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Sample records for mobil computerized gas

  1. A COMPUTERIZED SYSTEM ON KINETIC ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION OF GAS/SOLID REACTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.H. Liu; J. Y. Zhang; S.K. Wei

    2003-01-01

    The present paper presents the structure, features and functions of a computerized system on kinetic analysis and evaluation of gas/solid reactions, KinPreGSR. KinPreGSR is a menu driven system, can be operated with MS Windows as workbench in a PC computer. It has been developed using visual C++ with FoxPro hybrid coding technique.KinPreGSR combines the characteristics of gas/solid reactions with the kinetic models as well as mass and heat transfer equations. The database files were established for the apparent activation energies of some reduction and decomposition reactions to allow the prediction of the reaction kinetics to some extents. Outputs can be displayed using graphical or numerical forms. Examples regarding the oxide reduction and carbonate decomposition under isothermal conditions are given to show those functions.

  2. Psychometric properties of a computerized adaptive test for assessing mobility in older adults using novel video-animation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Edward H; Rejeski, W Jack; Marsh, Anthony P; Barnard, Ryan; Chen, Shyh-Huei

    2013-10-01

    This paper reports on the psychometric properties of a computerized adaptive test (CAT) version of the Mobility Assessment Tool (MAT) for older adults (MAT-CAT). An item pool of 78 video-animation-based items for mobility was developed, and response data were collected from a sample of 234 participants aged 65-90 years. The video-animation-based instrument was designed to minimize ambiguity in the presentation of task demands. In addition to evaluating traditional psychometric properties including dimensionality, differential item functioning (DIF), and local dependence, we extensively tested the performance of several MAT-CAT measures and compared their performances with a fixed format. Operationally, the MAT-CAT was sufficiently unidimensional and had acceptable levels of local independence. One DIF item was removed. Most importantly, the CAT measures showed that even starting with a single fixed item at the mean ability, the adaptive version delivered better performance than the fixed format in terms of several criteria including the standard error of estimate. The MAT-CAT demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties and superior performance to a fixed format. The video-animation-based adaptive instrument can be used for assessing mobility with specificity and precision.

  3. Utility of mobile devices in the computerized tomography evaluation of intracranial hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar G Panughpath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the utility of a mobile device to detect and assess intracranial hemorrhage (ICH on head computed tomographys (CT performed in the emergency setting. Materials and Methods: 100 head CT scans were randomly selected from our emergency radiology database and anonymized for patient demographics and clinical history. The studies were independently interpreted by two experienced radiologists in a blinded manner, initially on a mobile device (iPad, Apple computers and subsequently, at an interval of one week, on a regular desktop workstation. Evaluation was directed towards detection, localization and characterization of hemorrhage. The results were assessed for accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value. Statistical significance was ascertained using Fisher′s exact test. Results: 27 of the examinations were positive for ICH, of which 11 had multiple hemorrhages. Of these there were 17 subdural, 18 intraparenchymal, 8 subarachnoid, 4 intraventricular and 2 extradural hemorrhages. In 96 of the studies there was complete concurrence between the iPad and desktop interpretations for both radiologists. Of 49 hemorrhages, 48 were accurately detected on the iPad by one of the radiologists. In the remaining case, a tiny intraventricular hemorrhage was missed by both radiologists on the iPad as well as on the workstation, indicating that the miss was more likely related to the very small size of the hemorrhage than the viewer used. Conclusion: We conclude that in the emergency setting, a mobile device with appropriate web-based pictue archiving and communication system (PACS is effective in the detection of intracranial hemorrhage present on head CT.

  4. MOFs for storage of natural gas in mobile applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, S.; Arnold, L.; Gaab, M.; Maurer, S.; Weickert, M.; Mueller, U. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Gummaraju, R.; SantaMaria, M.; Wilson, K.; Garbotz, C.; Lynch, J. [BASF Corporation, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are supposed to have high potential in gas storage, particular in the storage of natural gas (NG) for mobile applications. Due to the shale gas exploration and the cost advantage of natural gas on the North American market as well as the environmental benign behavior upon combustion, storage of gaseous fuels will become more important for future mobility. The main challenge with all gaseous fuels is the limited range of the fuel stored on board of a vehicle. Instead of increasing the pressure in the tank, which would lead to heavy tanks and high compression costs, MOFs might help to improve the energy density of the gas stored in a tank resulting in an increased driving distance or reduced space needed for the gas tanks. (orig.)

  5. Mobilities of Li(+)-attached butanol isomers in He gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K; Saito, K; Koizumi, T; Matoba, S; Kojima, T M; Tanuma, H; Shiromaru, H

    2013-08-28

    Mobilities of Li(+)-attached butanol isomers, (n-BuOH)Li(+), (s-BuOH)Li(+), (i-BuOH)Li(+), and (t-BuOH)Li(+), in helium gas were measured over a range of reduced electric fields (E/N = 25-96 Td) at room temperature. Arrival time measurements accurately identified small differences in the measured mobilities of the isomer ions. At low E/N (≤30 Td, corresponding to a mean collision energy ε≤0.05 eV), (n-BuOH)Li(+) showed a mobility about 1.5% greater than that of the other ions, but at high E/N (≥75 Td, ε≥0.1 eV) its mobility was about 1.1% less.

  6. Small, Untethered, Mobile Robots for Inspecting Gas Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Small, untethered mobile robots denoted gas-pipe explorers (GPEXs) have been proposed for inspecting the interiors of pipes used in the local distribution natural gas. The United States has network of gas-distribution pipes with a total length of approximately 109 m. These pipes are often made of iron and steel and some are more than 100 years old. As this network ages, there is a need to locate weaknesses that necessitate repair and/or preventive maintenance. The most common weaknesses are leaks and reductions in thickness, which are caused mostly by chemical reactions between the iron in the pipes and various substances in soil and groundwater. At present, mobile robots called pigs are used to inspect and clean the interiors of gas-transmission pipelines. Some carry magnetic-flux-leakage (MFL) sensors for measuring average wall thicknesses, some capture images, and some measure sizes and physical conditions. The operating ranges of pigs are limited to fairly straight sections of wide transmission- type (as distinguished from distribution- type) pipes: pigs are too large to negotiate such obstacles as bends with radii comparable to or smaller than pipe diameters, intrusions of other pipes at branch connections, and reductions in diameter at valves and meters. The GPEXs would be smaller and would be able to negotiate sharp bends and other obstacles that typically occur in gas-distribution pipes.

  7. Mobility in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2014-04-01

    The mobility of a charged projectile in a strongly coupled dusty plasma is simulated. A net force F, opposed by a combination of collisional scattering and gas friction, causes projectiles to drift at a mobility-limited velocity up. The mobility μp=up/F of the projectile's motion is obtained. Two regimes depending on F are identified. In the high-force regime, μp∝F0.23, and the scattering cross section σs diminishes as up-6/5. Results for σs are compared with those for a weakly coupled plasma and for two-body collisions in a Yukawa potential. The simulation parameters are based on microgravity plasma experiments.

  8. Mobility in a strongly coupled dusty plasma with gas

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The mobility of a charged projectile in a strongly coupled dusty plasma is simulated. A net force $F$, opposed by a combination of collisional scattering and gas friction, causes projectiles to drift at a mobility-limited velocity $u_p$. The mobility $\\mu_p=u_p/F$ of the projectile's motion is obtained. Two regimes depending on $F$ are identified. In the high force regime, $\\mu_p \\propto F^{0.23}$, and the scattering cross section $\\sigma_s$ diminishes as $u_p^{-6/5}$. Results for $\\sigma_s$ are compared with those for a weakly coupled plasma and for two-body collisions in a Yukawa potential. The simulation parameters are based on microgravity plasma experiments.

  9. [A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Kan, Rui-feng; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Li-ming; Yu, Dian-qiang; Dong, Jin-ting; Han, Xiao-lei; Cui, Yi-ben; Liu, Jian-guo

    2012-02-01

    The detection of natural gas pipeline leak becomes a significant issue for body security, environmental protection and security of state property. However, the leak detection is difficult, because of the pipeline's covering many areas, operating conditions and complicated environment. A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage based on scanning wavelength differential absorption spectroscopy (SWDAS) is introduced. The improved soft threshold wavelet denoising was proposed by analyzing the characteristics of reflection spectrum. And the results showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was increased three times. When light intensity is 530 nA, the minimum remote sensitivity will be 80 ppm x m. A widely used SWDAS can make quantitative remote sensing of natural gas leak and locate the leak source precisely in a faster, safer and more intelligent way.

  10. A Development Method of Mobile Computerized Procedure System for the Cooperation among Field Workers and Main Control Room Operators in Korean Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Jin; Seong, No Kyu; Jung, Yeon Sub [KHNP ,Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Human errors can occur during the test and maintenance of steam generator, safety injection system and other various systems and devices in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Most of human errors can be improved by the human error prevention techniques such as self-check, peer-check, concurrent verification and etc. Another important technique is to share work information among main control room (MCR) operators and field workers. Various field service automation tools have been developed with recent information technology in many countries. APR1400 computerized procedure system (CPS) has been developed for the MCR operators of Shin-Kori 3 and 4 units. Especially, the concurrent verification support design is applied in the construction project of Shin-Hanul 1 and 2 CPS. It is expected that the proposed mobile CPS can enhance the reduction of human errors by supporting human error prevention techniques and information sharing. This paper describes the technical issues of the mobile CPS (mobile CPS) in the initial development stage. Based on the design of APR1400, CRI CPS has been developed and operated for SKN 3 and 4 HFE V and V and license test for the MCR operating staff. Therefore the mobile CPS will be developed by upgrading the CRI CPS with improved features.

  11. Gas-induced fluidization of mobile liquid-saturated grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gabriel; Varas, Germán; Géminard, Jean-Christophe; Vidal, Valérie

    2015-12-01

    Gas invasion in liquid-saturated sands exhibits different morphologies and dynamics. For mobile beds, the repeated rise of gas through the layer leads to the growth of a fluidized zone, which reaches a stationary shape. Here, we present experimental results characterizing the evolution of the fluidized region as a function of the gas-flow rate and grain size. We introduce a new observable, the flow density, which quantifies the motion of the grains in the system. The growth of the fluidized zone is characterized by a spatiotemporal analysis, which provides the stabilization time, τ(s). In the stationary regime, we report two main contributions to motion in the fluidized region: the central gas rise and a convective granular motion. Interestingly, a static model with a fixed porous network accounts for the final shape of the invasion zone. We propose an explanation where the initial gas invasion weakens the system and fixes since the early stage the morphology of the fluidized zone.

  12. Albany Interim Landfill gas extraction and mobile power system: Using landfill gas to produce electricity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Albany Interim Landfill Gas Extraction and Mobile Power System project served three research objectives: (1) determination of the general efficiency and radius of influence of horizontally placed landfill gas extraction conduits; (2) determination of cost and effectiveness of a hydrogen sulfide gas scrubber utilizing Enviro-Scrub{trademark} liquid reagent; and (3) construction and evaluation of a dual-fuel (landfill gas/diesel) 100 kW mobile power station. The horizontal gas extraction system was very successful; overall, gas recovery was high and the practical radius of influence of individual extractors was about 50 feet. The hydrogen sulfide scrubber was effective and its use appears feasible at typical hydrogen sulfide concentrations and gas flows. The dual-fuel mobile power station performed dependably and was able to deliver smooth power output under varying load and landfill gas fuel conditions.

  13. Computerized range of motion analysis following dual mobility total hip arthroplasty, traditional total hip arthroplasty, and hip resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenstein, Gregory G; Yeager, Alyssa M; Lipman, Joseph D; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2013-08-01

    Newer arthroplasty designs claim to provide superior range of motion (ROM) and greater stability than their predecessors. However, there is no way to compare ROM of implant systems in an equivalent anatomical environment in a clinical setting. This study used computer-aided design to compare ROM after hip resurfacing, 28 mm THA, 36 mm THA, and anatomic dual mobility (ADM) THA in 3D models of 5 cadaver pelvises. ROM to impingement was then tested in 10 different motions and a one-way ANOVA was used to compare results. The hip resurfacing resulted in restricted ROM compared to the other 3 models in all motions except adduction. The ADM, 36 mm, and 28 mm THA resulted in similar ROM. Dual mobility constructs provide comparable ROM in patients where large head THA is not appropriate.

  14. A computerized loop based approach for identification of isomorphism and type of mobility in planar kinematic chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj K Lohumi; Aas Mohammad; Irshad A Khan

    2015-04-01

    Some new invariants like chain string, link identification string, loop participation of joint frequency string and loop size frequency string of simple jointed kinematic chains are presented. The first step of the proposed method is to identify all possible loops of a kinematic chain and then these new invariants are developed. A modified loop-joint approach is proposed in this work as compared to the previous work in literature where loop-link matrix is formulated to search all the loops present in a kinematic chain. A computer program has been developed for formulating loop-joint matrix of kinematic chain and its all invariants. This method takes into consideration all the loops present, associated joints and links and is able to test isomorphism among kinematic chains and their inversions and also to detect type of mobility of multi degree of freedom kinematic chains. The proposed method is successfully tested for all kinematic chains upto five independent loops having any number of degree of freedom and no counter example is found. The detailed results of 9-link, M = 2 (mobility) and 10 link, M = 3 kinematic chains are provided with five types of mobility and results are in accordance with the results published in literature. The method is also explained with the help of some complex examples and presented in this paper.

  15. Ion mobilities in Xe/Ne and other rare-gas mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, D; Phelps, A V; de Urquijo, J; Basurto, E; Pitchford, L C

    2003-10-01

    The ion mobility or drift velocity data important for modeling glow discharges in rare gas mixtures are not generally available, nor are the ion-neutral scattering cross sections needed to calculate these data. In this paper we propose a set of cross sections for Xe+ and Ne+ collisions with Xe and Ne atoms. Ion mobilities at 300 K calculated using this cross section set in a Monte Carlo simulation are reported for reduced field strengths, E/N, up to 1500 x 10(-21) V m(2), in pure gases and in Xe/Ne mixtures containing 5% and 20% Xe/Ne, which are mixtures of interest for plasma display panels (PDPs). The calculated Xe+ mobilities depend strongly on the mixture composition, but the Ne+ mobility varies only slightly with increasing Xe in the mixture over the range studied here. The mobilities in pure gases compare well with available experimental values, and mobilities in gas mixtures at low E/N compare well with our recent measurements which will be published separately. Results from these calculations of ion mobilities are used to evaluate the predictions of Blanc's law and of the mixture rule proposed by Mason and Hahn [Phys. Rev. A 5, 438 (1972)] for determining the ion mobilities in mixtures from a knowledge of the mobilities in each of the pure gases. The mixture rule of Mason and Hahn is accurate to better than 10% at high field strengths over a wide range of conditions of interest for modeling PDPs. We conclude that a good estimate of ion mobilities at high E/N in Xe/Ne and other binary rare gas mixtures can be obtained using this mixture rule combined with known values of mobilities in parent gases and with the Langevin form for mobility of rare gas ions ion in other gases. This conclusion is supported by results in Ar/Ne mixtures which are also presented here.

  16. Multiple gas analyses using a mobile mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, J.H.; Bigelow, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    A truck-mounted mass-spectrometer gas analyzer is described and field examples of its use are given. This unit provides a gas analyzer that can be used in the field to rapidly analyze a large number of gases. It has enabled us to establish that gas anomalies occur over a variety of deposit types and in different environments. Gases may prove to be useful geochemical indicators in exploration for concealed mineral deposits. ?? 1990.

  17. Mobile Greenhouse Gas Flux Analyzer for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop highly-accurate, lightweight, low-power gas analyzers for measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O)...

  18. Mobile Passive Optical Imager for Remote Gas Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tunable filters based on electro-optic effect have shown great potential in detecting gas concentration through obtaining its absorption spectrum. In filter-based...

  19. Mobile Greenhouse Gas Flux Analyzer for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR Phase I effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to develop a highly-accurate, lightweight, low-power gas analyzer for eddy flux covariance...

  20. An uncooked vegan diet shifts the profile of human fecal microflora: computerized analysis of direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography profiles of bacterial cellular fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, R; Ling, W H; Hänninen, O; Eerola, E

    1992-01-01

    The effect of an uncooked extreme vegan diet on fecal microflora was studied by direct stool sample gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) of bacterial cellular fatty acids and by quantitative bacterial culture by using classical microbiological techniques of isolation, identification, and enumeration of different bacterial species. Eighteen volunteers were divided randomly into two groups. The test group received an uncooked vegan diet for 1 month and a conventional diet of mixed Western type for the other month of the study. The control group consumed a conventional diet throughout the study period. Stool samples were collected. Bacterial cellular fatty acids were extracted directly from the stool samples and measured by GLC. Computerized analysis of the resulting fatty acid profiles was performed. Such a profile represents all bacterial cellular fatty acids in a sample and thus reflects its microflora and can be used to detect changes, differences, or similarities of bacterial flora between individual samples or sample groups. GLC profiles changed significantly in the test group after the induction and discontinuation of the vegan diet but not in the control group at any time, whereas quantitative bacterial culture did not detect any significant change in fecal bacteriology in either of the groups. The results suggest that an uncooked extreme vegan diet alters the fecal bacterial flora significantly when it is measured by direct stool sample GLC of bacterial fatty acids. PMID:1482187

  1. Teledekteksi Gas pada Mobile Robot yang dikendalikan Gelombang Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Herjuno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Beberapa tahun terakhir terjadi peristiwa hilangnya nyawa manusia karena keracunan gas alam diarea pertambangan. Ada pula terjadi peristiwa dicurigainya bungkusan atau kemasan yang diduga adalah barang yang membahayakan jiwa. Karena banyaknya peristiwa yang meresahkan dan membahayakan masyarakat, maka dibutuhkan suatu alat yang dapat melakukan pengecekan pada suatu area atau benda dimana manusia tidak terlibat secara langsung atau melakukan kontak secara langsung yang dapat membahayakan manusia. Pada penlitian ini telah dibuat robot yang dilengkapi dengan sensor gas, sistem mikrokontroler serta beberapa perangkat jaringan seperti router, kamera ip yang digunakan untuk mensupport kelengkapan sistem. Dibutuhkan juga sebuah server komputer yang dapat memberikan perintah maupun memantau dari jarak jauh. Berdasarkan hasil pengukuran, resistansi sensor pada saat tidak terdeteksi gas bernilai paling tinggi 30KΩ dan resistansi sensor saat terdeteksi gas bernilai paling rendah sebesar 3KΩ. Dalam pengujian keseluruhan alat , robot ini berhasil bergerak sesuai perintah yang diberikan melalui gelombang radio dan mendeteksi gas dengan keberhasilan sebanyak 10 kali dari 10 kali percobaan dengan kecepatan rata-rata 0,12 m/s

  2. AUTOMATED MOBILE FACILITY FOR QUANTITY ESTIMATION OF RAW OIL AND OIL GAS, PROSPECTED FROM SUBSOIL

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In this article some aspects of the development of automated mobile control facility (MCF), aimed for estimation of raw oil and oil gas quantity that are retrieved from subsoil and transferring data on the estimation results and their indication on central dispatcher’s point.

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of Original Water Saturation and Mobile Water Saturation in Low Permeability Sandstone Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Shu-Sheng; YE Li-You; XIONG Wei; GUO He-Kun; HU Zhi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ We use nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR)and centrifugation to measure the original water saturation and mobile water saturation of cores from the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas reservoir,and compare the NMR results with the corresponding field data.It is shown that the NMR water saturation after 300 psi centrifugation effectively represents the original water saturation measured by weighing fresh cores.There is a good correlation between mobile water saturation and the water production performance of the corresponding gas wells.The critical mobile water saturation whether reservoir produces water of the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas is 6%.The higher the mobile water saturation,the greater the water production rate of gas well.This indicates that well's water production performance can be forecasted by mobile water saturation of cores.

  4. Measuring Gas Concentration and Wind Intensity in a Turbulent Wind Tunnel with a Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the measurement of gas concentration and wind intensity performed with a mobile robot in a custom turbulent wind tunnel designed for experimentation with customizable wind and gas leak sources. This paper presents the representation in different information layers of the measurements obtained in the turbulent wind tunnel under different controlled environmental conditions in order to describe the plume of the gas and wind intensities inside the experimentation chamber. The information layers have been generated from the measurements gathered by individual onboard gas and wind sensors carried out by an autonomous mobile robot. On the one hand, the assumption was that the size and cost of these specialized sensors do not allow the creation of a net of sensors or other measurement alternatives based on the simultaneous use of several sensors, and on the other hand, the assumption is that the information layers created will have application on the development and test of automatic gas source location procedures based on reactive or nonreactive algorithms.

  5. Research project RoboGas{sup Inspector}. Gas leak detection with autonomous mobile robots; Forschungsprojekt RoboGas{sup Inspector}. Gaslecksuche mit autonomen mobilen Robotern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Abdelkarim [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Berlin (Germany); Bonow, Gero; Kroll, Andreas [Fachgebiet Mess- und Regelungstechnik, Universitaet Kassel, Kassel (Germany); Hegenberg, Jens; Schmidt, Ludger [Fachgebiet Mensch-Maschine-Systemtechnik, Universitaet Kassel, Kassel (Germany); Barz, Thomas; Schulz, Dirk [Fraunhofer FKIE, Unbemannte Systeme, Wachtberg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    As part of the promotional program AUTONOMIK of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) a consortium of nine project partners developed a prototype of an autonomous mobile robot looking for gas leaks in extended industrial equipment. The autonomous mobility of the system for any systems was implemented using different types of sensors for self-localization and navigation. The tele-operation enables a manual intervention in the process. The robot performs inspection tasks in industrial plants by means of video technology and remote gas measurement technology without driving into the possible risk areas and without the presence of humans. The robot can be used for routine inspections of facilities or for the targeted inspection of specific plant components. Thanks to the remote sensing technique also plant components can be inspected which are difficult to be inspected due to their limited accessibility by conventional measurement techniques.

  6. Interaction-induced huge magnetoresistance in a high mobility two-dimensional electron gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockhorn, L.; Haug, R. J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Leibniz Universität Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Gornyi, I. V. [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut of Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schuh, D. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universität Regensburg, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Wegscheider, W. [ETH Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-12-04

    A strong negative magnetoresistance is observed in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas in a GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As quantum well. We discuss that the negative magnetoresistance consists of a small peak induced by a combination of two types of disorder and a huge magnetoresistance explained by the interaction correction to the conductivity for mixed disorder.

  7. Global coverage measurement planning strategies for mobile robots equipped with a remote gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Muhammad Asif; Trincavelli, Marco; Cirillo, Marcello; Schaffernicht, Erik; Lilienthal, Achim J

    2015-03-20

    The problem of gas detection is relevant to many real-world applications, such as leak detection in industrial settings and landfill monitoring. In this paper, we address the problem of gas detection in large areas with a mobile robotic platform equipped with a remote gas sensor. We propose an algorithm that leverages a novel method based on convex relaxation for quickly solving sensor placement problems, and for generating an efficient exploration plan for the robot. To demonstrate the applicability of our method to real-world environments, we performed a large number of experimental trials, both on randomly generated maps and on the map of a real environment. Our approach proves to be highly efficient in terms of computational requirements and to provide nearly-optimal solutions.

  8. Global Coverage Measurement Planning Strategies for Mobile Robots Equipped with a Remote Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asif Arain

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of gas detection is relevant to many real-world applications, such as leak detection in industrial settings and landfill monitoring. In this paper, we address the problem of gas detection in large areas with a mobile robotic platform equipped with a remote gas sensor. We propose an algorithm that leverages a novel method based on convex relaxation for quickly solving sensor placement problems, and for generating an efficient exploration plan for the robot. To demonstrate the applicability of our method to real-world environments, we performed a large number of experimental trials, both on randomly generated maps and on the map of a real environment. Our approach proves to be highly efficient in terms of computational requirements and to provide nearly-optimal solutions.

  9. Mobile Monitoring of Methane During and After the Aliso Canyon Natural Gas Leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, A.; Pikelnaya, O.; Low, J.; Wimmer, R.; Zhou, Q.

    2016-12-01

    The Aliso Canyon gas leak was discovered inside the SoCalGas (SCG) facility on October 23, 2015. This incident represented the worst natural gas leak in the US history, and spurred a number of odor nuisance complaints from local residents. The community of Porter Ranch, located directly south of the SCG Aliso Canyon facility, was the most affected by the leak although complaints have been also reported in other neighboring communities of the San Fernando Valley. Therefore, monitoring of air quality was and remains crucial for measuring the impact of methane emissions from this leak and assessing the well-being of all residents. As the main local air quality agency for this area, South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) organized a set of monitoring activities in response to the leak. Since December 21, 2015 SCAQMD has been conducting mobile survey measurements in and around Porter Ranch to characterize methane levels and concentration gradients within the community. For this purpose, a fast-response optical methane analyzer (LI-COR 7700) and a Global Positioning System (GPS) were mounted on top of a hybrid vehicle and driven around Porter Ranch and other surrounding areas. Following the permanent seal of the leaking well on February 18, 2016 mobile measurements have also been expanded to inside the Aliso Canyon SCG facility. During this presentation we will describe the experimental setup designed for mobile methane surveys and the monitoring strategy used for this study. We will discuss the main results of our mobile measurements including long-term methane trends since the end of the leak.

  10. Innovations in Computerized Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drasgow, Fritz, Ed.; Olson-Buchanan, Julie B., Ed.

    Chapters in this book present the challenges and dilemmas faced by researchers as they created new computerized assessments, focusing on issues addressed in developing, scoring, and administering the assessments. Chapters are: (1) "Beyond Bells and Whistles; An Introduction to Computerized Assessment" (Julie B. Olson-Buchanan and Fritz Drasgow);…

  11. Gas-phase metalloprotein complexes interrogated by ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faull, Peter A.; Korkeila, Karoliina E.; Kalapothakis, Jason M.; Gray, Andrew; McCullough, Bryan J.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2009-06-01

    Gas-phase biomolecular structure may be explored through a number of analytical techniques. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) continues to prove itself as a sensitive and reliable bioanalytical tool for gas-phase structure determination due to intense study and development over the past 15 years. A vast amount of research interest, especially in protein and peptide conformational studies has generated a wealth of structural information for biological systems from small peptides to megadalton-sized biomolecules. In this work, linear low field IM-MS has been used to study gas-phase conformations and determine rotationally averaged collision cross-sections of three metalloproteins--cytochrome c, haemoglobin and calmodulin. Measurements have been performed on the MoQToF, a modified QToF 1 instrument (Micromass UK Ltd., Manchester, UK) modified in house. Gas-phase conformations and cross-sections of multimeric cytochrome c ions of the form [xM + nH+]n+ for x = 1-3 (monomer to trimer) have been successfully characterised and measured. We believe these to be the first reported collision cross-sections of higher order multimeric cytochrome c. Haemoglobin is investigated to obtain structural information on the associative mechanism of tetramer formation. Haemoglobin molecules, comprising apo- and holo-monomer chains, dimer and tetramer are transferred to the gas phase under a range of solution conditions. Structural information on the proposed critical intermediate, semi-haemoglobin, is reported. Cross-sections of the calcium binding protein calmodulin have been obtained under a range of calcium-bound conditions. Metalloprotein collision cross-sections from ion mobility measurements are compared with computationally derived values from published NMR and X-ray crystallography structural data. Finally we consider the change in the density of the experimentally measured rotationally averaged collision cross-section for compact geometries of the electrosprayed proteins.

  12. Measurements of ion mobility in argon and neon based gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisting, Alexander; Garabatos, Chilo; Szabo, Alexander; Vranic, Danilo

    2017-02-01

    As gaseous detectors are operated at high rates of primary ionisation, ions created in the detector have a considerable impact on the performance of the detector. The upgraded ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will operate during LHC Run 3 with a substantial space charge density of positive ions in the drift volume. In order to properly simulate such space charges, knowledge of the ion mobility K is necessary. To this end, a small gaseous detector was constructed and the ion mobility of various gas mixtures was measured. To validate the corresponding signal analysis, simulations were performed. Results are shown for several argon and neon based mixtures with different CO2 fractions. A decrease of K was measured for increasing water content.

  13. Measurements of ion mobility in argon and neon based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Deisting, Alexander; Szabo, Alexander; Vranic, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    As gaseous detectors are operated at high rates of primary ionisation, ions created in the detector have a considerable impact on the performance of the detector. The upgraded ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will operate during LHC Run$\\,3$ with a substantial space charge density of positive ions in the drift volume. In order to properly simulate such space charges, knowledge of the ion mobility $K$ is necessary. To this end, a small gaseous detector was constructed and the ion mobility of various gas mixtures was measured. To validate the corresponding signal analysis, simulations were performed. Results are shown for several argon and neon based mixtures with different $\\textrm{CO}_2$ fractions. A decrease of $K$ was measured for increasing water content.

  14. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    simple movements of people, goods, and information from A to B. The ‘mobilities turn’ has made it its hallmark to explore the ‘more than’ effects of a world increasingly on the move. This new title in the Routledge Series ‘Critical Concepts in Built Environment’ creates a state-of-the-art reference work......The world is on the move. This is a widespread understanding by many inhabitants of contemporary society across the Globe. But what does it actually mean? During over one decade the ‘mobilities turn’ within the social sciences have provided a new set of insights into the repercussions of mobilities...... to social networks, personal identities, and our relationship to the built environment. The omnipresence of mobilities within everyday life, high politics, technology, and tourism (to mention but a few) all point to a key insight harnessed by the ‘mobilities turn’. Namely that mobilities is much more than...

  15. Design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer with a thick gas electron multiplier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orchard, Gloria M., E-mail: gloria.spirou@gmail.com [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, L1H 7K4 (Canada); Puddu, Silvia [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and University of Bern, LHEP, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Waker, Anthony J., E-mail: anthony.waker@uoit.ca [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, L1H 7K4 (Canada)

    2016-04-11

    The design and function of an electron mobility spectrometer (EMS) including a thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) is presented. The THGEM was designed to easily be incorporated in an existing EMS to investigate the ability to detect tritium in air using a micropattern gas detector. The THGEM and a collection plate (anode) were installed and the appropriate circuitry was designed and connected to supply the required voltages to the THGEM-EMS. An alpha source ({sup 241}Am) was used to generate electron-ion pairs within the gas-filled sensitive volume of the EMS. The electrons were used to investigate the THGEM-EMS response as a function of applied voltage to the THGEM and anode. The relative gas-gain and system resolution of the THGEM-EMS were measured at various applied voltage settings. It was observed a potential difference across the THGEM of +420 V and potential difference across the induction region of +150 V for this EMS setup resulted in the minimum voltage requirements to operate with a stable gain and system resolution. Furthermore, as expected, the gain is strongly affected not only by the potential difference across the THGEM, but also by the applied voltage to the anode and resulting potential difference between the THGEM and anode.

  16. Mobile monitoring of fugitive methane emissions from natural gas consumer industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Albertson, J. D.; Gaylord, A.; von Fischer, J.; Rudek, J.; Thoma, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas is used as a feedstock for major industrial processes, such as ammonia and fertilizer production. However, fugitive methane emissions from many major end-use sectors of the natural gas supply chain have not been quantified yet. This presentation introduces new tools for estimating emission rates from mobile methane measurements, and examines results from recent field measurements conducted downwind of several industrial plants using a specialized vehicle equipped with fast response methane sensor. Using these data along with local meteorological data measured by a 3-D sonic anemometer, a Bayesian approach is applied to probabilistically infer methane emission rates based on a modified Gaussian dispersion model. Source rates are updated recursively with repeated traversals of the downwind methane plume when the vehicle was circling around the targeted facilities. Data from controlled tracer release experiments are presented and used to validate the approach. With access via public roads, this mobile monitoring method is able to quickly assess the emission strength of facilities along the sensor path. This work is developing the capacity for efficient regional coverage of potential methane emission rates in support of leak detection and mitigation efforts.

  17. Monitoring greenhouse gas emissions in Australian landscapes: Comparing ground based mobile surveying data to GOSAT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, S.; Iverach, C.; Kelly, B. F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is threatening the health and stability of the natural world and human society. Such concerns were emphasized at COP21 conference in Paris 2015 which highlighted the global need to improve our knowledge of sources of greenhouse gas and to develop methods to mitigate the effects of their emissions. Ongoing spatial and temporal measurements of greenhouse gases at both point and regional scales is important for clarification of climate change mechanisms and accounting. The Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is designed to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from orbit. As existing ground monitoring stations are limited and still unevenly distributed, satellite observations provide important frequent, spatially extensive, but low resolution observations. Recent developments in portable laser based greenhouse gas measurement systems have enabled the rapid measurement of greenhouse gases in ppb at the ground surface. This study was conducted to map major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the eastern states of Australia at the landscape scale and to compare the results to GOSAT observations. During April 2016 we conducted a regional CH4 and CO2 mobile survey, using an LGR greenhouse gas analyzer. Measurements were made along a 4000 KM circuit through major cities, country towns, dry sclerophyll forests, coastal wetlands, coal mining regions, coal seam gas developments, dryland farming and irrigated agricultural landscapes. The ground-based survey data were then compared with the data (L2) from GOSAT. Ground-based mobile surveys showed that there are clear statistical differences in the ground level atmospheric concentration of CH4 and CO2 associated with all major changes in land use. These changes extend for kilometers, and cover one or more GOSAT pixels. In the coal mining districts the ground-level atmospheric concentration of CH4 exceeded 2 ppm for over 40 km, yet this was not discernable in the retrieved data (L2

  18. Thin Film Transistor Gas Sensors Incorporating High-Mobility Diketopyrrolopyrole-Based Polymeric Semiconductor Doped with Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Kwang Hee; Cho, Jangwhan; Kim, Yun-Hi; Chung, Dae Sung

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we fabricated a diketopyrrolopyrole-based donor-acceptor copolymer composite film. This is a high-mobility semiconductor component with a functionalized-graphene-oxide (GO) gas-adsorbing dopant, used as an active layer in gas-sensing organic-field-effect transistor (OFET) devices. The GO content of the composite film was carefully controlled so that the crystalline orientation of the semiconducting polymer could be conserved, without compromising its gas-adsorbing ability. The resulting optimized device exhibited high mobility (>1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and revealed sensitive response during programmed exposure to various polar organic molecules (i.e., ethanol, acetone, and acetonitrile). This can be attributed to the high mobility of polymeric semiconductors, and also to their high surface-to-volume ratio of GO. The operating mechanism of the gas sensing GO-OFET is fully discussed in conjunction with charge-carrier trap theory. It was found that each transistor parameter (e.g., mobility, threshold voltage), responds independently to each gas molecule, which enables high selectivity of GO-OFETs for various gases. Furthermore, we also demonstrated practical GO-OFET devices that operated at low voltage (<1.5 V), and which successfully responded to gas exposure.

  19. EXTENDED PERFORMANCE HANDHELD AND MOBILE SENSORS FOR REMOTE DETECTION OF NATURAL GAS LEAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael B. Frish; B. David Green; Richard T. Wainner; Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo; Paul Cataldi; Matthew C. Laderer

    2005-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) to advance the state-of-the-art of surveying for leaks of natural gas from transmission and distribution pipelines. The principal project goal was to develop means of deploying on an automotive platform an improved version of the handheld laser-based standoff natural gas leak detector previously developed by PSI and known as the Remote Methane Leak Detector or RMLD. A laser beam which interrogates the air for methane is projected from a spinning turret mounted upon a van. As the van travels forward, the laser beam scans an arc to the front and sides of the van so as to survey across streets and to building walls from a moving vehicle. When excess methane is detected within the arc, an alarm is activated. In this project, we built and tested a prototype Mobile RMLD (MRMLD) intended to provide lateral coverage of 10 m and one lateral scan for every meter of forward motion at forward speeds up to 10 m/s. Using advanced detection algorithms developed as part of this project, the early prototype MRMLD, installed on the back of a truck, readily detected simulated gas leaks of 50 liters per hour. As a supplement to the originally planned project, PSI also participated in a DoE demonstration of several gas leak detection systems at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) during September 2004. Using a handheld RMLD upgraded with the advanced detection algorithms developed in this project, from within a moving vehicle we readily detected leaks created along the 7.4 mile route of a virtual gas transmission pipeline.

  20. Identification of urban gas leaks and evaluation of methane emission inventories using mobile measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzeri, Giulia; Lowry, Dave; Fisher, Rebecca E.; France, James L.; Butler, Dominique; Lanoisellé, Mathias; Nisbet, Euan G.

    2017-04-01

    Leakages from the natural gas distribution network, power plants and refineries account for the 10% of national methane emissions in the UK (http://naei.defra.gov.uk/), and are identified as a major source of methane in big conurbations (e.g. Townsend-Small et al., 2012; Phillips et al., 2013). The National Atmospheric Emission Inventories (NAEI) website provides a list of gas installations, but emissions from gas leakage, which in the inventories are estimated on the basis of the population distribution, are difficult to predict, which makes their estimation highly uncertain. Surveys with a mobile measurement system (Zazzeri et al., 2015) were carried out in the London region for detection of fugitive natural gas and in other sites in the UK (i.e. Bacton, Southampton, North Yorkshire) to identify emissions from various gas installations. The methane isotopic analysis of air samples collected during the surveys, using the methodology in Zazzeri et al. (2015), allows the calculation of the δ13C signature characterising natural gas in the UK. The isotopic value of the natural gas supply to SE London has changed a little in recent years, being close to -34 ‰ over 1998-99 period (Lowry et al., 2001) and close to -36 ‰ since at least 2002. Emissions from gas installations, such as pumping stations in NE England (-41 ± 2 ‰ ) were detected, but some of them were not listed in the inventories. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of the gas leaks identified during the surveys in the London region does not coincide with the distribution suggested by the inventories. By locating both small gas leaks and emissions from large gas installations, we can verify how these methane sources are targeted by national emission inventories. Lowry, D., Holmes, C.W., Rata, N.D., O'Brien, P., and Nisbet, E.G., 2001, London methane emissions: Use of diurnal changes in concentration and δ13C to identify urban sources and verify inventories: Journal of Geophysical Research

  1. A volatile organic analyzer for Space Station: Description and evaluation of a gas chromatography/ ion mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA) is being developed as an essential component of the Space Station's Environmental Health System (EHS) air quality monitoring strategy to provide warning to the crew and ground personnel if volatile organic compounds exceed established exposure limits. The short duration of most Shuttle flights and the relative simplicity of the contaminant removal mechanism have lessened the concern about crew exposure to air contaminants on the Shuttle. However, the longer missions associated with the Space Station, the complex air revitalization system and the proposed number of experiments have led to a desire for real-time monitoring of the contaminants in the Space Station atmosphere. Achieving the performance requirements established for the VOA within the Space Station resource (e.g., power, weight) allocations led to a novel approach that joined a gas chromatograph (GC) to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors of this paper will discuss the rational for selecting the GC/IMS technology as opposed to the more established gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the foundation of the VOA. The data presented from preliminary evaluations will demonstrate the versatile capability of the GC/IMS to analyze the major contaminants expected in the Space Station atmosphere. The favorable GC/IMS characteristics illustrated in this paper included excellent sensitivity, dual-mode operation for selective detection, and mobility drift times to distinguish co-eluting GC peaks. Preliminary studies have shown that the GC/IMS technology can meet surpass the performance requirements of the Space Station VOA.

  2. Coating thickness measurements on gas-borne nanoparticles by combined mobility and aerodynamic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Frederik, E-mail: frederik.weis@kit.edu; Seipenbusch, Martin; Kasper, Gerhard [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Mechanical Process Engineering and Mechanics (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    An on-line method is described and validated to measure the thickness of coatings on gas-borne nanoparticles. The method is essentially a tandem technique which measures the aerodynamic diameter of a particle twice—before and after coating—by a single-stage low-pressure impactor (SS-LPI) for the same mobility equivalent diameter preselected via differential mobility analyzer (DMA). A shell thickness is then derived from the change in effective particle density determined by the SS-LPI. The method requires a difference in mass density between carrier particle and coating material. Its theoretical sensitivity is shown to range between about 0.1 and 1 nm, depending on the density ratio. One advantage of this approach is that both DMA and SS-LPI are situated in series but downstream of the coating step, so as not to interfere with the coating process. The method was validated against transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements, using spherical silica–titania particles coated with conformal shells of molybdenum and bismuth oxide by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). For such spherical particles, the agreement with TEM was excellent. The technique was able to provide layer thicknesses for sub-nanometer layers barely or not resolved by TEM. The paper also discusses the impact of ‘non-ideal’ phenomena such as the formation of doublet particles by coagulation, the effect of multiply charged particles, or the onset of homogeneous decomposition of the coating precursor. With supporting experimental data, it is shown that such phenomena can be interpreted reliably from certain features of the impactor penetration curve. The on-line method can thus be used for fast screening of process parameters and reliable process monitoring for gas-phase synthesis of composite nanopowders.

  3. Investigation of natural gas plume dispersion using mobile observations and large eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulton, Dana R.; Li, Qi; Golston, Levi; Pan, Da; Bou-Zeid, Elie; Fitts, Jeff; Lane, Haley; Lu, Jessica; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Recent work suggests the distribution of methane emissions from fracking operations is skewed with a small percentage of emitters contributing a large proportion of the total emissions. These sites are known as 'super-emitters.' The Marcellus shale, the most productive natural gas shale field in the United States, has received less intense focus for well-level emissions and is here used as a test site for targeted analysis between current standard trace-gas advection practices and possible improvements via advanced modeling techniques. The Marcellus shale is topographically complex, making traditional techniques difficult to implement and evaluate. For many ground based mobile studies, the inverse Gaussian plume method (IGM) is used to produce emission rates. This method is best applied to well-mixed plumes from strong point sources and may not currently be well-suited for use with disperse weak sources, short-time frame measurements or data collected in complex terrain. To assess the quality of IGM results and to improve source-strength estimations, a robust study that combines observational data with a hierarchy of models of increasing complexity will be presented. The field test sites were sampled with multiple passes using a mobile lab as well as a stationary tower. This mobile lab includes a Garmin GPS unit, Vaisala weather station (WTX520), LICOR 7700 CH4 open path sensor and LICOR 7500 CO2/H2O open path sensor. The sampling tower was constructed consisting of a Metek uSonic-3 Class A sonic anemometer, and an additional LICOR 7700 and 7500. Data were recorded for at least one hour at these sites. The modeling will focus on large eddy simulations (LES) of the wind and CH4 concentration fields for these test sites. The LES model used 2 m horizontal and 1 m vertical resolution and was integrated in time for 45 min for various test sites under stable, neutral and unstable conditions. It is here considered as the reference to which various IGM approaches can be

  4. Environmental feasibility study for deployment and construction of mobile gas turbine power plants in urbanized areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryukhan Fedor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the view of current electrical shortage in some regions of Russia, mobile gas turbine power plants (MGTPP have become urgent in recent years. Usually they are used as back-up power sources to cover peak loads in power networks and to ensure uninterrupted power supply to consumers. This paper deals with environmental feasibility study for deployment and construction of the MGTPP in an urban setting. Technogehic factors of the MGTPP impact on the environment have been assessed and possibility of the MGTPP deployment at various sites in different regions of Russia has been identified. The necessity of using the technology of water injection into the gas turbine units combustion chamber to suppress nitrogen oxides in some cases is mentioned. Quantitative assessments of the MGTPP technogehic impact on the environment components have been performed using standard techniques. The calculations have revealed that the MGTPP specifications ensure the levels of technogehic impacts within the standard limits. The results have ensured preparation of pre-design and design documentation related to protection of the environment against the MGTPP complex technogehic impact.

  5. Mobile robots for localizing gas emission sources on landfill sites: is bio-inspiration the way to go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Bennetts, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J; Neumann, Patrick P; Trincavelli, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Roboticists often take inspiration from animals for designing sensors, actuators, or algorithms that control the behavior of robots. Bio-inspiration is motivated with the uncanny ability of animals to solve complex tasks like recognizing and manipulating objects, walking on uneven terrains, or navigating to the source of an odor plume. In particular the task of tracking an odor plume up to its source has nearly exclusively been addressed using biologically inspired algorithms and robots have been developed, for example, to mimic the behavior of moths, dung beetles, or lobsters. In this paper we argue that biomimetic approaches to gas source localization are of limited use, primarily because animals differ fundamentally in their sensing and actuation capabilities from state-of-the-art gas-sensitive mobile robots. To support our claim, we compare actuation and chemical sensing available to mobile robots to the corresponding capabilities of moths. We further characterize airflow and chemosensor measurements obtained with three different robot platforms (two wheeled robots and one flying micro-drone) in four prototypical environments and show that the assumption of a constant and unidirectional airflow, which is the basis of many gas source localization approaches, is usually far from being valid. This analysis should help to identify how underlying principles, which govern the gas source tracking behavior of animals, can be usefully "translated" into gas source localization approaches that fully take into account the capabilities of mobile robots. We also describe the requirements for a reference application, monitoring of gas emissions at landfill sites with mobile robots, and discuss an engineered gas source localization approach based on statistics as an alternative to biologically inspired algorithms.

  6. Mobile Robots for Localizing Gas Emission Sources on Landfill Sites: Is Bio-Inspiration the Way to Go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor eHernandez Bennetts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Roboticists often take inspiration from animals for designing sensors, actuators or algorithms that control the behaviour of robots. Bio-inspiration is motivated with the uncanny ability of animals to solve complex tasks like recognizing and manipulating objects, walking on uneven terrains, or navigating to the source of an odour plume. In particular the task of tracking an odour plume up to its source has nearly exclusively been addressed using biologically inspired algorithms and robots have been developed, for example, to mimic the behaviour of moths, dungbeetles, or lobsters. In this paper we argue that biomimetic approaches to gas source localization are of limited use, primarily because animals differ fundamentally in their sensing and actuation capabilities from state-of-the-art gas-sensitive mobile robots. To support our claim, we compare actuation and chemical sensing available to mobile robots to the corresponding capabilities of moths. We further characterize airflow and chemosensor measurements obtained with three different robot platforms (two wheeled robots and one flying micro drone in four prototypical environments and show that the assumption of a constant and unidirectional airflow, which is at the basis of many gas source localization approaches, is usually far from being valid. This analysis should help to identify how underlying principles, which govern the gas source tracking behaviour of animals, can be usefully translated into gas source localization approaches that fully take into account the capabilities of mobile robots. We also describe the requirements for a reference application, monitoring of gas emissions at landfill sites with mobile robots, and discuss an engineered gas source localization approach based on statistics as an alternative to biologically-inspired algorithms.

  7. GIS based location optimization for mobile produced water treatment facilities in shale gas operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitwadkar, Amol Hanmant

    Over 60% of the nation's total energy is supplied by oil and natural gas together and this demand for energy will continue to grow in the future (Radler et al. 2012). The growing demand is pushing the exploration and exploitation of onshore oil and natural gas reservoirs. Hydraulic fracturing has proven to not only create jobs and achieve economic growth, but also has proven to exert a lot of stress on natural resources---such as water. As water is one of the most important factors in the world of hydraulic fracturing, proper fluids management during the development of a field of operation is perhaps the key element to address a lot of these issues. Almost 30% of the water used during hydraulic fracturing comes out of the well in the form of flowback water during the first month after the well is fractured (Bai et. al. 2012). Handling this large amount of water coming out of the newly fractured wells is one of the major issues as the volume of the water after this period drops off and remains constant for a long time (Bai et. al. 2012) and permanent facilities can be constructed to take care of the water over a longer period. This paper illustrates development of a GIS based tool for optimizing the location of a mobile produced water treatment facility while development is still occurring. A methodology was developed based on a multi criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to optimize the location of the mobile treatment facilities. The criteria for MCDA include well density, ease of access (from roads considering truck hauls) and piping minimization if piping is used and water volume produced. The area of study is 72 square miles east of Greeley, CO in the Wattenberg Field in northeastern Colorado that will be developed for oil and gas production starting in the year 2014. A quarterly analysis is done so that we can observe the effect of future development plans and current circumstances on the location as we move from quarter to quarter. This will help the operators to

  8. Quantifying Fugitive Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Production with Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, T.; Rella, C.; Crosson, E.

