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Sample records for mll irita kallis

  1. Kaberla kalmistu 12.-13. sajandi klaashelmed / Irita Kallis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kallis, Irita

    2010-01-01

    Kaberla kalmistult leitud klaashelmestest, põhitähelepanu on 12.-13. saj. matuste inventari hulka kuulunud leiumaterjalil. Ülevaade helmeste esimemisvariatsioonidest helmekeedes, võimalikust tähendusest ja väärtusest ning samatüübiliste helmeste dateeringutest naaberaladel

  2. Archaeological investigations on the site of the cistercian nunnery of st. Michael / Mauri Kiudsoo, Irita Kallis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiudsoo, Mauri

    2005-01-01

    2004. aasta suvel Tallinnas Suur-Kloostri 2 kinnistul toimunud kaevamistest. Leidis kinnitust hüpotees, mille kohaselt hävitati kloostri rajamisel mingi varasem asustusvorm. Arheoloogilise stratigraafia analüüsil ja fikseerimisel kasutati Edward C. Harrise koostatud stratigraafia teooria ja metoodika põhimõtteid ja nn. Harrise maatriksit

  3. Archaeological excavations on the iron-smelting site in Tõdva village / Mauri Kiudsoo, Jaak Mäll, Irita Kallis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiudsoo, Mauri, 1973-

    2009-01-01

    Tõdva rauasulatuskompleksi puhul on tegemist esimese uuritud viikingiaegse rauasulatusakohaga Eestis. Uudseks võib pidada šlakianalüüsidel baseeruvat avastust, et tõenäoliselt tunti peale soomaagi ka meretekkelisi raua-mangaanikonkretsioone

  4. Menin-MLL inhibitors reverse oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembecka, Jolanta; He, Shihan; Shi, Aibin; Purohit, Trupta; Muntean, Andrew G; Sorenson, Roderick J; Showalter, Hollis D; Murai, Marcelo J; Belcher, Amalia M; Hartley, Thomas; Hess, Jay L; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2012-01-29

    Translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene result in human acute leukemias with very poor prognosis. The leukemogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins is critically dependent on their direct interaction with menin, a product of the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN1) gene. Here we present what are to our knowledge the first small-molecule inhibitors of the menin-MLL fusion protein interaction that specifically bind menin with nanomolar affinities. These compounds effectively reverse MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemic transformation by downregulating the expression of target genes required for MLL fusion protein oncogenic activity. They also selectively block proliferation and induce both apoptosis and differentiation of leukemia cells harboring MLL translocations. Identification of these compounds provides a new tool for better understanding MLL-mediated leukemogenesis and represents a new approach for studying the role of menin as an oncogenic cofactor of MLL fusion proteins. Our findings also highlight a new therapeutic strategy for aggressive leukemias with MLL rearrangements.

  5. Mll5 is required for normal spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian B Yap

    Full Text Available Mll5 is currently a member of the Mll family of SET domain histone methyltransferase proteins but studies have also showed that it could be part of the SET3 branch of proteins. Recently, constitutive knock out animal studies have shown that Mll5 is required for proper haematopoietic stem cell differentiation, and loss of Mll5 results in synthetic lethality for genome de-methylation. Mll5 deficient male mice are infertile and here we analyse the consequences of Mll5 deficiency for spermatogenesis.Mll5 deficient male mice, but not female mice, are infertile. Here we show using RNA in-situ hybridization that Mll5 is expressed in the germ cells of the testes of wild type mice. Consistent with the expression of Mll5, we demonstrate by electron microscopy, video microscopy and in vitro fertilisation techniques that Mll5 deficient mice have defects in terminal maturation and packaging of sperm. The defects seen include detachment of the acrosomal cap and impaired excess cytoplasm removal. Functional tests of sperm motility show a lack of progressive motility of spermatozoa from Mll5 deficient animals. None of these defects could be rescued by in vitro fertilization. Using microarray analysis we show that transcripts implicated in spermatogenesis are dysregulated.Our data demonstrate a clear role of Mll5 in mammalian spermatogenesis at the level of terminal differentiation providing further support for its classification in the SET3 branch of proteins. Moreover, this study identifies Tlk2, Utx, Gpr64, Sult4a1, Rap2ip, Vstm2 and HoxA10 as possible Mll5 targets that together may account for the observed spermatozoa maturation defects.

  6. Both SEPT2 and MLL are down-regulated in MLL-SEPT2 therapy-related myeloid neoplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerveira, Nuno; Snijder, Simone; Mariz, José M; Norton, Lucília; Mellink, Clemens H; Buijs, Arjan; Teixeira, Manuel R; Santos, Joana; Bizarro, Susana; Costa, Vera; Ribeiro, Franclim R; Lisboa, Susana; Correia, Cecília; Torres, Lurdes; Vieira, Joana

    2009-01-01

    A relevant role of septins in leukemogenesis has been uncovered by their involvement as fusion partners in MLL-related leukemia. Recently, we have established the MLL-SEPT2 gene fusion as the molecular abnormality subjacent to the translocation t(2;11)(q37;q23) in therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia. In this work we quantified MLL and SEPT2 gene expression in 58 acute myeloid leukemia patients selected to represent the major AML genetic subgroups, as well as in all three cases of MLL-SEPT2-associated myeloid neoplasms so far described in the literature. Cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular studies (RT-PCR, qRT-PCR and qMSP) were used to characterize 58 acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML) at diagnosis selected to represent the major AML genetic subgroups: CBFB-MYH11 (n = 13), PML-RARA (n = 12); RUNX1-RUNX1T1 (n = 12), normal karyotype (n = 11), and MLL gene fusions other than MLL-SEPT2 (n = 10). We also studied all three MLL-SEPT2 myeloid neoplasia cases reported in the literature, namely two AML patients and a t-MDS patient. When compared with normal controls, we found a 12.8-fold reduction of wild-type SEPT2 and MLL-SEPT2 combined expression in cases with the MLL-SEPT2 gene fusion (p = 0.007), which is accompanied by a 12.4-fold down-regulation of wild-type MLL and MLL-SEPT2 combined expression (p = 0.028). The down-regulation of SEPT2 in MLL-SEPT2 myeloid neoplasias was statistically significant when compared with all other leukemia genetic subgroups (including those with other MLL gene fusions). In addition, MLL expression was also down-regulated in the group of MLL fusions other than MLL-SEPT2, when compared with the normal control group (p = 0.023) We found a significant down-regulation of both SEPT2 and MLL in MLL-SEPT2 myeloid neoplasias. In addition, we also found that MLL is under-expressed in AML patients with MLL fusions other than MLL-SEPT2

  7. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; Renneville, A; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Emerenciano, M; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Barbieri Blunck, C; Almeida Lopes, B; Zuna, J; Trka, J; Ballerini, P; Lapillonne, H; De Braekeleer, M; Cazzaniga, G; Corral Abascal, L; van der Velden, V H J; Delabesse, E; Park, T S; Oh, S H; Silva, M L M; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Moore, A S; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Zerkalenkova, E; Olshanskaya, Y; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Teigler-Schlegel, A; Zur Stadt, U; Lentes, J; Göhring, G; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Madsen, H O; Gruhn, B; Duarte, X; Gameiro, P; Lippert, E; Bidet, A; Cayuela, J M; Clappier, E; Alonso, C N; Zwaan, C M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Möricke, A; Alten, J; Schrappe, M; Stanulla, M; Strehl, S; Attarbaschi, A; Dworzak, M; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Caye, A; Suarez, L; Cavé, H; Marschalek, R

    2018-02-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL/KMT2A gene are associated with infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. Here we present the data obtained from 2345 acute leukemia patients. Genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and 11 novel TPGs were identified. Thus, a total of 135 different MLL rearrangements have been identified so far, of which 94 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. In all, 35 out of these 94 TPGs occur recurrently, but only 9 specific gene fusions account for more than 90% of all illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene. We observed an age-dependent breakpoint shift with breakpoints localizing within MLL intron 11 associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and younger patients, while breakpoints in MLL intron 9 predominate in AML or older patients. The molecular characterization of MLL breakpoints suggests different etiologies in the different age groups and allows the correlation of functional domains of the MLL gene with clinical outcome. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the MLL recombinome in acute leukemia and demonstrates that the establishment of patient-specific chromosomal fusion sites allows the design of specific PCR primers for minimal residual disease analyses for all patients.

  8. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (∼90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements. PMID:23628958

  9. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Meyer; T. Burmeister; D. Gröger (D.); G. Tsaur; L. Fechina; A. Renneville; R. Sutton; N. Venn; M. Emerenciano (M.); Pombo-De-Oliveira, M.S. (M. S.); Barbieri Blunck, C. (C.); Almeida Lopes, B. (B.); J. Zuna; J. Trka (Jan); Ballerini, P. (P.); Lapillonne, H. (H.); E. de Braekeleer; G. Cazzaniga (Gianni); Corral Abascal, L. (L.); V.H.J. van der Velden (Vincent); E. Delabesse; Park, T.S. (T. S.); S.H. Oh (S.); M.L.M. Silva (M. L M); T. Lund-Aho (T.); V. Juvonen (V.); A.S. Moore (A.); O. Heidenreich; Vormoor, J. (J.); Zerkalenkova, E. (E.); Olshanskaya, Y. (Y.); Bueno, C. (C.); P. Menéndez (Pablo); A. Teigler-Schlegel; U. zur Stadt; Lentes, J. (J.); G. Göhring (Gudrun); Kustanovich, A. (A.); O. Aleinikova (O.); Schäfer, B.W. (B. W.); S. Kubetzko (S.); H.O. Madsen; Gruhn, B. (B.); Duarte, X. (X.); P. Gameiro; E. Lippert (Eric); Bidet, A. (A.); J.-M. Cayuela (Jean-Michel); E. Clappier; C.N. Alonso (Cristina); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); S. Izraeli (Shai); L. Trakhtenbrot; P. Archer (P.); J. Hancock; A. Möricke; Alten, J. (J.); M. Schrappe (Martin); M. Stanulla (Martin); S. Strehl; A. Attarbaschi (Andishe); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); Haas, O.A. (O. A.); R. Panzer-Grümayer (Renate); L. Sedek (Lukasz); Szczepa, T. (T.); A. Caye (Aurélie); Suarez, L. (L.); H. Cavé (Helene); R. Marschalek (Rolf)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractChromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL/KMT2A gene are associated with infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. Here we present the data obtained from 2345 acute leukemia patients. Genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner

  10. The incidence and distribution characteristics of MLL rearrangements in Chinese acute myeloid leukemia patients by multiplex nested RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Cao, Tingting; Gao, Li; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Chengying; Xu, Yuanyuan; Jing, Yu; Zhu, Haiyan; Lv, Na; Yu, Li

    2017-07-20

    Occurrence of MLL (Mixed Lineage Leukemia) gene rearrangements indicates poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. This is the first study to report the positive rate and distribution characteristics of MLL rearrangements in AML patients in north China. We used multiplex nested real time PCR (RT-PCR) to screen for incidence of 11 MLL rearrangements in 433 AML patients. Eleven MLL rearrangements included (MLL-PTD, MLL-AF9, MLL-ELL, MLL-AF10, MLL-AF17, MLL-AF6, MLL-ENL, MLL-AF1Q, MLL-CBP, MLL-AF1P, MLL-AFX1). There were 68 AML patients with MLL rearrangements, and the positive rate was 15.7%. MLL-PTD (4.84%) was detected in 21 patients, MLL-AF9 in 15, (3.46%), MLL-ELL in 10 (2.31%), MLL-AF10 in 8 (1.85%), MLL-AF1Q in 2 (0.46%), 3 cases each of MLL-AF17, MLL-AF6, MLL-ENL (0.69% each), a and single case each of MLL-CBP, MLL-AF1P, and MLL-AFX1 (0.23% each). The highest rate of MLL rearrangements was found in 24 patients with M5 subtype AML, occurring in 24 cases (35.3%). MLL rearrangements occurred in 21 patients with M2 subtype AML (30.9%), and in 10 patients with M4 subtype AML (14.7%). Screening fusion genes by multiplex nested RT-PCR is a convenient, fast, economical, and accurate method for diagnosis and predicting prognosis of AML.

  11. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T

    2013-01-01

    patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79......Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia...... patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All...

  12. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Milne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis.

  13. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballabio, Erica; Milne, Thomas A., E-mail: thomas.milne@imm.ox.ac.uk [MRC Molecular Haematology Unit, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital Headington, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-10

    Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis.

  14. Molecular and Epigenetic Mechanisms of MLL in Human Leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballabio, Erica; Milne, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is often defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression or chromosome stability that don’t alter the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic changes are established through multiple mechanisms that include DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs and the covalent modification of specific residues on histone proteins. It is becoming clear not only that aberrant epigenetic changes are common in many human diseases such as leukemia, but that these changes by their very nature are malleable, and thus are amenable to treatment. Epigenetic based therapies have so far focused on the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, which tend to have more general and widespread effects on gene regulation in the cell. However, if a unique molecular pathway can be identified, diseases caused by epigenetic mechanisms are excellent candidates for the development of more targeted therapies that focus on specific gene targets, individual binding domains, or specific enzymatic activities. Designing effective targeted therapies depends on a clear understanding of the role of epigenetic mutations during disease progression. The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein is an example of a developmentally important protein that controls the epigenetic activation of gene targets in part by methylating histone 3 on lysine 4. MLL is required for normal development, but is also mutated in a subset of aggressive human leukemias and thus provides a useful model for studying the link between epigenetic cell memory and human disease. The most common MLL mutations are chromosome translocations that fuse the MLL gene in frame with partner genes creating novel fusion proteins. In this review, we summarize recent work that argues MLL fusion proteins could function through a single molecular pathway, but we also highlight important data that suggests instead that multiple independent mechanisms underlie MLL mediated leukemogenesis

  15. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D

    2018-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL/KMT2A gene are associated with infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. Here we present the data obtained from 2345 acute leukemia patients. Genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs)...... of patient-specific chromosomal fusion sites allows the design of specific PCR primers for minimal residual disease analyses for all patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 8 August 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.213....

  16. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from infants with MLL-AF4+ acute leukemia harbor and express the MLL-AF4 fusion gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina, Purificación; Rodríguez, René; Melen, Gustavo J.; Bueno, Clara; Arriero, Mar; García-Sánchez, Félix; Lassaletta, Alvaro; García-Sanz, Ramón

    2009-01-01

    MLL-AF4 fusion is a hallmark genetic abnormality in infant B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) known to arise in utero. The cellular origin of leukemic fusion genes during human development is difficult to ascertain. The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several hematological malignances. BM mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) from 38 children diagnosed with cytogenetically different acute leukemias were screened for leukemic fusion genes. Fusion genes were absent in BM-MSCs of childhood leukemias carrying TEL-AML1, BCR-ABL, AML1-ETO, MLL-AF9, MLL-AF10, MLL-ENL or hyperdiploidy. However, MLL-AF4 was detected and expressed in BM-MSCs from all cases of MLL-AF4+ B-ALL. Unlike leukemic blasts, MLL-AF4+ BM-MSCs did not display monoclonal Ig gene rearrangements. Endogenous or ectopic expression of MLL-AF4 exerted no effect on MSC culture homeostasis. These findings suggest that MSCs may be in part tumor-related, highlighting an unrecognized role of the BM milieu on the pathogenesis of MLL-AF4+ B-ALL. MLL-AF4 itself is not sufficient for MSC transformation and the expression of MLL-AF4 in MSCs is compatible with a mesenchymal phenotype, suggesting a differential impact in the hematopoietic system and mesenchyme. The absence of monoclonal rearrangements in MLL-AF4+ BM-MSCs precludes the possibility of cellular plasticity or de-differentiation of B-ALL blasts and suggests that MLL-AF4 might arise in a population of prehematopoietic precursors. PMID:19995953

  17. Simultaneous localization of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes in interphase nuclei by 3D-FISH: MLL translocation revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Jian-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haematological cancer is characterised by chromosomal translocation (e.g. MLL translocation in acute leukaemia and two models have been proposed to explain the origins of recurrent reciprocal translocation. The first, established from pairs of translocated genes (such as BCR and ABL, considers the spatial proximity of loci in interphase nuclei (static "contact first" model. The second model is based on the dynamics of double strand break ends during repair processes (dynamic "breakage first" model. Since the MLL gene involved in 11q23 translocation has more than 40 partners, the study of the relative positions of the MLL gene with both the most frequent partner gene (AF4 and a less frequent partner gene (ENL, should elucidate the MLL translocation mechanism. Methods Using triple labeling 3D FISH experiments, we have determined the relative positions of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes, in two lymphoblastic and two myeloid human cell lines. Results In all cell lines, the ENL gene is significantly closer to the MLL gene than the AF4 gene (with P value loci would indicate a greater probability of the occurrence of t(11;19(q23;p13.3 compared to t(4;11(q21;q23. However this is in contradiction to the epidemiology of 11q23 translocation. Conclusion The simultaneous multi-probe hybridization in 3D-FISH is a new approach in addressing the correlation between spatial proximity and occurrence of translocation. Our observations are not consistent with the static "contact first" model of translocation. The recently proposed dynamic "breakage first" model offers an attractive alternative explanation.

  18. Simultaneous localization of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes in interphase nuclei by 3D-FISH: MLL translocation revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gué, Michaël; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Boudier, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Haematological cancer is characterised by chromosomal translocation (e.g. MLL translocation in acute leukaemia) and two models have been proposed to explain the origins of recurrent reciprocal translocation. The first, established from pairs of translocated genes (such as BCR and ABL), considers the spatial proximity of loci in interphase nuclei (static 'contact first' model). The second model is based on the dynamics of double strand break ends during repair processes (dynamic 'breakage first' model). Since the MLL gene involved in 11q23 translocation has more than 40 partners, the study of the relative positions of the MLL gene with both the most frequent partner gene (AF4) and a less frequent partner gene (ENL), should elucidate the MLL translocation mechanism. Using triple labeling 3D FISH experiments, we have determined the relative positions of MLL, AF4 and ENL genes, in two lymphoblastic and two myeloid human cell lines. In all cell lines, the ENL gene is significantly closer to the MLL gene than the AF4 gene (with P value < 0.0001). According to the static 'contact first' model of the translocation mechanism, a minimal distance between loci would indicate a greater probability of the occurrence of t(11;19)(q23;p13.3) compared to t(4;11)(q21;q23). However this is in contradiction to the epidemiology of 11q23 translocation. The simultaneous multi-probe hybridization in 3D-FISH is a new approach in addressing the correlation between spatial proximity and occurrence of translocation. Our observations are not consistent with the static 'contact first' model of translocation. The recently proposed dynamic 'breakage first' model offers an attractive alternative explanation

  19. MLL-ENL cooperates with SCF to transform primary avian multipotent cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte, Cathleen E.; von Lindern, Marieke; Steinlein, Peter; Beug, Hartmut; Wiedemann, Leanne M.

    2002-01-01

    The MLL gene is targeted by chromosomal translocations, which give rise to heterologous MLL fusion proteins and are associated with distinct types of acute lymphoid and myeloid leukaemia. To determine how MLL fusion proteins alter the proliferation and/or differentiation of primary haematopoietic

  20. Targeting MLL1 H3K4 methyltransferase activity in mixed-lineage leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fang; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Karatas, Hacer; Xu, Jing; Li, Li; Lee, Shirley; Liu, Liu; Chen, Yong; Ouillette, Peter; Zhu, Jidong; Hess, Jay L; Atadja, Peter; Lei, Ming; Qin, Zhaohui S; Malek, Sami; Wang, Shaomeng; Dou, Yali

    2014-01-23

    Here we report a comprehensive characterization of our recently developed inhibitor MM-401 that targets the MLL1 H3K4 methyltransferase activity. MM-401 is able to specifically inhibit MLL1 activity by blocking MLL1-WDR5 interaction and thus the complex assembly. This targeting strategy does not affect other mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) family histone methyltransferases (HMTs), revealing a unique regulatory feature for the MLL1 complex. Using MM-401 and its enantiomer control MM-NC-401, we show that inhibiting MLL1 methyltransferase activity specifically blocks proliferation of MLL cells by inducing cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and myeloid differentiation without general toxicity to normal bone marrow cells or non-MLL cells. More importantly, transcriptome analyses show that MM-401 induces changes in gene expression similar to those of MLL1 deletion, supporting a predominant role of MLL1 activity in regulating MLL1-dependent leukemia transcription program. We envision broad applications for MM-401 in basic and translational research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting protein-protein interaction between MLL1 and reciprocal proteins for leukemia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui; Li, Dong-Dong; Chen, Wei-Lin; You, Qi-Dong; Guo, Xiao-Ke

    2018-01-15

    The mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1), as a lysine methyltransferase, predominantly regulates the methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and functions in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal. MLL1 gene fuses with partner genes that results in the generation of MLL1 fusion proteins (MLL1-FPs), which are frequently detected in acute leukemia. In the progress of leukemogenesis, a great deal of proteins cooperate with MLL1 to form multiprotein complexes serving for the dysregulation of H3K4 methylation, the overexpression of homeobox (HOX) cluster genes, and the consequent generation of leukemia. Hence, disrupting the interactions between MLL1 and the reciprocal proteins has been considered to be a new treatment strategy for leukemia. Here, we reviewed potential protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between MLL1 and its reciprocal proteins, and summarized the inhibitors to target MLL1 PPIs. The druggability of MLL1 PPIs for leukemia were also discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Zinc Finger Nuclease induced DNA double stranded breaks and rearrangements in MLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, To Uyen; Ho, Bay; Shih, Shyh-Jen; Vaughan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) targeting a leukemogenic hot spot for rearrangement in MLL is created. ► The novel ZFN efficiently cleaves MLL exon 13. ► Despite MLL cleavage and evidence of mis-repair, no leukemogenic translocations were produced. ► MLL cleavage alone is insufficient to generate leukemogenic translocations. - Abstract: Radiation treatment or chemotherapy has been linked with a higher risk of secondary cancers such as therapy related Acute Myeloid Leukemia (tAML). Several of these cancers have been shown to be correlated to the introduction of double stranded breaks (DSB) and rearrangements within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. We used Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) to introduce precise cuts within MLL to examine how a single DNA DSB might lead to chromosomal rearrangements. A ZFN targeting exon 13 within the Breakpoint Cluster Region of MLL was transiently expressed in a human lymphoblast cell line originating from a CML patient. Although FISH analysis showed ZFN DSB at this region increased the rate of MLL fragmentation, we were unable to detect leukemogenic rearrangements or translocations via inverse PCR. Interestingly, gene fragmentation as well as small interstitial deletions, insertions and base substitutions increased with the inhibition of DNA-PK, suggesting repair of this particular DSB is linked to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although mis-repair of DSBs may be necessary for the initiation of leukemogenic translocations, a MLL targeted DNA break alone is insufficient

  3. Zinc Finger Nuclease induced DNA double stranded breaks and rearrangements in MLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, To Uyen [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Ho, Bay; Shih, Shyh-Jen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Vaughan, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.vaughan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: ► A Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) targeting a leukemogenic hot spot for rearrangement in MLL is created. ► The novel ZFN efficiently cleaves MLL exon 13. ► Despite MLL cleavage and evidence of mis-repair, no leukemogenic translocations were produced. ► MLL cleavage alone is insufficient to generate leukemogenic translocations. - Abstract: Radiation treatment or chemotherapy has been linked with a higher risk of secondary cancers such as therapy related Acute Myeloid Leukemia (tAML). Several of these cancers have been shown to be correlated to the introduction of double stranded breaks (DSB) and rearrangements within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. We used Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) to introduce precise cuts within MLL to examine how a single DNA DSB might lead to chromosomal rearrangements. A ZFN targeting exon 13 within the Breakpoint Cluster Region of MLL was transiently expressed in a human lymphoblast cell line originating from a CML patient. Although FISH analysis showed ZFN DSB at this region increased the rate of MLL fragmentation, we were unable to detect leukemogenic rearrangements or translocations via inverse PCR. Interestingly, gene fragmentation as well as small interstitial deletions, insertions and base substitutions increased with the inhibition of DNA-PK, suggesting repair of this particular DSB is linked to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although mis-repair of DSBs may be necessary for the initiation of leukemogenic translocations, a MLL targeted DNA break alone is insufficient.

  4. MLL2 mutation detection in 86 patients with Kabuki syndrome: a genotype-phenotype study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrythanasis, P; van Bon, B W; Steehouwer, M; Rodríguez-Santiago, B; Simpson, M; Dias, P; Anderlid, B M; Arts, P; Bhat, M; Augello, B; Biamino, E; Bongers, E M H F; Del Campo, M; Cordeiro, I; Cueto-González, A M; Cuscó, I; Deshpande, C; Frysira, E; Izatt, L; Flores, R; Galán, E; Gener, B; Gilissen, C; Granneman, S M; Hoyer, J; Yntema, H G; Kets, C M; Koolen, D A; Marcelis, C l; Medeira, A; Micale, L; Mohammed, S; de Munnik, S A; Nordgren, A; Psoni, S; Reardon, W; Revencu, N; Roscioli, T; Ruiterkamp-Versteeg, M; Santos, H G; Schoumans, J; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, J H M; Silengo, M C; Toledo, L; Vendrell, T; van der Burgt, I; van Lier, B; Zweier, C; Reymond, A; Trembath, R C; Perez-Jurado, L; Dupont, J; de Vries, B B A; Brunner, H G; Veltman, J A; Merla, G; Antonarakis, S E; Hoischen, A

    2013-12-01

    Recently, pathogenic variants in the MLL2 gene were identified as the most common cause of Kabuki (Niikawa-Kuroki) syndrome (MIM#147920). To further elucidate the genotype-phenotype correlation, we studied a large cohort of 86 clinically defined patients with Kabuki syndrome (KS) for mutations in MLL2. All patients were assessed using a standardized phenotype list and all were scored using a newly developed clinical score list for KS (MLL2-Kabuki score 0-10). Sequencing of the full coding region and intron-exon boundaries of MLL2 identified a total of 45 likely pathogenic mutations (52%): 31 nonsense, 10 missense and four splice-site mutations, 34 of which were novel. In five additional patients, novel, i.e. non-dbSNP132 variants of clinically unknown relevance, were identified. Patients with likely pathogenic nonsense or missense MLL2 mutations were usually more severely affected (median 'MLL2-Kabuki score' of 6) as compared to the patients without MLL2 mutations (median 'MLL2-Kabuki score' of 5), a significant difference (p < 0.0014). Several typical facial features such as large dysplastic ears, arched eyebrows with sparse lateral third, blue sclerae, a flat nasal tip with a broad nasal root, and a thin upper and a full lower lip were observed more often in mutation positive patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Histone Methyltransferase Activity of MLL1 Is Dispensable for Hematopoiesis and Leukemogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibhu P. Mishra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite correlations between histone methyltransferase (HMT activity and gene regulation, direct evidence that HMT activity is responsible for gene activation is sparse. We address the role of the HMT activity for MLL1, a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4 methyltransferase critical for maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Here, we show that the SET domain, and thus HMT activity of MLL1, is dispensable for maintaining HSCs and supporting leukemogenesis driven by the MLL-AF9 fusion oncoprotein. Upon Mll1 deletion, histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16 acetylation is selectively depleted at MLL1 target genes in conjunction with reduced transcription. Surprisingly, inhibition of SIRT1 is sufficient to prevent the loss of H4K16 acetylation and the reduction in MLL1 target gene expression. Thus, recruited MOF activity, and not the intrinsic HMT activity of MLL1, is central for the maintenance of HSC target genes. In addition, this work reveals a role for SIRT1 in opposing MLL1 function.

  6. Initiation of MLL-rearranged AML is dependent on C/EBPα

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlsson, Ewa; Hasemann, Marie Sigurd; Willer, Anton

    2014-01-01

    have compared gene expression profiles from human MLL-rearranged AML to normal progenitors and identified the myeloid tumor suppressor C/EBPα as a putative collaborator in MLL-rearranged AML. Interestingly, we find that deletion of Cebpa rendered murine hematopoietic progenitors completely resistant...

  7. HOXA9 is required for survival in human MLL-rearranged acute leukemias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Faber (Joerg); A.V. Krivtsov (Andrei); M.C. Stubbs (Matthew); R. Wright (Renee); T.N. Davis (Tina); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); A.L. Kung (Andrew); S.A. Armstrong (Scott)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractLeukemias that harbor translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) possess unique biologic characteristics and often have an unfavorable prognosis. Gene expression analyses demonstrate a distinct profile for MLL-rearranged leukemias with consistent high-level expression

  8. Morel-Lavallee Lesion (MLL) Mimicking A Soft Tissue Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Hasan, Roumina; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Maddukuri, Satish Babu; Puppala, Radha

    2015-04-01

    Morel-lavallee lesion (MLL) represents post traumatic subcutaneous cyst generally overlying bony prominences like greater trochanter, lower back, knee and scapula. A 51-year-old man presented with a swelling in left thigh since six years which was insidious in onset, gradually progressive in size and not associated with pain, fever or discharge. There was no history of trauma or any associated constitutional symptoms. Since there was no history of trauma recalled by the patient the clinical dilemma was between soft tissue sarcoma and cold abscess. We report a case of slow growing painless mass lesion of thigh, diagnosed on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) as morel lavallee lesion and describe its salient imaging features with treatment options.

  9. MLL-ENL cooperates with SCF to transform primary avian multipotent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Cathleen E; von Lindern, Marieke; Steinlein, Peter; Beug, Hartmut; Wiedemann, Leanne M

    2002-08-15

    The MLL gene is targeted by chromosomal translocations, which give rise to heterologous MLL fusion proteins and are associated with distinct types of acute lymphoid and myeloid leukaemia. To determine how MLL fusion proteins alter the proliferation and/or differentiation of primary haematopoietic progenitors, we introduced the MLL-AF9 and MLL-ENL fusion proteins into primary chicken bone marrow cells. Both fusion proteins caused the sustained outgrowth of immature haematopoietic cells, which was strictly dependent on stem cell factor (SCF). The renewing cells have a long in vitro lifespan exceeding the Hayflick limit of avian cells. Analysis of clonal cultures identified the renewing cells as immature, multipotent progenitors, expressing erythroid, myeloid, lymphoid and stem cell surface markers. Employing a two-step commitment/differentiation protocol involving the controlled withdrawal of SCF, the MLL-ENL-transformed progenitors could be induced to terminal erythroid or myeloid differentiation. Finally, in cooperation with the weakly leukaemogenic receptor tyrosine kinase v-Sea, the MLL-ENL fusion protein gave rise to multilineage leukaemia in chicks, suggesting that other activated, receptor tyrosine kinases can substitute for ligand-activated c-Kit in vivo.

  10. Frequent alteration of MLL3 frameshift mutations in microsatellite deficient colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Watanabe

    Full Text Available MLL3 is a histone 3-lysine 4 methyltransferase with tumor-suppressor properties that belongs to a family of chromatin regulator genes potentially altered in neoplasia. Mutations in MLL3 were found in a whole genome analysis of colorectal cancer but have not been confirmed by a separate study.We analyzed mutations of coding region and promoter methylation in MLL3 using 126 cases of colorectal cancer. We found two isoforms of MLL3 and DNA sequencing revealed frameshift and other mutations affecting both isoforms of MLL3 in colorectal cancer cells and 19 of 134 (14% primary colorectal samples analyzed. Moreover, frameshift mutations were more common in cases with microsatellite instability (31% both in CRC cell lines and primary tumors. The largest isoform of MLL3 is transcribed from a CpG island-associated promoter that has highly homology with a pseudo-gene on chromosome 22 (psiTPTE22. Using an assay which measured both loci simultaneously we found prominent age related methylation in normal colon (from 21% in individuals less than 25 years old to 56% in individuals older than 70, R = 0.88, p<0.001 and frequent hypermethylation (83% in both CRC cell lines and primary tumors. We next studied the two loci separately and found that age and cancer related methylation was solely a property of the pseudogene CpG island and that the MLL3 loci was unmethylated.We found that frameshift mutations of MLL3 in both CRC cells and primary tumor that were more common in cases with microsatellite instability. Moreover, we have shown CpG island-associated promoter of MLL3 gene has no DNA methylation in CRC cells but also primary tumor and normal colon, and this region has a highly homologous of pseudo gene (psiTPTE22 that was age relate DNA methylation.

  11. MLL duplication in a pediatric patient with B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mater, David Van; Goodman, Barbara K; Wang, Endi; Gaca, Ana M; Wechsler, Daniel S

    2012-04-01

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma is the second most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma seen in children. Approximately, 90% of lymphoblastic lymphomas arise from T cells, with the remaining 10% being B-cell-lineage derived. Although T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma most frequently occurs in the anterior mediastinum (thymus), B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LBL) predominates in extranodal sites such as skin and bone. Here, we describe a pediatric B-LBL patient who presented with extensive abdominal involvement and whose lymphoma cells displayed segmental duplication of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. MLL duplication/amplification has been described primarily in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome with no published reports of discrete MLL duplication/amplification events in B-LBL. The MLL gene duplication noted in this case may represent a novel mechanism for tumorigenesis in B-LBL.

  12. The same pocket in menin binds both MLL and JUND but has opposite effects on transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Gurung, Buddha; Wan, Bingbing; Matkar, Smita; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Wan, Ke; Merchant, Juanita L.; Hua, Xianxin; Lei, Ming (Michigan); (Michigan-Med); (UPENN-MED)

    2013-04-08

    Menin is a tumour suppressor protein whose loss or inactivation causes multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1), a hereditary autosomal dominant tumour syndrome that is characterized by tumorigenesis in multiple endocrine organs. Menin interacts with many proteins and is involved in a variety of cellular processes. Menin binds the JUN family transcription factor JUND and inhibits its transcriptional activity. Several MEN1 missense mutations disrupt the menin-JUND interaction, suggesting a correlation between the tumour-suppressor function of menin and its suppression of JUND-activated transcription. Menin also interacts with mixed lineage leukaemia protein 1 (MLL1), a histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase, and functions as an oncogenic cofactor to upregulate gene transcription and promote MLL1-fusion-protein-induced leukaemogenesis. A recent report on the tethering of MLL1 to chromatin binding factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) by menin indicates that menin is a molecular adaptor coordinating the functions of multiple proteins. Despite its importance, how menin interacts with many distinct partners and regulates their functions remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of human menin in its free form and in complexes with MLL1 or with JUND, or with an MLL1-LEDGF heterodimer. These structures show that menin contains a deep pocket that binds short peptides of MLL1 or JUND in the same manner, but that it can have opposite effects on transcription. The menin-JUND interaction blocks JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated JUND phosphorylation and suppresses JUND-induced transcription. In contrast, menin promotes gene transcription by binding the transcription activator MLL1 through the peptide pocket while still interacting with the chromatin-anchoring protein LEDGF at a distinct surface formed by both menin and MLL1.

  13. Validation and Structural Characterization of the LEDGF/p75-MLL Interface as a New Target for the Treatment of MLL-Dependent Leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, K.; Těšina, Petr; Demeulemeester, J.; El Ashkar, S.; Méreau, H.; Schwaller, J.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Veverka, Václav; De Rijck, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 18 (2014), s. 5139-5151 ISSN 0008-5472 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11205; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08066; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : MLL * leukemia * LEDGF/p75 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 9.329, year: 2014

  14. Enhancer-associated H3K4 monomethylation by Trithorax-related, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Mll3/Mll4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Mohan, Man; Garruss, Alexander S; Liang, Kaiwei; Takahashi, Yoh-Hei; Mickey, Kristen; Voets, Olaf; Verrijzer, C Peter; Shilatifard, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Monomethylation of histone H3 on Lys 4 (H3K4me1) and acetylation of histone H3 on Lys 27 (H3K27ac) are histone modifications that are highly enriched over the body of actively transcribed genes and on enhancers. Although in yeast all H3K4 methylation patterns, including H3K4me1, are implemented by Set1/COMPASS (complex of proteins associated with Set1), there are three classes of COMPASS-like complexes in Drosophila that could carry out H3K4me1 on enhancers: dSet1, Trithorax, and Trithorax-related (Trr). Here, we report that Trr, the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian Mll3/4 COMPASS-like complexes, can function as a major H3K4 monomethyltransferase on enhancers in vivo. Loss of Trr results in a global decrease of H3K4me1 and H3K27ac levels in various tissues. Assays with the cut wing margin enhancer implied a functional role for Trr in enhancer-mediated processes. A genome-wide analysis demonstrated that Trr is required to maintain the H3K4me1 and H3K27ac chromatin signature that resembles the histone modification patterns described for enhancers. Furthermore, studies in the mammalian system suggested a role for the Trr homolog Mll3 in similar processes. Since Trr and mammalian Mll3/4 complexes are distinguished by bearing a unique subunit, the H3K27 demethylase UTX, we propose a model in which the H3K4 monomethyltransferases Trr/Mll3/Mll4 and the H3K27 demethylase UTX cooperate to regulate the transition from inactive/poised to active enhancers.

  15. Identification of CD34+ and CD34− leukemia-initiating cells in MLL-rearranged human acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yuki; Watanabe, Takashi; Saito, Yoriko; Kuroki, Yoko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Mariko; Eguchi-Ishimae, Minenori; Kaneko, Akiko; Ono, Rintaro; Sato, Kaori; Suzuki, Nahoko; Fujiki, Saera; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Eiichi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ohara, Osamu; Mizutani, Shuki

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene with AF4, AF9, or ENL results in acute leukemia with both lymphoid and myeloid involvement. We characterized leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in primary infant MLL-rearranged leukemia using a xenotransplantation model. In MLL-AF4 patients, CD34+CD38+CD19+ and CD34−CD19+ cells initiated leukemia, and in MLL-AF9 patients, CD34−CD19+ cells were LICs. In MLL-ENL patients, either CD34+ or CD34− cells were LICs, depending on the pattern of CD34 expression. In contrast, in patients with these MLL translocations, CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− cells were enriched for normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with in vivo long-term multilineage hematopoietic repopulation capacity. Although LICs developed leukemic cells with clonal immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) rearrangement in vivo, CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− cells repopulated recipient bone marrow and spleen with B cells, showing broad polyclonal IGH rearrangement and recipient thymus with CD4+ single positive (SP), CD8+ SP, and CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) T cells. Global gene expression profiling revealed that CD9, CD32, and CD24 were over-represented in MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, and MLL-ENL LICs compared with normal HSCs. In patient samples, these molecules were expressed in CD34+CD38+ and CD34− LICs but not in CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− HSCs. Identification of LICs and LIC-specific molecules in primary human MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia may lead to improved therapeutic strategies for MLL-rearranged leukemia. PMID:25538041

  16. TGIF1 is a negative regulator of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, Anton; Jakobsen, Janus Schou; Ohlsson, E

    2015-01-01

    orchestrates a transcriptional program required for the maintenance of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia (AML). TGIF1/TGIF2 are relatively uncharacterized TALE transcription factors, which, in contrast to the remaining family, have been shown to act as transcriptional repressors. Given the general......Members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) family of atypical homeodomain-containing transcription factors are important downstream effectors of oncogenic fusion proteins involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. A well-characterized member of this protein family is MEIS1, which...... influence the clinical outcome. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE family members can act both positively and negatively on transcriptional programs responsible for leukemic maintenance and provide novel insights into the regulatory gene expression circuitries in MLL-rearranged AML.Leukemia...

  17. MLL/WDR5 Complex Regulates Kif2A Localization to Ensure Chromosome Congression and Proper Spindle Assembly during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aamir; Veeranki, Sailaja Naga; Chinchole, Akash; Tyagi, Shweta

    2017-06-19

    Mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL), along with multisubunit (WDR5, RbBP5, ASH2L, and DPY30) complex catalyzes the trimethylation of H3K4, leading to gene activation. Here, we characterize a chromatin-independent role for MLL during mitosis. MLL and WDR5 localize to the mitotic spindle apparatus, and loss of function of MLL complex by RNAi results in defects in chromosome congression and compromised spindle formation. We report interaction of MLL complex with several kinesin and dynein motors. We further show that the MLL complex associates with Kif2A, a member of the Kinesin-13 family of microtubule depolymerase, and regulates the spindle localization of Kif2A during mitosis. We have identified a conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif, so far unique to the MLL family, in Kif2A. The Win motif of Kif2A engages in direct interactions with WDR5 for its spindle localization. Our findings highlight a non-canonical mitotic function of MLL complex, which may have a direct impact on chromosomal stability, frequently compromised in cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Estudio molecular del gen MLL en 30 pacientes con leucemias agudas Molecular study of MLL gen in 30 patients with acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Levón Herrera

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Los reordenamientos del gen MLL en la banda cromosómica 11q23 son frecuentes en leucemias agudas (LA en niños y en las LA secundarias desarrolladas después de la terapia con inhibidores de la enzima topoisomerasa II. En menor medida también se aprecia en adultos con LA. La presencia de estos reordenamientos se considera un indicador de mal pronóstico asociado con resultados clínicos desfavorables, por ello es muy importante realizar su determinación en las LA. En este trabajo mostramos los resultados preliminares de la introducción del estudio del gen MLL en nuestro país mediante la técnica de Southern. Analizamos ADN de 30 pacientes con LA, incluidos niños y adultos, que en el momento del estudio se encontraban al debut o en recaída. El estudio molecular se realizó con la sonda FA4, que es un inserto genómico del gen MLL. Sólo uno de los 30 pacientes mostró bandas de reordenamiento con 2 enzimas de restricción diferentes, el resto mostró el gen MLL en configuración germinal. Es interesante destacar que el paciente con el reordenamiento era un niño con leucemia mieloblástica aguda subtipo M5b, lo cual concuerda con la literatura, donde se describe que estos reordenamientos están estrechamente correlacionados con los subtipos mielomonocítico (M4 y monocítico (M5 de leucemia mieloide aguda (LMARearrangements of MLL gen in llq23 chromosomal band are frequents in childhood type of acute leukemia (AL and in secondary AL, developed after therapy with II topoisomerase enzyme. To a lesser extent also is seen in adults with AL. Presence of theses rearrangements is considered to be a worse prognosis indicator, associated with unfavourable clinical results, that is why it is very important to carry our its assessment in AL. In this paper authors present preliminary results from introduction of study on MLL gen in our country through Southern technique. DNA from 30 patients was analized, including children and adults, that at the

  19. Frequency and clinical impact of ETV6/RUNX1, AF4‑MLL, and BCR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Variations in disease presentation and outcome of leukemia treatment has been associated with the presence of certain mutant genes. Three major translocations (ETV6‑RUNX1, BCR‑ABL, and AF4‑MLL) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have been shown to affect treatment outcome. This study is aimed ...

