The objective of this project was the development of an electrode drying procedure, and the demonstration of processes with no decrease in battery performance. The benchmark for all drying data was an 80°C vacuum furnace treatment with a residence time of 18 – 22 hours. This report demonstrates an alternative roll to roll drying process with a 500-fold improvement in drying time down to 2 minutes and consumption of only 30% of the energy compared to vacuum furnace treatment.

  20. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste – LLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  1. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS - Final report

    Philip Holmes

    2005-12-31

    This document is the final report on the work completed on DE-FG02-95ER25238 since the start of the second renewal period: Jan 1, 2001. It supplements the annual reports submitted in 2001 and 2002. In the renewal proposal I envisaged work in three main areas: Analytical and topological tools for studying flows and maps Low dimensional models of fluid flow Models of animal locomotion and I describe the progess made on each project.

  2. Metodología para la localización de un parque de tratamiento y disposición final de residuos sólidos de tipo regional desde una perspectiva multidimensional Methodology for the location of a treatment and solid waste disposal regional park, from a multidimensional perspective

    Diana Elizabeth Valencia Londoño

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available El manejo y disposición final de los residuos sólidos en el oriente antioqueño siempre ha sido una preocupación desde CORNARE y los entes territoriales.El artículo presenta los hallazgos de una investigación realizado por el grupo proyecto Ciudad de la facultad de Artes Integradas de la Universidad de San Buenaventura, cofinanciado por CORNARE, cuyo objetivo es presentar la metodología elaborada para la determinación de las áreas potenciales para el asentamiento de un parque de tratamiento y disposición final de residuos sólidos de tipo regional, teniendo como soporte la descripción, caracterización y análisis del ambiente (abiótico, biótico y socioeconómico en la subregión Valles de San Nicolás. Dicha propuesta se basa en un análisis matricial combinado con una herramienta SIG, que permitió evaluar diferentes sitios desde su viabilidad, ambiental, social, económica y física y entregar tanto a las Administraciones municipales como a la Corporación una estrategia metodológica que, incorporando lo planteado en el decreto 838, permita una toma de decisiones territoriales acertadas.The issue of handling and disposal of solid waste in eastern Antioquia has always been a topic of special concern and attention from CORNARE and local authorities. This article presents the findings of a project conducted by Universidad de San Buenaventura, School of Arts, City Project Group, founded by CORNARE, which aims to present the methodology developed for the identification of potential areas for the settlement of a park of Treatment and Disposal of Solid Waste Regional Type, having as support the description, characterization and analysis of (abiotic, biotic, and socio-economic environment in Valles de San Nicolás region. This proposal is based on a matrix analysis tool combined with GIS, which allowed us to evaluate different sites from its environmental, social, economic, and physical feasibility, and deliver to both local governments

  3. Final Scientific Report: DE-SC0002194

    Seidler, Gerald [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-04-07

    We provide the final scientific report for DE-SC0002194. During the term of this grant, 28 publications spanning a variety of topics were addressed under the rubric of advanced x-ray methods and their application to extreme conditions of time-resolution or x-ray intensities. Notable accomplishments include a new observation of XANES features associated with f-shell reconfiguration in lanthanides, size-dependent x-ray heating effects under XFEL illumination conditions, theoretical development of improved treatments of inelastic x-ray scattering for 'warm dense matter' conditions, and several new instrument develop efforts for atomic, molecular, and condensed phase studies in the lab and at major facility lightsources.

  4. Exterior insulating shutter final prototype design. Final report, Phase II

    Dike, G.A.; Kinney, L.F.

    1982-12-01

    The final prototype shutter described uses sliding panels composed of inch-thick thermax sandwiched between 60 mil thick ultraviolet-resistant plastic on the outside, and 20 mil stryrene on the inside. The shuter system was shown to have an effective R-value of 6 using ASHRAE procedures to convert from still air conditions to 15 mph wind conditions in a simulated cold environment. Tests were performed for cyclical operation, vulnerability to ice and wind, thermal performance, and air infiltration. Marketing efforts are described. Cost effectiveness is determined via present value analysis. (LEW)

  5. Cholera Treatment

    ... Diagnosis and Detection Laboratory Testing for Cholera Treatment Rehydration Therapy Antibiotic Treatment Zinc Treatment Prevention & Control Five ... page for current cholera treatment recommendations. Cholera Treatments Rehydration therapy , meaning prompt restoration of lost fluids and ...

  6. Final amplifier design and mercury

    Rose, E.A.; Hanson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The final amplifier for the Mercury KrF excimer facility is being designed. The design exercise involves extensive modeling to predict amplifier performance. Models of the pulsed-power system, including a Child-Langmuir diode with closure, electron-beam energy deposition, KrF laser kinetics, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), a time-dependent laser extraction in the presence of ASE are presented as a design package. The design exercise indicates that the energy objective of Phase I -- 100 joules -- will be met

  7. Virtualized Network Control. Final Report

    Ghani, Nasir [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-02-01

    This document is the final report for the Virtualized Network Control (VNC) project, which was funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. This project was also informally referred to as Advanced Resource Computation for Hybrid Service and TOpology NEtworks (ARCHSTONE). This report provides a summary of the project's activities, tasks, deliverable, and accomplishments. It also provides a summary of the documents, software, and presentations generated as part of this projects activities. Namely, the Appendix contains an archive of the deliverables, documents, and presentations generated a part of this project.

  8. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs

  9. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Uranium Task Force final report

    1991-03-01

    Site-specific data on the management of uranium of 17 facilities have been assembled and analyzed to develop a comprehensive report on uranium processes, treatment, storage, and disposal on a Department of Energy-wide basis. By integrating a variety of waste generation sources, treatment processes, storage facilities, and disposal options, this waste management system study aims to effectively characterize and evaluate the performance and effectiveness of the total Department of Energy system for the management of uranium, as well as the individual sites. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  11. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105... Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination of... preference will be included in this final ranking in accordance with applicable regulations. ...

  12. Final disposition of MTR fuel

    Jonnson, Erik B.

    1996-01-01

    The final disposition of power reactor fuel has been investigated for a long time and some promising solutions to the problem have been shown. The research reactor fuels are normally not compatible with the zirkonium clad power reactor fuel and can thus not rely on the same disposal methods. The MTR fuels are typically Al-clad UAl x or U 3 Si 2 , HEU resp. LEU with essentially higher remaining enrichment than the corresponding power reactor fuel after full utilization of the uranium. The problems arising when evaluating the conditions at the final repository are the high corrosion rate of aluminum and uranium metal and the risk for secondary criticality due to the high content on fissionable material in the fully burnt MTR fuel. The newly adopted US policy to take back Foreign Research Reactor Spent Fuel of US origin for a period of ten years have given the research reactor society a reasonable time to evaluate different possibilities to solve the back end of the fuel cycle. The problem is, however, complicated and requires a solid engagement from the research reactor community. The task would be a suitable continuation of the RERTR program as it involves both the development of new fuel types and collecting data for the safe long-term disposal of the spent MTR fuel. (author)

  13. Interim and final storage casks

    Stumpfrock, L.; Kockelmann, H.

    2012-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste is a huge social challenge in Germany and all over the world. As is well known the search for a site for a final repository for high-level waste in Germany is not complete. Therefore, interim storage facilities for radioactive waste were built at plant sites in Germany. The waste is stored in these storage facilities in appropriate storage and transport casks until the transport in a final repository can be carried out. Licensing of the storage and transport casks aimed for use in the public space is done according to the traffic laws and for handling in the storage facility according to nuclear law. Taking into account the activity of the waste to be stored, different containers are in use, so that experience is available from the licensing and operation in interim storage facilities. The large volume of radioactive waste to be disposed of after the shut-down of power generation in nuclear power stations makes it necessary for large quantities of licensed storage and transport casks to be provided soon.

  14. Space tug applications. Final report

    1996-01-01

    This article is the final report of the conceptual design efforts for a 'space tug'. It includes preliminary efforts, mission analysis, configuration analysis, impact analysis, and conclusions. Of the several concepts evaluated, the nuclear bimodal tug was one of the top candidates, with the two options being the NEBA-1 and NEBA-3 systems. Several potential tug benefits were identified during the mission analysis. The tug enables delivery of large (>3,500 kg) payloads to the outer planets and it increases the GSO delivery capability by 20% relative to current systems. By providing end of life disposal, the tug can be used to extend the life of existing space assets. It can also be used to reboost satellites which were not delivered to their final orbit by the launch system. A specific mission model is the key to validating the tug concept. Once a mission model can be established, mission analysis can be used to determine more precise propellant quantities and burn times. In addition, the specific payloads can be evaluated for mass and volume capability with the launch systems. Results of the economic analysis will be dependent on the total years of operations and the number of missions in the mission model. The mission applications evaluated during this phase drove the need for large propellant quantities and thus did not allow the payloads to step down to smaller and less expensive launch systems

  15. Polishing ponds as tertiary treatment of municipal wastewater. Part one: Full scale experimental evaluation of effects on effluent characteristic; Stagni biologici nel trattamento terziario dei liquami urbani. Parte I: Valutazione sperimentale a scala reale degli effetti sulle caratteristiche all`effluente finale

    Tatano, Fabio

    1997-04-01

    The application of polishing ponds as tertiary treatment of municipal wastewater, is quite common in Germany. Nowadays, the wastewater treatment plants in the most industrialized Countries achieve high treatment efficiencies in the biological phase; then, it seems necessary to study - in these plants - the treatment efficiencies and the improvements achievable with polishing ponds inserted as tertiary treatment. This Part One of the paper describes the results of a full scale experimental evaluation of the treatment efficiency of the polishing ponds in a wastewater treatment plant situated in the Ruhr River Region (Germany).

  16. Regulation - renewable energies finally liberated?

    Blosseville, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Within the context defined by the new French policy for energy transition, notably in terms of share of renewable energies in final energy consumption, France seems to be somehow late in the development of these energies: about 1 GW of wind energy are installed each year when the expected pace would be 1,5 GW, and the photovoltaic market is shrinking. As the legal context is important, this article proposes an overview of the evolution of the French policy during the last four years which started with interesting measures. Recently, the government showed its will to liberate renewable energies from several constraints. Some legal procedures tend to slow down the development. Some advances could therefore be made, for example to make rules less complex and numerous. The different situations of the wind and biogas sectors are evoked, as well as new opportunities created by a new decree on investment planning

  17. Final strip mine regs released

    1977-12-12

    The final interim surface mining regulations were published by the Office of Surface Mining on 12 December. Among the requirements are that the operation should minimize disturbances to the prevailing hydrological balance in order to prevent long-term adverse changes in water quality and quantity, in the depth of ground water and in the location of surface water drainage channels. Regulations for sedimentation ponds are retained but exemption may be granted to allow the pH to rise above 9 if manganese levels (4 mg/l) cannot be met. The 24-hour frequency event for which effluent limitations must be applied has been reduced from 25 years to 10 years. Large sedimentation ponds must be constructed to withstand, at a minimum, a 100-year frequency, 6-hour duration storm. The regulations are to take effect on the 3rd of May 1978.

  18. Phase I Final Scientific Report

    Lu, Xijia [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Fetvedt, Jeremy [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Dimmig, Walker [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2017-10-15

    This Final Scientific Report addresses the accomplishments achieved during Phase I of DE- FE0023985, Coal Syngas Combustor Development for Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles. The primary objective of the project was to develop a coal syngas-fueled combustor design for use with high-pressure, high-temperature, oxy-fuel, supercritical CO2 power cycles, with particular focus given to the conditions required by the Allam Cycle. The primary goals, from the Statement of Project Objectives, were to develop: (1) a conceptual design of a syngas-fueled combustor-turbine block for a 300MWe high-pressure, oxy-fuel, sCO2 power plant; (2) the preliminary design of a 5MWt test combustor; and (3) the definition of a combustor test program. Accomplishments for each of these goals are discussed in this report.

  19. Mono pile foundation. Final report

    Lyngesen, S.; Brendstrup, C.