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of fugitive methane (CH4) emissions to determine the environmental impact of natural gas production is challenging with current methods. We present a new mobile method known as the Plume Scanner that can quickly quantify CH4 emissions of point sources. The Plume Scanner is a direct measurement technique which utilizes a mobile Picarro cavity ring-down spectrometer and a gas sampling system based on AirCore technology [1]. As the Plume Scanner vehicle drives through the plume, the air is simultaneously sampled at four different heights, and therefore, the spatial CH4 distribution can be captured (Fig. 1). The flux of the plume is then determined by multiplying the spatial CH4 distribution data with the anemometer measurements. In this way, fugitive emission rates of highly localized sources such as natural gas production pads can be made quickly (~7 min). Verification with controlled CH4 releases demonstrate that under stable atmospheric conditions (Pasquill stability class is C or greater), the Plume Scanner measurements have an error of 2% and a repeatability of 15% [2]. Under unstable atmospheric conditions (Class A or B), the error is 6%, and the repeatability increases to 70% due to the variability of wind conditions. Over two weeks, 275 facilities in the Barnett Shale were surveyed from public roads by sampling the air for elevations in CH4 concentration, and 77% were found leaking. Emissions from 52 sites have been quantified with the Plume Scanner (Fig. 2), and the total emission is 4,900 liters per min (lpm) or 39,000 metric tons/yr CO2e. 1. Karion, A., C. Sweeney, P. Tans, and T. Newberger (2010), AirCore: An innovative atmospheric sampling system, J. Atmos. Oceanic Tech, 27, 1839-1853. 2. F. Pasquill (1961), The estimation of the dispersion of wind borne material, Meterol. Mag., 90(1063), 33-49 Figure 1. Plume Scanner Cartoon Figure 2. Distribution of methane fugitive emissions with error bars associated with the Pasquill stability classes

  9. Mobile natural gas leak surveys indicate that two utilities have high false negative rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fischer, J. C.; Brewer, P. E.; Chamberlain, S.; Gaylord, A.; von Fischer, J.

    2016-12-01

    In the distribution systems that carry natural gas to consumers, leaks need to be discovered for safety reasons and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, few utilities have adopted newer laser-based technologies that have greater sensitivity and precision, and instead rely on "industry standard" equipment that is far less sensitive. In partnership with the Environmental Defense Fund and Google, we mapped natural gas leaks in the domains of two anonymous utilities (Utility "A" and "B") using high sensitivity Picarro methane analyzers in Google Street View Cars. Surprisingly, when we shared these results with utilities, their survey crews were unable to find most of the leaks that our survey indicated (84% in A and 80% in B). To investigate this phenomenon, our team visited a subset of the leaks in each utility domain (n=32 in A and n=30 in B), and worked alongside utility surveyors to search the leak indication area, using a Los Gatos Research ultraportable methane analyzer to pinpoint leak locations. We found evidence of natural gas leaks at 69% and 68% of the locations in Utilities A and B respectively where survey crews had found nothing. We describe this as a "false negative" rate for the utility because the utility survey falsely indicated that there was no leak at these locations. Of these false negatives, 7% (n=2 of 32 in A, n=2 of 30 in B) were determined to be Grade 1 leaks requiring immediate repair due to high safety risk. Instrument sensitivity appears to explain some of the false negative rates. In particular, use of some industry standard equipment appears to have created a false sense of confidence among utility surveyors that leaks were not present. However, there was also evidence of communication failures and that surveyors did not use optimal approaches in their search. Based on these findings, we suggest that: 1) mobile deployment of high-precision methane analyzers can help find more natural gas leaks, and 2) use of some hand-held survey

  10. Measurements of W-value, mobility and gas gain in electronegative gaseous CS{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkin, Kirill [Department of Physics, Occidental College, 1600 Campus Road, Los Angeles, CA 90041 (United States)], E-mail: kpushkin@bama.ua.edu; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel [Department of Physics, Occidental College, 1600 Campus Road, Los Angeles, CA 90041 (United States)

    2009-07-21

    W-value, mobility and gas gain measurements have been carried out in electronegative gaseous CS{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} with a broad range of gas mixture additives at a pressure of 40 Torr making use of a single-electron proportional counter method. The experimental results have revealed that W-values obtained for CS{sub 2} (40 Torr), CS{sub 2}-CF{sub 4} (30-10 Torr), CS{sub 2}-CF{sub 4} (20-20 Torr), CS{sub 2}-CF{sub 4} (10-30 Torr), CS{sub 2}-Ne (35-5 Torr) and CS{sub 2}-He (35-5 Torr) gas mixtures are 24.9{+-}0.8, 25.2{+-}0.6, 29.2{+-}1.0, 33.0{+-}1.0, 23.1{+-}0.8 and 23.7{+-}0.8 eV, respectively. The average mobility was measured in all CS{sub 2} gas mixtures and was found to be slightly greater than in pure CS{sub 2}. The gas gain was found to be significantly greater in CS{sub 2} gas mixtures relatively to pure CS{sub 2}.

  11. Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    istic and romantic emotionalism that typifies this genre. Longino, James C., et al. “A Study of World War Procurement and Industrial Mobilization...States. Harrisburg, PA: Military Service Publishing Co., 1941. CARL 355.22 J72b. Written in rough prose , this World War II era document explains the

  12. Computerizing the Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeanie; Whelan, Errol

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of a computerized high school library which uses CD-ROM optical storage systems. Describes hardware and software, setting up the system, preparing the online catalog, teaching information retrieval skills, and project evaluation. Notes prices of CD-ROM disks and equipment purchased. 4 references. (SV)

  13. Computerized Peer Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Phil

    2000-01-01

    Describes the introduction of a computerized peer assessment system as part of an undergraduate module in computer studies in the United Kingdom. Analyzes student responses to modification of the tutor-student relationship to a student-student relationship for assessment purposes, discusses plagiarism and the Web, and investigates effects on…

  14. Computerized Drug Information Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Smith, Daniel R.

    1972-01-01

    To compare computerized services in chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical medicine of pharmaceutical interest, equivalent profiles were run on magnetic tape files of CA-Condensates," CBAC," Excerpta Medica," MEDLARS" and Ringdoc." The results are tabulated for overlap of services, relative speed of citing references, and unique…

  15. Blood lactate concentrations are mildly affected by mobile gas exchange measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharhag-Rosenberger, F; Wochatz, M; Otto, C; Cassel, M; Mayer, F; Scharhag, J

    2014-06-01

    We sought to investigate the effects of wearing a mobile respiratory gas analysis system during a treadmill test on blood lactate (bLa) concentrations and commonly applied bLa thresholds. A total of 16 recreational athletes (31±3 years, VO2max: 58±6 ml · min(-1) · kg(-1)) performed one multistage treadmill test with and one without gas exchange measurements (GEM and noGEM). The whole bLa curve, the lactate threshold (LT), the individual anaerobic thresholds according to Stegmann (IATSt) and Dickhuth (IATDi), and a fixed bLa concentration of 4 mmol ∙ l(-1) (OBLA) were evaluated. The bLa curve was shifted slightly leftward in GEM compared to noGEM (Prate response was not different between conditions (P=0.89). There was no difference between GEM and noGEM for LT (2.61±0.34 vs. 2.64±0.39 m · s(-1), P=0.49) and IATSt (3.47±0.42 vs. 3.55±0.47 m · s(-1), P=0.12). However, IATDi (3.57±0.39 vs. 3.66±0.44 m · s(-1), Psystem. This also applies to bLa thresholds located at higher exercise intensities. While the magnitude of the effects is of little importance for recreational athletes, it might be relevant for elite athletes and scientific studies.

  16. Understanding gas phase modifier interactions in rapid analysis by differential mobility-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Amol; Coy, Stephen L; Wong, Bryan M; Fornace, Albert J; Glick, James J; Vouros, Paul

    2014-07-01

    A systematic study involving the use and optimization of gas-phase modifiers in quantitative differential mobility-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) analysis is presented using nucleoside-adduct biomarkers of DNA damage as an important reference point for analysis in complex matrices. Commonly used polar protic and polar aprotic modifiers have been screened for use against two deoxyguanosine adducts of DNA: N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP). Particular attention was paid to compensation voltage (CoV) shifts, peak shapes, and product ion signal intensities while optimizing the DMS-MS conditions. The optimized parameters were then applied to rapid quantitation of the DNA adducts in calf thymus DNA. After a protein precipitation step, adduct levels corresponding to less than one modification in 10(6) normal DNA bases were detected using the DMS-MS platform. Based on DMS fundamentals and ab initio thermochemical results, we interpret the complexity of DMS modifier responses in terms of thermal activation and the development of solvent shells. At very high bulk gas temperature, modifier dipole moment may be the most important factor in cluster formation and cluster geometry, but at lower temperatures, multi-neutral clusters are important and less predictable. This work provides a useful protocol for targeted DNA adduct quantitation and a basis for future work on DMS modifier effects.

  17. Detection of metabolites of trapped humans using ion mobility spectrometry coupled with gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautz, Wolfgang; Slodzynski, Rafael; Hariharan, Chandrasekhara; Seifert, Luzia; Nolte, Jürgen; Fobbe, Rita; Sielemann, Stefanie; Lao, Bolan C; Huo, Ran; Thomas, C L Paul; Hildebrand, Lars

    2013-02-19

    For the first time, ion mobility spectrometry coupled with rapid gas chromatography, using multicapillary columns, was applied for the development of a pattern of signs of life for the localization of entrapped victims after disaster events (e.g., earthquake, terroristic attack). During a simulation experiment with entrapped volunteers, 12 human metabolites could be detected in the air of the void with sufficient sensitivity to enable a valid decision on the presence of a living person. Using a basic normalized summation of the measured concentrations, all volunteers involved in the particular experiments could be recognized only few minutes after they entered the simulation void and after less than 3 min of analysis time. An additional independent validation experiment enabled the recognition of a person in a room of ∼25 m(3) after ∼30 min with sufficiently high sensitivity to detect even a person briefly leaving the room. Undoubtedly, additional work must be done on analysis time and weight of the equipment, as well as on validation during real disaster events. However, the enormous potential of the method as a significantly helpful tool for search-and-rescue operations, in addition to trained canines, could be demonstrated.

  18. The low-temperature mobility of two-dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-Feng; Mao Wei; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Hao Yue

    2008-01-01

    To reveal the internal physics of the low-temperature mobility of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures, we present a theoretical study of the strong dependence of 2DEG mobility on Al content and thickness of AlGaN barrier layer. The theoretical results are compared with one of the highest measured of 2DEG mobility reported for AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. The 2DEG mobility is modelled as a combined effect of the scattering mechanisms including acoustic deformation-potential, piezoelectric, ionized background donor, surface donor, dislocation, alloy disorder and interface roughness scattering. The analyses of the individual scattering processes show that the dominant scattering mechanisms are the alloy disorder scattering and the interface roughness scattering at low temperatures. The variation of 2DEG mobility with the barrier layer parameters results mainly from the change of 2DEG density and distribution. It is suggested that in AlGaN/GaN samples with a high Al content or a thick AlGaN layer, the interface roughness scattering may restrict the 2DEG mobility significantly, for the AlGan/GaN interface roughness increases due to the stress accumulation in AlGaN layer.

  19. Experimental investigation of mobile small-scale liquefier for 10000 NM3/D of coal bed methane gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaohu; Wu, J. F.; Gong, Maoqiong; Guo, Ping

    2012-06-01

    There is a growing recognition that unconventional sources of gas, such as shale gas, coal bed methane (CBM) and deep tight gas will contribute a significant component of future gas supplies as technologies evolve. In recent years, the interest in such source of gas utilization technologies based on small-scale LNG production has been rising steeply. In this paper, a mobile liquefier prototype for 10000 Nm3/d of CBM has been designed, constructed and tested. It has two cascade refrigeration systems. The high-temperature refrigeration system will pre-cool the resource gas to 5oC, and the low-temperature refrigeration system will continue to cool the resource gas to the liquefied point with a Mixed Refrigerant Cycle (MRC). The kernel compressor is a conventional oil-lubricated air-conditioning compressor with the discharge pressure of 2.0 MPa. The main heat exchanger is plate-fin heat exchanger with four passages. A series of experiments have been done on the prototype liquefier at different resource gas pressures and environmental temperatures. It is less than one hour from the start of the equipment to the existence of LNG. The maximum production of LNG is about 20 m3/d when a stream of about 12500 Nm3/d of pure CBM at a process pressure of 1.3 MPa is liquefied. The energy consumption of liquefying 1 Nm3 methane is 0.612 kWh.

  20. A computerized TLD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    A computerized thermoluminescent (TL) readout technique is presented which considerably improves the precision of dose readout and facilitates the dose information management and storage. The technique is relatively simple and it involves an interface between a commercially available thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) analyzer and a minicomputer. Curve fitting, subtraction of unwanted thermogram peaks, background subtraction, studies of TL decay kinetics, and storage of large number of measured TL data are easily performed with the technique.

  1. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application and comp......It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application...... and compliance with CPGs in most areas of clinical practice are deficient. Computerization of CPGs has been brought forward as a method to disseminate and to support application of CPGs. Until now, CPG-computerization has focused on development of formal expressions of CPGs. The developed systems have, however......, not gained any extensive application in clinical practice. The basic assumption in this thesis is that the scanty penetration is due to an inappropriate design process when designing computerized CPGs for clinical work practice. This thesis examines the application of guidance within areas where CPG...

  2. Liquid-Gated High Mobility and Quantum Oscillation of the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at an Oxide Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shengwei; Lü, Weiming; Huang, Zhen; Liu, Zhiqi; Han, Kun; Gopinadhan, Kalon; Li, Changjian; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Wenxiong; Ma, Haijiao Harsan; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Ariando

    2016-04-26

    Electric field effect in electronic double layer transistor (EDLT) configuration with ionic liquids as the dielectric materials is a powerful means of exploring various properties in different materials. Here, we demonstrate the modulation of electrical transport properties and extremely high mobility of two-dimensional electron gas at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) interface through ionic liquid-assisted electric field effect. With a change of the gate voltages, the depletion of charge carrier and the resultant enhancement of electron mobility up to 19 380 cm(2)/(V s) are realized, leading to quantum oscillations of the conductivity at the LAO/STO interface. The present results suggest that high-mobility oxide interfaces, which exhibit quantum phenomena, could be obtained by ionic liquid-assisted field effect.

  3. The design of stationary and mobile solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Wolfgang; Lorenz, Hagen

    A general thermodynamic model has shown that combined fuel cell cycles may reach an electric-efficiency of more than 80%. This value is one of the targets of the Department of Energy (DOE) solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) program. The combination of a SOFC and GT connects the air flow of the heat engine and the cell cooling. The principle strategy in order to reach high electrical-efficiencies is to avoid a high excess air for the cell cooling and heat losses. Simple combined SOFC-GT cycles show an efficiency between 60 and 72%. The combination of the SOFC and the GT can be done by using an external cooling or by dividing the stack into multiple sub-stacks with a GT behind each sub-stack as the necessary heat sink. The heat exchangers (HEXs) of a system with an external cooling have the benefit of a pressurization on both sides and therefore, have a high heat exchange coefficient. The pressurization on both sides delivers a low stress to the HEX material. The combination of both principles leads to a reheat (RH)-SOFC-GT cycle that can be improved by a steam turbine (ST) cycle. The first results of a study of such a RH-SOFC-GT-ST cycle indicate that a cycle design with an efficiency of more than 80% is possible and confirm the predictions by the theoretical thermodynamic model mentioned above. The extremely short heat-up time of a thin tubular SOFC and the market entrance of the micro-turbines give the option of using these SOFC-GT designs for mobile applications. The possible use of hydrocarbons such as diesel oil is an important benefit of the SOFC. The micro-turbine and the SOFC stack will be matched depending on the start-up requirements of the mobile system. The minimization of the volume needed is a key issue. The efficiency of small GTs is lower than the efficiency of large GTs due to the influence of the leakage within the stages of GTs increasing with a decreasing size of the GT. Thus, the SOFC module pressure must be lower than in larger

  4. The mobility of two-dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with varied Al content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JinFeng; HAO Yue; ZHANG JinCheng; NI JinYu

    2008-01-01

    The mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN hetero-structures changes significantly with AI content in the AlGaN barrier layer, while few mechanism analyses focus on it. Theoretical calculation and analysis of the 2DEG mobility in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with varied Al content are carried out based on the recently reported experimental data. The 2DEG mobility is modeled analytically as the total effects of the scattering mechanisms including acoustic deformation-potential, piezoelectric, polar optic phonon, alloy disorder, interface roughness, dislocation and remote modulation doping scattering. We show that the increase of the 2DEG density, caused by the ascension of the Al content in the barrier layer, is a dominant factor that leads to the changes of the individual scat-tering processes. The change of the 2DEG mobility with Al content are mainly de-termined by the interface roughness scattering and the alloy disorder scattering at 77 K, and the polar optic phonon scattering and the interface roughness scattering at the room temperature. The calculated function of the interface roughness pa-rameters on the Al content shows that the stress caused AlGaN/GaN interface degradation at higher Al content is an important factor in the limitation of the in-terface roughness scattering on the 2DEG mobility in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with high Al content.

  5. Computerized procedures system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipner, Melvin H.; Mundy, Roger A.; Franusich, Michael D.

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  6. Forensic application of gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry with two-way classification of ignitable liquids from fire debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Harrington, Peter B

    2007-09-01

    With respect to the emerging role of forensic science for arson investigation, a low cost and promising onsite detection method for ignitable liquids is desirable. Gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS) was investigated as a tool for analysis of ignitable liquids from fire debris. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was applied as the preconcentration and sampling method. The combined information afforded by gas chromatography and differential mobility spectrometry provided unique two-way patterns for each sample of ignitable liquid. Two-way GC-DMS data were classified into one of seven ignitable liquids using a fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES). The performance of the classifier was validated using bootstrap Latin partitions (BLPs) and also compared to optimized partial least-squares (PLS) classifiers. Better prediction results can be obtained by using two-way GC-DMS data than only using one-way total ion chromatograms or integrated differential mobility spectra. FuRES models constructed with the neat ignitable liquids identified the spiked samples from simulated fire debris with 99.07 +/- 0.04% accuracy.

  7. Natural gas and renewable methane for powertrains future strategies for a climate-neutral mobility

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on natural gas and synthetic methane as contemporary and future energy sources. Following a historical overview, physical and chemical properties, occurrence, extraction, transportation and storage of natural gas are discussed. Sustainable production of natural gas and methane as well as production and storage of synthetic methane are scrutinized next. A substantial part of the book addresses construction of vehicles for natural and synthetic methane as well as large engines for industrial and maritime use. The last chapters present some perspectives on further uses of renewable liquid fuels as well as natural gas for industrial engines and gas power plants.

  8. Mobile protons versus mobile radicals: gas-phase unimolecular chemistry of radical cations of cysteine-containing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Adrian K Y; Ryzhov, Victor; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2010-08-01

    A combination of electrospray ionization (ESI), multistage, and high-resolution mass spectrometry experiments are used to examine the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of radical cations of cysteine containing di- and tripeptides. Two different chemical methods were used to form initial populations of radical cations in which the radical sites were located at different positions: (1) sulfur-centered cysteinyl radicals via bond homolysis of protonated S-nitrosocysteine containing peptides; and (2) alpha-carbon backbone-centered radicals via Siu's sequence of reactions (J. Am. Chem. Soc.2008, 130, 7862). Comparison of the fragmentation reactions of these regiospecifically generated radicals suggests that hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) between the alpha C-H of adjacent residues and the cysteinyl radical can occur. In addition, using accurate mass measurements, deuterium labeling, and comparison with an authentic sample, a novel loss of part of the N-terminal cysteine residue was shown to give rise to the protonated, truncated N-formyl peptide (an even-electron x(n) ion). DFT calculations were performed on the radical cation [GCG]*(+) to examine: the relative stabilities of isomers with different radical and protonation sites; the barriers associated with radical migration between four possible radical sites, [G*CG](+), [GC*G](+), [GCG*](+), and [GC(S*)G](+); and for dissociation from these sites to yield b(2)-type ions. Copyright 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Computerized voiding diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, J M; McNett, J; Badlani, G H

    1993-01-01

    An electronic, computerized voiding diary, "Compu-Void" (patent pending) was developed in order to simplify, augment, and automate patients' recording of bladder symptomatology. A voiding diary as a tool has the potential to provide essential information for a more complete diagnostic and therefore therapeutic picture for each patient. Two major problems with the standard written voiding diary have been a lack of patient compliance and the limited amount of information it garners. Twenty-five women with various types of voiding dysfunctions were compared to twenty-five age and parity-matched control women in order to determine patient preferences of the Compu-Void when compared to the standard written voiding diary, compliance with each method, and amount and quality of information obtained with each method. Over 90% of subjects and over 70% of control group patients preferred the Compu-Void over the written diary (P Compu-Void exceeded that obtained with the written method.

  10. Computerizing natural history collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-09-01

    Computers are ubiquitous in the life sciences and are associated with many of the practical and conceptual changes that characterize biology's twentieth-century transformation. Yet comparatively little has been written about how scientists use computers. Despite this relative lack of scholarly attention, the claim that computers revolutionized the life sciences by making the impossible possible is widespread, and relatively unchallenged. How did the introduction of computers into research programs shape scientific practice? The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology (MVZ) at the University of California, Berkeley provides a tractable way into this under-examined question because it is possible to follow the computerization of data in the context of long-term research programs.

  11. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    . The analysis focuses on the emergence of general clinical work practice demands on guidance • An analysis of guidance demands from clinical work practice and business strategy, focusing on implications for the design of computerised CPGs. In my research, I have applied observation studies, interviews...... is comprised by fieldwork in three oncology departments and a case study of advanced life support. Although close to all patients within oncology are treated according to a CPG, I found limited application of physical CPGs and web-based CPG portals. However, I found comprehensive application of activity...... feasible • Designed in a way that provides room for local adaptations of guidance • Designed with focus on specific business strategic aims Further, based on my findings, I will suggest that design of computerized CPGs should be based on: 1) scrutinization of the clinical work practice, 2) articulation...

  12. Optical probing of the metal-to-insulator transition in a two-dimensional high-mobility electron gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionigi, F; Rossella, F; Bellani, V [Dipartimento di Fisica ' A Volta' and CNISM, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Amado, M [GISC and Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Diez, E [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Kowalik, K [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses, CNRS, 38042 Grenoble (France); Biasiol, G [Istituto Officina dei Materiali CNR, Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Sorba, L, E-mail: vittorio.bellani@unipv.it [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    We study the quantum Hall liquid and the metal-insulator transition in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas, by means of photoluminescence and magnetotransport measurements. In the integer and fractional regime at {nu}>1/3, by analyzing the emission energy dispersion we probe the magneto-Coulomb screening and the hidden symmetry of the electron liquid. In the fractional regime above {nu}=1/3, the system undergoes metal-to-insulator transition, and in the insulating phase the dispersion becomes linear with evidence of an increased renormalized mass.

  13. High mobility of the strongly confined hole gas in AgTaO3/SrTiO3

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2012-05-18

    A theoretical study of the two-dimensional hole gas at the (AgO)−/(TiO2)0 p-type interface in the AgTaO3/SrTiO3 (001) heterostructure is presented. The Ag 4d states strongly hybridize with the O 2p states and contribute to the hole gas. It is demonstrated that the holes are confined to an ultra thin layer (∼4.9Å) with a considerable carrier density of ∼1014cm−2. We estimate a hole mobility of 18.6 cm2 V−1 s−1, which is high enough to enable device applications.

  14. Alignment of retention time obtained from multicapillary column gas chromatography used for VOC analysis with ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, Thorsten; Bödeker, Bertram; Jünger, Melanie; Nolte, Jürgen; Vautz, Wolfgang

    2010-07-01

    Multicapillary column (MCC) ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) are increasingly in demand for medical diagnosis, biological applications and process control. In a MCC-IMS, volatile compounds are differentiated by specific retention time and ion mobility when rapid preseparation techniques are applied, e.g. for the analysis of complex and humid samples. Therefore, high accuracy in the determination of both parameters is required for reliable identification of the signals. The retention time in the MCC is the subject of the present investigation because, for such columns, small deviations in temperature and flow velocity may cause significant changes in retention time. Therefore, a universal correction procedure would be a helpful tool to increase the accuracy of the data obtained from a gas-chromatographic preseparation. Although the effect of the carrier gas flow velocity and temperature on retention time is not linear, it could be demonstrated that a linear alignment can compensate for the changes in retention time due to common minor deviations of both the carrier gas flow velocity and the column temperature around the MCC-IMS standard operation conditions. Therefore, an effective linear alignment procedure for the correction of those deviations has been developed from the analyses of defined gas mixtures under various experimental conditions. This procedure was then applied to data sets generated from real breath analyses obtained in clinical studies using different instruments at different measuring sites for validation. The variation in the retention time of known signals, especially for compounds with higher retention times, was significantly improved. The alignment of the retention time--an indispensable procedure to achieve a more precise identification of analytes--using the proposed method reduces the random error caused by small accidental deviations in column temperature and flow velocity significantly.

  15. A 2d model for the effect of gas diffusion on mobility of foam for EOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonnekes, L.E.; Cox, S.J.; Rossen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    Transport of gas across liquid films between bubbles is cited as one reason why CO2 foams for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) are usually weaker than N2 foams and why steam foams are weaker than foams of steam mixed with N2. We examine here the effect of inter-bubble gas diffusion on flowing bubbles in

  16. Computerized occlusal analysis in bruxism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Vojkan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sleep bruxism as nocturnal parafunction, also known as tooth grinding, is the most common parasomnia (sleep disorder. Most tooth grinding occurs during rapid eye movement - REM sleep. Sleep bruxism is an oral habit characterized by rhythmic activity of the masticatory muscles (m. masseter that causes forced contact between dental surfaces during sleep. Sleep bruxism has been associated with craniomandibular disorders including temporomandibular joint discomfort, pulpalgia, premature loss of teeth due to excessive attrition and mobility, headache, muscle ache, sleep interruption of an individual and problems with removable and fixed denture. Basically, two groups of etiological factors can be distinguished, viz., peripheral (occlusal factors and central (pathophysiological and psychological factors. The role of occlusion (occlusal discrepancies as the causative factor is not enough mentioned in relation to bruxism. Objective. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate the connection between occlusal factors and nocturnal parafunctional activities (occlusal disharmonies and bruxism. Method. Two groups were formed- experimental of 15 persons with signs and symptoms of nocturnal parafunctional activity of mandible (mean age 26.6 years and control of 42 persons with no signs and symptoms of bruxism (mean age 26.3 yrs.. The computerized occlusal analyses were performed using the T-Scan II system (Tekscan, Boston, USA. 2D occlusograms were analyzed showing the occlusal force, the center of the occlusal force with the trajectory and the number of antagonistic tooth contacts. Results. Statistically significant difference of force distribution was found between the left and the right side of the arch (L%-R% (t=2.773; p<0.02 in the group with bruxism. The difference of the centre of occlusal force - COF trajectory between the experimental and control group was not significant, but the trajectory of COF was longer in the group of

  17. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, C.; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.

    2016-09-01

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm2/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m0. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  18. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  19. Structures of mobilization and resistance: Confronting the oil and gas industries in Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierk, Simone; Tysyachnyouk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on recent developments in the problematic relationship between the oil industry and local communities in the Republic of Komi, we develop a case study of environmental grassroots mobilization in northwest Russia. Using a qualitative methodology comprising semi-structured interviews and

  20. Structures of mobilization and resistance: Confronting the oil and gas industries in Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierk, Simone; Tysyachnyouk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on recent developments in the problematic relationship between the oil industry and local communities in the Republic of Komi, we develop a case study of environmental grassroots mobilization in northwest Russia. Using a qualitative methodology comprising semi-structured interviews and parti

  1. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  2. Self assembly, mobilization, and flotation of crude oil contaminated sand particles as granular shells on gas bubbles in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Boglaienko, Daria

    2017-01-01

    Contaminant fate and transport studies and models include transport mechanisms for colloidal particles and dissolved ions which can be easily moved with water currents. However, mobilization of much larger contaminated granular particles (i.e., sand) in sediments have not been considered as a possible mechanism due to the relatively larger size of sand particles and their high bulk density. We conducted experiments to demonstrate that oil contaminated granular particles (which exhibit hydrophobic characteristics) can attach on gas bubbles to form granular shells and transfer from the sediment phase to the water column. The interactions and conditions necessary for the oil contaminated granular particles to self assemble as tightly packed granular shells on the gas bubbles which transfer from sediment phase to the water column were evaluated both experimentally and theoretically for South Louisiana crude oil and quartz sand particles. Analyses showed that buoyancy forces can be adequate to move the granular shell forming around the air bubbles if the bubble radius is above 0.001mm for the sand particles with 0.28mm diameter. Relatively high magnitude of the Hamaker constant for the oil film between sand and air (5.81×10(-20)J for air-oil-sand) indicates that air bubbles have high affinity to attach on the oil film that is on the sand particles in comparison to attaching to the sand particles without the oil film in water (1.60×10(-20)J for air-water-sand). The mobilization mechanism of the contaminated granular particles with gas bubbles can occur in natural environments resulting in transfer of granular particles from sediments to the water column. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. DC-current induced magneto-oscillations in very high-mobility 2D electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. L.; Zhang, Chi; Du, R. R.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2007-03-01

    We report on a systematic experimental study of DC-current induced magneto-oscillations [1] using Hall bar samples of very high-mobility (8-20 x 10^6 cm^2/Vs) GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures. Previously we show that remarkable nonlinear resistance and 1/B oscillations can arise when a high bias current (Ix) is passed through a Hall bar (width w), and the effect can be explained by a Zener tunneling model in the presence of a tilting Hall field [1]. Data of resistance Rxx≡Vx/Ix, differential resistance rxx≡Vx/Ix, and rxx'≡rxx/Ix in higher mobility samples, which show higher order oscillations, have confirmed the validity of this model. Our temperature dependent date show that this effect can persist to kBT>φc, where φc is the cyclotron energy. [1] Yang et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 076801 (2002).

  4. Chemical studies of H chondrites. I - Mobile trace elements and gas retention ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingner, David W.; Huston, Ted J.; Hutson, Melinda; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    1987-01-01

    Trends for 16 trace elements (Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Co, Cs, Ga, In, K, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, Tl, and Zn), chosen to span a broad geochemical and thermal response range, in 44 H4-6 chondrites, differ widely from those in L4-6 chondrites. In particular, H chondrites classified as heavily shocked petrologically do not necessarily exhibit Ar-40 loss and vice versa. The clear-cut causal relationship between siderophile and mobile element loss with increasing late shock seen in L chondrites is not generally evident in the H group. H chondrite parent material experienced an early high temperature genetic episode that mobilized a substantial proportion of these trace elements so that later thermal episodes resulted in more subtle, collateral fractionations. Mildly shocked L chondrites escaped this early high temperature event, indicating that the two most numerous meteorite groups differ fundamentally in genetic history.

  5. Perpetual motion of a mobile impurity in a one-dimensional quantum gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychkovskiy, O.

    2014-03-01

    Consider an impurity particle injected in a degenerate one-dimensional gas of noninteracting fermions (or, equivalently, Tonks-Girardeau bosons) with some initial momentum p0. We examine the infinite-time value of the momentum of the impurity, p∞, as a function of p0. A lower bound on |p∞(p0)| is derived under fairly general conditions. The derivation, based on the existence of the lower edge of the spectrum of the host gas, does not resort to any approximations. The existence of such bound implies the perpetual motion of the impurity in a one-dimensional gas of noninteracting fermions or Tonks-Girardeau bosons at zero temperature. The bound admits an especially simple and useful form when the interaction between the impurity and host particles is everywhere repulsive.

  6. GADEN: A 3D Gas Dispersion Simulator for Mobile Robot Olfaction in Realistic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Bennetts, Victor; Fan, Han; Lilienthal, Achim; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a simulation framework developed under the widely used Robot Operating System (ROS) to enable the validation of robotics systems and gas sensing algorithms under realistic environments. The framework is rooted in the principles of computational fluid dynamics and filament dispersion theory, modeling wind flow and gas dispersion in 3D real-world scenarios (i.e., accounting for walls, furniture, etc.). Moreover, it integrates the simulation of different environmental sensors, such as metal oxide gas sensors, photo ionization detectors, or anemometers. We illustrate the potential and applicability of the proposed tool by presenting a simulation case in a complex and realistic office-like environment where gas leaks of different chemicals occur simultaneously. Furthermore, we accomplish quantitative and qualitative validation by comparing our simulated results against real-world data recorded inside a wind tunnel where methane was released under different wind flow profiles. Based on these results, we conclude that our simulation framework can provide a good approximation to real world measurements when advective airflows are present in the environment. PMID:28644375

  7. GADEN: A 3D Gas Dispersion Simulator for Mobile Robot Olfaction in Realistic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Monroy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a simulation framework developed under the widely used Robot Operating System (ROS to enable the validation of robotics systems and gas sensing algorithms under realistic environments. The framework is rooted in the principles of computational fluid dynamics and filament dispersion theory, modeling wind flow and gas dispersion in 3D real-world scenarios (i.e., accounting for walls, furniture, etc.. Moreover, it integrates the simulation of different environmental sensors, such as metal oxide gas sensors, photo ionization detectors, or anemometers. We illustrate the potential and applicability of the proposed tool by presenting a simulation case in a complex and realistic office-like environment where gas leaks of different chemicals occur simultaneously. Furthermore, we accomplish quantitative and qualitative validation by comparing our simulated results against real-world data recorded inside a wind tunnel where methane was released under different wind flow profiles. Based on these results, we conclude that our simulation framework can provide a good approximation to real world measurements when advective airflows are present in the environment.

  8. Potential for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions through the use of mobility services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grischkat, Sylvie; Hunecke, Marcel; Böhler, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    gas emissions per person and year was found to be 78 kg in an optimistic scenario and 25 kg in a pessimistic scenario. Extrapolated to the German metropolitan population, behaviour-related measures alone could result in a 1.8 million ton (optimistic scenario) or 0.6 million ton (pessimistic scenario...

  9. GADEN: A 3D Gas Dispersion Simulator for Mobile Robot Olfaction in Realistic Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroy, Javier; Hernandez-Bennets, Victor; Fan, Han; Lilienthal, Achim; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Javier

    2017-06-23

    This work presents a simulation framework developed under the widely used Robot Operating System (ROS) to enable the validation of robotics systems and gas sensing algorithms under realistic environments. The framework is rooted in the principles of computational fluid dynamics and filament dispersion theory, modeling wind flow and gas dispersion in 3D real-world scenarios (i.e., accounting for walls, furniture, etc.). Moreover, it integrates the simulation of different environmental sensors, such as metal oxide gas sensors, photo ionization detectors, or anemometers. We illustrate the potential and applicability of the proposed tool by presenting a simulation case in a complex and realistic office-like environment where gas leaks of different chemicals occur simultaneously. Furthermore, we accomplish quantitative and qualitative validation by comparing our simulated results against real-world data recorded inside a wind tunnel where methane was released under different wind flow profiles. Based on these results, we conclude that our simulation framework can provide a good approximation to real world measurements when advective airflows are present in the environment.

  10. Computerization of a telescope at secondary education

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Santiago, A.; Martos Jumillas, J.

    2017-03-01

    The work we are presenting in this paper is the computerization of a refractor telescope on an EQ3 type equatorial mount through Arduino. The control of the mount is done via three different interfaces: Stellarium, an Android interface for mobile phones and a second interface for PC made with Processing. The aforementioned work was done by the authors with a double purpose: presenting the interest in astronomy in the Mathematics department, and the development of applications within the subject of Technology in 4th ESO. So, it is a collaborative project between both departments. Except for the telescope and the mount, all the resources we have used can be found in any high school: free software (Guadalinex v9), App Inventor and Processing.The project was carried out under the principle of reducing all possible costs given the economic possibilities of the institution.

  11. Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using mobile plume method with trace gas and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. One of the major anthropogenic sources is methane produced by bacteria in anaerobic environments such as rice pads and landfills. Land filling has for many years been the preferred waste disposal method, resulting in a large methane production with a large contribution to the global increase in atmospheric green house gas concentration. Several steps have been taken to reduce the emission of methane from landfills. In order to validate the effect of these steps, a measurement method is needed to quantify methane emissions with a large spatial variation. One method is to use a highly sensitive and fast analytical method, capable of measuring the atmospheric concentration methane downwind from emission areas. Combined with down-wind measurements of a trace gas, emitted at a controlled mass flow rate, the methane emission can be calculated. This method is called the mobile plume method, as the whole plume is measured by doing several transects. In the current study a methane/acetylene analyzer with cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection (Picarro, G2203) was used to estimate methane from a number of Danish landfills. We measured at both active and closed landfills and investigated the difference in methane emission. At landfills where the emissions could have more than one origin, the source strength of the different emission areas was determined by accurate trace gas positioning and choosing appropriate wind speed and measurement distance. To choose these factors, we addressed the uncertainties and limitations of the method with respect to the configuration of the trace gas bottles and the distance between the emission area and the measurement points. Composting of organic material in large piles was done at several of the investigated landfills and where possible, the methane emission from this partly anaerobic digestion was measured as a separate emission.

  12. High-power supersonic chemical lasers: gas-dynamic problems of operation of mobile systems with PRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreysho, A. S.; Malkov, V. M.; Savin, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    Supersonic chemical lasers, such as HF /DF and COIL, have always been in the focus of special interest as the most powerful sources of continuous wave generation. Presently, autonomous mobile laser complexes (both air- and landbased) are being developed on the basis of SCL [1-3]. It is commonly accepted that SCL appeared, conditionally speaking, at the crossroads of a number of sciences: of physics - quantum electronics and physical kinetics; chemistry - combustion theory and chemical kinetics; classic optics - theory of resonators, aero-optics, and gas dynamics (there is a supersonic flow in the SCL channel). Due to this fact, all tasks and problems which could be resolved in the course of SCL development have complex character and could be considered as the next stage of complexity in comparison with the well known similar tasks which had been considered earlier. This is why they should be resolved anew with consideration of the specific aspects of the SCL processes. This is true for the gas-dynamic problems: new parameter areas, non-traditional channel geometry, consideration of new phenomena, etc.Supersonic chemical lasers, such as HF /DF and COIL, have always been in the focus of special interest as the most powerful sources of continuous wave generation. Presently, autonomous mobile laser complexes (both air- and landbased) are being developed on the basis of SCL [1-3]. It is commonly accepted that SCL appeared, conditionally speaking, at the crossroads of a number of sciences: of physics - quantum electronics and physical kinetics; chemistry - combustion theory and chemical kinetics; classic optics - theory of resonators, aero-optics, and gas dynamics (there is a supersonic flow in the SCL channel). Due to this fact, all tasks and problems which could be resolved in the course of SCL development have complex character and could be considered as the next stage of complexity in comparison with the well known similar tasks which had been considered earlier

  13. Target identification of volatile metabolites to allow the differentiation of lactic acid bacteria by gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Janneth; Arce, Cristina; Jordano, Rafael; Arce, Lourdes; Medina, Luis M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the potential of gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (GC-IMS) to differentiate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) through target identification and fingerprints of volatile metabolites. The LAB selected were used as reference strains for their influence in the flavour of cheese. The four strains of LAB can be distinguished by the fingerprints generated by the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted. 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 2-heptanone and 3-methyl-1-butanol were identified as relevant VOCs for Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei. 2-Butanone and 3-methyl-1-butanol were identified in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactococcus cremoris subsp. cremoris. The IMS signals monitoring during a 24-30h period showed the growth of the LAB in vitro. The results demonstrated that GC-IMS is a useful technology for bacteria recognition and also for screening the aromatic potential of new isolates of LAB.

  14. Supervised Semi-Automated Data Analysis Software for Gas Chromatography / Differential Mobility Spectrometry (GC/DMS) Metabolomics Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirano, Daniel J; Pasamontes, Alberto; Davis, Cristina E

    2016-09-01

    Modern differential mobility spectrometers (DMS) produce complex and multi-dimensional data streams that allow for near-real-time or post-hoc chemical detection for a variety of applications. An active area of interest for this technology is metabolite monitoring for biological applications, and these data sets regularly have unique technical and data analysis end user requirements. While there are initial publications on how investigators have individually processed and analyzed their DMS metabolomic data, there are no user-ready commercial or open source software packages that are easily used for this purpose. We have created custom software uniquely suited to analyze gas chromatograph / differential mobility spectrometry (GC/DMS) data from biological sources. Here we explain the implementation of the software, describe the user features that are available, and provide an example of how this software functions using a previously-published data set. The software is compatible with many commercial or home-made DMS systems. Because the software is versatile, it can also potentially be used for other similarly structured data sets, such as GC/GC and other IMS modalities.

  15. Multiple Gas-Phase Conformations of a Synthetic Linear Poly(acrylamide) Polymer Observed Using Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haler, Jean R. N.; Far, Johann; Aqil, Abdelhafid; Claereboudt, Jan; Tomczyk, Nick; Giles, Kevin; Jérôme, Christine; De Pauw, Edwin

    2017-08-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has emerged as a powerful separation and identification tool to characterize synthetic polymer mixtures and topologies (linear, cyclic, star-shaped,…). Electrospray coupled to IM-MS already revealed the coexistence of several charge state-dependent conformations for a single charge state of biomolecules with strong intramolecular interactions, even when limited resolving power IM-MS instruments were used. For synthetic polymers, the sample's polydispersity allows the observation of several chain lengths. A unique collision cross-section (CCS) trend is usually observed when increasing the degree of polymerization (DP) at constant charge state, allowing the deciphering of different polymer topologies. In this paper, we report multiple coexisting CCS trends when increasing the DP at constant charge state for linear poly(acrylamide) PAAm in the gas phase. This is similar to observations on peptides and proteins. Biomolecules show in addition population changes when collisionally heating the ions. In the case of synthetic PAAm, fragmentation occurred before reaching the energy for conformation conversion. These observations, which were made on two different IM-MS instruments (SYNAPT G2 HDMS and high resolution multi-pass cyclic T-Wave prototype from Waters), limit the use of ion mobility for synthetic polymer topology interpretations to polymers where unique CCS values are observed for each DP at constant charge state. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Analysis of Phenolic Antioxidants in Navy Mobility Fuels by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    methyl phenol ECD Electrochemical detector GC-MS Gas chromatography with mass selective detection HT Hydrotreated HPLC High Performance...Antioxidants are often used to meet military storage stability requirements and are required in hydrotreated and alternative fuels. It is often necessary to...constituents to be quantifiable by this method. The single column method was successfully employed to measure TTBP depletion in hydrotreated Jet A fuels

  17. Express analysis of explosives, chemical warfare agents and drugs with multicapillary column gas chromatography and ion mobility increment spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakov, Igor A

    2004-02-05

    Description of a gas chromatograph designed for express analysis of explosives (2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate), chemical warfare agents (mustard gas, lewisite, sarin) and drugs (heroin, cocaine hydrochloride, crack) is given. The devices comprises a multicapillary chromatographic column and an ion mobility increment spectrometer (MCC-IMIS). The main analytical characteristics of an IMIS (estimated detection limit (DL), linear dynamic range (LDR), speed of response) and a chromatographic column (separation power, degree of separation, a number of possible peaks at a chromatogram section, divided by analysis time) are determined. The maximum value of DL equal to 5 pg/ml was registered for cis-alpha-LW, and the lowest one of 0.001 pg/ml was for cocaine. The maximum value of LDR equal to 1000 was registered for sarin and the lowest one of 150 was for the ions of lewisite. Speed of response of one compound detection with the IMIS was 0.7 s.

  18. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace-gas and criteria pollutant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the surface 50 m has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes, hence data at this level is necessary for addressing carbon cycle and public health related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous, on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions and assess the magnitude of CH4 emissions from known point sources. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.

  19. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace gas and criteria pollutant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the lower 50 m of the atmosphere has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes; hence data at this level are necessary for addressing carbon-cycle- and public-health-related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous, on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We assess the magnitude of known point sources of CH4 and also identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.

  20. Design and application of a mobile ground-based observatory for continuous measurements of atmospheric trace-gas and criteria pollutant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, S. E.; Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Lai, C.-T.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of atmospheric trace gas species and criteria pollutants are essential for understanding emissions dynamics across space and time. Gas composition in the surface 50 m has the greatest direct impacts on human health as well as ecosystem processes, hence data at this level is necessary for addressing carbon cycle and public health related questions. However, such surface data are generally associated with stationary measurement towers, where spatial representation is limited due to the high cost of establishing and maintaining an extensive network of measurement stations. We describe here a compact mobile laboratory equipped to provide high-precision, high-frequency, continuous, on-road synchronous measurements of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O, NOx, O3, aerosol, meteorological, and geospatial position data. The mobile laboratory has been deployed across the western USA. In addition to describing the vehicle and its capacity, we present data that illustrate the use of the laboratory as a powerful tool for investigating the spatial structure of urban trace gas emissions and criteria pollutants at spatial scales ranging from single streets to whole ecosystem and regional scales. We identify fugitive urban CH4 emissions and assess the magnitude of CH4 emissions from known point sources. We illustrate how such a mobile laboratory can be used to better understand emissions dynamics and quantify emissions ratios associated with trace gas emissions from wildfire incidents. Lastly, we discuss additional mobile laboratory applications in health and urban metabolism.

  1. Computerized proof techniques for undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher J.; Tefera, Akalu; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2012-12-01

    The use of computer algebra systems such as Maple and Mathematica is becoming increasingly important and widespread in mathematics learning, teaching and research. In this article, we present computerized proof techniques of Gosper, Wilf-Zeilberger and Zeilberger that can be used for enhancing the teaching and learning of topics in discrete mathematics. We demonstrate by examples how one can use these computerized proof techniques to raise students' interests in the discovery and proof of mathematical identities and enhance their problem-solving skills.

  2. The Use of Mobile, Electrochemical Sensor Nodes for the Measurement of Personal Exposure to Gas-Phase Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, G.; Popoola, O. A.; Mead, M. I.; McKeating, S. J.; Calleja, M.; Hayes, M.; Baron, R. P.; Saffell, J.; Jones, R.

    2012-12-01

    , and thus also the potential insufficiency at quantifying the risks to health in the surrounding area. Recent campaigns with mobile sensor nodes have included attempts to probe the differences in personal exposure to gas-phase air pollutants at different heights of breathing zone and between different methods of transport.