  20. An Evolutionary Conserved Epigenetic Mark of Polycomb Response Elements Implemented by Trx/MLL/COMPASS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, Ryan; Hu, Deqing; Collings, Clayton K; Woodfin, Ashley R; Piunti, Andrea; Mohan, Man; Herz, Hans-Martin; Kvon, Evgeny; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-07-21

    Polycomb response elements (PREs) are specific DNA sequences that stably maintain the developmental pattern of gene expression. Drosophila PREs are well characterized, whereas the existence of PREs in mammals remains debated. Accumulating evidence supports a model in which CpG islands recruit Polycomb group (PcG) complexes; however, which subset of CGIs is selected to serve as PREs is unclear. Trithorax (Trx) positively regulates gene expression in Drosophila and co-occupies PREs to antagonize Polycomb-dependent silencing. Here we demonstrate that Trx-dependent H3K4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) marks Drosophila PREs and maintains the developmental expression pattern of nearby genes. Similarly, the mammalian Trx homolog, MLL1, deposits H3K4me2 at CpG-dense regions that could serve as PREs. In the absence of MLL1 and H3K4me2, H3K27me3 levels, a mark of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), increase at these loci. By inhibiting PRC2-dependent H3K27me3 in the absence of MLL1, we can rescue expression of these loci, demonstrating a functional balance between MLL1 and PRC2 activities at these sites. Thus, our study provides rules for identifying cell-type-specific functional mammalian PREs within the human genome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Frequency and clinical impact of ETV6/RUNX1, AF4‑MLL, and BCR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-12

    May 12, 2015 ... features of prognostic importance, which include total white blood cell count (P = 0.416) and FAB subtype (P = 0.576). Conclusion: Presence of fusion ... Frequency and clinical impact of ETV6/RUNX1, AF4‑MLL, and BCR/ABL fusion ... define distinct clinic‑pathological subgroups and have been used in risk ...

  2. MLL-AF9-mediated immortalization of human hematopoietic cells along different lineages changes during ontogeny.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horton, S.J.; Jaques, J.; Woolthuis, C.; Dijk, J. van; Mesuraca, M.; Huls, G.A.; Morrone, G.; Vellenga, E.; Schuringa, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The MLL-AF9 fusion gene is associated with aggressive leukemias of both the myeloid and lymphoid lineage in infants, whereas in adults, this translocation is mainly associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These observations suggest that differences exist between fetal and adult tissues in terms of

  3. Mutations in Mll2, an H3K4 Methyltransferase, Result in Insulin Resistance and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, David; Matthews, Helen C.; Bogani, Debora; Moir, Lee; Long, Anna; Church, Christopher; Hugill, Alison; Anstee, Quentin M.; Goldin, Rob; Thursz, Mark; Hollfelder, Florian; Cox, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    We employed a random mutagenesis approach to identify novel monogenic determinants of type 2 diabetes. Here we show that haplo-insufficiency of the histone methyltransferase myeloid-lineage leukemia (Mll2/Wbp7) gene causes type 2 diabetes in the mouse. We have shown that mice heterozygous for two separate mutations in the SET domain of Mll2 or heterozygous Mll2 knockout mice were hyperglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic and developed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Consistent with previous Mll2 knockout studies, mice homozygous for either ENU mutation (or compound heterozygotes) died during embryonic development at 9.5–14.5 days post coitum. Heterozygous deletion of Mll2 induced in the adult mouse results in a normal phenotype suggesting that changes in chromatin methylation during development result in the adult phenotype. Mll2 has been shown to regulate a small subset of genes, a number of which Neurod1, Enpp1, Slc27a2, and Plcxd1 are downregulated in adult mutant mice. Our results demonstrate that histone H3K4 methyltransferase Mll2 is a component of the genetic regulation necessary for glucose homeostasis, resulting in a specific disease pattern linking chromatin modification with causes and progression of type 2 diabetes, providing a basis for its further understanding at the molecular level. PMID:23826075

  4. Mutations in Mll2, an H3K4 methyltransferase, result in insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Goldsworthy

    Full Text Available We employed a random mutagenesis approach to identify novel monogenic determinants of type 2 diabetes. Here we show that haplo-insufficiency of the histone methyltransferase myeloid-lineage leukemia (Mll2/Wbp7 gene causes type 2 diabetes in the mouse. We have shown that mice heterozygous for two separate mutations in the SET domain of Mll2 or heterozygous Mll2 knockout mice were hyperglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic and developed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Consistent with previous Mll2 knockout studies, mice homozygous for either ENU mutation (or compound heterozygotes died during embryonic development at 9.5-14.5 days post coitum. Heterozygous deletion of Mll2 induced in the adult mouse results in a normal phenotype suggesting that changes in chromatin methylation during development result in the adult phenotype. Mll2 has been shown to regulate a small subset of genes, a number of which Neurod1, Enpp1, Slc27a2, and Plcxd1 are downregulated in adult mutant mice. Our results demonstrate that histone H3K4 methyltransferase Mll2 is a component of the genetic regulation necessary for glucose homeostasis, resulting in a specific disease pattern linking chromatin modification with causes and progression of type 2 diabetes, providing a basis for its further understanding at the molecular level.

  5. A novel spliced fusion of MLL with CT45A2 in a pediatric biphenotypic acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerveira, Nuno; Marschalek, Rolf; Teixeira, Manuel R; Meyer, Claus; Santos, Joana; Torres, Lurdes; Lisboa, Susana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Bizarro, Susana; Correia, Cecília; Norton, Lucília

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities of 11q23 involving the MLL gene are found in approximately 10% of human leukemias. To date, nearly 100 different chromosome bands have been described in rearrangements involving 11q23 and 64 fusion genes have been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. In this work we present the identification of a novel MLL fusion partner in a pediatric patient with de novo biphenotypic acute leukemia. Cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), molecular studies (RT-PCR and LDI-PCR), and bioinformatic sequence analysis were used to characterize the CT45A2 gene as novel MLL fusion partner in pediatric acute leukemia. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of bone marrow G-banded metaphases demonstrated a cryptic insertion of 11q23 in Xq26.3 involving the MLL gene. Breakpoint fusion analysis revealed that a DNA fragment of 653 kb from 11q23, containing MLL exons 1-9 in addition to 16 other 11q23 genes, was inserted into the upstream region of the CT45A2 gene located at Xq26.3. In addition, a deletion at Xq26.3 encompassing the 3' region of the DDX26B gene (exons 9-16) and the entire CT45A1 gene was identified. RNA analysis revealed the presence of a novel MLL-CT45A2 fusion transcript in which the first 9 exons of the MLL gene were fused in-frame to exon 2 of the CT45A2 gene, resulting in a spliced MLL fusion transcript with an intact open reading frame. The resulting chimeric transcript predicts a fusion protein where the N-terminus of MLL is fused to the entire open reading frame of CT45A2. Finally, we demonstrate that all breakpoint regions are rich in long repetitive motifs, namely LINE/L1 and SINE/Alu sequences, but all breakpoints were exclusively identified outside these repetitive DNA sequences. We have identified CT45A2 as a novel spliced MLL fusion partner in a pediatric patient with de novo biphenotypic acute leukemia, as a result of a cryptic insertion of 11q23 in Xq26.3. Since CT45A2 is the first Cancer/Testis antigen family gene

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Taspase1, a Crucial Protease Regulating the Function of MLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan,J.; Dunn, B.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    Taspase1 catalyzes the proteolytic processing of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) nuclear protein, which is required for maintaining Hox gene expression patterns. Chromosomal translocations of the MLL gene are associated with leukemia in infants. Taspase1, a threonine aspartase, is a member of the type 2 asparaginase family, but is the only protease in this family. We report here the crystal structures of human activated Taspase1 and its proenzyme, as well as the characterization of the effects of mutations in the active site region using a newly developed fluorogenic assay. The structure of Taspase1 has significant differences from other asparaginases, especially near the active site. Mutation of the catalytic nucleophile, Thr234, abolishes autocatalytic processing in cis but does not completely block proteolysis in trans. The structure unexpectedly showed the binding of a chloride ion in the active site, and our kinetic studies confirm that chlorides ions are inhibitors of this enzyme at physiologically relevant concentrations.

  7. Neuronal Kmt2a/Mll1 histone methyltransferase is essential for prefrontal synaptic plasticity and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovcevski, Mira; Ruan, Hongyu; Shen, Erica Y; Dincer, Aslihan; Javidfar, Behnam; Ma, Qi; Peter, Cyril J; Cheung, Iris; Mitchell, Amanda C; Jiang, Yan; Lin, Cong L; Pothula, Venu; Stewart, A Francis; Ernst, Patricia; Yao, Wei-Dong; Akbarian, Schahram

    2015-04-01

    Neuronal histone H3-lysine 4 methylation landscapes are defined by sharp peaks at gene promoters and other cis-regulatory sequences, but molecular and cellular phenotypes after neuron-specific deletion of H3K4 methyl-regulators remain largely unexplored. We report that neuronal ablation of the H3K4-specific methyltransferase, Kmt2a/Mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (Mll1), in mouse postnatal forebrain and adult prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increased anxiety and robust cognitive deficits without locomotor dysfunction. In contrast, only mild behavioral phenotypes were observed after ablation of the Mll1 ortholog Kmt2b/Mll2 in PFC. Impaired working memory after Kmt2a/Mll1 ablation in PFC neurons was associated with loss of training-induced transient waves of Arc immediate early gene expression critical for synaptic plasticity. Medial prefrontal layer V pyramidal neurons, a major output relay of the cortex, demonstrated severely impaired synaptic facilitation and temporal summation, two forms of short-term plasticity essential for working memory. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing in Mll1-deficient cortical neurons revealed downregulated expression and loss of the transcriptional mark, trimethyl-H3K4, at <50 loci, including the homeodomain transcription factor Meis2. Small RNA-mediated Meis2 knockdown in PFC was associated with working memory defects similar to those elicited by Mll1 deletion. Therefore, mature prefrontal neurons critically depend on maintenance of Mll1-regulated H3K4 methylation at a subset of genes with an essential role in cognition and emotion. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355097-12$15.00/0.

  8. MLL-AF4 fusion transcripts in Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia patientsin Children hospital of Tabriz

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    Amir Monfaredan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: MLL-AF4 positive Leukemias comprise about 50-70% of acute lymphoid leukemias in children and about 5% of adolescents and adults Despite recent advances in the treatment of hematologic malignancies of children with ALL in particular, but it seems that poor results are obtained from treating this type of malignancy. Perhaps it is due to the lack of enough knowledge about the expression pattern of the fusion gene induced by chromosomal translocations. This study aims to consider several aspects of the common chromosomal disorder, t (4 11: due to lack of accurate statistical results for this type of translocation in our country, acceptable results are provided Sprevalence of isoforms of recombinant genes involved in MLL-AF4 are explained. Materials and methods: Of 36 patients with ALL between 4 months -11 years of age, peripheral blood sampling was done and total RNA extracted and cDNA was made. Then cDNA was amplified in two steps with the PCR and Nested PCR reactions. After electrophoresis the products were compared and analyzed in comparison with the internal control. Results: The results showed that MLL-AF4 recombinant gene expression in the age between 4 to 12 months range is maximum in the second stage by Nested PCR. Also the highest frequency of fusion isoforms of the gene involved in the same age range is e11-e4 isoform with the frequency of 0.13. Conclusion: It seems that investigation of translocation and chromosomal abnormalities using molecular techniques is one of the most accurate and suitable methods for identifying chromosomal characteristics in patients with acute leukemia, particularly ALL.

  9. A DNA probe combination for improved detection of MLL/11q23 breakpoints by double-color interphase-FISH in acute leukemias.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergh, A. von; Emanuel, B.; Zelderen-Bhola, S. van; Smetsers, A.F.C.M.; Soest, R. van; Stul, M.; Vranckx, H.; Schuuring, E.; Hagemeijer, A.; Kluin, P.

    2000-01-01

    Reciprocal translocations involving the MLL gene on chromosome band 11q23 have been observed in both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In AML, identification of MLL breakpoints is an important prognostic factor. Breakpoints are clustered in an 8 kb DNA fragment

  10. ARID5B polymorphism confers an increased risk to acquire specific MLL rearrangements in early childhood leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia in early age (EAL) is characterized by acquired genetic alterations such as MLL rearrangements (MLL-r). The aim of this case-controlled study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IKZF1, ARID5B, and CEBPE could be related to the onset of EAL cases (diagnosis). Methods The SNPs (IKZF1 rs11978267, ARID5B rs10821936 and rs10994982, CEBPE rs2239633) were genotyped in 265 cases [169 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 96 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)] and 505 controls by Taqman allelic discrimination assay. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between SNPs of cases and controls, adjusted on skin color and/or age. The risk was determined by calculating odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Children with the IKZF1 SNP had an increased risk of developing MLL-germline ALL in white children. The heterozygous/mutant genotype in ARID5B rs10994982 significantly increased the risk for MLL-germline leukemia in white and non-white children (OR 2.60, 95% CI: 1.09-6.18 and OR 3.55, 95% CI: 1.57-8.68, respectively). The heterozygous genotype in ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk for MLL-r leukemia in both white and non-white (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.12-3.79 and OR 2.36, 95% CI: 1.09-5.10, respectively). Furthermore, ARID5B rs10821936 conferred increased risk for MLL-MLLT3 positive cases (OR 7.10, 95% CI:1.54-32.68). Our data do not show evidence that CEBPE rs2239633 confers increased genetic susceptibility to EAL. Conclusions IKZF1 and CEBPE variants seem to play a minor role in genetic susceptibility to EAL, while ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk of MLL-MLLT3. This result shows that genetic susceptibility could be associated with the differences regarding MLL breakpoints and partner genes. PMID:24564228

  11. Development Refractoriness of MLL-Rearranged Human B Cell Acute Leukemias to Reprogramming into Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Muñoz-López

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are a powerful tool for disease modeling. They are routinely generated from healthy donors and patients from multiple cell types at different developmental stages. However, reprogramming leukemias is an extremely inefficient process. Few studies generated iPSCs from primary chronic myeloid leukemias, but iPSC generation from acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemias (ALL has not been achieved. We attempted to generate iPSCs from different subtypes of B-ALL to address the developmental impact of leukemic fusion genes. OKSM(L-expressing mono/polycistronic-, retroviral/lentiviral/episomal-, and Sendai virus vector-based reprogramming strategies failed to render iPSCs in vitro and in vivo. Addition of transcriptomic-epigenetic reprogramming “boosters” also failed to generate iPSCs from B cell blasts and B-ALL lines, and when iPSCs emerged they lacked leukemic fusion genes, demonstrating non-leukemic myeloid origin. Conversely, MLL-AF4-overexpressing hematopoietic stem cells/B progenitors were successfully reprogrammed, indicating that B cell origin and leukemic fusion gene were not reprogramming barriers. Global transcriptome/DNA methylome profiling suggested a developmental/differentiation refractoriness of MLL-rearranged B-ALL to reprogramming into pluripotency.

  12. Deciphering KRAS and NRAS mutated clone dynamics in MLL-AF4 paediatric leukaemia by ultra deep sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentin, Luca; Bresolin, Silvia; Giarin, Emanuela; Bardini, Michela; Serafin, Valentina; Accordi, Benedetta; Fais, Franco; Tenca, Claudya; De Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-10-04

    To induce and sustain the leukaemogenic process, MLL-AF4+ leukaemia seems to require very few genetic alterations in addition to the fusion gene itself. Studies of infant and paediatric patients with MLL-AF4+ B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) have reported mutations in KRAS and NRAS with incidences ranging from 25 to 50%. Whereas previous studies employed Sanger sequencing, here we used next generation amplicon deep sequencing for in depth evaluation of RAS mutations in 36 paediatric patients at diagnosis of MLL-AF4+ leukaemia. RAS mutations including those in small sub-clones were detected in 63.9% of patients. Furthermore, the mutational analysis of 17 paired samples at diagnosis and relapse revealed complex RAS clone dynamics and showed that the mutated clones present at relapse were almost all originated from clones that were already detectable at diagnosis and survived to the initial therapy. Finally, we showed that mutated patients were indeed characterized by a RAS related signature at both transcriptional and protein levels and that the targeting of the RAS pathway could be of beneficial for treatment of MLL-AF4+ BCP-ALL clones carrying somatic RAS mutations.

  13. LEDGF/p75 as a target for treatment of MLL-dependent leukemia and HIV infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, K.; Těšina, Petr; Demeulemeester, J.; El Ashkar, S.; Méreau, H.; Schwaller, J.; Christ, F.; Debyser, Z.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Veverka, Václav; De Rijck, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 30 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : LEDGF/p75 * leukemia * MLL Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  14. Transient spontaneous remission in congenital MLL-AF10 rearranged acute myeloid leukemia presenting with cardiorespiratory failure and meconium ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyárfás, Tobias; Wintgens, Juergen; Biskup, Wolfgang; Oschlies, Ilske; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner; Bens, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia; Meisel, Roland; Kuhlen, Michaela; Borkhardt, Arndt

    2016-12-01

    Neonatal leukemia is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of about one to five in a million neonates. The majority being acute myeloid leukemia (AML), neonatal leukemia can present with a variety of symptoms including hyperleucocytosis, cytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and skin infiltrates. Chromosomal rearrangements including mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) translocations are common in neonatal AML. A female neonate born at 34 weeks gestation presented with cardiorespiratory failure, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, and coagulopathy. She required intensive care treatment including mechanical ventilation, high-dose catecholamine therapy, and multiple transfusions. Small intestinal biopsy obtained during laparotomy for meconium ileus revealed an infiltrate by an undifferentiated monoblastic, MLL-rearranged leukemia. No other manifestations of leukemia could be detected. After spontaneous clinical remission, lasting 5 months without any specific treatment, the patient presented with leukemia cutis and full-blown monoblastic leukemia. MLL-AF10-rearranged AML could be re-diagnosed and successfully treated with chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Our patient exhibited a unique manifestation of neonatal MLL-AF10 rearranged AML with cardiorespiratory failure and intestinal infiltration. It highlights the importance of leukemia in the differential diagnosis of neonatal distress, congenital hematological abnormalities, and skin lesions.

  15. ZFP521 regulates murine hematopoietic stem cell function and facilitates MLL-AF9 leukemogenesis in mouse and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Brian S; Rybak, Adrian P; Beerman, Isabel; Heesters, Balthasar; Mercier, Francois E; Scadden, David T; Bryder, David; Baron, Roland; Rossi, Derrick J

    2017-08-03

    The concept that tumor-initiating cells can co-opt the self-renewal program of endogenous stem cells as a means of enforcing their unlimited proliferative potential is widely accepted, yet identification of specific factors that regulate self-renewal of normal and cancer stem cells remains limited. Using a comparative transcriptomic approach, we identify ZNF521 / Zfp521 as a conserved hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-enriched transcription factor in human and murine hematopoiesis whose function in HSC biology remains elusive. Competitive serial transplantation assays using Zfp521 -deficient mice revealed that ZFP521 regulates HSC self-renewal and differentiation. In contrast, ectopic expression of ZFP521 in HSCs led to a robust maintenance of progenitor activity in vitro. Transcriptional analysis of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples revealed that ZNF521 is highly and specifically upregulated in AMLs with MLL translocations. Using an MLL-AF9 murine leukemia model and serial transplantation studies, we show that ZFP521 is not required for leukemogenesis, although its absence leads to a significant delay in leukemia onset. Furthermore, knockdown of ZNF521 reduced proliferation in human leukemia cell lines possessing MLL-AF9 translocations. Taken together, these results identify ZNF521/ZFP521 as a critical regulator of HSC function, which facilitates MLL-AF9-mediated leukemic disease in mice.

  16. Thrombin-induced, TNFR-dependent miR-181c downregulation promotes MLL1 and NF-κB target gene expression in human microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Min; Chen, Zhiying; Ouyang, Yetong; Zhang, Huiyan; Wan, Zhigang; Wang, Han; Wu, Wei; Yin, Xiaoping

    2017-06-29

    Controlling thrombin-driven microglial activation may serve as a therapeutic target for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Here, we investigated microRNA (miRNA)-based regulation of thrombin-driven microglial activation using an in vitro thrombin toxicity model applied to primary human microglia. A miRNA array identified 22 differential miRNA candidates. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) identified miR-181c as the most significantly downregulated miRNA. TargetScan analysis identified mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) as a putative gene target for miR-181c. qRT-PCR was applied to assess tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), miR-181c, and MLL1 levels following thrombin or proteinase-activated receptor-4-specific activating peptide (PAR4AP) exposure. Anti-TNF-α antibodies and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) silencing were employed to test TNF-α/TNFR dependence. A dual-luciferase reporter system and miR-181c mimic transfection assessed whether mir-181c directly binds to and negatively regulates MLL1. Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB)-dependent luciferase reporter assays and NF-κB target gene expression were assessed in wild-type (MLL1+) and MLL1-silenced cells. Thrombin or PAR4AP-induced miR-181c downregulation (p < 0.05) and MLL1 upregulation (p < 0.05) that were dependent upon TNF-α/TNFR. miR-181c decreased wild-type MLL1 3'-UTR luciferase reporter activity (p < 0.05), and a miR-181c mimic suppressed MLL1 expression (p < 0.05). Thrombin treatment increased, while miR-181c reduced, NF-κB activity and NF-κB target gene expression in both wild-type (MLL1+) and MLL1-silenced cells (p < 0.05). Thrombin-induced, TNF-α/TNFR-dependent miR-181c downregulation promotes MLL1 expression, increases NF-κB activity, and upregulates NF-κB target gene expression. As miR-181c opposes thrombin's stimulation of pro-inflammatory NF-κB activity, miR-181c mimic therapy may show promise in controlling thrombin

  17. MLL5, a trithorax homolog, indirectly regulates H3K4 methylation, represses cyclin A2 expression, and promotes myogenic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Soji; Sreenivas, Prethish; Sambasivan, Ramkumar; Cheedipudi, Sirisha; Kandalla, Prashanth; Pavlath, Grace K.; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2009-01-01

    Most cells in adult tissues are nondividing. In skeletal muscle, differentiated myofibers have exited the cell cycle permanently, whereas satellite stem cells withdraw transiently, returning to active proliferation to repair damaged myofibers. We have examined the epigenetic mechanisms operating in conditional quiescence by analyzing the function of a predicted chromatin regulator mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) in a culture model of reversible arrest. MLL5 is induced in quiescent myoblasts and regulates both the cell cycle and differentiation via a hierarchy of chromatin and transcriptional regulators. Knocking down MLL5 delays entry of quiescent myoblasts into S phase, but hastens S-phase completion. Cyclin A2 (CycA) mRNA is no longer restricted to S phase, but is induced throughout G0/G1, with activation of the cell cycle regulated element (CCRE) in the CycA promoter. Overexpressed MLL5 physically associates with the CCRE and impairs its activity. MLL5 also regulates CycA indirectly: Cux, an activator of CycA promoter and S phase is induced in RNAi cells, and Brm/Brg1, CCRE-binding repressors that promote differentiation are repressed. In knockdown cells, H3K4 methylation at the CCRE is reduced, reflecting quantitative global changes in methylation. MLL5 appears to lack intrinsic histone methyl transferase activity, but regulates expression of histone-modifying enzymes LSD1 and SET7/9, suggesting an indirect mechanism. Finally, expression of muscle regulators Pax7, Myf5, and myogenin is impaired in MLL5 knockdown cells, which are profoundly differentiation defective. Collectively, our results suggest that MLL5 plays an integral role in novel chromatin regulatory mechanisms that suppress inappropriate expression of S-phase-promoting genes and maintain expression of determination genes in quiescent cells. PMID:19264965

  18. Enhancers of Polycomb EPC1 and EPC2 sustain the oncogenic potential of MLL leukemia stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Spencer, Gary J; Lynch, James T; Ciceri, Filippo; Somerville, Tim D D; Somervaille, Tim C P

    2013-01-01

    Through a targeted knockdown (KD) screen of chromatin regulatory genes we identified the EP400 complex components EPC1 and EPC2 as critical oncogenic co-factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). EPC1 and EPC2 were required for the clonogenic potential of human AML cells of multiple molecular subtypes. Focusing on MLL-mutated AML as an exemplar, Epc1 or Epc2 KD induced apoptosis of murine MLL-AF9 AML cells and abolished leukemia stem cell potential. By contrast, normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) were spared. Similar selectivity was observed for human primary AML cells versus normal CD34+ HSPC. In keeping with these distinct functional consequences, Epc1 or Epc2 KD induced divergent transcriptional consequences in murine MLL-AF9 granulocyte-macrophage progenitor-like (GMP) cells versus normal GMP, with a signature of increased MYC activity in leukemic but not normal cells. This was caused by accumulation of MYC protein and was also observed following KD of other EP400 complex genes. Pharmacological inhibition of MYC:MAX dimerization, or concomitant MYC KD, reduced apoptosis following EPC1 KD, linking the accumulation of MYC to cell death. Therefore EPC1 and EPC2 are components of a complex which directly or indirectly serves to prevent MYC accumulation and AML cell apoptosis, thus sustaining oncogenic potential. PMID:24166297

  19. Conformational control of the binding of the transactivation domain of the MLL protein and c-Myb to the KIX domain of CREB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Nihal Korkmaz

    Full Text Available The KIX domain of CBP is a transcriptional coactivator. Concomitant binding to the activation domain of proto-oncogene protein c-Myb and the transactivation domain of the trithorax group protein mixed lineage leukemia (MLL transcription factor lead to the biologically active ternary MLL∶KIX∶c-Myb complex which plays a role in Pol II-mediated transcription. The binding of the activation domain of MLL to KIX enhances c-Myb binding. Here we carried out molecular dynamics (MD simulations for the MLL∶KIX∶c-Myb ternary complex, its binary components and KIX with the goal of providing a mechanistic explanation for the experimental observations. The dynamic behavior revealed that the MLL binding site is allosterically coupled to the c-Myb binding site. MLL binding redistributes the conformational ensemble of KIX, leading to higher populations of states which favor c-Myb binding. The key element in the allosteric communication pathways is the KIX loop, which acts as a control mechanism to enhance subsequent binding events. We tested this conclusion by in silico mutations of loop residues in the KIX∶MLL complex and by comparing wild type and mutant dynamics through MD simulations. The loop assumed MLL binding conformation similar to that observed in the KIX∶c-Myb state which disfavors the allosteric network. The coupling with c-Myb binding site faded, abolishing the positive cooperativity observed in the presence of MLL. Our major conclusion is that by eliciting a loop-mediated allosteric switch between the different states following the binding events, transcriptional activation can be regulated. The KIX system presents an example how nature makes use of conformational control in higher level regulation of transcriptional activity and thus cellular events.

  20. Heterogeneous effects of M-CSF isoforms on the progression of MLL-AF9 leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Feifei; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Lina; Chen, Chong; Hu, Yuting; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2018-02-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) regulates both malignant cells and microenvironmental cells. Its splicing isoforms show functional heterogeneity. However, their roles on leukemia have not been well established. Here, the expression of total M-CSF in patients with hematopoietic malignancies was analyzed. The roles of M-CSF isoforms on the progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were studied by establishing MLL-AF9-induced mouse AML models with high level membrane-bound M-CSF (mM-CSF) or soluble M-CSF (sM-CSF). Total M-CSF was highly expressed in myeloid leukemia patients. Furthermore, mM-CSF but not sM-CSF prolonged the survival of leukemia mice. While sM-CSF was more potent to promote proliferation and self-renew, mM-CSF was more potent to promote differentiation. Moreover, isoforms had different effects on leukemia-associated macrophages (LAMs) though they both increase monocytes/macrophages by growth-promoting and recruitment effects. In addition, mM-CSF promoted specific phagocytosis of leukemia cells by LAMs. RNA-seq analysis revealed that mM-CSF enhanced phagocytosis-associated genes and activated oxidative phosphorylation and metabolism pathway. These results highlight heterogeneous effects of M-CSF isoforms on AML progression and the mechanisms of mM-CSF, that is, intrinsically promoting AML cell differentiation and extrinsically enhancing infiltration of macrophages and phagocytosis by macrophages, which may provide potential clues for clinical diagnosis and therapy. © 2017 Australasian Society for Immunology Inc.

  1. DOT1L inhibitor EPZ-5676 displays synergistic antiproliferative activity in combination with standard of care drugs and hypomethylating agents in MLL-rearranged leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Christine R; Iwanowicz, Dorothy; Johnston, Danielle; Campbell, Carly A; Smith, Jesse J; Moyer, Mikel P; Copeland, Robert A; Olhava, Edward J; Scott, Margaret Porter; Pollock, Roy M; Daigle, Scott R; Raimondi, Alejandra

    2014-09-01

    EPZ-5676 [(2R,3R,4S,5R)-2-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)-5-((((1r,3S)-3-(2-(5-(tert-butyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)ethyl)cyclobutyl)(isopropyl)amino)methyl)tetrahydrofuran-3,4-diol], a small-molecule inhibitor of the protein methyltransferase DOT1L, is currently under clinical investigation for acute leukemias bearing MLL-rearrangements (MLL-r). In this study, we evaluated EPZ-5676 in combination with standard of care (SOC) agents for acute leukemias as well as other chromatin-modifying drugs in cellular assays with three human acute leukemia cell lines: MOLM-13 (MLL-AF9), MV4-11 (MLL-AF4), and SKM-1 (non-MLL-r). Studies were performed to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of EPZ-5676 combinations in a cotreatment model in which the second agent was added simultaneously with EPZ-5676 at the beginning of the assay, or in a pretreatment model in which cells were incubated for several days in the presence of EPZ-5676 prior to the addition of the second agent. EPZ-5676 was found to act synergistically with the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) SOC agents cytarabine or daunorubicin in MOLM-13 and MV4-11 MLL-r cell lines. EPZ-5676 is selective for MLL-r cell lines as demonstrated by its lack of effect either alone or in combination in the nonrearranged SKM-1 cell line. In MLL-r cells, the combination benefit was observed even when EPZ-5676 was washed out prior to the addition of the chemotherapeutic agents, suggesting that EPZ-5676 sets up a durable, altered chromatin state that enhances the chemotherapeutic effects. Our evaluation of EPZ-5676 in conjunction with other chromatin-modifying drugs also revealed a consistent combination benefit, including synergy with DNA hypomethylating agents. These results indicate that EPZ-5676 is highly efficacious as a single agent and synergistically acts with other chemotherapeutics, including AML SOC drugs and DNA hypomethylating agents in MLL-r cells. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. A novel RT-qPCR assay for quantification of the MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcript in acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Lotte; Ommen, Hans Beier; Lausen, Birgitte Frederiksen

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) of the monocytic lineage often lack molecular markers for minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring. The MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcript found in patients with AML harbouring t(9;11) is amenable to RT-qPCR quantification but because...... of the heterogeneity of translocation break points, the MLL-MLLT3 fusion gene is a challenging target. We hypothesised that MRD monitoring using MLL-MLLT3 as a RT-qPCR marker is feasible in the majority of patients with t(9;11)-positive AML. METHODS: Using a locked nucleic acid probe, we developed a sensitive RT......-qPCR assay for quantification of the most common break point region of the MLL-MLLT3 fusion gene. Five paediatric patients with t(9;11)-positive AML were monitored using the MLL-MLLT3 assay. RESULTS: A total of 43 bone marrow (BM) and 52 Peripheral blood (PB) samples were collected from diagnosis until...

  3. Favorable outcome in non-infant children with MLL-AF4-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Daisuke; Kato, Motohiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Junya; Inukai, Takeshi; Fukushima, Takashi; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Ohara, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Unlike acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants, MLL gene rearrangement (MLL-r) is rare in ALL children (≥1 year old). The outcome and optimal treatment options for MLL-r ALL remain controversial. Among the 1827 children enrolled in the Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group ALL studies L95-14, L99-15, L99-1502, L04-16, and L07-1602 (1995-2009), 25 MLL-r ALL patients (1.3 %) were identified. Their median age and leukocyte count at diagnosis was 2 years old (range 1-15 years) and 27,690/μL (range 1800-1,113,000/μL), respectively. All but one patient achieved complete remission (CR) after induction therapy, and 19 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in first CR according to the protocol. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rate were 60.0 % [standard error (SE), 9.7 %] and 64.0 % (SE 9.6 %), respectively. Notably, 9/12 cases with MLL-AF4-positive ALL are alive in continuous CR with a 75.0 % (SE 12.5 %) EFS rate. The causes of treatment failure were as follows: one induction failure, five relapses, and five transplant-related deaths. With intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic HSCT, favorable outcome of children (≥1 year old) with MLL-AF4-positive ALL was observed. However, considering the risk of acute and late toxicities associated with HSCT, its indication should be restricted.

  4. Morus alba Leaf Lectin (MLL) Sensitizes MCF-7 Cells to Anoikis by Inhibiting Fibronectin Mediated Integrin-FAK Signaling through Ras and Activation of P38 MAPK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranya, Jayaram; Shilpa, Ganesan; Raghu, Kozhiparambil G.; Priya, Sulochana

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are a unique class of carbohydrate binding proteins/glycoproteins, and many of them possess anticancer properties. They can induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, inhibit protein synthesis, telomerase activity and angiogenesis in cancer cells. In the present study, we have demonstrated the effect of Morus alba leaf lectin (MLL) on anoikis induction in MCF-7 cells. Anoikis induction in cancer cells has a significant role in preventing early stage metastasis. MLL treatment in monolayers of MCF-7 cells caused significant detachment of cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. The detached cells failed to re-adhere and grew even to culture plates coated with different matrix proteins. DNA fragmentation, membrane integrity studies, annexin V staining, caspase 9 activation and upregulation of Bax/Bad confirmed that the detached cells underwent apoptosis. Upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) caused a decrease in fibronectin (FN) production which facilitated the cells to detach by blocking the FN mediated downstream signaling. On treatment with MLL, we have observed downregulation of integrin expression, decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), loss in FAK-integrin interaction and active Ras. MLL treatment downregulated the levels of phosphorylated Akt and PI3K. Also, we have studied the effect of MLL on two stress activated protein kinases p38 MAPK and JNK. p38 MAPK activation was found to be elevated, but there was no change in the level of JNK. Thus our study substantiated the possible antimetastatic effect of MLL by inducing anoikis in MCF-7 cells by activation of caspase 9 and proapoptotic Bax/Bad by blockage of FN mediated integrin/FAK signaling and partly by activation of p38 MAPK. PMID:28223935

  5. GPR84 sustains aberrant β-catenin signaling in leukemic stem cells for maintenance of MLL leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Philipp A; Yang, Chen; Leung, Halina H L; Lynch, Jennifer R; Gonzales, Estrella; Liu, Bing; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D; Wang, Jianlong; Wang, Jenny Yingzi

    2014-11-20

    β-catenin is required for establishment of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Targeted inhibition of β-catenin signaling has been hampered by the lack of pathway components amenable to pharmacologic manipulation. Here we identified a novel β-catenin regulator, GPR84, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family that represents a highly tractable class of drug targets. High GPR84 expression levels were confirmed in human and mouse AML LSCs compared with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Suppression of GPR84 significantly inhibited cell growth by inducing G1-phase cell-cycle arrest in pre-LSCs, reduced LSC frequency, and impaired reconstitution of stem cell-derived mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) AML, which represents an aggressive and drug-resistant subtype of AML. The GPR84-deficient phenotype in established AML could be rescued by expression of constitutively active β-catenin. Furthermore, GPR84 conferred a growth advantage to Hoxa9/Meis1a-transduced stem cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that GPR84 significantly upregulated a small set of MLL-fusion targets and β-catenin coeffectors, and downregulated a hematopoietic cell-cycle inhibitor. Altogether, our data reveal a previously unrecognized role of GPR84 in maintaining fully developed AML by sustaining aberrant β-catenin signaling in LSCs, and suggest that targeting the oncogenic GPR84/β-catenin signaling axis may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Striking a balance: regulation of transposable elements by Zfp281 and Mll2 in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qian; Shen, Yang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xin; Francisco, Joel Celio; Luo, Zhuojuan; Lin, Chengqi

    2017-12-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) compose about 40% of the murine genome. Retrotransposition of active TEs such as LINE-1 (L1) tremendously impacts genetic diversification and genome stability. Therefore, transcription and transposition activities of retrotransposons are tightly controlled. Here, we show that the Krüppel-like zinc finger protein Zfp281 directly binds and suppresses a subset of retrotransposons, including the active young L1 repeat elements, in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. In addition, we find that Zfp281-regulated L1s are highly enriched for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and H3K4me3. The COMPASS-like H3K4 methyltransferase Mll2 is the major H3K4me3 methylase at the Zfp281-regulated L1s and required for their proper expression. Our studies also reveal that Zfp281 functions partially through recruiting the L1 regulators DNA hydroxymethylase Tet1 and Sin3A, and restricting Mll2 at these active L1s, leading to their balanced expression. In summary, our data indicate an instrumental role of Zfp281 in suppressing the young active L1s in mouse ES cells. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Systematic chemical and molecular profiling of MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals efficacy of romidepsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, M N; Ford, J; Cheung, L C; Heng, J; Singh, S; Wells, J; Failes, T W; Arndt, G M; Smithers, N; Prinjha, R K; Anderson, D; Carter, K W; Gout, A M; Lassmann, T; O'Reilly, J; Cole, C H; Kotecha, R S; Kees, U R

    2017-01-01

    To address the poor prognosis of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (iALL), we generated a panel of cell lines from primary patient samples and investigated cytotoxic responses to contemporary and novel Food and Drug Administration-approved chemotherapeutics. To characterize representation of primary disease within cell lines, molecular features were compared using RNA-sequencing and cytogenetics. High-throughput screening revealed variable efficacy of currently used drugs, however identified consistent efficacy of three novel drug classes: proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Gene expression of drug targets was highly reproducible comparing iALL cell lines to matched primary specimens. Histone deacetylase inhibitors, including romidepsin (ROM), enhanced the activity of a key component of iALL therapy, cytarabine (ARAC) in vitro and combined administration of ROM and ARAC to xenografted mice further reduced leukemia burden. Molecular studies showed that ROM reduces expression of cytidine deaminase, an enzyme involved in ARAC deactivation, and enhances the DNA damage–response to ARAC. In conclusion, we present a valuable resource for drug discovery, including the first systematic analysis of transcriptome reproducibility in vitro, and have identified ROM as a promising therapeutic for MLL-rearranged iALL. PMID:27443263

  8. Nucleoporin Nup98 associates with Trx/MLL and NSL histone-modifying complexes and regulates Hox gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Garcia, Pau; Jeong, Jieun; Capelson, Maya

    2014-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex is a transport channel embedded in the nuclear envelope and made up of 30 different components termed nucleoporins (Nups). In addition to their classical role in transport, a subset of Nups has a conserved role in the regulation of transcription via direct binding to chromatin. The molecular details of this function remain obscure, and it is unknown how metazoan Nups are recruited to their chromatin locations or what transcription steps they regulate. Here, we demonstrate genome-wide and physical association between Nup98 and histone-modifying complexes MBD-R2/NSL [corrected] and Trx/MLL. Importantly, we identify a requirement for MBD-R2 in recruitment of Nup98 to many of its genomic target sites. Consistent with its interaction with the Trx/MLL complex, Nup98 is shown to be necessary for Hox gene expression in developing fly tissues. These findings introduce roles of Nup98 in epigenetic regulation that may underlie the basis of oncogenicity of Nup98 fusions in leukemia.