    1997-02-01

    The use of mono piles as foundations for maritime structures has been developed during the last decades. The installation requirements within the offshore sector have resulted in equipment enabling driving of piles up to 3-4 m to large penetration depths. The availability of this equipment has made the use of large mono piles feasible as foundations for structures like wind turbines. The mono pile foundations consists of three parts; the bare pile, a conical transition and a boat landing. All parts are prefitted at the yard in order to minimise the installation work that has to be carried out offshore. The study of a mono pile foundations for a 1.5 MW wind turbine has been conducted for two locations, Horns Rev and Roedsand. Three different water depths: 5, 8 and 11 m have been investigated in the study. The on-site welding between pile and conical transition is performed by an automatic welding machine. Final testing and eventually repair of the weld are conducted at least 16 hours after welding. This is followed by final installation of J-tube, tie-in to subsea cables and installation of the impressed current system for corrosive protection of the mono pile. The total cost for procurement and installation of the mono pile using the welded connection is estimated. The price does not include procurement and installation of access platform and boat landing. These costs are estimated to 250.000 DKK. Depending on water depth the cost of the pile ranges from 2,2 to 2,7 million DKK. Procurement and fabrication of the pile are approx. 75% of the total costs. The remaining 25% are due to installation. The total costs are very sensitive to the unit price of pile steel. During the project it became obvious that ice load has a very large influence on the dimensions of the mono pile. (EG)

  20. Metalcasting competitiveness research. Final report

    Piwonka, T.S.

    1994-08-01

    This report comprises eleven separate reports: prediction of non- metallic particle distribution, electromagnetic separation of inclusions from molten Al alloy, clean steel castings, waste stream identification and treatment, elastic wave lithotripsy for removal of ceramic from investment castings, metal penetration in sand molds, mold-metal interface gas composition, improved Alloy 718, specifications for iron oxide additions to no-bake sands, criteria functions for defect prediction, and computer-aided cooling curve analysis.

  1. Technical Report --Final Work Accomplishment

    Kim, Eun Heui

    2007-11-19

    The main goal of this project was to understand the solution structure of nonlinear boundary value problems arising in self-similar solutions of nonlinear systems of multidimensional conservation laws. This project further extended to study on biocomplex systems including Morphogen gradients systems (reaction-diffusion systems) and tumor growth and its treatment model problems (free boundary, conservation of mass and reaction-diffusion systems). The list of publications and the summary of those publications are listed.

  2. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project final siting report. Final report

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed

  3. Final Report of the Final Meeting of Project Coordinators

    Cordero Calderon, Carlos F.

    1996-06-01

    The Costa Rican Electricity Institute has always been worried of the verification of the good state of the works and thus to guarantee their operation. For that reason, it has established different sorts of auscultation of the Arenal's Dam. Some investigations have been done to find new methods to improve and to eliminate risks in different works or projects. The Arenal's Dam is one of the greatest engineering works in Costa Rica, it has the Arenal, Corobici and Sandillal Hydroelectric Plants. Furthermore, the irrigation system in the Tempisque River Valley, in the Guanacaste province. One special characteristic of the Site of the Dam, is the near location of the Arenal Volcano, in full activity and located at 6 Km. from the dam. This report has two goals, one is the traditional permanent measurements report for the project, and the other, is to present it as a final work of the Project Arcal XVIII, to the International Atomic Energy Agency. This report analyses the geo-hydraulic, structural and topographic auscultation, as well as the activities accomplished during the ARCAL XVIII /8/018, Application of Tracer Techniques for Leakage in Dams and Damming Project, based on information gathered through the geo-chemical auscultation, until June 1996. (author).30 ills., 80 charts, 35 tabs

  4. Fresh Kills leachate treatment and minimization study. Volume 1, Characteristics and treatment alternatives: Final report

    Fillos, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    1993-09-01

    The New York City Department of Sanitation is developing a comprehensive landfill leachate management plan for the Fresh Kills Landfill. The leachate was first analyzed for conventional and priority pollutants. The leachate was well buffered at pH 7 to 8 with an alkalinity of 5,000 to 6,000 mg/L. The BOD was low, usually less than 100 mg/L, but the COD was as high as 1,800 mg/L. Ammonia concentrations were around 700 mg/L and the color resembled strong tea at 3,000 colorimetric units. Only few of the priority pollutants were present, and at extremely low concentrations. Based on the chemical characteristics of the leachate, the primary environmental impact would be on the oxygen balance of the receiving surface waters.

  5. Platform treatment

    Jammazi, Rochdi; M'henni, Wafa

    2008-01-01

    Our project consists of making of a punt forms test for the radioactive treatment in the research's unit of the CNSTN .First a complete functional analysis is carried out, this analysis comprises a comparative study between our work and a design already established in a preparatory project, it emphasizes the failures whose made proof the old design .Second the metallurgical study which must lead on the choice of materials is in its turn carried out. Thirdly the design with all the details and the plans is carried out by the intermediary of the software CATIA. This design is accompanied by the various bodies's dimensioning and the calculation of the various states of stresses to which the parts of the system are subjected: buckling, inflection fourthly an automatic study is carried out, this study contains the automation's step of the system using the software, SIMATIC STEP 7. It also contains the choice of the various position and velocity pick-ups. Finally we will finish by the presentation of maintenance and safety's instructions of the system and the operator working in this research's . (Author)

  6. IRIS Final Technical Progress Report

    M. D. Carelli

    2003-11-03

    OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed

  7. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    2010-07-01

    ... coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers. 61.134 Section 61.134 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers. (a) No (“zero”) emissions are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke by...

  8. Final storage of radioactive waste

    Albrecht, E.; Kolditz, H.; Thielemann, K.; Duerr, K.; Klarr, K.; Kuehn, K.; Staupendahl, G.; Uerpmann, E.P.; Bechthold, W.; Diefenbacher, W.

    1974-12-01

    The present report - presented by the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH, Muenchen in cooperation with the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH, Karlsruhe - gives a survey of the 1973 work in the field of final storage of radioactive wastes. The mining and constructional work carried out aboveground and underground in the saline of Asse near Remlingen with a view to repair, maintenance and expansion for future tasks is discussed. Storage of slightly active wastes on the 750 m floor and the tentative storage of medium-activity wastes on the 490 m floor were continued in the time under review. In September, the multiple transport container S 7 V, developped in the GfK for transports of 7 200 l iron-hooped drums containing medium activity wastes, were employed in Asse for the first time. With two transports a week between Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre and the Asse mine, 14 drums were stored per week with a total of 233 drums at the end of the year. The report also gives information on the present state of research in the fields of mountain engineering geology and hydrology, and its results. In addition, new storage methods are mentioned which are still in the planning stage. (orig./AK) [de

  9. Final report for DESC0004031

    Kitchin, John [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-08-08

    In this project we aim to develop new multicomponent oxide-based electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction using combined theoretical and experimental approaches. We use density functional theory to compute the electronic structure and reactivity proxies of model oxide materials. From the understanding generated from these calculations, we synthesize materials and characterize their oxygen evolution activity. We use in situ spectroscopic methods to characterize oxide electrodes under reaction conditions. We also develop new data sharing strategies to facilitate the reuse of our data by others. Our work has several potential impacts of interest to DOE. First, the discovery of new oxygen evolution electrocatalysts directly affects the efficiency of many energy-related processes from hydrogen generation to air separation and electrochemical fuel synthesis. Second, we have identified new ways to promote the oxygen evolution reaction for some materials through the electrolyte. This opens new pathways to improving the efficiency of processes involving oxygen evolution. The ability to characterize electrodes under operating conditions enables new insights into the actual structure and composition of the materials, which we are finding are not the same as the as prepared materials. Finally, DOE has significant need and interest in improving the ability to share data among researchers.

  10. Customized PEC modules. Final report

    Soerensen, Martin B. (DTI, Taastrup (Denmark))

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the project ''Customized PEC modules'' was to move from the production hand-made individual DSCs (dye-sensitized solar cells) in the laboratory to the production of DSC modules in a semi-automated process. At the same time allowing sufficient variation in the product's specification for real tailoring of the product to the application. The tailoring can be related to the module's electrical output and size, but also to the possibility of designing patterns for decoration or communication purposes by playing around with the shape, size and layout of the individual cells forming the module. This was to be accomplished mainly by screen printing of DSC components on glass substrates at Mekoprint. For reaching this goal the work was divided into a number of steps. The central part of the work done was in the initial conception activity and the following manufacturing activity. An activity regarding optimization included several tasks of optimization and adaptation of the existing laboratory process for manufacturing of the DSCs. Finally, work focused on international activities was done. All the steps needed for the production of customized DSC modules have been demonstrated in this project. In combination with the development of a high performing printable sealant and sealing method all the prerequisites for producing customized DSC modules have been demonstrated. (LN)

  11. Archaeology audit program final report

    NONE

    2009-04-15

    In order to review oil and gas companies' archaeological management systems, the British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission (OGC) introduced its archaeology audit program (AAP) in April 2008. As part of this audit, twenty six oil and gas companies were selected for an office documentation review and a corresponding field audit. This document presented and described these audit results. The purpose of the final audit report was to provide information to assist oil and gas companies to improve their management systems by increasing the emphasis of the preservation of cultural resources. This report presented an overview of the AAP scope and methodology and provided examples from the audit of both good management practices encountered and practices in which opportunities for improvement to archaeological management systems could be implemented. Recommendations to address improvement opportunities were also discussed. It was concluded that the oil and gas companies subject to the audit were found to have met or exceeded OGC expectations for maintaining archaeological management systems. 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  12. Final disposal of nuclear waste

    Anon,

    1995-10-01

    The nuclear industry argues that high level radioactive waste can be safely disposed of in deep underground repositories. As yet, however, no such repositories are in use and the amount of spent nuclear fuel in ponds and dry storage is steadily increasing. Although the nuclear industry further argues that storage is a safe option for up to 50 years and has the merit of allowing the radioactivity of the fuel to decay to a more manageable level, the situation seems to be far from ideal. The real reasons for procrastination over deep disposal seem to have as much to do with politics as safe technology. The progress of different countries in finding a solution to the final disposal of high level waste is examined. In some, notably the countries of the former Soviet Union, cost is a barrier; in others, the problem has not yet been faced. In these countries undertaking serious research into deep disposal there has been a tendency, in the face of opposition from environmental groups, to retreat to sites close to existing nuclear installations and to set up rock laboratories to characterize them. These sites are not necessarily the best geologically, but the laboratories may end up being converted into actual repositories because of the considerable financial investment they represent. (UK).

  13. Final disposal of nuclear waste

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear industry argues that high level radioactive waste can be safely disposed of in deep underground repositories. As yet, however, no such repositories are in use and the amount of spent nuclear fuel in ponds and dry storage is steadily increasing. Although the nuclear industry further argues that storage is a safe option for up to 50 years and has the merit of allowing the radioactivity of the fuel to decay to a more manageable level, the situation seems to be far from ideal. The real reasons for procrastination over deep disposal seem to have as much to do with politics as safe technology. The progress of different countries in finding a solution to the final disposal of high level waste is examined. In some, notably the countries of the former Soviet Union, cost is a barrier; in others, the problem has not yet been faced. In these countries undertaking serious research into deep disposal there has been a tendency, in the face of opposition from environmental groups, to retreat to sites close to existing nuclear installations and to set up rock laboratories to characterize them. These sites are not necessarily the best geologically, but the laboratories may end up being converted into actual repositories because of the considerable financial investment they represent. (UK)

  14. Medicare and Medicaid programs; advance directives--HCFA. Final rule.

    1995-06-27

    This final rule responds to public comments on the March 6, 1992 interim final rule with comment period that amended the Medicare and Medicaid regulations governing provider agreements and contracts to establish requirements for States, hospitals, nursing facilities, skilled nursing facilities, providers of home health care or personal care services, hospice programs and managed care plans concerning advance directives. An advance directive is a written instruction, such as a living will or durable power of attorney for health care, recognized under State law, relating to the provision of health care when an individual's condition makes him or her unable to express his or her wishes. The intent of the advance directives provisions is to enhance an adult individual's control over medical treatment decisions. This rule confirms the interim final rule with several minor changes based on our review and consideration of public comments.