  3. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Source Detection and Attribution in the San Francisco Bay Area of California Using a Mobile Measurement Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A.; Bower, J.; Martien, P. T.; Perkins, I.; Randall, S.; Stevenson, E.; Young, A.; Hilken, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Bay Area Air Quality Management District is the greater San Francisco Bay metropolitan area's chief air quality regulatory agency. Aligning itself with the Governor's Executive Order S-3-05, the Air District has set a goal to reduce the region's GHG emissions by 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The Air District's 2016 Clean Air Plan will lay out the agency's vision and actions to put the region on a path forward towards achieving the 2050 goal while also reducing air pollution and related health impacts. The 2016 Plan has three overarching objectives: 1) develop a multi-pollutant emissions control strategy, (2) reduce population exposure to harmful air pollutants, especially in vulnerable communities, and (3) protect climate through a comprehensive Regional Climate Protection Strategy. To accomplish one of 2016 Plan's control measures (SL3 - Greenhouse Gas Monitoring and Measurement Network), the Air District has fabricated a mobile measurement platform i.e. a GHG research van to perform targeted CH4 emissions hotspot detection and source attribution. The van is equipped with analyzers capable of measuring CH4, CO2 and N2O in ambient plumes at fast sampling rates. The coincident measurement of source tracers like isotopic methane (13C - CH4), CO and ethane (C2H6) provide the capability to distinguish between biogenic, combustion-based and fossil-based fugitive methane sources, respectively. The GHG research van is a comprehensive mobile tool to perform tracer-based GHG source identification and apportionment. We report observation-based source-specific tracer-to-tracer emission ratios from a region-wide survey of well-known area sources like landfills, wastewater treatment facilities and dairies, and compare those with similar ratios in the Air District's GHG inventory. We also investigate plumes from potentially under-inventoried sources like anaerobic digesters, composting operations, active and plugged oil and gas wells, and a natural gas storage

  4. Evaluation and application of static headspace-multicapillary column-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry for complex sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denawaka, Chamila J; Fowlis, Ian A; Dean, John R

    2014-04-18

    An evaluation of static headspace-multicapillary column-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (SHS-MCC-GC-IMS) has been undertaken to assess its applicability for the determination of 32 volatile compounds (VCs). The key experimental variables of sample incubation time and temperature have been evaluated alongside the MCC-GC variables of column polarity, syringe temperature, injection temperature, injection volume, column temperature and carrier gas flow rate coupled with the IMS variables of temperature and drift gas flow rate. This evaluation resulted in six sets of experimental variables being required to separate the 32 VCs. The optimum experimental variables for SHS-MCC-GC-IMS, the retention time and drift time operating parameters were determined; to normalise the operating parameters, the relative drift time and normalised reduced ion mobility for each VC were determined. In addition, a full theoretical explanation is provided on the formation of the monomer, dimer and trimer of a VC. The optimum operating condition for each VC calibration data was obtained alongside limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) values. Typical detection limits ranged from 0.1ng bis(methylthio)methane, ethylbutanoate and (E)-2-nonenal to 472ng isovaleric acid with correlation coefficient (R(2)) data ranging from 0.9793 (for the dimer of octanal) through to 0.9990 (for isobutyric acid). Finally, the developed protocols were applied to the analysis of malodour in sock samples. Initial work involved spiking an inert matrix and sock samples with appropriate concentrations of eight VCs. The average recovery from the inert matrix was 101±18% (n=8), while recoveries from the sock samples were lower, that is, 54±30% (n=8) for sock type 1 and 78±24% (n=6) for sock type 2. Finally, SHS-MCC-GC-IMS was applied to sock malodour in a field trial based on 11 volunteers (mixed gender) over a 3-week period. By applying the SHS-MCC-GC-IMS database, four VCs were

  5. Computerized sociometric assessment for preschool children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endedijk, H.M.; Cillessen, A.H.N.

    2015-01-01

    In preschool classes, sociometric peer ratings are used to measure children's peer relationships. The current study examined a computerized version of preschool sociometric ratings. The psychometric properties were compared of computerized sociometric ratings and traditional peer ratings for prescho

  6. Gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry as a hyphenated technique for improved explosives detection and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, AL; Marsden, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is currently being successfully applied to the problem of on-line trace detection of plastic and other explosives in airports and other facilities. The methods of sample retrieval primarily consist of batch sampling for particulate residue on a filter card for introduction into the IMS. The sample is desorbed into the IMS using air as the carrier and negative ions of the explosives are detected, some as an adduct with a reagent ion such as Cl(-). Based on studies and tests conducted by different airport authorities, this method seems to work well for low vapor pressure explosives such as RDX and PETN, as well as TNT that are highly adsorptive and can be found in nanogram quantities on contaminated surfaces. Recently, the changing terrorist threat and the adoption of new marking agents for plastic explosives has meant that the sample introduction and analysis capabilities of the IMS must be enhanced in order to keep up with other detector developments. The IMS has sufficient analytical resolution for a few threat compounds but the IMS Plasmogram becomes increasingly more difficult to interpret when the sample mixture gets more complex.

  7. A Mobile Sensing Approach for Regional Surveillance of Fugitive Methane Emissions in Oil and Gas Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, John D; Harvey, Tierney; Foderaro, Greg; Zhu, Pingping; Zhou, Xiaochi; Ferrari, Silvia; Amin, M Shahrooz; Modrak, Mark; Brantley, Halley; Thoma, Eben D

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses the need for surveillance of fugitive methane emissions over broad geographical regions. Most existing techniques suffer from being either extensive (but qualitative) or quantitative (but intensive with poor scalability). A total of two novel advancements are made here. First, a recursive Bayesian method is presented for probabilistically characterizing fugitive point-sources from mobile sensor data. This approach is made possible by a new cross-plume integrated dispersion formulation that overcomes much of the need for time-averaging concentration data. The method is tested here against a limited data set of controlled methane release and shown to perform well. We then present an information-theoretic approach to plan the paths of the sensor-equipped vehicle, where the path is chosen so as to maximize expected reduction in integrated target source rate uncertainty in the region, subject to given starting and ending positions and prevailing meteorological conditions. The information-driven sensor path planning algorithm is tested and shown to provide robust results across a wide range of conditions. An overall system concept is presented for optionally piggybacking of these techniques onto normal industry maintenance operations using sensor-equipped work trucks.

  8. Computerized Systems: Centralized or Decentralized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Linda Ludington

    1985-01-01

    Computerized management information systems have long been used in business, and data integration and sophisticated programing now enable many businesses to decentralize their information operations. This approach has advantages and disadvantages that colleges and universities must weigh and plan for carefully. (MSE)

  9. Mobilities Mobilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Pompeyo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Urry, John (2007 Mobilities.Oxford: Polity Press.Urry, John (2007 Mobilities.Oxford: Polity Press.John Urry (1946-, profesor en la Universidad de Lancaster, es un sociólogo de sobra conocido y altamente reputado en el panorama internacional de las ciencias sociales. Su dilatada carrera, aparentemente dispersa y diversificada, ha seguido senderos bastante bien definidos dejando tras de sí un catálogo extenso de obras sociológicas de primer nivel. Sus primeros trabajos se centraban en el campo de la teoría social y la filosofía de las ciencias sociales o de la sociología del poder [...

  10. Megacity emission plume characteristics in summer and winter investigated by mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements: the Paris metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. von der Weiden-Reinmüller

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available For the investigation of megacity emission plume characteristics mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements were carried out in the greater Paris region in July 2009 and January/February 2010 within the EU FP7 MEGAPOLI project. The deployed instruments measured physical and chemical properties of sub-micron aerosol particles, gas phase constituents of relevance for urban air pollution studies and meteorological parameters. The emission plume was identified based on fresh pollutant (e.g. particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, black carbon, CO2 and NOx concentration changes in combination with wind direction data. The classification into megacity influenced and background air masses allowed a characterization of the emission plume during summer and winter environmental conditions. On average, a clear increase of fresh pollutant concentrations in plume compared to background air masses was found for both seasons. For example, an average increase of 190% (+8.8 ng m−3 in summer and of 130% (+18.1 ng m−3 in winter was found for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plume air masses. The aerosol particle size distribution in plume air masses was influenced by nucleation and growth due to coagulation and condensation in summer, while in winter only the second process seemed to be initiated by urban pollution. The observed distribution of fresh pollutants in the emission plume – its cross sectional Gaussian-like profile and the exponential decrease of pollutant concentrations with increasing distance to the megacity – are in agreement with model results. Differences between model and measurements were found for plume center location, plume width and axial plume extent. In general, dilution was identified as the dominant process determining the axial variations within the Paris emission plume. For in-depth analysis of transformation processes occurring in the advected plume, simultaneous measurements at a suburban measurement

  11. Proton-driven amide bond-cleavage pathways of gas-phase peptide ions lacking mobile protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Suhai, Sándor; Somogyi, Arpád; Paizs, Béla

    2009-10-07

    The mobile proton model (Dongre, A. R., Jones, J. L., Somogyi, A. and Wysocki, V. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1996, 118 , 8365-8374) of peptide fragmentation states that the ionizing protons play a critical role in the gas-phase fragmentation of protonated peptides upon collision-induced dissociation (CID). The model distinguishes two classes of peptide ions, those with or without easily mobilizable protons. For the former class mild excitation leads to proton transfer reactions which populate amide nitrogen protonation sites. This enables facile amide bond cleavage and thus the formation of b and y sequence ions. In contrast, the latter class of peptide ions contains strongly basic functionalities which sequester the ionizing protons, thereby often hindering formation of sequence ions. Here we describe the proton-driven amide bond cleavages necessary to produce b and y ions from peptide ions lacking easily mobilizable protons. We show that this important class of peptide ions fragments by different means from those with easily mobilizable protons. We present three new amide bond cleavage mechanisms which involve salt-bridge, anhydride, and imine enol intermediates, respectively. All three new mechanisms are less energetically demanding than the classical oxazolone b(n)-y(m) pathway. These mechanisms offer an explanation for the formation of b and y ions from peptide ions with sequestered ionizing protons which are routinely fragmented in large-scale proteomics experiments.

  12. Detection of Potato Storage Disease via Gas Analysis: A Pilot Study Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Rutolo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry. In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection. A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation.

  13. Computerized tomography. Yesterday and today

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D. (Montreal Neurological Inst., Quebec (Canada))

    1983-10-01

    This presentation describes the evolution of computerized tomography over the past decade and its contribution to the radiologic investigation of neurologic disorders. This new technique has not only stimulated development in the diagnosis of cerebral diseases, but the whole body as well. Detailed investigation of the spine, spinal cord, sella turcica, the orbits, as well as the petrous pyramids has been made possible through the development of high resolution scanning.

  14. Intrinsic Limits of Electron Mobility in Modulation-Doped AlGaN/GaN 2D Electron Gas by Phonon Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Pang

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically present the intrinsic limits to electron mobility in the modulation-doped AlGaN/GaN two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) due to effects including acoustic deformation potential (DP) scattering, piezoelectric scattering (PE), and polar-optic phonon scattering (POP). We find that DE and PE are the more significant limiting factors at intermediate temperatures of 40 K to 250 K, while POP becomes dominant as room temperature is approached. Detailed numerical results are presented for the change of electron mobility with respect to temperature and carrier density. We conclude that these three types of phonon scattering, which are generally determined by the material properties but not the technical processing, are hard limits to the 2DEG mobility.

  15. Analysis of psilocybin and psilocin in Psilocybe subcubensis Guzmán by ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, T; Schneider, A; Regenscheit, P; Dirnhofer, R; Rücker, T; Jaspers, J; Kisser, W

    1999-01-11

    A new method has been developed for the rapid analysis of psilocybin and/or psilocin in fungus material using ion mobility spectrometry. Quantitative analysis was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after a simple one-step extraction involving homogenization of the dried fruit bodies of fungi in chloroform and derivatization with MSTFA. The proposed methods resulted in rapid procedures useful in analyzing psychotropic fungi for psilocybin and psilocin.

  16. Conformational ordering of biomolecules in the gas phase: nitrogen collision cross sections measured on a prototype high resolution drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jody C; Goodwin, Cody R; Lareau, Nichole M; Leaptrot, Katrina L; Morris, Caleb B; Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Mordehai, Alex; Klein, Christian; Barry, William; Darland, Ed; Overney, Gregor; Imatani, Kenneth; Stafford, George C; Fjeldsted, John C; McLean, John A

    2014-02-18

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry measurements which describe the gas-phase scaling of molecular size and mass are of both fundamental and pragmatic utility. Fundamentally, such measurements expand our understanding of intrinsic intramolecular folding forces in the absence of solvent. Practically, reproducible transport properties, such as gas-phase collision cross-section (CCS), are analytically useful metrics for identification and characterization purposes. Here, we report 594 CCS values obtained in nitrogen drift gas on an electrostatic drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) instrument. The instrument platform is a newly developed prototype incorporating a uniform-field drift tube bracketed by electrodynamic ion funnels and coupled to a high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The CCS values reported here are of high experimental precision (±0.5% or better) and represent four chemically distinct classes of molecules (quaternary ammonium salts, lipids, peptides, and carbohydrates), which enables structural comparisons to be made between molecules of different chemical compositions for the rapid "omni-omic" characterization of complex biological samples. Comparisons made between helium and nitrogen-derived CCS measurements demonstrate that nitrogen CCS values are systematically larger than helium values; however, general separation trends between chemical classes are retained regardless of the drift gas. These results underscore that, for the highest CCS accuracy, care must be exercised when utilizing helium-derived CCS values to calibrate measurements obtained in nitrogen, as is the common practice in the field.

  17. Dopant-assisted negative photoionization Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with on-line cooling inlet for real-time monitoring H2S concentration in sewer gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Zhenxin; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2016-06-01

    Malodorous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas often exists in the sewer system and associates with the problems of releasing the dangerous odor to the atmosphere and causing sewer pipe to be corroded. A simple method is in demand for real-time measuring H2S level in the sewer gas. In this paper, an innovated method based on dopant-assisted negative photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (DANP-IMS) with on-line semiconductor cooling inlet was put forward and successfully applied for the real-time measurement of H2S in sewer gas. The influence of moisture was effectively reduced via an on-line cooling method and a non-equilibrium dilution with drift gas. The limits of quantitation for the H2S in ≥60% relative humidity air could be obtained at ≤79.0ng L(-1) with linear ranges of 129-2064ng L(-1). The H2S concentration in a sewer manhole was successfully determined while its product ions were identified by an ion-mobility time-of-fight mass spectrometry. Finally, the correlation between sewer H2S concentration and the daily routines and habits of residents was investigated through hourly or real-time monitoring the variation of sewer H2S in manholes, indicating the power of this DANP-IMS method in assessing the H2S concentration in sewer system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A computerized track detector reader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, S.W. (Centralne Lab. Ochrony Radiologicznej, Warsaw (Poland))

    1993-01-01

    The structure and basic operation function of a computerized facility named Track Detection Reader is described. This facility is used for recording, counting and evaluation of defects made by [alpha]-particles in a solid state detector. It consists of a microscope equipped with the movable stage, a TV screen and PC-AT computer. The microscope stage is being controlled by a stepper motor. The TV screen enables surface visualization of the detector analyzed while the PC-AT computer is being used for digital analysis of the detector surface, according to the functions of the program. (author). 4 refs, 3 figs.

  19. Classification of biodiesel and fuel blends using gas chromatography - differential mobility spectrometry with cluster analysis and isolation of C18:3 me by dual ion filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupuleti, Dedeepya; Eiceman, Gary A; Pierce, Karisa M

    2016-08-01

    Fatty acid alkyl esters (FAAEs) were determined at 10-100mg/L in biodiesel and blends with petrodiesel without sample pre-treatment using gas chromatography with a tandem differential mobility detector. Selectivity was provided through chromatographic separations and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization reactions in the detector with mobility characterization of gas ions. Limits of detection were ~0.5ng with an average of 2.98% RSD for peak area precision, ≤1.3% RSD for retention time precision, and ≤9.2% RSD for compensation voltage precision. Biodiesel blends were classified using principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Unsupervised cluster analysis captured 52.72% of variance in a single PC while supervised analysis captured 71.64% of variance using Fisher ratio feature selection. Test set predictions showed successful clustering according to source or feedstock when regressed onto the training set model. Detection of the regulated substance methyl linolenate (C18:3 me) was achieved in 6-10s with a 1m long capillary column using dual ion filtering in the tandem differential mobility detector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Computerized classification testing with the Rasch model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggen, Theo J.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    If classification in a limited number of categories is the purpose of testing, computerized adaptive tests (CATs) with algorithms based on sequential statistical testing perform better than estimation-based CATs (e.g., Eggen & Straetmans, 2000). In these computerized classification tests (CCTs), the

  1. A First Life with Computerized Business Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavikulwat, Precha

    2011-01-01

    The author discusses the theoretical lens, origins, and environment of his work on computerized business simulations. Key ideas that inform his work include the two dimensions (control and interaction) of computerized simulation, the two ways of representing a natural process (phenotypical and genotypical) in a simulation, which he defines as a…

  2. Computerizing primary schools in rural kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogembo, J.G.; Ngugi, B.; Pelowski, Matthew John

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the outstanding challenges facing primary schools' computerization in rural Kenya. Computerization of schools is often envisaged as a 'magic', or at least a particularly efficient, solution to many of the problems that developing countries face in improving primary school...

  3. Resources for Improving Computerized Learning Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an annotated review of human factors literature that discusses computerized environments. Topics discussed include the application of office automation practices to educational environments; video display terminal (VDT) workstations; health and safety hazards; planning educational facilities; ergonomics in computerized offices; and…

  4. The Evaluation of SISMAKOM (Computerized SDI Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Science, Penang (Malaysia).

    A survey of 88 users of SISMAKOM, a computerized selective dissemination of information (SDI) and document delivery service provided by the Universiti Sains Malaysia and four other Malaysian universities, was conducted in August 1982 in order to collect data about SISMAKOM and to assess the value of a computerized SDI service in a developing…

  5. Computerized Sociometric Assessment for Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endedijk, Hinke M.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In preschool classes, sociometric peer ratings are used to measure children's peer relationships. The current study examined a computerized version of preschool sociometric ratings. The psychometric properties were compared of computerized sociometric ratings and traditional peer ratings for preschoolers. The distributions, inter-item…

  6. A high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas at the spinel/perovskite interface of γ-Al2O3/SrTiO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Bovet, N.; Trier, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of two-dimensional electron gases at the heterointerface between two insulating perovskite-type oxides, such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, provides opportunities for a new generation of all-oxide electronic devices. Key challenges remain for achieving interfacial electron mobilities much be...... confined within a layer of 0.9 nm in proximity to the interface. Our findings pave the way for studies of mesoscopic physics with complex oxides and design of high-mobility all-oxide electronic devices.......The discovery of two-dimensional electron gases at the heterointerface between two insulating perovskite-type oxides, such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3, provides opportunities for a new generation of all-oxide electronic devices. Key challenges remain for achieving interfacial electron mobilities much...... beyond the current value of approximately 1,000 cm2V-1 s-1 (at low temperatures). Here we create a new type of two-dimensional electron gas at the heterointerface between SrTiO3 and a spinel g-Al2O3 epitaxial film with compatible oxygen ions sublattices. Electron mobilities more than one order...

  7. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state.

  8. Static headspace-multicapillary column with gas chromatography coupled to ion mobility spectrometry as a simple approach for the discrimination of crude and processed traditional Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Shou, Qiyang; Li, Qinglin; Jiang, Jianping; Chen, Xiaocheng

    2014-11-01

    The processing procedure can alter the nature and chemical transformation of traditional Chinese medicine to accommodate different clinical dispensing and preparation requirements. In this study, static headspace-multicapillary column with gas chromatography coupled to ion mobility spectrometry was developed for the rapid and sensitive discrimination of crude and processed traditional Chinese medicine. Using Radix Paeoniae Alba as a traditional Chinese medicine model, the combined power of this approach was illustrated by classifying the crude and processed Radix Paeoniae Alba samples into two main categories. The contents of the main components in Radix Paeoniae Alba varied significantly. The established method could promote the use of ion mobility spectrometry in intrinsic quality control and differentiation of herbal medicines from other processed products or preparations.

  9. Terahertz optical-Hall effect characterization of two-dimensional electron gas properties in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöche, S.; Shi, Junxia; Boosalis, A.; Kühne, P.; Herzinger, C. M.; Woollam, J. A.; Schaff, W. J.; Eastman, L. F.; Schubert, M.; Hofmann, T.

    2011-02-01

    The free-charge carrier mobility, sheet density, and effective mass of a two-dimensional electron gas are exemplarily determined in the spectral range from 640 GHz to 1 THz in a AlGaN/GaN heterostructure using the optical-Hall effect at room temperature. Complementary midinfrared spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements are performed for analysis of heterostructure constituents layer thickness, phonon mode, and free-charge carrier parameters. The electron effective mass is determined to be (0.22±0.04)m0. The high-frequency sheet density and carrier mobility parameters are in good agreement with results from dc electrical Hall effect measurements, indicative for frequency-independent carrier scattering mechanisms of the two-dimensional carrier distribution.

  10. Isomer separation and gas-phase configurations of organoruthenium anticancer complexes: ion mobility mass spectrometry and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan P; Bugarcic, Tijana; Habtemariam, Abraha; Giles, Kevin; Campuzano, Iain; Rodger, P Mark; Sadler, Peter J

    2009-06-01

    We have used ion mobility-mass spectrometry combined with molecular modeling for the separation and configurational analysis of three low-molecular-weight isomeric organoruthenium anticancer complexes containing ortho-, meta-, or para-terphenyl arene ligands. The isomers were separated using ion mobility based on traveling-wave technology and the experimentally determined collision cross sections were compared to theoretical calculations. Excellent agreement was observed between the experimentally and theoretically derived measurements.

  11. Scintillation detectors in computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilar, O.; Pavlicek, Z.; Jursova, L. (Tesla, Premysleni (Czechoslovakia). Vyzkumny Ustav Pristroju Jaderne Techniky)

    1984-07-01

    A new scintillator, Bi/sub 4/Ge/sub 3/O/sub 12/ (BGO), was tested for use in the detection part of computerized tomographs. In comparison with the NaI(Tl) scintillator it has a three-fold mass stopping power and allows the detection of medium and high energy gamma radiation with a higher detection efficiency, i.e., for the same detection efficiency its size is much smaller. Some other mechanical, physical and optical parameters of the BGO scintillator are given. BGO is prospective for use in high energy spectrometry and may replace NaI(Tl) wherever the following parameters are significant: crystal size, detection efficiency for gamma radiation, and good spatial resolution.

  12. Psychometrics behind Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-03-01

    The paper provides a survey of 18 years' progress that my colleagues, students (both former and current) and I made in a prominent research area in Psychometrics-Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). We start with a historical review of the establishment of a large sample foundation for CAT. It is worth noting that the asymptotic results were derived under the framework of Martingale Theory, a very theoretical perspective of Probability Theory, which may seem unrelated to educational and psychological testing. In addition, we address a number of issues that emerged from large scale implementation and show that how theoretical works can be helpful to solve the problems. Finally, we propose that CAT technology can be very useful to support individualized instruction on a mass scale. We show that even paper and pencil based tests can be made adaptive to support classroom teaching.

  13. Capillary electrophoresis, gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis, and electron microscopy: effective tools for quality assessment and basic rhinovirus research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Victor U; Subirats, Xavier; Kumar, Mohit; Harutyunyan, Shushan; Gösler, Irene; Kowalski, Heinrich; Blaas, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We describe standard methods for propagation, purification, quality control, and physicochemical characterization of human rhinoviruses, using HRV-A2 as an example. Virus is propagated in HeLa-OHIO cells grown in suspension culture and purified via sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Purity and homogeneity of the preparations are assessed with SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), capillary electrophoresis (CE), gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA), and electron microscopy (EM). We also briefly describe usage of these methods for the characterization of subviral particles as well as for the analysis of their complexes with antibodies and soluble recombinant receptor mimics.

  14. Quantum and Transport Mobilities of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in the Presence of the Rashba Spin-Orbit Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A systematic theoretical approach is developed to study the electronic and transport properties of a twodimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the presence of spin-orbit interactions induced by the Rashba effect. The standard random-phase approximation is employed to calculate the screening length caused by electron-electron interaction in different transition channels. The quantum and transport mobilities in different spin branches are evaluated using the momentum-balance equation derived from the Boltzmann equation,in which the electron interactions with both the remote and background impurities are taken into account in an InAlAs/InGaAs heterojunction at low-temperatures.

  15. Combining Non Selective Gas Sensors on a Mobile Robot for Identification and Mapping of Multiple Chemical Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Hernandez Bennetts

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the task of gas distribution modeling in scenarios where multiple heterogeneous compounds are present. Gas distribution modeling is particularly useful in emission monitoring applications where spatial representations of the gaseous patches can be used to identify emission hot spots. In realistic environments, the presence of multiple chemicals is expected and therefore, gas discrimination has to be incorporated in the modeling process. The approach presented in this work addresses the task of gas distribution modeling by combining different non selective gas sensors. Gas discrimination is addressed with an open sampling system, composed by an array of metal oxide sensors and a probabilistic algorithm tailored to uncontrolled environments. For each of the identified compounds, the mapping algorithm generates a calibrated gas distribution model using the classification uncertainty and the concentration readings acquired with a photo ionization detector. The meta parameters of the proposed modeling algorithm are automatically learned from the data. The approach was validated with a gas sensitive robot patrolling outdoor and indoor scenarios, where two different chemicals were released simultaneously. The experimental results show that the generated multi compound maps can be used to accurately predict the location of emitting gas sources.

  16. Combining non selective gas sensors on a mobile robot for identification and mapping of multiple chemical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetts, Victor Hernandez; Schaffernicht, Erik; Pomareda, Victor; Lilienthal, Achim J; Marco, Santiago; Trincavelli, Marco

    2014-09-17

    In this paper, we address the task of gas distribution modeling in scenarios where multiple heterogeneous compounds are present. Gas distribution modeling is particularly useful in emission monitoring applications where spatial representations of the gaseous patches can be used to identify emission hot spots. In realistic environments, the presence of multiple chemicals is expected and therefore, gas discrimination has to be incorporated in the modeling process. The approach presented in this work addresses the task of gas distribution modeling by combining different non selective gas sensors. Gas discrimination is addressed with an open sampling system, composed by an array of metal oxide sensors and a probabilistic algorithm tailored to uncontrolled environments. For each of the identified compounds, the mapping algorithm generates a calibrated gas distribution model using the classification uncertainty and the concentration readings acquired with a photo ionization detector. The meta parameters of the proposed modeling algorithm are automatically learned from the data. The approach was validated with a gas sensitive robot patrolling outdoor and indoor scenarios, where two different chemicals were released simultaneously. The experimental results show that the generated multi compound maps can be used to accurately predict the location of emitting gas sources.

  17. High mobility of the strongly confined hole gas in AgTaO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwingenschloegl, Udo; Nazir, Safdar; Upadhyay-Kahaly, Mousumi [KAUST, PSE Division, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-07-01

    A theoretical study of the two-dimensional hole gas at the (AgO){sup -}/(TiO{sub 2}){sup 0} p-type interface in the AgTaO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3}(001) heterostructure is presented. The Ag 4d states strongly hybridize with the O 2p states and contribute to the hole gas. It is demonstrated that the holes are confined to an ultra thin layer (∝ 4.9 Aa) with a considerable carrier density of ∝ 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. We estimate a hole mobility of 18.6 cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1}, which is high enough to enable device applications.

  18. Extension of the Breitbrunn/Eggstaett gas store of RWE-DEA and Mobil; Ausbau des Erdgasspeichers Breitbrunn/Eggstaett der RWE-DEA und Mobil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallmann, C.F.; Polk, H.J. [RWE-DEA Aktiengesellschaft fuer Mineraloel und Chemie, Hamburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The first stage of the work was completed in autumn 1996. Five horizontal boreholes were sunk down to a depth of 2000 m in tertiary chatt. The drilling method was described in detail at the DMK spring meeting of 1996. The working gas volume is 550 million cubic metres (V{sub N}). The second stage comprised the extension of the surface facilities and the drilling of 6 further boreholes into thes sands C and D below horizon B. The future working gas volume will be 1.08 thousand million cubic metres (V{sub N}). [German] Die 1. Baustufe konnte im Herbst 1996 in Betrieb genommen werden. Zuvor sind 5 Horizontalbohrungen bis in die etwa 2000 m tiefe Lagerstaette im tertiaeren Chatt abgeteuft worden. Ueber das im Horizont B eingesetzte Schaumbohrverfahren wurde auf der DGMK Fruehjahrstagung 1996 ausfuehrlich berichtet. Die barefoot komplettierten Speicherbohrungen haben ein Arbeitsgasvolumen von 550 Mio. m{sup 3}(V{sub N}) erschlossen. Fuer den Ausbau der Speichers sind nun im Rahmen einer 2. Baustufe die Obertage-Anlagen erweitert und 6 zusaetzliche Horizontalbohrungen niedergebracht worden. Sie erschliessen die unterhalb des Horizonts B liegenden Sande C und D. Das Arbeitsgasvolumen betraegt in Zukunft 1,08 Mrd. m{sup 3}(V{sub N}). (orig.)

  19. How useful is ion mobility mass spectrometry for structural biology? The relationship between protein crystal structures and their collision cross sections in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Barran, Perdita E

    2011-01-07

    The technique of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has become of increasing interest for rapid analysis of the conformations adopted by biological macromolecules. It is currently used routinely for analysis of explosives and illegal substances in airport and military security. In biophysical research, it can be used to determine the temperature dependent rotationally averaged collision cross section of gas-phase ions of proteins and nucleic acids along with their mass to charge ratios. Nanoelectrospray ionisation allows the gentle transfer of intact biomolecules from solutions in which the native form(s) are present, into the solvent free environment of a mass spectrometer. It is believed by many researchers that the experimental collision cross sections of these molecules should have some relationship to crystal structure coordinates. In this review we outline the different experimental methods that can be used to measure ion mobility; we also describe methods used to calculate collision cross sections from input coordinates. Following this survey of the methodological approaches to IM-MS, we then summarise IM-MS data published to date for some monomeric peptides and small soluble proteins, along with collision cross sections calculated from their crystal structure coordinates. Finally we consider the relationship between experimental gas-phase conformations and those adopted in crystals and give an outlook on the application of IM-MS as a tool for structural biology.

  20. FLEXIBLE MOBILE COMPUTERIZED SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING GROUND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Habarov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of highways environmental condition, in particular air pollution due to emission of hazardous substances into the atmosphere produced by exhaust gases of vehicles and the matters concerning traffic environment protection from hazardous radiation impact are considered.

  1. HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS FOR COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; David I. Gertman; Katya Le Blanc

    2011-09-01

    This paper provides a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures in nuclear power plant control rooms. It is beyond the scope of this paper to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper provides a review of HRA as applied to traditional paper-based procedures, followed by a discussion of what specific factors should additionally be considered in HRAs for computerized procedures. Performance shaping factors and failure modes unique to computerized procedures are highlighted. Since there is no definitive guide to HRA for paper-based procedures, this paper also serves to clarify the existing guidance on paper-based procedures before delving into the unique aspects of computerized procedures.

  2. Computerizing marine biota: a rational approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chavan, V.S.; Chandramohan, D.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Data on marine biota while being extensive are also patchy and scattered; thus making retrieval and dissemination of information time consuming. This emphasise the need for computerizing information on marine biota with the objective to collate...

  3. Modified Head Shake Computerized Dynamic Posturography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    form of dizziness (in- cluding complaints of lightheadedness, vertigo , or un- steadiness) lasting longer than 1 hr or recurring for greater than 1...noted limitations. Method: Forty participants ranging in age from 20 to 79 years with no history of dizziness completed Conditions 2 and 5 of the SOT...shake, Sensory Organization Test, computerized dynamic posturography, dizziness Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) is anassessment of an

  4. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  5. On Development and Characterisation of a Mobile and Metrologically Traceable Reference Gas Generator for Ammonia and Other Reactive Species in Ambient Air Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Daiana; Pascale, Céline; Guillevic, Myriam; Ackermann, Andreas; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia NH3 in the atmosphere is the major precursor for neutralising atmospheric acids and is thus affecting not only the long-range transport of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides but also stabilies secondary particulate matter. These aerosols have negative impacts on air quality and human health. Moreover, they negatively affect terrestrial ecosystems after deposition. NH3 has been included in the air quality monitoring networks and emission reduction directives of European nations. Atmospheric concentrations are in the order of 0.5-500 nmol/mol. However, the lowest substance amount fraction of available certified reference material (CRM) is 30 μmol/mol. The EMRP JRP ENV55 MetNH3 aims at overcoming this discrepancy by assessing and developing novel approaches for the production of CRM and measurement methods. The Federal Institute of Metrology METAS has developed a mobile and metrologically traceable reference gas generator for reactive gases (ReGaS1). This device is based on the specific temperature dependent permeation of the reference substance through a membrane into a flow of carrier gas and subsequent dynamic dilution to desired amount fractions. The characteristics of individual components lead to the uncertainty estimation for the generated NH3 gas mixture according to GUM, which is aimed to be <3 %. Here we present insights into the development of said instrument and results of the first performance tests. Moreover, we include results of the study on adsorption/desorption effects in dry as well as humidified matrix gas into the discussion on the generation of reference gas mixtures.

  6. Atmospheric pressure ionization and gas phase ion mobility studies of isomeric dihalogenated benzenes using different ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2004-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) featuring different ionization techniques was used to analyze isomeric ortho-, meta- and para-dihalogenated benzenes in order to assess how structural features affect ion formation and drift behavior. The structure of the product ions formed was investigated by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and IMS-MS coupling. Photoionization provided [M]+ ions for chlorinated and fluorinated compounds while bromine was cleaved from isomers of dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene. This ionization technique does not permit the different isomers to be distinguished. Comparable ions and additional clustered ions were obtained using 63Ni ionization. Depending on the chemical constitution, different clustered ions were observed in ion mobility spectra for the separate isomers of dichlorobenzene and dibromobenzene. Corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of dihalogenated compounds. Only clustered product ions were obtained. Corona discharge ionization enables the classification of different structural isomers of dichlorobenzene, dibromobenzene and bromofluorobenzene.

  7. The Effects of Manufacturing Automation on the Surge and Mobilization Capabilities of the Gas Turbine Engine Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    Manufacturina Modernization The continuous evolutionary process of implementing machines to do the work previously done by manual labor has continued...are one of the most critical problems facing companies as they try to implement CAD and CAM systems (9:126). Manual integration is often used to work...ability to surge or mobilize produccion . Why? AFSC Regulation 800-17 Technology Modernization (Tech Mod) requires that the benefits of Tech Mod will

  8. Computerized Adaptive Personality Testing: A Review and Illustration With the MMPI-2 Computerized Adaptive Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbey, Johnathan D.; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.

    2007-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing in personality assessment can improve efficiency by significantly reducing the number of items administered to answer an assessment question. Two approaches have been explored for adaptive testing in computerized personality assessment: item response theory and the countdown method. In this article, the authors…

  9. PROMINP (Program of Mobilization of the National Industry of Oil and Natural Gas): synergy in the national industry; PROMINP (Programa de Mobilizacao da Industria Nacional de Petroleo e Gas Natural): sinergia na industria nacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Jose Renato Ferreira de; Campos, Michel Fabianski; Lopesm Ronaldo Rangel; Lisboa, Vitor Manuel dos Santos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The Federal Government identified, from the forecast of massive investments in the sector of oil and natural gas in the next years, that it was establishing a favorable environment to foment the participation of the national industry of goods and services, in competitive and sustainable bases, in the implantation of projects of oil and gas in Brazil. Thus, in 2003, it was born the Program of Mobilization of the National Industry of Oil and Natural Gas - PROMINP. From an ample diagnosis of the necessary critical resources, throughout the time, for the implementation of the planned projects, the PROMINP identifies the gaps related to the professional qualification, industrial infrastructure and supply of materials and equipment, and, to surpass these challenges, it has lead, in these five years of existence, an expressive set of action for each one of the cited sources, of form to assure the competitiveness of the Industry of Supply of Goods and services and the support of this process. Such actions are elaborated and developed of joint form it enters all the participants of the chain. Since the creation of the PROMINP, the participation of the national industry (Local Content) in the investments of the sector increased of 57% in 2003 for 75% in 2007, what it means a US$ addition 8,3 billion orders of goods and services in the national market and generated more than 390 thousand new jobs. (author)

  10. Mobile Phone Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, an employee of a real estate firm is contacting his office by means of HICOM, an advanced central terminal for mobile telephones. Developed by the Orlando Division of Martin Marietta Aerospace, Orlando, Florida, and manufactured by Harris Corporation's RF Division, Rochester, N.Y., HICOM upgrades service to users, provides better system management to telephone companies, and makes more efficient use of available mobile telephone channels through a computerized central control terminal. The real estate man, for example, was able to dial his office and he could also have direct-dialed a long distance number. Mobile phones in most areas not yet served by HICOM require an operator's assistance for both local and long distance calls. HICOM improves system management by automatically recording information on all calls for accurate billing, running continual performance checks on its own operation, and reporting any malfunctions to a central office.

  11. Implementation of the ABL-90 blood gas analyzer in a ground-based mobile emergency care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Wolsing-Hansen, Jonathan; Nybo, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Point-of Care analysis is increasingly being applied in the prehospital scene. Arterial blood gas analysis is one of many new initiatives adding to the diagnostic tools of the prehospital physician. In this paper we present a study on the feasibility of the Radiometer ABL-90 in a ground...

  12. Human-eye versus computerized color matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, A U; Sim, C P; Loh, W L; Teo, J H

    1999-01-01

    This project compared the difference in color matching between human-eye assessment and computerized colorimetry. Fifty dental personnel were asked to color match Vita Lumin shade tabs to seven different randomly arranged test tabs from the Z100 shade guide. All evaluators were blinded to the shades of the test tabs and were asked to match only body shade of the Vita Lumin tab to the middle third or body of each test tab. The results obtained were subsequently computed into L*a*b* values and compared with results obtained by computerized colorimetry. Results indicate that the difference in color matching between human-eye assessment and computerized colorimetry is shade dependent. Discrepancy was significant for b* coordinates for shades A1 and B2 and L* and b* coordinates for shade C4. For all shades evaluated, color difference between human-eye and computerized color matching is perceivable under clinical settings, as delta E values are greater than 3. There is a need for correction factors in the formal specification of the color-matching software due to the discrepancy between human-eye and computerized colorimetric color matching.

  13. 气相色谱与离子迁移谱仪联用的研究%Research of gas chromatography-Ion mobility spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨俊超; 曹树亚; 杨柳

    2014-01-01

    气相色谱(Gas Chromatography)与离子迁移谱(Ion Mobility Spectrometry)的联用技术利用GC突出的分离特点和IMS快速响应、高灵敏度的优势有效地解决了GC低鉴别能力和IMS对混合物进行检测时存在的交叉灵敏度(cross sensitivity)问题,最后得到保留时间、漂移时间和信号强度的三维谱图,使定性分析更加准确。重点介绍GC-IMS联用技术的原理和优势,接口实现方法和主要影响因素,早期发展情况,存在主要问题和研究现状。%Hyphenated technique of the gas chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry has the high separation characteristic of GC and the fast response, high sensitivity of IMS. GC-IMS technique solves the low resolution capability of GC and the cross sensitivity problem when IMS was used to detect mixtures. The three dimensional spectrum results contain the retention time, drift time and signal intensity, which make the qualitative analysis more accurate. This paper mainly introduced the GC-IMS detection principle and advantages the interface implementation method and main factors,the early development problems and research status.

  14. Combined Mobile In Situ and Remote Sensing Investigation of the Aliso Canyon Natural Gas Leak in the Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. L.; Leifer, I.; Tratt, D. M.; Melton, C.; Frash, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Aliso Canyon natural gas leak in the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles, California was a major disruptive event whose societal impacts have continued well after the event itself ended, yet fortunately did not involve highly toxic gases. Chemical releases can have serious consequences for ecosystems, societies, and human health. Mitigating their destructive impacts relies on identification and mapping, monitoring, and trajectory forecasting. Improvements in the accuracy of such transport modeling capabilities can significantly improve the effectiveness of disaster response activities. Simultaneous plume characterization data were collected by the Mobile Infrared Sensor for Tactical Incident Response (MISTIR) and AutoMObile trace Gas (AMOG) Surveyor, two instrumented vehicles traveling in convoy. Surface vehicles have advantages over airplanes in terms of simpler logistics, such as not being limited by controlled airspace which is a major issue in Los Angeles, and ability to deploy rapidly. Moreover, it is the surface concentration that impacts human health and determines ecological damage. Fusion of the resulting correlative surface in situ observations and thermal-infrared spectroscopic column observations allowed both lateral and temporal plume characterization to derive emissions and to characterize the confining effect of topography on plume dispersion. Although a straightforward Gaussian plume inversion approach based on surface data yields an emission estimate with reasonable fidelity, it required assumptions of vertical profile and topographic influence that were validated by the column spectroscopic observations. Topographic factors within the Los Angeles Basin, including the Aliso Canyon locale, strongly influence transport processes. This situation challenges the predictive skill of numerical transport models that are used to assist the evacuation of at-risk communities, for example in the case of a refinery fire. This study demonstrated the utility

  15. Staging Mobilities / Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, urban research has taken a ‘mobilities turn’. There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not ‘just happen.’ Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed and lived...... as people are ‘staging themselves’ (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between ‘being staged’ (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the ‘mobile staging’ of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging mobilities is about the fact that mobility...... asks: what are the physical, social, technical, and cultural conditions to the staging of contemporary urban mobilities? The theoretical framing in the Staging mobilities book is applied to four in-depth cases in the accompanying volume Designing mobilities.This book explore how places, sites...

  16. Characterization of rhinovirus subviral A particles via capillary electrophoresis, electron microscopy and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Victor U; Subirats, Xavier; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Bilek, Gerhard; Winkler, Wolfgang; Kumar, Mohit; Allmaier, Günter; Blaas, Dieter; Kenndler, Ernst

    2012-07-01

    During infection, enteroviruses, such as human rhinoviruses (HRVs), convert from the native, infective form with a sedimentation coefficient of 150S to empty subviral particles sedimenting at 80S (B particles). B particles lack viral capsid protein 4 (VP4) and the single-stranded RNA genome. On the way to this end stage, a metastable intermediate particle is observed in the cell early after infection. This subviral A particle still contains the RNA but lacks VP4 and sediments at 135S. Native (150S) HRV serotype 2 (HRV2) as well as its empty (80S) capsid have been well characterized by capillary electrophoresis. In the present paper, we demonstrate separation of at least two forms of subviral A particles on the midway between native virions and empty 80S capsids by CE. For one of these intermediates, we established a reproducible way for its preparation and characterized this particle in terms of its electrophoretic mobility and its appearance in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the conversion of this intermediate to 80S particles was investigated. Gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) yielded additional insights into sample composition. More data on particle characterization including its protein composition and RNA content (for unambiguous identification of the detected intermediate as subviral A particle) will be presented in the second part of the publication.

  17. Comprehensive magnetotransport characterization of two dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures leading to the assessment of interface roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Manna Kumari [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India); Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, Dwarka, New Delhi-110078 (India); Sharma, Rajesh K., E-mail: rksharma@sspl.drdo.in; Manchanda, Rachna; Bag, Rajesh K.; Muralidharan, Rangarajan [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India); Thakur, Om Prakash [Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology, Dwarka, New Delhi-110078 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Magnetotransport in two distinct AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) on Fe-doped templates is investigated using Shubnikov de-Haas Oscillations in the temperature range of 1.8–6 K and multicarrier fitting in the temperature range of 1.8–300 K. The temperature dependence of the two dimensional electron gas mobility is extracted from simultaneous multicarrier fitting of transverse and longitudinal resistivity as a function of magnetic field and the data is utilized to estimate contribution of interface roughness to the mobility and the corresponding transport lifetime. The quantum scattering time obtained from the analysis of Shubnikov de Haas Oscillations in transverse magnetoresistance along with the transport lifetime time were used to estimate interface roughness amplitude and lateral correlation length. The results indicate that the insertion of AlN over layer deposited prior to the growth of GaN base layer on Fe doped GaN templates for forming HEMT structures reduced the parallel conduction but resulted in an increase in interface roughness.

  18. Comprehensive magnetotransport characterization of two dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures leading to the assessment of interface roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Kumari Mishra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotransport in two distinct AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE on Fe-doped templates is investigated using Shubnikov de-Haas Oscillations in the temperature range of 1.8–6 K and multicarrier fitting in the temperature range of 1.8–300 K. The temperature dependence of the two dimensional electron gas mobility is extracted from simultaneous multicarrier fitting of transverse and longitudinal resistivity as a function of magnetic field and the data is utilized to estimate contribution of interface roughness to the mobility and the corresponding transport lifetime. The quantum scattering time obtained from the analysis of Shubnikov de Haas Oscillations in transverse magnetoresistance along with the transport lifetime time were used to estimate interface roughness amplitude and lateral correlation length. The results indicate that the insertion of AlN over layer deposited prior to the growth of GaN base layer on Fe doped GaN templates for forming HEMT structures reduced the parallel conduction but resulted in an increase in interface roughness.

  19. State of the art stationary and mobile infrastructure for the dynamic generation and dilution of traceable reference gas mixtures of Ammonia at ambient air amount fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Daiana; Pascale, Céline; Guillevic, Myriam; Ackermann, Andreas; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) in the atmosphere is the major precursor for neutralising atmospheric acids and is thus affecting not only the long-range transport of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides but also stabilises secondary particulate matter. These aerosols have negative impacts on air quality and human health. Moreover, they negatively affect terrestrial ecosystems after deposition. NH3 has been included in the air quality monitoring networks and emission reduction directives of European nations. Atmospheric concentrations are in the order of 0.5-500 nmol/mol. However, the lowest substance amount fraction of available certified reference material (CRM) is 10 μmol/mol. This due to the fact that adsorption on the walls of aluminium cylinders and desorption as pressure in the cylinder decreases cause substantial instabilities in the amount fractions of the gas mixtures. Moreover, analytical techniques to be calibrated are very diverse and cause challenges for the production and application of CRM. The Federal Institute of Metrology METAS has developed, partially in the framework of EMRP JRP ENV55 MetNH3, an infrastructure to meet with the different requirements in order to generate SI-traceable NH3 reference gas mixtures dynamically in the amount fraction range 0.5-500 nmol/mol and with uncertainties UNH3 filling. The mobile system as well as these cylinders can be applied for calibrations in other laboratories and in the field. In addition, an SI traceable system based on a cascade of critical orifices has been established to dilute NH3 mixtures in the order of μmol/mol stored in cylinders for the participation in the international key-comparison CCQM K117. It is planned to establish this system to calibrate and re-sample gas cylinders due to its very economical gas use. Here we present insights into the development of said infrastructure and results of the first performance tests. Moreover, we include results of the study on adsorption/desorption effects in dry as well

  20. Fatigue lifespan of a mobile blade gas turbine with ceramic coating; Vida util por fatiga de un alabe movil de turbina de gas con recubrimiento ceramico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Illescas, Rafael; Z. Mazur Czerwiec, Zdzislaw; Islas Mungarro, Ricardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: rgi@iie.org.mx; mazur@iie.org.mx; rick_iie@terra.com.mx

    2010-11-15

    Fatigue analysis of a gas turbine moving blade made of IN738LC was carried out in order to evaluate useful life time. The life estimation was done from a previous 3D linear finite element analysis where thermal and mechanical stress calculation at high temperatures was done during steady and transient state i.e. normal start ups and shutdowns. Several load histories with different stresses and strains in the blade were used for different cooling conditions including a thermal barrier coating in comparison with to simple blade without such coating. The important effect of high temperatures on the blade material and stress calculations is shown. The analysis is focused on two different critical zones in the blade: the leading edge at the middle of the height and a cooling channel surface, where high stresses were found in numerical analysis as well as in reality. Finally, the benefit of the presence of a thermal barrier coating in the blade life is shown. [Spanish] Se realizo el analisis de fatiga de un alabe movil de turbina de gas fabricado de IN738LC a fin de evaluar su vida util. La estimacion de vida fue realizada a partir de simulaciones lineales de esfuerzos termomecanicos por elemento finito en 3D a altas temperaturas y durante el arranque y paro normal. Se utilizaron diversos historiales de carga, esfuerzos y deformaciones del alabe para diferentes configuraciones de enfriamiento incluyendo el recubrimiento ceramico tipo barrera termica en comparacion con los resultados sin incluir dicho recubrimiento. Se presenta el efecto importante de las temperaturas elevadas en las propiedades de fatiga del material del alabe y en sus esfuerzos. El analisis se centra en dos puntos de interes identificados como criticos: borde de entrada y un canal de enfriamiento, en donde esfuerzos elevados fueron encontrados tanto numericamente como en la realidad. Finalmente se muestra el beneficio del recubrimiento tipo barrera termica en la vida del alabe.