  9. Sensitivity of MLL-rearranged AML cells to all-trans retinoic acid is associated with the level of H3K4me2 in the RARα promoter region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, K; Imamura, T; Yano, M; Yoshida, H; Fujiki, A; Hirashima, Y; Hosoi, H

    2014-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is well established as differentiation therapy for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which the PML–RARα (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor α) fusion protein causes blockade of the retinoic acid (RA) pathway; however, in types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) other than APL, the mechanism of RA pathway inactivation is not fully understood. This study revealed the potential mechanism of high ATRA sensitivity of mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)-AF9-positive AML compared with MLL-AF4/5q31-positive AML. Treatment with ATRA induced significant myeloid differentiation accompanied by upregulation of RARα, C/EBPα, C/EBPε and PU.1 in MLL-AF9-positive but not in MLL-AF4/5q31-positive cells. Combining ATRA with cytarabine had a synergistic antileukemic effect in MLL-AF9-positive cells in vitro. The level of dimethyl histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2) in the RARα gene-promoter region, PU.1 upstream regulatory region (URE) and RUNX1+24/+25 intronic enhancer was higher in MLL-AF9-positive cells than in MLL-AF4-positive cells, and inhibiting lysine-specific demethylase 1, which acts as a histone demethylase inhibitor, reactivated ATRA sensitivity in MLL-AF4-positive cells. These findings suggest that the level of H3K4me2 in the RARα gene-promoter region, PU.1 URE and RUNX1 intronic enhancer is determined by the MLL-fusion partner. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms of ATRA sensitivity in AML and novel treatment strategies for ATRA-resistant AML

  10. Tallinna Sadama kallis kingitus / Airi Ilisson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ilisson, Airi, 1980-

    2006-01-01

    Riho Rasmann ja Jaan Toots sõlmisid Tallinna Sadama juhtidega lepingu, mis võimaldab transiidiärimehel Sandu Hubanil ja Vene transiidigigandil Severstalil küsida ettevõttelt üle 30 miljoni krooni. Vt. samas: Sandu Huban ja Severstal said pihta tulusale lepingule; Sandaal ja Lipinski teevad ühisäri juba kümmekond aastat; Riigikontroll taunib maa tasuta äraandmist; Sandu Hubani kuldne tehing. Kommenteerib Jaan Toots

  11. Kallis surm, odav vanadus / Nicholas Timmins

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Timmins, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    Vananemisest tingitud kulude puhul tuleks lisaks pensionisüsteemi maksumusele rääkida veel tervishoiu ja vanurite hoolekandega seotud kulutustest. Vanurite osakaalu kasv toob kaasa tervishoiukulude tõusu, mis ei ole katastroofiliselt suur. Diagrammid: Keskmine vanus; Sündivus; Vananemine

  12. Pathogenetic, Clinical, and Prognostic Features of Adult t(4;11(q21;q23/MLL-AF4 Positive B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Marchesi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Translocation t(4;11(q21;q23 leading to formation of MLL-AF4 fusion gene is found in about 10% of newly diagnosed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adult patients. Patients expressing this chromosomal aberration present typical biological, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. This form of leukemia is universally recognized as high-risk leukemia and treatment intensification with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in first complete remission (CR could be a valid option to improve prognosis, but data obtained from the literature are controversial. In this review, we briefly describe pathogenetic, clinical, and prognostic characteristics of adult t(4;11(q21;q23/MLL-AF4 positive ALL and provide a review of the clinical outcome reported by the most important cooperative groups worldwide.

  13. Acquisition of a CD19-negative myeloid phenotype allows immune escape of MLL-rearranged B-ALL from CD19 CAR-T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Rebecca; Wu, David; Cherian, Sindhu; Fang, Min; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Finney, Olivia; Smithers, Hannah; Jensen, Michael C; Riddell, Stanley R; Maloney, David G; Turtle, Cameron J

    2016-05-19

    Administration of lymphodepletion chemotherapy followed by CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells is a remarkably effective approach to treating patients with relapsed and refractory CD19(+) B-cell malignancies. We treated 7 patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) harboring rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene with CD19 CAR-T cells. All patients achieved complete remission (CR) in the bone marrow by flow cytometry after CD19 CAR-T-cell therapy; however, within 1 month of CAR-T-cell infusion, 2 of the patients developed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that was clonally related to their B-ALL, a novel mechanism of CD19-negative immune escape. These reports have implications for the management of patients with relapsed and refractory MLL-B-ALL who receive CD19 CAR-T-cell therapy. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. Discovery of a Highly Potent, Cell-Permeable Macrocyclic Peptidomimetic (MM-589) Targeting the WD Repeat Domain 5 Protein (WDR5)–Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein–Protein Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatas, Hacer; Li, Yangbing; Liu, Liu; Ji, Jiao; Lee, Shirley; Chen, Yong; Yang, Jiuling; Huang, Liyue; Bernard, Denzil; Xu, Jing; Townsend, Elizabeth C.; Cao, Fang; Ran, Xu; Li, Xiaoqin; Wen, Bo; Sun, Duxin; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng (Michigan)

    2017-06-06

    We report herein the design, synthesis, and evaluation of macrocyclic peptidomimetics that bind to WD repeat domain 5 (WDR5) and block the WDR5–mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) protein–protein interaction. Compound 18 (MM-589) binds to WDR5 with an IC50 value of 0.90 nM (Ki value <1 nM) and inhibits the MLL H3K4 methyltransferase (HMT) activity with an IC50 value of 12.7 nM. Compound 18 potently and selectively inhibits cell growth in human leukemia cell lines harboring MLL translocations and is >40 times better than the previously reported compound MM-401. Cocrystal structures of 16 and 18 complexed with WDR5 provide structural basis for their high affinity binding to WDR5. Additionally, we have developed and optimized a new AlphaLISA-based MLL HMT functional assay to facilitate the functional evaluation of these designed compounds. Compound 18 represents the most potent inhibitor of the WDR5–MLL interaction reported to date, and further optimization of 18 may yield a new therapy for acute leukemia.

  15. Acute myocardial infarction during induction chemotherapy for acute MLL t(4;11 leukemia with lineage switch and extreme leukocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In patients with acute leukemias hemorrhage is the most frequent problem. Vein thrombotic events may appear rarely but arterial thromboses are exceptionally rare. We present a patient with acute leukemia and bilateral deep leg vein thrombosis who developed an acute myocardial infarction (AMI during induction chemotherapy. The etiology and treatment of AMI in patients with acute leukemia, which is a rare occurrence, is discussed. Case Outline. In April of 2012 a 37-year-old male presented with bilateral deep leg vein thrombosis and malaise. Laboratory data were as follows: Hb 118 g/L, WBC 354x109/L (with 91% blasts in differential leukocyte count, platelets 60Ч109/L. Bone marrow aspirate and immunophenotype revealed the presence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytogenetic analysis was as follows: 46,XY,t(4;11(q21:q23 [2]/62-82,XY,t(4;11[18]. Molecular analysis showed MLL-AF4 rearrangement. The patient was on low molecular weight heparin and combined chemotherapy according to protocol HyperCVAD. On day 10 after chemotherapy he got chest pain. Three days later AMI was diagnosed (creatine kinase 66 U/L, CK-MB 13U/L, troponin 1.19 μg/L. Electrocardiogram showed the ST elevation in leads D1, D2, aVL, V5 and V6 and “micro q” in D1. On echocardiography, hypokinesia of the left ventricle and ejection fraction of 39% was found. After recovering from AMI and restoring left ventricle ejection fraction to 59%, second course of HyperCVAD was given. The control bone marrow aspirate showed 88% of blasts but with monoblastic appearance. Flow cytometry confirmed a lineage switch from lymphoblasts to monoblasts. In further course of the disease he was treated with a variety of chemotherapeutic combinations without achieving remission. Eventually, palliative chemotherapy was administered to reduce the bulk of blasts. He died five months after the initial diagnosis. Conclusion. AMI in young adults with acute leukemia is a very rare complication

  16. Improved outcome with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a poor prognostic subgroup of infants with mixed-lineage-leukemia (MLL)-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results from the Interfant-99 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Georg; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Schrappe, Martin

    2010-01-01

    received chemotherapy only (P = .03). However, the advantage was restricted to a subgroup with 2 additional unfavorable prognostic features: age less than 6 months and either poor response to steroids at day 8 or leukocytes more than or equal to 300 g/L. Ninety-seven of 297 MLL(+) patients (33%) had...

  17. Determination of the extraction efficiency for {sup 233}U source α-recoil ions from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wense, Lars v.d.; Seiferle, Benedict; Thirolf, Peter G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Laatiaoui, Mustapha [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Following the α decay of {sup 233}U, {sup 229}Th recoil ions are shown to be extracted in a significant amount from the MLL buffer-gas stopping cell. The produced recoil ions and subsequent daughter nuclei are mass purified with the help of a customized quadrupole mass spectrometer. The combined extraction and mass purification efficiency for {sup 229}Th{sup 3+} is determined via MCP-based measurements and via the direct detection of the {sup 229}Th α decay. A large value of (10±2)% for the combined extraction and mass purification efficiency of {sup 229}Th{sup 3+} is obtained at a mass resolution of about 1u/e. In addition to {sup 229}Th, also other α-recoil ions of the {sup 233,} {sup 232}U decay chains are addressed. (orig.)

  18. Roles for common MLL/COMPASS subunits and the 19S proteasome in regulating CIITA pIV and MHC class II gene expression and promoter methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koues, Olivia I; Mehta, Ninad T; Truax, Agnieszka D; Dudley, R Kyle; Brooks, Jeanne K; Greer, Susanna F

    2010-02-04

    Studies indicate that the 19S proteasome contributes to chromatin reorganization, independent of the role the proteasome plays in protein degradation. We have previously shown that components of the 19S proteasome are crucial for regulating inducible histone activation events in mammalian cells. The 19S ATPase Sug1 binds to histone-remodeling enzymes, and in the absence of Sug1, a subset of activating epigenetic modifications including histone H3 acetylation, H3 lysine 4 trimethylation and H3 arginine 17 dimethylation are inhibited at cytokine-inducible major histocompatibilty complex (MHC)-II and class II transactivator (CIITA) promoters, implicating Sug1 in events required to initiate mammalian transcription. Our previous studies indicate that H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at cytokine-inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters is dependent on proteolytic-independent functions of 19S ATPases. In this report, we show that multiple common subunits of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)/complex of proteins associated with Set I (COMPASS) complexes bind to the inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters; that overexpressing a single common MLL/COMPASS subunit significantly enhances promoter activity and MHC-II HLA-DRA expression; and that these common subunits are important for H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at MHC-II and CIITA promoters. In addition, we show that H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, which is inversely correlated with H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, is significantly elevated in the presence of diminished 19S ATPase Sug1. Taken together, these experiments suggest that the 19S proteasome plays a crucial role in the initial reorganization of events enabling the relaxation of the repressive chromatin structure surrounding inducible promoters.

  19. Roles for common MLL/COMPASS subunits and the 19S proteasome in regulating CIITA pIV and MHC class II gene expression and promoter methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koues Olivia I

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies indicate that the 19S proteasome contributes to chromatin reorganization, independent of the role the proteasome plays in protein degradation. We have previously shown that components of the 19S proteasome are crucial for regulating inducible histone activation events in mammalian cells. The 19S ATPase Sug1 binds to histone-remodeling enzymes, and in the absence of Sug1, a subset of activating epigenetic modifications including histone H3 acetylation, H3 lysine 4 trimethylation and H3 arginine 17 dimethylation are inhibited at cytokine-inducible major histocompatibilty complex (MHC-II and class II transactivator (CIITA promoters, implicating Sug1 in events required to initiate mammalian transcription. Results Our previous studies indicate that H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at cytokine-inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters is dependent on proteolytic-independent functions of 19S ATPases. In this report, we show that multiple common subunits of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL/complex of proteins associated with Set I (COMPASS complexes bind to the inducible MHC-II and CIITA promoters; that overexpressing a single common MLL/COMPASS subunit significantly enhances promoter activity and MHC-II HLA-DRA expression; and that these common subunits are important for H3 lysine 4 trimethylation at MHC-II and CIITA promoters. In addition, we show that H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, which is inversely correlated with H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, is significantly elevated in the presence of diminished 19S ATPase Sug1. Conclusion Taken together, these experiments suggest that the 19S proteasome plays a crucial role in the initial reorganization of events enabling the relaxation of the repressive chromatin structure surrounding inducible promoters.

  20. The MLL1-H3K4me3 Axis-Mediated PD-L1 Expression and Pancreatic Cancer Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunwan; Paschall, Amy V; Shi, Huidong; Savage, Natasha; Waller, Jennifer L; Sabbatini, Maria E; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Pearce, Cedric; Liu, Kebin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the cancers where anti-PD-L1/PD-1 immunotherapy has been unsuccessful. What confers pancreatic cancer resistance to checkpoint immunotherapy is unknown. The aim of this study is to elucidate the underlying mechanism of PD-L1 expression regulation in the context of pancreatic cancer immune evasion. Pancreatic cancer mouse models and human specimens were used to determine PD-L1 and PD-1 expression and cancer immune evasion. Histone methyltransferase inhibitors, RNAi, and overexpression were used to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism of PD-L1 expression regulation. All statistical tests were two-sided. PD-L1 is expressed in 60% to 90% of tumor cells in human pancreatic carcinomas and in nine of 10 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. PD-1 is expressed in 51.2% to 52.1% of pancreatic tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Tumors grow statistically significantly faster in FasL-deficient mice than in wild-type mice (P = .03-.001) and when CTLs are neutralized (P = .03-evasion. Targeting the MLL1-H3K4me3 axis is an effective approach to enhance the efficacy of checkpoint immunotherapy against pancreatic cancer. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD influence the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA but not LRP mRNA assessed with RQ-PCR method in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasilowska-Adamska, Barbara; Solarska, Iwona; Paluszewska, Monika; Malinowska, Iwona; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) and mixed-lineage leukemia gene-partial tandem duplication (MLL-PTD) are aberrations associated with leukemia which indicate unsatisfactory prognosis. Downstream regulatory targets of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD are not well defined. We have analyzed the expression of MDR-1, multidrug resistant protein-1 (MRP-1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in relation to the mutational status of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD in 185 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) adult patients. The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method was performed to assess the expression of the MDR-1, MRP-1, BCRP, and LRP mRNA, and the results were presented as coefficients calculated using an intermediate method according to Pfaffl's rule. Significantly higher expressions of MDR-1 mRNA were found in patients who did not harbor FLT3-ITD (0.20 vs. 0.05; p = 0.0001) and MRP-1 mRNA in patients with this mutation (0.96 vs. 0.70; p = 0.002) and of BCRP mRNA in patients with MLL-PTD (0.61 vs. 0.38; p = 0.03). In univariate analysis, the high expression of MDR-1 mRNA (≥0.1317) negatively influenced the outcome of induction therapy (p = 0.05), whereas the high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) was associated with a high relapse rate (RR) (p = 0.013). We found that the high expression of MDR-1 (≥0.1317), MRP-1 (≥0.8409), and BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) significantly influenced disease-free survival (DFS; p = 0.059, 0.032, and 0.009, respectively) and overall survival (0.048, 0.014, and 0.059, respectively). Moreover, a high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) proved to be an independent prognostic factor for RR (p = 0.01) and DFS (p = 0.002) in multivariate analysis. The significant correlation between the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA and FLT3-ITD or MLL-PTD in AML patients requires further investigation.

  2. Systematic in-vitro evaluation of the NCI/NIH Developmental Therapeutics Program Approved Oncology Drug Set for the identification of a candidate drug repertoire for MLL-rearranged leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeksema KA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Kimberley A Hoeksema1, Aarthi Jayanthan1, Todd Cooper2, Lia Gore3, Tanya Trippett4, Jessica Boklan6, Robert J Arceci5, Aru Narendran11Division of Pediatric Oncology, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Children's Hospital, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 4Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 5Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 6Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: Despite significant progress made in the overall cure rate, the prognosis for relapsed and refractory malignancies in children remains extremely poor. Hence, there is an urgent need for studies that enable the timely selection of appropriate agents for Phase I clinical studies. The Pediatric Oncology Experimental Therapeutics Investigators' Consortium (POETIC is systematically evaluating libraries of known and novel compounds for activity against subsets of high-risk pediatric malignancies with defined molecular aberrations for future clinical development. In this report, we describe the in-vitro activity of a diverse panel of approved oncology drugs against MLL-rearranged pediatric leukemia cell lines. Agents in the Approved Oncology Drug Set II (National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health Developmental Therapeutics Program were evaluated by in-vitro cytotoxicity assays in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia cell lines with MLL gene rearrangements. Validation studies were carried out with patient leukemia cells in culture. Comparative analysis for toxicity against nonmalignant cells was evaluated in normal bone marrow stromal cells and normal human lymphocytes. Results from this study show that 42 of the 89 agents tested have

  3. Unistuste Rail Baltic - ilus ja kallis / Mikk Salu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Salu, Mikk, 1975-

    2011-01-01

    Rail Balticu puhul on tähtsaim küsimus, kas uut raudteeühendust on üldse vaja, mitte aga see, kas tee läheb läbi Tartu või Pärnu. Konsutatsioonifirma AECOM koostatud raportist Rail Balticu tasuvuse kohta

  4. Kallis müügitrikk laste arvel / Priit Pullerits

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pullerits, Priit, 1965-

    2010-01-01

    Piret Raua digitaalsest pildiraamatust lastele "Emma roosad asjad" (Suurbritannia : WingedChariot, 2010), mida on võimalik kasutada Apple´i elektroonikatoodetes iPad, iPhone ja iPod (eesti, inglise ja jaapani keeles)

  5. Eestis käis ilmataadi maapealne asemik / Ain Kallis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kallis, Ain, 1942-

    2005-01-01

    Tänavu täitub 200 aastat pidevate instrumentaalsete ilmamõõtmiste algusest Eestis. Keskkonnaminister Villu Reiljan ja Euroopa Keskpika Ilmaennustuse Keskuse (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, ECMWF) direktor Dominique Marbouty kirjutasid alla koostöölepingule

  6. Pikad pühad ja kallis propaganda / Endel Rihvk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rihvk, Endel

    2007-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Kesknädal, 5. dets. 2007, lk. 4. Autor kritiseerib Eesti Vabariigi 90. aastapäeva aastapikkust tähistamist ja sellega seotud kulutamist ning kampaaniat Tallinna linnavõimu ettevõtmiste näitamist kõverpeeglis

  7. The clinical characteristics, therapy and outcome of 85 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AFF1 prospectively treated in the UKALLXII/ECOG2993 trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, David I.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Chilton, Lucy; Paietta, Elisabeth; Enshaie, Amir; DeWald, Gordon; Harrison, Christine J.; Fielding, Adele K.; Foroni, Letizia; Goldstone, Anthony H.; Litzow, Mark R.; Luger, Selina M.; McMillan, Andrew K.; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M.; Tallman, Martin S.; Wiernik, Peter; Lazarus, Hillard M.

    2013-01-01

    The biology and outcome of adult t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AFF1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia are poorly understood. We describe the outcome and delineate prognostic factors and optimal post-remission therapy in 85 consecutive patients (median age 38 years) treated uniformly in the prospective trial UKALLXII/ECOG2993. The immunophenotype of this leukemia was pro-B (CD10NEG). Immaturity was further suggested by high expression of the stem-cell antigens, CD133 and CD135, although CD34 expression was significantly lower than in t(4;11)-negative patients. Complete remission was achieved in 77 (93%) patients but only 35% survived 5 years (95% CI: 25–45%); the relapse rate was 45% (95% CI: 33–58%). Thirty-one patients underwent allogeneic transplantation in first remission (15 sibling donors and 16 unrelated donors): with 5-year survival rates of 56% and 67% respectively, only 2/31 patients relapsed. This compares with a 24% survival rate and 59% relapse rate in 46 patients who received post-remission chemotherapy. A major determinant of outcome was age with 71% of patients aged <25 years surviving. Younger patients had lower relapse rates (19%) but most received allografts in first complete remission. In conclusion, multivariate analysis did not demonstrate an advantage of allografting over chemotherapy but only five younger patients received chemotherapy. Prospective trials are required to determine whether poor outcomes in older patients can be improved by reduced-intensity conditioning allografts. NCT00002514 www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:23349309

  8. Kalli ajaloosarja esikfilm jõuab ETVsse / Kiur Aarma ; interv. Andri Maimets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aarma, Kiur, 1975-

    2005-01-01

    6-osalise ajaloodokumentaalide sarja "Kuum külm sõda" esimesena valminud, sisuliselt kolmas film "Haukka grupp" : stsenaristid Kiur Aarma, Tiit Pruuli : režissöör Rene Vilbre : Ruut Pictures 2005. Esilinastus 08.05. kinos "Sõprus"

  9. Eesti-Rootsi koostöös valmib kallis dokfilm Kuubal

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Režissöör Michel Miglis, kes on ka bändide mänedžer, filmib Kuubas dokfilmi "Cubaton". Film räägib Kuubas levinud muusikast reggaeton. Eestipoolne tootja on Film Tower, produtsent Margus Õunapuu

  10. "Sinu nimi ..." = "Ditt namn ..." : [luuletused] / Indrek Hirv ; tlk. rootsi keelde Kalli Klement

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hirv, Indrek, 1956-

    2003-01-01

    Sisu: "Sinu nimi ..." = "Ditt namn ..."; "Lind erutub su laulust ..." = "Fågeln blir uppeggad av din sång ..."; "Magasin kogu öö ..." = "Jag sov hela natten ..."; "Seisime saunalävel ..." = Vi stod på tröskeln till bastun ..."; "Sinu uks avab mind ..." = "Din dörr öppnar mig ..."; "Kogun sinusse ..." = "I dig samlar jag ..."; "signeerid mu päeva ..." = "du signerar min dag ..."

  11. Rapsist diislikütus : kallis ja tõrjutud / Heiki Raudla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raudla, Heiki, 1975-

    2008-01-01

    Paldiski Lõunasadamas avatud Biodiesel Paldiski AS tehas loodab tulevikus täisvõimsuse juures toota 100 000 tonni biodiislikütust aastas, praegu eksporditakse kogu toodang peamiselt Lääne-Euroopasse ja Skandinaaviasse. Eesti tarbijale biodiislikütuse tootmist takistab peamiselt tooraine kõrge hind ning vähene nõudlus. Küsimusele vastavad Kai Realo ja Indrek Kaju

  12. Whole exome sequencing reveals a MLL de novo mutation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    article/fulltext/jgen/094/04/0755-0758 ... University of Messina, Messina, 98123, Italy; National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom; The Portland Hospital for Women and Children, London, W1W 5AH, ...

  13. Üks liblika tiivalöök Brasiilias võib tekitada Texases tornaado / Ain Kallis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kallis, Ain, 1942-

    2008-01-01

    Meteoroloog ja matemaatik Edward Norton Lorenz (1917-2008) tegi 1961. aastal tavalist numbrilist ilmaprognoosi. Arvutustes tehtud väikese ümarduse tõttu muutus lõpp-prognoos ebatäpseks. Kogetu põhjal formuleeris ta ühe kaoseteooria põhiprintsiibi

  14. Ajutine juht - jube kallis, aga see-eest väga kasu(m)lik / Irja Rae

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rae, Irja

    2005-01-01

    Ajutise juhi (interim manager) ehk üleminekujuhi palkamisest ettevõttes. Vt. samas: Kus teda näha võib. Kommenteerib juhtimiskonsultatsioonide firma PW Partnersi vanemkonsultant Jana Võrk. Vt. samas: Keskpaik, Ivar. Eesti tuntuim üleminekujuht

  15. Lauli mi, tuvi' toro sisse, kalli kramahvoona sisse... ehk Neiu surm & suured saajad / Marju Torp-Kõivupuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Torp-Kõivupuu, Marju, 1960-

    2004-01-01

    Rets. rmt.: The Maiden's Death Song & The Great Wedding : Anne Vabarna's oral twin epic written down by A. O. Väisanen / by Lauri Honko in collaboration with Anneli Honko and Paul Hagu. Helsinki, 2003. Setu rahvalauliku Anne Vabarna kaksikeeposest "Suured saajad. Neiu koolulaul"

  16. Study of the components of renin-angiotensinaldosterone system and KalliKrein -Kinin system in normal pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu Fagundes, V.G. de.

    1984-01-01

    The alterations in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and Kallikrein-Kinin system were studied. The possible interferences of these systems on the arterial pressure and on the evolution of normal pregnancy were presented in the following situations: when the pregnant change from dorsal decumbency to left lateral decumbency and to orthostatic position. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. Kallis reostuse avastamise seade ähvardab jääda tolmu koguma / Ulvar Käärt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Käärt, Ulvar, 1982-

    2009-01-01

    Eelarvekärbete tõttu puudub siseministeeriumil raha, et saada luba hakata pärast piirivalve lennusalga vana kopteri MI-8 kasutusaja täis saamist edaspidi õlireostuste avastamiseks muretsetud Lidar-seadet vedama olemasolevate Augusta Westland 139 kopterite või lennuki L-410 pardal

  18. David James O'Brock-Kaljuvee : Viru Liimid oli omaniku kallis hobi / David James O'Brock-Kaljuvee ; interv. Gerli Romanovitsh

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    O'Brock-Kaljuvee, David James, 1970-

    2005-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Severnoje Poberezhje : Subbota. AS-i Viru Liimid juhatuse esimees oma ettevõttest, mille välismüük on kasvanud 20% ning esimest korda ollakse kasumis. Arvamust avaldavad Lembit Kaljuvee ja Tiit Vau

  19. Enhancer-associated H3K4 monomethylation by trithorax-related, the drosophila homolog of mammalian MLL3/MLL4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.-M. Herz (Hans-Martin); M. Mohan (Man); A.S. Garruss (Alexander); K. Liang (Kaiwei); Y.-H. Takahashi (Yoh-hei); K. Mickey (Kristen); O. Voets (Olaf); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter); A. Shilatifard (Ali)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMonomethylation of histone H3 on Lys 4 (H3K4me1) and acetylation of histone H3 on Lys 27 (H3K27ac) are histone modifications that are highly enriched over the body of actively transcribed genes and on enhancers. Although in yeast all H3K4 methylation patterns, including H3K4me1, are

  20. A PTIP-PA1 subcomplex promotes transcription for IgH class switching independently from the associated MLL3/MLL4 methyltransferase complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starnes, Linda M; Su, Dan; Pikkupeura, Laura M

    2016-01-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) diversifies antibodies for productive immune responses while maintaining stability of the B-cell genome. Transcription at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus targets CSR-associated DNA damage and is promoted by the BRCT domain-containing PTIP (Pax transacti...

  1. MLL2 conveys transcription-independent H3K4 trimethylation in oocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanna, C. W.; Taudt, A.; Huang, J.; Gahurová, Lenka; Kranz, A.; Andrews, S.; Dean, W.; Francis Stewart, A.; Colomé-Tatché, M.; Kelsey, G.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2018), s. 73-82 ISSN 1545-9993 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : H3K4 trimethylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 12.595, year: 2016

  2. A de novo Mutation in KMT2A (MLL) in monozygotic twins with Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkerton, Sophie; Field, Matthew; Cho, Vicki; Bertram, Edward; Whittle, Belinda; Groves, Alexandra; Goel, Himanshu

    2015-09-01

    Growth deficiency, psychomotor delay, and facial dysmorphism was originally described in a male patient in 1989 by Wiedemann et al. and later in 2000 by Steiner et al. Wiedemann-Steiner syndrome (WSS) has since been described only a few times in the literature, with the phenotypic spectrum both expanding and becoming more delineated with each patient reported. We report on the clinical and molecular features of monozygotic twins with a de novo mutation in KMT2A. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray was done on both twins and whole-exome sequencing was done using both parents and one of the affected twins. SNP microarray confirmed that they were monozygotic twins. A de novo heterozygous variant (p. Arg1083*) in the KMT2A gene was identified through whole-exome sequencing, confirming the diagnosis of WSS. In this study, we have identified a de novo mutation in KMT2A associated with psychomotor developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, short stature, hypertrichosis cubiti, and small kidneys. This finding in monozygotic twins gives specificity to the WSS. The description of more cases of WSS is needed for further delineation of this condition. Small kidneys with normal function have not been described in this condition in the medical literature before. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. SWI/SNF Subunits SMARCA4, SMARCD2 and DPF2 Collaborate in MLL-Rearranged Leukaemia Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruickshank, V Adam; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Sankar, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    the selective requirement for these proteins for leukaemic cell expansion and self-renewal in-vitro as well as in leukaemia. Gene expression profiling in human cells of each of these three factors suggests that they have overlapping functions in leukaemia. The gene expression changes induced by loss...... of the three proteins demonstrate that they are required for the expression of haematopoietic stem cell associated genes but in contrast to previous results obtained in mouse cells, the three proteins are not required for the expression of c-MYC regulated genes....

  4. Testing the potential significance of different scion/rootstock genotype combinations on the ecology of old cultivated olive trees in the southeast Mediterranean area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazani, Oz; Waitz, Yoni; Tugendhaft, Yizhar; Dorman, Michael; Dag, Arnon; Hamidat, Mohammed; Hijawi, Thameen; Kerem, Zohar; Westberg, Erik; Kadereit, Joachim W

    2017-02-06

    A previous multi-locus lineage (MLL) analysis of SSR-microsatellite data of old olive trees in the southeast Mediterranean area had shown the predominance of the Souri cultivar (MLL1) among grafted trees. The MLL analysis had also identified an MLL (MLL7) that was more common among rootstocks than other MLLs. We here present a comparison of the MLL combinations MLL1 (scion)/MLL7 (rootstock) and MLL1/MLL1 in order to investigate the possible influence of rootstock on scion phenotype. A linear regression analysis demonstrated that the abundance of MLL1/MLL7 trees decreases and of MLL1/MLL1 trees increases along a gradient of increasing aridity. Hypothesizing that grafting on MLL7 provides an advantage under certain conditions, Akaike information criterion (AIC) model selection procedure was used to assess the influence of different environmental conditions on phenotypic characteristics of the fruits and oil of the two MLL combinations. The most parsimonious models indicated differential influences of environmental conditions on parameters of olive oil quality in trees belonging to the MLL1/MLL7 and MLL1/MLL1 combinations, but a similar influence on fruit characteristics and oil content. These results suggest that in certain environments grafting of the local Souri cultivar on MLL7 rootstocks and the MLL1/MLL1 combination result in improved oil quality. The decreasing number of MLL1/MLL7 trees along an aridity gradient suggests that use of this genotype combination in arid sites was not favoured because of sensitivity of MLL7 to drought. Our results thus suggest that MLL1/MLL7 and MLL1/MLL1 combinations were selected by growers in traditional rain-fed cultivation under Mediterranean climate conditions in the southeast Mediterranean area.

  5. Karjamaa, pilved... Franz Liiv ja Juhan Kafka / Toomas Raudam

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raudam, Toomas, 1947-

    1998-01-01

    Varem ilmunud: Postimees, 1996, 7.sept. Rets. rmt.: Kafka, Franz. Kirjad Milenale / tlk. Tiiu Relve. Tallinn : Perioodika, 1996. (Loomingu Raamatukogu ; 27-30, 1996; Liiv, Juhan. Mu kallis Liisi / koost. Aarne Vinkel. Tartu : Ilmamaa, 1996

  6. PR-teenuse hind tõuseb 20% / Eda-Liis Kann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kann, Eda-Liis, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Suhtekorraldusfirmad prognoosivad aasta teiseks pooleks PR-teenuste 20protsendilist hinnatõusu. Kommenteerivad Kersti Luha, Maren Pärn, Ingrid Eha, Maria Raudsepp, Heidi Pihlak ja Rein Meripõld. Lisa: Väikefirmale on PR-teenus kallis

  7. Modernistliku ehitatud keskkonna kujunemine (1955-1960.aastad) / Mart Kalm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kalm, Mart, 1961-

    2013-01-01

    Akademismist modernismini ehk ehitaja võit arhitekti üle. Liialduste likvideerimine. Uuseestiaegsuse laine 1950. aastate keskel. Moodne loomulikkus. Uued tarindid. Tüüpprojektid. Eriprojektiga kooperatiivkorter - kallis mugavus. Sirgete joonte arhitektuur. Kolhoosiarhitektuur

  8. R-skeemil polnud lootust kunagi kohtusse jõuda / Norman Aas ; intervjueerinud Kadri Paas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Aas, Norman, 1975-

    2010-01-01

    Riigi peaprokuröri sõnul ei ole erakondade liikmete kampaaniate rahastamise kohta karistusseadustikus sõnagi. Korruptsioon on varasemast keerulisemaks muutunud ja korruptsioonikuritegu on väga kallis uurida

  9. Road of death to remain lethal / Kairi Kurm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kurm, Kairi

    2005-01-01

    Majandus- ja kommunikatsiooniministeeriumi teatel ei rajata Tartu ja Tallinna vahele neljarealist maanteed, kuna selle ehitus oleks kallis. Maanteeameti väitel ei ole olukord Tallinn-Tartu maanteel halb ning hukkunuid pole piisavalt, et oleks vajalik teed laiendada

  10. Bravocom süüdistab Tele2 ja EMT-d alatus konkurentsivõitluses / Kristiina Viiron

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Viiron, Kristiina, 1971-

    2007-01-01

    Kallines Tele2 ja EMT võrgust Bravocomi mobiilinumbritele helistamise minutihind. Bravocomi juhatuse esimees Peep Põldsamm peab nii kalli hinna - 4.50 minut - kehtestamist konkurentsivõitluseks. Tabelid: Hinnavõrdlus. Lisa: Tele2 ja EMT kommentaarid

  11. Vastased üritavad koos Haloneni lüüa / Erkki Bahovski

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Bahovski, Erkki, 1970-

    2006-01-01

    Soome presidendivalimistel teise vooru mitte pääsenud Koonderakonna kandidaat Matti Vanhanen, Rootsi rahvapartei kandidaat Henrik Lax ja kristlike demokraatide kandidaat Bjarne Kallis toetavad teise vooru pääsenud Koonderakonna kandidaati Sauli Niinistöd

  12. Basic instinct / Marju Lepajõe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lepajõe, Marju, 1962-

    2011-01-01

    Arvustus: Franz Kafka. Kirjad Milenale : [autori kirjad M. Jesenskale]. Tallinn : Perioodika, 1996. (Loomingu raamatukogu ; 1996, 27/30) ; Juhan Liiv. Mu kallis Liisi : [kirjad Liisa Goldingule]. Tartu : Ilmamaa, 1996

  13. Väikeste värviliste asjade ajastu = The Era of Small Colourful Things / Gabriel Verilaskja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Verilaskja, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    Uutest suundadest valgustuses, tarkvaraga lampidest, valgustite muutumisest väiksemaks, imetillukestest valgustitest, mille sisse on ehitatud võimalus muuta värvi. Illustratsiooniks neli Gabriel Verilaskja ja Kalli Seina disainitud valgustit

  14. Süüdistus: Professor pettis Tehnikaülikoolilt välja 35 000 eurot / Tarmo Vahter

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vahter, Tarmo, 1970-

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformaatika professor Madis Metsis müüs Tallinna Tehnikaülikoolile kalli seadme, mida polnud olemaski. Praegu töötab Madis Metsis Tallinna ülikoolis matemaatika ja loodusteaduste instituudis bioloogia professorina

  15. Ravimid, risk, raha & tervis / Inge Pitsner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pitsner, Inge

    2008-01-01

    Ravimifirma Roche Eesti OÜ tegevjuht Kadri Mägi selgitab ravimiäri toimemehhanisme ning põhjuseid, miks ravimitööstus on riskantne ja kallis valdkond. Lisa: Mis on farmakoökonoomika?; Roche Eesti kontor

  16. Complex three-way translocation involving MLL, ELL, RREB1, and CMAHP genes in an infant with acute myeloid leukemia and t(6;19;11)(p22.2;p13.1;q23.3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuborgh, A; Meyer, C; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    until progression to acute myeloid leukemia, AML-M5. The leukemic cells harbored a novel apparent 3-way translocation t(6;19;11)(p22.2;p13.1;q23.3). We utilized advanced molecular cytogenetic methods including 24-color karyotyping, high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and DNA...... in the initial stages of disease before clear morphological signs of bone marrow involvement. The patient responded well to therapy and remains in remission>6 years from diagnosis. This apparent 3-way translocation is remarkable because of its rarity and presentation with myeloid sarcoma, and may, as more cases...

  17. The “Mystique” of Acute Leukemia: MPAL-BAL-AUL-ALAL-aBLL-HAL-MLL: Initial presentation of MPAL as extramedullary neurological compromise; A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubhagya Ranjan Tripathy

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: For routine neurosurgical practice, these entities are extremely rare; and hence a working knowledge is very essential for appropriate & timely management notwithstanding the neurosurgical desire to rule out the compressive lesions first. Neurological status deterioration may be halted with timely institution of appropriate chemotherapy. In the extensive literature review in pubmed, this may be only the 1st case of MPAL with extramedullary neurological manifestation, at the first clinical presentation.

  18. Comparison of the effects of crude and spent oils on Tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxic effects of bonnylight crude and spent oils on Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings were conducted under laboratory conditions at the University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria for two months. Five concentrations (5 ml/L, 10 ml/L, 20 m1/L, 50 m1/L and l00 ml/L) of water soluble fraction (WSF) of crude and spent oils were ...

  19. Tudengid tahavad enam ühekohalisi ühikatube / Jüri Saar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saar, Jüri, 1973-

    2002-01-01

    Tartu Ülikooli mitusada ühiselamujärjekorras ootavat tudengit eelistaks ühekohalist ja odavat tuba, ühiselamute remondiprogramm toob aga juurde eelkõige kahekohalisi tube, mille üliõpilased kalli hinna pärast ära põlgavad.

  20. Hooajal asutatud toitlustaja kaob turult / Eda-Liis Kann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kann, Eda-Liis, 1979-

    2003-01-01

    Eesti catering-teenuste turg ning ettevõtted. Tabelid: Toitlustusteenus võrdne kalli restorani hindadega - ürituste hinnad; Tuntumad toitlustusfirmad. Kommenteerivad Riho Rasmann ja Hede Kerstin Luik. Frens pakub kõige maitsvamaid suupisteid - catering-firmade pimetesti tulemused

  1. Eesti piloodid Afganistanis täitsid ülesande

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2012-01-01

    Afganistanis teenivad Eesti õhuväe kopteripiloodid kapten Rene Kallis ja kapten Martin Noorsalu täitsid oma esimese teenistusülesande, lennates UH-60 Black Hawk tüüpi kopteritega. Ülesanne oli meedikute transport Camp Bastioni välihospidali. Pärast tutvumislende hakkavad piloodid lendama meditsiinilise evakuatsiooni üksuse koosseisus

  2. Pilt ja heli koos räägivad artisti kohta palju / Ove Musting ; intervjueerinud Margus Haav

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Musting, Ove

    2010-01-01

    Intervjuu režissööri ja produtsendi Ove Mustinguga, kelle uut lühimängufilmi "Kallis sõber, Sind austan" näidatakse 4. veebruaril 2010 Viljandi klubis Puhas Kuld. Räägitakse ka filmis üht peaosa kehastavast Jaan Pehkist alias Orelipoisist, kelle uue albumi "Õnn" esitluskontsert samas toimub

  3. A. H. Tammsaare park 112 / Andri Ksenofontov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ksenofontov, Andri, 1962-

    2005-01-01

    Rotermanni soolalaos avatud näituse "Kodu, kallis kodu" installatsioonist "Kast" A. H. Tammsaare pargis. Autorid Kämbu, Raskolnikova, Dragon ja AsmaRaa. Saelaudadest kastide autorid on Tabasalu ühisgümnaasiumi ja Vääna põhikooli poisid

  4. Me suudame ajaga kaasas käia / interv. Ene Riet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Eesti raamatukoguhoidjate VIII kongressi (9.-10. juuni 2002) delegaatitelt küsiti arvamust Eesti raamatukogunduse kohta, vastasid: Kalli Kuhi, Sirje Okapuu, Toomas Liivamägi, Sirje Lauring-Vaska, Helve Sreiberg, Irina Kruusla, Ädu Neemre, Tiit Margna, Valentina Brovina, Asko Tamme, Meeli Veskus

  5. Klaas ja mõis / Maie-Ann Raun

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raun, Maie-Ann, 1938-

    2007-01-01

    Klaasikunstinäitus "Ringkäik" Albu mõisas, kuraatorid Virve Kiil, Kati Kerstna, Kairi Orgusaar. Eksponeeritakse Tiina Sarapu, Mare Saare, Eeva Käsperi, Kai Kiudsoo-Värvi, Pilvi Ojamaa, Merle Bukoveci, Kalli Seina, Viivi-Ann Keerdo, Liisi Junolaineni, Kristiina Uslari, Ivo Lille töid

  6. Berlinale terad / Kadri Kõusaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõusaar, Kadri

    2006-01-01

    56. Berliini festivali filme - Jasmila Zhbanici "Grbavica", Michael Winterbottomi, Mat Whitecrossi "Teekond Guantanamosse", tailase Pen-ek Ratanaruangi "Nähtamatud lained", John Hillcoati "Ettepanek" (stsenarist ja muusika autor Nick Cave), Bennett Milleri "Capote" (nimiosas P.S. Hoffman), Yang Yong-hi dokfilm "Kallis Pyongyang", Tomer Heymanni dokfilm "Pabernukud"

  7. Preclinical Evaluation to Specifically Target Ovarian Cancer with Folic Acid-Conjugated Nanoceria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    28: 3567-72. 5. Elnakat H, Ratnam M (2006). Role of folate receptor genes in reproduction and related cancers. Front Biosci 11: 506-19. 6. Kalli...Cancer Res 67: 10823- 10830. 13. Kumar A, Babu S, Karakoti AS, Schulte A, Seal S (2009). Luminescence properties of europium- doped cerium oxide

  8. Un film très nonchalant / Kristiina Davidjants

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Davidjants, Kristiina, 1974-

    2001-01-01

    Mängufilm "Hüvasti, kallis kodu" ("Adieu, plancher des vaches") : rezžissöör Otar Iosseliani : Prantsusmaa - Šveits - Itaalia 1999. Lisa : A. Ermeli koostatud režissööri lühielulugu ja filmograafia. Kokkuvõte inglise keeles lk. 96

  9. Suhtesõlmed kire vastu / Aita Kivi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kivi, Aita, 1954-

    2002-01-01

    Sisu : Linn Ullmann. Enne kui sa uinud; Josie Lloyd, Emlyn Rees. Saame kokku; Deborah Moggach. Tulbipalavik; Victoria Clayton. Armastusest loobuja; Rosamunde Pilcher: Kaksikute tähtkujus; Hailey North. Kallis Armastuse Doktor; August Gailit. Muinasmaa; Aidi Vallik. Mis teha, Ann?; A. E. Hotchner. Papa Hemingway

  10. "Georgicat" näeb USA-s Californias

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Sulev Keeduse mängufilm "Georgica" linastub Berkeley kinos Fine Arts Cinema. Edasi läheb film Poola eesti filmi päevadele 6.-10. novembrini. Seal näidatakse ka V. Kuigi lühimängufilmi "Lurjus" ja R. Heidmetsa lastefilmi "Kallis härra Q"

  11. Prii internet pakub lisaväärtust / Kristjan Otsmann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Otsmann, Kristjan, 1971-

    2005-01-01

    Tasuta internetiühendusest erinevates avalikes kohtades, mis paljude ettevõtete juhtide arvates annab kohale lisaväärtust. Lisa: Korduma kippuvad küsimused. Vt. samas: Eesti härra WiFi; Mobiil-internet on kallis ja aeglane

  12. Eestlased ametis Iirimaal / Silva Männik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Männik, Silva, 1974-

    2003-01-01

    Eestist Iirimaale tööle siirdunud inimeste arv kasvab. Kaks Iirimaal töötavat eestlast vahendavad oma kogemusi. Vt. samas: Esimene ešelon eestlasi lendab Kerry Foodsi septembri lõpus; Elu Iirimaal on eestlasele kallis

  13. Administraatori lubatähega parteris / Mihkel Mutt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mutt, Mihkel, 1953-

    1996-01-01

    Anthony Shafferi 'Mõrvar' Eesti Draamateatris (lav. Mati Unt); David Lee Coburni 'Džinnimäng' (loominguline ühendus 'Teine laine', lav. Allan Kress); Anton Tšehhovi 'Kajakas' (lavakunstikooli 17. lennu diplomilavastus, lav. Kalju Komissarov); Oskar Lutsu - Toomas Kalli 'Tagahoovis' (Eesti Draamateatri ja Vanalinnastuudio ühislavastus, lav. Eino Baskin)

  14. Tartu Ülikool 375 / interv. Rein Raudvere

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Küsitlus: Mida on teile andnud Tartu Ülikool? Millest oleksite jäänud ilma, kui poleks olnud õnne õppida Tartu Ülikoolis? Vastavad: Tõnis Lukas, Hannes Kaljujärv, Aili Paju, Ain Kallis, Aarne Liiv ja Hans Trass. Vt. samas: EV ministrid TÜ vilistlased; Riigikogu liikmed TÜ vilistlased

  15. PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN EFFECTIVE MICROORGANISM-4 (EM-4 PADA PENGOMPOSAN TERHADAP PRODUKSI JAMUR MERANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisti Yuliastrin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed for knowing the influence of  EM-4 (effective microorganism-4 addition and the most effective concentration of EM-4 in compost media for straw mushroom (Volvariella volvacea (Bull. ex Fr. Sing production. The treatment examined the use of EM-4 solution divided into six treatments and four repetitions. EM-4 concentration from 0 ml/l – 12,5 ml/l with an interval increasing of 2,5 ml/l. The addition of 7,5 ml/l – 12,5 ml/l concentration of EM-4 did not give so different result with the control media. Composting with addition of 5 ml/l EM-4 gave the highest straw mushroom production (2272,25 g. Statistically the result showed that the concentrations of EM-4 had no significant effect on the mushroom production.