  15. Competence for Contract and Competence to Consent to Treatment

    前田, 泰

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes assessing competence to consent to treatment. It focuses on problems of competence for contract and competence to consent to treatment. Finally, it discusses the degree of assessing competence to consent to treatment.

  16. 32 CFR 536.64 - Final offers.

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Final offers. 536.64 Section 536.64 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.64 Final offers. (a) When claims personnel... less than the amount claimed, a settlement authority will make a written final offer within his or her...

  17. 5 CFR 1216.206 - Final determination.

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final determination. 1216.206 Section... PROCEEDINGS Demands or Requests for Testimony and Production of Documents § 1216.206 Final determination. The General Counsel makes the final determination on demands to requests to employees for production of...

  18. 45 CFR 150.219 - Final determination.

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final determination. 150.219 Section 150.219... Are Failing To Substantially Enforce HIPAA Requirements § 150.219 Final determination. If, after... the State a written notice of its final determination. The notice includes the following: (a...

  19. 36 CFR 908.33 - Final determination.

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final determination. 908.33... DEVELOPMENT AREA Review Procedure § 908.33 Final determination. (a) The Chairman or designee(s) shall make a final determination on the claim within 45 days of receipt of the file from the Director of Real Estate...

  20. 11 CFR 9409.9 - Final determination.

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final determination. 9409.9 Section 9409.9... INFORMATION AND PRODUCTION OF OFFICIAL RECORDS IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS § 9409.9 Final determination. The General Counsel will make the final determination on demands and requests to employees for production of official...

  1. 48 CFR 32.605 - Final decisions.

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Debts 32.605 Final decisions. (a) The contracting officer shall issue a final decision as required by 33.211 if— (1) The contracting officer and the contractor are unable... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final decisions. 32.605...

  2. Integrated sequence analysis. Final report

    Andersson, K.; Pyy, P.

    1998-02-01

    The NKS/RAK subprojet 3 'integrated sequence analysis' (ISA) was formulated with the overall objective to develop and to test integrated methodologies in order to evaluate event sequences with significant human action contribution. The term 'methodology' denotes not only technical tools but also methods for integration of different scientific disciplines. In this report, we first discuss the background of ISA and the surveys made to map methods in different application fields, such as man machine system simulation software, human reliability analysis (HRA) and expert judgement. Specific event sequences were, after the surveys, selected for application and testing of a number of ISA methods. The event sequences discussed in the report were cold overpressure of BWR, shutdown LOCA of BWR, steam generator tube rupture of a PWR and BWR disturbed signal view in the control room after an external event. Different teams analysed these sequences by using different ISA and HRA methods. Two kinds of results were obtained from the ISA project: sequence specific and more general findings. The sequence specific results are discussed together with each sequence description. The general lessons are discussed under a separate chapter by using comparisons of different case studies. These lessons include areas ranging from plant safety management (design, procedures, instrumentation, operations, maintenance and safety practices) to methodological findings (ISA methodology, PSA,HRA, physical analyses, behavioural analyses and uncertainty assessment). Finally follows a discussion about the project and conclusions are presented. An interdisciplinary study of complex phenomena is a natural way to produce valuable and innovative results. This project came up with structured ways to perform ISA and managed to apply the in practice. The project also highlighted some areas where more work is needed. In the HRA work, development is required for the use of simulators and expert judgement as

  3. Hanford 100-N Area Tracer Study Final Report

    Kretzschmar, S.P.; Bedi, G.S.; Martinez, P.; Ervin, K.

    1996-09-01

    This document provides an engineering tracer study final report for the determination of contact time for the disinfection process at Group A Nontransient Noncommunity water treatment plant for the 100- N Water Plant (located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington). The purpose of this study is to determine the actual detention time within the plant clearwell, and the disinfection contact time at several clearwell effluent flow rates

  4. L/ILW management and final disposal. Proceedings

    1993-01-01

    This is a proceedings of the Sino-French Seminar on Low- and Intermediate-Level waste Management and Final Disposal. The seminar was held on 26-28 April 1993 in Beijing of China. 33 papers are included in the proceedings. The great efforts in the treatment and disposal of different level radwastes and achievements in the research and development in China are introduced. The rich experience on the radwaste management in France are also introduced

  5. 42 CFR 8.34 - Court review of final administrative action; exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures for... Withdrawal of Approval of an Accreditation Body § 8.34 Court review of final administrative action...

  6. [Diagnostics and treatment of phenylketonuria].

    Bayat, Allan; Møller, Libeth Birk; Lund, Allan Meldgaard

    2015-02-16

    Primary phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency, also known as phenylketonuria, results in accumulation of phenylalanine in the blood. Early identification and treatment prevents the majority of clinical sequelae to the disease, but psychological and neurodevelopmental problems can occur in some patients. This article reviews the symptoms, diagnosis, classification and strategies of treatment and management of phenylketonuria. Finally we review new pharmacological and non-pharmaco-logical means of treatment.

  7. Integrated sequence analysis. Final report

    Andersson, K.; Pyy, P

    1998-02-01

    The NKS/RAK subprojet 3 `integrated sequence analysis` (ISA) was formulated with the overall objective to develop and to test integrated methodologies in order to evaluate event sequences with significant human action contribution. The term `methodology` denotes not only technical tools but also methods for integration of different scientific disciplines. In this report, we first discuss the background of ISA and the surveys made to map methods in different application fields, such as man machine system simulation software, human reliability analysis (HRA) and expert judgement. Specific event sequences were, after the surveys, selected for application and testing of a number of ISA methods. The event sequences discussed in the report were cold overpressure of BWR, shutdown LOCA of BWR, steam generator tube rupture of a PWR and BWR disturbed signal view in the control room after an external event. Different teams analysed these sequences by using different ISA and HRA methods. Two kinds of results were obtained from the ISA project: sequence specific and more general findings. The sequence specific results are discussed together with each sequence description. The general lessons are discussed under a separate chapter by using comparisons of different case studies. These lessons include areas ranging from plant safety management (design, procedures, instrumentation, operations, maintenance and safety practices) to methodological findings (ISA methodology, PSA,HRA, physical analyses, behavioural analyses and uncertainty assessment). Finally follows a discussion about the project and conclusions are presented. An interdisciplinary study of complex phenomena is a natural way to produce valuable and innovative results. This project came up with structured ways to perform ISA and managed to apply the in practice. The project also highlighted some areas where more work is needed. In the HRA work, development is required for the use of simulators and expert judgement as

  8. Santa Barbara Final Technical Report

    Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

    2013-11-30

    This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara County’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the County’s innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara County’s emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the program’s first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The County’s investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative

  9. Final Report Package_Winnebago

    Carolyn Stewart, Director, Red Mountain Energy Partners

    2006-10-31

    The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska energy options study results will be used to advance the Tribe’s near term energy management objectives. The array of energy options identified allows the Tribe to select those activities that best fit its energy strategies, goals and objectives. During the course of the study, Red Mountain analyzed both energy options and energy organizational alternatives suitable for the Tribe, presented findings to the Tribal Council, and made recommendations regarding each. Work products delivered to the Tribe, and provided in the Final Report included: • A matrix of energy management options applicable to the Tribe, which provided descriptions of particular conservation, efficiency, weatherization, and demand management alternatives. The matrix also provided insight about relative costs of the alternatives, cost/benefit efficacy, ease of implementation, resources for implementing, and observations about each. • A matrix of utility service options applicable to the Tribe, describing each of the four alternatives described above. The matrix also provided insight about key benefits of each option, required resources, costs and timeframe for implementation, funding sources and analysis, and key issues for consideration. • Discussion guides prepared for each meeting between the Energy Committee and Council, and the Tribe’s contractor, Red Mountain Energy Partners, which included preliminary analysis and findings. • A Position Description for the Energy Manager position, which was reviewed by the Tribal HR Department, and used by the Tribe to develop a position posting. • A Utility Code designed for Winnebago to use in establishing its Utility Board, and, ultimately, to provide guidance for the Board’s further development. • A project summary book developed to include all key information, deliverables and utility provider data for the project. Winnebago’s growth trends and expansion plans require the Tribe to play a more active

  10. Temperature buffer test. Final report

    Aakesson, Mattias [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report is the final report and a summary of all work performed within the TBT project. The design and the installation of the different components are summarized: the depositions hole, the heating system, the bentonite blocks with emphasis on the initial density and water content in these, the filling of slots with sand or pellets, the retaining construction with the plug, lid and nine anchor cables, the artificial saturation system, and finally the instrumentation. An overview of the operational conditions is presented: the power output from heaters, which was 1,500 W (and also 1,600 W) from each heater during the first {approx}1,700 days, and then changed to 1,000 and 2,000 W, for the upper and lower heater respectively, during the last {approx}600 days. From the start, the bentonite was hydrated with a groundwater from a nearby bore-hole, but this groundwater was replaced with de-ionized water from day {approx}1,500, due to the high flow resistance of the injections points in the filter, which implied that a high filter pressure couldn't be sustained. The sand shield around the upper heater was hydrated from day {approx}1,500 to day {approx}1

  11. Temperature buffer test. Final report

    Aakesson, Mattias

    2012-04-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modelling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report is the final report and a summary of all work performed within the TBT project. The design and the installation of the different components are summarized: the depositions hole, the heating system, the bentonite blocks with emphasis on the initial density and water content in these, the filling of slots with sand or pellets, the retaining construction with the plug, lid and nine anchor cables, the artificial saturation system, and finally the instrumentation. An overview of the operational conditions is presented: the power output from heaters, which was 1,500 W (and also 1,600 W) from each heater during the first ∼1,700 days, and then changed to 1,000 and 2,000 W, for the upper and lower heater respectively, during the last ∼600 days. From the start, the bentonite was hydrated with a groundwater from a nearby bore-hole, but this groundwater was replaced with de-ionized water from day ∼1,500, due to the high flow resistance of the injections points in the filter, which implied that a high filter pressure couldn't be sustained. The sand shield around the upper heater was hydrated from day ∼1,500 to day ∼1,800. The sensors data concerning

  12. Chemical mode control in nuclear power plant decommissioning during operation of technologies in individual radioactive waste processing plants

    Horvath, J.; Dugovic, L.

    1999-01-01

    Sewage treatment of nuclear power plant decommissioning is performed by system of sewage concentration in evaporator with formation of condensed rest, it means radioactive waste concentrate and breeding steam. During sewage treatment plant operation department of chemical mode performs chemical and radiochemical analysis of sewage set for treatment, chemical and radiochemical analysis of breeding steam condensate which is after final cleaning on ionization filter and fulfilling the limiting conditions released to environment; chemical and radiochemical analysis of heating steam condensate which is also after fulfilling the limiting conditions released to environment. Condensed radioactive concentrate is stored in stainless tanks and later converted into easy transportable and chemically stable matrix from the long term storage point of view in republic storage Mochovce. The article also refer to bituminous plant, vitrification plant, swimming pool decontamination plant of long term storage and operation of waste processing plant Bohunice

  13. Polymer systems testing: Final report

    1993-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is in the process of decontaminating lead shielding material. The procedure involves abrasive surface etching of the shielding to remove the outer layer of lead that contains the majority of the radioactive contaminants. This procedure generates a small volume of mixed waste in the form of a wet residue containing lead, abrasive grit (Al 2 O 3 ), uranium and water. IC Technologies, Inc. (ICT) has developed several processes for the treatment of mixed wastes involving stabilizing/encapsulating the waste in a polymer monolith. The objective of the test program was to verify the applicability of ICT's technology to this specific waste stream and provide LANL baseline data on the performance of polymer encapsulation techniques. Polymer microencapsulation of lead shielding/blasting grit (surrogate) mixed waste was evaluated. Two polymers, melamine formaldehyde and polyester xylene, were used to examine the effect of waste loading on Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract Pb concentration. Six levels of waste loading were evaluated by eleven tests. Significant reduction in Pb solubility during TCLP was achieved. Additional optimization to the single-stage microencapsulation technique utilized will be necessary to mitigate the toxic (RCRA) characteristic of the waste

  14. Project investigation and analysis of soil-structure interaction effects in seismic response of NPPs EBO, EMO, Slovakia. Final report

    Juhasova, E.