  1. Combining gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA), light scattering, field flow fractionation and cryo electron microscopy in a multidimensional approach to characterize liposomal carrier vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urey, Carlos; Weiss, Victor U; Gondikas, Andreas; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Marko-Varga, György; Andersson, Roland

    2016-11-20

    For drug delivery, characterization of liposomes regarding size, particle number concentrations, occurrence of low-sized liposome artefacts and drug encapsulation are of importance to understand their pharmacodynamic properties. In our study, we aimed to demonstrate the applicability of nano Electrospray Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analyser (nES GEMMA) as a suitable technique for analyzing these parameters. We measured number-based particle concentrations, identified differences in size between nominally identical liposomal samples, and detected the presence of low-diameter material which yielded bimodal particle size distributions. Subsequently, we compared these findings to dynamic light scattering (DLS) data and results from light scattering experiments coupled to Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4), the latter improving the detectability of smaller particles in polydisperse samples due to a size separation step prior detection. However, the bimodal size distribution could not be detected due to method inherent limitations. In contrast, cryo transmission electron microscopy corroborated nES GEMMA results. Hence, gas-phase electrophoresis proved to be a versatile tool for liposome characterization as it could analyze both vesicle size and size distribution. Finally, a correlation of nES GEMMA results with cell viability experiments was carried out to demonstrate the importance of liposome batch-to-batch control as low-sized sample components possibly impact cell viability. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nano electrospray gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (nES GEMMA) of liposomes: applicability of the technique for nano vesicle batch control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Victor U; Urey, Carlos; Gondikas, Andreas; Golesne, Monika; Friedbacher, Gernot; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Andersson, Roland; Marko-Varga, György; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-10-17

    Liposomes are biodegradable nanoparticle vesicles consisting of a lipid bilayer encapsulating an aqueous core. Entrapped cargo material is shielded from the extra-vesicular medium and sustained release of encapsulated material can be achieved. However, application of liposomes as nano-carriers demands their characterization concerning size and size distribution, particle-number concentration, occurrence of vesicle building blocks in solution and determination of the resulting vesicle encapsulation capacity. These questions can be targeted via gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) based on a nano electrospray (nES) charge-reduction source. This instrument separates single-charged nanoparticles in the gas-phase according to size in a high-laminar sheath-flow by means of an orthogonal, tunable electric field. nES GEMMA analysis enables to confirm liposome integrity after passage through the instrument (in combination with atomic force microscopy) as well as to exclude vesicle aggregation. Additionally, nanoparticle diameters at peak apexes and size distribution data are obtained. Differences of hydrodynamic and dry particle diameter values, as well as the effect of number- and mass-based concentration data analysis on obtained liposome diameters are shown. Furthermore, the repeatability of liposome preparation is studied, especially upon incorporation of PEGylated lipids in the bilayer. Finally, the instruments applicability to monitor mechanical stress applied to vesicles is demonstrated.

  3. Nano electrospray gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (nES GEMMA) of liposomes: applicability of the technique for nano vesicle batch control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Victor U.; Urey, Carlos; Gondikas, Andreas; Golesne, Monika; Friedbacher, Gernot; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Andersson, Roland; Marko-Varga, György; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes are biodegradable nanoparticle vesicles consisting of a lipid bilayer encapsulating an aqueous core. Entrapped cargo material is shielded from the extra-vesicular medium and sustained release of encapsulated material can be achieved. However, application of liposomes as nano-carriers demands their characterization concerning size and size distribution, particle-number concentration, occurrence of vesicle building blocks in solution and determination of the resulting vesicle encapsulation capacity. These questions can be targeted via gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) based on a nano electrospray (nES) charge-reduction source. This instrument separates single-charged nanoparticles in the gas-phase according to size in a high-laminar sheath-flow by means of an orthogonal, tunable electric field. nES GEMMA analysis enables to confirm liposome integrity after passage through the instrument (in combination with atomic force microscopy) as well as to exclude vesicle aggregation. Additionally, nanoparticle diameters at peak apexes and size distribution data are obtained. Differences of hydrodynamic and dry particle diameter values, as well as the effect of number- and mass-based concentration data analysis on obtained liposome diameters are shown. Furthermore, the repeatability of liposome preparation is studied, especially upon incorporation of PEGylated lipids in the bilayer. Finally, the instruments applicability to monitor mechanical stress applied to vesicles is demonstrated. PMID:27549027

  4. Evaluation of a new miniaturized ion mobility spectrometer and its coupling to fast gas chromatography multicapillary columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Herrador, E; Cárdenas, S; Ruzsanyi, V; Sielemann, S; Valcárcel, M

    2008-12-19

    A new miniaturized ion mobility spectrometer (microIMS) has been constructed and evaluated. The results obtained for a selected group of volatile organic compounds have been compared with those provided by an IMS of bigger dimensions with satisfactory conclusions. Moreover, its performance in terms of analytes resolution is better than those values given for other miniaturized instruments described in the literature. The possibility of an adjustable shutter opening time and the low intensity of the radiation source are also remarkable characteristics of the miniaturized detector. The small size of the microIMS enables its portability and its wide-range of applications as a sensor device. Six different substances supposed as respiratory markers of different diseases have been selected to prove the feasibility of the spectrometer constructed.

  5. Hierarchical Control for Optimised Operation of a Gas Plant At Mobil Oil La commande hiérarchique pour une conduite optimisée d'unité de gas plant (Mobil Oil française

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerbi O.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the interest and the benefit of hierarchical control through a typical example as applied to a gas plant. After a description of the hierarchical control principles, the plant is presented to highlight the interest of such an approach. The implemented control architecture consists of regular controllers and two Model Based Predictive Control algorithms (MONOREG and IDCOM-HIECON whose capabilities were helpful in this application. The implementation of these algorithms follows several steps which make use of the corresponding CAD tools. The performance is evaluated in different operating conditions, once the designed controllers are installed on the process computer. En s'appuyant sur une application exemplaire, cet article décrit l'intérêt et l'apport de la commande hiérarchique dans la conduite optimisée d'une unité. Après une description des principes de la hiérarchisation, la présentation de l'atelier gas plantmet en évidence l'intérêt d'une telle approche. L'architecture de commande fait intervenir des régulations classiques et deux algorithmes de commande prédictive mono et multivariable (MONOREG et IDCOM-HIECON dont les fonctionnalités sont mises à profit dans l'application. La mise en oeuvre de ces algorithmes comprend plusieurs étapes qui exploitent les outils de CAO associés. Après implantation dans le calculateur du site, les performances sont évaluées dans les différents modes opératoires.

  6. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F.; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions.

  8. The Construction and Uses of CATIA, a Computerized Mathematics Testbank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Charles R.; Marosz, Wanda A.

    1977-01-01

    Described is the construction of a computerized test bank to generate and score tests in college algebra, trigonometry, and intermediate algebra; including a discussion of uses, advantages and disadvantages of computerized testing. (JLH)

  9. The Construction and Uses of CATIA, a Computerized Mathematics Testbank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Charles R.; Marosz, Wanda A.

    1977-01-01

    Described is the construction of a computerized test bank to generate and score tests in college algebra, trigonometry, and intermediate algebra; including a discussion of uses, advantages and disadvantages of computerized testing. (JLH)

  10. Penerapan PID Predictive Air-Ratio Controller Pada Mesin Mobil Mitsubishi Tipe 4G63 Untuk Meminimumkan Emisi Gas Buang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendre Angga Prasetya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Seiring dengan adanya perkembangan sistem otomasi dalam dunia otomotif saat ini. dituntut untuk menghasilkan mesin dengan kadar emisi gas buang yang berada diambang batas kewajaran dan hemat bahan bakar sehingga diperlukan suatu sistem terhadap berbagai macam variabel yang mempengaruhi performansi mesin. Untuk menjaga supaya pemakaian bahan bakar pada kondisi optimal dapat diperoleh dengan cara mengatur waktu injeksi bahan bakar. Sistem waktu injeksi bahan bakar ini dipengaruhi oleh kecepatan mesin dan tekanan pada intake manifold. Dengan adanya pengaturan terhadap waktu injeksi bahan bakar akan meningkatkan efektifitas pembakaran yang secara tidak langsung juga mengurangi kadar emisi pada gas buang pada saat kondisi kecepatan stasioner. Pada tugas akhir ini, akan dilakukan penelitian tentang pengaruh waktu pengapian dan waktu injeksi yang diterapkan pada sistem pengaturan injeksi bahan bakar yang diaplikasikan pada mesin Mitsubishi 4G63 untuk mengatur waktu injeksi bahan bakar dan waktu pengapian pada saat mesin dalam kecepatan stasioner. Penelitian ini diujikan pada mesin Mitsubshi 4G63 empat silinder sebagai plant dengan kondisi kecepatan stasioner. Penerapan PID Predictive Air-Ratio Controller memberikan waktu injeksi  yang tepat pada saat kecepatan stasioner sehingga dapat menmaksimalkan perbandingan rasio udara sebesar 14,7 :1 standar performansi mesin .

  11. Recent improvements in mobile greenhouse gas analyzers and what they have done for top-down emissions verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in in-situ measurements of CO2, CH4 and N2O along with their isotopes and other associated tracers on moving platforms have opened the door to significant opportunities for directly measuring emissions of greenhouse gases from distributed and single-point emitters. By coupling advances in the stability and portability of these measurements with new techniques for sampling trace gases, it has been possible to advance our understanding of the processes that contribute most to greenhouse gas emissions, to understand the distribution of these emissions in space and magnitude, as well as to quantify the regional impact of these emissions. These advances can best be illustrated through the recent focus on the CH4 emissions from oil and gas production in the US and the deployment of in-situ measurements on aircraft, automobiles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Although these recent advances have significantly improved our ability to verify emission inventory estimates of CH4 emissions there are still gaps in our ability to extract multi-species information from point-source emissions and our ability to fully utilize the smaller UAV platforms that have reduced payload capacity and power.

  12. An Approach to Understanding Cohesive Slurry Settling, Mobilization, and Hydrogen Gas Retention in Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2009-05-22

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. Some of these vessels have mixing-system requirements to maintain conditions where the accumulation of hydrogen gas stays below acceptable limits, and the mixing within the vessels is sufficient to release hydrogen gas under normal conditions and during off-normal events. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries of solid particles suspended in Newtonian fluids that behave as non-Newtonian slurries, such as Bingham yield-stress fluids. When these slurries are contained in the process vessels, the particles can settle and become progressively more concentrated toward the bottom of the vessels, depending on the effectiveness of the mixing system. One limiting behavior is a settled layer beneath a particle-free liquid layer. The settled layer, or any region with sufficiently high solids concentration, will exhibit non-Newtonian rheology where it is possible for the settled slurry to behave as a soft solid with a yield stress. In this report, these slurries are described as settling cohesive slurries.

  13. Mobile marketing for mobile games

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Giang

    2016-01-01

    Highly developed mobile technology and devices enable the rise of mobile game industry and mobile marketing. Hence mobile marketing for mobile game is an essential key for a mobile game success. Even though there are many articles on marketing for mobile games, there is a need of highly understanding mobile marketing strategies, how to launch a mobile campaign for a mobile game. Besides that, it is essential to understand the relationship between mobile advertising and users behaviours. There...

  14. Computerized management information systems and organizational structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannetos, Z. S.; Sertel, M. R.

    1970-01-01

    The computerized management of information systems and organizational structures is discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) critical factors favoring centralization and decentralization of organizations, (2) classification of organizations by relative structure, (3) attempts to measure change in organization structure, and (4) impact of information technology developments on organizational structure changes.

  15. Computerized management support for swine breeding farms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huirne, R.B.M.

    1990-01-01

    1. INTRODUCTIONThe investigations described in this thesis have been directed towards computerized management support for swine breeding farms, focused on sow productivity and profitability. The study is composed of three basic parts: (1) basic description and definition of farm man

  16. The EORTC emotional functioning computerized adaptive test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamper, Eva-Maria; Grønvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aa

    2014-01-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is currently developing computerized adaptive testing measures for the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) scales. The work presented here describes the development of an EORTC item bank...

  17. An Introduction to the Computerized Adaptive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jian-quan; Miao, Dan-min; Zhu, Xia; Gong, Jing-jing

    2007-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has unsurpassable advantages over traditional testing. It has become the mainstream in large scale examinations in modern society. This paper gives a brief introduction to CAT including differences between traditional testing and CAT, the principles of CAT, psychometric theory and computer algorithms of CAT, the…

  18. The EORTC emotional functioning computerized adaptive test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamper, Eva-Maria; Grønvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aa;

    2014-01-01

    The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group is currently developing computerized adaptive testing measures for the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (QLQ-C30) scales. The work presented here describes the development of an EORTC item bank...

  19. Graphical Models and Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Almond, Russell G.

    This paper synthesizes ideas from the fields of graphical modeling and education testing, particularly item response theory (IRT) applied to computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Graphical modeling can offer IRT a language for describing multifaceted skills and knowledge, and disentangling evidence from complex performances. IRT-CAT can offer…

  20. [Computerization of hospital blood banks in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurat, G; Py, J-Y

    2012-11-01

    In France, most blood products are delivered by the établissement francais du sang, directly to the recipients, and hospital blood banks deliver a minor part, but are independent from it. However that may be, hospital blood banks are hazardous activities regarding to recipients, blood products, blood supply of the hospital and regional blood supply. Because of the high risk level, a computerized information system is compulsory for all hospital blood banks, except for those only devoted to vital emergency transfusion. On the field, the integration of computerization in the different processes is very heterogeneous. So, it has been decided to publish guidelines for computerizing hospital blood banks information systems and production management. They have been built according to risk assessment and are intended to minimize those risks. The principle is that all acquisition and processing of data about recipients or blood products and tracking, must be fully computerized and that the result of all manual processes must be checked by computer before proceeding to the next step. The guidelines list the different processes and, for each of them, the functions the software must play. All together, they form the basic level all hospital blood banks should reach. Optional functions are listed. Moreover, the guidelines are also aimed to be a common tool for regional health authorities who supervise hospital blood banks.

  1. Computerized adaptive testing: overview and introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Rob R.; Nering, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    Use of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) has increased substantially since it was first formulated in the 1970s. This paper provides an overview of CAT and introduces the contributions to this Special Issue. The elements of CAT discussed here include item selection procedures, estimation of the la

  2. Computerized Testing: The Hidden Figures Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ronald L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study adapted the Hidden Figures Test for use on PLATO and determined the reliability of the computerized version compared to the paper and pencil version. Results indicate the test was successfully adapted with some modifications, and it was judged reliable although it may be measuring additional constructs. (MBR)

  3. Computerized management support for swine breeding farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huirne, R.B.M.

    1990-01-01

    1. INTRODUCTION

    The investigations described in this thesis have been directed towards computerized management support for swine breeding farms, focused on sow productivity and profitability. The study is composed of three basic parts: (1) basic description and

  4. Computerized Financial Reporting Based on GAAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, Stan; Liljeberg, Burt

    1983-01-01

    Describes the statewide computerized system developed in Minnesota following the 1976 enactment of the Uniform Financial Accounting and Reporting Standards (UFARS) law. UFARS includes provisions for an advisory council responsible for recommending accounting and reporting procedures, and seven data processing centers to serve all 560 Minnesota…

  5. Desiccant dust and the use of CO2 gas as a mobility stimulant for bed bugs: a potential control solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aak, Anders; Roligheten, Espen; Rukke, Bjørn Arne; Birkemoe, Tone

    2017-01-01

    The common bed bug (Cimex lectularius, Hemiptera; Cimicidae) infests homes and service industries, and the number of infestations has greatly increased over the past 20 years. At present, no cost-effective control methods are available, and eradication programs are expensive and laborious. We investigated the control potential of desiccant dust in combination with CO2 as a bed bug activity stimulant. An initial experiment with two desiccant dusts was followed by arena studies with varying doses, available hiding places and the presence or absence of host signals. Finally, we conducted a field experiment with Syloid 244FP with or without CO2 gas. Syloid was superior compared to diatomaceous earth, and effective at the concentration of 1.0 g/m(2) in the field experiment. The number of harborages and partial application of desiccant dust decreased mortality in the laboratory. Bed bug activation by CO2 appeared of minor importance in the arena studies, but was crucial for the eradication in the student dormitories. In fact, all 5 bed bug-infested dormitories with a combined treatment of desiccant dust and CO2 were freed of bed bugs, whereas eradication was not successful in any of the 6 dormitories with only desiccant dust treatment. The different results in the laboratory and field experiment were most likely caused by the longer activation and higher dose of CO2 used in the field experiment than the laboratory experiment. Our study showed that application of desiccant dust in combination with release of CO2 gas to mimic human presence is a promising option for bed bug control.

  6. Gas-phase structure of amyloid-β (12-28) peptide investigated by infrared spectroscopy, electron capture dissociation and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thi Nga; Poully, Jean Christophe; Lecomte, Frédéric; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Manil, Bruno; Desfrançois, Charles; Chirot, Fabien; Lemoine, Jerome; Dugourd, Philippe; van der Rest, Guillaume; Grégoire, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    The gas-phase structures of doubly and triply protonated Amyloid-β12-28 peptides have been investigated through the combination of ion mobility (IM), electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry, and infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy together with theoretical modeling. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to explore the conformational space of these protonated peptides, from which several classes of structures were found. Among the low-lying conformers, those with predicted diffusion cross-sections consistent with the ion mobility experiment were further selected and their IR spectra simulated using a hybrid quantum mechanical/semiempirical method at the ONIOM DFT/B3LYP/6-31 g(d)/AM1 level. In ECD mass spectrometry, the c/z product ion abundance (PIA) has been analyzed for the two charge states and revealed drastic differences. For the doubly protonated species, N - Cα bond cleavage occurs only on the N and C terminal parts, while a periodic distribution of PIA is clearly observed for the triply charged peptides. These PIA distributions have been rationalized by comparison with the inverse of the distances from the protonated sites to the carbonyl oxygens for the conformations suggested from IR and IM experiments. Structural assignment for the amyloid peptide is then made possible by the combination of these three experimental techniques that provide complementary information on the possible secondary structure adopted by peptides. Although globular conformations are favored for the doubly protonated peptide, incrementing the charge state leads to a conformational transition towards extended structures with 310- and α-helix motifs.

  7. Characterization of rhinovirus subviral A particles via capillary electrophoresis, electron microscopy and gas phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Xavier; Weiss, Victor U; Gösler, Irene; Puls, Christoph; Limbeck, Andreas; Allmaier, Günter; Kenndler, Ernst

    2013-06-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are valuable tools in the investigation of early viral infection steps due to their far reaching (although still incomplete) characterization. During endocytosis, native virions first loose one of the four capsid proteins (VP4); corresponding particles sediment at 135S and were termed subviral A particles. Subsequently, the viral RNA genome leaves the viral shell giving rise to empty capsids. In continuation of our previous work with HRV serotype 2 (HRV2) intermediate subviral particles, in which we were able to discriminate by CE even between two intermediates (AI and AII) of virus uncoating, we further concentrated on the characterization of AI particles with the electrophoretic mobility of around -17.2 × 10(-9) m(2) /Vs at 20°C. In the course of our present work we related these particles to virions as previously described at the subviral A stage of uncoating (and as such sedimenting at 135S) by determination of their protein and RNA content--in comparison to native virions AI particles did not include VP4, however, still 93% of their initial RNA content. Binding of an mAb specific for subviral particles demonstrated antigenic rearrangements on the capsid surface at the AI stage. Furthermore, we investigated possible factors stabilizing intermediates of virus uncoating. We could exclude the influence of the previously suspected so-called contaminant of virus preparation on HRV2 subviral particle formation. Instead, we regarded other factors being part of the virus preparation system and found a dependence of AI particle formation on the presence of divalent cations.

  8. Simultaneous determination of benzene and phenol in heat transfer fluid by head-space gas chromatography hyphenated with ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado-García, L; Garrido-Delgado, R; Arce, L; López, F; Peón, R; Valcárcel, M

    2015-11-01

    The quantitative determination of some compounds such as benzene and phenol in a complex matrix by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) can be a difficult task, due to the influence of other components present in the matrix and the chemical properties of both compounds, such as their high volatility and low proton affinity. Monitoring of these compounds in a heat transfer fluid (HTF) is essential to check the correct working of a thermosolar plant and for safety and environmental reasons. Benzene and phenol, among other compounds, are produced when HTF is exposed to high temperatures in continuous cycles and their presence can decrease the efficiency of HTF. For the first time, a headspace module coupled to a gas chromatography column in combination with an IMS (with a tritium ionization source) has been optimized and fully validated to simultaneously quantify benzene and phenol in HTF. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) achieved with the method proposed were 0.011 and 0.038 g L(-1) and 0.004 and 0.014 g L(-1) for benzene and phenol respectively. The precision of the method was evaluated in terms of repeatability and reproducibility with all values lower than 9.2% and 13.3%, respectively. Results demonstrated that benzene and phenol were generated in the HTF heating process, and its concentration increased with heating time (approximately 483 h). The average concentration values for benzene and phenol in degraded HTF samples were not significantly different to values obtained using a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector instrument. Therefore, IMS is a promising technique for in-field quality control of HTF in a thermosolar plant due to its speed, versatility, sensitivity and selectivity to quantify these degradation compounds.

  9. 75 FR 13523 - Transparency Provisions of Section 23 of the Natural Gas Act; Notice of the Agenda for Form No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... appropriate? Panelists John Poe, Manager, Regulatory Affairs, ExxonMobil Gas & Power Marketing Company... American Gas Association). John Poe, Manager, Regulatory Affairs, ExxonMobil Gas & Power Marketing...

  10. Origin of fine oscillations in the photoluminescence spectrum of 2-dimensional electron gas formed in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, Dipankar, E-mail: dip2602@gmail.com; Porwal, S.; Oak, S. M.; Sharma, T. K., E-mail: tarun@rrcat.gov.in [Semiconductor Physics and Devices Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Jain, Anubha [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, New Delhi 110054 (India)

    2015-10-28

    An unambiguous identification of the fine oscillations observed in the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra of AlGaN/GaN based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures is carried out. In literature, such oscillations have been erroneously identified as the sub-levels of 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) formed at AlGaN/GaN heterointerface. Here, the origin of these oscillations is probed by performing the angle dependent PL and reflectivity measurements under identical conditions. Contrary to the reports available in literature, we find that the fine oscillations are not related to 2DEG sub-levels. The optical characteristics of these oscillations are mainly governed by an interference phenomenon. In particular, peculiar temperature dependent redshift and excitation intensity dependent blueshift, which have been interpreted as the characteristics of 2DEG sub-levels in HEMT structures by other researchers, are understood by invoking the wavelength and temperature dependence of the refractive index of GaN within the framework of interference phenomenon. The results of other researchers are also consistently explained by considering the fine oscillatory features as the interference oscillations.

  11. Comparison between theoretical and experimental results for energy states of two-dimensional electron gas in pseudomorphically strained InAs high-electron-mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Yui; Tange, Takahiro; Hirayama, Naomi; Iida, Tsutomu; Takanashi, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    The energy states of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in high-electron-mobility transistors with a pseudomorphically strained InAs channel (PHEMTs) were analyzed rigorously using a recently established theory that takes into account the nonparabolicity of the conduction band of the channel layer. The sheet density of the 2DEG in InxGa1-xAs-PHEMTs and the drain I-V characteristics of those devices were calculated theoretically and compared with the density and characteristics obtained experimentally. Not only the calculated threshold voltage (VTH) but also the calculated transconductance agreed fairly well with the corresponding values obtained experimentally. When the effects of the compositions of the InxGa1-xAs subchannel layer in the composite channel and the channel layer on energy states of 2DEG were investigated in order to establish a guiding principle for a design of the channel structure in PHEMTs, it was found that VTH is determined by the effective conduction-band offset energy ΔEC between the InAlAs barrier and the channel layers.

  12. Comparison of differential mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry for gas chromatographic detection of ignitable liquids from fire debris using projected difference resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Chen, Ping; Harrington, Peter B

    2009-08-01

    The significance of forensic arson analysis accelerates the applications of new technologies in this area. Based on the previously reported application of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a detection method for gas chromatography (GC) in arson analysis, the performances of DMS and mass spectrometry (MS) were compared using a novel chemometric tool, projected difference resolutions (PDRs). The PDR results show that one-way mass spectra data exhibit higher resolution than DMS data, while total ion chromatograms from GC-DMS show higher resolution than that from GC/MS for differentiating seven kinds of ignitable liquids. Combining the information from both chromatography and spectra, two-way data always have higher resolution than one-way data for these two detection methods, and GC/MS would exhibit better performance than GC-DMS according to the minimum resolution value. To verify the PDR results, a fuzzy rule-building expert system was applied for classifying these seven kinds of ignitable liquids from fire debris based on GC-DMS and GC/MS data, respectively. The prediction accuracies were consistent with PDR results, which proved that PDR is a powerful tool in comparing the performances of different analysis methods for pattern recognition.

  13. Computerized Interactive Gaming via Supporting Vector Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yang; Jiang, Jianmin; Palmer, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Computerized interactive gaming requires automatic processing of large volume of random data produced by players on spot, such as shooting, football kicking, and boxing. This paper describes a supporting vector machine-based artificial intelligence algorithm as one of the possible solutions to the problem of random data processing and the provision of interactive indication for further actions. In comparison with existing techniques, such as rule-based and neural networks, and so forth, our S...

  14. Computerized tomography in evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, R.F.; Resende, C.; Tishler, J.M.A.; Aldrete, J.S.; Shin, M.S.; Rubin, E.; Rahn, N.H.

    1984-08-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in 212 patients with histologically documented liver neoplasms seen during a 30-month period. The CT findings in cavernous hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia were specific, and permitted accurate diagnosis of this lesion before biopsy. The CT appearance of all other lesions was variable. CT is useful in providing an accurate evaluation of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic extent of the neoplasm.

  15. Computerized flow monitors detect small kicks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, D.; White, D. (Sedco Forex, Paris (FR))

    1992-02-24

    This paper reports on a smart alarm system installed on a number of offshore rigs and one land rig which can detect kicks more quickly than conventional systems. This rapid kick detection improves rig safety because the smaller the detected influx, the easier it is to control the well. The extensive computerized monitoring system helps drilling personnel detect fluid influxes and fluid losses before the changes in flow would normally be apparent.

  16. The Future of Computerized Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    available in digital form -- data such as newspaper articles, video, and books -- and can be searched according to topics and keywords , or sounds and...away from using observational or model- driven data to inform their decisions. At the same time, enhancements to methods for rapidly creating, merging...themselves---and that we need automated ways of reoptimizing as these metamodels evolve over time. Causal computerized decision making: As I discuss

  17. Errors associated with outpatient computerized prescribing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Salzberg, Claudia; Keohane, Carol A; Zigmont, Katherine; Devita, Jim; Gandhi, Tejal K; Dalal, Anuj K; Bates, David W; Poon, Eric G

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the frequency, types, and causes of errors associated with outpatient computer-generated prescriptions, and to develop a framework to classify these errors to determine which strategies have greatest potential for preventing them. Materials and methods This is a retrospective cohort study of 3850 computer-generated prescriptions received by a commercial outpatient pharmacy chain across three states over 4 weeks in 2008. A clinician panel reviewed the prescriptions using a previously described method to identify and classify medication errors. Primary outcomes were the incidence of medication errors; potential adverse drug events, defined as errors with potential for harm; and rate of prescribing errors by error type and by prescribing system. Results Of 3850 prescriptions, 452 (11.7%) contained 466 total errors, of which 163 (35.0%) were considered potential adverse drug events. Error rates varied by computerized prescribing system, from 5.1% to 37.5%. The most common error was omitted information (60.7% of all errors). Discussion About one in 10 computer-generated prescriptions included at least one error, of which a third had potential for harm. This is consistent with the literature on manual handwritten prescription error rates. The number, type, and severity of errors varied by computerized prescribing system, suggesting that some systems may be better at preventing errors than others. Conclusions Implementing a computerized prescribing system without comprehensive functionality and processes in place to ensure meaningful system use does not decrease medication errors. The authors offer targeted recommendations on improving computerized prescribing systems to prevent errors. PMID:21715428

  18. Changing to computerized documentation--plus!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, J

    1993-07-01

    A recent change to a computerized documentation system has had a positive influence on productivity, reliability of documentation, quality assurance, nurse satisfaction and professional practice. This software system combines the care plan and nurses' notes and is standard-based. Each patient's care plan is compiled from Units of Care, which provide a menu covering nursing diagnosis, medical diagnosis, chief complaints and special procedures and events.

  19. Computerized analysis of the smile in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Vicente de Moura LOPES

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In most cases the search for orthodontic treatment is related withesthetics cause. Nowadays, a beautiful smile is extremely importantfor the society. Establishing elements for diagnosis and planning,looking at a harmonious and well-balanced smile became an obligation at dentistry offices. The esthetics is evaluated by the outline of the bone tissues and its relation with the soft tissues. A good way to get this evaluation is using photographs. The purpose of this research was to analyze computer standard pictures of the maximum smile, as complement to the orthodontic documentation to help not only in the diagnostic and planning but also in the valuation of obtained results. Standard pictures of the maximum smile were obtained in the natural position of the head. Linear,angular and proportional measures were evaluated through the computerized program (CEFX2001 – CDT. The sample consisted of 28 patients, white, male, age between 19 and 25 years old, with Class I occlusion and no previous orthodontic treatment. The values of the descriptive statistics and error analysis were obtained. The results were compared with the values found in the literature, and the values found at a study using the same computerized program CEFX2001 – CDT, but with female patients. The final results were similar to the values found in the literature and the values found in a study using the same computerized program CEFX2001 – CDT,but with female patients.

  20. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Vishal; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Nikil; Gupta, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided) or dynamic (navigated) systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias), in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry. PMID:25810585

  1. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkle Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided or dynamic (navigated systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias, in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry.

  2. LUNGx Challenge for computerized lung nodule classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armato, Samuel G; Drukker, Karen; Li, Feng; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Tourassi, Georgia D; Engelmann, Roger M; Giger, Maryellen L; Redmond, George; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin S; Clarke, Laurence P

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to describe the LUNGx Challenge for the computerized classification of lung nodules on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans as benign or malignant and report the performance of participants' computerized methods along with that of six radiologists who participated in an observer study performing the same Challenge task on the same dataset. The Challenge provided sets of calibration and testing scans, established a performance assessment process, and created an infrastructure for case dissemination and result submission. Ten groups applied their own methods to 73 lung nodules (37 benign and 36 malignant) that were selected to achieve approximate size matching between the two cohorts. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values for these methods ranged from 0.50 to 0.68; only three methods performed statistically better than random guessing. The radiologists' AUC values ranged from 0.70 to 0.85; three radiologists performed statistically better than the best-performing computer method. The LUNGx Challenge compared the performance of computerized methods in the task of differentiating benign from malignant lung nodules on CT scans, placed in the context of the performance of radiologists on the same task. The continued public availability of the Challenge cases will provide a valuable resource for the medical imaging research community.

  3. Contribution of alloy clustering to limiting the two-dimensional electron gas mobility in AlGaN/GaN and InAlN/GaN heterostructures: Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh; Mishra, Umesh K. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Chalabi, Hamidreza [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kaun, Stephen W.; Shivaraman, Ravi; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    The influence of alloy clustering on fluctuations in the ground state energy of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN and InAlN/GaN heterostructures is studied. We show that because of these fluctuations, alloy clustering degrades the mobility even when the 2DEG wavefunction does not penetrate the alloy barrier unlike alloy disorder scattering. A comparison between the results obtained for AlGaN/GaN and InAlN/GaN heterostructures shows that alloy clustering limits the 2DEG mobility to a greater degree in InAlN/GaN heterostructures. Our study also reveals that the inclusion of an AlN interlayer increases the limiting mobility from alloy clustering. Moreover, Atom probe tomography is used to demonstrate the random nature of the fluctuations in the alloy composition.

  4. Mobile membrane introduction tandem mass spectrometry for on-the-fly measurements and adaptive sampling of VOCs around oil and gas projects in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, E.; Gill, C.; Bell, R.; Davey, N.; Martinsen, M.; Thompson, A.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The release of hydrocarbons into the environment can have significant environmental and economic consequences. The evolution of smaller, more portable mass spectrometers to the field can provide spatially and temporally resolved information for rapid detection, adaptive sampling and decision support. We have deployed a mobile platform membrane introduction mass spectrometer (MIMS) for the in-field simultaneous measurement of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. In this work, we report instrument and data handling advances that produce geographically referenced data in real-time and preliminary data where these improvements have been combined with high precision ultra-trace VOCs analysis to adaptively sample air plumes near oil and gas operations in Alberta, Canada. We have modified a commercially available ion-trap mass spectrometer (Griffin ICX 400) with an in-house temperature controlled capillary hollow fibre polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer membrane interface and in-line permeation tube flow cell for a continuously infused internal standard. The system is powered by 24 VDC for remote operations in a moving vehicle. Software modifications include the ability to run continuous, interlaced tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments for multiple contaminants/internal standards. All data are time and location stamped with on-board GPS and meteorological data to facilitate spatial and temporal data mapping. Tandem MS/MS scans were employed to simultaneously monitor ten volatile and semi-volatile analytes, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX), reduced sulfur compounds, halogenated organics and naphthalene. Quantification was achieved by calibrating against a continuously infused deuterated internal standard (toluene-d8). Time referenced MS/MS data were correlated with positional data and processed using Labview and Matlab to produce calibrated, geographical Google Earth data-visualizations that enable adaptive sampling protocols

  5. The Mobility of Electrons in Ammonia, Methylamine, and Water Vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanks, Daniel Kaye

    Measurements of the mobility (mu) of electrons photoinjected into ammonia, methylamine, and water vapors were carried out as a function of the gas density n (10('18) -10('20), 10('19)-10('20), and (TURN)10('19) cm('-3) for NH(,3), NeNH(,2), and H(,2)O, respectively). An anomalous drop in the normalized mobility n(mu) was observed as n was raised above 10('19) cm('-3) in the case of NH(,3) and MeNH(,2). It is proposed that the decrease in n(mu) is associated with the transition from free to localized states and possibly the solvation of the electrons into clusters of polar molecules similar to the solvating clusters observed for electrons in some polar liquids. A computerized data acquisition system was developed to measure the transient current of (TURN) 1 nanoamp and 1-1000 (mu)sec duration produced by the motion of electrons moving between two parallel plates in a constant electric field E. The electrons were injected into the gas by illuminating the cathode with a pulse of UV light provided by a xenon lamp or a dye laser. A computer program was developed to fit the transient curves to a theoretical equation and calculate the mobility (mu) and the longitudinal diffusion constant D(,L). This led to attempts to measure the electron temperature T(,e) = eD(,L)/k(mu) as a function of E, but distortions in the electric field were found to affect the diffusion constant too severely to produce reliable results.

  6. Computerized Information System for Nursing Educators; The First Step Towards Computerized Instruction or Computer Assisted Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvir, Howard P.

    This document outlines the guidelines and procedures for educators interested in using the Computerized Information System for Nursing Educators (CISNE), a project sponsored by Francophone International Learning Module Systems. In the first of the report's four sections are a brief description of CISNE guidelines for entry procedures and forms for…

  7. Computerized acoustical characterization system of medical phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazihah, M. D.; Kadri, S.; Yaacob, M. I. H.; Rosly, J.

    2013-05-01

    The development of a computerized acoustical characterization system of medical phantoms is described in this paper. The system employs the insertion technique and it was developed using LabView 2011 where the ultrasound signal was acquired through the interfacing scheme of an oscilloscope to a personal computer. The system performance was validated by comparing measured acoustical properties with values obtained from the previous studies. Other than faster measurement time, the developed system carried percentage difference at less than 1.00% for all of the acoustical properties measurements at 23.0°C to 25.0°C respectively.

  8. Visualization in the age of computerization

    CERN Document Server

    Carusi, Annamaria; Webmoor, Timothy; Woolgar, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Digitalization and computerization are now pervasive in science. This has deep consequences for our understanding of scientific knowledge and of the scientific process, and challenges longstanding assumptions and traditional frameworks of thinking of scientific knowledge. Digital media and computational processes challenge our conception of the way in which perception and cognition work in science, of the objectivity of science, and the nature of scientific objects. They bring about new relationships between science, art and other visual media, and new ways of practicing science and organizing

  9. Computerized documentation systems: blessings or curse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasses, F R

    1993-01-01

    This article considers the possibility that computerized documentation systems will negatively impact knowledge development in nursing. Ideas from three vantage points is presented. First, systems are being developed from theoretical frameworks that are not necessarily grounded in nursing, and these systems, in turn, influence the nurses's ability to process and conceptualize information. Second, computer systems may support the retrieval of empirical data to the elimination of other types of data necessary to the development of nursing knowledge. Third, computers may decrease opportunities for collegial dialogue. These factors together create an atmosphere of "technologic determinism" (Robinson & Robinson, 1990), which can inhibit the development of new ideas in nursing.

  10. Computerized axial tomography in clinical pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, D C; Kufta, C; Axelbaum, S P; Schellinger, D

    1977-02-01

    Computerized axial tomography (CAT), a noninvasive radiologie method, provides a new dimension in screening and diagnosis of intracranial pathology. Evaluation of 725 scans in infants and children demonstrates that CAT may be performed with negligible risk, although sedation and restraint are essential to the successful performance of studies in children under 6 years of age. CAT is the preferred initial diagnostic method in suspected hydrocephalls and is accurate in the detection and precise localization of brain tumors. The management of hydrocephalus and brain tumors has been significantly altered by the availability of CAT. Few invasive neuroradiologic procedures are required and pneumography is especially curtailed. Serial scanning is the best available method of monitoring ventricular alterations in hydrocephalus, tumor size during radiotherapy or chemotherapy, and postoperative recurrence of benign neoplasms. Complex intracranial anomalies are detectable with computerized tomography, but complete definition of pathology often requires angiography and air studies. Limited clinical experience in detecting neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage suggests that CAT will be a valuable tool for futlre investigations of that problem.

  11. Automatic computerized radiographic identification of cephalometric landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D J; Sinclair, P M; Coggins, J M

    1998-02-01

    Computerized cephalometric analysis currently requires manual identification of landmark locations. This process is time-consuming and limited in accuracy. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a novel method for automatic computer identification of cephalometric landmarks. Spatial spectroscopy (SS) is a computerized method that identifies image structure on the basis of a convolution of the image with a set of filters followed by a decision method using statistical pattern recognition techniques. By this method, characteristic features are used to recognize anatomic structures. This study compared manual identification on a computer monitor and the SS automatic method for landmark identification on minimum resolution images (0.16 cm2 per pixel). Minimum resolution (defined as the lowest resolution at which a cephalometric structure could be identified) was used to reduce computational time and memory requirements during this development stage of the SS method. Fifteen landmarks were selected on a set of 14 test images. The results showed no statistical difference (p > 0.05) in mean landmark identification errors between manual identification on the computer display and automatic identification using SS. We conclude that SS shows potential for the automatic detection of landmarks, which is an important step in the development of a completely automatic cephalometric analysis.

  12. The Reality, Direction, and Future of Computerized Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Sharing information in digital form by using a computer is a growing phenomenon. Many universities are making their applications available on computer. More than one hundred and thirty-six universities have developed computerized applications on their own or through a commercial vendor. Universities developed computerized applications in order to…

  13. [Diagnosis of toxic lesions of the brain using computerized tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushev, I I; Karpova, M N; Tskhovrebov, T M

    1990-01-01

    X-ray computerized tomography was used to examine the brain in 39 patients aged 14 to 39 years with different experience of using volatile narcotically acting substances. The discovered alterations make it possible to appraise the influence of toxic substances and the degree of brain atrophy, which attests to the diagnostic value of computerized tomography in patients with toxicomanias.

  14. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  15. Participatory design for computerization of clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie; Pedersen, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    There have been made many attempts on computerization of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), none have, however achieved any general application in clinical work practice. The objective of this paper is: (1) to raise awareness about the impact the design method used for computerization of CPGs......: PD as a design philosophy, PD as a toolbox and PD as a way to create a shared realm of understanding among IT-designers and health professionals as these are areas of utmost relevance for the design of computerized CPGs. Additionally, the application of PD for computerization of CPGs is illustrated...... by two cases. We conclude that PD is a beneficial approach for design of computerized CPGs. © 2011 Elsevier Inc....

  16. Simple setup for gas-phase H/D exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistarz, Ulrik H; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F; Rand, Kasper D

    2014-12-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) is a fast and sensitive, yet unharnessed analytical approach for providing information on the structural properties of biomolecules, in a complementary manner to mass analysis. Here, we describe a simple setup for ND3-mediated millisecond gas-phase HDX inside a mass spectrometer immediately after ESI (gas-phase HDX-MS) and show utility for studying the primary and higher-order structure of peptides and proteins. HDX was achieved by passing N2-gas through a container filled with aqueous deuterated ammonia reagent (ND3/D2O) and admitting the saturated gas immediately upstream or downstream of the primary skimmer cone. The approach was implemented on three commercially available mass spectrometers and required no or minor fully reversible reconfiguration of gas-inlets of the ion source. Results from gas-phase HDX-MS of peptides using the aqueous ND3/D2O as HDX reagent indicate that labeling is facilitated exclusively through gaseous ND3, yielding similar results to the infusion of purified ND3-gas, while circumventing the complications associated with the use of hazardous purified gases. Comparison of the solution-phase- and gas-phase deuterium uptake of Leu-Enkephalin and Glu-Fibrinopeptide B, confirmed that this gas-phase HDX-MS approach allows for labeling of sites (heteroatom-bound non-amide hydrogens located on side-chains, N-terminus and C-terminus) not accessed by classical solution-phase HDX-MS. The simple setup is compatible with liquid chromatography and a chip-based automated nanoESI interface, allowing for online gas-phase HDX-MS analysis of peptides and proteins separated on a liquid chromatographic time scale at increased throughput. Furthermore, online gas-phase HDX-MS could be performed in tandem with ion mobility separation or electron transfer dissociation, thus enabling multiple orthogonal analyses of the structural properties of peptides and proteins in a single automated LC-MS workflow.

  17. Compliance with future emission standards of mobile machines by developing a monovalent natural gas combustion process; Einhaltung zukuenftiger Abgasnormen von mobilen Arbeitsmaschinen durch Entwicklung eines monovalenten Erdgas-Brennverfahrens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prehn, Sascha [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Kolbenmaschinen und Verbrennungsmotoren; Wichmann, Volker; Harndorf, Horst; Beberdick, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    Within the presented project a monovalent natural gas engine is being developed. Based on a serial diesel engine the operation mode of this prototype is changed to a spark ignition concept. The long term purpose of this new engine is an agricultural application. One major objective of the project is the investigation and evaluation of a combustion process, able to fulfil the performance requests as well as the European emission limits for nitrogen oxides NO{sub x}, and carbon monoxide CO of mobile machinery, which become into law in October 2014 (EU stage IV). At the time there are no legislative regulations existing regarding the methane emissions of the observed engines. To get a benefit in greenhouse gas emissions compared to diesel or gasoline engines the methane emissions have to be minimized while operating in natural gas mode. In the course of the current project an engine operation with a methane emission less than 0.5 g/kWh (representing the EURO VI limit for heavy duty vehicles) could be demonstrated. In contrast to diesel engines for agricultural applications it is possible to comply with the emission standards without using a high sophisticated after treatment system consisting of diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), particulate filter (DPF) and SCR catalyst. The usage of a three way catalyst optimized for high methane conversions is sufficient for a stoichiometry gas operation with exhaust gas recirculation. Therefore a significant cost advantage is given.

  18. Combined single photon emission computerized tomography and conventional computerized tomography: Clinical value for the shoulder surgeons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Hirschmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With the cases described, we strive to introduce single photon emission computerized tomography in combination with conventional computer tomography (SPECT/CT to shoulder surgeons, illustrate the possible clinical value it may offer as new diagnostic radiologic modality, and discuss its limitations. SPECT/CT may facilitate the establishment of diagnosis, process of decision making, and further treatment for complex shoulder pathologies. Some of these advantages were highlighted in cases that are frequently seen in most shoulder clinics.

  19. Computerized tomographic evaluation of cerebral cysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Young; Lee, Mi Sook; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Precbyterian Medical Center, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-08-15

    Cerebral cysticercosis, unfortunately frequent in Korea, is a parastic disease in which man serve as the intermediate host of taenia solium. The larvae have a predilection for the central nervous system and can cause a variety of neurologic symptoms. The authors reviewed 19 cases of surgically proven cerebral cysticercosis and following results were obtained. 1. The most frequent age distribution was 5th and 6th decade and male to female ratio was 14:5. 2. The most frevalent involving site was cerebral parenchyme and following by ventricles. 3. Clinical manifestations were symtom and sign of increased ICP, seizure and focal neurological dificit. 4. It was assumed that computerized tomography was the procedure of choice for the diagnosis of these parasitic brain disease.

  20. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Geometric Computing Based on Computerized Descriptive Geometric

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hai-yan; HE Yuan-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided Design (CAD), video games and other computer graphic related technology evolves substantial processing to geometric elements. A novel geometric computing method is proposed with the integration of descriptive geometry, math and computer algorithm. Firstly, geometric elements in general position are transformed to a special position in new coordinate system. Then a 3D problem is projected to new coordinate planes. Finally, according to 2D/3D correspondence principle in descriptive geometry, the solution is constructed computerized drawing process with ruler and compasses. In order to make this method a regular operation, a two-level pattern is established. Basic Layer is a set algebraic packaged function including about ten Primary Geometric Functions (PGF) and one projection transformation. In Application Layer, a proper coordinate is established and a sequence of PGFs is sought for to get the final results. Examples illustrate the advantages of our method on dimension reduction, regulatory and visual computing and robustness.

  2. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  3. Organ doses from computerized tomography examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janeczek, J.

    1995-12-31

    Estimates of mean organs doses from five typical computerized tomography (CT) examinations were obtained. Measurements were done using Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). Radiation dose distributions within a phantom has been measured for each examination and results were used for organ dose calculation. Doses to organs specified by ICPR 60 Recommendations were measured for five CT scanners (CT/T8800, CT 9800, CT MAX - made by General Electric; CT 1200 SX - made by Picker; SOMATOM 2 - made by Siemens). Dose distributions from scattered radiation were measured and indicate that scattered radiation dose to thyroid and eye lens can be reduced by proper examination limits setting. The lowest mean organ doses were obtained from CT/T8800 scanner. More advanced scanners using high intensity continuous radiation were giving higher organ doses. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs, 13 tabs.

  4. COMPUTERIZED MODEL OF RISK MANAGEMENT IN BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrişor MANDU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of risk situation and the manager’s awareness of it are serious threats for the organization and its objectives. Consequently, the manager has to have available, analyze, select and interpret many pieces of information, under stress, before making a decision for avoiding a disaster. Under these circumstances, a computerized model of risk management is the most adequate solution to make the intervention possibilities effective through a quicker and more accurate intervention. The model offers enough confidence and a favorable psychological state for managing risk. In accordance with this model, the risk manager processes the information by means of some operational (mathematical methods and that favors reaching optimum solutions in the shortest delay, based on some estimated anticipations through a rational model.