  16. Comparative toxicity of petrol and kerosene to periwinkle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The comparative toxicities of two petroleum products, petrol and kerosene were examined by exposing Tympanotonus fuscatus to acute concentrations (60, 90, 120 and 150ml/L) of these toxicants for 96 hours. The 48th hour LC50 for petrol was 177.36 ml/L, while that of kerosene was 306.16 ml/L. The 96th hour LC50 was ...

  17. UJI EFEKTIFITAS INSEKTISIDA NABATI EKSTRAK AKAR TUBA (Derris elliptica B. DAN UMBI GADUNG (Dioscorea hispida D. TERHADAP MORTALITAS DAN PERKEMBANGAN HAMA Plutella xylostella L. DI LABORATORIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    irfan sugiono utomo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plutella xylostella L. merupakan hama penting tanaman kubis. Hama ini menyerang bagian daun dengan gejala daun menjadi berlubang sehingga turunnya produksi mencapai 80-100% penyebaran hama Plutella xylostella tersebar di daerah tropis dan subtropis.. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan di laboratorium Hama Tumbuhan Jurusan Hama dan Penyakit Tumbuhan Fakultas Pertanian Universitas Jember. Penelitian ini dilakukan menggunakan Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL dan di uji menggunakan uji Beda Nyata Terkecil (BNT dengan taraf 5%. Perlakuan aplikasi yang digunakan dengan 2 metode, yaitu metode tetes (ulat dan metode celup (pakan. Perlakuan yang digunakan yaitu: K1 (Konsentrasi akar tuba 20ml/l air, K2 (Konsentrasi akar tuba 25ml/l air, K3 (Konsentrasi akar tuba 30ml/l air, K4 (Konsentrasi umbi gadung 20ml/l air, K5 (Konsentrasi umbi gadung 25ml/l air, K6 (Konsentrasi umbi gadung 30ml/l air, K7 (Konsentrasi akar tuba 20 ml/l air +umbi gadung 30ml/l air, K8 (Konsentrasi akar tuba 30 ml/l air +umbi gadung 20ml/l air. Pengamatan meliputi persentase mortalitas larva P. xlostella , persentase larva yang menjadi pupa, persentase larva yang menjadi imago Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa Insektisida nabati akar tuba dan umbi gadung berpengaruh sangat nyata terhadap mortalitas larva Plutella xylostella yakni dapat menyebabkan tingkat mortalitas sebesar 86,67 % dengan konsentrasi paling efektif pada perlakuan K8 yaitu ektrak akar tuba 30ml/l air + umbi gadung 20ml/l air. Perlakuan ekstrak nabati akar tuba lebih efektif dengan metode celup sedangkan ekstrak umbi gadung lebih efektif dengan metode tetes. Penggunaan perlakuan kombinasi insektisida nabati lebih efektif dibandingkan dengan pemberian insektisida nabati tunggal.Kata kunci: Plutella xylostella, Akar tuba, Umbi gadung 

  18. Sectioning of multilayers to make a multilayer Laue lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyon Chol; Stephenson, G. Brian; Liu Chian; Conley, Ray; Khachatryan, Ruben; Wieczorek, Michael; Macrander, Albert T.; Yan Hanfei; Maser, Joerg; Hiller, Jon; Koritala, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    We report a process to fabricate multilayer Laue lenses (MLL's) by sectioning and thinning multilayer films. This method can produce a linear zone plate structure with a very large ratio of zone depth to width (e.g., >1000), orders of magnitude larger than can be attained with photolithography. Consequently, MLL's are advantageous for efficient nanofocusing of hard x rays. MLL structures prepared by the technique reported here have been tested at an x-ray energy of 19.5 keV, and a diffraction-limited performance was observed. The present article reports the fabrication techniques that were used to make the MLL's

  19. Birth characteristics, maternal reproductive history, and the risk of infant leukemia: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Logan G; Davies, Stella M; Robison, Leslie L; Hilden, Joanne M; Roesler, Michelle; Ross, Julie A

    2007-01-01

    Leukemias with MLL gene rearrangements predominate in infants (birth weight, higher birth order, and prior fetal loss have, with varying consistency, been associated with infant leukemia, but no studies have reported results with respect to MLL status. Here, we report for the first time such an analysis. During 1999 to 2003, mothers of 240 incident cases (113 MLL(+), 80 MLL(-), and 47 indeterminate) and 255 random digit dialed controls completed a telephone interview. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for quartile of birth weight, birth order, gestational age, maternal age at delivery, prior fetal loss, pre-pregnancy body mass index, and weight gain during pregnancy were obtained using unconditional logistic regression; P for linear trend was obtained by modeling continuous variables. There was a borderline significant linear trend of increasing birth weight with MLL(+) (P = 0.06), but not MLL(-) (P = 0.93), infant leukemia. Increasing birth order showed a significant inverse linear trend, independent of birth weight, with MLL(+) (P = 0.01), but not MLL(-) (P = 0.18), infant leukemia. Other variables of interest were not notably associated with infant leukemia regardless of MLL status. This investigation further supports the contention that molecularly defined subtypes of infant leukemia have separate etiologies.

  20. Lapsepõlve igavesed armid / Aita Kivi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kivi, Aita, 1954-

    2001-01-01

    Sisu : Tiia Kriisa. Võõras; Tove Ditlevsen. Lapsepõlve tänav; Tiina Tamman. Õie teekond; Elizabeth Kim. Kümme tuhat muret; Charles Bukowski. Postkontor; Charles Bukowski. Naised; Aarne Ruben. Volta annab kaeblikku vilet; Robyn Sisman. Lihtsalt sõbrad; Charlotte Bingham. Tähetolm; Spencer Johnson. Kes näppas minu juustu?; Jean Webster. Kallis vaenlane; Christoph Gann. Raoul Wallenberg

  1. "Monokliga" maailma vaadates / Eteri Kekelidze

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kekelidze, Eteri, 1944-

    2001-01-01

    1.-8. märtsini toimus Peterburis III monolavastuste festival "Monokkel 2001" deviisi all "Tema Kõrgus näitleja". Peaauhind jäeti välja andmata, selle asemel määrati kaks esimest auhinda. Eestit esindas Vene Draamateatri näitleja Ljubov Agapova "Ma ootan sind, kallis!" Autasu näitleja ei saanud, aga publik võttis näitlejanna soojalt vastu

  2. Illusiooni võitlus igavusega ehk Kes teatris ei käi, see ise on / Andrus Laansalu, Margus Kasterpalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laansalu, Andrus

    1996-01-01

    Dialoog. Draamateatri külalisetendused Tartus: Oskar Lutsu - Toomas Kalli 'Tagahoovis' (lav. Eino Baskin); William Shakespeare'i 'Eksituste komöödia' (lav. Evald Hermaküla); Pierre Corneille' 'Näitaja näitab ja vaataja vaatab ehk Illusioon' (lav. Mati Unt); Arthur Milleri 'Vaade sillalt' (Mikk Mikiver); Peter Shafferi 'Leekrüübe' (Priit Pedajas) ja 'Amadeus' (Kalju Komissarov); Alan Ayckbourni 'Intiimsed tehingud' ja Noel Cowardi 'Heinapalavik' (mõlemad Ivo Eensalu)

  3. Sotsiaalselt pime ja poliitiliselt impotentne teater / Alvar Loog

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Loog, Alvar

    2006-01-01

    Poliitilisest ja sotsiaalsest teatrist Eestis 2005. aasta lavastuste põhjal : Pip Upponi "Adolf" Tartu Püssirohukeldris, lavastaja Ervin Õunapuu; Merle Karusoo "Misjonärid" Rakvere Teatris; Alistair Beatoni "Õnnetunne" Ugalas, lavastaja Jaak Allik; Toomas Kalli " Viimane sent" Vana Baskini Teatris, lavastaja Eino Baskin; George Orwelli "Loomade farm" Tallinna Linnateatris, lavastaja Mart Koldits; Kai Henseli "Klammi sõda" VAT Teatris, lavastaja Aare Toikka

  4. Näitus "Sajand eesti puugravüüri klotsidel" / Jüri Hain

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hain, Jüri, 1941-

    2007-01-01

    Eesti Rahvusraamatukogus 15. I-3. II eksponeeritud ja rahvusraamatukogu kollektsioonist koostatud näitusest "Sajand eesti puugravüüri klotsidel: 1840-1940". Järgmistest kunstnikest ja nende töödest: Aleksander Otto Gern, Bogdan Gottlieb Friedrich Kally, August Daugell, Hermann Eduard Hartmann, Eduard Magnus Jakobson, Mart Pukits, Andres Kuusk, Karl Friedrich Schnell, Anton Suurkask (1873-1965), Arkadio Laigo, Hando Mugasto, Eduard Järv, Richard Kaljo, Ott Kangilaski, Ants Puks (1918-?), Salome Trei

  5. Maakonna tegu – Käsitööplahvatus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2016-01-01

    Eesti Rahvakunsti ja Käsitöö Liidu juhatus andis teist korda välja auhinda “Maakonna tegu”, mille pälvis Pärnu Muuseumi näitus “Käsitöö plahvatus” 6.10.2015- 24.01.2016, mis koosnes kolmest alanäitusest “Loomast loodud”, “Puulased” ja “Helmes, sina kallis väike helmes ...”

  6. Heino Harak : biodiislikütus paisataks Eesti tanklatesse 2006. aasta lõpuks / Heino Harak ; interv. Toivo Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Harak, Heino, 1941-

    2005-01-01

    Firma Biodiesel suuromanik vastab küsimustele, mis puudutavad biodiislikütuse tehase rajamist, kütuse müüki, tavalise diislikütuse ja biodiislikütuse hinna vahet, Werol Tehaste kava müüa oma osalus Biodieselis, biodiislikütuse võimalikku vabastamist aktsiisimaksust. Diagrammid: Biodiislikütus on aktsiisiga liiga kallis. Lisad: Biodiislikütusest on puudu kogu Euroopas; Kes ta on?

  7. Full Multilayer Laue Lens for Focusing Hard X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chian; Shi, B.; Qian, J.; Conley, R.; Yan, H.; Wieczorek, M.; Macrander, A. T.; Maser, J.; Stephenson, G. B.

    2010-01-01

    Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLLs) were developed by us using dynamic diffraction effects to efficiently focus hard x-rays to very small spots. Using a partial MLL we were able to focus 19.5-keV hard x-rays to a line focus of 16 nm with an efficiency of 31%. A full MLL is a complete linear MLL structure. It can be fabricated by bonding two partial MLL wafers, or by growing the full structure using magnetron sputtering without bonding. A 40-μm full MLL, with a total of 5166 layers of WSi 2 and Si, has been successfully grown by sputter deposition. The layer thicknesses gradually vary from 4 nm to ∼400 nm and then back to 4 nm. Two coating runs were used to grow the full structure, one for each half. It took over 56 h for each run. A 100-μm nearly-full MLL was constructed by bonding. Each 50-μm half-structure has 1788 WSi 2 and Si layers with 12-nm to ∼32-nm thicknesses and ∼32-μm total thickness, followed by a thick WSi 2 layer of ∼17 μm, and an AuSn layer of ∼1 μm. Both full MLL structures survived dicing and polishing. The primary results demonstrate the feasibility and potential of a full MLL with a doubled numerical aperture and large beam acceptance for hard x-rays.

  8. DNA-damage-induced differentiation of leukaemic cells as an anti-cancer barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Margarida A; Faryabi, Robert B; Ergen, Aysegul V; Day, Amanda M; Malhowski, Amy; Canela, Andres; Onozawa, Masahiro; Lee, Ji-Eun; Callen, Elsa; Gutierrez-Martinez, Paula; Chen, Hua-Tang; Wong, Nancy; Finkel, Nadia; Deshpande, Aniruddha; Sharrow, Susan; Rossi, Derrick J; Ito, Keisuke; Ge, Kai; Aplan, Peter D; Armstrong, Scott A; Nussenzweig, André

    2014-10-02

    Self-renewal is the hallmark feature both of normal stem cells and cancer stem cells. Since the regenerative capacity of normal haematopoietic stem cells is limited by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA double-strand breaks, we speculated that DNA damage might also constrain leukaemic self-renewal and malignant haematopoiesis. Here we show that the histone methyl-transferase MLL4, a suppressor of B-cell lymphoma, is required for stem-cell activity and an aggressive form of acute myeloid leukaemia harbouring the MLL-AF9 oncogene. Deletion of MLL4 enhances myelopoiesis and myeloid differentiation of leukaemic blasts, which protects mice from death related to acute myeloid leukaemia. MLL4 exerts its function by regulating transcriptional programs associated with the antioxidant response. Addition of reactive oxygen species scavengers or ectopic expression of FOXO3 protects MLL4(-/-) MLL-AF9 cells from DNA damage and inhibits myeloid maturation. Similar to MLL4 deficiency, loss of ATM or BRCA1 sensitizes transformed cells to differentiation, suggesting that myeloid differentiation is promoted by loss of genome integrity. Indeed, we show that restriction-enzyme-induced double-strand breaks are sufficient to induce differentiation of MLL-AF9 blasts, which requires cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip1) (Cdkn1a) activity. In summary, we have uncovered an unexpected tumour-promoting role of genome guardians in enforcing the oncogene-induced differentiation blockade in acute myeloid leukaemia.

  9. Wedged multilayer Laue lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, Ray; Liu Chian; Qian Jun; Kewish, Cameron M.; Macrander, Albert T.; Yan Hanfei; Maser, Joerg; Kang, Hyon Chol; Stephenson, G. Brian

    2008-01-01

    A multilayer Laue lens (MLL) is an x-ray focusing optic fabricated from a multilayer structure consisting of thousands of layers of two different materials produced by thin-film deposition. The sequence of layer thicknesses is controlled to satisfy the Fresnel zone plate law and the multilayer is sectioned to form the optic. An improved MLL geometry can be created by growing each layer with an in-plane thickness gradient to form a wedge, so that every interface makes the correct angle with the incident beam for symmetric Bragg diffraction. The ultimate hard x-ray focusing performance of a wedged MLL has been predicted to be significantly better than that of a nonwedged MLL, giving subnanometer resolution with high efficiency. Here, we describe a method to deposit the multilayer structure needed for an ideal wedged MLL and report our initial deposition results to produce these structures

  10. Modification of growth medium of mixed-culture species of microalgae isolated from southern java coastal region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudibyo Hanifrahmawan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, there is growing interest in microalgae as production organisms. Microalgae contain lipids (oil, proteins and carbohydrates (sugars, and, especially marine algae have been used as food and feed for centuries. Recently, production cost reduction related to the supply of growth nutrients is necessary to make it profitable. Therefore, utilization of molasses, a byproduct of sugar production, as the natural carbon, macronutrients, and micronutrients sources can be helpful. The analysis showed that the content of sucrose, glucose, fructose, potassium, zinc, and magnesium was 68.4% w/w, 18.5% w/w, and 13.1% w/w, 5.5% w/w, 3.91 ppm, and 1,370 ppm respectively. This work aimed to determine the effect of molasses addition to the physio-chemical properties of multi-culture species of microalgae isolated from southern Java coastal region in Indonesia grown under mixotrophic culture. The cultivation in this work used medium which was self-formulated by the authors consisting of NaNO3 (5 mL/L, H3BO3 (1 mL/L, EDTA (1 mL/L, N2H2PO4 (5 mL/L, FeSO4 (1 mL/L, MgSO4 (1 mL/L, NaCl (1 mL/L, micronutrients (1 mL/L, vitamin B1 (1 mL/L, and vitamin B12 (1 mL/L in 500 mL of water. The medium will be treated to have molasses concentration of 0.05% v/v, 0.15% v/v, 0.25% v/v, 0.35% v/v, and 0.45% v/v.

  11. [Diagnostic and Treatment Strategies in Morel-Lavallee Lesions in the Spinal Column and Pelvis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Christopher A; Kammerlander, Christian; Greiner, Axel; Sommer, Fabian; Linhart, Christoph; Böcker, Wolfgang; Rubenbauer, Bianka; Weidert, Simon

    2018-04-12

    The Morel-Lavallée lesion is one of the concomitant soft tissue lesions of pelvic fractures. Its role in spine fractures and its treatment in combination with osteosynthesis of pelvic or spine fractures have not yet been determined. The aim of this study was to analyse the best diagnostic and treatment options of both spine and pelvic fractures combined with Morel-Lavallée lesions (MLL). An analysis of the literature was performed via PubMed and Medline. This revealed a total of 197 studies and case reports. After analysing the literature, 19 studies/case reports met our inclusion criteria. There are several diagnostic options for MLL, including ultrasound, computed tomography or MRI. In spinal and pelvic lesions, ultrasound is capable of detecting MLL. Some authors tend to perform open debridement of the MLL, whereas others recommend percutanous treatment. Open debridement and vacuum-assisted closure are recommended in late diagnosed MLL, where primary suture of the soft tissue is impossible. Fracture fixation should be performed simultaneously to treatment of the MLL. Broad-spectrum cephalosporins combined with an aminoglycoside or piperacilline/tazobactam should be initiated. Radical debridement and drainage are recommended, especially when MLL is diagnosed late. Repeated ultrasound examinations should be performed of the surrounding soft tissue of the fracture. When MLL is diagnosed within 2 days, percutanous fracture and MLL treatment should be performed. After more than 2 days, both fracture and MLL should be treated with open debridement, open fracture fixation and primary suture if possible. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Immunophenotypic investigation of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study – immunophenotype description of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. 64 patients (29 boys and 35 girls with acute leukemia (AL aged from 0 to 11 months were included in the current study. ALL was found less frequently in infants than in older children (67.19 % and 87.69 %, respectively. BI-ALL was the most common immunological ALL type (60.46 % in infant ALL, while BII-ALL was notably less frequent compared with other age groups (30.23 %. Significant immunophenotypic differences were observed in patients with and without MLL gene rearrangements. Number of cases in those tumor cells expressed CD10, CD20, CD45, CD133, CD15, NG2 varied between MLL-positive and MLL-negative groups. CD10- and CD20-negativity, high CD45, CD15, CD65 and NG2 expression were immunophenotypic signatures of MLL-rearranged infant ALL, although NG2 had the highest diagnostic efficacy. High CD34 and CD65 expression was frequently associated with presence of MLL-AF4 fusion gene. Thus infants’ B-cell precursor ALL immunophenotype differs significantly due to the presence of MLL gene rearrangements. Diagnostic immunophenotyping of infants’ ALL allows predicting presence of MLL rearrangements and NG2 is the most applicable single marker.

  13. Immunophenotypic investigation of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Popov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study – immunophenotype description of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. 64 patients (29 boys and 35 girls with acute leukemia (AL aged from 0 to 11 months were included in the current study. ALL was found less frequently in infants than in older children (67.19 % and 87.69 %, respectively. BI-ALL was the most common immunological ALL type (60.46 % in infant ALL, while BII-ALL was notably less frequent compared with other age groups (30.23 %. Significant immunophenotypic differences were observed in patients with and without MLL gene rearrangements. Number of cases in those tumor cells expressed CD10, CD20, CD45, CD133, CD15, NG2 varied between MLL-positive and MLL-negative groups. CD10- and CD20-negativity, high CD45, CD15, CD65 and NG2 expression were immunophenotypic signatures of MLL-rearranged infant ALL, although NG2 had the highest diagnostic efficacy. High CD34 and CD65 expression was frequently associated with presence of MLL-AF4 fusion gene. Thus infants’ B-cell precursor ALL immunophenotype differs significantly due to the presence of MLL gene rearrangements. Diagnostic immunophenotyping of infants’ ALL allows predicting presence of MLL rearrangements and NG2 is the most applicable single marker.

  14. EFEKTIVITAS PEMBERIAN URIN KELINCI UNTUK MENGURANGI DOSIS PUPUK ANORGANIK PADA BUDIDAYA PUTREN JAGUNG MANIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintia Fitriasari

    2018-01-01

    Increased production of sweet corn corn (Zea mays L. var. Indurata should be balanced with sufficient nutrients during its growth. The study was conducted from January to March 2017 at the Experimental Garden of the Faculty of Agriculture, University of Muhammadiyah Jakarta. The experimental design used was the Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD with six treatments consisting of P0 (100% Inorganic fertilizer (Control; P1 (Rabbit urine 20 ml.l-1 of water + 50% inorganic fertilizer; P2 (Rabbit urine 25 ml.l-1of water + 50% inorganic fertilizer; P4 (Rabit urine 35 ml.l-1of water + 50% inorganic fertilizer; and P5 (Rabbit urine 40 ml.l-1of water + 50% inorganic fertilizer. Each treatment was repeated 4 times so that there were 24 experimental units, each units consists of 3 plants. The result, utilization of rabbit urine 25 ml.l-1of water + 50% inorganic fertilizer gives the highest value of plant height, leaf and widest leaf area. Utilization of rabbit urine 40 ml.l-1 of water + 50% inorganic fertilizer gives the fastest of flowering age of males and females. Utilization of rabbit urine 30 ml.l-1 of water + 50% inorganic fertilizer gives haighest value of total, length, diameter and the weight of cobs.

  15. MicroRNA-205 downregulates mixed-lineage-AF4 oncogene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dou L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Liping Dou,1,* Jingxin Li,1,* Dehua Zheng,2,* Yonghui Li,1 Xiaoning Gao,1 Chengwang Xu,1 Li Gao,1 Lili Wang,1 Li Yu1 1Department of Hematology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Myeloid/lymphoid or mixed-lineage AF4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MLL-AF4 ALL is a pediatric leukemia that occurs rarely in adults. MLL-AF4 ALL is typically characterized by the presence of chromosomal translocation (t(4;11(q21;q23, leading to expression of MLL-AF4 fusion protein. Although MLL-AF4 fusion protein triggers a molecular pathogenesis and hematological presentations that are unique to leukemias, the precise role of this oncogene in leukemogenesis remains unclear. Previous studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRs might modulate the expression of MLL-AF4 ALL fusion protein, thereby suggesting the involvement of miR in progression or suppression of MLL-AF4 ALL. We have previously demonstrated that miR-205 negatively regulates transcription of an MLL-AF4 luciferase reporter. Here, we report that exogenous expression of miR-205 in MLL-AF4 human cell lines (RS4;11 and MV4-11 inversely regulates the expression of MLL-AF4 at both messenger RNA (mRNA and protein level. Furthermore, miR-205 significantly induced apoptosis in MLL-AF4 cells as evidenced by Annexin V staining using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis. The proliferative capacity of leukemic cells was suppressed by miR-205. The addition of an miR-205 inhibitor was able to restore the observed effects. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that miR-205 may have potential value as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of MLL-AF4 ALL.Keywords: miR-205, MLL-AF4, leukemia, microRNA, oncogene expression, untranslated regions, proliferation

  16. Focusing performance of a multilayer Laue lens with layer placement error described by dynamical diffraction theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingfei; Chang, Guangcai; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Liang

    2015-07-01

    The multilayer Laue lens (MLL) is essentially a linear zone plate with large aspect ratio, which can theoretically focus hard X-rays to well below 1 nm with high efficiency when ideal structures are used. However, the focusing performance of a MLL depends heavily on the quality of the layers, especially the layer placement error which always exists in real MLLs. Here, a dynamical modeling approach, based on the coupled wave theory, is proposed to study the focusing performance of a MLL with layer placement error. The result of simulation shows that this method can be applied to various forms of layer placement error.

  17. Clinical implications of genomic alterations in the tumour and circulation of pancreatic cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sausen, Mark; Phallen, Jillian; Adleff, Vilmos

    2015-01-01

    tumour-specific mutations in the circulation of these patients. These analyses reveal somatic mutations in chromatin-regulating genes MLL, MLL2, MLL3 and ARID1A in 20% of patients that are associated with improved survival. We observe alterations in genes with potential therapeutic utility in over...... a third of cases. Liquid biopsy analyses demonstrate that 43% of patients with localized disease have detectable circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) at diagnosis. Detection of ctDNA after resection predicts clinical relapse and poor outcome, with recurrence by ctDNA detected 6.5 months earlier than with CT...

  18. Lääne pensionärid suunavad ravimitööstust üle maailma / Violetta Riidas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Riidas, Violetta

    2008-01-01

    Ravimitootjate Liidu juhatuse esimees ja Glaxosmithkline Eesti juht Akshay Mody sõnul tahetakse arendada võimalikult häid ravimeid, kuid samas tuleb arvestada, et ollakse kasumit teeniv ettevõte, kes peab aktsionäridele raha tooma. Ravimiameti peadirektori asetäitja Alar Irs arvates on halb, et varem perefirmadena tegutsenud ettevõtted on muutunud rahvusvahelisteks kontsernideks, mis on orienteeritud eelkõige kasumlikkusele. Vt. samas: Ligi poole ravimiturust hõlmas Põhja-Ameerika; Violetta Riidas. Personaliseeritud ravi on veel kallis; Akshay Mody. Ravimiarendus sõltub baasteadusest

  19. Puugravüüriklotsid kõnelevad / Jüri Hain

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hain, Jüri, 1941-

    2007-01-01

    Näitus "Sajand eesti puugravüüri klotsidel Eesti Rahvusraamatukogu kollektsioonist" rahvusraamatukogus 15. I - 3. II. Näitusel on vanim klots aastast 1842, noorim 1941. aastast. Kunstnikest (Aleksander Otto Gern, Bogdan Gottlieb Friedrich Kally, August Daugell, Eduard Magnus Jakobson, Mart Pukits, Andres Kuusk, Anton Suurkask, Arkadio Laigo, Hando Mugasto, Eduard Järv, Paul Liivak, Salome Trei, Ott Kangilaski), töödest. Näitust täiendavad Eduard Wiiralti "Tüdruku pea" (1919) kaks linoollõikeplaati

  20. Värsse / Rudolf Rimmel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rimmel, Rudolf, 1937-2003

    2008-01-01

    Sisu: "Elan Eestis ja selge on see..." ; "Eesti Vabariigi ajaloo lisana..." ; "ma ütlen lause Eesti vabaduse hinnast..." ; "Õiglust ja kõlblust üksainuski sõõm..." ; "Euroopa Liit on rahvuste kalmistu..." ; "meie jalge alt müüakse maad...." ; "teab setu ja soomegi hõim..." ; "poliitikas ei ole Eestis diletante..." ; "Pean salmi looma ma..." ; "Kord tuleb aeg, kui mõtte kaotab seadus..." ; "äriideid - olen päri..." ; "vanapapi kallis eestiaegses kukrus..." ; "sul häbelikkust olgu kasvõi raas..." ; "Hea lahe Eesti Vabariik on lukuta...". Rudolf Rimmeli seniavaldamata luulet saatis Kesknädalale Malle Rimmel

  1. Aeg on Soome ja Rootsi töösturid kinni püüda / Taivo Paju, Kärt Blumberg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paju, Taivo, 1968-

    2008-01-01

    Ettevõtete edutegurite üle arutlevad Arengufondi juhatuse liige Heido Vitsur, Balti Uuringute Instituudi juhatuse esimees Marek Tiits, TTÜ mehhaanikateaduskonna professor Rein Küttner. Vt. samas: Ketlin Priilinn. Metsikult kallis küll, kuid seda väärt; Merike Teder. Uute seadmeteta oleksime kadunud (ilmunud ka Molodjozh Estonii : Biznes Sreda 16. apr. lk. 8); Taivo Paju. Pelmeenikuningas Ivan Zakotei (ilmunud ka Molodjozh Estonii : Biznes Sreda 30. apr. lk. 11); Poolteist kuud ja tehas töökorras

  2. Innovation in the management of lessons learned in an IT project with the adoption of social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Winter

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research explores the gap in the management of lessons learned (MLL in an Information Technology project (IT, validating a model (named Target with the support of a wiki platform in a medium-sized company in the IT industry. This model supports the following MLL processes: awareness, collection, verification, storage, dissemination and reuse. This study adopts the paradigm of the Design Science Research and the Technical Action Research method to instantiate the Target model in the implementation phase of an IT project. The theoretical contribution lies in the practical utility of an LL model, which was validated in the field promoting innovation in the MLL. The practical implications can be seen in the company's learning to introduce the MLL, improve design productivity, increase employee collaboration and better disseminate knowledge.

  3. Can a Morel-Lavallée lesion be misdiagnosed as a mass like lesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Kim, Jun Hyeok; Kim, Ji Young; Han, Hyun Ho

    2017-12-01

    The Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) is a post-traumatic closed soft tissue degloving injury. Common complaints of MLL patients are a haematoma or fluid collection on the trunk or the lower extremity. However, the authors introduce unique cases of MLL that present an atypical appearance. The fluid collection was not apparent, and the capsule formation was not detected on preoperative image study. The main complaint of patients was the uncomfortable mass-like lesion that was regarded as a simple benign lump. The purpose of this case study is to introduce the atypical cases of MLL and to help other physicians make accurate diagnosis based on trial and error of our cases. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Bonded Multilayer Laue Lens for focusing hard X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chian; Conley, R.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C.M.; Macrander, A.T.; Maser, J.; Kang, H.C.; Yan, H.; Stephenson, G.B.

    2007-01-01

    We have fabricated partial Multilayer Laue Lens (MLL) linear zone plate structures with thousands of alternating WSi 2 and Si layers and various outermost zone widths according to the Fresnel zone plate formula. Using partial MLL structures, we were able to focus hard X-rays to line foci with a width of 30 nm and below. Here, we describe challenges and approaches used to bond these multilayers to achieve line and point focusing. Bonding was done by coating two multilayers with AuSn and heating in a vacuum oven at 280-300 o C. X-ray reflectivity measurements confirmed that there was no change in the multilayers after heating to 350 o C. A bonded MLL was polished to a 5-25 μm wedge without cracking. SEM image analyses found well-positioned multilayers after bonding. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a bonded full MLL for focusing hard X-rays

  5. Characterization of a multilayer Laue lens with imperfections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, H.; Kang, H.C.; Maser, J.; Macrander, A.T.; Kewish, C.M.; Liu, C.; Conley, R.; Stephenson, G.B.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simulation result of the focusing performance of a multilayer Laue lens (MLL) with imperfections. Imperfections we have studied correspond to deviations of sequence of layers in the fabricated structure from the zone plate law. The actual sequence of layers of the MLL is measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and fitted by second order polynomials. X-ray characterization of the MLL structures is performed using coherent X-rays at the Advanced Photon Source. We observe very good agreement between experiment and simulation. This demonstrates that our simulation method can serve as an efficient tool to characterize the focusing performance of MLLs with imperfections, and thereby allows us to provide feedback following deposition and fabrication of the MLL structures and optimization of focusing structures prior to X-ray characterization

  6. (Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet) chez le bananier plantain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    31 mars 2014 ... gratissimum and sprayed sprayed in a mixture with banole oil at 5 ml/l. The application of ..... Cymbopogon citratus à inhiber la croissance des appressoria de ... American Perfumer & Essential Oil Review,. 1928, 467-503.

  7. Focusing of hard x-rays to 16 nanometers with a multilayer Laue lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyon Chol; Yan Hanfei; Winarski, Robert P.; Holt, Martin V.; Maser, Joerg; Liu Chian; Conley, Ray; Vogt, Stefan; Macrander, Albert T.; Stephenson, G. Brian

    2008-01-01

    We report improved results for hard x-ray focusing using a multilayer Laue lens (MLL). We have measured a line focus of 16 nm width with an efficiency of 31% at a wavelength λ=0.064 nm (19.5 keV) using a partial MLL structure with an outermost zone width of 5 nm. The results are in good agreement with the theoretically predicted performance

  8. Use of Sodium Hypochlorite for the Control of Bakanae Disease in Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Bum Shin; Jaeduk Goh; Bong Choon Lee; In Jeong Kang; Hang-Won Kang

    2014-01-01

    For application of sodium hypochlorite as a seed disinfectant to the control of bakanae disease caused by Gibberella fujikuroi in rice, we investigated the effects of sodium hypochlorite for antifungal activity, eliminating fungus from seeds and reducing disease occurrence in vitro and greenhouse. The viability of the pathogen was significantly reduced at 80 ml/l concentration of sodium hypochlorite, and the pathogens did not grow at over 100 ml/l concentration of sodium hypochlor...

  9. Multilayer Laue Lens: A Path Toward One Nanometer X-Ray Focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, H.; Stephenson, G.B.; Maser, J.; Yan, H.; Conley, R.; Kang, H.C.; Stephenson, G.B.; Kang, H.C.; Maser, J.; Conley, R.; Liu, Ch.; Macrander, A.T.

    2010-01-01

    The multilayer Laue lens (MLL) is a novel diffractive optic for hard X-ray nano focusing, which is fabricated by thin film deposition techniques and takes advantage of the dynamical diffraction effect to achieve a high numerical aperture and efficiency. It overcomes two difficulties encountered in diffractive optics fabrication for focusing hard X-rays: (1) small outmost zone width and (2) high aspect ratio. Here, we will give a review on types, modeling approaches, properties, fabrication, and characterization methods of MLL optics. We show that a full-wave dynamical diffraction theory has been developed to describe the dynamical diffraction property of the MLL and has been employed to design the optimal shapes for nano focusing. We also show a 16 nm line focus obtained by a partial MLL and several characterization methods. Experimental results show a good agreement with the theoretical calculations. With the continuing development of MLL optics, we believe that an MLL-based hard x-ray microscope with true nanometer resolution is on the horizon

  10. Effect of Post-Harvest Acetic Acid and Plant Essential Oils on Shelf-Life Extension of Tomato Fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, E.A.; Naweto, M.; Mostafa, M.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro effect of different concentrations of acetic acid on linear growth of Alternaria alternate was studied. The causal agent of tomato black rots in contact and fumigation showed that acetic acid inhibit A. alternata growth at 2 ml/L and on 0.8 ml/L in contact and fumigation, respectively. In vivo effect showed that acetic acid at 6 ml/L reduced severity of infection of tomato fruits from 53.5% to 4.8% after 3 weeks of storage in dipping method but at the strongest fumigation methods, acetic acid inhibit tomato fruits rot at 0.4 ml/L after 3 weeks of storage. In vitro effect of camphore (Eucalyptus globulus Labill), caraway (Carium carvum L.) and peppermint oil (Mentha piperita L.) at different concentrations were tested against Alternaria alternata, since caraway oil is the strongest oil effect on fungal growth followed by peppermint and camphore respectively. Similarly in in vivo caraway oil inhibit tomato fruits rots at 6 ml/L followed by peppermint that inhibited tomato rots at 8 ml / L but camphore reduced tomato rots at 8 ml/L from 40% to 8.1%. Accepted April 2013

  11. Guanicid and PHMG Toxicity Tests on Aquatic Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Poštulková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and development of new algicidal products is caused by the ever increasing popularity of garden ponds as well as the use of these products in the fisheries sector, especially for disposal of cyanobacteria and algae. Most frequent means of combating cyanobacteria and algae are applications of algicidal substances. Newly developed algaecides include Guanicid and polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMG. The aim of the study was to identify toxic effects of Guanicid and PHMG on zebrafish (Danio rerio and green algae (Desmodesmus communis. We determined the acute toxicity in fish according to ČSN EN ISO 7346-1, and conducted the freshwater algae growth inhibition test according to ČSN ISO 8692 methodology. For inhibition tests with green algae we chose Guanicid and PHMG concentrations of 0.001, 0.005, and 0.010 ml/L. For fish short-term acute toxicity tests we chose Guanicid concentrations of 0.010, 0.050, 0.150, 0.200, 0.250, and 0.300 ml/L and PHMG concentrations of 0.010, 0.025, 0.050, 0.075, 0.100, and 0.125 ml/L. In case of zebrafish (Danio rerio, the LC50 value for Guanicid is 0.086 ml/L, while the LC50 value for PHMG is 0.043 ml/L. Effects of Guanicid on inhibition of green algae (Desmodesmus communis appear highly significant (p < 0.010 at a concentration of 0.010 ml/L. For PHMG, these effects are highly significant (p < 0.001 at concentrations of 0.005 and 0.010 ml/L in 48 hours.

  12. Evolution of AF6-RAS association and its implications in mixed-lineage leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Ottoni, Elizabeth; Ishiyama, Noboru; Goudreault, Marilyn; Haman, André; Meyer, Claus; Tucholska, Monika; Gasmi-Seabrook, Genevieve; Menezes, Serena; Laister, Rob C.; Minden, Mark D.; Marschalek, Rolf; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Hoang, Trang; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2017-10-23

    Elucidation of activation mechanisms governing protein fusions is essential for therapeutic development. MLL undergoes rearrangement with numerous partners, including a recurrent translocation fusing the epigenetic regulator to a cytoplasmic RAS effector, AF6/afadin. We show here that AF6 employs a non-canonical, evolutionarily conserved α-helix to bind RAS, unique to AF6 and the classical RASSF effectors. Further, all patients with MLL-AF6 translocations express fusion proteins missing only this helix from AF6, resulting in exposure of hydrophobic residues that induce dimerization. We provide evidence that oligomerization is the dominant mechanism driving oncogenesis from rare MLL translocation partners and employ our mechanistic understanding of MLL-AF6 to examine how dimers induce leukemia. Proteomic data resolve association of dimerized MLL with gene expression modulators, and inhibiting dimerization disrupts formation of these complexes while completely abrogating leukemogenesis in mice. Oncogenic gene translocations are thus selected under pressure from protein structure/function, underscoring the complex nature of chromosomal rearrangements.

  13. Trithorax dependent changes in chromatin landscape at enhancer and promoter regions drive female puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Carlos A; Wright, Hollis; Aylwin, Carlos F; Ojeda, Sergio R; Lomniczi, Alejandro

    2018-01-04

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins control the timing of puberty by repressing the Kiss1 gene in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Here we identify two members of the Trithorax group (TrxG) of modifiers, mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1), and 3 (MLL3), as central components of an activating epigenetic machinery that dynamically counteracts PcG repression. Preceding puberty, MLL1 changes the chromatin configuration at the promoters of Kiss1 and Tac3, two genes required for puberty to occur, from repressive to permissive. Concomitantly, MLL3 institutes a chromatin structure that changes the functional status of a Kiss1 enhancer from poised to active. RNAi-mediated, ARC-specific Mll1 knockdown reduced Kiss1 and Tac3 expression, whereas CRISPR-Cas9-directed epigenome silencing of the Kiss1 enhancer selectively reduced Kiss1 activity. Both interventions delay puberty and disrupt reproductive cyclicity. Our results demonstrate that an epigenetic switch from transcriptional repression to activation is crucial to the regulatory mechanism controlling the timing of mammalian puberty.