    1999-01-01

    The work described in this report was devoted to investigation of expected seismic response of the structures of WWER-440/213 type NPPs, namely Mochovce and Bohunice. Special attention was devoted to the properties of subsoil materials and the transfer of seismic waves from the bedrock to the foundation structures. Theoretical background was elaborated and discussed for wave propagation of surface waves. Alternative procedure was derived for non-linear media accounting for complex modulus theory. Material characteristics of subsoils were investigated for both NPPs. The obtained results were used as a basis for forecasting and calculation of expected seismic response when the time history records from Paks explosion were used an input. It was pointed out that the used procedure, together with previous calculation of subsoil transfer characteristics completed well the comparison with experimental results

  15. PRIMA-X Final Report

    Lorenz, Daniel [German Research School for Simulation Sciences GmbH, Aachen (Germany); Wolf, Felix [German Research School for Simulation Sciences GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2016-02-17

    Darmstadt) starting February 1st, 2015, the project ended at GRS on January 31st, 2015. This report reflects the work accomplished at GRS until then. The work of GRS is expected to be continued at TU Darmstadt. The first main accomplishment of GRS is the design of different thread-level aggregation techniques. We created a prototype capable of aggregating the thread-level information in performance profiles using these techniques. The next step will be the integration of the most promising techniques into the Score-P measurement system and their evaluation. The second main accomplishment is a substantial increase of Score-P’s scalability, achieved by improving the design of the system-tree representation in Score-P’s profile format. We developed a new representation and a distributed algorithm to create the scalable system tree representation. Finally, we developed a lightweight approach to MPI wait-state profiling. Former algorithms either needed piggy-backing, which can cause significant runtime overhead, or tracing, which comes with its own set of scaling challenges. Our approach works with local data only and, thus, is scalable and has very little overhead.

  16. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Reeder, Richard [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Phillips, Brian [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2017-10-18

    A variety of calcifying organisms produce a transient or metastable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase that is assembled and subsequently transformed into a crystalline biomineral, typically calcite or aragonite. The complex shapes, hierarchical structures, and unique physical properties of the biominerals that result from this calcification pathway have stimulated interest in adapting these concepts for the design and creation of bio-inspired functional materials in the laboratory. ACC also forms as a reactive precursor in diverse inorganic systems and is likely to play a much broader role in calcium carbonate formation. Knowledge of the structure, composition, and behavior of this metastable phase is critical for establishing a structural and mechanistic framework for calcium carbonate formation and its role in biogeochemical processes, including carbon cycling. Minor additives, such as magnesium, phosphorus, and organic macromolecules, are known to play important roles in controlling ACC stability, transformation kinetics, and selection of final crystalline polymorph. Molecular water also occurs in many types of ACC and is thought to play a structural role in its stability and transformation behavior. One of the major challenges that remain unresolved is identification of the structural basis for the role of these minor additives and molecular water. The absence of long-range order in ACC, and other amorphous phases, has posed a challenge for study by techniques commonly used for crystalline solids. Preliminary studies in our group show that the combination of two techniques, synchrotron X-ray-based pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide entirely new insight to structural properties of synthetic ACC over length scales that are most relevant for understanding its transformation properties. Building on preliminary experiments, we propose a systematic study of synthesis, structure, and

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. Final report

    1994-03-01

    In the period 1969-1986, this project was directed to the evolution of target-specific labeled chemicals useful for nuclear medical imaging, especially radioactive indicators suited to tracing adrenal functions and localizing tumors in the neuroendocrine system. Since 1986, this project research has focused on the chemistry of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. This project has involved the evaluation of methods for radiochemical syntheses with fluorine-18, as well as the development and preliminary evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography. In the radiochemistry area, the ability to predict fluorine-18 labeling yields for aromatic substitution reactions through the use of carbon-13 NMR analysis was studied. Radiochemical yields can be predicted for some structurally analogous aromatic compounds, but this correlation could not be generally applied to aromatic substrates for this reaction, particularly with changes in ring substituents or leaving groups. Importantly, certain aryl ring substituents, particularly methyl groups, appeared to have a negative effect on fluorination reactions. These observations are important in the future design of syntheses of complicated organic radiopharmaceuticals. In the radiopharmaceutical area, this project has supported the development of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals based on the monoamine vesicular uptake systems. The new radioligands, based on the tetrabenazine structure, offer a new approach to the quantification of monoaminergic neurons in the brain. Preliminary primate imaging studies support further development of these radioligands for PET studies in humans. If successful, such radiopharmaceuticals will find application in studies of the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson`s disease.

  18. Calculation of external exposure during transport and disposal of radioactive waste arisen from dismantling of steam generator

    Hornacek, M.; Necas, V.

    2014-01-01

    The dismantling of large components (reactor pressure vessel, reactor internals, steam generator) represents complex of processes involving preparation, dismantling, waste treatment and conditioning, transport and final disposal. To optimise all of these activities in accordance with the ALARA principle the prediction of the exposure of workers is an essential prerequisite. The paper deals with the calculation of external exposure of workers during transport and final disposal of heat exchange tubes of steam generator used in Slovak nuclear power plant V1 in Jaslovske Bohunice. The type of waste packages, the calculation models of truck and National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mochovce are presented. The detailed methodology of radioactive waste disposal is showed and the degree of influence of time decay (0, 5 and 10 years) on the radiological conditions during transport and disposal is studied. All of the results do not exceed the limits given in Slovak and international regulatory documents. (authors)

  19. Testing of GFL Geosiphon; FINAL

    Steimke, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    A full-scale, transparent replica of a GeoSiphon was constructed in the TFL to test a new concept, using a solar powered vacuum pump to remove accumulated gases from the air chamber. It did not have a treatment cell containing iron filings as do the actual TNX GeoSiphons in the field, but it was accurate in all other respects. The gas generation that is observed in an actual GeoSiphon was simulated by air injection at the inlet of the TFL GeoSiphon. After facility shakedown, three stages of testing were conducted: verification testing, parametric testing and long term testing. In verification testing, the TFL GeoSiphon was used to reproduce a particular test at TNX in which the water flowrate decreased gradually as the result of air accumulation at the crest of a siphon without an air chamber. For this test the vacuum pump was not used and the air chamber was initially filled with air rather than water. Agreement between data from the TNX GeoSiphon and the TFL GeoSiphon was good, which gave confidence that the TFL GeoSiphon was a good hydraulic representation of the TNX GeoSiphon. For the remaining tests, the solar powered vacuum pump and air chamber were used. In parametric testing, steady state runs were made for water flowrates ranging from 1 gpm to 19 gpm, air injection rates ranging from 0 to 77 standard cc/min and outfall line angles ranging from vertical to 60 degrees from vertical. In all cases, the air chamber and vacuum pump removed nearly all of the air and the GeoSiphon operated without problems. In long term testing, the GeoSiphon was allowed to run continuously for 21 days at one set of conditions. During this time the solar cell kept the storage battery fully charged at all times and the control circuit for the vacuum pump operated reliably. The solar panel was observed to have a large excess capacity when used with the vacuum pump. With two changes, the concept of using a solar powered vacuum pump attached to an air chamber should be ready for long

  20. Superconducting quadrupoles for the SLC final focus

    Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Murray, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The final focus system of the SLC will be upgraded by replacing the final quadrupoles with higher gradient superconducting magnets positioned closer to the interaction point. The parameters of the new system have been chosen to be compatible with the experimental detectors with a minimum of changes to other final focus components. These parameter choices are discussed along with the expected improvement in SLC performance

  1. Superconducting quadrupoles for the SLC final focus

    Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Murray, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The final focus system of the SLC will be upgraded by replacing the final quadrupoles with higher gradient supperconducting magnets positioned closer to the interaction point. The parameters of the new system have been chosen to be compatible with the experimental detectors with a minimum of changes to other final focus components. These parameter choices are discussed along with the expected improvement in SLC performance

  2. Torrefaction of biomass. Final report

    NONE

    2013-05-15

    occurring even at biomass torrefied at 300 deg. C. Thus it cannot be concluded if pellets of torrefied materials can be stored outside or not. Due to the fact that the densification process will also have big influence on this property and full scale testing with more materials is required before this can be concluded. Densification of torrefied material was tested in both bench scale as well as lab scale pellet presses and revealed larger challenges than expected. Torrefied material reveals a much higher friction, internal between particles as well as external with the die surface, than untreated biomass does and requires thus higher amounts of energy to compress and push through the dies. Moreover, due to that the chemistry of the binding agents in the biomass is altered by the heat treatment, it is also more challenging to produce pellets with high quality. Elevated die temperatures of above {approx}190 deg. C and usage of lubricating additives such as rape seed oil was shown to clearly improve the pelletisation properties, but more research and optimisation is necessary in the future. While grindability and moisture uptake are important for the usage and storage at the power plants, the densification of torrefied is important for the transport to the plant as it is necessary for increasing the energy density. Due to that devolatilization creates cavities in the material the energy density on a volume bases (GJ/m{sup 3}) is actually lowered during torrefaction. But the remaining torrefied biomass material does have a higher energy density on a mass basis (GJ/kg), and therefore subsequent densification by pelletisation will significantly increase it energy density above that of not treated biomass also on a volume bases. Due to the fact that transport of solid fuels on ships is limited by volume rather that mass, this property is important for the economics of the supply chain. (LN)

  3. On Darwin's 'metaphysical notebooks'. II: "Metaphysics" and final cause.

    Calabi, L

    2001-01-01

    The first part of this paper was published in Rivista di Biologia/Biology Forum 94 (2001). In the second part below an examination is made of the meaning of the term Metaphysics in some passages of the Darwinian Notebooks for the years 1836-1844. Metaphysics no longer defines a field of philosophical enquiries mainly concerning the being and the essence after the manner of Aristotle; it now refers to a kind of philosophy of mind after the manner of J. Locke's criticism of the Hypokeimenon. However Aristotle's Metaphysics also encompasses a treatment of the idea of causes, and of final cause particularly, in the explanation of events, and in the explanation of natural phenomena especially. The criticism of the idea of final cause in the interpretation of the world of life is one of Darwin's foundational acts in his early years. When conceiving his Système du monde, in the last years of the XVIII Century, Laplace could think that God is a hypothesis not really needed by science, as we are told. For the knowledge of organic nature to attain the status of science, it remained to be shown that since--certain of the exemplariness of Newton's Principles as much as cautious before the mystery of life--did not need the hypothesis of final ends in order to understand and explain the productions of the living nature: not only in the form of that final cause (the First Cause, the Vera Causa) in which Natural Theology still rested, but also in the form of nature's inner finality which still moulded Whewell's Kantian philosophy. Such demonstration is a very important subject in Darwin's early enquiries, where he criticises finalism as a projection of self-conceiving Man, likely inherited from a knowing of causality in nuce to be found also in animals.

  4. Case law

    2015-01-01

    This section treats of the two following case laws: Slovak Republic: Further developments in cases related to the challenge by Greenpeace Slovakia to the Mochovce nuclear power plant; United States: Judgment of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission denying requests from petitioners to suspend final reactor licensing decisions pending the issuance of a final determination of reasonable assurance of permanent disposal of spent fuel

  5. 14 CFR 314.16 - Final determination.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final determination. 314.16 Section 314.16... REGULATIONS EMPLOYEE PROTECTION PROGRAM Determination of Qualifying Dislocation § 314.16 Final determination... determination and, within 3 business days after the determination, serve a copy of the order on the persons...

  6. 36 CFR 902.61 - Final determination.

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final determination. 902.61 Section 902.61 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Time Limitations § 902.61 Final determination. A determination with respect to any appeal made...