  5. Sandia computerized shock compression bibliographical database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbeck, J.S.; Anderson, C.E.; Hokanson, J.C.; Asay, J.R.; Grady, D.E.; Graham, R.A.; Kipp, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    A searchable and updateable bibliographical database is being developed which will be designed, controlled, and evaluated by working technical experts in the field of shock-compression science. It will emphasize shock-compression properties in the stress region of a few tens of GPa and provide a broad and complete base of bibliographical information on the shock-compression behavior of materials. Through the operation of technical advisors, the database provides authoritative blbliographical and keyword data for use by both the inexperienced and expert user. In its current form, it consists of: (1) a library of journal articles, reports, books, and symposia papers in the areas of shock physics and shock mechanics; and (2) a computerized database system containing complete bibliographical information, exhaustive keyword descriptions, and author abstracts for each of the documents in the database library.

  6. Termination Criteria for Computerized Classification Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan A. Thompson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Computerized classification testing (CCT is an approach to designing tests with intelligent algorithms, similar to adaptive testing, but specifically designed for the purpose of classifying examinees into categories such as - pass- and - fail.- Like adaptive testing for point estimation of ability, the key component is the termination criterion, namely the algorithm that decides whether to classify the examinee and end the test or to continue and administer another item. This paper applies a newly suggested termination criterion, the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR, to CCT. It also explores the role of the indifference region in the specification of likelihood-ratio based termination criteria, comparing the GLR to the sequential probability ratio test. Results from simulation studies suggest that the GLR is always at least as efficient as existing methods.

  7. Mobility management in mobile IP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medidi, Sirisha; Golshani, Forouzan

    2002-07-01

    There is an emerging interest in integrating mobile wireless communication with the Internet based on the Ipv6 technology. Many issues introduced by the mobility of users arise when such an integration is attempted. This paper addresses the problem of mobility management, i.e., that of tracking the current IP addresses of mobile terminals and sustaining active IP connections as mobiles move. The paper presents some architectural and mobility management options for integrating wireless access to the Internet. We then present performance results for Mobile IPv4, route optimization and Mobile IPv6.

  8. Why Computerized Adaptive Testing In Pediatric Brain Tumor Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jin-Shei; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Nowinski, Cindy J; Cella, David; Hartsell, William F; Han-Chih Chang, John; Manley, Peter E; Goldman, Stewart

    2017-08-07

    Monitoring of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and symptoms of patients with brain tumors is needed yet not always feasible. This is partially due to lack of brief-yet-precise assessments with minimal administration burden that are easily incorporated into clinics. Dynamic computerized adaptive testing (CAT) or static fixed-length short-forms, derived from psychometrically-sound item banks, are designed to fill this void. This study evaluated the comparability of scores obtained from CATs and short-forms. Patients (ages 7-22) were recruited from brain tumor clinics and completed PROMIS CATs and short-forms (Fatigue, Mobility, Upper Extremity, Depressive Symptoms, Anxiety, and Peer Relationships). Pearson correlations, paired t-tests, and Cohen's d were used to evaluate the relationship, significant differences and the magnitude of the difference between these two scores, respectively. Data from 161 patients with brain tumors were analyzed. Patients completed each CAT within 2 minutes. Scores obtained from CATs and short-forms were highly correlated (r=0.95 - 0.98). Significantly different CAT versus short-form scores were found on 4 (of 6) domains yet with negligible effect sizes (|d| < 0.09). These relationships varied across patients with different levels of reported symptoms, with the strongest association at the worst or best symptom scores. This study demonstrated the comparability of scores from CATs and short-forms. Yet the agreement between these two varied across degrees of symptom severity which was a result of the ceiling effects of static short-forms. We recommend CATs to enable individualized assessment for longitudinal monitoring. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Problems and Solutions of Popularization of Accounting Computerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kan; Fu, YingLi; Gu, CaiDong; Zhang, Liang

    With the integration of China's economy and international markets, accounting computerization, which conducts accounting and accounting control by taking advantage of computer, has become a major component sector of accounting modernization and the main content of accounting reform. The popularization of accounting computerization is beyond question. Only this popularization can meet the requirement of knowledge economy for accounting information. It is the need to deepen accounting reform, to further enhance the level of accounting work and to achieve China's modernization of science and technology as well. This paper discusses problems and relevant solutions in the popularization process of accounting computerization so as to carry out this popularization better.

  10. Two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility affected by the in mole fraction fluctuation in InxAl1-xN/GaN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guipeng; Zhang, Jinfeng; Lu, Kunyi; Chen, Wenjie; Tian, Yonghui; Yang, Jianhong

    2016-09-01

    In an InxAl1-xN/GaN heterostructure, we have studied the mobility limited by the In mole fraction fluctuation scattering. The In mole fraction fluctuation characterizes the quality of the InxAl1-xN material with two parameters, one is the mole fraction fluctuation δx and the other is its lateral s Λ. Similar to a roughness scattering, for a fixed mole fraction x, the mobility limited by the In mole fraction fluctuation initially decreases with Λ increasing, reaches a minimum at a certain value of Λ and then increases.

  11. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    that of ‘mobilities design’. The book revolves around the following research question: How are design decisions and interventions staging mobilities? It builds upon the Staging Mobilities model (Jensen 2013) in an explorative inquiry into the problems and potentials of the design of mobilities. The exchange value...... between mobilities and design research is twofold. To mobilities research this means getting closer to the ‘material’, and to engage in the creative, explorative and experimental approaches of the design world which offer new potentials for innovative research. Design research, on the other hand, might...... enter into a fruitful relationship with mobilities research, offering a relational and mobile design thinking and a valuable base for a reflective design practice around the ubiquitous structures, spaces and systems of mobilities....

  12. Computerized mouse pupil size measurement for pupillary light reflex analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Tan, Jinglu; Zhang, Keqing; Lei, Bo

    2008-06-01

    Accurate measurement of pupil size is essential for pupillary light reflex (PLR) analysis in clinical diagnosis and vision research. Low pupil-iris contrast, corneal reflection, artifacts and noises in infrared eye imaging pose challenges for automated pupil detection and measurement. This paper describes a computerized method for pupil detection or identification. After segmentation by a region-growing algorithm, pupils are detected by an iterative randomized Hough transform (IRHT) with an elliptical model. The IRHT iteratively suppresses the effects of extraneous structures and noise, yielding reliable measurements. Experimental results with 72 images showed a mean absolute difference of 3.84% between computerized and manual measurements. The inter-run variation for the computerized method (1.24%) was much smaller than the inter-observer variation for the manual method (7.45%), suggesting a higher level of consistency of the former. The computerized method could facilitate PLR analysis and other non-invasive functional tests that require pupil size measurements.

  13. Computerized adaptive testing--ready for ambulatory monitoring?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Matthias; Bjørner, Jakob; Fischer, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive tests (CATs) have abundant theoretical advantages over established static instruments, which could improve ambulatory monitoring of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). However, an empirical demonstration of their practical benefits is warranted....

  14. Journal of EEA, Vol. 30, 2013 COMPUTERIZED FACILITIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    30, 2013. COMPUTERIZED FACILITIES LAYOUT DESIGN ... School of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering. Addis Ababa ... layout while algorithms such as CORELAP are used to build new ..... Facilities Planning: Layout Optimization.

  15. Computerized Staffing and Scheduling of PRN Nursing Personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Veranth, Martha M; Cheson, Christine

    1984-01-01

    A computerized system developed at LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah for staffing and scheduling PRN nursing personnel is described. Pre- and post-implementation staffing and scheduling activities are compared.

  16. Stratification of mammographic computerized analysis by BI-RADS categories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederman, Richard [Department of Radiology, Hadassah University Hospital, Ein Kerem, Jerusalem (Israel); Leichter, Isaac [Department of Electro-Optics, Jerusalem College of Technology, P.O.B. 16031, Jerusalem (Israel); Buchbinder, Shalom [Department of Radiology of The Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Novak, Boris [Department of Applied Mathematics, Jerusalem College of Technology, P.O.B. 16031, Jerusalem 91160 (Israel); Bamberger, Philippe [Department of Electronics, Jerusalem College of Technology, POB 16031, Jerusalem (Israel); Fields, Scott [Department of Radiology, Hadassah University Hospital, Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2003-02-01

    The Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was implemented to standardize characterization of mammographic findings. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate in which BI-RADS categories the changes recommended by computerized mammographic analysis are most beneficial. Archival cases including, 170 masses (101 malignant, 69 benign) and 63 clusters of microcalcifications (MCs; 36 malignant, 27 benign), were evaluated retrospectively, using the BI-RADS categories, by several radiologists, blinded to the pathology results. A computerized system then automatically extracted from the digitized mammogram features characterizing mammographic lesions, which were used to classify the lesions. The results of the computerized classification scheme were compared, by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, to the conventional interpretation. In the ''low probability of malignancy group'' (excluding BI-RADS categories 4 and 5), computerized analysis improved the A{sub z}of the ROC curve significantly, from 0.57 to 0.89. In the ''high probability of malignancy group'' (mostly category 5) the computerized analysis yielded an ROC curve with an A {sub z}of 0.99. In the ''intermediate probability of malignancy group'' computerized analysis improved the A {sub z}significantly, from 0.66 for to 0.83. Pair-wise analysis showed that in the latter group the modifications resulting from computerized analysis were correct in 83% of cases. Computerized analysis has the ability to improve the performance of the radiologists exactly in the BI-RADS categories with the greatest difficulties in arriving at a correct diagnosis. It increased the performance significantly in the problematic group of ''intermediate probability of malignancy'' and pinpointed all the cases with missed cancers in the ''low probability'' group. (orig.)

  17. Computerized craniofacial reconstruction: Conceptual framework and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Peter; Vandermeulen, Dirk; De Greef, Sven; Willems, Guy; Clement, John Gerald; Suetens, Paul

    2010-09-10

    When confronted with a corpse that is unrecognizable due to its state of decomposition, soft-tissue mutilation or incineration, and if no other identification evidence is available, craniofacial reconstruction (CFR) can be a useful tool in the identification of the body. Traditional methods are based on manual reconstruction by physically modelling a face on a skull replica with clay or plasticine. The progress in computer science and the improvement of medical imaging technologies during recent years has had a significant impact on this domain. New, fast, flexible and computer-based objective reconstruction programs are under development. Employing the newer technologies and permanently evaluating the obtained results will hopefully lead to more accurate reconstructions, beneficial to the added value of CFR methods during crime-scene investigations. A general model-based workflow is observed, when analysing computerized CFR techniques today. The main purpose of this paper is to give an overview of existing computer-based CFR methods up to date defined within a common framework using a general taxonomy. The paper will also discuss the various alternatives and problems which arise during the process of designing a CFR program.

  18. Computerized ionospheric tomography with the IRI model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Orhan; Arikan, Feza; Erol, Cemil B.

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) is a method to estimate ionospheric electron density distribution by using the global positioning system (GPS) signals recorded by the GPS receivers. Ionospheric electron density is a function of latitude, longitude, height and time. A general approach in CIT is to represent the ionosphere as a linear combination of basis functions. In this study, the model of the ionosphere is obtained from the IRI in latitude and height only. The goal is to determine the best representing basis function from the set of Squeezed Legendre polynomials, truncated Legendre polynomials, Haar Wavelets and singular value decomposition (SVD). The reconstruction algorithms used in this study can be listed as total least squares (TLS), regularized least squares, algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and a hybrid algorithm where the reconstruction from the TLS algorithm is used as the initial estimate for the ART. The error performance of the reconstruction algorithms are compared with respect to the electron density generated by the IRI-2001 model. In the investigated scenario, the measurements are obtained from the IRI-2001 as the line integral of the electron density profiles, imitating the total electron content estimated from GPS measurements. It has been observed that the minimum error between the reconstructed and model ionospheres depends on both the reconstruction algorithm and the basis functions where the best results have been obtained for the basis functions from the model itself through SVD.

  19. Computerized ionospheric tomography based on geosynchronous SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cheng; Tian, Ye; Dong, Xichao; Wang, Rui; Long, Teng

    2017-02-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) based on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an emerging technique to construct the three-dimensional (3-D) image of ionosphere. The current studies are all based on the Low Earth Orbit synthetic aperture radar (LEO SAR) which is limited by long repeat period and small coverage. In this paper, a novel ionospheric 3-D CIT technique based on geosynchronous SAR (GEO SAR) is put forward. First, several influences of complex atmospheric environment on GEO SAR focusing are detailedly analyzed, including background ionosphere and multiple scattering effects (induced by turbulent ionosphere), tropospheric effects, and random noises. Then the corresponding GEO SAR signal model is constructed with consideration of the temporal-variant background ionosphere within the GEO SAR long integration time (typically 100 s to 1000 s level). Concurrently, an accurate total electron content (TEC) retrieval method based on GEO SAR data is put forward through subband division in range and subaperture division in azimuth, obtaining variant TEC value with respect to the azimuth time. The processing steps of GEO SAR CIT are given and discussed. Owing to the short repeat period and large coverage area, GEO SAR CIT has potentials of covering the specific space continuously and completely and resultantly has excellent real-time performance. Finally, the TEC retrieval and GEO SAR CIT construction are performed by employing a numerical study based on the meteorological data. The feasibility and correctness of the proposed methods are verified.

  20. Radation distribution in head & thorax computerized tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahdavi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determination of the exposure levels in the computerized tomography (CT practices is necessary to define the respected national reference levels, quality control of CT centers and the risk assessment for radiation induced cancers. Material and Methods: On the basis of this necessity, the radiation exposure distribution due to common CT practices has been investigated at Razi Hospital CT center in Rasht using tissue-equivalent phantoms and the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD. The Head and Thorax phantoms were used with the standard dimensions incorporating holes at the center and edges for TLD placement. Dosimetry was carried out using LiF Mg, Cu, P small chips due to their relatively tissue equivalence, high sensitivity convenient annealing procedure and the non-complex glow curve. Results: Results showed that CTDI for Head is 52.85 mGy and for Body is 68.15mGy. CTDLW for Head is 13.67 mGy and for Body is 16.94mGy . Conclusion: In comparison with other radiographical procedures, patient absorbed doses in CT imaging are usually very high. Content of dose is increased by increase of mAs.

  1. Comprehensive computerized medical imaging: interim hypothetical economic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Rebecca N.; Fisher, Paul D.; Nosil, Josip

    1990-08-01

    The 422-bed Victoria General Hospital (VGH) and Siemens Electric Limited have since 1983 been piloting the implementation of comprehensive computerized medical imaging, including digital acquisition of diagnostic images, in British Columbia. Although full PACS is not yet in place at VGH, experience to date habeen used to project annual cost figures (including capital replacement) for a fully-computerized department. The resulting economic evaluation has been labelled hypothetical to emphasize that some key cost components were estimated rather than observed; this paper presents updated cost figures based on recent revisions to proposed departmental equipment configuration which raised the cost of conventional imaging equipment by 0.3 million* and lowered the cost of computerized imaging equipment by 0.8 million. Compared with conventional diagnostic imaging, computerized imaging appears to raise overall annual costs at VGH by nearly 0.7 million, or 11.6%; this is more favourable than the previous results, which indicated extra annual costs of 1 million (16.9%). Sensitivity analysis still indicates that all reasonable changes in the underlying assumptions result in higher costs for computerized imaging than for conventional imaging. Computerized imaging offers lower radiation exposure to patients, shorter waiting times, and other potential advantages, but as yet the price of obtaining these benefits remains substantial.

  2. Nursing medication administration and workflow using computerized physician order entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschannen, Dana; Talsma, Akkeneel; Reinemeyer, Nicholas; Belt, Christine; Schoville, Rhonda

    2011-07-01

    The benefits of computerized physician order entry systems have been described widely; however, the impact of computerized physician order entry on nursing workflow and its potential for error are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a computerized physician order entry system on nursing workflow. Using an exploratory design, nurses employed on an adult ICU (n = 36) and a general pediatric unit (n = 50) involved in computerized physician order entry-based medication delivery were observed. Nurses were also asked questions regarding the impact of computerized physician order entry on nursing workflow. Observations revealed total time required for administering medications averaged 8.45 minutes in the ICU and 9.93 minutes in the pediatric unit. Several additional steps were required in the process for pediatric patients, including preparing the medications and communicating with patients and family, which resulted in greater time associated with the delivery of medications. Frequent barriers to workflow were noted by nurses across settings, including system issues (ie, inefficient medication reconciliation processes, long order sets requiring more time to determine medication dosage), less frequent interaction between the healthcare team, and greater use of informal communication modes. Areas for nursing workflow improvement include (1) medication reconciliation/order duplication, (2) strategies to improve communication, and (3) evaluation of the impact of computerized physician order entry on practice standards.

  3. Mobility Divides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    Contemporary mobilities are cultural and social manifestations, and the mobile practices in the everyday life of billions of humans are re-configuring senses of place, self, other and relationships to the built environment. The way ‘mobile situations’ are staged in designed and built environments...... are increasingly becoming ‘second nature’ but also expressions of power, exclusion, and difference. In this talk I will be applying a perspective of ‘mobile situationism’ illustrating how mobile everyday life practices are staged ‘from above’ in planning and policy frameworks, design codes and architectural...... designs, but also how the situated and embodied mobile everyday life practices are staged ‘from below’ in concrete acts of choice concerning modes of mobilities, ways of moving and interacting. The ‘staging mobilites’ framework opens up to an understanding of the meaning of ‘mobilities design...

  4. Mobile payment

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Paying with mobile devices such as mobile phones or smart phones will expand worldwide in the coming years. This development provides opportunities for various industries (banking, telecommunications, credit card business, manufacturers, suppliers, retail) and for consumers.

  5. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    are already mobile – but lexicography is not yet fully ready for the mobile challenge, mobile users and mobile user situations. The article is based on empirical data from two surveys comprising 10 medical doctors, who were asked to look up five medical substances with the medical dictionary app Medicin...... and that lexicographic innovation is needed. A new type of users, new user situations and new access methods call for new lexicographic solutions, and this article proposes a six-pointed hexagram model, which can be used during dictionary app design to lexicographically calibrate the six dimensions in mobile......Mobile phones are ubiquitous and have completely transformed the way we live, work, learn and conduct our everyday activities. Mobile phones have also changed the way users access lexicographic data. In fact, it can be argued that mobile phones and lexicography are not yet compatible. Modern users...

  6. Mobility Divides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    Contemporary mobilities are cultural and social manifestations, and the mobile practices in the everyday life of billions of humans are re-configuring senses of place, self, other and relationships to the built environment. The way ‘mobile situations’ are staged in designed and built environments...... are increasingly becoming ‘second nature’ but also expressions of power, exclusion, and difference. In this talk I will be applying a perspective of ‘mobile situationism’ illustrating how mobile everyday life practices are staged ‘from above’ in planning and policy frameworks, design codes and architectural...... designs, but also how the situated and embodied mobile everyday life practices are staged ‘from below’ in concrete acts of choice concerning modes of mobilities, ways of moving and interacting. The ‘staging mobilites’ framework opens up to an understanding of the meaning of ‘mobilities design...

  7. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phones are ubiquitous and have completely transformed the way we live, work, learn and conduct our everyday activities. Mobile phones have also changed the way users access lexicographic data. In fact, it can be argued that mobile phones and lexicography are not yet compatible. Modern users...... are already mobile – but lexicography is not yet fully ready for the mobile challenge, mobile users and mobile user situations. The article is based on empirical data from two surveys comprising 10 medical doctors, who were asked to look up five medical substances with the medical dictionary app Medicin...... and that lexicographic innovation is needed. A new type of users, new user situations and new access methods call for new lexicographic solutions, and this article proposes a six-pointed hexagram model, which can be used during dictionary app design to lexicographically calibrate the six dimensions in mobile...

  8. Mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, W.J.; Marquina, N.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents papers given at a conference on mobile robots. Topics the conference included are the following: mobility systems for robotic vehicles; detection and control of mobile robot motion by real-time computer vision, obstacle avoidance algorithms for an autonomous land vehicle; hierarchical processor and matched filters for range image processing; asynchronous distributed control system for a mobile robot, and, planning in a hierarchical nested autonomous control system.

  9. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Users are already mobile, but the question is to which extent knowledge-based dictionary apps are designed for the mobile user situation. The objective of this article is to analyse the characteristics of the mobile user situation and to look further into the stationary user situation and the mob...

  10. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon; Jensen, Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    utilitarian transport from A to B; they constitute a rich societal phenomenon with, for example, social, cultural, sensorial, emotional, and material dimensions. The article proposes two fruitful links between the mobilities turn and the designerly examination of mobilities spaces. First, the mobilities turn...

  11. Subversive Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thelle, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    The article approaches mobility through a cultural history of urban conflict. Using a case of “The Copenhagen Trouble,“ a series of riots in the Danish capital around 1900, a space of subversive mobilities is delineated. These turn-of-the-century riots points to a new pattern of mobile gathering...

  12. Maximum-entropy mobility spectrum of two-dimensional hole gas in strained-Si sub 1 sub - sub x Ge sub x /Si heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Kiatgamolchai, S

    2000-01-01

    gamma has the bowl shape with the minimum at x approx 0.25-0.3. These characteristics suggest a possible influence of alloy disorder scattering. The mobilities and activation energies of the carriers in the boron-doped cap vary between samples and this is believed to be due to boron-spike near the Si/Si-substrate interface, in some samples. The source of electron-like carrier is presently unknown. Magnetotransport properties of modulation-doped p-type Si sub 1 sub - sub x Ge sub x /Si and Si sub 1 sub - sub x Ge sub x /Si sub 1 sub - sub y Ge sub y heterostructures were studied, in the magnetic field range 0-12 T, and in the temperature range 0.35-300 K. The experimental data within the classical regime have been analysed by mobility spectrum analysis, in order to separate the influences of different parallel conduction paths. A new method of mobility spectrum analysis has been developed by the based on the concept of maximum-entropy, and this computation has been shown to overcome several drawbacks or limita...

  13. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided......In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  14. Mobile Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter aims to understand the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The chapter explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. What takes place...... is a ‘mobile sense making’ where signs and materially situated meanings connect to the moving human body and thus create particular challenges and complexities of making sense of the world. The chapter includes notions of mobility systems and socio-technical networks in order to show how a ‘semiotic layer’ may...... work to afford or restrict mobile practices....

  15. Instruction manual for the Wahoo computerized database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasota, D.; Watts, K.

    1995-05-01

    As part of our research on the Lisburne Group, we have developed a powerful relational computerized database to accommodate the huge amounts of data generated by our multi-disciplinary research project. The Wahoo database has data files on petrographic data, conodont analyses, locality and sample data, well logs and diagenetic (cement) studies. Chapter 5 is essentially an instruction manual that summarizes some of the unique attributes and operating procedures of the Wahoo database. The main purpose of a database is to allow users to manipulate their data and produce reports and graphs for presentation. We present a variety of data tables in appendices at the end of this report, each encapsulating a small part of the data contained in the Wahoo database. All the data are sorted and listed by map index number and stratigraphic position (depth). The Locality data table (Appendix A) lists of the stratigraphic sections examined in our study. It gives names of study areas, stratigraphic units studied, locality information, and researchers. Most localities are keyed to a geologic map that shows the distribution of the Lisburne Group and location of our sections in ANWR. Petrographic reports (Appendix B) are detailed summaries of data the composition and texture of the Lisburne Group carbonates. The relative abundance of different carbonate grains (allochems) and carbonate texture are listed using symbols that portray data in a format similar to stratigraphic columns. This enables researchers to recognize trends in the evolution of the Lisburne carbonate platform and to check their paleoenvironmental interpretations in a stratigraphic context. Some of the figures in Chapter 1 were made using the Wahoo database.

  16. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    that mobility is more than movement between point A and B. It explores how the movement of people, goods, information, and signs influences human understandings of self, other and the built environment. Moving towards a new understanding of the relationship between movement, interaction and environments......In recent years, the social sciences have taken a “mobilities turn.” There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not “just happen.” Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed...... and lived as people are “staging themselves” (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between “being staged” (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the “mobile staging” of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging Mobilities is about the fact...

  17. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Users are already mobile, but the question is to which extent knowledge-based dictionary apps are designed for the mobile user situation. The objective of this article is to analyse the characteristics of the mobile user situation and to look further into the stationary user situation...... and the mobile user situation. The analysis is based on an empirical survey involving ten medical doctors and a monolingual app designed to support cognitive lexicographic functions, cf. (Tarp 2006:61-64). In test A the doctors looked up five medical terms while sitting down at a desk and in test B the doctors......:565), and it was found that the information access success of the mobile user situation is lower than that of the stationary user situation, primarily because users navigate in the physical world and in the mobile device at the same time. The data also suggest that the mobile user situation is not fully compatible...

  18. Assessment of Volatile Organic Compound and Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Oil and Natural Gas Well Pads using Mobile Remote and On-site Direct Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from oil and natural gas production were investigated using direct measurements of component-level emissions on well pads in the Denver-Julesburg (DJ) Basin and remote measurements of production pad-...

  19. Correlation of the structural information obtained for europium-chelate ensembles from gas-phase photoluminescence and ion-mobility spectroscopy with density-functional computations and ligand-field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greisch, Jean-François; Chmela, Jiří; Harding, Michael E; Wunderlich, Dirk; Schäfer, Bernhard; Ruben, Mario; Klopper, Wim; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M

    2017-02-22

    We report a combined investigation of europium(iii)9-oxo-phenalen-1-one (PLN) coordination complexes, [Eu(PLN)4AE](+) with AE = Mg, Ca, and Sr, using gas-phase photoluminescence, trapped ion-mobility spectrometry and density-functional computations. In order to sort out the structural impact of the alkali earth dications on the photoluminescence spectra, the experimental data are compared to the predicted ligand-field splittings as well as to the collision cross-sections for different isomers of [Eu(PLN)4AE](+). The best fitting interpretation is that one isomer family predominantly contributes to the recorded luminescence. The present work demonstrates the complexity of the coordination patterns of multicenter lanthanoid chelates involved in dynamical equilibria and the pertinence of using isolation techniques to elucidate their photophysical properties.

  20. A high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas at the spinel/perovskite interface of γ-Al2O3/SrTiO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yunzhong; Trier, Felix; Christensen, Dennis Valbjørn

    The realization of high-mobility 2DEGs in epitaxially grown heterostructures made of traditional semiconductors is at the heart of present electronics, which has led to a wealth of new physical phenomena as well as new electronic and photonic devices over the past few decades. 2DEGs...... at the interface between insulating complex oxides not only provide a wealth of opportunities to study mesoscopic physics with strongly correlated electrons confined in nanostructures, but also show promise for multifunctional all-oxide devices with probably even richer behavior than those we experienced...... in semiconductor devices....

  1. Methodology Approaches Regarding Classic versus Mobile Enterprise Application Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile-Daniel PAVALOAIA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the nowadays enterprise computerized context, there is a trend that shifts the business ap-plications to the new mobile environments. In the light of this information, it is highly important to be knowledgeable about the software development methodologies available in order to make the right choice when it comes to developing a mobile application. The current research aims to presenting the methodological approaches regarding the development cycle of classic enterprise software versus mobile apps. In the first part of the paper a brief literature review regarding the mobile apps is made, for the purpose of justifying the current research theme. The most consistent part of the article puts face-to-face the “classical” and the new development methodologies adapted to the requirements of the new mobile environment trends. The paper also presents the challenges and limitations of mobile applications as well as few of the future trends in the researched domain.

  2. Computerized tomographic evaluation of intracranial metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Yong; Lee, Mi Sook; Choi, Jin Ok; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song [Presbyterian Medical Center, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-12-15

    In a study of intracranial metastases, 46 cases having satisfactory clinical, operative and histological proofs were analyzed by computerized tomography at Presbyterian Medical Center from May, 1982 to February, 1986. The results were as follows: 1. The male to female ratio of intracranial metastases were 67:33. The 5th decade group (34.8%) was the most prevalent age group, followed by the 6th decade (21.7%) and 7th decade (21.7%). 2. The number of lesions was found be: single -25 cases (54.3%); multiple -21 cases (45.7%). 3. The source of intracranial metastases found to be: lung 15 cases (32.6%); unknown 12 cases (26.0%); chorioca 3 cases (6.5%); liver 3 cases (6.5%); stomach 2 cases (4.3%); parotid, breast, kidney, prostate, melanoma, rectal ca, rhabdomyosarcoma, nasal ca, lymphoma, testicular ca, cervix, each 1 case (2.2%). 4. The locations of the intracranial metastases were as follows: Cerebral hemisphere 37.7% in parietal region Cerebral hemisphere 15.9% in in frontal region Cerebral hemisphere 13.4% in occipital region Cerebral hemisphere 10.5% in temporal region Cerebellar hemisphere 3.2% Cerebellopontine angle 3.2% Intraventricular 4.8% Meninges 4.8% Skull vault 6.5% 5. Peritumor edema was found to be: Grade II-17 cases (37.0%): Grade III-14 cases (30.4%); Grade I-8 cases (17.4%); Grade 0-7 cases (15.2%) in that order. 6. The chief complaints of intracranial metastases on admission, were as follows: Headache 30 cases (65.2%); Vomiting 11 cases (23.9%); deteriorated mental state 10 cases (21.7%); Hemiplegia 7 cases (15.2%); visual disturbance 6 cases (13.0%); hemiparesis 4 cases (8.7%); seizure 4 cases (8.7%); other symptoms were less frequent. 7. On pre-contrast scan, hyperdense lesions were present in 18 cases (39.1%); hypodense lesions in 15 cases (32.6%); mixed density in 8 cases (17.4%); isodensity was present in 5 cases (10.9%). On post-contrast scan, ring enhancement was seen in 19 cases (41.3%); nodular enhancement in 17 cases (37%), mixed ring

  3. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we identify the nexus between design (architecture, urban design, service design, etc.) and mobilities as a new and emerging research field. In this paper, we apply a “situational mobilities” perspective and take point of departure in the pragmatist question: “What design decisions...... and interventions affords this particular mobile situation?” The paper presents the contours of an emerging research agenda within mobilities research. The advent of “mobilities design” as an emerging research field points towards a critical interest in the material as well as practical consequences of contemporary...... sites of mobilities and technology. Furthermore, the paper argues that heightened material sensitivity with an acute focus on situations and the multi-sensorial dimensions of human mobilities is largely under-prioritised within much contemporary city planning and transport planning as well as policy...

  4. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    of departure in the sociological perspective termed ‘Staging Mobilities’ (Jensen 2013a) and utilizes this as an analytical frame for exploring cases of mobility design. The paper put focus on how the material shape, design and architectures of technologies, spaces and sites influence mobilities practices......, mobilitiy technologies or urban sites of movement we get much closer to understanding the meaning of mobilities to social interaction and culture. The cases are still representing work-in-progress but will be reported in the book ‘Designing Mobilites’ (Jensen 2013b) and will cover the four cases of......Within the so-called ‘mobilities turn’ (Adey 2010; Cresswell 2006; Urry 2007) much research has taken place during the last decade bringing mobilities into the centre of sociological analysis. However, the materiality and spatiality of artefacts, infrastructures, and sites hosting mobilities...

  5. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we identify the nexus between design (architecture, urban design, service design, etc.) and mobilities as a new and emerging research field. In this paper, we apply a “situational mobilities” perspective and take point of departure in the pragmatist question: “What design decisions...... and interventions affords this particular mobile situation?” The paper presents the contours of an emerging research agenda within mobilities research. The advent of “mobilities design” as an emerging research field points towards a critical interest in the material as well as practical consequences of contemporary......-making. The paper proposes that increased understanding of the material affordances facilitated through design provides important insight to planning and policymaking that at times might be in risk of becoming too detached from the everyday life of the mobile subject within contemporary mobilities landscapes....

  6. Mobile Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter aims to understand the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The chapter explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. What takes place is a ‘mob......This chapter aims to understand the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The chapter explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. What takes place...... is a ‘mobile sense making’ where signs and materially situated meanings connect to the moving human body and thus create particular challenges and complexities of making sense of the world. The chapter includes notions of mobility systems and socio-technical networks in order to show how a ‘semiotic layer’ may...

  7. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    , mobilitiy technologies or urban sites of movement we get much closer to understanding the meaning of mobilities to social interaction and culture. The cases are still representing work-in-progress but will be reported in the book ‘Designing Mobilites’ (Jensen 2013b) and will cover the four cases of......Within the so-called ‘mobilities turn’ (Adey 2010; Cresswell 2006; Urry 2007) much research has taken place during the last decade bringing mobilities into the centre of sociological analysis. However, the materiality and spatiality of artefacts, infrastructures, and sites hosting mobilities...... of departure in the sociological perspective termed ‘Staging Mobilities’ (Jensen 2013a) and utilizes this as an analytical frame for exploring cases of mobility design. The paper put focus on how the material shape, design and architectures of technologies, spaces and sites influence mobilities practices...

  8. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    users in very different ways and for various purposes. The book provides many stimulating examples of resource-sharing applications. Enabling technologies for mobile clouds are also discussed, highlighting the key role of network coding. Mobile clouds have the potential to enhance communications...... of resource sharing takes a wider and deeper meaning, creating the foundations for a global real-time multidimensional resource pool, the underlying infrastructure for shareconomy. Above all, this is an inspiring book for anyone who is concerned about the future of wireless and mobile communications networks...... and their relationship with Social networks. Key Features: Provides fundamental ideas and promising concepts for exploiting opportunistic cooperation and cognition in wireless and mobile networks Gives clear definitions of mobile clouds from different perspectives Associates mobile and wireless networks with social...

  9. Mobility Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    We posit the concept of Mobility Work to describe efforts of moving about people and things as part of accomplishing tasks. Mobility work can be seen as a spatial parallel to the concept of articulation work proposed by the sociologist Anselm Strauss. Articulation work describes efforts...... of coordination necessary in cooperative work, but focuses, we argue, mainly on the temporal aspects of cooperative work. As a supplement, the concept of mobility work focuses on the spatial aspects of cooperative work. Whereas actors seek to diminish the amount of articulation work needed in collaboration...... by constructing Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs), actors minimise mobility work by constructing Standard Operation Configurations (SOCs). We apply the concept of mobility work to the ethnography of hospital work, and argue that mobility arises because of the need to get access to people, places, knowledge and...

  10. The energies of formation and mobilities of Cu surface species on Cu and ZnO in methanol and water gas shift atmospheres studied by DFT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dominik Bjørn; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Temel, Burcin;

    2012-01-01

    ) species are investigated in relevant synthesis gas compositions. The CuCO and Cu2HCOO species are identified to be predominant for metal transport on Cu particles, which may contribute to sintering of Cu by particle migration and coalescence. Furthermore, transport of Cu on ZnO is found mostly to occur......Catalysts based on copper, such as the Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 system are widely used for industrial scale methanol synthesis and the low temperature water gas shift reaction. A common characteristic of these catalysts is that they deactivate quite rapidly during operation and therefore understanding...... through CuCO species, which indicates that CuCO is an important species for Ostwald ripening in a Cu/ZnO catalyst. These results provide atomistic perspective on the diffusion of the species that may contribute to catalyst sintering, therefore lending a valuable foundation for future investigations...

  11. Mobility Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    by constructing Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs), actors minimise mobility work by constructing Standard Operation Configurations (SOCs). We apply the concept of mobility work to the ethnography of hospital work, and argue that mobility arises because of the need to get access to people, places, knowledge and....../or resources. To accomplish their work, actors have to make the right configuration of these four aspects emerge....

  12. Current Human Reliability Analysis Methods Applied to Computerized Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-06-01

    Computerized procedures (CPs) are an emerging technology within nuclear power plant control rooms. While CPs have been implemented internationally in advanced control rooms, to date no US nuclear power plant has implemented CPs in its main control room (Fink et al., 2009). Yet, CPs are a reality of new plant builds and are an area of considerable interest to existing plants, which see advantages in terms of enhanced ease of use and easier records management by omitting the need for updating hardcopy procedures. The overall intent of this paper is to provide a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures. It is beyond the scope of this document to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper serves as a review of current HRA as it may be used for the analysis and review of computerized procedures.

  13. Mobile museology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    Drawing together perspectives from museology, digital culture studies and fashion theory, this thesis considers changes in and challenges for current - day museums as related to ‘mobile museology’. This concept is developed for and elucidated in the thesis to describe an orientation towards...... the fashionable, the ephemeral, and towards an (ideal) state of change and changeability. This orientation is characterised with the triplet concepts of mobile, mobility, and mobilisation, as related to mobile media and movability; to ‘trans - museal’ mediation; and to the mobilisation of collections, audiences...

  14. Pain Perception: Computerized versus Traditional Local Anesthesia in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, M; Kumar, A; Srivastava, D; Sharma, P; Sharma, S

    2015-01-01

    Local anesthetic injection is one of the most anxiety- provoking procedure for both children and adult patients in dentistry. A computerized system for slow delivery of local anesthetic has been developed as a possible solution to reduce the pain related to the local anesthetic injection. The present study was conducted to evaluate and compare pain perception rates in pediatric patients with computerized system and traditional methods, both objectively and subjectively. It was a randomized controlled study in one hundred children aged 8-12 years in healthy physical and mental state, assessed as being cooperative, requiring extraction of maxillary primary molars. Children were divided into two groups by random sampling - Group A received buccal and palatal infiltration injection using Wand, while Group B received buccal and palatal infiltration using traditional syringe. Visual Analog scale (VAS) was used for subjective evaluation of pain perception by patient. Sound, Eye, Motor (SEM) scale was used as an objective method where sound, eye and motor reactions of patient were observed and heart rate measurement using pulse oximeter was used as the physiological parameter for objective evaluation. Patients experienced significantly less pain of injection with the computerized method during palatal infiltration, while less pain was not statistically significant during buccal infiltration. Heart rate increased during both buccal and palatal infiltration in traditional and computerized local anesthesia, but difference between traditional and computerized method was not statistically significant. It was concluded that pain perception was significantly more during traditional palatal infiltration injection as compared to computerized palatal infiltration, while there was no difference in pain perception during buccal infiltration in both the groups.

  15. Analysis of Listeria using exogenous volatile organic compound metabolites and their detection by static headspace-multi-capillary column-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (SHS-MCC-GC-IMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Carl; Lough, Fraser; Stanforth, Stephen P; Schwalbe, Edward C; Fowlis, Ian A; Dean, John R

    2017-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium and an opportunistic food-borne pathogen which poses significant risk to the immune-compromised and pregnant due to the increased likelihood of acquiring infection and potential transmission of infection to the unborn child. Conventional methods of analysis suffer from either long turn-around times or lack the ability to discriminate between Listeria spp. reliably. This paper investigates an alternative method of detecting Listeria spp. using two novel enzyme substrates that liberate exogenous volatile organic compounds in the presence of α-mannosidase and D-alanyl aminopeptidase. The discriminating capabilities of this approach for identifying L. monocytogenes from other species of Listeria are investigated. The liberated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are detected using an automated analytical technique based on static headspace-multi-capillary column-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (SHS-MCC-GC-IMS). The results obtained by SHS-MCC-GC-IMS are compared with those obtained by the more conventional analytical technique of headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS). The results found that it was possible to differentiate between L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, based on their VOC response from α-mannosidase activity.

  16. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  17. THE VALIDITY OF HUMAN AND COMPUTERIZED WRITING ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2005-09-01

    This paper summarizes an experiment designed to assess the validity of essay grading between holistic and analytic human graders and a computerized grader based on latent semantic analysis. The validity of the grade was gauged by the extent to which the student’s knowledge of the topic correlated with the grader’s expert knowledge. To assess knowledge, Pathfinder networks were generated by the student essay writers, the holistic and analytic graders, and the computerized grader. It was found that the computer generated grades more closely matched the definition of valid grading than did human generated grades.

  18. Mobile Semiotics - signs and mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper is about how to comprehend the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The paper explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. The theoretical scope...... is therefore an attempt to mobilize semiotics by drawing on a central body of theory within and adjacent to the discipline. For instance the founding works of C. S. Peirce will be related to the contemporary notions of ‘geosemiotics’ by Scollon & Scollon. The paper’s theoretical claim is that semiotics hold...... a potential for mobilities studies if the awareness of seeing the environment as a semiotic layer and system can be sensitized to the insights of the ‘mobilities turn’. Empirically the paper tentatively explores the usefulness of a mobile semiotics approach to cases such as street signage, airport design...

  19. Mobile phones and mobile communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ling, Richard; Donner, Jonathan

    With staggering swiftness, the mobile phone has become a fixture of daily life in almost every society on earth. In 2007, the world had over 3 billion mobile subscriptions. Prosperous nations boast of having more subscriptions than people. In the developing world, hundreds of millions of people who...... could never afford a landline telephone now have a mobile number of their own. With a mobile in our hand many of us feel safer, more productive, and more connected to loved ones, but perhaps also more distracted and less involved with things happening immediately around us. Written by two leading...... researchers in the field, this volume presents an overview of the mobile telephone as a social and cultural phenomenon. Research is summarized and made accessible though detailed descriptions of ten mobile users from around the world. These illustrate popular debates, as well as deeper social forces at work...

  20. Gas-Phase Analysis of the Complex of Fibroblast GrowthFactor 1 with Heparan Sulfate: A Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry (TWIMS) and Molecular Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Xu, Yongmei; Zong, Chengli; Zhang, Fuming; Boons, Geert-Jan; Liu, Jian; Linhardt, Robert J.; Woods, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulate several cellular developmental processes by interacting with cell surface heparan proteoglycans and transmembrane cell surface receptors (FGFR). The interaction of FGF with heparan sulfate (HS) is known to induce protein oligomerization, increase the affinity of FGF towards its receptor FGFR, promoting the formation of the HS-FGF-FGFR signaling complex. Although the role of HS in the signaling pathways is well recognized, the details of FGF oligomerization and formation of the ternary signaling complex are still not clear, with several conflicting models proposed in literature. Here, we examine the effect of size and sulfation pattern of HS upon FGF1 oligomerization, binding stoichiometry and conformational stability, through a combination of ion mobility (IM) and theoretical modeling approaches. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) of FGF1 in the presence of several HS fragments ranging from tetrasaccharide (dp4) to dodecasaccharide (dp12) in length was performed. A comparison of the binding stoichiometry of variably sulfated dp4 HS to FGF1 confirmed the significance of the previously known high-affinity binding motif in FGF1 dimerization, and demonstrated that certain tetrasaccharide-length fragments are also capable of inducing dimerization of FGF1. The degree of oligomerization was found to increase in the presence of dp12 HS, and a general lack of specificity for longer HS was observed. Additionally, collision cross-sections (CCSs) of several FGF1-HS complexes were calculated, and were found to be in close agreement with experimental results. Based on the (CCSs) a number of plausible binding modes of 2:1 and 3:1 FGF1-HS are proposed.

  1. Gas-Phase Analysis of the Complex of Fibroblast GrowthFactor 1 with Heparan Sulfate: A Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry (TWIMS) and Molecular Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuejie; Singh, Arunima; Xu, Yongmei; Zong, Chengli; Zhang, Fuming; Boons, Geert-Jan; Liu, Jian; Linhardt, Robert J.; Woods, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulate several cellular developmental processes by interacting with cell surface heparan proteoglycans and transmembrane cell surface receptors (FGFR). The interaction of FGF with heparan sulfate (HS) is known to induce protein oligomerization, increase the affinity of FGF towards its receptor FGFR, promoting the formation of the HS-FGF-FGFR signaling complex. Although the role of HS in the signaling pathways is well recognized, the details of FGF oligomerization and formation of the ternary signaling complex are still not clear, with several conflicting models proposed in literature. Here, we examine the effect of size and sulfation pattern of HS upon FGF1 oligomerization, binding stoichiometry and conformational stability, through a combination of ion mobility (IM) and theoretical modeling approaches. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) of FGF1 in the presence of several HS fragments ranging from tetrasaccharide (dp4) to dodecasaccharide (dp12) in length was performed. A comparison of the binding stoichiometry of variably sulfated dp4 HS to FGF1 confirmed the significance of the previously known high-affinity binding motif in FGF1 dimerization, and demonstrated that certain tetrasaccharide-length fragments are also capable of inducing dimerization of FGF1. The degree of oligomerization was found to increase in the presence of dp12 HS, and a general lack of specificity for longer HS was observed. Additionally, collision cross-sections (CCSs) of several FGF1-HS complexes were calculated, and were found to be in close agreement with experimental results. Based on the (CCSs) a number of plausible binding modes of 2:1 and 3:1 FGF1-HS are proposed.

  2. Construct Validation of a Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Test for Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolaus, Stephanie; Bode, Christina; Taal, Erik; Vonkeman, Harald E.; Glas, Cees A.W.; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multidimensional computerized adaptive testing enables precise measurements of patient-reported outcomes at an individual level across different dimensions. This study examined the construct validity of a multidimensional computerized adaptive test (CAT) for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

  3. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    examples of mobile clouds applications, based on both existing commercial initiatives as well as proof-of-concept test-beds. Visions and prospects are also discussed, paving the way for further development. As mobile networks and social networks become more and more reliant on each other, the concept...

  4. Residential mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, Tim; Manley, David; Sabel, Clive

    2016-01-01

    lacks the detail and temporal perspectives now seen as critical to understanding residential mobility decisions. Through a critical re-think of mobility processes with respect to health outcomes and an exploitation of longitudinal analytical techniques we argue that health geographers have the potential...

  5. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    In recent years, the social sciences have taken a “mobilities turn.” There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not “just happen.” Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed...... that mobility is more than movement between point A and B. It explores how the movement of people, goods, information, and signs influences human understandings of self, other and the built environment. Moving towards a new understanding of the relationship between movement, interaction and environments......, the book asks: what are the physical, social, technical, and cultural conditions to the staging of contemporary urban mobilities?...

  6. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    How is the width of the pavement shaping the urban experience? How is the material design of transport infrastructure and mobile technology affording social interaction in everyday life spaces? How do people inhabit these spaces with their bodies and in accordance to social and cultural norms......? These are some of the questions that this book raises in order to explore how the design of mobile sites and situations affect people's everyday life. The book takes point of departure in the author's book 'Staging Mobilities' (Routledge, 2013) in which it is argued that mobility is much more than simple...... acts of moving in the city. 'Designing Mobilities' is based on more than a decade of academic research by Professor of Urban Theory, Ole B. Jensen and a must-read for students and scholars with an interest in urban studies, urban design, architecture, urban planning, transport planning and geography...

  7. Characterization of TATP gas phase product ion chemistry via isotope labeling experiments using ion mobility spectrometry interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Wooten, Alfred; Kozole, Joseph; Deline, James; Beresford, Pamela; Stairs, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Identification of the fragment ion species associated with the ion reaction mechanism of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), a homemade peroxide-based explosive, is presented. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has proven to be a key analytical technique in the detection of trace explosive material. Unfortunately, IMS alone does not provide chemical identification of the ions detected; therefore, it is unknown what ion species are actually formed and separated by the IMS. In IMS, ions are primarily characterized by their drift time, which is dependent on the ion׳s mass and molecular cross-section; thus, IMS as a standalone technique does not provide structural signatures, which is in sharp contrast to the chemical and molecular information that is generally obtained from other customary analytical techniques, such as NMR, Raman and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. To help study the ion chemistry that gives rise to the peaks observed in IMS, the hardware of two different commercial IMS instruments has been directly coupled to triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometers, in order to ascertain each ion׳s corresponding mass/charge (m/z) ratios with different dopants at two temperatures. Isotope labeling was then used to help identify and confirm the molecular identity of the explosive fragment and adduct ions of TATP. The m/z values and isotope labeling experiments were used to help propose probable molecular formulas for the ion fragments. In this report, the fragment and adduct ions m/z 58 and 240 of TATP have been confirmed to be [C3H6NH·H](+) and [TATP·NH4](+), respectively; while the fragment ions m/z 73 and 89 of TATP are identified as having the molecular formulas [C4H9NH2](+) and [C4H9O2](+), respectively. It is anticipated that the work in this area will not only help to facilitate improvements in mobility-based detection (IMS and MS), but also aid in the development and optimization of MS-based detection algorithms for TATP.