  14. Development of a biochip-based assay integrated in a global strategy for identification of fusion transcripts in acute myeloid leukemia: a work flow for acute myeloid leukemia diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusiano, S; Formisano-Tréziny, C; Benziane, A; Maroc, N; Picard, C; Hermitte, F; Taranger-Charpin, C; Gabert, J

    2010-08-01

    Three major types of rearrangements are involved in acute myeloid leukemias (AML): t(8;21)(q22;q22), inv(16)(p13q22), and 11q23/MLL abnormalities. Their precise identification becomes essential for diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic choices. Resulting fusion transcripts (FT) are also powerful markers for monitoring the efficacy of treatment, the minimal residual disease (MRD) and could become therapeutic targets. Today, the challenge is to propose an individual follow-up for each patient even for those with a rare fusion event. In this study, we propose a biochip-based assay integrated in a global strategy for identification of rare FT in AML, after fluorescence in situ hybridization detection, as described by the World Health Organization classification. Using cell lines, we developed and validated a biochip-based assay called the AMLFusionChip that identifies every FT of AML1-ETO, CBFbeta-MYH11 as well as MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, MLL-AF6, and MLL-AF10. The original design of our AMLFusionChip.v01 enables the identification of these FT wherever the breakpoint on the partner gene may be. In case of biochip negative result, our 3'RACE amplification strategy enables to clone and then sequence the new translocation partner. This AMLFusionChip strategy fits into the concept of personalized medicine for the largest number of patients.

  15. Morel-Lavallée Lesion of the Knee in a Recreational Frisbee Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Shmerling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic swelling/effusion in the knee region is a relatively common presenting complaint among athletes and nonathletes. Due to its broad differential diagnosis, a comprehensive evaluation beginning with history and physical examination are recommended. Knee joint effusion can be differentiated from other types of swelling by careful physical examination. Imaging, including plain radiography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, is preferred modality. Aspiration of a local fluctuating mass may help with the diagnosis and management of some of these conditions. We present a case of a 26-year-old gentleman with superomedial Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL of the knee with history of a fall during a Frisbee game. His MLL was successfully treated with therapeutic aspiration and compression wrap without further sequelae. MLL is a rare condition consisting of a closed degloving injury caused by pressure and shear stress between the subcutaneous tissue and the superficial fascia or bone. Most commonly, MLL is found over the greater trochanter and sacrum but in rare cases can occur in other regions of the body. In most cases, concurrent severe injury mechanisms and concomitant fractures are present. MLL due to sports injuries are very rare. Therapeutic strategies may vary from compression wraps and aspiration to surgical evacuation.

  16. Effectiveness of ambon banana stem juice as immunostimulatory against Aeromonas hydrophila infections in catfish Clarias gariepinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qorie Astria

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Outbreaks of infectious diseases due to Aeromonas hydrophila in catfish can cause high death rates (80–100%. Fish disease control can be done using phytopharmaceutical to prevent or treat diseases of fish. One of the phytopharmaceutical that known to prevent the fish diseases is ambon banana stem Musa cavendishii var. dwarf Paxton. This study was conducted to test the effectiveness of catfish immersion using banana stem juice as an immunostimulant against bacterial infections A. hydrophila. The observed parameters were a total performance of production, hematological test, and water quality. Immersion of catfish seeds with stem juice was performed at a concentration of 5 mL/L, 13 mL/L, and 21 mL/L for 30 minutes. Each treatment consisted of three replications. A  total of 15 fishes were immersed in 1.5 L water. At day-9 after immersion, fish was infected by A. hydrophila bacteria at a dose of 104 cfu/mL. The results showed that fish treated with banana stem juice at a concentration of 13 mL/L had the survival rate of 53.33±6.67% which is higher than positive control (33.33±6.67%. Based on hematology observations on the 3rd day post-challenge test (H12 with A. hydrophila, total erythrocytes, hemoglobin, total leukocytes, phagocytic activity, differential leukocyte, and lysozyme activity was highest in treatment13 mL/L. Lower feed conversion ratio (1.08±0.04 were also obtained in treatment 13 mL/L. Thus Immersion of seeds in stem juice can boost the immune system against infections A. hydrophila. Keywords: Aeromonas hydrophila, ambon banana stem juice, soaking, catfish, immune system  ABSTRAK Wabah penyakit akibat infeksi Aeromonas hydrophila pada ikan lele dapat menyebabkan tingkat kematian yang tinggi (80–100%. Penanggulangan penyakit ikan dapat dilakukan menggunakan fitofarmaka untuk mencegah ataupun mengobati penyakit ikan. Salah satu fitofarmaka yang dapat digunakan dalam upaya pencegahan penyakit ikan adalah batang

  17. Lumbar Morel-Lavallée lesion: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zairi, F; Wang, Z; Shedid, D; Boubez, G; Sunna, T

    2016-06-01

    The Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) is a rarely reported closed degloving injury, in which shearing forces have lead to break off subcutaneous tissues from the underlying fascia. Lumbar MLL have been rarely reported to date, explaining that patients are frequently misdiagnosed. While patients could be treated conservatively or with non-invasive procedures, delayed diagnosis may require open surgery for its cure. Indeed, untreated lesions can cause pain, infection or growing subcutaneous mass that can be confused with a soft tissue tumor. We report the clinical and radiological features of a 45-year old man with voluminous lumbar MLL initially misdiagnosed. We also reviewed the relevant English literature to summarize the diagnostic tools and the main therapeutic options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanometer Linear Focusing of Hard X Rays by a Multilayer Laue Lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H.C.; Stephenson, G.B.; Maser, J.; Liu, C.; Conley, R.; Macrander, A.T.; Vogt, S.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a type of linear zone plate for nanometer-scale focusing of hard x rays, a multilayer Laue lens (MLL), produced by sectioning a multilayer and illuminating it in Laue diffraction geometry. Because of its large optical depth, a MLL spans the diffraction regimes applicable to a thin Fresnel zone plate and a crystal. Coupled wave theory calculations indicate that focusing to 5 nm or smaller with high efficiency should be possible. Partial MLL structures with outermost zone widths as small as 10 nm have been fabricated and tested with 19.5 keV synchrotron radiation. Focal sizes as small as 30 nm with efficiencies up to 44% are measured

  19. Estandarización de un medio de cultivo a partir de fuentes agroindustriales para la multiplicación de Azospirillum brasilense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Rivera

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Plackett-Burman statistical design was initially applied for Screening the most important nutritional variables (four carbon sources, two nitrogen sources, K2 HPO4 y MgSO4 and a trace elements solution affecting microorganism biomass production. Subsequently, a optimising the process by applied a BoxBehnken design for the most important factors tree. The results showed that biomass (UFC/mL production was strongly affected by nutritional and physico conditions of culture medium. The highest yield was obtained in the following conditions: 3g/L sucrose, 6,75 mL/L molasses, 0,77 mL/L glycerol, 14,42 mL/L soybean hydrolyzate, 0,848 g/L yeast hidrolyzate, 0,25 g/L K2 HPO4 , ⅗ aeration and shaking at 120 rpm 26 hours total fermentation time during which 1 x 109 UFC/mL were obtained.

  20. Biochemical reconstitution and phylogenetic comparison of human SET1 family core complexes involved in histone methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Monteith, Kelsey E; Viggiano, Susan; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2015-03-06

    Mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases that are required for metazoan development. MLL1 is the best characterized human SET1 family member, which includes MLL1-4 and SETd1A/B. MLL1 assembles with WDR5, RBBP5, ASH2L, DPY-30 (WRAD) to form the MLL1 core complex, which is required for H3K4 dimethylation and transcriptional activation. Because all SET1 family proteins interact with WRAD in vivo, it is hypothesized they are regulated by similar mechanisms. However, recent evidence suggests differences among family members that may reflect unique regulatory inputs in the cell. Missing is an understanding of the intrinsic enzymatic activities of different SET1 family complexes under standard conditions. In this investigation, we reconstituted each human SET1 family core complex and compared subunit assembly and enzymatic activities. We found that in the absence of WRAD, all but one SET domain catalyzes at least weak H3K4 monomethylation. In the presence of WRAD, all SET1 family members showed stimulated monomethyltransferase activity but differed in their di- and trimethylation activities. We found that these differences are correlated with evolutionary lineage, suggesting these enzyme complexes have evolved to accomplish unique tasks within metazoan genomes. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we employed a "phylogenetic scanning mutagenesis" assay and identified a cluster of amino acid substitutions that confer a WRAD-dependent gain-of-function dimethylation activity on complexes assembled with the MLL3 or Drosophila trithorax proteins. These results form the basis for understanding how WRAD differentially regulates SET1 family complexes in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Imunisasi Ikan Jambal Siam dengan Vaksin Ichthyophthirius multifiliis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henni Syawal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment on the immunization of Jambal Siam ( Pangasius hypophthalmus withIchthyophthirius multifiliis vaccine was conducted in the Laboratorium of Parasitic and Fish Diseases,Faculty Fisheries and Marine Science of Riau University, and Laboratorium of Fish Health of FacultyFisheries and Marine Science, IPB. The objective of the study was to enhance immune system of the fishfry on the ichthyophthiriasis diseases. The vaccine was prepared by prolonged treatment of theron in waterbath of 47°C for 30 minutes. The vaccine was administrated to fish by immersion in aquaria. A completelyrandomized design (CRD in factorial pattern (3 X 3 X 3 was carried out with dose and time as factors.Doses of treatment and time of immersion were of 1 ml/L, 2 ml/L and 3 ml/L as well as 15, 30 and 45minutes of treatment time respectively. To evaluate the effectiveness of vaccine in fish, a challenge test tofish was done at day 15 with theron 90.000 cell/ aquaria until rearing day 25 after vaccination. It revealedthat the best performance (p<0.5 were of dose 3 ml/L and time treatment of 15 minutes in that survivalrate of fish was 100% followed by dose 3 ml/L with time 45 minutes (63,3%. The total erythrocyte count,hematocrit level and hemoglobin of tested fish were fluctuated. The water quality were recorded including;dissolved oxygen range from 3,74 - 4,98 ppm; temperature 25 - 30°C and acidity of 4 - 6, quality were ofnormal range for fish. The optimal vaccine dose is 3 ml/l with 15 minute immersion.

  2. Morel-Lavallee lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Fangjie; Lei, Guanghua

    2014-01-01

    To review current knowledge of the Morel-Lavallee lesion (MLL) to help clinicians become familiar with this entity. Familiarization may decrease missed diagnoses and misdiagnoses. It could also help steer the clinician to the proper treatment choice. A search was performed via PubMed and EMBASE from 1966 to July 2013 using the following keywords: Morel-Lavallee lesion, closed degloving injury, concealed degloving injury, Morel-Lavallee effusion, Morel-Lavallee hematoma, posttraumatic pseudocyst, posttraumatic soft tissue cyst. Chinese and English language literatures relevant to the subject were collected. Their references were also reviewed. Morel-Lavallee lesion is a relatively rare condition involving a closed degloving injury. It is characterized by a filled cystic cavity created by separation of the subcutaneous tissue from the underlying fascia. Apart from the classic location over the region of the greater trochanter, MLLs have been described in other parts of the body. The natural history of MLL has not yet been established. The lesion may decrease in volume, remain stable, enlarge progressively or show a recurrent pattern. Diagnosis of MLL was often missed or delayed. Ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging have great value in the diagnosis of MLL. Treatment of MLL has included compression, local aspiration, open debridement, and sclerodesis. No standard treatment has been established. A diagnosis of MLL should be suspected when a soft, fluctuant area of skin or chronic recurrent fluid collection is found in a region exposed to a previous shear injury. Clinicians and radiologists should be aware of both the acute and chronic appearances to make the correct diagnosis. Treatment decisions should base on association with fractures, the condition of the lesion, symptom and desire of the patient.

  3. "Ma vannun tema niuete kui paleuse nimel ..." : [luuletused] / tlk. Andres Ehin, tlk. Ly Seppel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Sisu: "Ma vannun tema niuete kui paleuse nimel ..." ; "Ta on nagu kuu, kelle kuma kõik kummuli kukutab ..." ; "Kuu südaöösel ennustab me jäävat lahkujääma ..." ; "Ei hinda naisterahvas kasinuse mulli ..." ; "Ta nõtket kaela kutsun ligemale ..." ; "Meid ühte heitma tõmbab armuköis ..." ; "Meil kahel pole mõtet lahku minna ..." ; "Ei kuuga saa võrrelda sind, sest et kuu läheb looja ..." ; "Allah ise su ilude hoob on ja kang ..." ; "Kui meesterahvale läeb korda meesterahvas ..." ; "Ja kuis ka kiremöll tal südames ei hulla ..." ; "Teie jaoks ei ole minu võlurohke kallike ..." ; "Oli see vast poisike, nägu ilu täis ..." ; "Aeg tagasi kalli las toob, et mind suisa salvata ...". Tundmatute autorite kirjutatud luuletused jutukogust "1001 ööd" (9. - 10. saj)

  4. "Iz bõli i krassok vozniknut novõje babotshki..." : [luuletused] / Jaan Kaplinski ; tlk. Svetlan Semenenko,

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaplinski, Jaan, 1941-

    1999-01-01

    Sisu: "Iz põli i krassok vozniknut novõje babotshki..." ; "Vertsingetorig skazal: Tsesar, tõ mozhesh..." ; "Tesnõm tõ stalo vremja..." ; "Daite mne vremeni vremeni..." ; "Lozh dorogo stoit lozh deshevo stoit..." ; "A ja hotshu vozduhhom bõt..." ; "Poetõ pust pishut stihhi a ja letutshaja..." ; "Net ni proshlogo ni budushtshego ni nastojashtshego..." ; "Legko trudnõm bõt..." ; "Ona pojot i ja govorju...". Orig.: "Tolmust ja värvidest saavad uued liblikad aga meid..." ; "Vercingetorix ütles: Caesar, sa võid..." ; "Ahtaks oled sa jäänud kaasaeg..." ; Andke mulle aega aega ; "Vale on kallis, vale on odav..." ; "Aga mina tahan õhk olla..." ; "Luuletajad luuletavad, mina olen kala kes tõuseb lendu..." ; "Ei ole minevikku tulevikku ega olevikku..." ; "Kerge on raske olla..." ; "Ta laulab ja mina räägin..."

  5. Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis var israelinsis (Bti) on Culex and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dosage that can be used to control Culex mosquito larvae in Zomba after ... exposed to the same dosage of liquid formulation of Bti (0.001ml/L) there ... The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Bti on mosquito ...... In short Bti whether liquid or granular is very important as it significantly reduces the densities of ...

  6. Blocking the Metastatic Phenotype in Prostate Cancer Through Direct Inhibition of the ETV/PEA3 Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    38381 showing no inhibition against another coactivator motif, CBP KIX, and two of its binding partners, MLL and the phosphorylated KID domain of CREB...Inventions, patent applications, and/or licenses None noted Other products None noted 7) PARTICIPANTS AND OTHER COLLABORATING ORGANIZATIONS

  7. CTD and Bottle Data from Leg 1: 20 December 1986 - 18 January 1987. Leg 2: 17 July - 15 August 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    tabular data includes pressure, temperature, salinity, oxygen in ml/l and in micro -moles per kilogram, oxygen percent saturation, potential...I f T I T 7 1 1- - -1[ 1 1 1 1 I I IO- -r- Distribution List ARGENTINA FRANCE Alberto Piola Dr. Michele Fieux Armada Argentina, Servicio de

  8. 150 ACUTE TOXICITY OF GLYPHOSATE ON CLARIAS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of glyphosate on mortality rate and behavioural responses of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings were investigated under laboratory conditions for 96 hours exposure period. The lethal concentration (LC50) value of glyphosate on fingerlings of Clarias gariepinus was 0.0018 ml/l for 96 hours of exposure.

  9. Dysregulation of the DNA Damage Response and KMT2A Rearrangement in Fetal Liver Hematopoietic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Nanya

    Full Text Available Etoposide, a topoisomerase 2 (TOP2 inhibitor, is associated with the development of KMT2A (MLL-rearranged infant leukemia. An epidemiological study suggested that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors may be involved in generation of KMT2A (MLL rearrangement. The present study examined the mechanism underlying the development of KMT2A (MLL-rearranged infant leukemia in response to in utero exposure to etoposide in a mouse model. Fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells were more susceptible to etoposide than maternal bone marrow mononuclear cells. Etoposide-induced Kmt2a breakage was detected in fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells using a newly developed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. Assessment of etoposide-induced chromosomal translocation by next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq identified several chimeric fusion messenger RNAs that were generated by etoposide treatment. However, Kmt2a (Mll-rearranged fusion mRNA was detected in Atm-knockout mice, which are defective in the DNA damage response, but not in wild-type mice. The present findings suggest that in utero exposure to TOP2 inhibitors induces Kmt2a rearrangement when the DNA damage response is defective.

  10. Immunophenotypic investigation of infant acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Popov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study – characterization of immunophenotype in infant acute myeloid leukemia (AML. 90 patients (40 boys and 50 girls with acute leukemia (AL aged up to 365 days were included in the current study. AML was found more frequently in infants than in older children (26.67 % and 10.83 % respectively; p = 0.0002. Significant immunophenotypic differences were observed in patients with and without MLL gene rearrangements. Number of cases in those tumor cells expressed CD99, CD61, CD133, CD15, NG2 varied between MLL-positive and MLL-negative groups. CD61-negativity, high CD99, CD15, CD133 and NG2 expression were immunophenotypic signatures of MLLrearranged infant AML, although CD99 and NG2 had the highest diagnostic efficacy. Thus infants’ AML immunophenotype differs significantly due to the presence of MLL gene rearrangements. Diagnostic immunophenotyping of infants’ AML allows predicting presence of MLL rearrangements by either CD99 or NG2 expression.

  11. Immunophenotypic investigation of infant acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Popov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study – characterization of immunophenotype in infant acute myeloid leukemia (AML. 90 patients (40 boys and 50 girls with acute leukemia (AL aged up to 365 days were included in the current study. AML was found more frequently in infants than in older children (26.67 % and 10.83 % respectively; p = 0.0002. Significant immunophenotypic differences were observed in patients with and without MLL gene rearrangements. Number of cases in those tumor cells expressed CD99, CD61, CD133, CD15, NG2 varied between MLL-positive and MLL-negative groups. CD61-negativity, high CD99, CD15, CD133 and NG2 expression were immunophenotypic signatures of MLLrearranged infant AML, although CD99 and NG2 had the highest diagnostic efficacy. Thus infants’ AML immunophenotype differs significantly due to the presence of MLL gene rearrangements. Diagnostic immunophenotyping of infants’ AML allows predicting presence of MLL rearrangements by either CD99 or NG2 expression.

  12. Author template for journal articles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SONY

    2013-02-06

    Feb 6, 2013 ... MS basal medium (pH 5.7) with 1 mg/L NAA, 100 ml/L coconut water, 30 g/L sucrose, 30 g/L ... One approach to overcoming these problems is to ... an in vitro propagation technique for 'Virupakshi' through ... Data analysis.

  13. Regioisomers of octanoic acid-containing structured triacylglycerols analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry using ammonia negative ion chemical ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurvinen, J.P.; Mu, Huiling; Kallio, H.

    2001-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry based on ammonia negative ion chemical ionization and sample introduction via direct exposure probe was applied to analysis of regioisomeric structures of octanoic acid containing structured triacylglycerols (TAG) of type MML, MLM, MLL, and LML (M, medium-chain fatty acid...

  14. Response of rat prostate and lung tumors to ionizing radiation combined with the angiogenesis inhibitor AMCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kal, H.B. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands); Struikmans, H. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Medical Centre Haaglanden, Westeinde Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands); Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Voest, E.E. [Dept. of Medical Oncology, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-12-01

    Aim: to determine whether radiation combined with Trans-4-AminoMethyl cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCA, or tranexamic acid, Cyklokapron registered) results in a better tumor response than radiation alone. Materials and methods: we evaluated the responses of the L44 lung tumor in BN rats and R3327-MATLyLu (MLL) prostate tumor in Copenhagen rats, to single and fractionated X-ray doses with and without AMCA (1.5 g/kg). Tumors were grown subcutaneously in the flank of the animal. AMCA was administered subcutaneously twice daily for at least 2 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated according to excess growth delay and specific growth delay. Results: L44 and MLL tumors treated with AMCA only experienced a non-significant growth delay. L44 tumors treated with 4 daily dose fractions of 2.5 Gy had a significant excess and specific growth delay when treated with AMCA, the enhancement ratio was 1.6-1.7. The enhancement ratio based on the calculated excess biologically effective dose of the linear-quadratic concept was 1.4-1.5. MLL tumors treated with a single dose of 20 Gy and AMCA had no significant excess growth delay. Conclusion: the enhancement ratio of 1.4-1.7 for the L44 tumor, but not for the MLL tumor, due to AMCA treatment, indicates that AMCA may potentiate the anti-tumor effect of ionizing radiation in distinct tumor types. (orig.)

  15. Response of rat prostate and lung tumors to ionizing radiation combined with the angiogenesis inhibitor AMCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Struikmans, H.; Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Voest, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: to determine whether radiation combined with Trans-4-AminoMethyl cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCA, or tranexamic acid, Cyklokapron registered) results in a better tumor response than radiation alone. Materials and methods: we evaluated the responses of the L44 lung tumor in BN rats and R3327-MATLyLu (MLL) prostate tumor in Copenhagen rats, to single and fractionated X-ray doses with and without AMCA (1.5 g/kg). Tumors were grown subcutaneously in the flank of the animal. AMCA was administered subcutaneously twice daily for at least 2 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated according to excess growth delay and specific growth delay. Results: L44 and MLL tumors treated with AMCA only experienced a non-significant growth delay. L44 tumors treated with 4 daily dose fractions of 2.5 Gy had a significant excess and specific growth delay when treated with AMCA, the enhancement ratio was 1.6-1.7. The enhancement ratio based on the calculated excess biologically effective dose of the linear-quadratic concept was 1.4-1.5. MLL tumors treated with a single dose of 20 Gy and AMCA had no significant excess growth delay. Conclusion: the enhancement ratio of 1.4-1.7 for the L44 tumor, but not for the MLL tumor, due to AMCA treatment, indicates that AMCA may potentiate the anti-tumor effect of ionizing radiation in distinct tumor types. (orig.)

  16. Validated method for the detection and quantitation of synthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These methods were applied to postmortem cases from the Johannesburg Forensic Pathology Services Medicolegal Laboratory (FPS-MLL) to assess the prevalence of these synthetic cannabinoids amongst the local postmortem population. Urine samples were extracted utilizing a solid phase extraction (SPE) method, ...

  17. Substitusi Medium Sintetik dengan Pupuk Daun, Air Kelapa dan Ekstrak Nabati pada Subkultur Anggrek Cattleya pastoral Innocence secara In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etty Handayani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A research was perfomed to find the proper of coconut water and natural ekstracts combined with Hyponex medium that compared with Vacin & Went medium. This research has been done at Tissue Culture Laboratory, Agricultural Faculty, Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta. The method of this research was arranged in Randomized Complete Design with 9 treatments and 8 replications. The treatments were VW + NAA 0,5 ppm + BAP 3 ppm, green Hyponex 3 g/l, green Hyponex 3 g/l + bean sprouts 150 g/l, green Hyponex 3 g/l + tomatoes 150 ml/l, green Hyponex 3 g/l + avocado 150 g/l, red Hyponex 3 g/l, red Hyponex 3 g/l + bean sprouts 150 g/l, red Hyponex 3 g/l + tomatoes 150 ml/l, red Hyponex 3 g/l + avocado 150 g/l. The each of Hyponex mediums were given with bananas 150 g/l and coconut water 150 ml/l. The result of this research showed that Hyponex mediums combined with natural ekstract was not signicicantly with Vacin & Went medium to high and shoot growth. Red Hyponex medium 3 g/l combined bananas 150 g/l and coconut water 150 ml/l resulted the best high, leaf and shoot in tissue culture Cattleya pastoral innocence orchid.

  18. Effects of washed platelets vs platelet-rich plasma on the proliferation and mineralization of rat dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Xie, Y H; Lin, B R

    2015-08-14

    We examined the effects of washed platelets (WPLTs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the proliferation and mineralization of rat dental pulp cells. Rat dental pulp cells were separated, cultured, and identified. Medium containing 1, 10, 100, or 500 mL/L PRP or WPLTs was added to 4th generation cells. The MTS method was used to determine cell proliferation. Alizarin red staining was used to observe the formation of mineralized nodules after cell mineralization and induction for 10 and 20 days under different culture conditions, and the areas of the mineralized nodules formed 20 days after induction were computed. The addition of 1, 10, and 100 mL/L WPLTs or PRP significantly promoted rat dental pulp cell proliferation (P 0.05). Under the same concentrations, no significant differences on cell proliferation were observed between WPLT and PRP treatments (P > 0.05 in all groups). After 10 days mineralization and culture, the 100 and 500 mL/L WPLT and PRP group positive nodule rates were significantly higher than those of the low concentration and the control groups (P < 0.05). After 20 days, the areas of the mineralized nodules formed in the 100 and 500 mL/L WPLT and PRP groups were significantly larger than those in the control group (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that both WPLTs and PRP are equally able to significantly promote the proliferation and calcification of rat dental pulp cells under a certain range of concentrations.

  19. Karyotyping, FISH, and PCR in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: competing or complementary diagnostics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise; Mellink, Clemens; van der Schoot, Ellen; van den Berg, Henk

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromosomal abnormalities, such as t(9;22)(q34;q11) (ABL/BCR), t(12;21)(p13;q22) (TEL/AML1), and t(11q23) (MLL) are independent prognostic indicators in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia resulting in risk adapted therapy. Accurate and rapid detection of these abnormalities is

  20. Pulsed Power Bibliography. Volume 1. Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    4110 INSULATORS) »NO ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OP DIELECTRIC MllECTtIC tut» MIXTURE* MITM POL»« COMPONENTS 777J ON TNC «OLE Of TNI HMTMM DTKT IONISATION...SHIELDING TECHNMUES 21» PUISE-FORMHG NETWORKS U1TH TIME-VARYING OK NONLINEAR RESISTIVE LOADS «III MItM NHC« WITCH DEVELOPMENT PULIE POME

  1. The Long Non-coding RNA HOTTIP Enhances Pancreatic Cancer Cell Proliferation, Survival and Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACTHOTTIP is a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcribed from the 5' tip of the HOXA locus and is associated with the polycomb repressor complex 2 (PRC2) and WD repeat containing protein 5 (WDR5)/mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) chromatin modifying complexes. HOTTIP is expres...

  2. Morel-Lavallee Lesion in the Upper Extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Grant K; Hanna, Kathryn H

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Morel-Lavallee lesion (MLL) is a closed internal degloving injury that results from shearing of the skin and subcutaneous tissue from the underlying fascia. Disruption of the perforating blood vessels and lymphatics results in a lesion filled with serosanguinous fluid and necrotized fat. MLLs are most commonly described in association with pelvic and lower extremity trauma, and there are limited reports of these lesions in other locations. Methods: This case report describes a 58-year-old male referred from his primary care physician with a soft tissue mass in the upper arm. Careful history discovered prior trauma with extensive bruising and MRI revealed a large encapsulated mass consistent with MLL. Results: An open debridement with excision of pseudocapsule was performed. Meticulous closure over a drain was performed and the patient healed without complication or recurrence. Intra-operative cultures were negative and pathology was consistent with MLL. Conclusion: MLL should always be considered in the setting of previous trauma regardless the location. In the chronic setting an open approach with excision of pseudocapsule can have an acceptable result.

  3. A rare case of severe third degree friction burns and large Morel-Lavallee lesion of the abdominal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Darnell J; Lu, Kuo Jung G; Chang, Kristina; Levin, Jennifer; Schulz, John T; Goverman, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    Morel-Lavallee lesions (MLLs) are rare internal degloving injuries typically caused by blunt traumatic injuries and most commonly occur around the hips and in association with pelvic or acetabular fractures. MLL is often overlooked in the setting of poly-trauma; therefore, clinicians must maintain a high degree of suspicion and be familiar with the management of such injuries, especially in obese poly-trauma patients. We present a 30-year-old female pedestrian struck by a motor vehicle who sustained multiple long bone fractures, a mesenteric hematoma, and full-thickness abdominal skin friction burn which masked a significant underlying abdominal MLL. The internal degloving caused significant devascularization of the overlying soft tissue and skin which required surgical drainage of hematoma, abdominal wall reconstruction with tangential excision, allografting, negative pressure wound therapy, and ultimately autografting. MLL is a rare, often overlooked, internal degloving injury. Surgeons must maintain a high index of suspicion when dealing with third degree friction burns as they may mask underlying injuries such as MLL, and a delay in diagnosis can lead to increased morbidity.

  4. Field evaluation of non-synthetic insecticides for the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    /l and B.thurigiensis was applied at the rate 1.0 g/l of water. Actellic 25 EC, a synthetic insecticide, was applied at the rate of 2 ml/l as standard check. Arthropod fauna on okra were sampled using traps, sweep nets, aspirators and handpicking.

  5. Behavioral Changes Over Time Following Ayahuasca Exposure in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldi, Robson; Polari, Daniel; Pinheiro-da-Silva, Jaquelinne; Silva, Priscila F; Lobao-Soares, Bruno; Yonamine, Mauricio; Freire, Fulvio A M; Luchiari, Ana C

    2017-01-01

    The combined infusion of Banisteriopsis caapi stem and Psychotria viridis leaves, known as ayahuasca, has been used for centuries by indigenous tribes. The infusion is rich in N , N -dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, with properties similar to those of serotonin. Despite substantial progress in the development of new drugs to treat anxiety and depression, current treatments have several limitations. Alternative drugs, such as ayahuasca, may shed light on these disorders. Here, we present time-course behavioral changes induced by ayahuasca in zebrafish, as first step toward establishing an ideal concentration for pre-clinical evaluations. We exposed adult zebrafish to five concentrations of the ayahuasca infusion: 0 (control), 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 3 ml/L ( n = 14 each group), and behavior was recorded for 60 min. We evaluated swimming speed, distance traveled, freezing and bottom dwelling every min for 60 min. Swimming speed and distance traveled decreased with an increase in ayahuasca concentration while freezing increased with 1 and 3 ml/L. Bottom dwelling increased with 1 and 3 ml/L, but declined with 0.1 ml/L. Our data suggest that small amounts of ayahuasca do not affect locomotion and reduce anxiety-like behavior in zebrafish, while increased doses of the drug lead to crescent anxiogenic effects. We conclude that the temporal analysis of zebrafish behavior is a sensitive method for the study of ayahuasca-induced functional changes in the vertebrate brain.

  6. Dynamically coated capillaries improve the identification power of capillary zone electrophoresis for basic drugs in toxicological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, C.M; Jonkers, E.Z; Franke, J.P.; de Zeeuw, R.A; Ensing, K

    2001-01-01

    In systematic toxicological analysis (STA), analytical methods should have a high identification power. This can be suitably expressed by parameters such as mean list length (MLL) or discriminating power (DP). The reproducibility of a method has a great impact on its identification power, and should

  7. Multilevel Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness in Indian Technical Education: The Mediating Role of Communication, Power and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochhayat, Jyotiranjan; Giri, Vijai N.; Suar, Damodar

    2017-01-01

    This study provides a new conceptualization of educational leadership with a multilevel and integrative approach. It examines the impact of multilevel leadership (MLL) on the effectiveness of technical educational institutes through the mediating effects of organizational communication, bases of power and organizational culture. Data were…

  8. Behavioral Changes Over Time Following Ayahuasca Exposure in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Savoldi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The combined infusion of Banisteriopsis caapi stem and Psychotria viridis leaves, known as ayahuasca, has been used for centuries by indigenous tribes. The infusion is rich in N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT and monoamine oxidase inhibitors, with properties similar to those of serotonin. Despite substantial progress in the development of new drugs to treat anxiety and depression, current treatments have several limitations. Alternative drugs, such as ayahuasca, may shed light on these disorders. Here, we present time-course behavioral changes induced by ayahuasca in zebrafish, as first step toward establishing an ideal concentration for pre-clinical evaluations. We exposed adult zebrafish to five concentrations of the ayahuasca infusion: 0 (control, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 3 ml/L (n = 14 each group, and behavior was recorded for 60 min. We evaluated swimming speed, distance traveled, freezing and bottom dwelling every min for 60 min. Swimming speed and distance traveled decreased with an increase in ayahuasca concentration while freezing increased with 1 and 3 ml/L. Bottom dwelling increased with 1 and 3 ml/L, but declined with 0.1 ml/L. Our data suggest that small amounts of ayahuasca do not affect locomotion and reduce anxiety-like behavior in zebrafish, while increased doses of the drug lead to crescent anxiogenic effects. We conclude that the temporal analysis of zebrafish behavior is a sensitive method for the study of ayahuasca-induced functional changes in the vertebrate brain.

  9. ABALONE (HALIOTIS SQUAMATA ANESTHESIA WITH ETHANOL ON GRADING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanni N.A.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An abalone is a group of marine molluscs that have high economic value. To increase abalone production, such cultivation needs to be done considering that abalone production still dominating. However, there are still obstacles in the cultivation which is the high mortality rates on the grading process of juvenile abalone. The fatality occurs due to the traditional grading process by gouging abalone to separate abalone that is attached to the substrate. The use of ethanol as an anesthetic material is expected to minimize the mortality and increase the survival rate of abalone. In this study, the use of ethanol by 30 ml/L as an anesthetic material can separate the abalone from its substrate 447.67 seconds faster than the dose of 10 ml/L. However, the 30 ml/L dose also showed the lowest survival rate of 86.67%. The best recovery test is at 10 ml/L with the fastest recovery time of 143.33 seconds which has a high survival rate of 98.33%. The success of anesthesia by using ethanol in this study can also be done in the grading process of abalone seed and can minimize death due to the traditional grading process.

  10. Decontamination of a municipal landfill leachate from endocrine disruptors using a combined sorption/bioremoval approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffredo, Elisabetta; Castellana, Giancarlo; Senesi, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Sorption and biodegradation are the main mechanisms for the removal of endocrine disruptor compounds (EDs) from both solid and liquid matrices. There are recent evidences about the capacity of white-rot fungi to decontaminate water systems from phenolic EDs by means of their ligninolytic enzymes. Most of the available studies report the removal of EDs by biodegradation or adsorption separately. This study assessed the simultaneous removal of five EDs—the xenoestrogens bisphenol A (BPA), ethynilestradiol (EE2), and 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), and the herbicide linuron and the insecticide dimethoate—from a municipal landfill leachate (MLL) using a combined sorption/bioremoval approach. The adsorption matrices used were potato dextrose agar alone or added with each of the following adsorbent materials: ground almond shells, a coffee compost, a coconut fiber, and a river sediment. These matrices were either not inoculated or inoculated with the fungus Pleurotus ostreatus and superimposed on the MLL. The residual amount of each ED in the MLL was quantified after 4, 7, 12, and 20 days by HPLC analysis and UV detection. Preliminary experiments showed that (1) all EDs did not degrade significantly in the untreatedMLL for at least 28 days, (2) the mycelial growth of P. ostreatus was largely stimulated by components of the MLL, and (3) the enrichment of potato dextrose agar with any adsorbent material favored the fungal growth for 8 days after inoculation. A prompt relevant disappearance of EDs in the MLL occurred both without and, especially, with fungal activity, with the only exception of the very water soluble dimethoate that was poorly adsorbed and possibly degraded only during the first few days of experiments. An almost complete removal of phenolic EDs, especially EE2 and NP, occurred after 20 days or much earlier and was generally enhanced by the adsorbent materials used. Data obtained indicated that both adsorption and biodegradation mechanisms contribute

  11. Production of hydrogen and volatile fatty acid by Enterobacter sp. T4384 using organic waste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Chun; Deshpande, Tushar R; Chun, Jongsik; Yi, Sung Chul; Kim, Hyunook; Um, Youngsoon; Sang, Byoung-In

    2013-02-01

    In a study of hydrogen-producing bacteria, strain T4384 was isolated from rice field samples in the Republic of Korea. The isolate was identified as Enterobacter sp. T4384 by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences. Enterobacter sp. T4384 grew at a temperature range of 10-45 degrees C and at an initial pH range of 4.5-9.5. Strain T4384 produced hydrogen at 0-6% NaCl by using glucose, fructose, and mannose. In serum bottle cultures using a complete medium, Enterobacter sp. T4384 produced 1,098 ml/l H2, 4.0 g/l ethanol, and 1.0 g/l acetic acid. In a pH-regulated jar fermenter culture with the biogas removed, 2,202 ml/l H2, 6.2 g/l ethanol, and 1.0 g/l acetic acid were produced, and the lag-phase time was 4.8 h. Strain T4384 metabolized the hydrolysate of organic waste for the production of hydrogen and volatile fatty acid. The strain T4384 produced 947 ml/l H2, 3.2 g/l ethanol, and 0.2 g/l acetic acid from 6% (w/v) food waste hydrolysate; 738 ml/l H2, 4.2 g/l ethanol, and 0.8 g/l acetic acid from Miscanthus sinensis hydrolysate; and 805 ml/l H2, 5.0 g/l ethanol, and 0.7 g/l acetic acid from Sorghum bicolor hydrolysate.

  12. Effect of Aqueous Moringa Oleifera (Lam Leaf Extracts on Growth Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Hubbard Broiler Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OJ Alabi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Two hundred and forty day old broiler chicks were used to investigate the effect of aqueous Moringa oleifera leaf extracts (AMOLE on growth performance and carcass characteristics of broiler chicken. The birds were randomly allocated into six treatments with four replicates, and each replicate containing 10 broiler chicks; the CRD was used. The treatments contained AMOLE0+ (positive control with antibiotic treatment, AMOLE0- (negative control with ordinary water, AMOLE60 (60 ml/l, AMOLE90 (90 ml/l, AMOLE120 (120 ml/l and AMOLE150 (150 ml/l inclusion levels of AMOLE, respectively. Birds on positive control had the highest final body weight and growth rate (2392.00 g and 53.61 g respectively and the ones on 150 ml/l of AMOLE had the least (2042.00 g and 45.37 g respectively. Results of feed intake showed that birds on positive control had the highest (84.70 g and the ones on 90 ml/litre of AMOLE had the lowest (73.19 g; while the results of feed conversion ratio indicated that birds on AMOLE90 and AMOLE120 performed better than the positive control treatment. Birds on the AMOLE had similar dressing percentages though that of positive control was highest (94.93 %; while those on AMOLE60 and AMOLE150 had the highest large intestine and lung weights respectively. Aqueous Moringa oleifera leaf extract can be included up to 90 ml/litre in the drinking water of broiler chicken for reduced feed intake (12.83 % and improved feed conversion efficiency (9.11 thus, AMOLE can be used to replace synthetic antibiotics as growth promoter.

  13. THE ACTION OF CORAGEN INSECTICIDE ON CERTAIN PHYSIOLOGICAL BIOMARKERS ON CARASSIUS AURATUS GIBELIO BLOCH L. 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Alexandru Baciu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In our researches we have determined the variation of certain physiological indexes, such as the oxygen consume, the breathing rhythm, the glycaemia and the number of red blood cells under the action of Coragen insecticide on Carassius auratus gibelio Bloch. Under the action of Coragen, we have registered significant changes in the oxygen consume, the breathing rhythm, the number of red blood cells and glycemia at the Carassius auratus gibelio Bloch items, considered as answers to the stress provoked by emissions. The highest variations of the physiological indexes, from the perspective of the percentage, were noticed at the glycemia, which at the mark was 28 mg/dl, and in the treated sample, with 0.1 ml/l Coragen is 42 mg/dl, representing a 50% growth and at the breathing rhythm in 24 hours, where values significantly decreased with 41.18% at the concentration of 0.07 ml/l and with 39.33% at the concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 ml/l Coragen. The slightest variations of the physiological indexes, from the perspective of percentage, were noticed at the oxygen consumption, which, at the mark is of 55.302 ml oxygen/kg/hour, and for the treated sample, with 0.1 ml/l Coragen is 34.81 ml oxygen/kg/hour, representing a decrease of 37.06% in 24 hours and the number of red blood cells, where the values have significantly decrease with 9.58%, 13.48%, respectively 18.44% for the concentrations of 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1 ml/l Coragen.

  14. Seleção de Fungicidas para Controle de Oídio em Eucalipto Selection of Fungicides for Control of Eucalypt Powdery Mildew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Mazur Bizi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

    O objetivo deste estudo foi encontrar fungicidas eficientes contra o oídio do eucalipto. Foram testados os fungicidas chlorothalonil (2 g/l, fenarimol (0,5 ml/l, enxofre (3 g/l, tebuconazole (1 ml/l, propiconazol 12,5% + trifloxistrobina 12,5% (0,6 ml/l, benzothiadiazol (1g/l, piraclostrobina 13,3% + epoxiconazol 5% (1ml/l e triadimenol (1 ml/l. Os fungicidas foram pulverizados em 30 mudas por tratamento de Eucalyptus benthamii, naturalmente infectadas. A doença foi avaliada aos 9, 16, 23, 30 e 37 dias após serem colocadas em um ambiente infectado, onde os sintomas foram classificados em uma escala de notas que variam de 0 (ausência de sintomas a 4 (sintoma muito forte. Os melhores tratamentos foram piraclostrobina + epoxiconazol, propiconazol + trifloxistrobina e triadimenol, apresentando um índice médio de infecção de 0,39 e 0,63 e 1,01, respectivamente.  
    The objective of this study was to find effective fungicides against eucalypt powdery mildew. Fungicides tested were chlorothalonil, fenarimol, sulfur, tebuconazole, propiconazole, benzothiazole, pyraclostrobin + epoxiconazole and triadimenol. These fungicides were sprayed on Eucalyptus benthamii seedlings in a greenhouse infested with powdery mildew. Severity was evaluated at 9, 16, 23, 30 and 37 days after spraying, classifying symptoms observed with a scale 0 (symptoms absent to 4 (strong symptoms. Best treatments were obtained with pyraclostrobin + epoxiconazole, propiconazole + trifloxystrobin and triadimenol, with an infection index average of 0.39, 0.63 and 1.01, respectively.