  7. FameLab - Swiss Semi Finals

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-two young scientists participated in the FameLab semi-final at CERN's Globe of Science and Innovation on 4 February, supported by a large audience and by more than 100 fans following via webcast. A panel of judges chose Lemmer and four other candidates to join five other semi-finalists at the national finals in Zurich on 30 March.

  8. 24 CFR 7.37 - Final action.

    2010-04-01

    ..., Color Religion, Sex, National Origin, Age, Disability or Reprisal Complaints § 7.37 Final action. (a... consult with the General Counsel, the Assistant Secretary of Administration, the Office of Human Resources... shall contain notice of the right to appeal the final action to the EEOC, the right to file a civil...

  9. Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier upgrades

    Howard, D.; Calvert, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lax, J.; Lindner, A.; Richter, R.; Ridgeway, W.

    1991-01-01

    With the assistance of the DOE In-house Energy Management Program, the Bevalac injector final stage RF amplifier systems have been successfully upgraded to reduce energy consumption and operating costs. This recently completed project removed the energy-inefficient plate voltage modulator circuits that were used in conjunction with the final stage RF amplifiers. Construction, design, and operating parameters are described in detail

  10. 17 CFR 8.20 - Final decision.

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final decision. 8.20 Section 8.20 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION EXCHANGE PROCEDURES FOR DISCIPLINARY, SUMMARY, AND MEMBERSHIP DENIAL ACTIONS Disciplinary Procedure § 8.20 Final decision. Each...

  11. 5 CFR 1201.126 - Final decisions.

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final decisions. 1201.126 Section 1201.126 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES Procedures for Original Jurisdiction Cases Special Counsel Disciplinary Actions § 1201.126 Final...

  12. Cryptosporidium: Treatment

    ... lt;/label> Parasites Home Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Most people who have healthy immune systems will recover without treatment. Diarrhea can be managed by drinking plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration. ...

  13. Cancer treatments

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000901.htm Cancer treatments To use the sharing features on this page, ... or IV. Immunotherapy Immunotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that relies on the body's ability to fight ...

  14. Treatment Wetlands

    Dotro, Gabriela; Langergraber, Günter; Molle, Pascal; Nivala, Jaime; Puigagut, Jaume; Stein, Otto; Von Sperling, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Overview of Treatment Wetlands; Fundamentals of Treatment Wetlands; Horizontal Flow Wetlands; Vertical Flow Wetlands; French Vertical Flow Wetlands; Intensified and Modified Wetlands; Free Water Surface Wetlands; Other Applications; Additional Aspects.

  15. FY 2000 research cooperation project on the research cooperation for the commercialization of the waste water treatment technology for global warming prevention. Final report on subsidy work; NEDO kenkyu kyoryoku jigyo. Chikyu ondanka boshi haisui shori gijutsu no jitsuyoka ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku jose gyomu (Saishu hokokusho)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    As to the commercialization of the waste water treatment technology for food plant, the research cooperation with Thailand was carried out from FY 1998 to FY 2000, and the results were summed up. In this project, the R and D were made for the following purposes: treatment of organic matters in waste water for reduction in water pollutants, recovery of the methane gas emitted in the atmosphere for the effective use, reduction in sludge generation in the anaerobic + aerobic treatment system, simplification of operation/maintenance of the system, reduction in running cost. In FY 1998, conducted were the design of the total process and the manufacture/construction of a part of the anaerobic treatment process. In FY 1999, conducted was the manufacture/construction of the total process including the aerobic treatment process. After the completion of the construction work, operational study was made. In FY 2000, the demonstrative operation was conducted at the demonstrative plant, and the technology transfer was made in terms of analysis of operational data, maintenance of equipment, operational management, etc. Further, the technical explanatory meeting such as seminar was held as activities for the spread of this technology. (NEDO)

  16. Tuberculosis Treatment

    Tuberculosis Treatment, Lusaka, Zambia. 1. 2. 2. 3. 3 ... TB treatment has contributed to the steady rise of TB incidence in ... respondents (89.4%) had positive attitude towards TB treatment ..... respondents described feelings of depression, anger and apathy .... Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,. 1979, 37:1-11.

  17. The common project for completion of Bubbler Condenser Qualification (Bohunice, Mochovce, Dukovany and Paks NPPs)

    Jaroslav, H.; Pavol, B.

    2003-01-01

    Described is the common project for completion of bubbler condenser qualification for nuclear power plants in Bohunice, Mochovice, Dukovany and Paks. Functionality of the bubbler condenser was elaborated during the simulation of the main steam line brake, medium break and small break LOCA. On this basis the appropriate operation of bubbler condenser containment under accident conditions can be positively confirmed

  18. The Slovak nuclear regulatory authority and start-up of the Mochovce NPP

    Seliga, M.; Micankova, J.

    2000-01-01

    A major element of providing information is the demonstration that the area of nuclear energy uses has its binding rules in the Slovak Republic and the observance thereof is controlled by the state through an independent institution Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority (UJD). As early as 1995 were laid on the UJD the foundations of the concept of broadly keeping the public informed on UJD activity and the safety of nuclear installations by opening the UJD Information Centre that provides by its activity communications with the public and mass media, which is instrumental in creating in the public a favourable picture of the independent state nuclear regulation. Clear communication policy is the key to credibility and is based on perceptions which give ride to varying levels of confidence. It has been consistently found in opinion research that credibility is the single most powerful persuasive force. Public communication programmes are the principal currency for the Regulatory Authority to inform the public on issues like costs, benefit requirements and risks

  19. Simulation of rod drop experiments in the initial cores of Loviisa and Mochovce

    Kaloinen, E.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Wasastjerna, F.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of rod drop measurements during startup tests of the Loviisa reactors has earlier been studied with two-dimensional core calculations using a spatial prompt jump approximation. In these calculations the prediction for the reactivity meter reading was lower than the measured values by 25%. Another approach to solve the problem is simulation of the rod drop experiment with dynamic core calculations coupled with out of core calculations to estimate the response of ex-core ionization chambers for the reactivity meter. This report described the calculations performed with the three-dimensional dynamic code HEXTRAN for prediction of the reactivity meter readings in rod drop experiments in initial cores of the WWER-440 reactors. (Authors)

  20. Multidisciplinary treatment

    Hayabuchi, Naofumi; Jingu, Kenichi; Matsuura, Keiichi

    1985-01-01

    Multidisciplinary treatment for malignant lymphoma is reported in terms of indication, current status, and outcome of this approach to Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NLH). HD is considered to be most successfully managed with multidisciplinary treatment. Success of treatment of HD in European countries and the US, which has resulted from accurate staging of HD and developments in radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is reviewed in the literature. Problems in the treatment of HD in Japan are presented. A treatment policy for NHL is discussed according to the original site, i.e. lymph nodes, Waldeyer's ring or other sites of tumor involvement. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Regulatory impact analysis of the part 503 sewage sludge regulation. Final report

    Burris, S.

    1992-01-01

    The report evaluates the costs, benefits, and economic impacts of the final 40 CFR Part 503 regulation governing the use of disposal of sewage sludge generated during the treatment of domestic sewage in a treatment works and domestic septage. The report begins by describing some relevant characteristics of treatment works and domestic septage haulers. The report focuses on the costs, risks, and benefits of the Part 503 regulation

  2. Hadron final states in deep inelastic processes

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1976-05-01

    Lectures are presented dealing mainly with the description and discussion of hadron final states in electroproduction, colliding beams, and neutrino reactions from the point of view of the simple parton model. Also the space-time evolution of final states in the parton model is considered. It is found that the picture of space-time evolution of hadron final states in deep inelastic processes isn't totally trivial and that it can be made consistent with the hypotheses of the parton model. 39 references

  3. Mine-by experiment final design report

    Read, R.S.; Martin, C.D.

    1991-12-01

    The Underground Research Laboratory (URL) Mine-by Experiment is designed to provide information on rock mass response to excavation that will be used to assess important aspects of the design of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in a granitic pluton. The final experiment design is the result of a multidisciplinary approach, drawing on experience gained at other sites as well as the URL, and using both internal expertise and the external consultants. The final experiment design, including details on characterization, construction, instrumentation, and numerical modelling, is presented along with final design drawings

  4. Treatment Effects

    Heckman, James J.; Lopes, Hedibert F.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low-dimensional v......This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low...... to observe the same person in both the treated and untreated states, but it also turns out to be straightforward to implement. Formulae are provided to compute mean treatment effects as well as their distributional versions. A Monte Carlo simulation study is carried out to illustrate how the methodology can...

  5. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    Erickson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    The final focus system of a linear collider must perform two primary functions, it must focus the two opposing beams so that their transverse dimensions at the interaction point are small enough to yield acceptable luminosity, and it must steer the beams together to maintain collisions. In addition, the final focus system must transport the outgoing beams to a location where they can be recycled or safely dumped. Elementary optical considerations for linear collider final focus systems are discussed, followed by chromatic aberrations. The design of the final focus system of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is described. Tuning and diagnostics and steering to collision are discussed. Most of the examples illustrating the concepts covered are drawn from the SLC, but the principles and conclusions are said to be generally applicable to other linear collider designs as well. 26 refs., 17 figs

  6. Moonshot Panel Moving Toward Final Report

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog from acting NCI Director Dr. Doug Lowy providing an update on the activities of the National Cancer Moonshot Initiative’s Blue Ribbon Panel and its work to develop a final report.

  7. Final report, Feedback limitations of photosynthesis

    Sharkey, Thomas D.

    1999-07-22

    Final report of research on carbon metabolism of photosynthesis. The feedback from carbon metabolism to primary photosynthetic processes is summarized, and a comprehensive list of published scientific papers is provided.

  8. Guidelines for Preparing Final Technical Reports

    fdieudonne

    Prior to submitting the Final Technical Report, any outstanding issues related to dissemination in accordance with ... The report should be an opportunity to reflect on the management of the project from various perspectives: .... of poor quality.

  9. Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results

    2004-07-01

    U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

  10. Final Determination - signed March 1, 1990

    Final Determination of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Assistant Administrator for Water pursuant to Section 404(c) of the Clean Water Act concerning the proposed Big River water supply impoundment in Kent county, RI.

  11. 29 CFR 34.46 - Final Determination.

    2010-07-01

    ... TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT OF 1982, AS AMENDED (JTPA) Compliance Procedures § 34.46 Final Determination. (a... grant applicant or recipient fails or refuses to correct the violation(s) within the applicable time...

  12. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    Helm, R.; Irwin, J.

    1992-08-01

    Final focus systems for linear colliders present many exacting challenges in beam optics, component design, and beam quality. Efforts to resolve these problems as they relate to a new generation of linear colliders are under way at several laboratories around the world. We will outline criteria for final focus systems and discuss the current state of understanding and resolution of the outstanding problems. We will discuss tolerances on alignment, field quality and stability for optical elements, and the implications for beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread, bunch length, and stability in position and energy. Beam-based correction procedures, which in principle can alleviate many of the tolerances, will be described. Preliminary results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) under construction at SLAC will be given. Finally, we mention conclusions from operating experience at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC)

  13. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    Helm, R.; Irwing, J.

    1992-01-01

    Final focus systems for linear colliders present many exacting challenges in beam optics, component design, and beam quality. Efforts to resolve these problems as they relate to a new generation of linear colliders are under way at several laboratories around the world. We outline criteria for final focus systems and discuss the current state of understanding and resolution of the outstanding problems. We discuss tolerances on alignment, field quality and stability for optical elements, and the implications for beam parameters such as emittance, energy spread , bunch length, and stability in position and energy. Beam-based correction procedures, which in principle can alleviate many of the tolerances, are described. Preliminary results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) under construction at SLAC are given. Finally, we mention conclusions from operating experience at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). (Author) 16 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  14. 7 CFR 1710.115 - Final maturity.

    2010-01-01

    ... Basic Policies § 1710.115 Final maturity. (a) RUS is authorized to make loans and loan guarantees with a... due, in part, to obsolescence. Operating loans to finance working capital required for the initial...