  8. Computerized Classification Testing under the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Liu, Chen-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM) has been recently developed to describe item responses to Likert items (agree-disagree) in attitude measurement. In this study, the authors (a) developed two item selection methods in computerized classification testing under the GGUM, the current estimate/ability confidence interval method and the cut…

  9. Computerized Adaptive Testing, Anxiety Levels, and Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, Barbara E.; Marszalek, Jacob M.

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the amount of test anxiety experienced on a computerized adaptive test (CAT) to a paper-and-pencil test (P&P), as well as the state test anxiety experienced between males and females. Ninety-four middle school CAT examinees were compared to 65 middle school P&P examinees on their responses to the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory…

  10. Validation of Computerized Cognitive Assessment in Cross-Cultural Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    B, WAIS-R Coding) in predominantly Caucasian samples (e.g. Kabat et al., 2001). 8 TABLE 5: Pearson Product Moment Correlations...satisfaction with computerized versus traditional cognitive testing. References Kabat , M.H., Kane, R.L., Jefferson, A.L., & DiPino, R.K. (2001

  11. Modern Sequential Analysis and Its Applications to Computerized Adaptive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartroff, Jay; Finkelman, Matthew; Lai, Tze Leung

    2008-01-01

    After a brief review of recent advances in sequential analysis involving sequential generalized likelihood ratio tests, we discuss their use in psychometric testing and extend the asymptotic optimality theory of these sequential tests to the case of sequentially generated experiments, of particular interest in computerized adaptive testing. We…

  12. Computerized history-taking as a tool to manage dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakim, David; Fritz, Christine; Braun, Niko; Fritz, Peter; Alscher, M Dominik

    2010-11-12

    Validated guidelines to manage low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol are utilized inconsistently or not at all even though their application lowers the incidence of coronary events. New approaches are needed, therefore, to implement these guidelines in everyday practice. We compared an automated method for applying The National Cholesterol Education Panel (NCEP) guidelines with results from routine care for managing LDL-cholesterol. The automated method comprised computerized history-taking and analysis of historical data without physician input. Results from routine care were determined for 213 unselected patients and compared with results from interviews of the same 213 patients by a computerized history-taking program. Data extracted from hospital charts showed that routine care typically did not collect sufficient information to stratify risk and assign treatment targets for LDL-cholesterol and that there were inconsistencies in identifying patients with normal or elevated levels of LDL-cholesterol in relation to risk. The computerized interview program outperformed routine care in collecting historical data relevant to stratifying risk, assigning treatment targets, and clarifying the presence of hypercholesterolemia relative to risk. Computerized history-taking coupled with automated analysis of the clinical data can outperform routine medical care in applying NCEP guidelines for stratifying risk and identifying patients with hypercholesterolemia in relation to risk.

  13. A more cost-effective method of preoperative computerized imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, W B

    1989-07-01

    Stimulated by the explosive expansion of the computerized desk top publishing industry during the past few years, microcomputer hardware and software are evolving at a staggering rate. Memory is rapidly increasing, and prices are declining. I have found that with the hardware and software described in this paper, I was able to obtain, in a much more cost-effective manner, as useful preoperative information for my practice as I could obtain with more expensive "turnkey" (only one use) computerized imaging systems. This type of microcomputer, of course, is not limited to just the imaging system, but can be used for a variety of other programs as well, such as word processing, slide labeling and production, spreadsheet functions, billing and filing, and numerous business and other applications. The ease of use with readily available 35-mm slides of my patients has greatly enhanced the appeal of this system. Computerized imaging, when used as an educational tool, can be very helpful in preoperative planning, resident teaching, and for illustration and discussion of a patient's proposed surgery. The electronic imaging disclaimer compiled by the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons has been extremely helpful in clarifying the limits of computerized imaging and reducing any false expectations that my patients might have. All of us are experiencing the dawn of a very exciting evolution.

  14. Computerized tomography used as a routine procedure at postmortem investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    2009-01-01

    This is a prospective investigation of a consecutive series of 250 deceased individuals who were computerized tomography (CT)-scanned and autopsied. In 13% of patients, important findings at the CT-scanning were not found at the autopsy, and in 48% of patients, important autopsy findings were...

  15. Computerized Atlases: The Potential of Computers in Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, G.; Waters, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the use of computer atlases to see how they might contribute to the attainment of established social studies goals. Reviews advantages and disadvantages of existing software and hardware. Describes the potentials of computerized atlases and the hardware required to support such uses. (JDH)

  16. Multistage Computerized Adaptive Testing with Uniform Item Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael C.; Flora, David B.; Thissen, David

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a computerized adaptive test (CAT) based on the uniform item exposure multi-form structure (uMFS). The uMFS is a specialization of the multi-form structure (MFS) idea described by Armstrong, Jones, Berliner, and Pashley (1998). In an MFS CAT, the examinee first responds to a small fixed block of items. The items comprising…

  17. Limb-length discrepancy measured with computerized axial tomographic equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huurman, W.W.; Jacobsen, F.S.; Anderson, J.C.; Chu, W.K.

    1987-06-01

    A simple, rapid, and accurate method for measuring limb-length discrepancies with computerized axial tomographic equipment is described. With this method less irradiation is delivered and some of the errors of computation are eliminated, compared with conventional methods. The costs of the technique are comparable with those of scanograms. The method is particularly applicable in the patient who has contracture of a joint.

  18. Computerized sociometric and peer assessment: An empirical and practical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Y.H.M. van den; Cillessen, A.H.N.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic analysis and comparison was conducted of the psychometric properties of standard (paper-and-pencil) and computerized sociometry and peer assessments. The standard assessment took place with 817 children (47.5% boys) in 34 fifth- and sixth-grade classrooms of 28 elementary schools. The c

  19. NCLEX-RN Performance: Predicting Success on the Computerized Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Julie Keith; Beeman, Pamela Butler

    2001-01-01

    Discriminant analysis was used to identify variables predictive of success in the computerized National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses with data from 289 nursing graduates. Using seven significant predictors, 94% of passes and 92% of failures were correctly identified. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  20. Computerized comprehensive data analysis of Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC)

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jun; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xingwei; Leader, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) is the largest public CT image database of lung nodules. In this study, the authors present a comprehensive and the most updated analysis of this dynamically growing database under the help of a computerized tool, aiming to assist researchers to optimally use this database for lung cancer related investigations.

  1. Computerized Atlases: The Potential of Computers in Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, G.; Waters, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the use of computer atlases to see how they might contribute to the attainment of established social studies goals. Reviews advantages and disadvantages of existing software and hardware. Describes the potentials of computerized atlases and the hardware required to support such uses. (JDH)

  2. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  3. Duplicated laboratory tests: evaluation of a computerized alert intervention abstract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Sharon A; Papa, Linda; Norris, Anne E; Chase, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Redundant testing contributes to reductions in healthcare system efficiency. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine if the use of a computerized alert would reduce the number and cost of duplicated Acute Hepatitis Profile (AHP) laboratory tests and (2) assess what patient, test, and system factors were associated with duplication. This study used a quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design to determine the proportion of duplication of the AHP test before and after implementation of a computerized alert intervention. The AHP test was duplicated if the test was requested again within 15 days of the initial test being performed and the result present in the medical record. The intervention consisted of a computerized alert (pop-up window) that indicated to the clinician that the test had recently been ordered. A total of 674 AHP tests were performed in the pre-intervention period and 692 in the postintervention group. In the pre-intervention period, 53 (7.9%) were duplicated and in postintervention, 18 (2.6%) were duplicated (ptests (p≤.001). Implementation of computerized alerts may be useful in reducing duplicate laboratory tests and improving healthcare system efficiency.

  4. Discovering Visual Scanning Patterns in a Computerized Cancellation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ho-Chuan; Wang, Tsui-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an attention sequential mining mechanism for investigating the sequential patterns of children's visual scanning process in a computerized cancellation test. Participants had to locate and cancel the target amongst other non-targets in a structured form, and a random form with Chinese stimuli. Twenty-three…

  5. Computerized Screening for Visual Stress in Children with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Chris; Henderson, Lisa-Marie

    2007-01-01

    Visual stress--a condition in which unpleasant visual symptoms are experienced when reading--has been reported to be more prevalent in dyslexic individuals but at the present time the relationship between dyslexia and visual stress remains controversial. ViSS, a computerized visual stress screener that incorporates reading-like visual search, has…

  6. 381 Developing of a Computerized Brain Diagnosing System for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    (Pp. 381-396). Ogunsanwo O. D. - Department of Computer Science, Gate way ICT ... computerized brain diagnosing system that would be used in carrying out the .... on Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology are being built into photocopiers, ..... This aspect explores the techniques use for the design of interface, menus and.

  7. The Effects of Computerized Information Systems on Juvenile Courts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Gary L.

    1976-01-01

    Organizational theorists alternatively hypothesized that computerized information systems (CIS) will produce no necessary changes, centralization, or decentralization in juvenile courts. This hypothesis is supported by the results of a four year study on the phenomenon. Suggestions are offered for improving the juvenile judicial system through…

  8. Computerized adaptive testing for measuring development of young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobusse, G.; Buuren, S. van

    2007-01-01

    Developmental indicators that are used for routine measurement in The Netherlands are usually chosen to optimally identify delayed children. Measurements on the majority of children without problems are therefore quite imprecise. This study explores the use of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) to

  9. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Testing for Indonesia Junior High School Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Bor-Chen; Daud, Muslem; Yang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a curriculum-based multidimensional computerized adaptive test that was developed for Indonesia junior high school Biology. In adherence to the Indonesian curriculum of different Biology dimensions, 300 items was constructed, and then tested to 2238 students. A multidimensional random coefficients multinomial logit model was…

  10. Computerized Mastery Testing Using Fuzzy Set Decision Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yi; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A new computerized mastery test is described that builds on the Lewis and Sheehan procedure (sequential testlets) (1990), but uses fuzzy set decision theory to determine stopping rules and the Rasch model to calibrate items and estimate abilities. Differences between fuzzy set and Bayesian methods are illustrated through an example. (SLD)

  11. Monkeys Exhibit Prospective Memory in a Computerized Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Theodore A.; Beran, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) involves forming intentions, retaining those intentions, and later executing those intended responses at the appropriate time. Few studies have investigated this capacity in animals. Monkeys performed a computerized task that assessed their ability to remember to make a particular response if they observed a PM cue embedded…

  12. The Nominal Response Model in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ayala, R. J.

    One important and promising application of item response theory (IRT) is computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The implementation of a nominal response model-based CAT (NRCAT) was studied. Item pool characteristics for the NRCAT as well as the comparative performance of the NRCAT and a CAT based on the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model were…

  13. An Assessment of a Computerized Simulation of Counseling Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Richard S.; Lucas, Margaretha

    1993-01-01

    Developed Computerized Counseling Simulation, simulation of client-counselor interaction. Tested simulation on seven groups with varying degrees of counseling experience: counselors, predoctoral counseling interns, counseling students, first-year counseling students, student peer counselors, undergraduates, and noncounselors (total n=108). Interns…

  14. 11 CFR 9033.12 - Production of computerized information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and assistance. Upon request, the committee shall provide documentation explaining the computer system... make available such personnel as are necessary to explain the operation of the computer system's... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production of computerized information....

  15. Rice seed identification by computerized AFLP-DNA fingerprinting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ We developed a computerized seed identification system. Fifteen rice varieties that were widely used in China were analyzed by AFLP fingerprinting. 12 primer pairs were screened. In order to simplify the procedure and cut down the cost in seed identification, the least number of primer pairs for practical seed identification should be selected. In this study, 3 primer pairs were selected.

  16. Computerized adaptive testing in industrial and organizational psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makransky, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The overarching goal of this dissertation is to increase the precision and efficiency of the measurement tools that are used to make selection decisions in industrial/organizational psychology, by introducing psychometric innovations in the framework of computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Chapter 1

  17. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed to in an inter......A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  18. Morphological analysis of the vestibular aqueduct by computerized tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Sergio Ricardo [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: sergioanat.morf@epm.br; Smith, Ricardo Luiz [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Isotani, Sadao [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Alonso, Luis Garcia [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Anadao, Carlos Augusto [Otorhinolaryngology Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Prates, Jose Carlos [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Image Diagnosis Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-01-15

    Objective: In the last two decades, advances in the computerized tomography (CT) field revise the internal and medium ear evaluation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze the morphology and morphometric aspects of the vestibular aqueduct on the basis of computerized tomography images (CTI). Material and method: Computerized tomography images of vestibular aqueducts were acquired from patients (n = 110) with an age range of 1-92 years. Thereafter, from the vestibular aqueducts images a morphometric analysis was performed. Through a computerized image processing system, the vestibular aqueduct measurements comprised of its area, external opening, length and the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus. Results: The morphology of the vestibular aqueduct may be funnel-shaped, filiform or tubular and the respective proportions were found to be at 44%, 33% and 22% in children and 21.7%, 53.3% and 25% in adults. The morphometric data showed to be of 4.86 mm{sup 2} of area, 2.24 mm of the external opening, 4.73 mm of length and 11.88 mm of the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus, in children, and in adults it was of 4.93 mm{sup 2}, 2.09 mm, 4.44 mm, and 11.35 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Computerized tomography showed that the vestibular aqueduct presents high morphological variability. The morphometric analysis showed that the differences found between groups of children and adults or between groups of both genders were not statistically significant.

  19. A computerized aid in ventilating neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arrøe, M

    1991-01-01

    and contains a continuous evaluation of the last six values of pCO2 and pO2 resulting in statements and warnings in potentially harmful situations. The program is consistent with the written instructions of the department. The ventilator treatment of 30 premature babies is evaluated retrospectively using......A computer program for ventilating neonates using a volume controlled ventilator is presented. The program proposes directions for changes of ventilator settings decided from the actual arterial blood gas samples and ventilator settings. The program deals with up to six babies at the same time...... the program, showing a total agreement of 37.5%, lowest among the babies who died in respiratory insufficiency. The advantage of the use of the program is discussed....

  20. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    2016-01-01

    of increasing concern and societal importance, regardless if the focus is on new inequalities, environmental sustainability, or the meaning of vernacular mobilities design to the everyday life. The theme of ‘mobilities design’ opens up the agenda of architectural research into infrastructure spaces as ‘spaces...... insights, concepts of space and place, and relations between fixities and flows. The new and emerging field of ‘mobilities design’ will be exploring the borderlines between architecture, urban design, urban planning, and infrastructure design. The field will address the ‘gap’ in research on an issue...... of life’ for billions of people in the everyday life. This paper is structured in three parts. After the general introduction we present the mobilities theory perspective of ‘staging mobilities’ and connects this to the empirical phenomenon of parking lots and their design. The paper ends in section three...

  1. Mobile Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Petschenka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rezension zu: de Witt, Claudia, und Almut Sieber, Hrsg. 2013. Mobile Learning: Potenziale, Einsatzszenarien und Perspektiven des Lernens mit mobilen Endgeräten. Wiesbaden: Springer VS.

  2. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    How is the width of the pavement shaping the urban experience? How is the material design of transport infrastructure and mobile technology affording social interaction in everyday life spaces? How do people inhabit these spaces with their bodies and in accordance to social and cultural norms......? These are some of the questions that this book raises in order to explore how the design of mobile sites and situations affect people's everyday life. The book takes point of departure in the author's book 'Staging Mobilities' (Routledge, 2013) in which it is argued that mobility is much more than simple...... movements of people, goods, and information 'from A to B'. Accordingly, the way people, goods, and information moves shapes the way we understand our built environment, other consociates, and ourselves. The book contributes with a new and critical-creative gaze on what might seem to be trivial and mundane...

  3. Restricted Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Lassen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    communities and shopping centres through mobility lenses. The article shows how different mobility systems enable and restrict the public access to private-public spaces, and it points out that proprietary communities create an unequal potential for human movement and access in the city. The main argument......Privatisation of public spaces in the contemporary city has increased during the last decades but only few studies have approached this field from a mobility perspective. Therefore the article seeks to rectify this by exploring two Australian examples of private spaces in the city; gated...... in the article is that the many mobility systems enable specialization of places that are targeted at a special section of the population. This means that various forms of motilities not only create new opportunities for urban life but it is also one of the most critical components of production of new exclusion...

  4. Mobile museology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    posts from the research project blog with three research articles: ‘Museum metamorphosis à la mode’, proposing a fashion perspective on ongoing museum developments; ‘Augmenting the agora: media and civic engagement in museums’, questioning the idea of social media holding a vital potential......Drawing together perspectives from museology, digital culture studies and fashion theory, this thesis considers changes in and challenges for current - day museums as related to ‘mobile museology’. This concept is developed for and elucidated in the thesis to describe an orientation towards...... the fashionable, the ephemeral, and towards an (ideal) state of change and changeability. This orientation is characterised with the triplet concepts of mobile, mobility, and mobilisation, as related to mobile media and movability; to ‘trans - museal’ mediation; and to the mobilisation of collections, audiences...

  5. Intelligent Mobile Olfaction of Swarm Robots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siti Nurmaini; Bambang Tutuko; Aulia Rahman Thoharsin

    2013-01-01

      This work presents intelligent mobile olfaction design and experimental results of intelligent swarm robots to detection a gas/odour source in an indoor environment by using multi agent based on hybrid algorithm...

  6. The dynamics of foams with mobile interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Michael B.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2011-11-01

    Using a novel technique for resolving nearly singular integrals, we investigate the dynamics of two-dimensional foams with mobile interfaces and an incompressible, inviscid gas phase by a boundary integral method. For foams with small liquid fractions (CMMI-0826703.

  7. Mobile Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Enache

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile commerce, or m-commerce, refers to the use of wireless digital devices to enable transactions on the Web. Described more fully in Chapter 3, m-commerce involves the use of wireless networks to connect cell phones, handheld devices such Blackberries, and personal computers to the Web. Once connected, mobile consumers can conduct transactions, including stock trades, in-store price comparisons, banking, travel reservations, and more.

  8. Design of a Prediction System for Hydrate Formation in Gas Pipelines using Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Raed Moukhtar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Before the evolution of the Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN technology, many production wells in the oil and gas industry were suffering from the gas hydration formation process, as most of them are remotely located away from the host location. By taking the advantage of the WSN technology, it is possible now to monitor and predict the critical conditions at which hydration will form by using any computerized model. In fact, most of the developed models are based on two well-known hand calculation methods which are the Specific gravity and K-Factor methods. In this research, the proposed work is divided into two phases; first, the development of a three prediction models using the Neural Network algorithm (ANN based on the specific gravity charts, the K-Factor method and the production rates of the flowing gas mixture in the process pipelines. While in the second phase, two WSN prototype models are designed and implemented using National Instruments WSN hardware devices. Power analysis is carried out on the designed prototypes and regression models are developed to give a relation between the sensing nodes (SN consumed current, Node-to-Gateway distance and the operating link quality. The prototypes controller is interfaced with a GSM module and connected to a web server to be monitored via mobile and internet networks.

  9. Mobility of people with lower limb amputations : scales and questionnaires: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, G.M.; Groothoff, J.W.; Eisma, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objective and design: A systematic literature review to compare mobility scales used for lower limb amputees. A literature search was carried out by computerized search of biomedical literature including Medline and Embase. The studies included were published between 1978 and 1998 and including the

  10. Mobility Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lassen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This article takes point of departure in the challenges to understand the importance of contemporary mobility. The approach advocated is a cross-disciplinary one drawing on sociology, geography, urban planning and design, and cultural studies. As such the perspective is to be seen as a part of th...... mobilities. In particular the article discusses 1) the physical city, its infrastructures and technological hardware/software, 2) policies and planning strategies for urban mobility and 3) the lived everyday life in the city and the region.......This article takes point of departure in the challenges to understand the importance of contemporary mobility. The approach advocated is a cross-disciplinary one drawing on sociology, geography, urban planning and design, and cultural studies. As such the perspective is to be seen as a part...... of the so-called ‘mobility turn’ within social science. The perspective is illustrative for the research efforts at the Centre for Mobility and Urban Studies (C-MUS), Aalborg University. The article presents the contours of a theoretical perspective meeting the challenges to research into contemporary urban...

  11. Study on rubber gas actuators driven by the Hydrogen Storage Alloy for in-pipe inspection mobile robots with flexible structure and on an application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Toshio; Hosokai, Hidemi (Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Uemura, Masahiro

    1989-06-01

    This paper deals with rubber actuators using Hydrogen Storage Alloy for an in-pipe inspection robot, which has the capability of moving inside pipelines with two inches diameter. Since in-pipe inspection robots require flexible mechanisms for going through complicated construction of pipeline networks, the actuators which are light in weight and flexible must first be developed rather than using conventional actuators. For this purpose, rubber actuators with both stretching and shrinking characteristics are shown here for the application of such a robot. The proposed robot uses these actuators with six degrees of freedom, so that it has more flexibility and adaptability in motion: it can move in the inch worm mode through pipelines and has adaptability to the change of pipe diameters and also of passing over the L-joints and T-joints of pipelines. The method of activating the robot is proposed as the robot dock method, thus the robot actuators can initially be activated by hydrogen gas. The control method is also shown with an example of the T-joint movement. (author).

  12. The use of ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the detection of illicit drugs on clandestine records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Brian; Jourdan, Thomas; Fetterolf, Dean D.; Beasley, James O., II

    1995-01-01

    the records. The detection of trace drug residue on surfaces by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is well documented in literature. The following procedure will deal primarily with the newer techniques of trace drug analysis and drug record analysis developed by the Chemistry/Toxicology Unit of the FBI Laboratory since the more traditional techniques of latent finger print analysis and document analysis are well known.

  13. Mobility of people with lower limb amputations: scales and questionnaires: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Rommers, G. M.; Groothoff, J. W.; Eisma, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objective and design: A systematic literature review to compare mobility scales used for lower limb amputees. A literature search was carried out by computerized search of biomedical literature including Medline and Embase. The studies included were published between 1978 and 1998 and including the following keywords: amputation, artificial limbs, prosthesis, lower limb, activities of daily living, mobility. Results: Thirty-five studies were identified; 19 had a measurement of separate levels...

  14. Status of computerized cognitive testing in aging: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Katherine; Howieson, Diane; Webbe, Frank; Seelye, Adriana; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2008-11-01

    Early detection of cognitive decline in the elderly has become of heightened importance in parallel with the recent advances in therapeutics. Computerized assessment might be uniquely suited to early detection of changes in cognition in the elderly. We present here a systematic review of the status of computer-based cognitive testing, focusing on detection of cognitive decline in the aging population. All studies purporting to assess or detect age-related changes in cognition or early dementia/mild cognitive impairment by means of computerized testing were included. Each test battery was rated on availability of normative data, level of evidence for test validity and reliability, comprehensiveness, and usability. All published studies relevant to a particular computerized test were read by a minimum of two reviewers, who completed rating forms containing the above mentioned criteria. Of the 18 test batteries identified from the initial search, 11 were appropriate to cognitive testing in the elderly and were subjected to systematic review. Of those 11, five were either developed specifically for application with the elderly or have been used extensively with that population. Even within the computerized testing genre, great variability existed in manner of administration, ranging from fully examiner-administered to fully self-administered. All tests had at least minimal reliability and validity data, commonly reported in peer-reviewed articles. However, level of rigor of validity testing varied widely. All test batteries exhibited some of the strengths of computerized cognitive testing: standardization of administration and stimulus presentation, accurate measures of response latencies, automated comparison in real time with an individual's prior performance as well as with age-related norms, and efficiencies of staffing and cost. Some, such as the Mild Cognitive Impairment Screen, adapted complicated scoring algorithms to enhance the information gathered from

  15. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

  16. Discrimination of bacteria by rapid sensing their metabolic volatiles using an aspiration-type ion mobility spectrometer (a-IMS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratiu, Ileana Andreea; Bocos-Bintintan, Victor; Patrut, Adrian; Moll, Victor Hugo; Turner, Matthew; Thomas, C L Paul

    2017-08-22

    The objective of our study was to investigate whether one may quickly and reliably discriminate different microorganism strains by direct monitoring of the headspace atmosphere above their cultures. Headspace samples above a series of in vitro bacterial cultures were directly interrogated using an aspiration type ion mobility spectrometer (a-IMS), which produced distinct profiles ("fingerprints") of ion currents generated simultaneously by the detectors present inside the ion mobility cell. Data processing and analysis using principal component analysis showed net differences in the responses produced by volatiles emitted by various bacterial strains. Fingerprint assignments were conferred on the basis of product ion mobilities; ions of differing size and mass were deflected in a different degree upon their introduction of a transverse electric field, impacting finally on a series of capacitors (denominated as detectors, or channels) placed in a manner analogous to sensor arrays. Three microorganism strains were investigated - Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus; all strains possess a relatively low pathogenic character. Samples of air with a 5 cm(3) volume from the headspace above the bacterial cultures in agar growth medium were collected using a gas-tight chromatographic syringe and injected inside the closed-loop pneumatic circuit of the breadboard a-IMS instrument model ChemPro-100i (Environics Oy, Finland), at a distance of about 1 cm from the ionization source. The resulting chemical fingerprints were produced within two seconds from the moment of injection. The sampling protocol involved to taking three replicate samples from each of 10 different cultures for a specific strain, during a total period of 72 h after the initial incubation - at 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to discriminate between the IMS fingerprints. PCA was found to successfully discriminate between bacteria at three

  17. Intensive mobilities:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of facto....... By exploring how experiences of long-distance workers become constituted by a range of different material forces enables us to more sensitively consider the practical, technical, and political implications of this increasingly prevalent yet underexplored regime of work....... which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory...... with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this experience...

  18. Mobile healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  19. Computerized games to study the development of attention in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A; Jones, L; Rothbart, M K; Posner, M I

    2000-05-01

    Children enjoy playing games. We can take advantage of this in the designs of computerized tasks that will engage their interest. These designs also serve to advance the study of chronometric measures, such as manual and saccadic reaction times and event related potentials, with young children. The goals of our method development are (1) to allow for comparable tasks across a wide variety of ages, (2) to make possible comparisons of child performance with data gathered in adult cognitive studies, and (3) to help to support inferences about the development of underlying mechanisms. We have designed a battery of computerized tasks in order to study the development of attention functions of alertness, orienting, and executive control during childhood. Our purpose is to describe each of these tasks in detail and present the results that have been obtained so far. The battery was tested using a sample of 5-year-old children as subjects.

  20. Computerization of Mental Health Integration complexity scores at Intermountain Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oniki, Thomas A; Rodrigues, Drayton; Rahman, Noman; Patur, Saritha; Briot, Pascal; Taylor, David P; Wilcox, Adam B; Reiss-Brennan, Brenda; Cannon, Wayne H

    2014-01-01

    Intermountain Healthcare's Mental Health Integration (MHI) Care Process Model (CPM) contains formal scoring criteria for assessing a patient's mental health complexity as "mild," "medium," or "high" based on patient data. The complexity score attempts to assist Primary Care Physicians in assessing the mental health needs of their patients and what resources will need to be brought to bear. We describe an effort to computerize the scoring. Informatics and MHI personnel collaboratively and iteratively refined the criteria to make them adequately explicit and reflective of MHI objectives. When tested on retrospective data of 540 patients, the clinician agreed with the computer's conclusion in 52.8% of the cases (285/540). We considered the analysis sufficiently successful to begin piloting the computerized score in prospective clinical care. So far in the pilot, clinicians have agreed with the computer in 70.6% of the cases (24/34).

  1. Algorithms for Computerized Fetal Heart Rate Diagnosis with Direct Reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Maeda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Since pattern classification of fetal heart rate (FHR was subjective and enlarged interobserver difference, objective FHR analysis was achieved with computerized FHR diagnosis. Methods: The computer algorithm was composed of an experts’ knowledge system, including FHR analysis and FHR score calculation, and also of an objective artificial neural network system with software. In addition, a FHR frequency spectrum was studied to detect ominous sinusoidal FHR and the loss of baseline variability related to fetal brain damage. The algorithms were installed in a central-computerized automatic FHR monitoring system, which gave the diagnosis rapidly and directly to the attending doctor. Results: Clinically perinatal mortality decreased significantly and no cerebral palsy developed after introduction of the centralized system. Conclusion: The automatic multichannel FHR monitoring system improved the monitoring, increased the objectivity of FHR diagnosis and promoted clinical results.

  2. Does familiarity with computers affect computerized neuropsychological test performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Grant L; Brooks, Brian L; Ashton, V Lynn; Johnson, Lynda G; Gualtieri, C Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-reported computer familiarity is related to performance on computerized neurocognitive testing. Participants were 130 healthy adults who self-reported whether their computer use was "some" (n = 65) or "frequent" (n = 65). The two groups were individually matched on age, education, sex, and race. All completed the CNS Vital Signs (Gualtieri & Johnson, 2006b) computerized neurocognitive battery. There were significant differences on 6 of the 23 scores, including scores derived from the Symbol-Digit Coding Test, Stroop Test, and the Shifting Attention Test. The two groups were also significantly different on the Psychomotor Speed (Cohen's d = 0.37), Reaction Time (d = 0.68), Complex Attention (d = 0.40), and Cognitive Flexibility (d = 0.64) domain scores. People with "frequent" computer use performed better than people with "some" computer use on some tests requiring rapid visual scanning and keyboard work.

  3. Project, construction and test of a mini computerized tomograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Junior, J.M. de [Universidade de Sorocaba (UNISO), SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas (CETEC)

    2003-06-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object from both transmission or reflection data collected by illuminating the object from many different directions. CT is an imaging technique that has revolutionized the field of medical diagnostics. There are many others applications for CT images, such as, nondestructive evaluation of industrial products and analysis of biological specimens. A mini computerized tomograph was projected, constructed and tested. It operates with a gamma ray source of {sup 241} Am (photons of 60 keV and 100 mCi of intensity) and a NaI(Tl) solid state detector. The system features translation and rotation scanning modes, a 100 mm effective field of view, and 1 mm spatial resolution. The preliminary results indicated a resolution between 5 % to 7 % to detect mass attenuation coefficient variations. The total cost of the Mini Computerized Tomograph of UNISO (MTCU) was about US$ 20.000,00. (author)

  4. Modern Sequential Analysis and its Applications to Computerized Adaptive Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Bartroff, Jay; Lai, Tze Leung

    2011-01-01

    After a brief review of recent advances in sequential analysis involving sequential generalized likelihood ratio tests, we discuss their use in psychometric testing and extend the asymptotic optimality theory of these sequential tests to the case of sequentially generated experiments, of particular interest in computerized adaptive testing. We then show how these methods can be used to design adaptive mastery tests, which are asymptotically optimal and are also shown to provide substantial improvements over currently used sequential and fixed length tests.

  5. A Fully Computerized Method to Backup the Router Configuration File

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan H.Majeed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fully computerized method to backup the router configuration file. The method consists of a friendly graphical interface programmed by Java programming language The proposed method is compared with the two existing methods, namely: TFTP server method and Copy/Paste method. The comparison reveals that the proposed method has many advantages over the existing ones. The proposed method has been implemented on Cisco routers (series 2500, 2600 and 2800

  6. Computerized tomography using a modified orthogonal tangent correction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, T C; Smith, S C; Lantz, B M

    1976-10-01

    A modified orthogonal tangent correction algorithm is presented for computerized tomography. The algorithm uses four X-rays scans spaced 45 degrees apart, to reconstruct a transverse axial image. The reconstruction procedure is interative in which image matrix elements are corrected by alternately matching the two sets of orthogonal scan data. The algorithm has been applied to phantom data as well as to video recorded fluoroscopic data.

  7. Evaluation of a Computerized Clinical Information System (Micromedex).

    OpenAIRE

    Lundsgaarde, H. P.; Moreshead, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes data collected as part of a project designed to identify and assess the technical and organizational problems associated with the implementation and evaluation of a Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS), Micromedex, in three U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). The study began in 1987 as a national effort to implement decision support technologies in the Veterans Administration Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP). The specific...

  8. Information integrity and privacy for computerized medical patient records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, J.; Hamilton, V.; Gaylor, T.; McCurley, K.; Meeks, T.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Oceania, Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in November 1993 to provide ``Information Integrity and Privacy for Computerized Medical Patient Records`` (CRADA No. SC93/01183). The main objective of the project was to develop information protection methods that are appropriate for databases of patient records in health information systems. This document describes the findings and alternative solutions that resulted from this CRADA.

  9. Computerized Analysis of MR and Ultrasound Images of Breast Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Yearbook of Radiology) 3. Horsch K, Giger ML, Venta LA, Huo Z, Vyborny CJ; Computer-aided diagnosis of breast lesions on ultrasound. Proceedings...International Workshop on Digital Mammography. Toronto, Canada, June, 2000. 4. Horsch K, Giger ML, Venta LA, Vyborny CJ: Automatic segmentation of breast...lesions on ultrasound. Medical Physics (in press). 5. Horsch K, Giger ML, Venta LA, Vyborny CJ: Computerized diagnosis of breast lesions on ultrasound

  10. TBASE: a computerized database for transgenic animals and targeted mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woychik, R P; Wassom, J S; Kingsbury, D; Jacobson, D A

    1993-05-27

    A computerized database, called TBASE, has been developed to organize and make available information on transgenic animals and targeted mutations by using resources at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Johns Hopkins University (JHU). The database is available through the JHU Computational Biology Gopher Server. To ensure that all interested users have access, several mechanisms will be installed to accommodate varying levels of telecommunication network connectivity.

  11. Managing people problems in changing to computerized text processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    Change is always both a promise and a threat. Changing to a computerized text processing system is, from a management viewpoint, mostly a promise; but from an employee viewpoint, mostly a threat. A variety of people problems arise from such a changeover because of the perceived threats involved. Most of these problems can be expected, so that, by proper management, their effects can be reduced or eliminated.

  12. Computerized estimation of coal reserves of underground coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solymosi, F.; Kiss, J.

    1988-01-01

    No standardized methodology for long term planning exists in Hungary in the coal industry. A computerized method of coal reserve estimation based on normatives is described. The method has been applied in the Maza-South-Varalja-South region (Transdanubia, South Hungary). The applicability of the method is outlined and the error limit that was missing in coal reserve estimations is suggested to be introduced.

  13. Computerized assessment of pain drawing area: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wenngren

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Wenngren, Britt-Marie StålnackeDepartment of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, SwedenAim: To investigate if pain area in patients with chronic pain could be measured by a computerized assessment on previously marked pain drawings on paper figures and to analyze the further application of the method.Methods: Seventy-two patients (54 women and 18 men who were admitted to Umeå University Hospital during 2003 for assessment of chronic pain answered a set of questionnaires (pain intensity on the visual analog scale [VAS], disability on the Disability Rating Index [DRI], life satisfaction on the LiSat-11 and filled in pain drawings on paper figures of the human body. The pain drawings were later analyzed by using computerized assessment.Results: Women marked a greater pain area than men, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.433. No significant difference was shown for the previous seven days between men and women on the VAS (p = 0.914, DRI (p = 0.493, or LiSat-11 (p = 0.124. A statistically significant correlation was found between pain area and VAS for the previous seven days (r = 0.250; p = 0.046. Pain area was statistically significantly correlated to the DRI (r = 0.336; p = 0.014 and close to negatively correlated to the LiSat-11 (r = -0.687; p = 0.057.Conclusion: This pilot study shows that pain drawing area could be measured by a computerized assessment of pain drawings. The method points to the possibility of relating pain area with other instruments. In the present study, an association between the patients’ pain drawing area and pain intensity and between pain area and level of activity was shown.Keywords: musculoskeletal pain, screening, pain drawing, computerized assessment

  14. Mobile Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Ichiro

    Mobile agents are autonomous programs that can travel from computer to computer in a network, at times and to places of their own choosing. The state of the running program is saved, by being transmitted to the destination. The program is resumed at the destination continuing its processing with the saved state. They can provide a convenient, efficient, and robust framework for implementing distributed applications and smart environments for several reasons, including improvements to the latency and bandwidth of client-server applications and reducing vulnerability to network disconnection. In fact, mobile agents have several advantages in the development of various services in smart environments in addition to distributed applications.

  15. Mobile Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aryana, Bijan; Clemmensen, Torkil

    2013-01-01

    In this article, a country specific comparative mobile usability study is presented, using Iran and Turkey as the two chosen emerging/emergent nation exemplars of smartphone usage and adoption. In a focus group study, three mobile applications were selected by first-time users of smartphones....... In both countries, the music player application was tested, wherein common patterns of accessing and sorting songs emerged. Whereas the Iranian users appeared to be more interested in social networking via use of an SMS service, the Turkish users tended to prefer to apply hierarchies to their own daily...

  16. Natural gas; Gas Natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Carlos A.; Moraes, Claudia C.D. [Eletricidade de Sao Paulo S.A. (ELETROPAULO), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Carlos H.F. [Centrais Eletricas de Santa Catarina S.A., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Silva, Clecio Fabricio da; Alves, Ricardo P. [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sposito, Edivaldo Soares; Hulle, Lutero [Espirito Santo Centrais Eletricas S.A. (ESCELSA), Vitoria, ES (Brazil); S. Martins, Icaro da [Centrais Eletricas do Norte do Brasil S.A. (ELETRONORTE), Belem, PA (Brazil); Vilhena, Joao Luiz S. de [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fagundes, Zaluar Aquino [Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    An increase in the consumption of natural gas in Brazil is an expected fact in what concerns energetic planning. This work presents the existing situation in what concerns natural gas utilization in the main world economies, as well as an analysis of the participation of this fuel among the energy final consumption per sources. The Brazilian consumption of natural gas is also analysed as well as the international agreement between Brazil and Bolivia for natural gas commercialization. Some legal, institutional and political aspects related to natural gas commercialization are also discussed. Finally, several benefits to be brought by the utilization of natural gas are presented 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. 49 CFR 193.2019 - Mobile and temporary LNG facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobile and temporary LNG facilities. 193.2019... LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 193.2019 Mobile and temporary LNG facilities. (a) Mobile and temporary LNG facilities for peakshaving application, for service...

  18. Reflecting on the ethical administration of computerized medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collmann, Jeff R.

    1995-05-01

    This presentation examines the ethical issues raised by computerized image management and communication systems (IMAC), the ethical principals that should guide development of policies, procedures and practices for IMACS systems, and who should be involved in developing a hospital's approach to these issues. The ready access of computerized records creates special hazards of which hospitals must beware. Hospitals must maintain confidentiality of patient's records while making records available to authorized users as efficiently as possible. The general conditions of contemporary health care undermine protecting the confidentiality of patient record. Patients may not provide health care institutions with information about themselves under conditions of informed consent. The field of information science must design sophisticated systems of computer security that stratify access, create audit trails on data changes and system use, safeguard patient data from corruption, and protect the databases from outside invasion. Radiology professionals must both work with information science experts in their own hospitals to create institutional safeguards and include the adequacy of security measures as a criterion for evaluating PACS systems. New policies and procedures on maintaining computerized patient records must be developed that obligate all members of the health care staff, not just care givers. Patients must be informed about the existence of computerized medical records, the rules and practices that govern their dissemination and given the opportunity to give or withhold consent for their use. Departmental and hospital policies on confidentiality should be reviewed to determine if revisions are necessary to manage computer-based records. Well developed discussions of the ethical principles and administrative policies on confidentiality and informed consent and of the risks posed by computer-based patient records systems should be included in initial and continuing

  19. Sustainable Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Aslak Aamot

    This paper combines strands of mobilities theory and planning theory, and develops a qualitative approach to look across emerging planning practices. By actively following 8 Danish urban and transport planners, over the course of 2 years, we learn how their practices have changed, inspired...

  20. Mobile Phone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    籍万杰

    2004-01-01

    Your mobile phone rings.and instead of usual electronic signals,it's playing your favorite music.A friend sends your favorite song to cheer you up.One day,a record company might forward new records and music videos to your phone.

  1. Mobil nationalisme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Lasse Martin

    2006-01-01

    , varer, mennesker og kapital men derimod en integreret del af disse tendenser. Gennem begrebet mobil nationalisme argumenteres der for en analytisk optik, hvor nationalisme forstås som en proces hvorigennem skiftende relationer og bevægelser mellem forskellige socio-rumlige skalaer som kroppen...

  2. Mobile IP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijenk, Geert; Sallent, S.; Pras, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Internet is growing exponentially, both in the amount of traffic carried, and in the amount of hosts connected. IP technology is becoming more and more important, in company networks (Intranets), and also in the core networks for the next generation mobile networks. Further, wireless access to I

  3. Sustainable Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Aslak Aamot

    This paper combines strands of mobilities theory and planning theory, and develops a qualitative approach to look across emerging planning practices. By actively following 8 Danish urban and transport planners, over the course of 2 years, we learn how their practices have changed, inspired...

  4. Mobile IP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijenk, Gerhard J.; Sallent, S.; Pras, Aiko

    1999-01-01

    The Internet is growing exponentially, both in the amount of traffic carried, and in the amount of hosts connected. IP technology is becoming more and more important, in company networks (Intranets), and also in the core networks for the next generation mobile networks. Further, wireless access to

  5. Mobile Misfortune

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigh, Henrik Erdman

    2015-01-01

    for themselves and their families, it shows how involvement in the cocaine trade is both a curse and a catalyst. Though trading the drug may facilitate migration and mobility, generating social being and worth in the process, it is an activity that is haunted by the threat of deportation and the termination...

  6. Polypyrrole/montmorillonite nanocomposite as a new solid phase microextraction fiber combined with gas chromatography–corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of diazinon and fenthion organophosphorus pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Mohammad T., E-mail: jafari@cc.iut.ac.ir; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • A novel SPME fiber based on polypyrrole/montmorillonite nanocomposites with highly porous and thermal stability was prepared. • The two-dimensional separation technique, GC–IMS, was used for analysis of complex matrices extracted by SPME. • Direct and simultaneous analysis of diazinon and fenthion in various real samples was successfully accomplished. Abstract: A novel solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was prepared and coupled with gas chromatography corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (GC–CD–IMS) based on polypyrrole/montmorillonite nanocomposites for the simultaneous determination of diazinon and fenthion. The nanocomposite polymer was coated using a three-electrode electrochemical system and directly deposited on a Ni–Cr wire by applying a constant potential. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the new fiber exhibited a rather porous and homogenous surface. The thermal stability of the fabricated fiber was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The effects of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as extraction temperature and time, salt addition, stirring rate, the amount of nanoclay, and desorption temperature were investigated and optimized. The method was exhaustively evaluated in terms of sensitivity, recovery, and reproducibility. The linearity ranges of 0.05–10 and 0.08–10 μg L⁻¹, and the detection limits of 0.020 and 0.035 μg L⁻¹ were obtained for diazinon and fenthion, respectively. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 5% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was applied to determine the diazinon and fenthion (as model compounds) in cucumber, lettuce, apple, tap and river water samples. The satisfactory recoveries revealed the capability of the two-dimensional separation technique (retention time in GC and drift time in IMS) for the analysis of complex matrices extracted by

  7. Enhanced two dimensional electron gas transport characteristics in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlInN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors on Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedsman, J. J., E-mail: freedy54@gmail.com; Watanabe, A.; Urayama, Y. [Research Center for Nano-Devices and Advanced Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 8555 (Japan); Egawa, T., E-mail: egawa.takashi@nitech.ac.jp [Research Center for Nano-Devices and Advanced Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 8555 (Japan); Innovation Center for Multi-Business of Nitride Semiconductors, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 8555 (Japan)

    2015-09-07

    The authors report on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 0.85}In{sub 0.15}N/GaN Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor High-Electron-Mobility Transistor (MOS-HEMT) on Si fabricated by using atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as gate insulator and passivation layer. The MOS-HEMT with the gate length of 2 μm exhibits excellent direct-current (dc) characteristics with a drain current maximum of 1270 mA/mm at a gate bias of 3 V and an off-state breakdown voltage of 180 V for a gate-drain spacing of 4 μm. Also, the 1 μm-gate MOS-HEMT shows good radio-frequency (rf) response such as current gain and maximum oscillation cut-off frequencies of 10 and 34 GHz, respectively. The capacitance-voltage characteristics at 1 MHz revealed significant increase in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density for the MOS-HEMT compared to conventional Schottky barrier HEMTs. Analyses using drain-source conductivity measurements showed improvements in 2DEG transport characteristics for the MOS-HEMT. The enhancements in dc and rf performances of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 0.85}In{sub 0.15}N/GaN MOS-HEMT are attributed to the improvements in 2DEG characteristics.

  8. Airborne Chemical Sensing with Mobile Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienthal, Achim J.; Loutfi, Amy; Duckett, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Airborne chemical sensing with mobile robots has been an active research area since the beginning of the 1990s. This article presents a review of research work in this field, including gas distribution mapping, trail guidance, and the different subtasks of gas source localisation. Due to the difficulty of modelling gas distribution in a real world environment with currently available simulation techniques, we focus largely on experimental work and do not consider publications that are purely based on simulations.

  9. Computerized tools in psychology: cross cultural and genetically informative studies of memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismatullina V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we presented the computerized tools for psychological studies of memory. The importance of implementing computerized automated tools for psychological studies is discussed. It has been shown that this tools can be used both for cross-cultural and genetically informative studies. The validity of these tools for cross-cultural and genetically informative studies of memory can be seen as the first step to use automated computerized tools for big data collection in psychology.

  10. Mobile-to-mobile wireless channels

    CERN Document Server

    Zajic, Alenka

    2013-01-01

    Present-day mobile communications systems can be classified as fixed-to-mobile because they allow mobility on only one end (e.g. the mobile phone to a fixed mobile operator's cell tower). In answer to the consumer demand for better coverage and quality of service, emerging mobile-to-mobile (M-to-M) communications systems allow mobile users or vehicles to directly communicate with each other. This practical book provides a detailed introduction to state-of-the-art M-to-M wireless propagation. Moreover, the book offers professionals guidance for rapid implementation of these communications syste

  11. Urban Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This anthology is the proceedings publication from the 2015 NAF Symposium in Malmö, Sweden. The aim of the 2015 NAF Symposium “Urban Mobility – Architectures, Geographies and Social Space” was to facilitate a cross-disciplinary discussion on urban mobility in which the juxtaposition of different...... discursive perceptions of the concept would foster greater insight into and understanding of both the challenges and potentials that it represents. It focused on some of the key themes currently facing cities and the urban: the transformation of the city and our built environment; migration; rural decline......; the interaction between city, architecture, and inhabitants; the role of architects and architecture in the creation of democratic and sustainable urban contexts; the city and its representation; the politics of intervention; and the actions of governing and developing. This proceedings publication from...

  12. An overview of selected information storage and retrieval issues in computerized document processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Ihebuzor, Valentine U.

    1984-01-01

    The rapid development of computerized information storage and retrieval techniques has introduced the possibility of extending the word processing concept to document processing. A major advantage of computerized document processing is the relief of the tedious task of manual editing and composition usually encountered by traditional publishers through the immense speed and storage capacity of computers. Furthermore, computerized document processing provides an author with centralized control, the lack of which is a handicap of the traditional publishing operation. A survey of some computerized document processing techniques is presented with emphasis on related information storage and retrieval issues. String matching algorithms are considered central to document information storage and retrieval and are also discussed.