  15. Effect of Formic Acid on In Vitro Ruminal Fermentation and Methane Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanber Kara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of formic acid on the in vitro methane production and in vitro ruminal fermentation of alfalfa hay. Effect of 0.0 (control group: YF0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 ml/L (experimental groups: YF1, YF2, YF3, YF4, and YF5 respectively formic acid (Amasil85-liquid addition to rumen fluid on ruminal fermentation parameters of alfalfa hay were determined by using in vitro gas production techniques. Methane production of in vitro incubation increased (to about 20% with addition of linearly increased formic acid. Linearly increased levels of formic acid addition to rumen fluid has significantly changed the production of in vitro total gas production, metabolic energy (ME and organic matter digestibility (OMD at linear, quadratic and cubic. The addition of 0.1 ml/L and 0.2 ml/L formic acid to rumen fluid significantly decreased in vitro total gas production, ME and OMD however addition of 0.3 ml/L and 0.4 ml/L formic acid was not changed in vitro gas production, ME and OMD levels and 0.5 ml/L formic acid was significantly increased all these parameters. Ruminal pH was not changed by addition of formic acid. Formic acid is a safe feed additive because of its properties antibacterial and flavorings and also is used as a fermentation promoter in silage. In this study it has been observed that all doses of formic acid increased in vitro enteric methane production and low doses decreased in vitro total gas production, ME and OMD and high doses have increased all these parameters. High doses have a positive effect on ME and OMD; however formic acid should be used at limited levels in diets due to the negative effect of increasing greenhouse gases. The effect of formic acid addition to the feed raw matter and rations of all livestock would be beneficial to investigate in terms of digestive system parameters and global warming, further in vitro and in vivo studies.

  16. Jmjd2/Kdm4 demethylases are required for expression of Il3ra and survival of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Karl; Miyagi, Satoru; Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) with a rearrangement of the mixed-linage leukemia (MLL) gene are aggressive hematopoietic malignancies. Here, we explored the feasibility of using the H3K9- and H3K36-specific demethylases Jmjd2/Kdm4 as putative drug targets in MLL-AF9 translocated leukemia. Using...... a mechanism involving removal of H3K9me3 from the promoter of the Il3ra gene. Importantly, ectopic expression of Il3ra in Jmjd2/Kdm4 knockout cells alleviates the requirement of Jmjd2/Kdm4 for the survival of AML cells, showing that Il3ra is a critical downstream target of Jmjd2/Kdm4 in leukemia...

  17. Toxicity of water and sediment from stormwater retarding basins to Hydra hexactinella

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke Tjørnhøj; Pollino, Carmel A.; Nugegoda, Dayanthi

    2008-01-01

    of 50 ml/L and 100 ml/L, while the 7 h pulse exposure caused a significant increase in the mean population growth rate compared to the control. Water samples from the two other retarding basins were found non-toxic to H. hexactinella. This is the first study to employ sediment tests with Hydra spp....... on stormwater sediments and a lower population growth rate was observed for organisms exposed to sediment from the Avoca St retarding basins. The behavioral study showed that H. hexactinella tended to avoid the sediment-water interface when exposed to sediment from all retarding basins, compared...... to the reference sediment. Further work is needed to determine the long-term effects of stormwater polluted sediments and acute effects due to organism exposure to short-term high concentrations during rain events. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. shRNA screening identifies JMJD1C as being required for leukemia maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sroczynska, Patrycja; Cruickshank, V Adam; Bukowski, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are implicated in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia (AML and ALL). Recent progress suggests that proteins involved in epigenetic control are amenable to drug intervention, but little is known about the cancer-specific dependency on epigenetic...... candidate drug targets identified in these screens was Jmjd1c. Depletion of Jmjd1c impairs growth and colony formation of mouse MLL-AF9 cells in vitro, as well as establishment of leukemia after transplantation. Depletion of JMJD1C impairs expansion and colony formation of human leukemic cell lines......, with the strongest effect observed in the MLL-rearranged ALL cell line, SEM. In both mouse and human leukemic cells, the growth defect upon JMJD1C depletion appears to be primarily due to increased apoptosis, which implicates JMJD1C as a potential therapeutic target in leukemia....

  19. CTD data from the N. E. Atlantic 31N to 46N, July 1982 Discovery cruise 130

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, P M

    1983-01-01

    Lists and graphs of CTD data obtained aboard RRS Discovery during July 1982 are presented. A series of 14 stations were occupied between approximate 31 deg N 24 deg W and 46 deg N 14 deg W in support of sound ranging trials. A further 20 stations were occupied in the vicinity of Discovery Gap, a channel for deep flow between the Madeira and Iberian basins near 37 deg 30 N 15 deg 30 W. All CTD data were reconciled with reversing thermometer measurements, and salinity and oxygen samples. Root mean square differences for pressure, temperature, salinity and oxygen were 7 dB, .012 deg C, .007 PSU and 0.3 ml/l in the depth interval 0 to 2,000 dB and 6 dB, .005 deg C, .003 PSU and .16 ml/l for depths 2,000 to 5,600 dB.

  20. Experimental Evaluation of Fuzzy Logic Control of a Flexible Arm Manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-09

    linki -diag = [M-jinkld"iagI]; M-tipl.diag = O*ones(n 1); for i=2n-, M-tipl-diag(iji) = mtl*l1**2;... end M....tipl-diag(l,l) = mtl*(ohl+Hl)**2; M...M-jink lofC~diagl 1 = O*ones(nl~nl); for i= 2:nl-1,.... forj = i+1:nl,... M- linki -off-diagll(i,j) =(1I2)*ml1*11**2+(n1-j)*mll*11**2;... end end for...i = 2:nl,... M~ linki -off~diagl 1(1,1) =(1/2)*mll*(ohl+Il)*Il+(nl-i)*inil*(ohl+Il)*ll;... end Mjinkl~off..diagllI = MjIinkl~offjLiagl l+MjIinkl_off

  1. Search for new high-mass particles decaying to Lepton pairs in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2005-12-16

    A search for new particles (X) that decay to electron or muon pairs has been performed using approximately 200 pb(-1) of pp collision data at (square root) s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Limits on sigma(pp --> X)BR (X --> ll) are presented as a function of dilepton invariant mass m(ll) > 150 GeV/c2, for different spin hypotheses (0, 1, or 2). The limits are approximately 25 fb for m(ll) > GeV/c2. Lower mass bounds for X from representative models beyond the standard model including heavy neutral gauge bosons are presented.

  2. The NSLS-II Multilayer Laue Lens Deposition System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Biancarosa, J.; Shen, Q.; Boas, L.; Feraca, J.; Rosenbaum, L.

    2009-01-01

    The NSLS-II(1) program has a requirement for an unprecedented level of x-ray nanofocusing and has selected the wedged multilayer Laue lens(2,3) (MLL) as the optic of choice to meet this goal. In order to fabricate the MLL a deposition system is required that is capable of depositing depth-graded and laterally-graded multilayers with precise thickness control over many thousands of layers, with total film growth in one run up to 100 m thick or greater. This machine design expounds on the positive features of a rotary deposition system(4) constructed previously for MLLs and will contain multiple stationary, horizontally-oriented magnetron sources where a transport will move a substrate back and forth in a linear fashion over shaped apertures at well-defined velocities to affect a multilayer coating.

  3. Calidad de agua en la bahía de Huacho 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    En el 2002 cumpliendo con el Programa de Vigilancia en Bahías con Alto Potencial de Contaminación, se realizaron cinco prospecciones en las bahías de Huacho (11°05’S-11°07’S) y Carquín (11°04’S-11°05’S). En las dos bahías, la temperatura promedio anual fue 17,7 °C; el O2 promedio en superficie varió entre 3,5-3,8 mL/L y en fondo entre 1,3-1,7 mL/L. Los fosfatos en Huacho presentaron valores normales, en Carquín excedieron los límites permisibles en la LGA (15,80 μg-at/L, julio), los silicatos...

  4. Electromagnetic fields mediate efficient cell reprogramming into a pluripotent state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Soonbong; Quan, Xiaoyuan; Kim, Soochan; Lengner, Christopher; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil

    2014-10-28

    Life on Earth is constantly exposed to natural electromagnetic fields (EMFs), and it is generally accepted that EMFs may exert a variety of effects on biological systems. Particularly, extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (EL-EMFs) affect biological processes such as cell development and differentiation; however, the fundamental mechanisms by which EMFs influence these processes remain unclear. Here we show that EMF exposure induces epigenetic changes that promote efficient somatic cell reprogramming to pluripotency. These epigenetic changes resulted from EMF-induced activation of the histone lysine methyltransferase Mll2. Remarkably, an EMF-free system that eliminates Earth's naturally occurring magnetic field abrogates these epigenetic changes, resulting in a failure to undergo reprogramming. Therefore, our results reveal that EMF directly regulates dynamic epigenetic changes through Mll2, providing an efficient tool for epigenetic reprogramming including the acquisition of pluripotency.

  5. Recovery of Copper from Cyanidation Tailing by Flotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tingsheng; Huang, Xiong; Yang, Xiuli

    2016-02-01

    In this work, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, sodium metabisulfite and copper sulfate as activators were investigated to lessen the depression effect of cyanide for deep-depressing chalcopyrite. The experimental results indicate that the copper recovery exceeded 94%, 84% and 97% at the dosage: sodium hypochlorite 3 mL/L, hydrogen peroxide 2 mL/L, sodium metabisulfite 2 × 10-3 mol/L and copper sulfate 1.67 × 10-4 mol/L, respectively. According to the results of zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectrum, it is suggested that chalcopyrite was depressed because of the chemical adsorption of cyanide on the chalcopyrite surfaces. Sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide and sodium metabisulfite can destroy Cu-C bond on the deep-depressing chalcopyrite surface by chemical reaction. Copper sulfate can activate deep-depressing chalcopyrite by copper ion adsorption.

  6. O mínimo de oxigênio na costa leste do Brasil entre 7-22ºS The minimum oxygen concentration in easthern Brasilian coast between 7-22ºS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argeo Magliocca

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available In the South Atlantic nearly the Brazilian coast, at low latitudes, the layer of minimum oxygen concentration shows distinct values between the Equatorial region (7ºS and the region limited by latitudes of 18-22ºS. In the vicinity of the Equator the minimum concentration is remarkably clear (2,0 ml/l at 7ºS and at 22ºS the minima values raise up to 4.0-4.5 ml/l. The minimum oxygen layer follows the isopynics surfaces (σt = 26.8-27.2 in depths of 300-400 m (7ºS and 600-800 m (22ºS . The oxygen concentration in this area results from a biochemical and physical processes, due to the presence of poor water Brazil Current southward and the rich one Intermediate Antartic water flowing northward.

  7. Complex decision making using a structured framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.A.; McKeown, T.J.; Jankousky, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    In response to regulatory requirements, Rocky Flats has developed and implemented a methodology to select primary treatment technologies for its mixed low-level (MLL) wastes. Several factors have contributed to the complexity of technology selection at Rocky Flats, including lack of detailed waste characterization data, lack of detailed information about the technologies under consideration, and the intense public scrutiny that the selection process is expected to generate. These three factors were the primary drivers for development of the selection methodology

  8. IL-13 regulates human nasal epithelial cell differentiation via H3K4me3 modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu L

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lei Yu,1 Na Li,1 Jisheng Zhang,2 Yan Jiang1 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, 2Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China Introduction: Epigenetic regulation has been shown to play an important role in the development of inflammatory diseases, including chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps. The latter are characterized by epithelial mis-differentiation and infiltration of inflammatory cytokines. H3K4me3 has been shown to be involved in regulating lineage commitment. However, the underlying mechanisms, especially in human nasal epithelial cells (HNEpC, remain underexplored. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of H3K4me3 in HNEpC differentiation treated with the Th2 cytokine IL-13. Patients and methods: The expression levels of mRNA and proteins were investigated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays and Western blot in nasal polyp tissues and human nasal epithelial cells respectively. We measured these levels of H3K4me3, MLL1 and targeted genes compared with control subjects.Results: We demonstrate that expression of H3K4me3 and its methyltransferase MLL1 was significantly upregulated in IL-13-treated HNEpC. This elevation was also observed in nasal polyps. Expression of cilia-related transcription factors FOXJ1 and DNAI2 decreased, while goblet cell-derived genes CLCA1 and MUC5a increased upon IL-13 treatment. Mechanistically, knockdown of MLL1 restored expression of these four genes induced by IL-13. Conclusion: These findings suggest that H3K4me3 is a critical regulator in control of nasal epithelial cell differentiation. MLL1 may be a potential therapeutic target for nasal inflammatory diseases. Keywords: IL-13, H3K4me3 modification, nasal epithelial cell, differentiation 

  9. Manufacturing Methods for High Speed Machining of Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-02-01

    results• obt.ained with t~his o,’-,ination are presented in Figur 85. There, it; can be seen that .’ the selected end mll, which had a runout of 0.001 inch...Cw - Cost of grinding wheel for resharpening tool or cutter ($/cutter). Sa Time to preset tools away from maohine (In tool room) (min.).t I Time to

  10. Biostimulant action of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate produced through enzymatic hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eColla

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the biostimulant action (hormone like activity, nitrogen uptake, and growth stimulation of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate by means of two laboratory bioassays: a corn (Zea mays L. coleoptile elongation rate test (experiment 1, a rooting test on tomato cuttings (experiment 2; and two greenhouse experiments: a dwarf pea (Pisum sativum L. growth test (experiment 3, and a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. nitrogen uptake trial (experiment 4. Protein hydrolysate treatments of corn caused an increase in coleoptile elongation rate when compared to the control, in a dose-dependent fashion, with no significant differences between the four concentrations tested (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L, and inodole-3-acetic acid (IAA treatment. The auxin-like effect of the protein hydrolysate on corn has been also observed in the rooting experiment of tomato cuttings. The shoot, root dry weight, root length, and root area were significantly higher by 21%, 35%, 24%, and 26%, respectively in tomato treated plants with the protein hydrolysate at 6 ml/L than untreated plants. In experiment 3, the application of the protein hydrolysate at all doses (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L significantly increased the shoot length of the giberellin (GA-deficient dwarf pea plants by an average value of 33% in comparison with the control treatment. Increasing the concentration of the protein hydrolysate from 0 to 10 ml/L increased the total dry biomass, SPAD index, and leaf nitrogen content by 20.5%, 15% and 21.5%, respectively. Thus the application of plant-derived protein hydrolysate containing amino acids and small peptides elicited a hormone-like activity, enhanced nitrogen uptake and consequently crop performances.

  11. Object Imaging Accomplished with an Integrated Circuit Robotic Tactile Sensor Incorporating a Piezoelectric Polyvinylidene Fluoride Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    polarization [12]: 3-16 h K" + (3.34) Similarly, the stress in a material due to an applied strain and polarization is [12]: T = cS- hTP (3.35) The electric...pp. 37-63, 1992. [11] KYNAR Piezo Film Department. Kynar Piezo Film Technical Manual . Manual 10-M-ll-83-M. King of Prussia, PA: Pennwalt Corporation

  12. New species of Ciliates (Genus: Strombidium sp.) from hypoxic waters of the Bay of Bengal, Northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Elangovan, S.S.; Gauns, M.

    water (125m depth). Temperature: 20˚C, Salinity: 34.8 psu Dissolved oxygen: 0.02 ml/l Key features Cell almost heart shaped, anterior cylindrical, posterior conical. Cell almost heart shaped, anterior cylindrical, posterior conical. 10 15..., including a description of Apostrombidium parakielum spec.nov. (Ciliophora, Ologotrichia), Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol., 63 (2013), 1179-1191. 7. Lynn, D.H & Montagnes D.J.C., Taxonomic descriptions of some conspicuous species of Strombilidiine...

  13. The effect of cutting origin and organic plant growth regulator on the growth of Daun Ungu (Graptophyllum pictum) through stem cutting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, S. P.; Yunus, A.; Purwanto, E.; Widyastuti, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Graptophyllum pictum is one of medical plants which has important chemical content to treat diseases. Leaf, bark and flower can be used to facilitate menstruation, treat hemorrhoid, constipation, ulcers, ulcers, swelling, and earache. G. pictum is difficult to propagated by seedling due to the long duration of seed formation, thusvegetative propagation is done by stem cutting. The aims of this study are to obtain optimum combination of cutting origin and organic plant growth regulator in various consentration for the growth of Daun Ungu through stem cutting method. This research was conducted at Research center for Medicinal Plant and Traditional DrugTanjungsari, Tegal Gede, Karanganyar in June to August 2016. Origin of cuttings and organic plant growth regulator were used as treatments factor. A completely randomized design (RAL) is used and data were analyzed by F test (ANOVA) with a confidence level of 95%. Any significant differences among treatment followed with Duncan test at a = 5%. The research indicates that longest root was resulted from the treatment of 0,5 ml/l of organic plant growth regulator. The treatment of 1 ml/l is able to increase the fresh and dry weight of root, treatment of 1,5 ml/l of organic plant growth regulator was able to increase the percentage of growing shoots. Treatment of base part as origin of cuttings increases the length, fresh weight and and dry weight of shoot, increase the number of leaves. Interaction treatment between 1 ml/l consentration of organic plant growth regulator and central part origin of cuttings is capable of increasing the leaf area, whereas treatment without organic plant growth regulator and base part as planting material affects the smallest leaf area.

  14. Preparation of 103Pd seeds. Part 2. 'Molecular Plating' of 103Pd onto copper rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chunfu Zhang; Yongxian Wang; Haibin Tian; Duanzhi Yin

    2002-01-01

    A method for 103 Pd 'molecular plating' onto the surface of the copper rod is reported. The optimal composition of the plating bath was: palladium chloride 2 g/l, ammonium hydroxide (28%) 150 ml/l, sodium hypophosphite 12 g/l, and ammonium chloride 37 g/l. The whole procedure of 103 Pd 'molecular plating' will last 50 minutes at 40 deg C. Valuable experience for the preparation of 103 Pd seeds is provided. (author)

  15. Quercetin alters the DNA damage response in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells via TopoII- and PI3K-dependent mechanisms synergizing in leukemogenic rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biechonski, Shahar; Gourevich, Dana; Rall, Melanie; Aqaqe, Nasma; Yassin, Muhammad; Zipin-Roitman, Adi; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Olender, Leonid; Raz, Yael; Jaffa, Ariel J; Grisaru, Dan; Wiesmuller, Lisa; Elad, David; Milyavsky, Michael

    2017-02-15

    Quercetin (Que) is an abundant flavonoid in the human diet and high-concentration food supplement with reported pro- and anti-carcinogenic activities. Topoisomerase II (TopoII) inhibition and subsequent DNA damage induction by Que was implicated in the mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) rearrangements that can induce infant and adult leukemias. This notion raised concerns regarding possible genotoxicities of Que in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). However, molecular targets mediating Que effects on DNA repair relevant to MLL translocations have not been defined. In this study we describe novel and potentially genotoxic Que activities in suppressing non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination pathways downstream of MLL cleavage. Using pharmacological dissection of DNA-PK, ATM and PI3K signalling we defined PI3K inhibition by Que with a concomitant decrease in the abundance of key DNA repair genes to be responsible for DNA repair inhibition. Evidence for the downstream TopoII-independent mutagenic potential of Que was obtained by documenting further increased frequencies of MLL rearrangements in human HSPCs concomitantly treated with Etoposide and Que versus single treatments. Importantly, by engaging a tissue engineered placental barrier, we have established the extent of Que transplacental transfer and hence provided the evidence for Que reaching fetal HSPCs. Thus, Que exhibits genotoxic effects in human HSPCs via different mechanisms when applied continuously and at high concentrations. In light of the demonstrated Que transfer to the fetal compartment our findings are key to understanding the mechanisms underlying infant leukemia and provide molecular markers for the development of safety values. © 2016 UICC.

  16. Secondary Leukemia Associated with the Anti-Cancer Agent, Etoposide, a Topoisomerase II Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Sachiko Ezoe

    2012-01-01

    Etoposide is an anticancer agent, which is successfully and extensively used in treatments for various types of cancers in children and adults. However, due to the increases in survival and overall cure rate of cancer patients, interest has arisen on the potential risk of this agent for therapy-related secondary leukemia. Topoisomerase II inhibitors, including etoposide and teniposide, frequently cause rearrangements involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL<...

  17. Daunorubicin Hydrochloride, Cytarabine and Oblimersen Sodium in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Plankton production associated with cold water incursion into the estuarine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devassy, V.P

    such as NO@d2@@-N (0.35-1.4 mu g at/l) and PO@d4@@-P (1.4-2.8 mu g at/l) were high, whereas NO@d3@@-N was low (0.23-0.92 mu g at/l). At the subsurface layers temperature, dissolved oxygen and salinity varied from 22.5 to 29.16 degrees C, 0.6 to 56 ml/l and 32...

  19. Target genes discovery through copy number alteration analysis in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, De-Leung; Chen, Yen-Hsieh; Shih, Jou-Ho; Lin, Chi-Hung; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Chen, Chian-Feng

    2013-12-21

    High-throughput short-read sequencing of exomes and whole cancer genomes in multiple human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cohorts confirmed previously identified frequently mutated somatic genes, such as TP53, CTNNB1 and AXIN1, and identified several novel genes with moderate mutation frequencies, including ARID1A, ARID2, MLL, MLL2, MLL3, MLL4, IRF2, ATM, CDKN2A, FGF19, PIK3CA, RPS6KA3, JAK1, KEAP1, NFE2L2, C16orf62, LEPR, RAC2, and IL6ST. Functional classification of these mutated genes suggested that alterations in pathways participating in chromatin remodeling, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, JAK/STAT signaling, and oxidative stress play critical roles in HCC tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, because there are few druggable genes used in HCC therapy, the identification of new therapeutic targets through integrated genomic approaches remains an important task. Because a large amount of HCC genomic data genotyped by high density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays is deposited in the public domain, copy number alteration (CNA) analyses of these arrays is a cost-effective way to reveal target genes through profiling of recurrent and overlapping amplicons, homozygous deletions and potentially unbalanced chromosomal translocations accumulated during HCC progression. Moreover, integration of CNAs with other high-throughput genomic data, such as aberrantly coding transcriptomes and non-coding gene expression in human HCC tissues and rodent HCC models, provides lines of evidence that can be used to facilitate the identification of novel HCC target genes with the potential of improving the survival of HCC patients.

  20. Detection of maximum loadability limits and weak buses using Chaotic PSO considering security constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharjee, P.; Mallick, S.; Thakur, S.S.; Ghoshal, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The unique cost function is derived considering practical Security Constraints. → New innovative formulae of PSO parameters are developed for better performance. → The inclusion and implementation of chaos in PSO technique is original and unique. → Weak buses are identified where FACTS devices can be implemented. → The CPSO technique gives the best performance for all the IEEE standard test systems. - Abstract: In the current research chaotic search is used with the optimization technique for solving non-linear complicated power system problems because Chaos can overcome the local optima problem of optimization technique. Power system problem, more specifically voltage stability, is one of the practical examples of non-linear, complex, convex problems. Smart grid, restructured energy system and socio-economic development fetch various uncertain events in power systems and the level of uncertainty increases to a great extent day by day. In this context, analysis of voltage stability is essential. The efficient method to assess the voltage stability is maximum loadability limit (MLL). MLL problem is formulated as a maximization problem considering practical security constraints (SCs). Detection of weak buses is also important for the analysis of power system stability. Both MLL and weak buses are identified by PSO methods and FACTS devices can be applied to the detected weak buses for the improvement of stability. Three particle swarm optimization (PSO) techniques namely General PSO (GPSO), Adaptive PSO (APSO) and Chaotic PSO (CPSO) are presented for the comparative study with obtaining MLL and weak buses under different SCs. In APSO method, PSO-parameters are made adaptive with the problem and chaos is incorporated in CPSO method to obtain reliable convergence and better performances. All three methods are applied on standard IEEE 14 bus, 30 bus, 57 bus and 118 bus test systems to show their comparative computing effectiveness and

  1. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with AdvancedProstate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    propose to study the mechanism of pharmacologic inhibition of the MLL complex in prostate cancer cells 3) we will assess the in vivo efficacy of the...Project Goals: 1) Enroll patients with known or suspicious for prostate cancer in the NIH MRI /metabolic imaging program, 2) Whole exome and...Henderson 02/11/2014-01/31/2017 Project Goals: 1) Enroll patients with known or suspicious for prostate cancer in the NIH MRI /metabolic imaging program

  2. Genomic and transcriptome profiling identified both human and HBV genetic variations and their interactions in Chinese hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between HBV and host genome integrations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC development is a complex process and the mechanism is still unclear. Here we described in details the quality controls and data mining of aCGH and transcriptome sequencing data on 50 HCC samples from the Chinese patients, published by Dong et al. (2015 (GEO#: GSE65486. In additional to the HBV-MLL4 integration discovered, we also investigated the genetic aberrations of HBV and host genes as well as their genetic interactions. We reported human genome copy number changes and frequent transcriptome variations (e.g. TP53, CTNNB1 mutation, especially MLL family mutations in this cohort of the patients. For HBV genotype C, we identified a novel linkage disequilibrium region covering HBV replication regulatory elements, including basal core promoter, DR1, epsilon and poly-A regions, which is associated with HBV core antigen over-expression and almost exclusive to HBV-MLL4 integration.

  3. Removal of Nitrate by Zero Valent Iron in the Presence of H2O2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Samarghandi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Nitrate is the oxidation state of nitrogen compounds, which is founded in water resources that contaminated by municipal, industrial and agricultural waste water. If nitrate leek in to ground water resources, it can cause health problems. Material and Methods: Removal of nitrate from ground water by iron powder in the presence of H2O2 was investigated. Experiments have been done by use of 250 ml of water samples containing 100 mg/L nitrate in various condition. Various parameters such as pH (3, 5, 7, 9, iron dosage (10, 15, 20, 30 g/L, initial H2O2 concentration (5, 10, 15, 20 ml/L and contact time (10-120 min. Results: Obtained results shows the removal of nitrate was increased by pH reduction, increment of iron mass and contact time. In addition, nitrate reduction was increased by increment of initial H2O2 concentration up to 15 ml/L. High removal was observed at pH=3, iron mass=30 g/L, contact time equal 120 min and H2O2 concentration=15 ml/L. At above condition, upon 98% of nitrate was removed. Conclusion: In summary, this method is simple, low cost and effective for removal of nitrate from ground water and industrial activity.

  4. PENYELAMATAN EMBRIO Dendrobium anosmum Lindl. MELALUI KULTUR IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Yuni Astriani Dewi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to analyse germination percentage, effect of coconut water addition in the media to number of last stage embryos and development of final stage D. anosmum Lindl. embryo. Research was conducted at Plant Structure and Development of Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences University of Udayana and UPT. Balai Benih Induk Tanaman Pangan dan Hortikultura Provinsi Bali from February 2015 to July 2015. Three type of media were employed, i.e. PDA, Organic, MS. Three different concentration of coconut was added to media, i.e. 0 ml/L 50 ml/L, 100 ml/L. Results showed that seed D. anosmum Lindl. on PDA, Organic and MS has not germinated yet on all media, only swollen cells observed. Seed dormancy and maturity of seed were the main factors affecting seed germination.  Addition of 100 ml / L coconut water in MS showed that media is capable to increase the formation of final stages embryos (> 32 cells. Embryo development on PDA and Organic largely showed cell stage embryos 1 to 8 cells, while MS media already showed embryo development stages of > 32 cells.

  5. PENGARUH JAMUR Gliocladium sp. DAN BAKTERI Pseudomonas fluorencens DALAM MENEKAN PERKEMBANGAN PENYAKIT LAYU FUSARIUM PADA TANAMAN PISANG MAS (Musa Paradisiaca L. HASIL KULTUR INVITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etti Siti Hikmawati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to determine the potence of natural agent, a mmushroom of Gliocladium sp. and bacterium Peudomonas fluorencens in resisting against the withering disease (Fusarium Oxysporum f.sp. Cubense and their effect to the growth of the in-vitro cultured banana plant (Musa paradisiaca L. Thiswas conducted in the experimental farm of Agriculture Faculty, University of Muhammadiyah Purwokerto, in the period of June to December 2013. This research is a single experiment using Randomized Completely Block Design. The treatment was the administration of Gliocladium sp. In three different doses of 10 g/polybag (G1,20 g/ polybag (G2, 30 g/ polybag (G3, and the giving of Pseudomonas fluorencens in three different dosage of10 ml/l water/ polybag (PF1,20 ml/l water/polybag (PF2 and 30 ml/l water/polybag(PF3 and one control group of no treatment (K0. Based on the result of data analysis, it is proved that the treatment of natural agents of Gliocladiumsp and Pseudomonas fluorencenshas induced the plants resistance against the withering disease of FusariumOxysporumf.sp. Cubense in the banana, as it is indicated by the increase of phenol compounds, i.e. glychoseda, saponin, and thanin. However, the treatment has no significant effect on the plant growth either on their leaves or their stalk diameter.

  6. Controle da antracnose na pós-colheita de manga 'Ubá' com o uso de produtos alternativos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Moreira Carvalho Lemos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliada a eficácia de produtos alternativos aos agroquímicos no controle da antracnose na pós-colheita de mangas 'Ubá'. Frutos fisiologicamente maduros foram pulverizados até o completo molhamento, com suspensão de conídios de Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, na concentração de 2,5 x 10(5 conídios/mL. Após a secagem ao ar, foram pulverizados com água destilada (testemunha, tween 20 (8 mL/L de solução, Prochloraz (1,10 mL de Sportak 450 EC/L de solução, óleo de alho (10 mL/L + 8 mL/L de tween 20, óleo de amêndoa de Acrocomia aculeata + leite em pó instantâneo (LPI (25 mL/L+ 10 g LPI/L, óleo de amêndoa de A. aculeata + tween (25 mL/L + 8 mL/L de tween 20, biofertilizante agro-mos® (100 µL/L, óleo de neen (10 mL/L + 8 mL/L de tween 20, quitosana (10 mL/L + 8 mL/L de tween 20 e biomassa cítrica (10 mL/L + 8 mL/L tween 20.O solvente utilizado foi água destilada. Avaliaram-se o período de incubação, o período latente, a perda de massa fresca, a produção de CO² e, diariamente, a severidade e incidência da doença. Os períodos mais curtos de incubação da doença foram observados nos frutos tratados com óleo de neen, água + tween e biomassa cítrica, com aproximadamente cinco dias. O óleo de amêndoa de A. aculeata + LPI e agro-mos® foram os produtos que mais retardaram o aparecimento dos sintomas, impondo à doença o período de incubação de nove dias após a inoculação do patógeno. Quanto à severidade, o óleo de amêndoa de macaúba + LPI e o Prochloraz foram os mais eficientes em conter o crescimento do patógeno até o oitavo dia após a inoculação, sendo que, logo depois, os frutos tratados com óleo de amêndoa de A. aculeata + LPI se igualaram àqueles tratados com a maioria dos demais produtos. Os frutos tratados com óleo de amêndoa de A. aculeata + LPI e óleo de amêndoa de A. aculeata + tween manifestaram as estruturas do patógeno apenas após 13 e 14 dias de avalia

  7. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  8. Selection of the all-time best World XI Test cricket team using the TOPSIS method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Chakraborty

    2019-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to apply the technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS as a multi-criteria decision making tool to form the all-time best World XI Test cricket team while taking into consideration over 2600 cricketers participated in Test matches for more than 100 years of cricket history. From the voluminous database containing the performance of numerous Test cricketers, separate lists are first prepared for different positions in the batting and bowling orders consisting of manageable numbers of candidate alternatives while imposing some constraints with respect to the minimum number of innings played (for batsmen, minimum number of tests played (for wicketkeepers and bowlers, and minimum numbers of runs scored and wickets taken (for all-rounders. The TOPSIS method is later adopted to rank those shortlisted cricketers and identify the best performers for inclusion in the proposed World XI Test team. The best World Test cricket team is thus formed as Alastair Cook (ENG (c, Sunil Gavaskar (IND, Rahul Dravid (IND (vc, Sachin Tendulkar (IND, Shivnarine Chanderpaul (WI, Jacques Kallis (SA, Adam Gilchrist (AUS (wk, Glenn McGrath (AUS, Courtney Walsh (WI, Muttiah Muralitharan (SL and Shane Warne (AUS.

  9. Canine parvoviral enteritis: an update on the clinical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylonakis ME

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mathios E Mylonakis, Iris Kalli, Timoleon S Rallis Companion Animal Clinic, School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece  Abstract: Canine parvovirus type 2 is the cause of a highly contagious acute enteritis associated with high morbidity and mortality, with very low survival rates in untreated dogs. Although severe clinical disease typically occurs in dogs younger than 6 months of age, adults with insufficient immunity may potentially be affected. In this article, the current state of knowledge is reviewed regarding the diagnostic aspects of parvoviral enteritis, with special emphasis placed on the clinical relevance of the detection of viral antigens in the feces, detection of viral antibodies in the serum, or the polymerase chain reaction-based amplification of the viral DNA in the feces. In addition, the components of the supportive and symptomatic treatment aiming to optimize the outcome of the disease in the clinical setting are thoroughly reviewed. Immunization guidelines for the prevention of the disease are also updated. Keywords: dog, parvovirus type 2, acute enteritis, treatment, vaccination

  10. Mis tuleb

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Pärnu Uue Kunsti Muuseumis Uno Roosvaldi maalide ja graafika näitus "Mõttes Kihnus", Heino Lillepuu kollaazhide näitus "Kõik naised on inglid". Tartu Mänguasjamuuseumis jõuluehete näitus. Rahvusraamatukogu fuajees Andy Horneri näitus "Terra Borealis". Eesti Rahva Muuseumis näitus "Põhjamaine tunnetus", mis tutvustab Sleipneri stipendiumi saanud noorte kunstnike valiktöid. Iisaku muuseumis jõulupostkaartide näitus. Eesti Tarbekunsti- ja Disainimuuseumis näitus "Klaashelmed maailma rahvaste kultuuris" (suur osa helmeist ja helmetikandeist on Torben Sode kogust). Rottermanni soolalaos näitus "Kodu, kallis kodu". Viljandi muuseumis on väljas EKA nahakunsti osakonna tööd aastaist 1917-2004 "Mälu ja mäng", Eesti lapitööseltsi näitus, Viljandi maagümnaasiumi kunstistuudio näitus "Jõulusokk". Eesti Meremuuseumis näitus"Klaas, fajanss ja portselan uppunud laevadelt"

  11. 'De strijd om Amsterdam'. Een nieuwe benadering in het onderzoek naar de NSB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josje Damsma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘The Fight for Amsterdam’. A New Approach in Research into the NSBThe main characteristics of the members of the Dutch Nazi-movement (Nationaal- Socialistische Beweging, NSB are constructed by historians De Jong and De Jonge. Both labeled the members of the NSB as ‘opportunistic’ and ‘isolated’. Up until now, that image has remained unchallenged. Inspired by Aristotle Kallis, Roger Griffin and Robert Paxton, we analyzed the behavior and social position of members of the NSB in Amsterdam during the Second World War in a new way. By focusing on their actions instead of on ideology, their isolated position can be brought into doubt along with opportunism as the main motivational factor. It is more likely that a combination of idealism, opportunism and social networks led to membership of the NSB. The interaction pattern differed from person to person and per political, economic or social level of communication. The results of this research show that Dutch political history and identity is complex and a lot of research still has to be done in this field.

  12. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thys, Ryan G., E-mail: rthys@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Lehman, Christine E., E-mail: clehman@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Pierce, Levi C.T., E-mail: Levipierce@gmail.com [Human Longevity, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Wang, Yuh-Hwa, E-mail: yw4b@virginia.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0733 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  13. Overexpression of the catalytically impaired Taspase1 T234V or Taspase1 D233A variants does not have a dominant negative effect in T(4;11 leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Bier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chromosomal translocation t(4;11(q21;q23 is associated with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia of infants. The resulting AF4•MLL oncoprotein becomes activated by Taspase1 hydrolysis and is considered to promote oncogenic transcriptional activation. Hence, Taspase1's proteolytic activity is a critical step in AF4•MLL pathophysiology. The Taspase1 proenzyme is autoproteolytically processed in its subunits and is assumed to assemble into an αββα-heterodimer, the active protease. Therefore, we investigated here whether overexpression of catalytically inactive Taspase1 variants are able to interfere with the proteolytic activity of the wild type enzyme in AF4•MLL model systems. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: The consequences of overexpressing the catalytically dead Taspase1 mutant, Taspase1(T234V, or the highly attenuated variant, Taspase1(D233A, on Taspase1's processing of AF4•MLL and of other Taspase1 targets was analyzed in living cancer cells employing an optimized cell-based assay. Notably, even a nine-fold overexpression of the respective Taspase1 mutants neither inhibited Taspase1's cis- nor trans-cleavage activity in vivo. Likewise, enforced expression of the α- or β-subunits showed no trans-dominant effect against the ectopically or endogenously expressed enzyme. Notably, co-expression of the individual α- and β-subunits did not result in their assembly into an enzymatically active protease complex. Probing Taspase1 multimerization in living cells by a translocation-based protein interaction assay as well as by biochemical methods indicated that the inactive Taspase1 failed to assemble into stable heterocomplexes with the wild type enzyme. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results demonstrate that inefficient heterodimerization appears to be the mechanism by which inactive Taspase1 variants fail to inhibit wild type Taspase1's activity in trans. Our work favours strategies targeting Taspase1's catalytic activity

  14. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thys, Ryan G.; Lehman, Christine E.; Pierce, Levi C.T.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  15. Improvement of Haramay Fiber by Pre-treatment of Retting Process withPhosphoric Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuntari-Sasas; Neni-Rustini Eriawati

    2000-01-01

    Haramay as bast fiber contains of cellulose fiber as the main part, mixedwith hemi cellulose, pectin, and lignin as binding material for cellulosefiber to keep it together in the bundle form. For textile material, this bastfiber has to be freed from its binding material, called as retting process,before subjecting to scouring, dyeing and finishing process in textileindustry. In the retting process the dissolve of binding material can be doneeither by using enzyme in bio technology or extraction with strong alkalinecondition in common technology. Using sodium hydroxide for dissolving thebinding material can be carried out easily with good dissolving ability, butcan render the strength retention of the cellulose fiber. Pre-treatment ofthe bast fiber with phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ), is expected to hydrolyze someof the binding materials that can not be dissolved in alkaline condition,including natural pigment that colored the fiber with creamy white. In thisstudy, the pre-treatment process before retting with phosphoric acid wascarried out in various condition, such as concentration of phosphoric acid (5ml/l- 25 ml/l), time and temperature of pre-treatment (1-3 hours at 50 o C or12-24 hours at room temperature), followed by neutralization in dilutealkaline. The retting process was carried out by means of scouring in variousconcentration of sodium hydroxide (NaOH 38 o Be, 10 ml/l-30 m/l), and then wascontinued with bleaching process in hydrogen peroxide solution. Aftercarrying out those experiment, the bast fiber that called haramay wassubjected to testing for weight reduction, strength retention and degree ofwhiteness. From the testing results it is concluded that pre-treatment withphosphoric acid can increase the weight reduction, strength retention ortenacity and degree of whiteness of haramay fiber compared to the oneswithout pre-treatment with phosphoric acid. The best result was obtained bypre-treatment with 5 ml/l H 3 PO 4 at 50 o C for 2 hours, continued by

  16. Controle da antracnose na pós-colheita de bananas-'prata' com produtos alternativos aos agrotóxicos convencionais Postharvest control of antracnose in 'prata' bananas with alternatives products to conventional pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo José Zimmermann de Negreiros

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Produtos alternativos aos agrotóxicos convencionais foram avaliados no controle da antracnose causada por Colletotrichum musae em pós-colheita de bananas 'Prata' [Musa spp. (AAB]. Foram utilizados buquês com três frutos, com diâmetro médio de 32 mm a 36 mm, no estádio pré-climatérico, com coloração de casca totalmente verde. Os frutos foram pulverizados com uma suspensão de conídios de C. musae, na concentração de 2,5x10(5 conídios/mL e mantidos em câmara úmida a 25 ºC, por 24 horas. Após esse período, foram pulverizados com as caldas dos produtos alternativos extrato cítrico 'Biogermex', óleo de nim 'Organic Neem' e óleo de alho 'Probinatu', na concentração de 10,0 mL/L, óleo de pimenta-longa e óleo de cravo-da-índia na concentração de 5,0 mL/L e quitosana na concentração de 10,0 mg/mL, além do fungicida Tectoï SC (tiabendazol na concentração de 0,65 mL/L. Água destilada foi utilizada como tratamento-testemunha. Os frutos tratados com quitosana, óleo de nim e óleo de alho tiveram a severidade da doença reduzida. O óleo de alho foi o produto mais eficiente, com redução também da incidência da doença. A qualidade dos frutos não foi depreciada por nenhum dos tratamentos alternativos nas concentrações utilizadas.Alternatives products to conventional pesticides in the control of anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum musae after harvest of 'Prata' banana [Musa spp. (AAB] were evaluated. Fruits with an average diameter of 32-36 mm were selected at the pre-climacteric stage, with a peel color index of 1 (totally green peel. Hands were subdivided into clusters of three fruits. The fruits were sprayed with a conidial suspension of C. musae at a concentration of 2.5 x 10(5 conidia/mL and were kept in a moist chamber at 25°C for 24 hours. After this period, fruits were sprayed with the alternative products 'Biogermex' citric extract, 'Organic Neem' oil and 'Probinatu' garlic oil at a concentration of 10.0 mL/L

  17. Structural analysis of the core COMPASS family of histone H3K4 methylases from yeast to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoh-hei; Westfield, Gerwin H; Oleskie, Austin N; Trievel, Raymond C; Shilatifard, Ali; Skiniotis, Georgios

    2011-12-20

    Histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation is catalyzed by the highly evolutionarily conserved multiprotein complex known as Set1/COMPASS or MLL/COMPASS-like complexes from yeast to human, respectively. Here we have reconstituted fully functional yeast Set1/COMPASS and human MLL/COMPASS-like complex in vitro and have identified the minimum subunit composition required for histone H3K4 methylation. These subunits include the methyltransferase C-terminal SET domain of Set1/MLL, Cps60/Ash2L, Cps50/RbBP5, Cps30/WDR5, and Cps25/Dpy30, which are all common components of the COMPASS family from yeast to human. Three-dimensional (3D) cryo-EM reconstructions of the core yeast complex, combined with immunolabeling and two-dimensional (2D) EM analysis of the individual subcomplexes reveal a Y-shaped architecture with Cps50 and Cps30 localizing on the top two adjacent lobes and Cps60-Cps25 forming the base at the bottom. EM analysis of the human complex reveals a striking similarity to its yeast counterpart, suggesting a common subunit organization. The SET domain of Set1 is located at the juncture of Cps50, Cps30, and the Cps60-Cps25 module, lining the walls of a central channel that may act as the platform for catalysis and regulative processing of various degrees of H3K4 methylation. This structural arrangement suggested that COMPASS family members function as exo-methylases, which we have confirmed by in vitro and in vivo studies.