  15. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrolein (2003 Final)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Acrolein: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Acrolein and accompanying toxicological review have been added to the IRIS Database.

  16. IRIS Toxicological Review of Chloroform (Final Report)

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Chloroform: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Chloroform and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Database.

  17. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  18. Final Focus Systems in Linear Colliders

    Raubenheimer, Tor

    1998-01-01

    In colliding beam facilities, the ''final focus system'' must demagnify the beams to attain the very small spot sizes required at the interaction points. The first final focus system with local chromatic correction was developed for the Stanford Linear Collider where very large demagnifications were desired. This same conceptual design has been adopted by all the future linear collider designs as well as the SuperConducting Supercollider, the Stanford and KEK B-Factories, and the proposed Muon Collider. In this paper, the over-all layout, physics constraints, and optimization techniques relevant to the design of final focus systems for high-energy electron-positron linear colliders are reviewed. Finally, advanced concepts to avoid some of the limitations of these systems are discussed

  19. Final Project Report for Award ER65581

    Stoy, Paul C. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2017-07-13

    The attached final project report describes contributions of Montana State University (MSU) to the project "Bridging land-surface fluxes and aerosol concentrations to triggering convective rainfall" (PI: Fuentes).

  20. Final disposal room structural response calculations

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    Finite element calculations have been performed to determine the structural response of waste-filled disposal rooms at the WIPP for a period of 10,000 years after emplacement of the waste. The calculations were performed to generate the porosity surface data for the final set of compliance calculations. The most recent reference data for the stratigraphy, waste characterization, gas generation potential, and nonlinear material response have been brought together for this final set of calculations

  1. Report on the final BRACElet workshop

    Tony Clear

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the thirteenth and final BRACElet workshop. In this paper we provide a brief retrospective review of the workshops and the findings that have resulted from this multi-institutional multinational investigation into the teaching and learning of novice programmers. Subsequently we report on the work undertaken during the final workshop and then discuss future avenues for research that have evolved as a result of the BRACElet project.

  2. The final focus test beam project

    Burke, D.

    1991-05-01

    An overview is given of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) that is being constructed as a prototype final focus system for a future electron-positron linear collider. This beam line will use as input the 50 GeV electron beam from the SLC linac, and is designed to reduce the transverse dimensions of the beam spot at the focal point to 1 μm. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. Health insurance premium tax credit. Final regulations.

    2013-02-01

    This document contains final regulations relating to the health insurance premium tax credit enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.These final regulations provide guidance to individuals related to employees who may enroll in eligible employer-sponsored coverage and who wish to enroll in qualified health plans through Affordable Insurance Exchanges (Exchanges) and claim the premium tax credit.

  4. Specified radioactive waste final disposal act

    Yasui, Masaya

    2001-01-01

    Radioactive wastes must be finally and safely disposed far from human activities. Disposal act is a long-range task and needs to be understood and accepted by public for site selection. This paper explains basic policy of Japanese Government for final disposal act of specified radioactive wastes, examination for site selection guidelines to promote residential understanding, general concept of multi-barrier system for isolating the specific radioactive wastes, and research and technical development for radioactive waste management. (S. Ohno)

  5. Comprehensive supernate treatment

    Egan, B.Z.; Collins, J.L.; Davidson, D.J.; Anderson, K.K.; Chase, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    This task involves the recovery of the liquid (supernatant or supernate) portions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Melton Valley Storage Tank waste in a hot cell and treatment of the supernate to separate and remove the radionuclides. The supernate is utilized in testing various sorbent materials for removing cesium, strontium, and technetium from the highly alkaline, saline solutions. Batch tests are used to evaluate and select the most promising materials for supernate treatment to reduce the amount of waste for final disposal. Once the sorbents have been selected based on the results from the batch tests, small column tests are made to verify the batch data. Additional data from these tests can be used for process design. The sorption tests emphasize evaluation of newly developed sorbents and engineered forms of sorbents. Methods are also evaluated for recovering the radionuclides from the sorbents, including evaluating conditions for eluting ion exchange resins. A final report will summarize the results and compare the results with those of other investigators, along with recommendations for separating and concentrating radionuclides from DOE storage tank supernates at Oak Ridge and other sites. Documentation of the data and the significance of the findings will be compared, and recommendations will be provided to likely users of the data in EM-30. This program also provides input to the supernate treatment process demonstration projects at ORNL

  6. Osteoporosis treatment

    Pazianas, Michael; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The findings of the Women's Health Initiative study in 2002 marginalized the use of hormone replacement therapy and established bisphosphonates as the first line of treatment for osteoporosis. Denosumab could be used in selected patients. Although bisphosphonates only maintain the structure of bone...... to their benefits/harm ratio. Treatment of osteoporosis is a long process, and many patients will require treatment with more than one type of drug over their lifetime....

  7. The final checkpoint. Cancer as an adaptive evolutionary mechanism

    Rumena Petkova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms for identification of DNA damage and repair usually manage DNA damage very efficiently. If damaged cells manage to bypass the checkpoints where the integrity of the genome is assessed and the decisions whether to proceed with the cell cycle are made, they may evade the imperative to stop dividing and to die. As a result, cancer may develop. Warding off the potential sequence-altering effects of DNA damage during the life of the individual or the existence span of the species is controlled by a set of larger checkpoints acting on a progressively increasing scale, from systematic removal of damaged cells from the proliferative pool by means of repair of DNA damage/programmed cell death through ageing to, finally, cancer. They serve different purposes and act at different levels of the life cycle, safeguarding the integrity of the genetic backup of the individual, the genetic diversity of the population, and, finally, the survival of the species and of life on Earth. In the light of the theory that cancer is the final checkpoint or the nature's manner to prevent complex organisms from living forever at the expense of genetic stagnation, the eventual failure of modern anti-cancer treatments is only to be expected. Nevertheless, the medicine of today and the near future has enough potential to slow down the progression to terminal cancer so that the life expectancy and the quality of life of cancer-affected individuals may be comparable to those of healthy aged individuals.

  8. Clinical outcomes after final kissing balloon inflation compared with no final kissing balloon inflation in bifurcation lesions treated with a dedicated coronary bifurcation stent

    Grundeken, Maik J.; Lesiak, Maciej; Asgedom, Solomon; Garcia, Eulogio; Bethencourt, Armando; Norell, Michael S.; Damman, Peter; Woudstra, Pier; Koch, Karel T.; Vis, M. Marije; Henriques, Jose P.; Tijssen, Jan G.; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Foley, David P.; Bartorelli, Antonio L.; Stella, Pieter R.; de Winter, Robbert J.; Wykrzykowska, Joanna J.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated differences in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent final kissing balloon inflation (FKBI) and patients who did not undergo FKBI in bifurcation treatment using the Tryton Side Branch Stent (Tryton Medical, Durham, North Carolina, USA). Clinical outcomes were defined as

  9. Clinical outcomes after final kissing balloon inflation compared with no final kissing balloon inflation in bifurcation lesions treated with a dedicated coronary bifurcation stent

    M.J. Grundeken (Maik); M. Lesiak (MacIej); S. Asgedom (Solomon); E. Garcia (Eulogio); A. Bethencourt (Armando); M.S. Norell (Michael); K. Damman (Kevin); E. Woudstra (Evert); K. Koch (Karel); M.M. Vis (Marije); J.P.S. Henriques (Jose); J.G.P. Tijssen (Jan); Y. Onuma (Yoshinobu); D.P. Foley (David); A. Bartorelli (Antonio); P.R. Stella (Pieter); R.J. de Winter (Robbert); J.J. Wykrzykowska (Joanna)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective We evaluated differences in clinical outcomes between patients who underwent final kissing balloon inflation (FKBI) and patients who did not undergo FKBI in bifurcation treatment using the Tryton Side Branch Stent (Tryton Medical, Durham, North Carolina, USA). Methods Clinical

  10. Computerized radiation treatment planning

    Laarse, R. van der.

    1981-01-01

    Following a general introduction, a chain consisting of three computer programs which has been developed for treatment planning of external beam radiotherapy without manual intervention is described. New score functions used for determination of optimal incidence directions are presented and the calculation of the position of the isocentre for each optimum combination of incidence directions is explained. A description of how a set of applicators, covering fields with dimensions of 4 to 20 cm, for the 6 to 20 MeV electron beams of a MEL SL75-20 linear accelerator was developed, is given. A computer program for three dimensional electron beam treatment planning is presented. A microprocessor based treatment planning system for the Selectron remote controlled afterloading system for intracavitary radiotherapy is described. The main differences in treatment planning procedures for external beam therapy with neutrons instead of photons is discussed. A microprocessor based densitometer for plotting isodensity lines in film dosimetry is described. A computer program for dose planning of brachytherapy is presented. Finally a general discussion about the different aspects of computerized treatment planning as presented in this thesis is given. (Auth.)

  11. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem

  12. Antihypertensive treatment

    Christensen, Cramer; Mogensen, C E

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify whether antihypertensive treatment has any effect on the rate of progression of kidney disease in patients with incipient diabetic nephropathy. Six insulin-dependent diabetic men with incipient nephropathy (urinary albumin excretion above 15 micrograms....../min and total protein excretion below 0.5 g/24 h) were first given metoprolol (200 mg daily) with the subsequent addition of hydroflumethiazide. At the start of antihypertensive treatment, mean patient age was 32 +/- 4.2 years (SD) and mean duration of diabetes was 18 +/- 1.2 years. The patients were followed...... with repeated measurements of urinary albumin excretion for a mean of 5.4 +/- 3.1 years prior to, and for 4.7 +/- 1.3 years (SD) during treatment. Mean arterial blood pressure declined significantly during treatment, e.g., the values at 6 months before initiation of treatment being compared with values during...

  13. [Headache Treatment].

    Diener, Hans Christoph; Holle-Lee, Dagny; Nägel, Steffen; Gaul, Charly

    2017-03-01

    A precondition for the successful treatment of headaches is the correct headache diagnosis. Triptans are effective for attack treatment of migraine and cluster headache. However, there are not effective for the treatment of tension-type headache. For the prevention of frequent episodic migraine betablockers, flunarizine, topiramate and amitriptyline are recommended. For the prevention of chronic migraine evidence is only available for onabotulinumtoxinA and topiramate. For prophylactic treatment of tension-type headaches tricyclic antidepressants are used. In cluster headache verapamil (in combination with steroids) is the most frequently used prophylactic agent. This article focusses on the current acute and prophylactic treatment of common headache syndromes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. 77 FR 14416 - Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement and Final Environmental Impact...

    2012-03-09

    ...In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA), and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, as amended (FLPMA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has prepared a Proposed California Desert Conservation Area (CDCA) Plan Amendment (PA)/Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Ocotillo Express Wind Energy Facility (OWEF) and by this notice is announcing the availability of the Proposed PA and Final EIS/EIR.

  15. Regulation of radioactive waste management

    2002-01-01

    This bulletin contains information about activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). In this leaflet the regulation of radioactive waste management of the UJD are presented. Radioactive waste (RAW) is the gaseous, liquid or solid material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or activities greater than clearance levels and for which no use is foreseen. The classification of radioactive waste on the basis of type and activity level is: - transition waste; - short lived low and intermediate level waste (LlLW-SL); - long lived low and intermediate level waste (LlLW-LL); - high level waste. Waste management (in accordance with Act 130/98 Coll.) involves collection, sorting, treatment, conditioning, transport and disposal of radioactive waste originated by nuclear facilities and conditioning, transport to repository and disposal of other radioactive waste (originated during medical, research and industrial use of radioactive sources). The final goal of radioactive waste management is RAW isolation using a system of engineered and natural barriers to protect population and environment. Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic regulates radioactive waste management in accordance with Act 130/98 Coll. Inspectors regularly inspect and evaluate how the requirements for nuclear safety at nuclear facilities are fulfilled. On the basis of safety documentation evaluation, UJD issued permission for operation of four radioactive waste management facilities. Nuclear facility 'Technologies for treatment and conditioning contains bituminization plants and Bohunice conditioning centre with sorting, fragmentation, evaporation, incineration, supercompaction and cementation. Final product is waste package (Fibre reinforced container with solidified waste) acceptable for near surface repository in Mochovce. Republic repository in Mochovce is built for disposal of short lived low and intermediate level waste. Next

  16. Exclusive B Decays to Charmonium Final States

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-10-13

    We report on exclusive decays of B mesons into final states containing charmonium using data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. The charmonium states considered here are J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), and {chi}{sub c1}. Branching fractions for several exclusive final states, a measurement of the decay amplitudes for the B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K* decay, and measurements of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} masses are presented. All of the results we present here are preliminary.