  13. Using Computerized Bilingual Dictionaries To help Maximize English Vocabulary Learning at Japanese Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucky, John Paul

    2003-01-01

    Compares various computerized bilingual dictionaries for their relative effectiveness in helping Japanese college students at several language proficiency levels to access new English target vocabulary. (Author/VWL)

  14. Design and evaluation of computerized operating procedures in nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Fei-Hui; Hwang, Sheue-Ling

    2003-01-15

    A small-scale virtual system has been developed in this study to enhance operators' understanding and operating performance. For this, a computerized graphical interface based on Dynamic Work Causality Equation (DWCE) has been designed to transform the operating procedure into a flowchart. Furthermore, the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) was installed to connect the signboard (proposed system) with the computerized graphical interface. An experiment was conducted to verify the effect of computerized graphic interface, indicating that the computerized system significantly decreases learning time and improves operational performance.

  15. Robotique Mobile

    OpenAIRE

    Filliat, David

    2011-01-01

    1 Introduction I Les bases de la navigation 2 Les différents types de navigation 3 Les sources d'information 4 Matériels courants en robotique mobile II Navigation réactive 5 Navigation vers un but 6 Évitement d'obstacles 7 Apprentissage par renforcement III Navigation utilisant une carte 8 Localisation, Cartographie et Planification 9 Les représentations de l'environne 10 Localisation 11 Cartographie 12 Planification; Engineering school

  16. The African Mobile Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks......This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks...

  17. The African Mobile Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks......This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks...

  18. Network Mobiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhamali Masoud Alfrgani .Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are becoming increasingly popular for delivering multimedia content, particularly by means of streaming. The main disadvantage of these devices is their limited battery life. Unfortunately, streaming of multimedia content causes the battery of the device to discharge very fast, often causing the battery to deplete before the streaming task finishes, resulting in user dissatisfaction. It is generally not possible to charge the device while on the go as electricity socket and charger are required. Therefore, to avoid this user dissatisfaction, it is necessary to find ways to prolong the battery lifetime and to support the completion of the multimedia streaming tasks. A typical architecture for mobile multimedia streaming is presented In this architecture, a wired server streams multimedia content over a wireless IP network to a number of client devices. These devices could be PDAs, smartphones or any other mobile device with 802.11 connectivity. In relation to possible power savings, the multimedia streaming process can be described as consisting of three stages: reception, decoding and playing. Other researchers have shown that energy savings can be made in each stage, for example by using pre-buffering in the reception stage, feedback control during decoding and backlight adjustment for playing. However, it is not a common practice to combine energy savings in the three stages in order to achieve the best

  19. Going mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  20. [Computerized cardiotocography analysis of fetal heart response to acoustic stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Roseli Mieko Yamamoto; Kwon, Clarice; Miyadahira, Seizo; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2009-11-01

    to study the effect of acoustic stimulation in the fetal cardiac response, according to parameters from computerized cardiotocography in low risk pregnancies. twenty low risk pregnant women were included in the study, according to the following criteria: age over 18; single gestation, living fetus; gestational age between 36 and 40 weeks; amniotic liquid index over 8.0 cm and absence of fetal malformation. Cases with post-natal diagnosis of fetal anomaly were excluded. Computerized cardiotocography was performed for 20 minutes, before and after fetal acoustic stimulation. Results were analyzed by the t test for dependent samples, with significance level at pstimulation was successfully performed in all cases analyzed. By the analysis of the cardiotocographic parameters, there was no significant difference when the pre and post-stimulation parameters were compared: average number of fetal movements per hour (55.6 versus 71.9, p=0.1); mean basal fetal heart rate (FHR) (135.2 versus 137.5 bpm, p=0.3); mean FHR increases>10 bpm (6.5 versus 6.8, p=0.7); mean FHR increases>15 bpm (3.8 versus 4.3, p=0.5); mean duration of high FHR variation episodes (11.4 versus 10.9 min, p=0.7); mean duration of low FHR variation episodes (2.5 versus 1.1 min, p=0.2), and mean short-term variation (10.6 versus 10.9 ms, p=0.6). in low risk gestations at term, computerized cardiotocography has not evidenced differences in the FHR parameters after the fetal sonic stimulation.

  1. An epidemiologic approach to computerized medical diagnosis--AEDMI program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer Salvans, P; Alonso Vallès, L

    1990-01-01

    A program called "An Epidemiological Approach to Computerized Medical Diagnosis" (AEDMI) is presented. Using an interactive questionnaire, physician-patient interviews are conducted and a summary of the relevant clinical data is provided. Standard items, obtained on a multi-centre basis, form a large-scale data base. Simultaneously, the reasoning of clinical experts in each real case is analyzed to obtain a knowledge-rules data base. The methodology of the program combines Bayesian systems, expert systems, and other new lines of research such as neural networks or case-based reasoning. The general concepts of clinical decision making aid systems are reviewed. This publication is aimed at obtaining international cooperation.

  2. COMPUTERIZED HEAT-TREATMENT IN A ZIMBABWEAN FACTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Collier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of Zimbabwe's current economic problems, parts of the manufacturing industry are turning their attention to the possibility of utilising local design talent in upgrading their manufacturing plants. This paper describes a project undertaken by the National University of Science and Technology to convert the heat-treatment process in a major manufacturing plant from semi -manual to a computerized one. The system comprises microcontroller connection to the furnaces and sensors, and communicates with a central computer on which software for a windowed user-interface is hosted. Experimental results for the system are presented, and a strategy for other companies in the same predicament is proposed.

  3. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.

    1992-10-01

    This Reference Guide contains instructions on how to install and use Version 3.5 of the NRC-sponsored Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). The NUCLARR data management system is contained in compressed files on the floppy diskettes that accompany this Reference Guide. NUCLARR is comprised of hardware component failure data (HCFD) and human error probability (HEP) data, both of which are available via a user-friendly, menu driven retrieval system. The data may be saved to a file in a format compatible with IRRAS 3.0 and commercially available statistical packages, or used to formulate log-plots and reports of data retrieval and aggregation findings.

  4. Assessment outcomes: computerized instruction in a human gross anatomy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Elaine L

    2002-01-01

    New and traditional educational media were used to study alternative methods of instruction in a human gross anatomy course. Three consecutive entry-level physical therapy (PT) classes (55 students total) participated in this study. No other anatomy course was available to these students during this time. During the first year, all entering PT students (n = 18) completed a traditional cadaver anatomy course. This traditional group attended weekly lectures and dissection laboratories for 15 weeks. During the second year, the next entering class of PT students (n = 17) completed a self-study, computerized noncadaver anatomy course. This self-study group attended an introductory session to receive course objectives and instruction in using the computer package chosen for the study. After the introductory session, this group worked independently for the remainder of their 15-week course. During the third year, the entering class of PT students (n = 20) attended weekly lectures and completed a self-study, computerized non-cadaver laboratory course. This lecture and self-study group attended an introductory session to review course objectives and receive instruction in using the computer package. For the remainder of their 15-week course, this group attended a weekly lecture and worked independently on the computer for the laboratory portion of their course. All groups kept time logs, recording class and study time for each day of the course. The time logs were collected on the last day of each course. Each group's performance in anatomy-based system courses was followed through the remainder of the PT curricula, including clinical rotations, and through the completion of the state board licensure examination. Data were analyzed using a multivariate analysis of variance and a Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. There was no significant difference in anatomy course class means, class study times, performance throughout the remainder of the PT curricula, and performance

  5. Rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis. A case study utilizing computerized tomography examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prando, D. (Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Clemente Filho, A.S.; Secaf, F. (Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    Rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis is a very serious and frequently fatal disease in which accurate analysis will often suggest the diagnosis. The Computerized Tomography (CT) scans are very helpful to establish the early diagnosis of mucormycosis and in the clear demonstration of the typical relationship between the sinus, orbital and cerebral disease. The recognition of the characteristic pattern in the involved areas should be helpful to early diagnosis and surgical treatment. The findings in one patient with craniofacial mucormycosis who underwent five times to CT examination are presented. Special attention is given to the serial CT scans and in the rapid spread to the central nervous system.

  6. Technical innovation: Multidimensional computerized software enabled subtraction computed tomographic angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Mona; Rosset, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Didier, Dominique; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a frequent noninvasive alternative to digital subtraction angiography. We previously reported the development of a new subtraction software to overcome limitations of adjacent bone and calcification in CT angiographic subtraction. Our aim was to further develop and improve this fast and automated computerized software, universally available for free use and compatible with most CT scanners, thus enabling better delineation of vascular structures, artifact reduction, and shorter reading times with potential clinical benefits. This computer-based free software will be available as an open source in the next release of OsiriX at the Web site http://www.osirix-viewer.com.

  7. A Concept-Map Integrated Dynamic Assessment System for Improving Ecology Observation Competences in Mobile Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Pi-Hsia; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Su, I-Hsiang; Lin, I-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Observation competence plays a fundamental role in outdoor scientific investigation. The computerized concept mapping technique as a Mindtool has shown the potential for enhancing meaningful learning in science education. The purposes of the present study are to develop a concept map integrated mobile learning design for ecology observation and to…

  8. A novel gas chromatography detector based on ion mobility spectrometry technology and its application%一种基于离子迁移谱的气相色谱检测器及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程沙沙; 陈创; 王卫国; 杜永斋; 韩丰磊; 李林; 周庆华; 张骧; 李海洋

    2011-01-01

    离子迁移谱作为气相色谱的检测器,兼有色谱的高分离能力和离子迁移谱的高灵敏度,有利于实现复杂混合物的实时在线监测.基于在色谱、离子迁移谱方面的研究基础,本实验室搭建了一套以离子迁移谱为检测器的气相色谱仪,分别对检测器的温度、总电压、尾吹气流速等参数进行了系统优化,并用于碘甲烷、1,2-二氯乙烷、四氯化碳和二溴甲烷4种卤代烃化合物的检测.实验结果表明,参数优化后的离子迁移谱检测器对碘甲烷、1,2-二氯乙烷、四氯化碳和二溴甲烷的检出限可分别达到2、0.02、1和0.1 ng,线性范围有两个数量级.离子迁移谱与气相色谱联用,其二维的分离能力可以为复杂混合物的准确定性提供更多的信息,还可以实现不同化合物的选择性检测.%Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an attractive detector of gas chromatography (GC) due to its high sensitivity, short response time, and comparatively low cost. The hyphenated GC-IMS instrument can simultaneously provide high separation ability of GC and high sensitivity of IMS. In this paper, one setup of a GC-IMS instrument is introduced. The parameters of IMS as the GC detector were evaluated and studied with respect to the resolution and sensitivity including temperature, total voltage and drift gas flow rate. Under the optimal conditions, GC-IMS was used to detect iodomethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, tetrachloromethane and dibro-momethane and the detection limits were 2, 0. 02, 1 and 0.1 ng, respectively. And the linear ranges of two orders of magnitude were achieved. As the detector of gas chromatography, IMS can provide more information for compound identification because of its second dimensional separation and can realize selective detection of different compounds.

  9. NETWORK MOBILITY SUPPORTED PROXY MOBILE IPV6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Jebaseeli SamuelRaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6 is a network-based mobility management protocol, designed to keep track of individual mobile node’s movement. So a mobile node can easily roam in PMIPV6 network without changing it’s IP address. Network Mobility-Basic Support Protocol (NEMO-BSP, based on MIPV6, is the protocol designed for mobility management of NEMO in MPIV6 network. But NEMO-BSP cannot be directly used in PMIPV6 due to differences in the underlying protocols. To make PMIPV6 as a complete mobility management protocol, functionality of PMIPV6 should be enhanced to support network mobility in PMIPV6. This work enhances functionality of PMIPV6 and NEMO-BSP protocols and proposes a new architecture called NEMO supported PMIPV6 that supports movement of mobile nodes as well as network mobility in PMIPV6 network.

  10. Findings of psychopathology and computerized tomography in neuropsychiatric diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, G.; Huber, G.; Schuettler, R.

    1982-08-01

    1978-1980 we examined 451 patients of the Psychiatric University Clinic of Bonn by computerized tomography. From 260 patients with characterized diseases of the brain and brain damages, 78 patients had neuropsychiatric diseases of old age, i.e. cerebro-vascular processes (average age of 63.7 years) and 9 patients had primary degenerative processes of the brain (average age of 62.1 years). Patients with diseases of the cerebral vessels showed irreversible psychopathological syndromes in 87%. The rate of pathological findings in CT increases in relation to degree of severity of the chronic (irreversible) organic psychosyndromes from 76% in pseudoneurasthenics syndromes to 93% in patients with organic changes of personality and to 100% in patients with dementia. The ambiguity of the conception of the multi-infarct-dementia is discussed. Only 19% of the sample with irreversible psychopathological changes showed localized neurological deficits and infarctions in CT, but none of them more than one. In all patients with dementia a cortical atrophy was found. There is a significant positive correlation between cerebral atrophy in CT and irreversible organic psychosyndrome. These findings with computerized tomography demonstrate in accordance with earlier pneumoencephalographic findings that distinct types of irreversible psychosyndromes can be correlated to distinct types of cerebral atrophy. But these statistical correlations between the degree of the severity of the loss of psychic functions and the reduction of cerebral tissue are not necessarily valid for any single case.

  11. Identification of individuals using palatal rugae: Computerized method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hemanth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of individuals is a challenging task in forensic odontology. In circumstances where identification of an individual by fingerprint or dental record comparison is difficult, the palatal rugae may be considered as an alternative source. Palatal rugae have been shown to be highly individualistic and it maintains consistency in shape throughout life. Aims and Objectives: The present study is conducted to test the efficiency of computerized software in the identification of individuals after obtaining digital photographic images of the rugae. Materials and Methods: The intra oral photographs of 100 individuals were taken using a SLR digital camera. The custom made external attachment was attached to the camera to standardize all the photographs. A special software was designed called the Palatal Rugae Comparison Software (PRCS Version 2.0 to match the clinical photographs. Five evaluators including 3 dentists, 1 computer professional, and 1 general surgeon were asked to match the rugae pattern using the software. The results were recorded along with time taken by each operator to match all the photos using software. Results: The software recorded an accuracy of 99% in identification of individuals. Conclusion: The present study supports the fact of individuality of the rugae. Computerized method has given very good results to support the individualization of rugae. Through our study, we feel that palatal rugae patterns will be of great use in the future of forensic odontology.

  12. Computerized geometric features of carpal bone for bone age estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Wen Hsieh; Tai-Lang Jong; Yi-Hong Chou; Chui-Mei Tiu

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone age development is one of the significant indicators depicting the growth status of children.However, bone age assessment is an heuristic and tedious work for pediatricians. We developed a computerized bone age estimation system based on the analysis of geometric features of carpal bones.Methods The geometric features of carpals were extracted and analyzed to judge the bone age of children by computerized shape and area description. Four classifiers, linear, nearest neighbor, back-propagation neural network,and radial basis function neural network, were adopted to categorize bone age. Principal component and discriminate analyses were employed to improve assorting accuracy.Results The hand X-ray films of 465 boys and 444 girls served as our database. The features were extracted from carpal bone images, including shape, area, and sequence. The proposed normalization area ratio method was effective in bone age classification by simulation. Besides, features statistics showed similar results between the standard of the Greulich and Pyle atlas and our database.Conclusions The bone area has a higher discriminating power to judge bone age. The ossification sequence of trapezium and trapezoid bones between Taiwanese and the atlas of the GP method is quite different. These results also indicate that carpal bone assessment with classification of neural networks can be correct and practical.

  13. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Converse, S.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  14. Social Mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Todd; Goldstein, Noah J; Fox, Craig R

    2017-09-25

    This article reviews research from several behavioral disciplines to derive strategies for prompting people to perform behaviors that are individually costly and provide negligible individual or social benefits but are meaningful when performed by a large number of individuals. Whereas the term social influence encompasses all the ways in which people influence other people, social mobilization refers specifically to principles that can be used to influence a large number of individuals to participate in an activity. The motivational force of social mobilization is amplified by the fact that others benefit from the encouraged behaviors, and its overall impact is enhanced by the fact that people are embedded within social networks. This article may be useful to those interested in the provision of public goods, collective action, and prosocial behavior, and we give special attention to field experiments on election participation, environmentally sustainable behaviors, and charitable giving. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Psychology Volume 69 is January 4, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  15. Mobile Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, STS-110 mission, deployed this railcar, called the Mobile Transporter, and an initial 43-foot section of track, the S0 (S-zero) truss, preparing the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks. The first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The 27,000-pound S0 truss is the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002. STS-110's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station.

  16. Mobile Misfortune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Vigh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the emergent cocaine trade in Bissau, the capital of the west African country of Guinea-Bissau, has become entangled with and trickled into the life worlds, hopes and fears of the city's many impoverished young men. The article is divided into two parts. While the first part looks at the predicament of youth and the hope of migration in Bissau, the second illuminates the anguish of deportation and the despair of being forcefully "displaced back home." Following in the footsteps of the young men that seek to navigate the cocaine trade, in order to obtain better lives for themselves and their families, it shows how involvement in the cocaine trade is both a curse and a catalyst. Though trading the drug may facilitate migration and mobility, generating social being and worth in the process, it is an activity that is haunted by the threat of deportation and the termination of the mobility it enables. This article, thus, looks at the motives and manners in which young men in Bissau become caught up in transnational flows of cocaine. It shows how motion is emotively anchored and affectively bound: tied to and directed toward a feeling of worth and realisation of being, and how migration from the global South often has negative potentiality as an end-point via the ascription of illegality and condition of deportability that shade it.

  17. Acceptance of Computerized Compared to Paper-and-Pencil Assessment in Psychiatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bernhard; Schneider, Barbara; Fritze, Jurgen; Gille, Boris; Hornung, Stefan; Kuhner, Thorsten; Maurer, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the acceptance of computerized assessment, particularly compared to conventional paper-and-pencil techniques, in seriously impaired psychiatric inpatients. Describes the development of a self-rating questionnaire (OPQ, Operation and Preference Questionnaire) and reports results that showed computerized assessment was convincingly…

  18. The Effect of a Computerized Review on NCLEX-RN Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, Pamela J.; Hodson, Kay E.; Henriksen, Larry

    1985-01-01

    This presentation will describe a pilot study being conducted at Ball State University. The study is attempting to determine the effect of a computerized review experience on the clinical subscale scores of NCLEX-RN. Relationships between the computerized review clinical subscores and the NCLEX-RN clinical subscale scores are also being investigated.

  19. Computerized Testing of Level III Associate Degree Nursing Students versus Paper and Pencil Testing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Shirna R.

    2014-01-01

    Computerized testing may be one solution to enhance performance on the curricular Health Education Systems Inc. (HESI) exam and the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Due to the integration of improved technological processes and procedures in healthcare for computerized documentation and electronicmedical records,…

  20. Limit orders, asymmetric information and the formation of asset prices with a computerized specialist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Baye (Michael); A. Gilette (Ann); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractWe analyze the existence of equilibrium in an asset market under asymmetric information. Price formation is modeled as a bilateral sealed bid auction where uninformed and informed traders submit limit orders to a computerized specialist. The computerized specialist is programmed to sell

  1. A Sample CISNE [Computerized Information Service for Nursing Educators] Nursing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvir, Howard P.

    The Computerized Information Service for Nursing Educators (CISNE) is a computerized information system designed to help nursing instructors exchange ideas in an attempt to improve teaching methods. The system, which is under development, will assist nursing educators by performing eight functions: (1) coding courses for instant input and…

  2. Proposed Standard Purchase Order, Variable Format for the Computerized Ordering of Books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information Technology and Libraries, 1984

    1984-01-01

    A purchase order variable format in support of computerized book ordering/acquisitions process is proposed for libraries and vendors by Subcommittee U, Computerized Ordering of Books, and National Information Standards Organization. General format structure, record content, generalized schematic, examples, and descriptions of data elements are…

  3. 15 CFR 950.9 - Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Information Retrieval Service. 950.9 Section 950.9 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce... Computerized Environmental Data and Information Retrieval Service. The Environmental Data Index (ENDEX... computerized, information retrieval service provides a parallel subject-author-abstract referral service....

  4. Computerized Assessment System for Academic Satisfaction (ASAS) for First-Year University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Leonardo Adrian; Liporace, Mercedes Fernandez; Perez, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computerized tests have become one of the most widely used and efficient educational assessment methods. Increasing efforts to generate computerized assessment systems to identify students at risk for drop out have been recently noted. An important variable influencing student retention is academic satisfaction. Accordingly, the…

  5. Differential diagnosis in computerized tomography. 2. rev. and enl. ed.; Differenzialdiagnosen in der Computertomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgener, Francis A.; Meyers, Steven P. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Imaging Sciences; Herzog, Christopher [Rotkreuzklinikum Muenchen (Germany); Zaunbauer, Wolfgang [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2013-02-01

    The book on differential diagnosis in computerized tomography is aimed to support radiologists and physicians with experience concerning the interpretation of computerized tomography images by detailed descriptions of CT diagnoses. The book covers the following topics: intracranial indications, head and neck, spinal cord, muscle-skeleton system, thorax, abdomen and pelvis.

  6. A comparison of nano-electrospray gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization linear time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the characterization of the recombinant coagulation glycoprotein von Willebrand factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemptner, Jasmin; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Müller, Roland; Ivens, Andreas; Turecek, Peter; Schwarz, Hans Peter; Allmaier, Günter

    2010-03-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF), an adhesive glycoprotein with an approximate molecular weight (MW) of the monomer of 260 kDa, circulates in human blood plasma as a series of multimers ranging in size up to 20.000 kDa; thus the determination of the accurate MW of the monomer is of great importance and due to its high MW quite challenging. In this study accurate MW determination of intact recombinant VWF monomer (rVWF) was performed with GEMMA (gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analysis) and MALDI TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization linear time-of-flight mass spectrometry). Three rVWF preparations with differing buffer systems and glycoprotein concentrations were analyzed. First investigations directed towards heterogeneity determination by means of capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE)-on-the-chip with a laser-induced fluorescence detector revealed two compounds (MW of 277 kDa (migration time 44.3 s) and 341 kDa (migration time 49.5 s)) present in each sample to varying extents, namely mature and pro-rVWF. MALDI MS analysis in the linear positive ion mode allowed the detection of mature rVWF with an exact MW of 256.1 kDa (+/-0.8%) and pro-rVWF with a MW of 349.8 kDa (+/-0.8%). Two samples containing pro-rVWF in very minor concentration resulted in GEMMA detection of the mature rVWF with a MW of 227.4 kDa (+/-2.5%), derived from the measured globular size of 10.9 nm. For one sample containing both rVWF species in almost equal concentrations no differentiation of the two species was possible with GEMMA. Due to its lower resolution only a peak representing a mixture of both species at 11.8 nm could be observed, yielding a MW of 298.8 kDa (+/-1.6%).

  7. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care.

  8. Computerized Cognitive Testing in the Management of Youth Sports-Related Concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Anthony P; Broshek, Donna K

    2016-01-01

    Computerized neurocognitive testing has become a growing practice across medical populations, but particularly within sports medicine and the management of sports-related concussion. Although traditional neuropsychological measures are solely administered and interpreted by neuropsychologists, computerized cognitive tests are marketed to and utilized by a wide range of professionals involved in the management of sports-related concussions, many of whom lack specialized psychometric training. Although the benefits of computerized testing allow for many youth athletes to be evaluated quickly, professionals implementing their use should be aware of the potential pitfalls and the high potential for misuse. After briefly reviewing the recommended guidelines set forth by the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology and the National Academy of Neuropsychology, we review the benefits/limitations of computerized testing in the management of sports-related concussion and the basic psychometric properties of some of the more widely used computerized measures. Lastly, we discuss the practical application of these devices.

  9. Computerized epileptiform transient detection in the scalp electroencephalogram: obstacles to progress and the example of computerized ECG interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Jonathan J

    2009-11-01

    Computerized detection of epileptiform transients (ETs), also called spikes and sharp waves, in the electroencephalogram (EEG) has been a research goal for the last 40years. A reliable method for detecting ETs could improve efficiency in reviewing long EEG recordings and assist physicians in interpreting routine EEGs. Computer algorithms developed so far for detecting ETs are not as reliable as human expert interpreters, mostly due to the large number of false positive detections. Typical methods for ET detection include measuring waveform morphology, detecting signal non-stationarity, and power spectrum analysis. Some progress has been made by using more advanced algorithmic approaches including wavelet analysis, artificial neural networks, and dipole analysis. Comparing the performance of different algorithms is difficult since each study uses its own EEG test dataset. In order to overcome this problem, European researchers in the field of computerized electrocardiogram interpretation organized a large multi-center research workgroup to create a standardized dataset of ECG recordings which were interpreted by a large group of cardiologists. EEG researchers need to follow this as a model and seek funding for the creation of a standardized EEG research dataset to develop ET detection algorithms and certify commercial software.

  10. Mobility Impact on Performance of Mobile Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Nandeppanavar, A S; Manvi, S S; Shridhar,

    2010-01-01

    Wireless mobile grids are one of the emerging grid types, which help to pool the resources of several willing and cooperative mobile devices to resolve a computationally intensive task. The mobile grids exhibit stronger challenges like mobility management of devices, providing transparent access to grid resources, task management and handling of limited resources so that resources are shared efficiently. Task execution on these devices should not be affected by their mobility. The proposed work presents performance evaluation of wireless mobile grid using normal walk mobility model. The normal walk model represents daily motion of users and the direction of motion is mostly symmetric in a real life environment, thus it is effective in location updating of a mobile station and in turn helps task distribution among these available mobile stations. Some of the performance parameters such as Task Execution Time, task failure rate, communication overhead on Brokering Server and Monitoring Cost are discussed.

  11. GMIN: A computerized chemical equilibrium model using a constrained minimization of the Gibbs free energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, A.R.

    1990-04-01

    This document is a user's manual and technical reference for the computerized chemical equilibrium model GMIN. GMIN calculates the chemical composition of systems composed of pure solid phases, solid-solution phases, gas phases, adsorbed phases, and the aqueous phase. In the aqueous phase model, the excess solution free energy is modeled by using the equations developed by PITZER and his coworkers, which are valid to high ionic strengths. The Davies equation can also be used. Activity coefficients for nonideal soild-solution phases are calculated using parameters of polynomial expansion in mole fraction of the excess free energy of mixing. The free energy of adsorbed phase species is described by the triple-layer site-binding model. The mathematical algorithm incorporated into GMIN is based upon a constrained minimization of the Gibbs free energy. This algorithm is numerically stable and reliably converges to a free energy minimum. The data base for GMIN contains all standard chemical potentials and Pitzer ion-interaction parameters necessary to model the system Na-K-Ca-Mg-H-Cl-SO{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-B(OH){sub 4}-H{sub 2}0 at 25{degrees}C.

  12. Gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ok Ryong

    2004-01-15

    This book introduces gas turbine cycle explaining general thing of gas turbine, full gas turbine cycle, Ericson cycle and Brayton cycle, practical gas turbine cycle without pressure loss, multiaxial type gas turbine cycle and special gas turbine cycle, application of basic theory on a study on suction-cooling gas turbine cycle with turbo-refrigerating machine using the bleed air, and general performance characteristics of the suction-cooling gas turbine cycle combined with absorption-type refrigerating machine.

  13. Mobile video with mobile IPv6

    CERN Document Server

    Minoli, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Increased reliance on mobile devices and streaming of video content are two of the most recent changes that have led those in the video distribution industry to be concerned about the shifting or erosion of traditional advertising revenues. Infrastructure providers also need to position themselves to take advantage of these trends. Mobile Video with Mobile IPv6provides an overview of the current mobile landscape, then delves specifically into the capabilities and operational details of IPv6. The book also addresses 3G and 4G services, the application of Mobile IPv6 to streaming and other mobil

  14. 用于清除水面污染物的移动式气动CO2激光器%Jet engine based mobile gas dynamic CO2 laser for water surface cleaning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    APOLLONOV V V

    2012-01-01

    本文介绍的工程项目在于研发一种激光技术来清除大面积海域和其他水面存在的油膜污染物.针对海面严重污染问题,研究了基于喷气发动机的可移动气动CO2激光器(100~250 kW)的设计方案及其在清除水面污染时的工程实现.提出的技术方案意在有效弥补传统的海面油膜处理方法只可处理块状油层而无法消除100 μm厚油膜的弊病.文中介绍了可移动气动CO2激光器的设计机理,研究了可执行该项工作的不同类型的激光器,证明了选用可移动气动CO2激光器执行该项工作的合理性.考虑了激光器系统的供气方案,选择了高质量的喷气发动机作气动CO2激光器的动力设备并设置了该设备工作时需要的容量.最后,描述了该激光系统气动液压设备的设计方案,给出了相关设备、油箱、和操作控制单元的结构.目前,作者已经完成了用于处理水面油膜的气动CO2激光器的概念设计,并制备了相应的激光系统.另外,研制了气动CO2激光器系统的工作平台,通过用激光束扫描石油膜覆盖的水面,实验验证了利用该系统收集油膜和令油膜有效燃烧的可行性.%The purpose of the project presented in the paper is to develop a laser technology to clean large areas of seas and other water surfaces from oil film contamination.It mainly aims development of technological scheme and engineering design of jet engine based mobile Gas Dynamic Lasers (GDLs) (100-250 kW) intended to solve this important problem of environment protection.This method and laser system proposed are expected to complement other traditional methods,which usually more successfully treat bulk layer oil pollution but do not match to eliminate up to 100 μm oil films.In this paper,the basic design concept of a mobile gas dynamic CO2 laser is introduced,and the possibility of using various types of lasers for solution of required tasks is considered and the selection of GDL

  15. Anti-3-[18F]FACBC Positron Emission Tomography-Computerized Tomography and 111In-Capromab Pendetide Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography-Computerized Tomography for Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Amzat, Rianot; Bowman, F. DuBois; Halkar, Raghuveer K.; Master, Viraj A.; Nye, Jonathon A.; Odewole, Oluwaseun A.; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Alaei-Taleghani, Pooneh; Goodman, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We prospectively evaluated the amino acid analogue positron emission tomography radiotracer anti-3-[18F]FACBC compared to ProstaScint® (111In-capromab pendetide) single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography to detect recurrent prostate carcinoma. Materials and Methods A total of 93 patients met study inclusion criteria who underwent anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography plus 111In-capromab pendetide single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography for suspected recurrent prostate carcinoma within 90 days. Reference standards were applied by a multidisciplinary board. We calculated diagnostic performance for detecting disease. Results In the 91 of 93 patients with sufficient data for a consensus on the presence or absence of prostate/bed disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 90.2% sensitivity, 40.0% specificity, 73.6% accuracy, 75.3% positive predictive value and 66.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromab pendetide with 67.2%, 56.7%, 63.7%, 75.9% and 45.9%, respectively. In the 70 of 93 patients with a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 55.0% sensitivity, 96.7% specificity, 72.9% accuracy, 95.7% positive predictive value and 61.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromabpendetide with10.0%, 86.7%, 42.9%, 50.0% and 41.9%, respectively. Of 77 index lesions used to prove positivity histological proof was obtained in 74 (96.1%). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC identified 14 more positive prostate bed recurrences (55 vs 41) and 18 more patients with extraprostatic involvement (22 vs 4). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography correctly up-staged 18 of 70 cases (25.7%) in which there was a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic involvement. Conclusions Better diagnostic performance was noted for anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography than for 111In

  16. Mobile technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2002-12-01

    This article describes how a fuel cell works, and reports on the introduction of Mercedes-Benz Citaro fuel cell buses in major European cities. The advantages of hydrogen gas as a fuel are highlighted, and the three electric propulsion systems, namely the battery-powered, the hybrid battery and internal combustion engine, and the fuel cell powered systems are discussed. Details are given of the increased efficiency of fuel cells compared with internal combustion engines, their simple construction, problems due to the use of hydrogen fuel, and the methanol fueled Daimler-Chrysler prototype car.

  17. A Practitioner's Guide for Variable-length Computerized Classification Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan A. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Variable-length computerized classification tests, CCTs, (Lin & Spray, 2000; Thompson, 2006 are a powerful and efficient approach to testing for the purpose of classifying examinees into groups. CCTs are designed by the specification of at least five technical components: psychometric model, calibrated item bank, starting point, item selection algorithm, and termination criterion. Several options exist for each of these CCT components, creating a myriad of possible designs. Confusion among designs is exacerbated by the lack of a standardized nomenclature. This article outlines the components of a CCT, common options for each component, and the interaction of options for different components, so that practitioners may more efficiently design CCTs. It also offers a suggestion of nomenclature.

  18. Item Overexposure in Computerized Classification Tests Using Sequential Item Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Huebner

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Computerized classification tests (CCTs often use sequential item selection which administers items according to maximizing psychometric information at a cut point demarcating passing and failing scores. This paper illustrates why this method of item selection leads to the overexposure of a significant number of items, and the performances of three different methods for controlling maximum item exposure rates in CCTs are compared. Specifically, the Sympson-Hetter, restricted, and item eligibility methods are examined in two studies realistically simulating different types of CCTs and are evaluated based upon criteria including classification accuracy, the number of items exceeding the desired maximum exposure rate, and test overlap. The pros and cons of each method are discussed from a practical perspective.

  19. Computerized assessment of social approach behavior in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon T Page

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Altered sociability is a core feature of a variety of human neurological disorders, including autism. Social behaviors may be tested in animal models, such as mice, to study the biological bases of sociability and how this is altered in neurodevelopmental disorders. An easily quantifiable social behavior frequently used to assess sociability in the mouse is the tendency to approach and interact with an unfamiliar mouse. Here we present a novel computer-assisted method for scoring social approach behavior in mice using a three-chambered apparatus. We find consistent results between data scored using the computer assisted method and a human observer, making computerized assessment a reliable, low cost, high-throughput method for testing sociability.

  20. The computerized OMAHA system in microsoft office excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiaobin; Wong, Frances K Y; Zhang, Peiqiang; Leung, Carenx W Y; Lee, Lai H; Wong, Jessica S Y; Lo, Yim F; Ching, Shirley S Y

    2014-01-01

    The OMAHA System was adopted as the documentation system in an interventional study. To systematically record client care and facilitate data analysis, two Office Excel files were developed. The first Excel file (File A) was designed to record problems, care procedure, and outcomes for individual clients according to the OMAHA System. It was used by the intervention nurses in the study. The second Excel file (File B) was the summary of all clients that had been automatically extracted from File A. Data in File B can be analyzed directly in Excel or imported in PASW for further analysis. Both files have four parts to record basic information and the three parts of the OMAHA System. The computerized OMAHA System simplified the documentation procedure and facilitated the management and analysis of data.

  1. Computerized tomography analysis of aceptic necrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichioka, Yoshiaki; Masuda, Takeshi; Matsuno, Takeo; Hasegawa, Isao; Sugano, Hiroki; Konno, Takushi.

    1988-03-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) findings of the normal femoral head in 14 patients with unilateral aceptic necrosis of the femoral head (ANF) and in healthy adults were analyzed for early diagnostic significance. CT appearance of the bone trabeculae fell into normal finding, diffuse sclerosis, and mottled sclerosis. The development of necrosis during the process was accompanied by diffuse sclerosis, suggesting that diffuse sclerosis is an early CT appearance in the case of ANF. In a three-dimensional quantification of the necrotic area for 20 patients before rotational osteotomy of the femoral head, deformation of the femoral head after the surgery was found to frequently result from 50 % or more of the necrotic area in the femoral head, irrespective of the size of necrosis on the surface of the femoral head. This suggested the influence of the three-dimensional spread of necrosis on the intensity of the femoral head. (Namekawa, K.).

  2. Cranial computerized tomography and cerebral angiography in diagnosis of infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuelich, K.J.

    1988-08-05

    Discussion of the radiological means to further analysis of the pathogenesis of cerebrovascular alterations up to real stroke with infarction. Today in the first place computer-tomography even with contrast means, moreover in the form of 'angio-CT' are used. Localization, size, form, and the grade of tissue destruction may be analyzed. Furthermore perifocal edema and the stage as also the effect of vascular anastomoses for a collateral circulation may be evaluated. Invasive angiography with puncture of carotid and vertebral arteries is used only in special rare indications. Instead, digital computerized angiography (DSA) can be adopted if particular interest is in the study of intracranial arteries, even with an 'invasive' approach, e.g. by femoral catheter (Seldinger). In summarizing: For the analysis of particular problems radiological methods may assist diagnosis and therapy of cerebrovascular infarct.

  3. Identification of Porphyra lines using computerized DNA fingerprinting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    RAPD (Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA) analysis was performed with filaments of 15 Porphyra lines representing four important groups (P. yezoensis, P. haitanensis, P.katadai var. Hemiphylla and P. oligospermatangia ). Eight stable and repeatable RAPD bands am plified with two primers, OPN-02 and OPJ-18, were selected for the construction of DNA fingerprint ing. The RAPD results were scored based on the presence or absence of each of the 8 bands and then converted to computer language expressed with two digitals, 1 and 0, which represented the presence (numbered as 1) or absence (numbered as 0) of each band, respectively. Based on these results, a model DNA fingerprint and a computerized DNA fingerprint were constructed. In the constructed DNA fingerprint, each Porphyra line has its unique fingerprinting pattern and can be easily distinguished from each other. Later, a software, named as PhGI, was designed based on this DNA fingerprinting.It can be used in practical Porphyra line identification.

  4. Vesicoureteral reflux in adults studied by computerized radionuclide cystography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinn, A.C.; Jacobsson, H.; Schnell, P.O. (Depts. of Urology Diagnostic Radiology and Hospital Physics, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    Direct radionuclide cystography in a computerized method as described by Willi and Treves was used in adults with recurrent pyelites but without evidence of obstruction. Reflux was observed in 15 out of 38 patients. In patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction or megaureters, reflux began early during the bladder filling and attained higher volumes than in those with uncomplicated pyelitis, who has minor reflux appearing mainly during voiding. Bladder capacity and detrusor compliance were lower in patients with reflux than in those without reflux. The low radiation exposure in radionuclide cystography permits observation of the urodynamic course of urinary reflux and correlation to the intravesical volume and pressure. The method is sensitive, and minorl refluxed volumes can be detected. Radionuclide cystrography can therefore be recommended for checking or surgical results and for follow-up of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. (au).

  5. Computerized Tomography with Total Variation and with Shearlets

    CERN Document Server

    Garduño, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    To reduce the x-ray dose in computerized tomography (CT), many constrained optimization approaches have been proposed aiming at minimizing a regularizing function that measures lack of consistency with some prior knowledge about the object that is being imaged, subject to a (predetermined) level of consistency with the detected attenuation of x-rays. Proponents of the shearlet transform in the regularizing function claim that the reconstructions so obtained are better than those produced using TV for texture preservation (but may be worse for noise reduction). In this paper we report results related to this claim. In our reported experiments using simulated CT data collection of the head, reconstructions whose shearlet transform has a small $\\ell_1$-norm are not more efficacious than reconstructions that have a small TV value. Our experiments for making such comparisons use the recently-developed superiorization methodology for both regularizing functions. Superiorization is an automated procedure for turning...

  6. Computerized Tomography Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN among adult inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Passamani Diogo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN is one of the complications of the use of intravascular contrast agents, being defined as a reduction of the glomerular filtration rate caused by the iodinated contrast. Most CIN data derive from the cardiovascular literature, which identified as the most consistent risk factors pre-existing chronic renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. However, these studies limit their conclusions to a more specific patient population. Computerized tomography as a cause of CIN has been studied less often. Objective: To report on the incidence of computerized tomography contrast induced nephropathy (CIN in an inpatient population of a tertiary general hospital, identifying potentially avoidable risk factors. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study with inpatients admitted at a tertiary hospital requiring contrast-induced CT. The primary outcome was the development of CIN, measure by the alteration of serum creatinine or glomerular filtration rate in 48 or 72 hours. Through clinical interview, we verified possible risk factors and preventive measures instituted by the medical team and their association with development of CIN. Results: Of a total of 410 patients, 35 (8.5% developed CIN. There was a positive correlation between CIN and the presence of diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.15; 95%CI 1.35-4.06; p = 0.02, heart failure (OR = 2.23; 95%CI 1.18-8.8; p = 0.022, and renal failure (OR = 3.36; 95%CI 1.57- 7.17; p = 0.002 Conclusion: Incidence of CIN varies according to the population. Diabetes mellitus, heart failure and renal failure were independent risk factors for the development of CT-associated CIN. Further studies are needed to better understand and treat CT-associated CIN.

  7. Evaluation of a Computerized Clinical Information System (Micromedex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundsgaarde, H P; Moreshead, G E

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes data collected as part of a project designed to identify and assess the technical and organizational problems associated with the implementation and evaluation of a Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS), Micromedex, in three U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). The study began in 1987 as a national effort to implement decision support technologies in the Veterans Administration Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP). The specific objectives of this project were to (1) examine one particular decision support technology, (2) identify the technical and organizational barriers to the implementation of a CCIS in the VA host environment, (3) assess the possible benefits of this system to VA clinicians in terms of therapeutic decision making, and (4) develop new methods for identifying the clinical utility of a computer program designed to provide clinicians with a new information tool. The project was conducted intermittently over a three-year period at three VA medical centers chosen as implementation and evaluation test sites for Micromedex. Findings from the Kansas City Medical Center in Missouri are presented to illustrate some of the technical problems associated with the implementation of a commercial database program in the DHCP host environment, the organizational factors influencing clinical use of the system, and the methods used to evaluate its use. Data from 4581 provider encounters with the CCIS are summarized. Usage statistics are presented to illustrate the methodological possibilities for assessing the "benefits and burdens" of a computerized information system by using an automated collection of user demographics and program audit trails that allow evaluators to monitor user interactions with different segments of the database.

  8. Analysis of concrete material through gamma ray computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Junior, J.M. de [Universidade de Sorocaba - UNISO, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Martins, A.C.G.; Milito, J.A. de [Faculdade de Engenharia de Sorocaba - FACENS, SP (Brazil)

    2004-09-15

    Computerized Tomography (CT) refers to the cross sectional imaging of an object from both transmission or reflection data collected by illuminating the object from many different directions. The most important contribution of CT is to greatly improve abilities to distinguish regions with different gamma ray transmittance and to separate over-lying structures. The mathematical problem of the CT imaging is that of estimating an image from its projections. These projections can represent, for example, the linear attenuation coefficient of {gamma}-rays along the path of the ray. In this work we will present some new results obtained by using tomographic techniques to analyze column samples of concrete to check the distribution of various materials and structural problems. These concrete samples were made using different proportions of stone, sand and cement. Another set of samples with different proportions of sand and cement were also used to verify the outcome from the CT analysis and the differences between them. Those samples were prepared at the Material Laboratory of Faculdade de Engenharia de Sorocaba, following the same procedures used in real case of concrete tests. The projections used in this work was obtained by Mini Computerized Tomograph of Uniso (MTCU), located at the Experimental Nuclear Physics Laboratory at University of Sorocaba. This tomograph operates with a gamma ray source of {sup 241}Am (photons of 60 keV and 100 mCi of intensity) and a NaI(Tl) solid state detector. The system features translation and rotation scanning modes, a 100 mm effective field of view, and 1 mm spatial resolution. The image reconstruction problem is solved using Discrete Filtered Backprojection (FBP). (author)

  9. MOBILITY: A SYSTEMS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola I. Striuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the problem of mobility in the socio-educational and technical systems was carried out: the evolution of the concept of mobility in scientific sources of XIX–XXI centuries was analyzed and the new sources on the issue of mobility introduced into scientific circulation, the interrelation of the types of mobility in the socio-pedagogical and technical systems are theoretically grounded, an integrative model of mobility in the information society is proposed. The major trends in academic mobility are identified (the transition from student mobility to mobility programs and educational services providers, the new mobility programs (franchising, double/joint degrees, combinations, nostrification etc. are characterized. The new types of mobility providers are reviewed and attention is focused on virtual universities that are now the basis of virtual mobility of students and activities which are based on the use of new ICT in higher education, especially – the Internet and mobile learning environments.

  10. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  11. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  12. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  13. Cooperating mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  14. Trends in Mobile Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Chocholová, Petra

    2010-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis is to assess the state of the mobile marketing as of the first quarter of 2011 and to discuss various scenarios of the future development. This thesis defines the terms "mobile marketing" and "mobile advertising" and identifies the main players in the industry. It explores the main categories of mobile advertising such as mobile messaging, in-content and mobile internet advertising. Later, it analyzes the latest trends in the industry and describes in detail t...

  15. The utility of flexible sigmoidoscopy after a computerized tomographic colonography revealing only rectosigmoid lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, P E; Gentry, A B; Cash, B D

    2008-03-15

    Identifying polyps by computerized tomographic colonography typically prompts colonoscopy, increasing its cost, risk and inconvenience. Many polyps are confined to the rectosigmoid and theoretically amenable to resection via flexible sigmoidoscopy. To determine the prevalence of advanced proximal colonic neoplasia when computerized tomographic colonography reveals only rectosigmoid polyps, and characterize the yield of polypectomy via flexible sigmoidoscopy in such patients. Subjects underwent computerized tomographic colonography and colonoscopy with segmental unblinding. Patients with only rectosigmoid findings by computerized tomographic colonography were identified retrospectively. Flexible sigmoidoscopy findings were estimated by including lesions distal to the descending/sigmoid colon junction during colonoscopy. Proximal lesions were also reviewed. Advanced lesions were defined as: adenocarcinoma, tubular adenoma >1 cm, > or =3 tubular adenomas, tubulovillous histology or high-grade dysplasia. By computerized tomographic colonography, 15% (203 of 1372) had only rectosigmoid polyps. Concomitant lesions in the proximal colon were seen in 32% (64 of 203) during colonoscopy. Advanced proximal neoplasia occurred in 2% (three of 203) with only rectosigmoid polyps on computerized tomographic colonography. Using flexible sigmoidoscopy to follow-up computerized tomographic colonography demonstrating only rectosigmoid polyps would eliminate 15% of subsequent colonoscopies. This strategy carries a small risk of missed proximal advanced neoplasia. This miss rate appears comparable to that of colonoscopy alone. Further study on the cost-effectiveness of this approach is warranted.

  16. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  17. Computerized Virtual Reality Simulation in Preclinical Dentistry: Can a Computerized Simulator Replace the Conventional Phantom Heads and Human Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessas, Anastasios

    2017-07-10

    In preclinical dental education, the acquisition of clinical, technical skills, and the transfer of these skills to the clinic are paramount. Phantom heads provide an efficient way to teach preclinical students dental procedures safely while increasing their dexterity skills considerably. Modern computerized phantom head training units incorporate features of virtual reality technology and the ability to offer concurrent augmented feedback. The aims of this review were to examine and evaluate the dental literature for evidence supporting their use and to discuss the role of augmented feedback versus the facilitator's instruction. Adjunctive training in these units seems to enhance student's learning and skill acquisition and reduce the required faculty supervision time. However, the virtual augmented feedback cannot be used as the sole method of feedback, and the facilitator's input is still critical. Well-powered longitudinal randomized trials exploring the impact of these units on student's clinical performance and issues of cost-effectiveness are warranted.

  18. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Satyavir

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR 1674,217 (USD 35,622. Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213. The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924. Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision.