  18. Biohydrogen production by dark fermentation of glycerol using Enterobacter and Citrobacter Sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Biniam T; Constanti, Magda; Stchigel, Alberto M; Medina, Francesc; Sueiras, Jesus E

    2013-01-01

    Glycerol is an attractive substrate for biohydrogen production because, in theory, it can produce 3 mol of hydrogen per mol of glycerol. Moreover, glycerol is produced in substantial amounts as a byproduct of producing biodiesel, the demand for which has increased in recent years. Therefore, hydrogen production from glycerol was studied by dark fermentation using three strains of bacteria: namely, Enterobacter spH1, Enterobacter spH2, and Citrobacter freundii H3 and a mixture thereof (1:1:1). It was found that, when an initial concentration of 20 g/L of glycerol was used, all three strains and their mixture produced substantial amounts of hydrogen ranging from 2400 to 3500 mL/L, being highest for C. freundii H3 (3547 mL/L) and Enterobacter spH1 (3506 mL/L). The main nongaseous fermentation products were ethanol and acetate, albeit in different ratios. For Enterobacter spH1, Enterobacter spH2, C. freundii H3, and the mixture (1:1:1), the ethanol yields (in mol EtOH/mol glycerol consumed) were 0.96, 0.67, 0.31, and 0.66, respectively. Compared to the individual strains, the mixture (1:1:1) did not show a significantly higher hydrogen level, indicating that there was no synergistic effect. Enterobacter spH1 was selected for further investigation because of its higher yield of hydrogen and ethanol. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  19. Knockdown of menin affects pre-mRNA processing and promoter fidelity at the interferon-gamma inducible IRF1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auriemma Lauren B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor menin (MEN1 is mutated in the inherited disease multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, and has several documented cellular roles, including the activation and repression of transcription effected by several transcription factors. As an activator, MEN1 is a component of the Set1-like mixed lineage leukemia (MLL MLL1/MLL2 methyltransferase complex that methylates histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4. MEN1 is localized to the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1-dependent gene, interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1, and is further recruited when IRF1 transcription is triggered by interferon-γ signaling. Results RNAi-mediated knockdown of MEN1 alters the H3K4 dimethylation and H3 acetylation profiles, and the localization of histone deacetylase 3, at IRF1. While MEN1 knockdown does not impact the rate of transcription, IRF1 heteronuclear transcripts become enriched in MEN1-depleted cells. The processed mRNA and translated protein product are concomitantly reduced, and the antiviral state is attenuated. Additionally, the transcription start site at the IRF1 promoter is disrupted in the MEN1-depleted cells. The H3K4 demethylase, lysine specific demethylase 1, is also associated with IRF1, and its inhibition alters H3K4 methylation and disrupts the transcription start site as well. Conclusions Taken together, the data indicate that MEN1 contributes to STAT1-activated gene expression in a novel manner that includes defining the transcription start site and RNA processing.

  20. [THE COMPARISON OF RESULTS OF DETECTION OF MINIMAL RESIDUAL DISEASE IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD AND MARROW IN CHILDREN OF THE FIRST YEAR OF LIFE WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUCOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaur, G A; Riger, T O; Popov, A M; Nasedkina, T V; Kustanovich, A M; Solodovnikov, A G; Streneva, O V; Shorikov, E V; Tsvirenko, S V; Saveliev, L I; Fechina, L G

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of minimal residual disease is an important prognostic factor under acute lymphoblastic leucosis in children and adults. In overwhelming majority of research studies bone marrow is used to detect minimal residual disease. The comparative characteristic of detection of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood and bone marrow was carried out. The prognostic role of occurrence of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood and bone marrow under therapy according protocol MLL-Baby was evaluated. The analysis embraced 142 pair samples from 53 patients with acute lymphoblastic leucosis and various displacements of gene MLL younger than 365 days. The minimal residual disease was detected by force of identification of chimeric transcripts using polymerase chain reaction in real-time mode in 7 sequential points of observation established by protocol of therapy. The comparability of results of qualitative detection of minimal residual disease in bone marrow and peripheral blood amounted to 84.5%. At that, in all 22 (15.5%) discordant samples minimal residual disease was detected only in bone marrow. Despite of high level of comparability of results of detection of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood and bone marrow the occurrence of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood at various stages of therapy demonstrated no independent prognostic significance. The established differences had no relationship with sensitivity of method determined by value of absolute expression of gene ABL. Most likely, these differences reflected real distribution of tumor cells. The results of study demonstrated that application of peripheral blood instead of bone marrow for monitoring of minimal residual disease under acute lymphoblastic leucosis in children of first year of life is inappropriate. At the same time, retention of minimal residual disease in TH4 in bone marrow was an independent and prognostic unfavorable factor under therapy of acute lymphoblastic

  1. A novel forward osmosis system in landfill leachate treatment for removing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and for direct fertigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Niu, Aping; Lu, Chun-Jiao; Zhang, Jing-Hui; Junaid, Muhammad; Strauss, Phyllis R; Xiao, Ping; Wang, Xiao; Ren, Yi-Wei; Pei, De-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Landfill leachate (LL) is harmful to aquatic environment because it contains high concentrations of dissolved organic matter, inorganic components, heavy metals, and other xenobiotics. Thus, the remediation of LL is crucial for environmental conservation. Here, a potential application of the forward osmosis (FO) filtration process with ammonium bicarbonate (NH 4 HCO 3 ) as a draw solution (DS) was investigated to remediate membrane bioreactor-treated LL (M-LL). After the leachate treatment, the toxicity and removal efficiencies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were evaluated using zebrafish and cultured human cells. The water recovery rate was improved using the current protocol up to 86.6% and 91.6% by both the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode and the forward osmosis (FO) mode. Water flux increased with the increasing DS concentrations, but solution velocities decreased with the operation time. Toxicity tests revealed that the M-LL treated by NH 4 HCO 3 had no toxic effect on zebrafish and human cells. Moreover, green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in the transgenic zebrafish Tg(cyp1a:gfp) induced by PAHs was very weak compared to the effects induced by untreated M-LL. Since the diluted DS met local safety requirements of liquid fertilizer, it could be directly applied as the liquid fertilizer for fertigation. In conclusion, this novel FO system using NH 4 HCO 3 as the DS provides a cheap and efficient protocol to effectively remove PAHs and other pollutants in LL, and the diluted DS can be directly applied to crops as a liquid fertilizer, indicating that this technique is effective and eco-friendly for the treatment of different types of LL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The rate of spontaneous mutations in human myeloid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araten, David J.; Krejci, Ondrej; DiTata, Kimberly; Wunderlich, Mark; Sanders, Katie J.; Zamechek, Leah; Mulloy, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We provide the first measurement of the mutation rate (μ) in human myeloid cells. • μ is measured to be 3.6–23 × 10 −7 per cell division. • The AML-ETO and MLL-AF9 fusions do not seem to increase μ. • Cooperating mutations in NRAS, FLT3 and p53 not seem to increase μ. • Hypermutability may be required to explain leukemogenesis. - Abstract: The mutation rate (μ) is likely to be a key parameter in leukemogenesis, but historically, it has been difficult to measure in humans. The PIG-A gene has some advantages for the detection of spontaneous mutations because it is X-linked, and therefore only one mutation is required to disrupt its function. Furthermore, the PIG-A-null phenotype is readily detected by flow cytometry. Using PIG-A, we have now provided the first in vitro measurement of μ in myeloid cells, using cultures of CD34+ cells that are transduced with either the AML-ETO or the MLL-AF9 fusion genes and expanded with cytokines. For the AML-ETO cultures, the median μ value was ∼9.4 × 10 −7 (range ∼3.6–23 × 10 −7 ) per cell division. In contrast, few spontaneous mutations were observed in the MLL-AF9 cultures. Knockdown of p53 or introduction of mutant NRAS or FLT3 alleles did not have much of an effect on μ. Based on these data, we provide a model to predict whether hypermutability must occur in the process of leukemogenesis

  3. Prenatal origin of childhood AML occurs less frequently than in childhood ALL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burjanivova, Tatiana; Zuna, Jan; Madzo, Jozef; Muzikova, Katerina; Meyer, Claus; Schneider, Bjoern; Votava, Felix; Marschalek, Rolf; Stary, Jan; Trka, Jan

    2006-01-01

    While there is enough convincing evidence in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the data on the pre-natal origin in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are less comprehensive. Our study aimed to screen Guthrie cards (neonatal blood spots) of non-infant childhood AML and ALL patients for the presence of their respective leukemic markers. We analysed Guthrie cards of 12 ALL patients aged 2–6 years using immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (n = 15) and/or intronic breakpoints of TEL/AML1 fusion gene (n = 3). In AML patients (n = 13, age 1–14 years) PML/RARalpha (n = 4), CBFbeta/MYH11 (n = 3), AML1/ETO (n = 2), MLL/AF6 (n = 1), MLL/AF9 (n = 1) and MLL/AF10 (n = 1) fusion genes and/or internal tandem duplication of FLT3 gene (FLT3/ITD) (n = 2) were used as clonotypic markers. Assay sensitivity determined using serial dilutions of patient DNA into the DNA of a healthy donor allowed us to detect the pre-leukemic clone in Guthrie card providing 1–3 positive cells were present in the neonatal blood spot. In 3 patients with ALL (25%) we reproducibly detected their leukemic markers (Ig/TCR n = 2; TEL/AML1 n = 1) in the Guthrie card. We did not find patient-specific molecular markers in any patient with AML. In the largest cohort examined so far we used identical approach for the backtracking of non-infant childhood ALL and AML. Our data suggest that either the prenatal origin of AML is less frequent or the load of pre-leukemic cells is significantly lower at birth in AML compared to ALL cases

  4. Simple prediction method of lumbar lordosis for planning of lumbar corrective surgery: radiological analysis in a Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong Suh; Chung, Sung Soo; Park, Se Jun; Kim, Dong Min; Shin, Seong Kee

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at deriving a lordosis predictive equation using the pelvic incidence and to establish a simple prediction method of lumbar lordosis for planning lumbar corrective surgery in Asians. Eighty-six asymptomatic volunteers were enrolled in the study. The maximal lumbar lordosis (MLL), lower lumbar lordosis (LLL), pelvic incidence (PI), and sacral slope (SS) were measured. The correlations between the parameters were analyzed using Pearson correlation analysis. Predictive equations of lumbar lordosis through simple regression analysis of the parameters and simple predictive values of lumbar lordosis using PI were derived. The PI strongly correlated with the SS (r = 0.78), and a strong correlation was found between the SS and LLL (r = 0.89), and between the SS and MLL (r = 0.83). Based on these correlations, the predictive equations of lumbar lordosis were found (SS = 0.80 + 0.74 PI (r = 0.78, R (2) = 0.61), LLL = 5.20 + 0.87 SS (r = 0.89, R (2) = 0.80), MLL = 17.41 + 0.96 SS (r = 0.83, R (2) = 0.68). When PI was between 30° to 35°, 40° to 50° and 55° to 60°, the equations predicted that MLL would be PI + 10°, PI + 5° and PI, and LLL would be PI - 5°, PI - 10° and PI - 15°, respectively. This simple calculation method can provide a more appropriate and simpler prediction of lumbar lordosis for Asian populations. The prediction of lumbar lordosis should be used as a reference for surgeons planning to restore the lumbar lordosis in lumbar corrective surgery.

  5. Chemical Composition of the Essential Oil of Nigeria Grown Hoslundia opposita Vahl (Lamiaceae) Dried Leaves and Its Bioactivity against Cowpea Seed Bruchid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babarinde, Samuel Adelani; Pitan, Olufemi Olutoyin Richard; Olatunde, Ganiyu Olatunji; Ajala, Michael Oluwole

    2017-06-01

    Due to several ecological and human hazards of synthetic pesticides in postharvest crop protection, there is the need to search for eco-friendly alternatives. In this study, chemical composition and insecticidal activities of essential oil (EO) obtained from Hoslundia opposita dried leaves were evaluated against cowpea seed bruchid. Eight constituents, predominated by oxygenated monoterpenes (78.86%), were identified using Gas Chromatography (GC)/MS. The constituents were 1,8-cineole (1; 61.15%), followed by α-terpineol (2; 16.81%), β-phellandrene (3; 13.24%), β-farnesene (4; 3.55%), α-pinene (5; 1.89%), Germacrene D (6; 1.83%), cis-sabinene hydrate (7; 0.90%) and caryophyllene (8; 0.63%). In fumigation bioassay, at 6 h after exposure (HAE), 0.78 ml EO/l air caused 35.33% mortality which was significantly lower than 60.90% and 63.6% observed at 3.15 and 6.25 ml/l air, respectively. Mortality reached 90.0% at 24 HAE regardless of the applied concentration. Lethal time for 50% of the bruchids (LT 50 ) at concentration of 0.78 ml/l air (6.89 h) was higher than the LT 50 at 3.15 and 6.25 ml/l air (4.72 and 4.44 h, respectively). H. opposita EO reduced Callosobruchus maculatus oviposition, while progeny emergence observed in EO-treated seeds (2.42 - 25.73) was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than 51.56 observed in control. The results confirm H. opposita EO's potentials for control of cowpea bruchids. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  6. The Investigation of Decontamination Effects of Ozone Gas on Microbial Load and Essential Oil of Several Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh VALI ASILL

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, Ozone as a disinfectant method, without putting on the harmful effects on human and plant products, it is alternative common methods for disinfection of plant material. The research as a factorial experiment was conducted on the basis of randomized complete block design with three replications and the effects of Ozone gas on decreasing the microbial load of some important medicinal plants include: Peppermint (Mentha piperita, Summer savory (Satureja hortensis, Indian valerian(Valeriana wallichii, Meliss (Melissa officinalis and Iranian thyme (Zataria multiflora were investigated. Medicinal plants leaves were treated with Ozone gas concentration 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 ml/L at times of 10 and 30 then total count, coliform and mold and yeast of the samples were studied. The result showed that Ozone gas decreases microbial load of medicinal plants samples. But Ozone gas and Ozone gas in medicinal plants interaction effect had no effect on essential oil content. The lowest and the highest of microbial load were detected in samples treated with concentration of 0.9 ml/L of Ozone gas and control respectively. The highest and the lowest of microbial load were observed in Iranian thyme and Indian valerian respectively. Also result showed that Ozone gas treatment for 30 min had the greatest of effect in reducing the microbial load and 0.9 ml/L Ozone gas concentration had the lowest of microbial load. Results of this survey reflect that the use of Ozone as a method of disinfection for medicinal plants is a decontamination.

  7. Conformational Ensembles of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein pKID with and without a KIX Domain in Explicit Solvent Investigated by All-Atom Multicanonical Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Nakamura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The phosphorylated kinase-inducible activation domain (pKID adopts a helix–loop–helix structure upon binding to its partner KIX, although it is unstructured in the unbound state. The N-terminal and C-terminal regions of pKID, which adopt helices in the complex, are called, respectively, αA and αB. We performed all-atom multicanonical molecular dynamics simulations of pKID with and without KIX in explicit solvents to generate conformational ensembles. Although the unbound pKID was disordered overall, αA and αB exhibited a nascent helix propensity; the propensity of αA was stronger than that of αB, which agrees with experimental results. In the bound state, the free-energy landscape of αB involved two low free-energy fractions: native-like and non-native fractions. This result suggests that αB folds according to the induced-fit mechanism. The αB-helix direction was well aligned as in the NMR complex structure, although the αA helix exhibited high flexibility. These results also agree quantitatively with experimental observations. We have detected that the αB helix can bind to another site of KIX, to which another protein MLL also binds with the adopting helix. Consequently, MLL can facilitate pKID binding to the pKID-binding site by blocking the MLL-binding site. This also supports experimentally obtained results.

  8. Congenital heart defects in molecularly proven Kabuki syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, Maria Cristina; Gnazzo, Maria; Lepri, Francesca; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Pisaneschi, Elisa; Baban, Anwar; Passarelli, Chiara; Capolino, Rossella; Angioni, Adriano; Novelli, Antonio; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2017-11-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart defects (CHD) in Kabuki syndrome ranges from 28% to 80%. Between January 2012 and December 2015, 28 patients had a molecularly proven diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome. Pathogenic variants in KMT2D (MLL2) were detected in 27 patients, and in KDM6A gene in one. CHD was diagnosed in 19/27 (70%) patients with KMT2D (MLL2) variant, while the single patient with KDM6A change had a normal heart. The anatomic types among patients with CHD included aortic coarctation (4/19 = 21%) alone or associated with an additional CHD, bicuspid aortic valve (4/19 = 21%) alone or associated with an additional CHD, perimembranous subaortic ventricular septal defect (3/19 = 16%), atrial septal defect ostium secundum type (3/19 = 16%), conotruncal heart defects (3/19 = 16%). Additional CHDs diagnosed in single patients included aortic dilatation with mitral anomaly and hypoplastic left heart syndrome. We also reviewed CHDs in patients with a molecular diagnosis of Kabuki syndrome reported in the literature. In conclusion, a CHD is detected in 70% of patients with KMT2D (MLL2) pathogenic variants, most commonly left-sided obstructive lesions, including multiple left-sided obstructions similar to those observed in the spectrum of the Shone complex, and septal defects. Clinical management of Kabuki syndrome should include echocardiogram at the time of diagnosis, with particular attention to left-sided obstructive lesions and mitral anomalies, and annual monitoring for aortic arch dilatation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Efficacy of one dose vaccination against experimental infection with two Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Annelies; Arsenakis, Ioannis; Boyen, Filip; Krejci, Roman; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Maes, Dominiek

    2017-08-29

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) is the primary agent of enzootic pneumonia in pigs. Pigs are often infected with different M. hyopneumoniae strains. This study assessed the efficacy of vaccination against experimental infection with two genetically different M. hyopneumoniae strains in weaned piglets. At 33 days of age (D0), 45 M. hyopneumoniae-free piglets were randomly assigned to three different groups: 1) negative control group (NCG; n = 5): not vaccinated, not infected, 2) positive control group (PCG; n = 20): not vaccinated, infected, and 3) vaccination group (VG; n = 20): single vaccination with an inactivated whole-cell M. hyopneumoniae vaccine (Hyogen®, Ceva) (D1), infected. The PCG and VG were endotracheally inoculated with 7 × 10 7 CCU in 7 ml of the highly virulent M. hyopneumoniae strain F7.2C (D24) and 7 × 10 7 CCU in 7 ml low virulent strain F1.12A (D25). A respiratory disease score (RDS) was assessed from D24 until D53. At D53 (euthanasia), macroscopic lung lesions (MLL) were scored, log copies of M. hyopneumoniae DNA (qPCR) and IL-1 and IL-6-concentrations (ELISA) on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. The RDS and MLL at euthanasia were respectively 0, 1.20 and 0.55 (P hyopneumoniae strain as the vaccinated pigs coughed significantly less, and showed significantly less lung lesions compared to the non-vaccinated challenged pigs: the vaccinated animals showed a 52.9% lower RDS and 91.0% lower MLL compared to the PCG. In the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collected at the necropsy of the vaccinated pigs, a significantly lower amount of M. hyopneumoniae-DNA and a significantly lower IL-1 and IL-6 concentration was found compared to the pigs of the PCG.

  10. Caracterización del mercado laboral del sector hotelero del estado Mérida, Venezuela

    OpenAIRE

    Villasmil R., María A.; Andrade, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Esta investigación trata sobre modelos que permiten caracterizar Mercados Laborales Locales (MLL), ya que en Venezuela el manejo de los mismos es casi inexistente. En este sentido, se plantea como objetivo caracterizar al mercado laboral del sector hotelero del estado Mérida-Venezuela en función del conocimiento de las particularidades económicas, institucionales, políticas, sociales, educativas y culturales de la zona así como las condiciones que se tengan en materia de empleo, oferta de for...

  11. Influence of initial L-asparagine and glycerol concentrations on the batch growth kinetics of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Influência das concentrações iniciais de asparagina e glicerol sobre a cinética de crescimento submerso de Mycobacterium bovis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Betania Batista Leal

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The influences of the L-asparagine and glycerol initial concentrations in Sauton medium on the productivities of biomass and colony forming units were studied. The submerged batch cultivations of Mycobacterium bovis were carried out in a 20 L bioreactor. The L-asparagine and glycerol initial concentrations of 4.54 g/L and 25 mL/L, respectively, corresponded to the best biomass productivity, namely 2.5 g/L.day. On the other hand, the concentrations of 2.27 g/L and 25 mL/L, respectively, led to the highest productivity in terms of colony forming units, namely 2.7·10(6 colonies/mg.day. In addition, by means of the relative consumption analysis of L-asparagine and glycerol (50 and 26% respectively, it was concluded that the concentrations of such components could be reduced, with respect to the original Sauton medium composition, aiming the obtainment of an optimal BCG vaccine production in the bioreactor.Estudou-se a influência das concentrações iniciais, no meio de Sauton, de asparagina e glicerol sobre as produtividades, expressas em unidades formadoras de colônias e biomassa microbiana, referentes aos cultivos submersos do Mycobacterium bovis, em biorreator de 20 mL. As concentrações iniciais de 2,27 e 25 mL/L de asparagina e glicerol, respectivamente, conduziram à maior produtividade, em unidades formadoras de colônias, a saber 2,7.10(6 colônias/mg.dia. Por outro lado, as concentrações de 4,54 e 25 mL/L dos mesmos componentes, corresponderam à melhor produtividade em biomassa, a saber: 2,5 g/dia. Através das análises dos consumos relativos de asparagina e glicerol (50 e 26% respectivamente, verificou-se também que as concentrações destes componentes podem ser reduzidas na composição original do meio de Sauton, com o objetivo de obter uma produção otimizada de vacina BCG em bioreator.

  12. Essays on Strategy. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    Van Dong, Truong Chinh , To Huu, and Le Duc Tho, but retained and pro- moted to the number two position Pham Hung, the Min- ister of Interior and one...explained that a basic concern of the United States was that the Pacific region Should not be trans - formed "into yet another area of superpower confronta... tran - ,sition to mutual 13Mll) t’apkailities would be frought with uncertainty, instabilitY, and po-,ible peril. ("On.juentlvt. alternative tour vields

  13. Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Unrelated Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Fanconi Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. Identification of a Genomic Signature Predicting for Recurrence in Early Stage Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    HRAS, LMO2, MLH1 , MLL, MPL, TFE3, WEE1, and WNT10B. Scatter plots for individual genes are presented in Supplementary Figure S4...expression A ffy m et rix e xp re ss io n Cor: 0.17 8078544 /// MLH1 232 ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● 7.2 7.4 7.6 7.8 8.0 8.2 6. 2 6. 4 6. 6 6. 8 Prostate data

  15. FGFR1 tyrosine kinase domain duplication in pilocytic astrocytoma with anaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Leomar Y; Penas-Prado, Marta; Leeds, Norman E; Huse, Jason T; Fuller, Gregory N

    2018-04-01

    We report the case of a 27-yr-old male with visual field loss who had a 4.9-cm complex cystic mass in the right occipital lobe. Histologic examination showed pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) with anaplasia, and molecular characterization revealed FGFR1 duplication with additional variants of unknown significance in several genes ( ARID1A, ARID1B, CHEK2, EPHA5, and MLL2 ). This is one of only a very few reported cases of anaplastic PA with characterization of molecular alterations. © 2018 Ballester et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Phenotypic Analysis of ATM Protein Kinase in DNA Double-Strand Break Formation and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Elisabeth; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase, which is involved in various regulatory processes in mammalian cells. Its best-known role is apical activation of the DNA damage response following generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). When DSBs appear, sensor and mediator proteins are recruited, activating transducers such as ATM, which in turn relay a widespread signal to a multitude of downstream effectors. ATM mutation causes Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), whereby the disease phenotype shows differing characteristics depending on the underlying ATM mutation. However, all phenotypes share progressive neurodegeneration and marked predisposition to malignancies at the organismal level and sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chromosome aberrations at the cellular level. Expression and localization of the ATM protein can be determined via western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy; however, detection of subtle alterations such as resulting from amino acid exchanges rather than truncating mutations requires functional testing. Previous studies on the role of ATM in DSB repair, which connects with radiosensitivity and chromosomal stability, gave at first sight contradictory results. To systematically explore the effects of clinically relevant ATM mutations on DSB repair, we engaged a series of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from AT patients and controls. To examine DSB repair both in a quantitative and qualitative manners, we used an EGFP-based assay comprising different substrates for distinct DSB repair mechanisms. In this way, we demonstrated that particular signaling defects caused by individual ATM mutations led to specific DSB repair phenotypes. To explore the impact of ATM on carcinogenic chromosomal aberrations, we monitored chromosomal breakage at a breakpoint cluster region hotspot within the MLL gene that has been associated with therapy-related leukemia. PCR-based MLL-breakage analysis of HeLa cells

  17. Search for exclusive Z-boson production and observation of high-mass pp[over ]-->pgammagammap[over ]-->pl;{+}l;{-}p[over ] events in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pinfold, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-06-05

    This Letter presents a search for exclusive Z boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV, using the CDF II detector. No exclusive Z-->l;{+}l;{-} candidates are observed and the first upper limit on the exclusive Z cross section in hadron collisions is found to be sigma_{excl}(Z)pgammagammap[over ]-->pl;{+}l;{-}p[over ] are observed, and a measurement of the cross section for M_{ll}>40 GeV/c;{2} and |eta_{l}|<4 is found to be sigma=0.24_{-0.10};{+0.13} pb, which is consistent with the standard model prediction.

  18. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-12

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Utilization of Liposuction for Delayed Morel-Lavallée Lesion: A Case Report and Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Preston; Flis, Diana; Chaiyasate, Kongkrit

    2017-01-01

    Morel-Lavallée lesions are irregularly occurring and often overlooked results of traumatic injuries, resulting in potential long-term encapsulation of fluid between soft-tissue layers. The objective in this review was to discuss the delayed presentation of a Morel-Lavallée lesion and operative utility of liposuction in the patient's treatment and review literature with particular focus on diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. The reviewed case demonstrates the presentation and successful therapy of a young female presenting with a MLL and contour deformity.

  1. Effectiveness of BPMC Application against Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius Population and CMMV Disease Incidence on Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wartono Wartono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Control of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius is the starting point in suppressing the CMMV disease (cowpea mild mottle virus. This study aims to determine the influence of applications BPMC (500 g a.i./l against B. tabaci populations and disease incidence of CMMV on soybean plants. Research was conducted in the field with randomized complete block design consisting of 5 treatments i.e. five concentration levels: 0.75, 1.50,2.25, and 3.00 ml/l including control (untreated with 5 replications. The results showed that BPMC is effective in suppressing the adult population of B. tabaci and disease incidence of CMMV.

  2. Thin Films for X-ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Raymond

    Focusing x-rays with refraction requires an entire array of lens instead of a single element, each contributing a minute amount of focusing to the system. In contrast to their visible light counterparts, diffractive optics require a certain depth along the optical axis in order to provide sufficient phase shift. Mirrors reflect only at very shallow angles. In order to increase the angle of incidence, contribution from constructive interference within many layers needs to be collected. This requires a multilayer coating. Thin films have become a central ingredient for many x-ray optics due to the ease of which material composition and thickness can be controlled. Chapter 1 starts with a short introduction and survey of the field of x-ray optics. This begins with an explanation of reflective multilayers. Focusing optics are presented next, including mirrors, zone plates, refractive lenses, and multilayer Laue lens (MLL). The strengths and weaknesses of each "species" of optic are briefly discussed, alongside fabrication issues and the ultimate performance for each. Practical considerations on the use of thin-films for x-ray optics fabrication span a wide array of topics including material systems selection and instrumentation design. Sputter deposition is utilized exclusively for the work included herein because this method of thin-film deposition allows a wide array of deposition parameters to be controlled. This chapter also includes a short description of two deposition systems I have designed. Chapter 2 covers a small sampling of some of my work on reflective multilayers, and outlines two of the deposition systems I have designed and built at the Advanced Photon Source. A three-stripe double multilayer monochromator is presented as a case study in order to detail specifications, fabrication, and performance of this prolific breed of x-ray optics. The APS Rotary Deposition System was the first deposition system in the world designed specifically for multilayer

  3. Quantum hashing is maximally secure against classical leakage

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Cupjin; Shi, Yaoyun

    2017-01-01

    Cryptographic hash functions are fundamental primitives widely used in practice. For such a function $f:\\{0, 1\\}^n\\to\\{0, 1\\}^m$, it is nearly impossible for an adversary to produce the hash $f(x)$ without knowing the secret message $x\\in\\{0, 1\\}^n$. Unfortunately, all hash functions are vulnerable under the side-channel attack, which is a grave concern for information security in practice. This is because typically $m\\ll n$ and an adversary needs only $m$ bits of information to pass the veri...

  4. Hydrogen production from formic acid in pH-stat fed-batch operation for direct supply to fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Tai Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Enterobacter asburiae SNU-1 harvested after cultivation was used as a whole cell biocatalyst, for the production of hydrogen. Formic acid was efficiently converted to hydrogen using the harvested cells with an initial hydrogen production rate and total hydrogen production of 491 ml/l/h and 6668 ml/l, respectively, when 1 g/l of whole cell enzyme was used. Moreover, new pH-stat fed-batch operation was conducted, and total hydrogen production was 1.4 times higher than that of batch operation. For practical application, bio-hydrogen produced from formic acid using harvested cells was directly applied to PEMFC for power generation.

  5. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. "Juba õhtu on käes..." : [luuletused] / Sergei Jessenin ; tlk. Helvi Jürisson, Artur Alliksaar, Muia Veetamm, Linda Ruud, Jaan Kross, Ellen Niit, Debora Vaarandi, Venda Sõelsepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jessenin, Sergei, 1895-1925

    2006-01-01

    Sisu: "Juba õhtu on käes..." ; "Seal, kus koit valab kapsaste vahel..." ; "Tulvavesi suitsev..." ; "Tegin oja kaldal vene..." ; "Laia taevaliua sinal..." ; "Kallis kodu! Näen kui unes..." ; "Olen karjus; minu valdus..." ; Venemaa ; Joobumus ; Hobused ; Laul koerast ; "Milleks punakuldseis põõsais nuuksed..." ; "Teispool jõge lõkkeread..." ; "Mind väsitand on kodunurk..." ; "See on mu kodu, mõtlik-hell..." ; Sinendus ; "Õhtul, kui kõik jooned nõrgemad..." ; "Homme varakult üles mind aja..." ; "Isamaja, kuhu jäid..." ; "Paljad põllud, metsaveered..." ; "Su juus on roheline..." ; "Laulud, laulud, kuhu te viite..." ; "Õnn, sina rumal! Mu aknad..." ; "Valged teed kinni tuiskab..." ; "Taas kiindumust ma vajan uut..." ; "Tiigipinnale kuldlehti liibub..." ; "Tuuled, tuuled, oo lund tooge, tuuled..." ; "Olen viimane külapoeet ma..." ; "Pole tarvis palvet, kurtmist, nuttu..." ; "Jah! Nüüd kindel on küll, et ei iial..." ; "Samasugune lihtne kui muud..." ; "Mingi troika on värava taga..." ; Kiri emale ; "Kõik me vähehaaval kaome sinna..." ; "Shagane, minu hea Shagane..." ; "Elurõõmus maailm, sinine ja lai..." ; "Koju ma ei leia teed..." ; "Sinav mai. Eha punerdav joom..." ; "Magab stepp. Koirohu tinast värskust..." ; "Meretäis sädinat õues..." ; "Elu pettus on, mis kestab päevast päeva..." ; "Mängi, lõõtspill, julgelt, mängi, lõõtspill, valju..." ; "Pole näinud ma kaunimat sinust..." ; "Laula nüüd mõnda laulukest, mida..." ; "Selle maailma kiiresti läbin..." ; "Sinistkirja pluus ja sinisilmadki..." ; "Tukub heledas kuuvalges..." ; "Küll on tuisk, tont võtaks, taevas ära kaob..." ; "Kes ma olen? Ainult unistaja..." ; "Sõber, hüvasti, mul ees on minek...". Eluloolisi andmeid autori kohta lk. 821

  7. EFFECT OF ORGANIC AND CHEMICAL SOIL FERTILIZERS AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH FOLIAR FERTILIZER ON SOME VEGETATIVE GROWTH OF FENUGREEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H. JASIM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted on the extension experiments farm in Babylon during the growing season 2013 - 2014 to study the effect of 5 soil fertilization treatments [control, 200 kg.ha-1 of NPK (18-18-0 , 4 and 8 t.ha-1 of compost of poultry], and its interaction with 4 treatments of foliar fertilizers [control, spray urea 1 g / liter, spraying humic acid 2 ml.l-1 and spray polimet 2 ml.l-1] on growth and yield of fenugreek. Randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications was used. Seeds are sown on lines (30 cm apart in 21.10.2013 and the experimental unit contained 6 lines. After a week of germination the seedlings were thinned to 10 cm apart. Soil fertilizers were added as side dressing and the foliar fertilizers were added twice in 15/1 and 01/02/2014. The results showed that chemical fertilizer was superior significantly compared to other treatment in plant height, number of leaves, leaf area and wet and dry weight, while poultry (8 t.ha-1 was superior compared to control in branches number and wet weight. Urea spray was superior in plant height, leaves no. and soft weight. Polimet spray was superior compared to control in branches.plant-1. The interaction between the soil and spraying fertilizers had a significant effect in increasing plant height, branches no., leaves no., leaf area and wet and dry weight.

  8. ZFX Controls Propagation and Prevents Differentiation of Acute T-Lymphoblastic and Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart P. Weisberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-propagating cells in acute leukemia maintain a stem/progenitor-like immature phenotype and proliferative capacity. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML and acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL originate from different lineages through distinct oncogenic events such as MLL fusions and Notch signaling, respectively. We found that Zfx, a transcription factor that controls hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal, controls the initiation and maintenance of AML caused by MLL-AF9 fusion and of T-ALL caused by Notch1 activation. In both leukemia types, Zfx prevents differentiation and activates gene sets characteristic of immature cells of the respective lineages. In addition, endogenous Zfx contributes to gene induction and transformation by Myc overexpression in myeloid progenitors. Key Zfx target genes include the mitochondrial enzymes Ptpmt1 and Idh2, whose overexpression partially rescues the propagation of Zfx-deficient AML. These results show that distinct leukemia types maintain their undifferentiated phenotype and self-renewal by exploiting a common stem-cell-related genetic regulator.

  9. A role for the nucleosome assembly proteins TAF-Iβ and NAP1 in the activation of BZLF1 expression and Epstein-Barr virus reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Sheila; Wang, Shan; Frappier, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from latent to lytic infection begins with the expression of the viral BZLF1 gene, leading to a subsequent cascade of viral gene expression and amplification of the EBV genome. Using RNA interference, we show that nucleosome assembly proteins NAP1 and TAF-I positively contribute to EBV reactivation in epithelial cells through the induction of BZLF1 expression. In addition, overexpression of NAP1 or the β isoform of TAF-I (TAF-Iβ) in AGS cells latently infected with EBV was sufficient to induce BZLF1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments performed in AGS-EBV cells showed that TAF-I associated with the BZLF1 promoter upon lytic induction and affected local histone modifications by increasing H3K4 dimethylation and H4K8 acetylation. MLL1, the host protein known to dimethylate H3K4, was found to associate with the BZLF1 promoter upon lytic induction in a TAF-I-dependent manner, and MLL1 depletion decreased BZLF1 expression, confirming its contribution to lytic reactivation. The results indicate that TAF-Iβ promotes BZLF1 expression and subsequent lytic infection by affecting chromatin at the BZLF1 promoter.

  10. Radionuclide Concentrations in Soils and Vegetation at Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area G during the 1997 Growing Season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Naranjo, Jr.; P. R. Fresquez; R. J. Wechsler

    1998-08-01

    Soil and overstory and understory vegetation (washed and unwashed) collected at eight locations within and around Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-were analyzed for 3H, 238Pu, 239Pu, 137CS, 234U, 235U, 228AC, Be, 214Bi, 60Co, 40& 54Mn, 22Na, 214Pb and 208Tl. In general, most radionuclide concentrations, with the exception of 3Ef and ~9Pu, in soils and overstory and understory vegetation collected from within and around Area G were within upper (95'%) level background concentrations. Although 3H concentrations in vegetation from most sites were significantly higher than background (>2 pCi mL-l), concentrations decreased markedly in comparison to last year's results. The highest `H concentration in vegetation was detected from a juniper tree that was growing over tritium shaft /+150; it contained 530,000 pCi 3H mL-l. Also, as in the pas~ the transuranic waste pad area contained the highest levels of 239Pu in soils and in understory vegetation as compared to other areas at Area G.

  11. Treatment of sugar beet extraction juice stillage by natural coagulants extracted from common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanović Jelena M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distillery wastewaters have a great pollution potential, and pollution caused by them is one of the most critical environmental issues. This study is concerned with the coagulation efficiency of a new, environmental friendly, natural coagulant extracted from common bean seeds in the primary treatment of distillery wastewater in the bioethanol production from sugar beet juice. Active coagulation components were extracted from ground seeds of common bean with 0.5 mol/L NaCl. The obtained raw extract was used as a coagulant. The coagulation efficiency was measured by jar test at different pH values of wastewater, and a decrease in organic matter content was determined. The experiments confirmed that natural coagulant from common bean could be successfully used for the treatment of extraction juice distillery wastewater. The highest coagulation efficiencies were achieved at the pH 5.2 with a coagulant dose of 30 mL/L, and at the pH 8.5 with a coagulant dose of 5 mL/L, and they were 64.71% and 68.75% respectively. These encouraging results indicate that natural coagulant from common bean seeds is a potential alternative to conventional chemical coagulant/flocculant agents for treatment of wastewaters.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 43005

  12. Effect of utilization of tomato extract and foliar fertilizer as media on shoots multiplication of banana cv Ambon in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidhari, L. A.; Purwanto, E.; Yunus, A.

    2018-03-01

    The good quality banana seeds are still difficult to obtain. There are two ways to provide seeds, namely conventional and tissue culture (in vitro). Tomato extract contains natural ZPT or phytohormone which can be utilized in modification of banana tissue culture media. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of media types and tomato extracts in various concentrations for multiplication of banana cv. Ambon in vitro. The study was conducted from October - December 2016 at the Tissue Culture Laboratory of Horticulture Seed Center, Salaman, Magelang. The experimental design used was completely randomized design with two treatment factors. The firs factor was media type with the addition of foliar fertilizer, the second factor was modification of tomato extract with 4 levels. The results showed that the different of the treated media treatment did not affect the emerge of leaf and leaf length, the number of roots and root length. The emerge of the leaves of all treatments occurred at 6 days after planting with the highest average length was obtained in MS treatment with a combination of tomato extract 50 ml/l (10.3 cm). The use of MS medium with a combination of tomato extract 50 ml/l generated the average root number 15.5 with a root lengths 7.5 cm. Substitution of MS medium with tomato extract and foliar fertilizer did not show better results compared to the use of MS media in the multiplication of banana shoots in tissue culture.

  13. Antigen Loss Variants: Catching Hold of Escaping Foes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Maulik; Müller, Rolf; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Since mid-1990s, the field of cancer immunotherapy has seen steady growth and selected immunotherapies are now a routine and preferred therapeutic option of certain malignancies. Both active and passive cancer immunotherapies exploit the fact that tumor cells express specific antigens on the cell surface, thereby mounting an immune response specifically against malignant cells. It is well established that cancer cells typically lose surface antigens following natural or therapy-induced selective pressure and these antigen-loss variants are often the population that causes therapy-resistant relapse. CD19 and CD20 antigen loss in acute lymphocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, respectively, and lineage switching in leukemia associated with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements are well-documented evidences in this regard. Although increasing number of novel immunotherapies are being developed, majority of these do not address the control of antigen loss variants. Here, we review the occurrence of antigen loss variants in leukemia and discuss the therapeutic strategies to tackle the same. We also present an approach of dual-targeting immunoligand effectively retargeting NK cells against antigen loss variants in MLL-associated leukemia. Novel immunotherapies simultaneously targeting more than one tumor antigen certainly hold promise to completely eradicate tumor and prevent therapy-resistant relapses.