  17. UOP FIN 571 Final Exam Guide New

    ADMIN

    2018-01-01

    UOP FIN 571 Final Exam Guide New Check this A+ tutorial guideline at http://www.fin571assignment.com/fin-571-uop/fin-571-final-exam-guide -latest For more classes visit http://www.fin571assignment.com Question 1 The underlying assumption of the dividend growth model is that a stock is worth: A. An amount computed as the next annual dividend divided by the required rate of return. B. An amount computed as the next annual dividend divided by the ma...

  18. Convention on nuclear safety. Final act

    1994-01-01

    The Diplomatic Conference, which was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency at its Headquarters from 14 to 17 June 1994, adopted the Convention on Nuclear Safety reproduced in document INFCIRC/449 and the Final Act of the Conference. The text of the Final Act of the Conference, including an annexed document entitled ''Some clarification with respect to procedural and financial arrangements, national reports, and the conduct of review meetings, envisaged in the Convention on Nuclear Safety'', is reproduced in the Attachment hereto for the information of all Member States

  19. Final sonorant sequences in the Celje dialect

    Alja Ferme

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will analyse final sonorant sequencesin the Celje variety of Slovene. In §2 various definitions of a consonant cluster will be discussed and the definition needed for further development ofthe article will be provided. In §3 I will present pretheoretical arguments against treating all final sonorant sequences as consonant clusters. In addition, a seemingly special behaviour of a small group of sequences will be pointed out. The government phonology framework will be introduced in §4. In §5 the hin the given theoretical framework.

  20. KEWB facilities decontamination and disposition. Final report

    Ureda, B.F.

    1976-01-01

    The decontamination and disposition of the KEWB facilities, Buildings 073, 643, 123, and 793, are complete. All of the facility equipment, including reactor enclosure, reactor vessel, fuel handling systems, controls, radioactive waste systems, exhaust systems, electrical services, and protective systems were removed from the site. Buildings 643, 123, and 793 were completely removed, including foundations. The floor and portions of the walls of Building 073 were covered over by final grading. Results of the radiological monitoring and the final survey are presented. 9 tables, 19 figures

  1. Final Technical Report 09 LW 112

    Lenhoff, R J

    2010-11-28

    Since the development of new antibiotics is out-paced by the emergence of bacterial resistance to existing antibiotics, it is crucial to understand the genetic mechanisms underlying resistance existing antibiotics. At the center of this mystery is a poorly understood phenomenon, heteroresistance: the coexistence of multiple subpopulations with varying degrees of antibiotic resistance. A better understanding of the fundamental basis of heteroresistance could result in sorely needed breakthroughs in treatment options. This project proposed to leverage a novel microfluidic (microchemostat) technology to probe the heteroresistance phenomenon in bacteria, with the aim of restoring the efficacy of existing {beta}-lactam antibiotics. The clinically important bacteria Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was used as the test case of bacteria that exhibits antibiotic heteroresistance. MRSA is difficult to treat because it is resistant to all {beta}-lactam antibiotics, as well as other classes of antimicrobials. Whereas {beta}-lactams such as methicillin and oxacillin are the preferred antibiotics to treat S. aureus infections due to their efficacy and low side effects, accurate determination and use of oxacillin/methicillin dosage is hampered by heteroresistance. In fact, invasive MRSA infections now account for about 95,000 deaths per year, a number that exceeds the deaths due to either influenza or HIV (12). In some MRSA strains, two subpopulations of cells may coexist: both populations carry the mecA gene that confers resistance, but mecA is differentially expressed so that only a small number of cells are observed during in vitro testing. Why this occurs is not understood. Prior experiments have sought to explain this phenomenon with conflicting results, with technology being the primary barrier to test the system sufficiently. This is the final report on work accomplished under the Lab-wide LDRD project 09-LW-112. This project was awarded to Frederick Balagadde who

  2. Tank waste treatment science

    LaFemina, J.P.; Blanchard, D.L.; Bunker, B.C.; Colton, N.G.; Felmy, A.R.; Franz, J.A.; Liu, J.; Virden, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Remediation efforts at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site require that many technical and scientific principles be combined for effectively managing and disposing the variety of wastes currently stored in underground tanks. Based on these principles, pretreatment technologies are being studied and developed to separate waste components and enable the most suitable treatment methods to be selected for final disposal of these wastes. The Tank Waste Treatment Science Task at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is addressing pretreatment technology development by investigating several aspects related to understanding and processing the tank contents. The experimental work includes evaluating the chemical and physical properties of the alkaline wastes, modeling sludge dissolution, and evaluating and designing ion exchange materials. This paper gives some examples of results of this work and shows how these results fit into the overall Hanford waste remediation activities. This work is part of series of projects being conducted for the Tank Waste Remediation System

  3. Electrocoagulation in Water Treatment

    Liu, Huijuan; Zhao, Xu; Qu, Jiuhui

    Electrocoagulation (EC) is an electrochemical method of treating polluted water where sacrificial anodes corrode to release active coagulant precursors (usually aluminum or iron cations) into solution. At the cathode, gas evolves (usually as hydrogen bubbles) accompanying electrolytic reactions. EC needs simple equipments and is designable for virtually any size. It is cost effective and easily operable. Specially, the recent technical improvements combined with a growing need for small-scale water treatment facilities have led to a revaluation of EC. In this chapter, the basic principle of EC was introduced first. Following that, reactions at the electrodes and electrode assignment were reviewed; electrode passivation process and activation method were presented; comparison between electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation was performed; typical design of the EC reactors was also described; and factors affecting electrocoagulation including current density, effect of conductivity, temperature, and pH were introduced in details. Finally, application of EC in water treatment was given in details.

  4. Development of a method for direct biological removal of ammonium to nitrogen in treatment of waste waters of the anaerobic sludge digestion - deammonification. Final report; Entwicklung eines Verfahrens zur direkten biologischen Umsetzung von Ammonium zu Stickstoff bei der Behandlung von Abwaessern der Anaerob-Klaerschlammfaulung - Deammonifikation. Abschlussbericht

    Rosenwinkel, K.H.; Seyfried, C.F.; Kunst, S.; Diekmann, H.; Hippen, A.; Helmer, C.; Scholten, E.

    2001-07-01

    The nitrogen elimination in municipal and industrial wastewater continues to play a major role in wastewater treatment, especially since the Wastewater Directive (AbwV) from 1997 introduced several changes in the requirements and regulations in regard to the pollutant and nutrient removal. As particularly the nitrogen elimination often makes for a considerable cost factor in wastewater treatment, especially when part-streams with high nitrogen loads must be (co-)treated, there is a constant search for economically viable treatment concepts. In this research project, the method of deammonification was developed, that is the process sequence of aerobic nitritation and anoxic ammonium oxidation ('biological comproportioning' of ammonium and nitrite into molecular nitrogen), which is based completely on the metabolism processes of autotrophic micro-organisms, which leads to saving potentials, especially of the carbon demand. Because of the shortened aerobic oxidation steps and the application of biofilm technology, it is also possible to reduce the oxygen demand and the reaction volume. In regard to the purposeful application of deammonification in operation technology, the project steps were targeted to determine the process-defining parameters and to check suitable method technologies and operation control systems in greater detail. To achieve this, the crucial frame conditions for the realisation and the operation performance of the autotrophic nitrogen elimination were defined on the basis of industrial and pilot-technical examinations under consideration of the (micro-)biological connections. Eventually, directives on the establishment of a stable deammonification operation could be derived. On the one hand, we ran a stock-taking of the operation of three industrial leachate treatment plants, on the other hand we operated test-plants on sludge-water treatment. Furthermore, various examinations with different reactor configurations and purposeful

  5. 75 FR 60723 - Seamless Refined Copper Pipe and Tube From Mexico: Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair...

    2010-10-01

    ... Comment 4: Model Matching Hierarchy Comment 5: Nacobre's U.S. Date of Sale Comment 6: Treatment of Nacobre... suspension-of- liquidation instructions will remain in effect until further notice. Final Determination The...

  6. Waste treatment

    Davies, D.; Hooper, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of wastes, such as liquid radioactive effluents, it is known to remove radionuclides by successive in situ precipitation of cobalt sulphide, an hydroxide, barium sulphate and a transition element ferrocyanide, followed by separation of the thereby decontaminated effluent. In this invention, use is made of precipitates such as obtained above in the treatment of further fresh liquid radioactive effluent, when it is found that the precipitates have additional capacity for extracting radionuclides. The resulting supernatant liquor may then be subjected to a further precipitation treatment such as above. Decontamination factors for radionuclides of Ce, Ru, Sr and Cs have been considerably enhanced. (author)

  7. Psychological Treatment

    ... cognitive-behavioral therapy ), relaxation therapy , hypnotherapy , and biofeedback therapy . Psychological treatments can also be combined. Review of well- ... Antidepressant Medications Newer IBS Medications Probiotics and Antibiotics ... Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS Take Part in Online ...

  8. Wastewater Treatment

    ... day before releasing it back to the environment. Treatment plants reduce pollutants in wastewater to a level nature can handle. Wastewater is used water. It includes substances such as human waste, food ...

  9. Depression Treatment

    ... 3286 After hours (404) 639-2888 Contact Media Depression Treatment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... How Do I Know if I Am Experiencing Depression? The following questions may help you determine if ...

  10. Treatment Options

    ... one that is tailored to your symptoms. article Protecting your eyesight when taking Plaquenil Some lupus treatments have the potential for eye health side-effects. Know the warning signs. article ​ ...

  11. Rotavirus Treatment

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rotavirus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rotavirus Home About Rotavirus Symptoms Transmission Treatment Photos Vaccination ...

  12. Final ITER CTA project board meeting

    Vlasenkov, V.

    2003-01-01

    The final ITER CTA Project Board Meeting (PB) took place in Barcelona, Spain on 8 December 2002. The PB took notes of the comments concerning the status of the International Team and the Participants Teams, including Dr. Aymar's report 'From ITER to a FUSION Power Reactor' and the assessment of the ITER project cost estimate

  13. Determinants of Outcome of Final Undergraduate Surgery ...

    2018-06-11

    Jun 11, 2018 ... Female gender (P < 0.001), passing CA (P < 0.001), and shorter duration‑<9 years in medical school (P < 0.001) were strongly associated with passing the final surgery ... Conclusion: CA is the single most important determinant of ... disadvantages of the traditional clinical examinations.[10]. Since then ...

  14. Call for applications_2013_VA_Final

    Lindsay Beck

    2013-04-12

    Apr 12, 2013 ... graduate level field-‐school, taught by UNBC and CoPEH-‐Canada team members1 . Final ... and most of the sessions in the course will be given in English. ... o demonstrated interest in Ecosystem approaches to health.

  15. The stabilisation of final focus system

    The StaFF (stabilisation of final focus) system will use interferometers to monitor the relative ... quadrupole magnets will be the most demanding application, where mutual and beam- ... interferometers to measure lines of a geodetic network to record relative motion between two beam ... coupled interferometer design.

  16. Indicators for Building Process without Final Defects -

    Jørgensen, Kirsten; Rasmussen, Grane Mikael Gregaard; Thuesen, Christian Langhoff

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the preliminary data analysis, as well as the underlying theories and methods for identifying the indicators for building process without final defects. Since 2004, the Benchmark Centre for the Danish Construction Sector (BEC) has collected information about legal defects...