  19. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors) and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR) 1674,217 (USD 35,622). Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213). The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924). Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision. PMID:21078203

  20. A Web-Based Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) to Assess Patient Perception in Hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Wang, Wen-Chung; Huang, Sheng-Yun; Lai, Wen-Pin

    2011-01-01

    Background Many hospitals have adopted mobile nursing carts that can be easily rolled up to a patient’s bedside to access charts and help nurses perform their rounds. However, few papers have reported data regarding the use of wireless computers on wheels (COW) at patients’ bedsides to collect questionnaire-based information of their perception of hospitalization on discharge from the hospital. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative efficiency of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and the precision of CAT-based measures of perceptions of hospitalized patients, as compared with those of nonadaptive testing (NAT). An Excel module of our CAT multicategory assessment is provided as an example. Method A total of 200 patients who were discharged from the hospital responded to the CAT-based 18-item inpatient perception questionnaire on COW. The numbers of question administrated were recorded and the responses were calibrated using the Rasch model. They were compared with those from NAT to show the advantage of CAT over NAT. Results Patient measures derived from CAT and NAT were highly correlated (r = 0.98) and their measurement precisions were not statistically different (P = .14). CAT required fewer questions than NAT (an efficiency gain of 42%), suggesting a reduced burden for patients. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of gender and other demographic characteristics. Conclusions CAT-based administration of surveys of patient perception substantially reduced patient burden without compromising the precision of measuring patients’ perceptions of hospitalization. The Excel module of animation-CAT on the wireless COW that we developed is recommended for use in hospitals. PMID:21844001

  1. Computerized Functional Reach Test to Measure Balance Stability in Elderly Patients With Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scena, Silvio; Steindler, Roberto; Ceci, Moira; Zuccaro, Stefano Maria; Carmeli, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Background The ability to maintain static and dynamic balance is a prerequisite for safe walking and for obtaining functional mobility. For this reason, a reliable and valid means of screening for risk of falls is needed. The functional reach test (FRT) is used in many countries, yet it does not provide some kinematic parameters such as shoulder or pelvic girdles translation. The purpose was to analyze video records measuring of distance, velocity, time length, arm direction and girdles translation while doing FRT. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted where the above variables were correlated to the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) for mental status and the Tinetti balance assessment test, which have been validated, in order to computerize the FRT (cFRT) for elderly patients with neurological disorders. Eighty patients were tested and 54 were eligible to serve as experimental group. The patients underwent the MMSE, the Tinetti test and the FRT. LAB view software was used to record the FRT performances and to process the videos. The control group consisted of 51 healthy subjects who had been previously tested. Results The experimental group was not able to perform the tests as well as the healthy control subjects. The video camera provided valuable kinematic results such as bending down while performing the forward reach test. Conclusions Instead of manual measurement, we proposed to use a cheap with fair resolution web camera to accurately estimate the FRT. The kinematic parameters were correlated with Tinetti and MMSE scores. The performance values established in this study indicate that the cFRT is a reliable and valid assessment, which provides more accurate data than “manual” test about functional reach. PMID:27635176

  2. [Computerized system for managing nursing care indicators at Hospital São Paulo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbadia, Lilian Lestingi; D'Innocenzo, Maria; Fogliano, Rosana Rodrigues Figueira; Silva, Gabriela Eneida Françolin; de Queiroz, Rita Marina Ribeiro Melo; Carmagnani, Maria Isabel Sampaio; Salvador, Maria Elisabete

    2011-08-01

    Indicators are tools that permit to define parameters that will be used to make comparisons between a result and its expected value, as well as to add a value of judgement in this regard. The purpose of this study is to describe the experience of a group of nurses in the development of a computerized system to manage nursing care indicators at Hospital São Paulo. Four stages were used to implement the indicator management system: developing a nursing care indicator handbook; performing a manually registered pilot test; developing the computerized system; and performing the pilot test of the computerized system in eleven units at the hospital.

  3. Monitoring Re-execution Condition of Continuous Action Step in Computerized Procedure System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yun Goo; Lee, Sung Jin [KHNP Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The APR1400 digital main control room (MCR) has many advanced features of computerized control room. One of the most important improvements is the Computerized Procedure System (CPS). Emergency operating procedure (EOP) in the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) provides a series of instructions to MCR operators to cope with design base events. Computerized EOP supports the operator in terms of plant monitoring, decision making, and control access. Continuous Action Step (CAS) in EOP should be monitored through the entire procedure execution when plant processes are disturbed under emergency conditions. CPS can monitor CAS re-execution condition during EOP execution. CPS has functions to monitor CAS re-execution condition

  4. Computerization upgrade project for the Rocky Flats Plant Critical Mass Laboratory Reactor Control Console

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, H.C.; Miles, R.E.; Sachs, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    This report discusses present and planned future work on computerization of the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) Critical Mass Laboratory (CML) Nuclear Reactor Control Console. No computerized control functions are planned or anticipated at this time. The scope of this computerization effort is limited to Data Acquisition and Analysis. In this work an IBM-PC will be connected to four (4) Nuclear Safety channels, and two (2) nonnuclear safety channels. Programming is being done in interpretive advanced BASIC. At the present time only two channels, Linear Picoammeters 1 and 2, are having their signals processed by the IBM-PC.

  5. Design and evaluation of a computerized test for hand motor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hsien-Sheng; Chang, Cheng-Sian; Lin, Chien-Yu; Chiu, Ching-Tsun

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of this study are to design and develop a computerized test to measure junior high school students' motor skills, specifically their abilities in hand-eye motor coordination and hand motor skills, using the Wii Remote. The hand motor skills computerized test, which is based on the operational examinations in the General Aptitude Test Battery, examines hand and finger dexterity (i.e., motion, rotation, fabrication, and disassembly tests). 55 students participated in the experiment to assess the reliability and validity of the computerized test, which were supported. Information literacy and experience in the use of Wii devices did not affect the reliability.

  6. TYPOLOGIES OF MOBILE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Ivan; Alin Zamfiroiu; Dragoş Palaghiţă3

    2013-01-01

    Mobile applications and their particularities are analyzed. Mobile application specific characteristics are defined. Types of applications are identified and analyzed. The paper established differences between mobile applications and mobile application categories. For each identified type the specific structures and development model are identified.

  7. Mobile Support For Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    mobile app . This would include all tablets and smartphones and be compatible with all mobile operating systems such as Android , iOS, BlackBerry, and... SMARTPHONE SENSORS ....................................................................12 H. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE MOBILE DEVICE STRATEGY...2014, p. 51. .................................................................................9 Figure 3. GCSS-MC Mobile App Architecture

  8. [Computerized decision support systems: EBM at the bedside].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobussi, Matteo; Banzi, Rita; Moja, Lorenzo; Bonovas, Stefanos; González-Lorenzo, Marien; Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Polo Friz, Hernan; Nanni, Oriana; Mangia, Massimo; Ruggiero, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    One of the aims of Evidence-Based Medicine is to improve quality and appropriateness of care by the expedition of the knowledge transfer process. Computerized Decision Support Systems (CDSSs) are computer programs that provide alerts to the prescribing doctor directly at the moment of medical examination. In fact, alerts are integrated within the single patient electronic health record. CDSS based on the best available and updated evidence and guidelines may be an efficient tool to facilitate the transfer of the latest results from clinical research directly at the bedside, thus supporting decision-making. The CODES (COmputerized DEcision Support) trial is a research program funded by the Italian Ministry of Health and the Lombardy Region. It aims to evaluate the feasibility of the implementation of a CDSS at the hospital level and to assess its efficacy in daily clinical practice. The CODES project includes two pragmatic RCTs testing a CDSS (i.e. the EBMeDS - MediDSS) in two large Italian hospitals: the first is a general hospital in Vimercate (Lombardy), the second is an oncologic research center in Meldola (Emilia Romagna). The CDSS supports a full spectrum of decisions: therapy, drug interactions, diagnosis, and management of health care services are covered by a hundreds of reminders. However only few reminders are activated per patient, highlighting crucial problems in the delivery of high-quality care. The two trials have similar design and primary outcome, the rate at which alerts detected by the software are resolved by a decision of the clinicians. The project also includes the assessment of barriers and facilitators in the adoption of these new technologies by hospital staff members and the retrospective evaluation of the repeated risks in prescription habits. The trials are ongoing and currently more than 10,000 patients have been randomized. The qualitative analysis revealed a progressive shift in the perception of the tool. Doctors are now seeing it

  9. Next generation mobile broadcasting

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Barquero, David

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Mobile Broadcasting provides an overview of the past, present, and future of mobile multimedia broadcasting. The first part of the book-Mobile Broadcasting Worldwide-summarizes next-generation mobile broadcasting technologies currently available. This part covers the evolutions of the Japanese mobile broadcasting standard ISDB-T One-Seg, ISDB-Tmm and ISDB-TSB; the evolution of the South Korean T-DMB mobile broadcasting technology AT-DMB; the American mobile broadcasting standard ATSC-M/H; the Chinese broadcasting technologies DTMB and CMMB; second-generation digital terrestrial

  10. 78 FR 17940 - Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Computerized Orthopedic Surgical Devices, Software, Implants, and Components Thereof..., Software, Implants, and Components Thereof, DN 2945; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public... devices, software, implants, and components thereof. The complaint names as respondents Stanmore...

  11. The costs of marketing slaughter cattle by computerized and conventional auction systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chieruzzi, Alice M., 1956-; Buccola, Steven T.

    1981-01-01

    by Alice M. Chieruzzi and Steven T. Buccola This report is based upon Alice Chieruzzi's Master's thesis, A Cost Comparison of Computerized and Conventional Auction Marketing Systems for Slaughter Cattle.

  12. Applications of satellite snow cover in computerized short-term streamflow forecasting. [Conejos River, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure is described whereby the correlation between: (1) satellite derived snow-cover depletion and (2) residual snowpack water equivalent, can be used to update computerized residual flow forecasts for the Conejos River in southern Colorado.

  13. Evaluating the use of computerized stimulus preference assessments in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Cristina M; Vollmer, Timothy R; Colbert, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to extend the use of stimulus preference assessments to children in foster care. In Study 1, subjects completed a computerized 4-point Likert-type questionnaire designed to assess preference for a wide range of stimuli and activities. Next, items identified as highly preferred (HP) and less preferred (LP) on the questionnaire were tested using a computerized paired-stimulus preference assessment. Results showed complete correspondence between the results of the computerized preference assessments for 11 of 17 subjects. Studies 2 and 3 evaluated whether the stimuli identified as HP in Study 1 would function as reinforcers. Overall, subjects allocated their engagement to HP items, and those HP items could be used as reinforcers for math problem completion. Collectively, these studies demonstrated that computerized preference assessments may be a feasible method of identifying preferences in the foster care system. Implications for their use in foster care are discussed. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  14. The Effect of Occupational Information on a Computerized Vocational Counseling System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Richard S.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the effect of giving or withholding occupational information in terms of impact on reliability and concurrent validity of a computerized vocational counseling system (Exploring Careers), used with 141 high school students. Results showed students found the program helpful. (JAC)

  15. Design criteria and realization of a computerized supervisory system for nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maestri, F.; Mangiarotti, M.; Maciocco, G.

    1987-11-01

    This paper describes the design criteria and the realization modalities of a computerized supervisory system for nuclear applications. The man-machine interface design aspects for the Alto Lazio Nuclear Power Plant control room are discussed.

  16. Development of a computerized handbook of architectural plans : Ontwikkeling van een gecomputeriseerd handboek van architectonische plattegronden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, A.

    1990-01-01

    The dissertation investigates an approach to the development of visual / spatial computer representations for architectural purposes through the development of the computerized handbook of architectural plans (chap), a knowledge-based computer system capable of recognizing the metric properties of

  17. Computerized image analysis of the Ki-67 proliferation index in mantle cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaker, Yngvild N; Brodtkorb, Marianne; Maddison, John;

    2015-01-01

    practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of computerized image analysis software for scoring of Ki-67 in MCL. METHODS AND RESULTS: We developed an automated method for determining the Ki-67 index by computerized image analysis and tested it using a cohort of 62 MCL patients. The data were...... compared to Ki-67 scores obtained by semiquantitative estimation and image-based manual counting. When using the Ki-67 index as a continuous parameter, both image-based manual counting and computerized image analysis were related inversely to survival (P = 0.020 and P = 0.025, respectively). Ki-67 index...... obtained by semiquantitative estimation was not associated significantly with survival (P = 0.093). The results were validated in a second patient cohort with similar results. CONCLUSION: Computerized image analysis of the Ki-67 index in MCL is an attractive alternative to semiquantitative estimation...

  18. Gas and Gas Pains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems with gas if you: Are lactose or gluten intolerant Eat a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes Drink carbonated beverages Have a chronic intestinal condition, such as irritable bowel syndrome or inflammatory bowel disease Neither age nor sex ...

  19. Mobile platform security

    CERN Document Server

    Asokan, N; Dmitrienko, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mobile security has garnered considerable interest in both the research community and industry due to the popularity of smartphones. The current smartphone platforms are open systems that allow application development, also for malicious parties. To protect the mobile device, its user, and other mobile ecosystem stakeholders such as network operators, application execution is controlled by a platform security architecture. This book explores how such mobile platform security architectures work. We present a generic model for mobile platform security architectures: the model illustrat

  20. ON MOBILE MESH NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    With the advances in mobile computing technologies and the growth of the Net, mobile mesh networks are going through a set of important evolutionary steps. In this paper, we survey architectural aspects of mobile mesh networks and their use cases and deployment models. Also, we survey challenging areas of mobile mesh networks and describe our vision of promising mobile services. This paper presents a basic introductory material for Masters of Open Information Technologies Lab, interested in m...

  1. LTE mobile network technology

    OpenAIRE

    Sladič, Klemen

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis is an introduction to long term evolution of fourth generation mobile networks based on LTE mobile network standard. Fourth generation mobile networks are currently one of the most developed technology in the world of mobile communications and are somewhere already available for commercial use. At the beginning is a short history of mobile networks evolution, for easier understanding. In the history you can find information from first researches of magnetic...

  2. MOBILE AGENT: EMERGING TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    RAJGURU P. V. DR. DESHMUKH S. D

    2011-01-01

    Mobile agent technology has been promoted as an emerging technology that makes it much easier to design, implement, and maintain distributed systems, introduction to basic concepts of mobile agents like agent mobility, agent types and places and agent communication. Then benefits of the usage of mobile agents are summarized and illustrated by selected applications. The next section lists requirements and desirable properties for mobile agent languages and systems. We study the main features, ...

  3. Psychometric and psychological effects of review on computerized fixed and adaptive tests

    OpenAIRE

    Olea Díaz, Julio; Revuelta Menéndez, Javier; Ximénez, Carmen; Abad,Francisco José

    2000-01-01

    Two computerized versions of an English vocabulary test for Spanish speakers (an adaptive and a fixed one) were applied in a Spanish sample of first-year psychology undergraduate students. The effects of test type (computer-adaptive vs. computerized-fixed) and review condition (allowed vs. not allowed) on several psychological variables were examined. Withinsubject variables were measured both before and after review to study the effects of review on the psychological and psychometric variabl...

  4. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Satyavir; Yadav Kapil; Nongkynrih Baridalyne; Krishnan Anand; Gupta Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Met...

  5. The ABC's required for establishing a practical computerized plant engineering management data base system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiocco, F. R.; Hume, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    A system's approach is outlined in the paper to assist facility and Plant Engineers improve their organization's data management system. The six basic steps identified may appear somewhat simple; however, adequate planning, proper resources, and the involvement of management will determine the success of a computerized facility management data base. Helpful suggestions are noted throughout the paper to insure the development of a practical computerized data management system.

  6. PSYCHOLOGY OF COMPUTERIZATION AS A STEP TOWARDS THE DEVELOPMENT OF CYBERPSYCHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Voiskounsky, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    The need for the psychology of computerization as a separate psychological discipline was suggested by Prof. Oleg K. Tikhomirov in mid-1980s. First he tried to initiate this discipline as a by-product of his experiments in the psychology of thinking, which formed the basis of the Personal Meanings Theory of Thinking, to be formulated later; soon Tikhomirov enlarged the field of the psychology of computerization. The aims of the new discipline were to study (1) the differences between human me...

  7. Discussion of “Attitude of Physicians Towards Automatic Alerting in Computerized Physician Order Entry Systems”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bates, D. W.; Baysari, M. T.; Dugas, M.

    2013-01-01

    With these comments on the paper “Attitude of Physicians Towards Automatic Alerting in Computerized Physician Order Entry Systems”, written by Martin Jung and coauthors, with Dr. Elske Ammenwerth as senior author, the journal wants to stimulate a broad discussion on computerized physician order...... entry systems. An international group of experts have been invited by the editor of Methods to comment on this paper. Each of the invited commentaries forms one section of this paper....

  8. An ergonomics study of computerized emergency operating procedures: Presentation style, task complexity, and training level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Song; Song Fei [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Zhizhong [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: zzli@tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhao Qianyi; Luo Wei [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He Xuhong [Scanpower Risk Management China Inc., Towercrest International Plaza, No. 3 Maizidian West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100016 (China); Salvendy, Gavriel [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-10-15

    Emergency operating procedures (EOPs) are widely used in nuclear power plants (NPPs). With the development of information technology, computerized EOPs are taking the place of paper-based ones. Unlike paper-based EOPs, the industrial practice of computerized EOPs is still quite limited. Ergonomics issues of computerized EOPs have not been studied adequately. This study focuses on the effects of EOP presentation style, task complexity, and training level on the performance of the operators in the execution of computerized EOPs. One simulated computerized EOP system was developed to present two EOPs, each with different task complexity levels, by two presentation styles (Style A: one- and two-dimensional flowcharts combination; Style B: two-dimensional flowchart and success logic tree combination). Forty subjects participated in the experiment of EOP execution using the simulated system. Statistical analysis of the experimental results indicates that: (1) complexity, presentation style, and training level all can significantly influence the error rate. High-complexity tasks and lack of sufficient training may lead to a higher error rate. Style B caused a significantly higher error rate than style A did in the skilled phase. So the designers of computerized procedures should take the presentation styles of EOPs into account. (2) Task complexity and training level can significantly influence operation time. No significant difference was found in operation time between the two presentation styles. (3) Training level can also significantly influence the subjective workload of EOPs operations. This implies that adequate training is very important for the performance of computerized EOPs even if emergency responses with computerized EOPs are much more simple and easy than that with paper-based EOPs.

  9. Implementasi Sensor Gas pada Kontrol Lengan Robot untuk Mencari Sumber Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abi Nawang Gustica

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kebakaran dapat mengakibatkan berbagai kerugian. Salah satu penyebab kebakaran yang sering terjadi yaitu kebocoran gas mudah terbakar. Mobile robot dengan sensor gas dapat digunakan untuk mencari sumber kebocoran. Mobile robot dengan sensor gas hanya dapat memposisikan sensor pada posisi terdekat sumber gas yang dapat dijangkau. Letak sumber gas yang tidak pasti sejajar dengan sensor gas pada mobile robot, tidak memungkinkan untuk menemukan letak sumber gas. Dengan diimplementasikannya sensor gas pada lengan robot, maka sumber gas dapat ditemukan. Dalam penelitian ini dirancang implementasi sensor gas pada kontrol lengan robot untuk mencari sumber gas. Sensor gas yang digunakan TGS 2620 yang dipasang pada ujung lengan robot. Pergerakan lengan robot ditentukan sesuai dengan output posisi dari sistem fuzzy. Aktuator lengan robot menggunakan motor servo yang dikontrol dengan servo controller. Keberhasilan terbesar adalah ketika lengan robot berada posisi 90°, karena posisi ini adalah posisi terdekat dari set point lengan robot. Semakin jauh letak sumber gas dari posisi set point lengan robot, maka keberhasilannya akan semakin kecil. Dibutuhkan pompa penyedot yang lebih kuat untuk dapat membantu sensor mendeteksi dengan jangkauan yang lebih jauh.

  10. Simple setup for gas-phase h/d exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation and ion mobility for analysis of polypeptide structure on a liquid chromatographic time scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mistarz, Ulrik Hvid; Brown, Jeffery M; Haselmann, Kim F

    2014-01-01

    inside a mass spectrometer immediately after ESI (gas-phase HDX-MS) and show utility for studying the primary and higher-order structure of peptides and proteins. HDX was achieved by passing N2-gas through a container filled with aqueous deuterated ammonia reagent (ND3/D2O) and admitting the saturated....../D2O as HDX reagent indicate that labeling is facilitated exclusively through gaseous ND3, yielding similar results to the infusion of purified ND3-gas, while circumventing the complications associated with the use of hazardous purified gases. Comparison of the solution-phase- and gas-phase deuterium...... separation or electron transfer dissociation, thus enabling multiple orthogonal analyses of the structural properties of peptides and proteins in a single automated LC-MS workflow....

  11. Method of computerized glow curve deconvolution for analysing thermoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, T [Division of General Education, Ashikaga Institute of Technology, Omae-cho 268-1, Ashikaga, Tochigi 326-8558 (Japan); Gartia, R K [Luminescence Dating Laboratory, Manipur University, Imphal 795003 (India)

    2003-11-07

    The conventional worldwide accepted method of computerized glow curve deconvolution based on the general order kinetics formalism has two fatal defects in systems where the trapping levels (two or more) have non-zero retrapping probability. The first one is ignoring the thermal connectivity between thermoluminescence (TL) peaks. This arises from the fact that under such a situation electrons trapped at one trapping level, once activated, can be retrapped in another thermally connected level via the conduction band during the recording of the glow curve. The other is the impossibility of obtaining a global minimum, in fitting the experimental TL with the theoretical one with existing techniques. This paper aims to provide answers to these defects. The first one can be overcome by resorting to rigorous analysis using appropriate mathematical rate equations describing the flow of charge carriers. Though the second defect cannot be overcome completely, one can obtain a reasonable fit, which may not be unique. The algorithm is tested for synthetic as well as experimental glow curves.

  12. Computerized clinical documentation system in the pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Deborah Y

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether a computerized clinical documentation system (CDS: 1 decreased time spent charting and increased time spent in patient care; 2 decreased medication errors; 3 improved clinical decision making; 4 improved quality of documentation; and/or 5 improved shift to shift nursing continuity. Methods Before and after implementation of CDS, a time study involving nursing care, medication delivery, and normalization of serum calcium and potassium values was performed. In addition, an evaluation of completeness of documentation and a clinician survey of shift to shift reporting were also completed. This was a modified one group, pretest-posttest design. Results With the CDS there was: improved legibility and completeness of documentation, data with better accessibility and accuracy, no change in time spent in direct patient care or charting by nursing staff. Incidental observations from the study included improved management functions of our nurse manager; improved JCAHO documentation compliance; timely access to clinical data (labs, vitals, etc; a decrease in time and resource use for audits; improved reimbursement because of the ability to reconstruct lost charts; limited human data entry by automatic data logging; eliminated costs of printing forms. CDS cost was reasonable. Conclusions When compared to a paper chart, the CDS provided a more legible, compete, and accessible patient record without affecting time spent in direct patient care. The availability of the CDS improved shift to shift reporting. Other observations showed that the CDS improved management capabilities; helped physicians deliver care; improved reimbursement; limited data entry errors; and reduced costs.

  13. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in pediatric patients: is computerized tomography a must?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Abdullah; Tutus, Ali; Kayan, Devrim; Yılmaz, Yakup; Bircan, Kamuran

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of pediatric percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) cases, and discuss the results and necessity of non-contrast computerized tomography (CT) in these cases. In all, 48 pediatric patients who underwent PNL were retrospectively evaluated. Before PNL, either intravenous urography or CT was performed. In all patients, we evaluated the PNL time, scopy time with stone burden, and complications. During the PNL procedure, we switched to open surgery in two cases: in one because of renal pelvis perforation and in the other because of transcolonic access. In one patient who was scheduled to undergo PNL, we performed open surgery, primarily because we detected a retrorenal colon with CT. The stone burden in 45 patients who underwent PNL was 445 ± 225 mm(2), the PNL time was 51 ± 23 min, and the scopy time was 6.1 ± 2.7 min. We removed nephrostomy tubes 1-4 days after the procedure. In two patients, 24 h after removal of nephrostomy tubes, we inserted double J stents because of prolonged urine extravasation from the tract. In all, 34 of the 45 patients were stone-free, 5 patients had clinically insignificant stone fragments, and 6 patients had residual stones. PNL is a safe and effective method in the treatment of pediatric patients with kidney stones. Clinical experience is the most important factor in obtaining stone-free results. CT should be performed in all pediatric patients in order to prevent colon perforation.

  14. Development of a computerized adaptive test for Schizotypy assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fonseca-Pedrero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schizotypal traits in adolescents from the general population represent the behavioral expression of liability for psychotic disorders. Schizotypy assessment in this sector of population has advanced considerably in the last few years; however, it is necessary to incorporate recent advances in psychological and educational measurement. OBJECTIVE: The main goal of this study was to develop a Computerized Adaptive Test (CAT to evaluate schizotypy through "The Oviedo Questionnaire for Schizotypy Assessment" (ESQUIZO-Q, in non-clinical adolescents. METHODS: The final sample consisted of 3,056 participants, 1,469 males, with a mean age of 15.9 years (SD=1.2. RESULTS: The results indicated that the ESQUIZO-Q scores presented adequate psychometric properties under both Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory. The Information Function estimated using the Gradual Response Model indicated that the item pool effectively assesses schizotypy at the high end of the latent trait. The correlation between the CAT total scores and the paper-and-pencil test was 0.92. The mean number of presented items in the CAT with the standard error fixed at ≤ 0.30 was of 34 items. CONCLUSION: The CAT showed adequate psychometric properties for schizotypy assessment in the general adolescent population. The ESQUIZO-Q adaptive version could be used as a screening method for the detection of adolescents at risk for psychosis in both educational and mental health settings.

  15. Computerized Operator Support System – Phase II Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Thomas A.; Boring, Ronald L.; Lew, Roger T.; Thomas, Kenneth D.

    2015-02-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) prototype for nuclear control room process control is proposed and discussed. The COSS aids operators in addressing rapid plant upsets that would otherwise result in the shutdown of the power plant and interrupt electrical power generation, representing significant costs to the owning utility. In its current stage of development the prototype demonstrates four advanced functions operators can use to more efficiently monitor and control the plant. These advanced functions consist of: (1) a synthesized and intuitive high level overview display of system components and interrelations, (2) an enthalpy-based mathematical chemical and volume control system (CVCS) model to detect and diagnose component failures, (3) recommended strategies to mitigate component failure effects and return the plant back to pre-fault status, and (4) computer-based procedures to walk the operator through the recommended mitigation actions. The COSS was demonstrated to a group of operators and their feedback was collected. The operators responded positively to the COSS capabilities and features and indicated the system would be an effective operator aid. The operators also suggested several additional features and capabilities for the next iteration of development. Future versions of the COSS prototype will include additional plant systems, flexible computer-based procedure presentation formats, and support for simultaneous component fault diagnosis and dual fault synergistic mitigation action strategies to more efficiently arrest any plant upsets.

  16. The Initial Development of a Computerized Operator Support System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger Lew; Ronald L Boring; Thomas A Ulrich; Ken Thomas

    2014-08-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is a collection of resilient software technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall nuclear power plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. The COSS provides rapid assessments, computations, and recommendations to reduce workload and augment operator judgment and decision-making during fast- moving, complex events. A prototype COSS for a chemical volume control system at a nuclear power plant has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The development process identified four underlying elements necessary for the prototype, which consist of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. An operational prototype resides at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) using the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). Several human-machine interface (HMI) considerations are identified and incorporated in the prototype during this initial round of development.

  17. A combined reconstruction algorithm for computerized ionospheric tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, D. B.; Ou, J. K.; Yuan, Y. B.

    Ionospheric electron density profiles inverted by tomographic reconstruction of GPS derived total electron content TEC measurements has the potential to become a tool to quantify ionospheric variability and investigate ionospheric dynamics The problem of reconstructing ionospheric electron density from GPS receiver to satellite TEC measurements are formulated as an ill-posed discrete linear inverse problem A combined reconstruction algorithm of computerized ionospheric tomography CIT is proposed in this paper In this algorithm Tikhonov regularization theory TRT is exploited to solve the ill-posed problem and its estimate from GPS observation data is input as the initial guess of simultaneous iterative reconstruction algorithm SIRT The combined algorithm offer a more reasonable method to choose initial guess of SIRT and the use of SIRT algorithm is to improve the quality of the final reconstructed imaging Numerical experiments from the actual GPS observation data are used to validate the reliability of the method the reconstructed results show that the new algorithm works reasonably and effectively with CIT the overall reconstruction error reduces significantly compared to the reconstruction error of SIRT only or TRT only

  18. Assessment of computerized tomography devices in Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Paulo Marcio C., E-mail: pmco@cdtn.br, E-mail: ambienttal@ambienttal.com.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Horta, Mara Alice Avelar Saraiva [Faculdade Sao Camilo de Minas Gerais - FASC - MG, Graduacao de Tecnologia em Radiologia (Brazil); Santana, Priscila do Carmo [Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares - PCTN, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Magalhaes, Marcos Juliano [Ambienttal Protecao Radiologica Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is the diagnostic imaging method most commonly performed today. It is a device that is undergoing a technological evolution and their quality control is sorely needed. The image quality evaluation process allow a better diagnosis and control of the patient dose received during image acquisition. The CT doses are higher than other X-ray examination techniques, like a conventional X-ray. Performance evaluation of computed tomography in Minas Gerais is not significant. Therefore, this work aims to analyze 20 CT equipment in Minas Gerais, with parameters according to the national regulatory agency (ANVISA - Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria) in twelve quality control tests. Sixty five percent (65%) of CT equipment evaluated showed excellent results and were not disapproved in any of the tests performed and 30% had failed in only one of the twelve tests performed. The worst result was found in the CT scanners in the test that evaluates the low contrast resolution, where 20% of CT showed non-compliance, followed by the test that evaluates the x-rays collimation beam, where 15% had failed. The tests allowed us to observe that the twenty computerized tomography equipment achieved a great pass rate. Considering that the evaluated CTs performed the quality control tests for the first time, it is concluded that the equipment used in clinics and hospitals are of good quality image and low radiation doses. (author)

  19. Computerized tomographic analysis of fluid flow in fractured tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felice, C.W.; Sharer, J.C. (Terra Tek, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Springer, E.P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this summary is to demonstrate the usefulness of X-ray computerized tomography to observe fluid flow down a fracture and rock matrix imbibition in a sample of Bandelier tuff. This was accomplished by using a tuff sample 152.4 mm long and 50.8 mm in diameter. A longitudinal fracture was created by cutting the core with a wire saw. The fractured piece was then coupled to its adjacent section to that the fracture was not expected. Water was injected into a dry sample at five flow rates and CT scanning performed at set intervals during the flow. Cross sectional images and longitudinal reconstructions were built and saturation profiles calculated for the sample at each time interval at each flow rate. The results showed that for the test conditions, the fracture was not a primary pathway of fluid flow down the sample. At a slow fluid injection rate into the dry sample, the fluid was imbibed into the rock uniformly down the length of the core. With increasing injection rates, the flow remained uniform over the core cross section through complete saturation.

  20. Computerized adaptive measurement of depression: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammen Oommen

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient, accurate instruments for measuring depression are increasingly important in clinical practice. We developed a computerized adaptive version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We examined its efficiency and its usefulness in identifying Major Depressive Episodes (MDE and in measuring depression severity. Methods Subjects were 744 participants in research studies in which each subject completed both the BDI and the SCID. In addition, 285 patients completed the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Results The adaptive BDI had an AUC as an indicator of a SCID diagnosis of MDE of 88%, equivalent to the full BDI. The adaptive BDI asked fewer questions than the full BDI (5.6 versus 21 items. The adaptive latent depression score correlated r = .92 with the BDI total score and the latent depression score correlated more highly with the Hamilton (r = .74 than the BDI total score did (r = .70. Conclusions Adaptive testing for depression may provide greatly increased efficiency without loss of accuracy in identifying MDE or in measuring depression severity.

  1. Computerized tomographic study of normal Evans index in adult Nigerians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Umdagas Hamidu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evaluation of degree of ventricular enlargement should be based on established indices rather than on personal experience as this is highly subjective. Our aim was to establish normal values for Evans index in a Nigerian adult population as none has been found in the Nigerian medical literature. Materials and Methods: Axial computerized tomographic brain scans of 488 normal subjects were reviewed retrospectively. Of them, 319 (65.36% of the patients were males and 169 (34.63% were females; their ages ranged from 18 to 84 years with a mean age of 37.26 years. The images were acquired using a multi-slice GE Sigma excite scanner. Evans index was measured as the linear ratio of the total width of the frontal horns of the cerebral lateral ventricles to the maximum intracranial diameter. Results: The mean value for Evans index for the studied population was 0.252 ± 0.04. The EI increased with age and it was slightly higher among males. The difference in Evans value in males and females was not statistically significant. Individuals above 60 years old had the highest Evans values in both sexes. Conclusion: This study has established ranges of normal value for Evans index in a Nigerian population. It agrees with the diagnostic cut-off value of > 0.3 for hydrocephalus and it compares well with that of the Caucasians.

  2. Digital balanced detection for fast optical computerized tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Rehan; Ozanyan, Krikor B.

    2006-10-01

    Analogue Balanced Photo-detection has found extensive usage in high- sensitivity small signal applications e.g. coherent heterodyne detection. It is particularly effective for laser intensity noise removal. Nevertheless, the high cost of the commercially available analogue systems makes them unsuitable for multi-channel applications, such as fast tomography. In this paper a flexible, scalable, inexpensive and compact solution for multi channel digital balanced detection is presented. The proposed system has two components: an analogue front-end, comprising a differential photodiode amplifier for minimizing the external interference noise, and a digital balanced noise remover. The latter component initially calculates a balancing factor (BF) from the average power ratio of the signal and reference photocurrents, measured with the object removed from the signal path. Three digital balancing algorithms (DBAx) are considered for subsequent processing. In DBA1, BF is directly used in real-time ratiometric calculations. In DBA2, the BF is adjusted in real time by monitoring the window-averaged power of the received photocurrents. In DBA3, first the baseline is removed using differentiation and then ratiometric detection is performed. Using the digital alternative only one measurement of the reference beam is necessary for single-source, multi-channel detection systems. The data from multiple channels are processed in parallel by pipelined hardware, configured as a state machine. The proposed system leads to a fast optical computerized tomography system using digital balanced detection.

  3. Computerized database management system for breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Kok Swee; Chong, Sze Siang; Tso, Chih Ping; Nia, Mohsen Esmaeili; Chong, Aun Kee; Abbas, Siti Fathimah

    2014-01-01

    Data analysis based on breast cancer risk factors such as age, race, breastfeeding, hormone replacement therapy, family history, and obesity was conducted on breast cancer patients using a new enhanced computerized database management system. My Structural Query Language (MySQL) is selected as the application for database management system to store the patient data collected from hospitals in Malaysia. An automatic calculation tool is embedded in this system to assist the data analysis. The results are plotted automatically and a user-friendly graphical user interface is developed that can control the MySQL database. Case studies show breast cancer incidence rate is highest among Malay women, followed by Chinese and Indian. The peak age for breast cancer incidence is from 50 to 59 years old. Results suggest that the chance of developing breast cancer is increased in older women, and reduced with breastfeeding practice. The weight status might affect the breast cancer risk differently. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  4. Neuroplasticity-based computerized cognitive remediation for geriatric depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Sarah Shizuko; Wexler, Bruce E; Alexopoulos, George S

    2012-12-01

    This article describes a novel treatment model designed to target specific neurocognitive deficits in geriatric depression with neuroplasticity-based computerized cognitive remediation (NBCCR). The recent National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) report "From Discovery to Cure" calls for studies focusing on mechanisms of treatment response with the goal of arriving at new interventions for those who do not respond to existing treatments. We describe the process that led to the identification of specific executive deficits and their underlying neurobiology, as well as the rationale for targeting these symptoms as a part of a strategy intended to improve both executive dysfunction and depression. We then propose a strategy for further research in this emerging area. Despite significant developments, conventional antidepressant treatments leave many older adults still depressed and suffering. Psychotherapy may be effective in some depressed elders, although a recent review concluded that none of the available treatment studies meets stringent criteria for efficacy in the acute treatment of geriatric depression. Appropriately developed and targeted NBCCR, has the potential to serve as a novel treatment intervention for geriatric depression. Pathophysiological changes associated with executive dysfunction may be an appropriate target for NBCCR. Examining both behavioral changes and indices of structural integrity and functional change of networks related to cognitive and emotional regulation may lead to a novel treatment and elucidate the role of specific cerebral networks in geriatric depression. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The Computerized Table Setting Test for Detecting Unilateral Neglect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Jong Chung

    Full Text Available Patients with unilateral neglect fail to respond normally to stimuli on the left side. To facilitate the evaluation of unilateral spatial neglect, we developed a new application that runs on a tablet device and investigated its feasibility in stroke patients.We made the computerized table setting test (CTST to run on the tablet computer. Forty acute ischemic stroke patients (20 patients with right hemispheric infarction with neglect, 10 patients with right hemispheric infarction without neglect, and 10 patients with left hemispheric infarction and 10 healthy controls were prospectively enrolled to validate the CTST. The test requires subjects to set a table by dragging 12 dishes located below the table on the tablet screen. The horizontal deviation of the 12 dishes from the midline of the table, the selection tendency measured by the sequence of the dish selection, and the elapsed time for table setting were calculated automatically.Parameters measured by the CTST were correlated with the results of conventional neglect tests. The horizontal deviation was significantly higher in patients with right hemispheric infarction with neglect compared with the other groups. The selection tendency and elapsed time also were significantly different in patients with right hemispheric infarction with neglect compared with the left hemispheric infarction and control groups, but were similar to those with right hemispheric infarction without neglect.The CTST is feasible to administer and comparable with conventional neglect tests. This new application may be useful for the initial diagnosis and follow-up of neglect patients.

  6. High resolution, MRI-based, segmented, computerized head phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubal, I.G.; Harrell, C.R.; Smith, E.O.; Smith, A.L.; Krischlunas, P. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1999-01-01

    The authors have created a high-resolution software phantom of the human brain which is applicable to voxel-based radiation transport calculations yielding nuclear medicine simulated images and/or internal dose estimates. A software head phantom was created from 124 transverse MRI images of a healthy normal individual. The transverse T2 slices, recorded in a 256x256 matrix from a GE Signa 2 scanner, have isotropic voxel dimensions of 1.5 mm and were manually segmented by the clinical staff. Each voxel of the phantom contains one of 62 index numbers designating anatomical, neurological, and taxonomical structures. The result is stored as a 256x256x128 byte array. Internal volumes compare favorably to those described in the ICRP Reference Man. The computerized array represents a high resolution model of a typical human brain and serves as a voxel-based anthropomorphic head phantom suitable for computer-based modeling and simulation calculations. It offers an improved realism over previous mathematically described software brain phantoms, and creates a reference standard for comparing results of newly emerging voxel-based computations. Such voxel-based computations lead the way to developing diagnostic and dosimetry calculations which can utilize patient-specific diagnostic images. However, such individualized approaches lack fast, automatic segmentation schemes for routine use; therefore, the high resolution, typical head geometry gives the most realistic patient model currently available.

  7. Computerized atmospheric trace contaminant control simulation for manned spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Buildup of atmospheric trace contaminants in enclosed volumes such as a spacecraft may lead to potentially serious health problems for the crew members. For this reason, active control methods must be implemented to minimize the concentration of atmospheric contaminants to levels that are considered safe for prolonged, continuous exposure. Designing hardware to accomplish this has traditionally required extensive testing to characterize and select appropriate control technologies. Data collected since the Apollo project can now be used in a computerized performance simulation to predict the performance and life of contamination control hardware to allow for initial technology screening, performance prediction, and operations and contingency studies to determine the most suitable hardware approach before specific design and testing activities begin. The program, written in FORTRAN 77, provides contaminant removal rate, total mass removed, and per pass efficiency for each control device for discrete time intervals. In addition, projected cabin concentration is provided. Input and output data are manipulated using commercial spreadsheet and data graphing software. These results can then be used in analyzing hardware design parameters such as sizing and flow rate, overall process performance and program economics. Test performance may also be predicted to aid test design.

  8. Potential of Computerized Maintenance Management System in Facilities Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Farisya Azahar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For some time it has been clear that managing buildings or estates has been carried out in the context of what has become known as facilities management. British Institute of Facilities Management defined facilities management is the integration of multi-disciplinary activities within the built environment and the management of their impact upon people and the workplace. Effective facilities management is vital to the success of an organisation by contributing to the delivery of its strategic and operational objectives. Maintenance of buildings should be given serious attention before (stage design, during and after a building is completed. But total involvement in building maintenance is after the building is completed and during its operations. Residents of and property owners require their building to look attractive, durable and have a peaceful indoor environment and efficient. The objective of the maintenance management system is to stream line the vast maintenance information system to improve the productivity of an industrial plant. a good maintenance management system makes equipment and facilities available. This paper will discuss the fundamental steps of maintenance management program and Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS

  9. A statistical model for interpreting computerized dynamic posturography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Metter, E. Jeffrey; Paloski, William H.

    2002-01-01

    Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) is widely used for assessment of altered balance control. CDP trials are quantified using the equilibrium score (ES), which ranges from zero to 100, as a decreasing function of peak sway angle. The problem of how best to model and analyze ESs from a controlled study is considered. The ES often exhibits a skewed distribution in repeated trials, which can lead to incorrect inference when applying standard regression or analysis of variance models. Furthermore, CDP trials are terminated when a patient loses balance. In these situations, the ES is not observable, but is assigned the lowest possible score--zero. As a result, the response variable has a mixed discrete-continuous distribution, further compromising inference obtained by standard statistical methods. Here, we develop alternative methodology for analyzing ESs under a stochastic model extending the ES to a continuous latent random variable that always exists, but is unobserved in the event of a fall. Loss of balance occurs conditionally, with probability depending on the realized latent ES. After fitting the model by a form of quasi-maximum-likelihood, one may perform statistical inference to assess the effects of explanatory variables. An example is provided, using data from the NIH/NIA Baltimore Longitudinal Study on Aging.

  10. Computerized Neuropsychological Assessment in Aging: Testing Efficacy and Clinical Ecology of Different Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Canini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital technologies have opened new opportunities for psychological testing, allowing new computerized testing tools to be developed and/or paper and pencil testing tools to be translated to new computerized devices. The question that rises is whether these implementations may introduce some technology-specific effects to be considered in neuropsychological evaluations. Two core aspects have been investigated in this work: the efficacy of tests and the clinical ecology of their administration (the ability to measure real-world test performance, specifically (1 the testing efficacy of a computerized test when response to stimuli is measured using a touch-screen compared to a conventional mouse-control response device; (2 the testing efficacy of a computerized test with respect to different input modalities (visual versus verbal; and (3 the ecology of two computerized assessment modalities (touch-screen and mouse-control, including preference measurements of participants. Our results suggest that (1 touch-screen devices are suitable for administering experimental tasks requiring precise timings for detection, (2 intrinsic nature of neuropsychological tests should always be respected in terms of stimuli presentation when translated to new digitalized environment, and (3 touch-screen devices result in ecological instruments being proposed for the computerized administration of neuropsychological tests with a high level of preference from elderly people.

  11. Charging of mobile services by mobile payment reference model

    OpenAIRE

    Pousttchi, Key; Wiedemann, Dietmar Georg

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyze mobile payments in the mobile commerce scenario. Therefore, we first classify the mobile payment in the mobile commerce scenario by explaining general offer models, charging concepts, and intermediaries. Second, we describe the mobile payment reference model, especially, the mobile payment reference organization model and different mobile payment standard types. Finally, we conclude our findings.

  12. Abrechnung mobiler Dienste im Mobile-Payment-Referenzmodell

    OpenAIRE

    Pousttchi, Key; Wiedemann, Dietmar Georg

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyze mobile payments in the mobile commerce scenario. Therefore, we first classify the mobile payment in the mobile commerce scenario by explaining general offer models, charging concepts, and intermediaries. Second, we describe the mobile payment reference model, especially, the mobile payment reference organization model and different mobile payment standard types. Finally, we conclude our findings.

  13. Abrechnung mobiler Dienste im Mobile-Payment-Referenzmodell

    OpenAIRE

    Pousttchi, Key; Wiedemann, Dietmar Georg

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyze mobile payments in the mobile commerce scenario. Therefore, we first classify the mobile payment in the mobile commerce scenario by explaining general offer models, charging concepts, and intermediaries. Second, we describe the mobile payment reference model, especially, the mobile payment reference organization model and different mobile payment standard types. Finally, we conclude our findings.

  14. Mobility Charters and Manifestos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2010-01-01

    the ‘mobility turn’ that mobility is much more than movement from A to B. Seeing the cultural dimension as well as the underpinning power plays of normative mobility discourses opens up the reflection about imagined futures and imagined mobile subjects. Theoretically the paper bridges discourse studies......This paper explore a number of different cases of articulating notions of ‘correct’ mobility behavior and practice by looking into charters, manifestos and codes of mobility regulation. Within such discourses of ‘correct mobility’ more or less subtle expressions of power as well as normative...... and ethical positions on mobility prevail. Such ‘imagined correct mobility behavior’ are drawing on larger issues of societal change that need to be brought out in a critical analysis and discussion reflecting the attempts to control, design and orchestrate mobility patterns. The paper therefore argues within...

  15. Mobility Charters and Manifestos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2010-01-01

    and ethical positions on mobility prevail. Such ‘imagined correct mobility behavior’ are drawing on larger issues of societal change that need to be brought out in a critical analysis and discussion reflecting the attempts to control, design and orchestrate mobility patterns. The paper therefore argues within......This paper explore a number of different cases of articulating notions of ‘correct’ mobility behavior and practice by looking into charters, manifestos and codes of mobility regulation. Within such discourses of ‘correct mobility’ more or less subtle expressions of power as well as normative...... the ‘mobility turn’ that mobility is much more than movement from A to B. Seeing the cultural dimension as well as the underpinning power plays of normative mobility discourses opens up the reflection about imagined futures and imagined mobile subjects. Theoretically the paper bridges discourse studies...

  16. Children's velo-mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Trine Agervig; Nielsen, Thomas Sick; Olafsson, Anton Stahl

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable mobilities play a dominate role in low carbon futures and cycling is an integral element. Children are heirs of transport cultures and crucial for future sustainable mobility. Moreover cycling is important for children’s independent mobility and geographical experience. Dominating app...... the paper inform a discussion of urban planning and transport policy measures important for stabilizing sustainable mobility.......Sustainable mobilities play a dominate role in low carbon futures and cycling is an integral element. Children are heirs of transport cultures and crucial for future sustainable mobility. Moreover cycling is important for children’s independent mobility and geographical experience. Dominating...... approaches in transport research, including cycling, understand travel behaviour individualistic and lack to grasp the relational complexities, which are inevitable when considering children’s mobilities. Furthermore has children’s cycling largely been studied as independent mobility and active school travel...

  17. Gas Sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Luebke, Ryan

    2015-01-22

    A gas sensor using a metal organic framework material can be fully integrated with related circuitry on a single substrate. In an on-chip application, the gas sensor can result in an area-efficient fully integrated gas sensor solution. In one aspect, a gas sensor can include a first gas sensing region including a first pair of electrodes, and a first gas sensitive material proximate to the first pair of electrodes, wherein the first gas sensitive material includes a first metal organic framework material.

  18. Head First Mobile Web

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, Lyza; Grigsby, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of mobile devices and apps in use today, your business still needs a website. You just need it to be mobile. Head First Mobile Web walks you through the process of making a conventional website work on a variety smartphones and tablets. Put your JavaScript, CSS media query, and HTML5 skills to work-then optimize your site to perform its best in the demanding mobile market. Along the way, you'll discover how to adapt your business strategy to target specific devices. Navigate the increasingly complex mobile landscapeTake both technical and strategic approaches to mobile

  19. Mobile Portal Implementation Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Ping; Damsgaard, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Mobile portal plays an important role in mobile commerce market. Current literature focuses on static analysis on the value chain of mobile portals. This article provides a dynamic perspective on mobile portal strategy. Drawing upon network economics, we describe mobile portal implementation...... as a fourphase process. In different phase, a portal provider has various challenges to overcome and adopt diverse strategies, and correspondingly the regulator has different foci. The conceptual framework proposed in this article offers a basis for further analyses on the market dynamics of mobile commerce......, and can be generalized to studying other networked technologies...

  20. Mobile Router Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.