  17. Stratospheric tritium sampling. Final progress report

    Mason, A.S.; Oestlund, H.G.

    1985-09-01

    Stratospheric tritium sampling was part of Project Airstream (sponsored by the US Department of Energy) between 1975 and 1983. Data from the final deployment in November 1983 are reported here, and the results of the 9 years of effort are summarized. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Photon final states at the Tevatron

    Campanelli, Mario; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The authors present here several recent measurements involving associate production of photons and jets at the Tevatron. In particular, inclusive photon + met from D0, and photon + b-jets and photon + b-jet + leptons + MET from CDF are described in some detail. These measurements offer a good test of QCD predictions in rather complex final states.

  19. Final Syllable Lengthening (FSL) in Infant Vocalizations.

    Nathani, Suneeti; Oller, D. Kimbrough; Cobo-Lewis, Alan B.

    2003-01-01

    Sought to verify research findings that suggest there may be a U-shaped developmental trajectory for final syllable lengthening (FSL). Attempted to determine whether vocal maturity and deafness influence FSL . Eight normally hearing infants and eight deaf infants were examined at three levels of prelinguistic vocal development. (Author/VWL)

  20. Final/Progress Report for Instrumentation Grant

    None

    1997-01-01

    The major piece of equipment was a Furnace Model 1000 used during the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process to sinter the ceramic final product. NAC is a new technology to immobilize liquid radioactive waste simulants. The grant also funded related control and measuring equipment

  1. 78 FR 46309 - Rules of Administrative Finality

    2013-07-31

    ...-772-1213 or TTY 1-800-325-0778, or visit our Internet site, Social Security Online, at http://www... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Parts 404 and 416 [Docket No. SSA 2013-0011] Rules of Administrative Finality AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA) ACTION: Notice and request for comments...

  2. 31 CFR 223.20 - Final decisions.

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final decisions. 223.20 Section 223.20 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE SURETY COMPANIES DOING BUSINESS WITH THE UNITED...

  3. 32 CFR 989.20 - Final EIS.

    2010-07-01

    ... limited to factual corrections and responses to comments, the proponent and EPF may, with the prior..., the EPF must submit the Draft EIS and all of the above documents, with a new cover sheet indicating... more extensive modifications are required, the EPF must prepare a preliminary final EIS incorporating...

  4. Horticulture Therapy Curriculum Development. Final Report.

    Taylor, Sally; And Others

    This final report includes two major components: a narrative describing a project at Edmonds Community College, Washington, to develop a horticultural therapy curriculum and descriptions of six courses developed or revised during the project. The narrative reports the development of a supplementary interdisciplinary certification program to train…

  5. Radioactive waste products - suitability for final disposal

    Merz, E.; Odoj, R.; Warnecke, E.

    1985-06-01

    48 papers were read at the conference. Separate records are available for all of them. The main problem in radioactive waste disposal was the long-term sealing to prevent pollution of the biosphere. Problems of conditioning, acceptance, and safety measures were discussed. Final disposal models and repositories were presented. (PW) [de

  6. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

  7. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J.; Quapp, W.J.; Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W.; Swartz, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs

  8. Treatment Planning for Ion Beam Therapy

    Jäkel, Oliver

    The special aspects of treatment planning for ion beams are outlined in this chapter, starting with positioning and immobilization of the patient, describing imaging and segmentation, definition of treatment parameters, dose calculation and optimization, and, finally, plan assessment, verification, and quality assurance.

  9. 78 FR 43912 - Final Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances, Final Environmental Assessment, and...

    2013-07-22

    ...-FF02ENEH00] Final Candidate Conservation Agreement with Assurances, Final Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impact; Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout, New Mexico and Colorado AGENCY: Fish and... environmental assessment (EA) and the draft Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) under the National...

  10. Combination of biological treatment of waste air and liquid effluents in small and medium-sized businesses by using spherical carrier media in exchange with each other. Final report; Kombination der biologischen Behandlung von Abluft- und Abwasserreinigung in kleinen und mittleren Unternehmen durch die Verwendung von kugeligen Traegermaterialien im gegenseitigen Austausch. Abschlussbericht

    Kunz, P.M.; Brunk, M.; Bentz, P.; Bach, K.; Marcos del Rio, O.; Stahl, B.; Wolf, C.

    2002-05-08

    A combined system for biological treatment of solvent-contaminated liquid and gaseous effluents was to be constructed. The system was to be mobile for demonstration purposes in industrial processes and was to serve for dimensioning of full-scale systems. The system works by a combined process via exchange of spherical carriers with a growth of micro-organisms. Two pilot systems of the Institut fuer Biologische Verfahrenstechnik, one for liquid and one for gaseous effluents, were combined for this purpose, ensuring exchange of carrier materials between the two units. (orig.) [German] Aufgabe im Rahmen dieses F+E-Vorhabens war es gewesen, eine kombinierte biologische Abluft- und Abwasserreinigungsanlage - speziell fuer loesungsmittelhaltige Abluft und Abwaesser - zu untersuchen. Dazu sollte eine Anlage aufgebaut werden, die auch als Demonstrations- und Versuchsanlage zu Industriebetrieben gebracht und dort zur Dimensionierung von full-scale-Anlage eingesetzt werden kann. Idee fuer dieses Vorhaben war gewesen, die Kombination beider Behandlungssysteme ueber den Austausch von mit Mikroorganismen bewachsenem Traegermaterial herzustellen. Am Institut fuer Biologische Verfahrenstechnik existierte bereits eine Pilotanlage fuer die biologische Abwasserreinigung mit kugeligem Traegermaterial (Vario-Bio-Reaktor) und eine Pilotanlage fuer die biologische Behandlung von Abluft nach dem Trickling-Filter-Prinzip mit ebenfalls kugeligem Traegermaterial. Diese beiden Anlagen sollten miteinander kombiniert und der Austausch des Traegermaterials hergestellt werden. (orig.)

  11. Amendments to excepted benefits. Final rules.

    2014-10-01

    This document contains final regulations that amend the regulations regarding excepted benefits under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, the Internal Revenue Code (the Code), and the Public Health Service Act. Excepted benefits are generally exempt from the health reform requirements that were added to those laws by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. In addition, eligibility for excepted benefits does not preclude an individual from eligibility for a premium tax credit under section 36B of the Code if an individual chooses to enroll in coverage under a Qualified Health Plan through an Affordable Insurance Exchange. These regulations finalize some but not all of the proposed rules with minor modifications; additional guidance on limited wraparound coverage is forthcoming.

  12. Sewage Treatment

    1991-01-01

    Stennis Space Center's aquaculture research program has led to an attractive wastewater treatment for private homes. The system consists of a septic tank or tanks for initial sewage processing and a natural secondary treatment facility for further processing of septic tanks' effluent, consisting of a narrow trench, which contains marsh plants and rocks, providing a place for microorganisms. Plants and microorganisms absorb and digest, thus cleansing partially processed wastewater. No odors are evident and cleaned effluent may be discharged into streams or drainage canals. The system is useful in rural areas, costs about $1,900, and requires less maintenance than mechanical systems.

  13. ESCHARS TREATMENT

    Cioc Liliana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article carry out a modern research and principles of the main solutions for the treatment of eschars, including cleaning solutions for wound debridement, dressings, antibiotics, surgery and adjuvant therapies. The approach taken to achieve the research is justified by the fact that, despite current interest and progress in medicine, surgery, medical care and education for self-care, pressure sores remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality, affecting in particular, people with prolonged immobilization and the elderly. The conclusions of the paper are oriented towards to analysis of the efficiency of each treatment solutions presented in active control eschars and negative effects they generate.

  14. Final Evaluation of MIPS M/500

    1987-11-01

    recognizing common subexpressions by changing the code to read: acke (n,m) If (, - 0) return *+I; return a ker(n-1, 0 ? 1 aaker (n,.-1)); I the total code...INSTITUTE JPO PTTTSBURCH. PA 15213 N/A N/A N/O 11 TITLE (Inciude Security Class.iication) Final Evaluation of MIPS M/500 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Daniel V

  15. ROLL OUT THE TALENT : Final project report

    Eerola, Tuomas; Tuominen, Pirjo; Hakkarainen, Riitta-Liisa; Laurikainen, Marja; Mero, Niina

    2014-01-01

    The ROLL OUT THE TALENT project was born out of the desire to recognise and support the strengths of vocational students and to develop new and innovative operating models. ROLL OUT THE TALENT promoted regional cooperation between institutes and companies. The project produced operating and study path models that take into consideration the individual strengths of vocational students and the principles of lifelong learning. This is the final report of the ROLL OUT THE TALENT project, and ...

  16. Final results for the neutron detector efficiencies

    Zhou Zuying; Tang Hongqing; Qi Bujia; Du Yanfeng; Zhou Chenwei; Xia Haihong; Chen Zemin; Chen Zhenpeng; Chen Yingtang

    1998-01-01

    Final results for neutron detector efficiencies of a liquid organic scintillator are presented. The comparisons of efficiency results to calculations with discrimination against γ-rays and without n-γ discrimination are shown out and discussed. The measured relative neutron detection efficiency of a liquid organic scintillator with the PSD constraint active is in good agreement with SCINFUL calculations from 9 to 40 Mev and NEFF7 calculations from 9 to 20 Mev, the upper limit of the latter code

  17. Program Development Plan and Team up; FINAL

    Solar Electric Power Association

    2001-01-01

    The final summary report is a comprehensive view of TEAM-UP, with documented data, information, and experiences that SEPA has collected throughout the program, including lessons learned by participating ventures, and sections covering costs and other information on both large and small systems. This report also covers the barriers that TEAM-UP faced to PV commercialization at the beginning of the program, barriers the project was able to remove or reduce, and what barriers remain on the road ahead

  18. Communication strategy for final disposal facility

    Seppaelae, Timo; Kurki, Osmo

    2000-01-01

    In May 1999, Posiva filed an application for a policy decision to the Council of State on the construction of a final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel in Olkiluoto in the municipality of Eurajoki. The decision to be made by the Council of State must be ratified by the Parliament. The precondition for a positive decision is that the preliminary statement on safety to be provided by STLTK by the end of the year 1999 is in favour of Posiva. continuing with its repository development programme, and that the Eurajoki municipality approves the project in its statement by the 28th of January 2000. The policy decision by the Council of State is expected to be made in March followed by the ratification of the Parliament before the summer. In a poll-carried out among 350 decision-makers, less than 10 % of those who answered 134 persons) found Internet as the most important source of Posiva's information on final disposal. On the other hand, over 80 % of those who answered found the information folder as the most significant source of information. When considering all the information available on final disposal (TV, radio, newspapers, authorities, environmental organisations, etc.) Posiva was found to be the most significant source of information while newspapers and periodicals came second. In this case the environmental organisations seemed to have a minor role, as a result of not being too active in confrontation. As a conclusive remark it can be assumed that because it is not only Posiva's information that is relevant to decision-makers, but the media also plays a significant role, the impression that decision-makers have of final disposal is based on a mixture of messages coming from Posiva and from the media. That is why the communication related to decision-makers is also communication with media, in order to ensure that the messages produced by the media support the information produced by Posiva

  19. Leven estuary project. Fisheries Department final report

    Bayliss, B.D.

    1997-01-01

    This is the report on the Leven estuary project: Fisheries Department final report produced by the Environment Agency North West in 1997. This report contains information about Leven estuary, river Leven catchment, river Crake catchment and the Ulverston Discharges. The Leven estuary is characterised by being very shallow, and shares the extremely variable tides and currents that characterize the whole of Morecambe Bay. There was little detailed knowledge of the impact on the Leven estuary, a...

  20. Chromatic correction for the final transport system

    Brown, K.L.; Peterson, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The final transport and focusing of the heavy-ion beam onto the fusion pellet in vacuum is complicated by several non-linear effects - namely, chromatic (momentum dependent) effects, geometric aberrations, and space-charge forces. This paper gives an example of how the chromatic effects can be nullified, at least to second order. Whether third- or higher-order terms are important is not yet clear. Space-charge effects are important but are not considered here