  14. Computation of interactive effects and optimization of process parameters for alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Bisht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline lipase production by mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055 was optimized in shake flask batch fermentation using response surface methodology. An empirical model was developed through Box-Behnken experimental design to describe the relationship among tested variables (pH, temperature, castor oil, starch and triton-X-100. The second-order quadratic model determined the optimum conditions as castor oil, 1.77 mL.L-1; starch, 15.0 g.L-1; triton-X-100, 0.93 mL.L-1; incubation temperature, 34.12 ºC and pH 8.1 resulting into maximum alkaline lipase production (3142.57 U.mL-1. The quadratic model was in satisfactory adjustment with the experimental data as evidenced by a high coefficient of determination (R² value (0.9987. The RSM facilitated the analysis and interpretation of experimental data to ascertain the optimum conditions of the variables for the process and recognized the contribution of individual variables to assess the response under optimal conditions. Hence Box-Behnken approach could fruitfully be applied for process optimization.

  15. Pre and post harvest IPM for the mango fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verghese, Abraham; Sreedevi, K.; Nagaraju, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    The fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is a major pest of mango in India. So, investigations were carried out to standardize an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for fruit fly-free and residue-free mango fruits. The study required orchard and laboratory studies, which were conducted on the commercial variety Banganapalli, at the Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghatta Lake P.O., Bangalore, India, during 2004 and 2005. Results showed that a pre harvest IPM combination of male annihilation technique (MAT) (using methyl eugenol as a lure) + sanitation brought down B. dorsalis infestation to 5.00% from an infestation ranging from 17 to 66% in control in both years. An additional cover spray of Decamethrin 2.8EC 0.5ml/l (which is half the recommended dose) + Azadirachtin (0.03 %) 2ml/l (neem based botanical) gave 100% control in both the years. Post harvest treatments with hot water at 48 degree C for 60 and 75 min resulted in 100% control at both the time regimes in 2004 and 2005. The untreated fruits, which were also exposed to gravid females (but not treated in hot water) showed 30% and 5.5% infestations, respectively, in 2004 and 2005. (author)

  16. Brief Report: Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Reprogramming to Pluripotency Is a Rare Event and Selects for Patient Hematopoietic Cells Devoid of Leukemic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hee; Salci, Kyle R; Reid, Jennifer C; Orlando, Luca; Tanasijevic, Borko; Shapovalova, Zoya; Bhatia, Mickie

    2017-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming has provided critical insights into disease processes by modeling the genetics and related clinical pathophysiology. Human cancer represents highly diverse genetics, as well as inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity, where cellular model systems capable of capturing this disease complexity would be invaluable. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents one of most heterogeneous cancers and has been divided into genetic subtypes correlated with unique risk stratification over the decades. Here, we report our efforts to induce pluripotency from the heterogeneous population of human patients that represents this disease in the clinic. Using robust optimized reprogramming methods, we demonstrate that reprogramming of AML cells harboring leukemic genomic aberrations is a rare event with the exception of those with de novo mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) mutations that can be reprogrammed and model drug responses in vitro. Our findings indicate that unlike hematopoietic cells devoid of genomic aberrations, AML cells harboring driver mutations are refractory to reprogramming. Expression of MLL fusion proteins in AML cells did not contribute to induced reprogramming success, which continued to select for patient derived cells devoid of AML patient-specific aberrations. Our study reveals that unanticipated blockades to achieving pluripotency reside within the majority of transformed AML patient cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:2095-2102. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Effect of hydro-ethanolic extracts of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume and common horsetail (Equisetum arvense L. on incidence and severity of Botrytis cinerea on strawberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazmiño-Miranda Pilar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of application of three dosages (5, 10 and 15 mL/L and two frequencies (each 6 and 8 days of ethanoic extracts obtained from cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume and common horsetail (Equisetum arvense L. on incidence and severity of grey mould (Botrytis cinerea on strawberry crop (Fragaria ananassa cv. Albion was evaluated. Experiment was carried out in a randomized block design with factorial arrangement 2 x 3 x 2 + 1, with three replications. Lower incidence and severity percentage in flower and fruit (10.24 and 24.43%, respectively were observed after application of cinnamon extract at 15 mL/L at 6 days interval. Similarly, lower fruit severity (11.86% was observed with the same treatment. In general, reduction in B. cinerea incidence and severity was lower when common horsetail extract was used, compared to cinnamon extracts. According to our results, using of cinnamon hydro-ethanoic extracts could be considered as sustainable alternative for grey mold management in strawberry crops.

  18. Recoveries of rat lymph FA after administration of specific structured C-13-TAG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Bodil; Mu, Huiling; Høy, Carl-Erik

    2003-01-01

    of intragastrically administered L*L*L*, M*M*M*, ML*M, and ML*L* (where * = C-13-labeled FA) in rats. Lymph lipids were separated into lipid classes and analyzed by GC combustion isotope ratio MS. The recoveries of lymph TAG 18:2n-6 8 h after administration of L*L*L*, ML*M, and ML*L* were 38.6, 48.4, and 49...... rapid recovery of exogenous long-chain FA following administration of specific structured TAG compared with long-chain TAG was probably due to fast hydrolysis. The lymphatic recovery of 8:0 was 2.2% 24 h after administration of M*M*M*. This minor lymphatic recovery of exogenous 8:0 was probably due...... to low stimulation of chylomicron formation. These results demonstrate tendencies toward faster lymphatic recovery of long-chain FA after administration of specific structured TAG compared with long-chain TAG....

  19. Photonic-Based RF Transceiver for UWB Multi-Carrier Wireless Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Scotti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an all-optical system exploitable as the core structure for a photonic-based RF transceiver is presented. The proposed scheme is able to simultaneously perform either up- or down-conversion of multiple frequency Ultra-Wide Band (UWB RF signals, employing a single Mode-Locking Laser (MLL. The system has been experimentally demonstrated and tested by up- and down-converting orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM signals over a bandwidth of about 4 GHz. The scheme’s performance has been validated by measuring the error vector magnitude (EVM of the OFDM signals over the whole considered RF spectrum (from 5 GHz to 26.5 GHz, both in up-conversion and in down-conversion. The measurements show negligible power penalties, lower than 0.5 dB. Since the proposed scheme can act either as an up- or down-converter, and it is composed by easily integratable devices, two identical structures can be combined on a single integrated platform, sharing a single MLL, to build a compact and efficient UWB transceiver.

  20. Mucocele-like lesions of the breast: a clinical outcome and histologic analysis of 102 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meares, Annie L; Frank, Ryan D; Degnim, Amy C; Vierkant, Robert A; Frost, Marlene H; Hartmann, Lynn C; Winham, Stacey J; Visscher, Daniel W

    2016-03-01

    Mucocele-like lesions (MLLs) of the breast are characterized by cystic architecture with stromal mucin and frequent atypia, but it is unknown whether they convey long-term breast cancer risk. We evaluated 102 MLLs that were derived from a single-institution benign breast disease cohort of 13412 women who underwent biopsy from 1967 to 2001. MLLs were histologically characterized by type of lining epithelium, architecture of the lesion, associated atypical hyperplasia (AH), and incidence of breast cancer (14.8-year median follow-up). A relatively large proportion of MLLs (42%) were diagnosed in women older than 55 years. AH was significantly more frequent in MLL patient compared to the cohort overall (27% versus 5%; P Breast cancer has developed in 13 patients with MLL. This frequency is only slightly higher than population expected rates overall (standardized incidence ratio, 2.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-3.91) and not significantly different from women in the cohort with (nonatypical) proliferative breast lesions. Younger women (breast lesion that is often associated with coexisting AH. However, in women older than 45 years, MLLs do not convey additional risk of breast cancer beyond that associated with the presence of proliferative disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CT incidence of Morel-Lavallee lesions in patients with pelvic fractures: a 4-year experience at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Nicholas M; Cai, Chunyan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the incidence and location of Morel-Lavallee lesions (MLLs) on pelvic CTs performed in evaluation of pelvic fractures and determine if correlation exists between MLLs and mechanism of injury or pelvic ring injury pattern. A retrospective review was performed of pelvic CTs on 1493 consecutive patients presenting with pelvic fractures at our level 1 trauma center. MLLs occurred in 182 of 1493 patients presenting with pelvic fractures. Statistical significance in MLL incidence was found across mechanism of injuries with MLLs being seen most frequently in MCC/ATV accidents and crush injuries. A little over half of MLLs occurred over the lateral thigh with almost all other MLLs occurring over the posterior (flank or lumbar) region. MLLs were much more common in vertical shear and spinopelvic dissociation pelvic ring fracture patterns compared to lateral compression and AP compression patterns. In lateral compression injuries, MLLs most commonly occurred over the thigh. In all other pelvic ring injury patterns, MLLs were predominately posterior. MLL's are not as rare as previously believed. The lateral thigh and lumbar/flank regions should be closely inspected on pelvic trauma patients to identify MLLs, particularly in patients with a spinopelvic dissociation injury pattern.

  2. The comparison of heavy metals (Pb and Cd) in the water and sediment during spring and neap tide tidal periods in Popoh Bay, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yona, D.; Febriana, R.; Handayani, M.

    2018-04-01

    This study attempted to investigate different concentration of lead (Pb) dan cadmium (Cd) in the water and sediment during spring and neap tidal periods in the Popoh Bay, Indonesia. Water and sediment samples were taken during spring and neap tides from eight sampling stations in the study area. The result shows higher concentration of Pb than the concentration of Cd in both spring and neap tides due to higher input of Pb from the oil pollution by boat and fisheries activities. Pb concentrations were doubled during neap tide in both water and sediments with the value of 0.51 and 0.28 ml/L in the water during neap and spring tide, respectively; and 0.27 ppm and 0.16 mg/kg in the sediment during neap and spring tide, respectively. On the other hand, Cd concentrations in the water were found in almost similar values between spring and neap tide (0.159 and 0.165 ml/L in spring tide and neap tide, respectively), but in the sediment, the concentration was a little higher during spring tide (0.09 and 0.05 mg/kg during spring and neap tide, respectively). This study shows that water movement during spring and neap tides has significant effect on the distribution of heavy metals.

  3. Secondary Leukemia Associated with the Anti-Cancer Agent, Etoposide, a Topoisomerase II Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Ezoe

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Etoposide is an anticancer agent, which is successfully and extensively used in treatments for various types of cancers in children and adults. However, due to the increases in survival and overall cure rate of cancer patients, interest has arisen on the potential risk of this agent for therapy-related secondary leukemia. Topoisomerase II inhibitors, including etoposide and teniposide, frequently cause rearrangements involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL gene on chromosome 11q23, which is associated with secondary leukemia. The prognosis is extremely poor for leukemias associated with rearrangements in the MLL gene, including etoposide-related secondary leukemias. It is of great importance to gain precise knowledge of the clinical aspects of these diseases and the mechanism underlying the leukemogenesis induced by this agent to ensure correct assessments of current and future therapy strategies. Here, I will review current knowledge regarding the clinical aspects of etoposide-related secondary leukemia, some probable mechanisms, and strategies for treating etoposide-induced leukemia.

  4. Pre-treatment with melatonin decreases abamectin induced toxicity in a nocturnal insect Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subala, Subramanian P; Zubero, Eduardo E; Alatorre-Jimenez, Moises A; Shivakumar, Muthugounder S

    2017-12-01

    Oxidative stress is an important component of the mechanism of pesticide toxicity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time-dependent melatonin effects against abamectin-induced oxidative stress in a S.litura model. Larvae were divided into 5 different groups; (1) control group,(2) Melatonin group (4.3×10 -5 M/100ml diet), (3) Abamectin group 1.5ml/L, (4) Pre-melatonin treated group (PM) (4.3×10 -5 M/100ml diet) before abamectin exposure 1.5ml/L, (5) Post-melatonin treated group (TM) after abamectin exposure. Melatonin was supplemented via artificial diet in PM and TM animals during 24h. Midgut, fatbody, and hemolymph, were collected for the analysis of oxidative stress markers (Total ROS, GSH, nitrite, TBARS, LPO), antioxidant enzyme levels (SOD, GST, CAT, POX, APOX) in fifth instar larvae. Midgut damage was examined by using morphological analysis. Our results observed that ABA group showed significant changes (pmelatonin. Significant (pmelatonin treatment reduces this damage due to its antioxidant properties, especially POX levels in midgut, fatbody, and hemolymph. Therefore, indoleamine can play a vital role curtailing the abamectin toxicity in time dependent manner in S.litura. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pre and post harvest IPM for the mango fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verghese, Abraham; Sreedevi, K.; Nagaraju, D.K., E-mail: avergis@iihr.ernet.i [Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2006-07-01

    The fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is a major pest of mango in India. So, investigations were carried out to standardize an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for fruit fly-free and residue-free mango fruits. The study required orchard and laboratory studies, which were conducted on the commercial variety Banganapalli, at the Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghatta Lake P.O., Bangalore, India, during 2004 and 2005. Results showed that a pre harvest IPM combination of male annihilation technique (MAT) (using methyl eugenol as a lure) + sanitation brought down B. dorsalis infestation to 5.00% from an infestation ranging from 17 to 66% in control in both years. An additional cover spray of Decamethrin 2.8EC 0.5ml/l (which is half the recommended dose) + Azadirachtin (0.03 %) 2ml/l (neem based botanical) gave 100% control in both the years. Post harvest treatments with hot water at 48 degree C for 60 and 75 min resulted in 100% control at both the time regimes in 2004 and 2005. The untreated fruits, which were also exposed to gravid females (but not treated in hot water) showed 30% and 5.5% infestations, respectively, in 2004 and 2005. (author)

  6. A Rare Presentation of a Morel-Lavallee Lesion of the Lower Leg Successfully Treated With Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconi, Audrey; Crellin, Holly; Tagawa, Chelsea

    2017-07-21

    A Morel-Lavallee lesion (MLL) is a relatively rare condition that is caused by a traumatic shearing force. This force leads to a closed degloving injury of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia that creates a potential space that can fill with lymph, blood, and necrotic fat. The MLLs are traditionally seen after high impact trauma and typically located at the greater trochanter and pelvis, although recent reports have found them to be located at the knee, thigh, and lower leg. The MLLs typically present as swelling at the site of injury, which can be difficult to differentiate from several other diagnoses. This case report discusses an MLL in the lower extremity that occurred during a rugby game. A lack of familiarity with MLLs often leads to delayed diagnosis and treatment. The diagnosis was eventually made with an magnetic resonance imaging, and the lesion was successfully treated with ultrasound-guided aspiration and compression. The athlete was able to return to play without recurrence of the lesion.

  7. EFFECT OF ORGASOL ON SNAP BEAN CROP (Phaseolus vulgaris L. WITH AND WITHOUT CHEMICAL FERTILIZERS EFEITO DO ORGASOL NA CULTURA DE FEIJÃO-DE-VAGEM (Phaseolus vulgaris L. NA PRESENÇA E NA AUSÊNCIA DE ADUBAÇÃO QUÍMICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jácomo Divino Borges

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The Orgasol, an organic compound of animal origin, was tested on seeds and on snap crop (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Bush Blue Lake, with and without chemical fertilizer (NPK in two planting dates. The orgasol-s with three applied doses (0, 1 and 2 ml/l of water on a first date and 0, 3 and 6 ml/l, on a second date had no influence on seed germination and pods production on this crop.

    O Orgasol, um composto orgânico de origem animal, foi testado em sementes e na cultura do feijão-de-vagem (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Bush Blue Lake, em duas épocas de plantio, na presença e na ausência de adubação química. O Orgasol-S foi empregado nas doses de 0, 1 e 2 ml/litro de água na primeira época de plantio e 0, 3 e 6 ml/litro de água na segunda época. Este composto não influenciou a germinação nem a produção de vagens na cultura estudada.

  8. Evolutionary changes of Hox genes and relevant regulatory factors provide novel insights into mammalian morphological modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kui; Sun, Xiaohui; Chen, Meixiu; Sun, Yingying; Tian, Ran; Wang, Zhengfei; Xu, Shixia; Yang, Guang

    2018-01-01

    The diversity of body plans of mammals accelerates the innovation of lifestyles and the extensive adaptation to different habitats, including terrestrial, aerial and aquatic habitats. However, the genetic basis of those phenotypic modifications, which have occurred during mammalian evolution, remains poorly explored. In the present study, we synthetically surveyed the evolutionary pattern of Hox clusters that played a powerful role in the morphogenesis along the head-tail axis of animal embryos and the main regulatory factors (Mll, Bmi1 and E2f6) that control the expression of Hox genes. A deflected density of repetitive elements and lineage-specific radical mutations of Mll have been determined in marine mammals with morphological changes, suggesting that evolutionary changes may alter Hox gene expression in these lineages, leading to the morphological modification of these lineages. Although no positive selection was detected at certain ancestor nodes of lineages, the increased ω values of Hox genes implied the relaxation of functional constraints of these genes during the mammalian evolutionary process. More importantly, 49 positively-selected sites were identified in mammalian lineages with phenotypic modifications, indicating adaptive evolution acting on Hox genes and regulatory factors. In addition, 3 parallel amino acid substitutions in some Hox genes were examined in marine mammals, which might be responsible for their streamlined body. © 2017 The Authors. Integrative Zoology published by International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. The DNA damage- and transcription-associated protein Paxip1 controls thymocyte development and emigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, E.; Faryabi, R.B.; Daniel, Jeremy Austin

    2012-01-01

    Histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is associated with promoters of active genes and found at hot spots for DNA recombination. Here we have shown that PAXIP1 (also known as PTIP), a protein associated with MLL3 and MLL4 methyltransferase and the DNA damage response, regulates RAG......-mediated cleavage and repair during V(D)J recombination in CD4 CD8 DP thymocytes. Loss of PAXIP1 in developing thymocytes diminished Jα H3K4me3 and germline transcription, suppressed double strand break formation at 3' Jα segments, but resulted in accumulation of unresolved T cell receptor α-chain gene (Tcra......) breaks. Moreover, PAXIP1 was essential for release of mature single positive (SP) αβ T cells from the thymus through transcriptional activation of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor S1pr1 as well as for natural killer T cell development. Thus, in addition to maintaining genome integrity during Tcra...

  10. Chromatin-regulating proteins as targets for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oike, Takahiro; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Kohno, Takashi; Amornwichet, Napapat; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin-regulating proteins represent a large class of novel targets for cancer therapy. In the context of radiotherapy, acetylation and deacetylation of histones by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks generated by ionizing irradiation, and are therefore attractive targets for radiosensitization. Small-molecule inhibitors of HATs (garcinol, anacardic acid and curcumin) and HDACs (vorinostat, sodium butyrate and valproic acid) have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to ionizing irradiation in preclinical models, and some of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy. Meanwhile, recent large-scale genome analyses have identified frequent mutations in genes encoding chromatin-regulating proteins, especially in those encoding subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, in various human cancers. These observations have driven researchers toward development of targeted therapies against cancers carrying these mutations. DOT1L inhibition in MLL-rearranged leukemia, EZH2 inhibition in EZH2-mutant or MLL-rearranged hematologic malignancies and SNF5-deficient tumors, BRD4 inhibition in various hematologic malignancies, and BRM inhibition in BRG1-deficient tumors have demonstrated promising anti-tumor effects in preclinical models, and these strategies are currently awaiting clinical application. Overall, the data collected so far suggest that targeting chromatin-regulating proteins is a promising strategy for tomorrow's cancer therapy, including radiotherapy and molecularly targeted chemotherapy. (author)

  11. Jumping translocations in hematological malignancies: a cytogenetic study of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manola, Kalliopi N; Georgakakos, Vasileios N; Stavropoulou, Chryssa; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Angelopoulou, Maria K; Vlachadami, Ioanna; Katsigiannis, Andreas; Roussou, Paraskevi; Pantelias, Gabriel E; Sambani, Constantina

    2008-12-01

    Jumping translocations (JT) are rare cytogenetic aberrations in hematological malignancies that include unbalanced translocations involving a donor chromosome arm or chromosome segment that has fused to two or more different recipient chromosomes in different cell lines. We report five cases associated with different hematologic disorders and JT to contribute to the investigation of the origin, pathogenesis, and clinical significance of JT. These cases involve JT of 1q in a case of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML)-M1, a case of Burkitt lymphoma, and a case of BCR/ABL-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as well as a JT of 13q in a case of AML-M5, and a JT of 11q segment in a case of undifferentiated leukemia. To our knowledge, with regard to hematologic malignancies, this study presents the first case of JT associated with AML-M1, the first case of JT involving 13q as a donor chromosome, and the first report of JT involving a segment of 11q containing two copies of the MLL gene, jumping on to two recipient chromosomes in each cell line and resulting in six copies of the MLL gene. Our investigation suggests that JT may not contribute to the pathogenesis but rather to the progression of the disease, and it demonstrates that chromosome band 1q10 as a breakpoint of the donor chromosome 1q is also implicated in AML, not only in multiple myeloma as it has been known until now.

  12. Pomegranate polyphenols and extract inhibit nuclear factor of activated T-cell activity and microglial activation in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Puig, Kendra L; Combs, Colin K

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) brain is characterized by extracellular plaques of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide with reactive microglia. This study aimed to determine whether a dietary intervention could attenuate microgliosis. Memory was assessed in 12-mo-old male amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice via Barnes maze testing followed by division into either a control-fed group provided free access to normal chow and water or a treatment group provided free access to normal chow and drinking water supplemented with pomegranate extract (6.25 mL/L) for 3 mo followed by repeat Barnes maze testing for both groups. Three months of pomegranate feeding decreased the path length to escape of mice compared with their initial 12-mo values (P pomegranate-fed mice had lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) concentrations (P pomegranate or control mice were also compared with an additional control group of 12-mo-old mice for histologic analysis. Immunocytochemistry showed that pomegranate- but not control-fed mice had attenuated microgliosis (P pomegranate extract-supplemented drinking water (6.25 mL/L) for 1 mo followed by repeat T-maze testing in both groups. One month of pomegranate feeding increased spontaneous alternations versus control-fed mice (P pomegranate extract, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated NFAT activity in a reporter cell line (P pomegranate produces brain antiinflammatory effects that may attenuate AD progression.

  13. Pomegranate Polyphenols and Extract Inhibit Nuclear Factor of Activated T-Cell Activity and Microglial Activation In Vitro and in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Puig, Kendra L.; Combs, Colin K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) brain is characterized by extracellular plaques of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide with reactive microglia. This study aimed to determine whether a dietary intervention could attenuate microgliosis. Memory was assessed in 12-mo-old male amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice via Barnes maze testing followed by division into either a control-fed group provided free access to normal chow and water or a treatment group provided free access to normal chow and drinking water supplemented with pomegranate extract (6.25 mL/L) for 3 mo followed by repeat Barnes maze testing for both groups. Three months of pomegranate feeding decreased the path length to escape of mice compared with their initial 12-mo values (P pomegranate-fed mice had lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) concentrations (P pomegranate or control mice were also compared with an additional control group of 12-mo-old mice for histologic analysis. Immunocytochemistry showed that pomegranate- but not control-fed mice had attenuated microgliosis (P pomegranate extract–supplemented drinking water (6.25 mL/L) for 1 mo followed by repeat T-maze testing in both groups. One month of pomegranate feeding increased spontaneous alternations versus control-fed mice (P pomegranate extract, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated NFAT activity in a reporter cell line (P pomegranate produces brain antiinflammatory effects that may attenuate AD progression. PMID:23468550

  14. Respon Pertumbuhan Planlet Anggrek Dendrobium sp. Melalui Aplikasi Ekstrak Tauge dan Air Kelapa pada Media Organik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HESTIN YUSWANTI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Growth Response of Orchid Plantlets of Dendrobium sp. by Aplicación of Bean Sprouts Extract and Coconut Water in Organic Medium The aim of this researh is to obtain the effect of coconut water and bean sprouts extract and the best combination added to organic medium on growth of orchid planlets in vitro. The experiment was conducted at Tissue Culture Laboratory of Agriculture Faculty, Udayana University, Pegok Denpasar from Mei until Oktober 2012. The research design was Completely Randomized Design (RAL with ten treatments and six replications. The results of this ezperiment showed that addition of coconut water at concentration of 150 ml/l and bean sprouts extract of 50 ml/l resulted in the best growth of orchid planlet which includes the height of plantlets (4,10 cm, the number of leaf (3,33 leaves, length of root (1,07 cm. The total fresh weight of plantlet was 0,20 g and total oven dry-weight of plantlet was 0,021 g.

  15. High resolution melting curve analysis, a rapid and affordable method for mutation analysis in childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin eLiu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular genetic alterations with prognostic significance have been described in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The aim of this study was to establish cost-effective techniques to detect mutations of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3, Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1, and a partial tandem duplication within the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-PTD genes in childhood AML. Procedure: Ninety-nine children with newly diagnosed AML were included in this study. We developed a fluoresent dye SYTO-82 based high resolution melting curve (HRM anaylsis to detect FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD, FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain (FLT3-TKD and NPM1 mutations. MLL-PTD was screened by real-time quantitative PCR. Results: The HRM methodology correlated well with gold standard Sanger sequencing with less cost. Among the 99 patients studied, the FLT3-ITD mutation was associated with significantly worse event free survival (EFS. Patients with the NPM1 mutation had significantly better EFS and overall survival. However, HRM was not sensitive enough for minimal residual disease monitoring. Conclusions: HRM was a rapid and efficient method for screening of FLT3 and NPM1 gene mutations. It was both affordable and accurate, especially in resource underprivileged regions. Our results indicated that HRM could be a useful clinical tool for rapid and cost effective screening of the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in AML patients.

  16. Improvement of date palm plant lets during rooting stage by silver ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharaf, M.M.; Khamis, M.A.; El Bana, A.; Abd El Galeil, L.M.; Zaid, Z.E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aim to promote growth plant lets of date palm cv. Zaghlool by decreasing ethylene production inside the containers during rooting stage. Data obtained declared that three silver thiosulphate (STS) levels added to one half strength MS rooting medium improved significantly three rooting measurements (rooting percentage; number and length of developed root lets). However, the lightest STS level (0.25 ml/L of 4 mM STS solution) was the superior, while highest one (1.0 ml/L) was the inferior from statistical point of view. Data obtained displayed that providing MS rooting medium with silver nitrate improved 3 rooting measurements (rooting %; number of root lets and their length) for Zaghloul date palm shoot lets proliferated from somatic embryos. However, the 0.50 mg/L AgNO 3 provided MS medium was the most preferable in this concern. Plant lets were transferred to capped tubes contained 1/4 liquid MS medium through 3 weeks in the growth chamber (under aseptic condition). Ventilation was allowed gradually by punching holes in aluminum foil caps during first five days of 2 nd week. After then, the plant lets were transplanted in acclimatization green house on mixture from (peat moss + perlite + vermiculite at 1:1:1) and survival percentage was 75% after three months.

  17. Análise biomecânica e histológica de músculos gastrocnêmios de ratas submetidas à lesão muscular e tratados com laserterapia de baixa intensidade Biomechanical and histological analysis of the gastrocnemius in rats subjected to muscle injury and treatment with low-level laser therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício José Falcai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar, mecânica e histologicamente, a aplicação do laser terapêutico de baixa potência, no processo reparativo de lesões provocadas por impacto em músculos gastrocnêmios de ratas. MÉTODOS: 45 ratas Wistar foram divididas em três grupos (n=15/grupo: C (controle, sem lesão, LM (lesão muscular e LM-L (lesão muscular e laserterapia. A lesão muscular experimental foi produzida pela queda de uma carga de 250 g, de uma altura de 30cm, diretamente sobre o músculo. Os animais do grupo LM-L foram submetidos à aplicação de laser 960nm, 2J/cm², durante três dias, duas aplicações por dia, no local da lesão. Foi realizado ensaio mecânico na máquina universal de ensaio Emic®. RESULTADOS: As médias dos valores de força máxima foram: (35,70 ± 2,69 N no grupo C, (31,77 ± 2,59 N no grupo LM e (34,36 ± 3,63 N no grupo LM-L, com diferença estatística significativa nos grupos C e LM (p 0,05. A análise histológica evidenciou presença de vasos sanguíneos no grupo LM-L e hematomas em processo de reparação. CONCLUSÃO: A laserterapia influencia de forma positiva no processo de regeneração da lesão muscular.OBJETIVE: To evaluate, by means of biomechanical and histological analysis, the effect of low-level laser therapy on the gastrocnemius of rats subjected to muscle lesion by impact. METHODS: 45 female Wistar rats, weighing 250g, were divided into 3 groups (n=15/group: C (control, ML (animals submitted to muscle lesion and ML-L (animals submitted to muscle lesion and laser therapy. The animals from groups ML and ML-L were subjected to an experimental muscle lesion by means of an impact of a 250g load, released from a height of 30 cm, directly on the gastrocnemius. The animals from group ML-L were submitted to a treatment with a 960 Nm laser, 2 J/cm², for 3 days, twice a day. RESULTS: The mechanical tests were performed on the Universal Testing Machine. The average values of maximum force were: 35.70 (± 2.69 N in

  18. MEASUREMENT OF WASTE LOADING IN SALTSTONE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-01-01

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. One of those properties of importance is the Waste Loading (WL) of the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) in the Saltstone waste form. Waste loading is a measure of the amount of waste that can be incorporated within a waste form. The value of the Saltstone waste loading ultimately determines the number of vaults that will be required to disposition all of the DSS. In this report, the waste loading is defined as the volume in milliliters of DSS per liter of Saltstone waste form. The two most important parameters that determine waste loading for Saltstone are water to cementitious material (w/cm) ratio and the cured grout density. Data are provided that show the dependence of waste loading on the w/cm ratio for a fixed DSS composition using the current premix material (45% Blast Furnace Slag (BFS), 45% Fly Ash (FA) and 10% Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC)). The impact of cured grout density on waste loading was also demonstrated. Mixes (at 0.60 w/cm) made with a Modular Caustic side extraction Unit (MCU) simulant and either OPC or BFS have higher cured grout densities than mixes made with premix and increase the WL to 709 mL/L for the OPC mix and 689 mL/L for the BFS mix versus the value of 653 mL/L for MCU in premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio. Bleed liquid reduces the waste loading and lowers the effective w/cm ratio of Saltstone. A method is presented (and will be used in future tasks) for correcting the waste loading and the w/cm ratio of the as-batched mixes in those cases where bleed liquid is present. For example, the Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA) mix at an as-batched 0.60 w/cm ratio, when corrected for % bleed, gives a mix with a 0.55 w/cm ratio and a WL that has been reduced from 662 to 625 mL/L. An example is provided that

  19. Morel-Lavallée Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant G Simpson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 17-year-old male presented to the emergency department for significant localized right lower extremity (RLE swelling following a motorcycle traffic accident 12 days prior, causing high-impact blunt trauma to his RLE and included multiple orthopedic fractures on the initial date of injury. Significant findings: On physical examination, he was noted to have a nearly “watermelon-sized” fluctuant mass to his right lateral superior quadriceps with multiple overlying abrasions (Image 1. Computed tomography (CT scans of the area showed a large heterogeneous collection measuring roughly 37×9.5×16 centimeters in the subcutaneous adipose layer of the lateral right thigh (Image 2, while ultrasonography revealed a complex fluid collection containing some nodular solid components and debris (Image 3. Additionally, radiographs confirmed multiple fractures including most significantly a pelvic ring fracture. Surgical debridement, evacuation, and sclerodhesis were performed nine weeks post injury to allow overlying abrasions to heal prior to intervention. Discussion: Morel Lavallée Lesions (MLL are a rare internal degloving injury involving the traumatic separation of the mobile subcutaneous tissue from the immobile underlying fascia, allowing for hemolymph to develop in the closed potential space.1-3 MLL was initially used to refer to regions involving the trochanteric region,1 first reported by Maurice Morel-Lavallée in 1863,4 but now includes various anatomical locations of varying relative incidence2. Clinical manifestations can be inconsistent, though the hallmark physical finding is a soft fluctuant area due to fluid collection,1,3 with motor vehicle collisions comprising the most common mechanism. Onset typically occurs within hours to days, but in up to one third of cases, onset is delayed by up to several months.5 No established standard of care yet exists, but management algorithms have been suggested.2,6 A recent

  20. Efecto de la concentración de linóculo y la melaza como suplemento de la vinaza de destilería para la producción de biomasa de Candida utilis nativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Cajo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La vinaza es un residuo de las destilerías de alcohol, rico en materia orgánica y sales minerales, cuyo aprovechamiento está limitado y finalmente es vertido al alcantarillado, ocasionando contaminación, no obstante, puede constituir un sustrato par a la producción de biomasa de levaduras, utilizadas en la alimentación animal. En la presente investigación se determinó el efecto de la concentración del inóculo y la melaza como suplemento de la vinaza, para la producción de biomasa de Candida utilis nativa. Las levaduras se aislaron de panca de Zea mays L. “maíz” en agar Sabouraud glucosado, identificando el 40.23 % como C. utilis. Luego, se cultivaron en vinaza con 30 g/L de melaza, a 28 ºC, durante 24 horas, se pesó la biomasa y se seleccionó C. utilis MKJ12, debido a que alcanzó el mayor valor de 7.667 g/L. Esta levadura en concentraciones de 25, 50 y 75 mL/L de inóculo se cultivó en biorreactores tipo tanque, en lote discontinuo, conteniendo 300 mL de vinaza con 10, 30, y 50 g/L de melaza, con flujo de aire descendente (1vvm, y una incubación a 28 ºC, durante 20 horas. Con 50 mL/L de inóculo y 50 g/L de melaza se determinó el menor tiempo de generación (2.88 h y los mayores valores en el número de generaciones (6.95, tasa específica de crecimien to (0.35 h - 1 , peso de biomasa (11.78 g/L y proteína (40.15 %. Se demostró la factibilidad de la producción de biomasa de C. utilis con 5 mL/L de inóculo en vinaza suplementada con melaza.

  1. Meios de cultura semi-seletivos para Macrophomina phaseolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Rogéria de Carvalho Nascimento

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi Golidanich é um fungo habitante do solo importante economicamente devido ao amplo número de espécies de plantas que infectam e da dificuldade do seu controle. Vários estudos envolvendo densidade de inóculo, taxonomia, sobrevivência, necessitam de meios de cultura seletivo ou semi-seletivo. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar 16 meios de cultura quanto à especificidade a este patógeno, proporcionando maior porcentagem de detecção do seu crescimento e menor número de contaminações, para substituir o meio semi-seletivo RB modificado, rotineiramente utilizado em estudos deste patógeno. O meio semi-seletivo RB modificado é bastante eficiente e contém em sua composição o fungicida metalaxyl (inibidor de oomycetos, que atualmente não se encontra disponível comercialmente em formulação simples, sem adição do Mancozeb ou Clorotalonil que inibem o crescimento do fungo M. phaseolina. Os meios de cultura avaliados foram repicados com o inóculo do fungo produzido em substrato areno-orgânico, contido em bolsas de náilon, recuperados após 30 dias de um solo não autoclavado, contido em uma bandeja. Cada meio de cultura avaliado tiveram 7 repetições, representadas por uma placa de Petri. Para as comparações das médias das porcentagens do crescimento de M. phaseolina e do número de contaminantes foi utilizado o teste de Scott-knott a 5% de probabilidade e os valores em porcentagem foram transformados em arc sem (√/100. Dentre os meios de cultura avaliados os MSTP 1 [(BDA com tetraciclina 50 mg.L-1 mais propamocarb a 1 mL.L-1(Previcur N® 72,2% p.a.], MSRP 0,5 (BDA com rifampicina 100 mg.L-1 mais fungicida propamocarb a 0,5 mL.L-1 e MSRP 1 (BDA com rifampicina 100 mg.L-1 mais fungicida propamocarb a 1 mL.L-1 proporcionaram maior porcentagem e detecção do fungo M. phaseolina e menor número de contaminações por outros fungos e bactérias. Estes meios de cultura semi-seletivos podem ser

  2. Control de Dysmicoccus brevipes (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae, en el fruto de piña, San Carlos, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Miranda Vindas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron 6 productos para el control de Dysmicoccus brevipes en piña (Ananas comosus. El ensayo de laboratorio se realizó en el Laboratorio de Biocontroladores de la empresa BioEco Natural S.A., ubicada en Aguas Zarcas, San Carlos, mientras que los ensayos de campo se realizaron en una plantación comercial de piña, en Venecia de San Carlos. En el laboratorio se evaluó Beauveria bassiana (4,0 x 1010 esporas.g-1; Metarhizium anisopliae (1,0 x 1010 esporas.g-1; una mezcla de ambos hongos (0,5 g + 0,5 g.l-1 de agua destilada, de 4,0 x 1010 esporas.g-1 + 1,0 x 1010 esporas.g-1; un jabón líquido de sales potásicas, “Goyca”® (7 ml.l-1; el extracto botánico(Biorep® (mezcla de chile picante, ajo, cebolla, mostaza y gavilana (7 ml.l-1; y agua destilada como testigo. Los resultados más promisorios fueron con el extracto botánico y el jabón líqui do, los que causaron una mortalidad más rápida. Los tratamientos evaluados en la plantacióncomercial de piña, var. MD-2, fueron los mis mos, a excepción del testigo en donde se utilizó los productos utilizados de forma comercial en la finca: Diazinon® 60 EC (diazinon (0,5 ml.l-1 y Sevin® 80 WP (carbaril (1 kg.ha-1. El extrac to botánico resultó en la menor incidencia de cochinillas (X=6,4, < al testigo (X=10,8, < el Goyca® (X=13,7, < M. anisopliae (X=44,4, < B. bassiana (X=45,1, y

  3. Eficiência de Azadiractina no controle de mosca-branca em meloeiro sob condições de casa de vegetação e de campo Efficiency of Azadirachtin against whitefly in melon crop in greenhouse and field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D. da Silva

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O melão é um dos principais produtos agrícolas de exportação do nordeste brasileiro, sendo, atualmente, sua produção gravemente afetada pela mosca-branca (Bemisia argentifolii, que por sua vez só é controlada por inseticidas convencionais. Estudou-se a potencialidade de um inseticida formulado à base de Azadiractina a 1% para o controle desta praga em meloeiro sob condições de casa de vegetação e de campo. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi de blocos ao acaso, com seis tratamentos e quatro repetições. Avaliou-se a média de ninfas no ensaio de casa de vegetação e a média de adultos e de ninfas no campo. Obteve-se uma resposta progressiva de controle de ninfas em casa de vegetação. No campo, os melhores resultados foram obtidos com do uso de Azadiractina, a 4 e 8 ml/L de calda, com eficiência de 67,83 e 70,13%, respectivamente, para controle de adultos, e Azadiractina a 8,0 ml/L, com eficiência de 88,10% e Azadiractina + Permethrin, cuja eficência foi de 85,71%, para controle de ninfas.Melons are of great importance for exportation by the Brazilian northeast region, actually being threatened by the whitefly pest, which is only controlled by the use of the conventional chemical insecticides actually used in the crop. In this study a potential botanical insecticide containing 1% Azadirachtin was evaluated against Bemisia argentifolii on melon, under greenhouse and field conditions. A randomized complete block design was used in both cases, with four replicates. Evaluating nymphs in greenhouse and nymphs and adults in field, we observed an increase in mortality by increasing dosages. In field, efficiency was 67.83 and 70.13% for adults and 80.36 and 88.10% for nymphs using 4.0 and 8.0 ml/L of the commercial Azadirachtin formulation, respectively.

  4. Surface-water hydrology of the Little Black River basin, Missouri and Arkansas, before water-land improvement practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkas, W.R.; Femmer, Suzanne R.; Mesko, T.O.; Thompson, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, in accordance with Public Law 566, is implementing various types of water-land improvement practices in the Little Black River basin in southeastern Missouri. These practices are designed, in part, to decrease the suspended sediment (SS) transport in the basin, decrease flood damage in the basin, and improve drainage in the agricultural area. The general features of the basin, such as geology, groundwater hydrology, soils, land use, water use, and precipitation are described; surface water quantity, quality, and suspended sediment discharge are also described. The aquifers are the Mississippi River valley alluvial aquifer, which can yield about 3,500 gal/min to properly constructed wells, and the Ozark and St. Francois aquifers, which can yield from about 30 to 500 gal/min to properly constructed wells. Soils in the area have formed in loess and cherty residuum in the uplands or have formed in alluvial sediment in the lowlands. About 93% of the estimated 3 billion gal/year of water used in the basin is for crop irrigation. The average monthly precipitation varies slightly throughout the year, with an average annual precipitation of about 47 inches. Water quality data were collected at seven stations. Specific conductance values ranged from 50 to 400 microsiemens/cm at 25 C. Water temperatures ranged from 0.0 C in the winter to 33.5 C in summer. pH values ranged from 6.4 to 8.5 units. Dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 2.2 to 12.8 ml/l. Total nitrogen concentrations ranged from 0.13 to 2.20 ml/l as nitrogen, with organic nitrogen as the most abundant form. Phosphorus concentrations ranged from zero to 0.29 ml/l as phosphorus. Bacterial counts were largest during storm runoff in the basin with livestock waste as the significant contributor. For the period from October 1, 1980, to September 30, 1984, the average annual SS discharge ranged from 2,230 tons/yr in the headwater areas to 27,800 tons

  5. Sisseminekuks : [luuletused] / Anna Haava ; [Impressioonid]: Viiu Härm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Haava, Anna, pseud., 1864-1957

    2004-01-01

    Sisu: Sisseminekuks ; Kartus ; Ööbikule ; Käokene, kuldalindu ; Mis sa tahad, kevade? ; Ei tule uni ; Hoia ennast; Tuksuv süda ; Sina oled kelm ; Hinge hellal' igatsusel' ; Kõik kallile ; Soov ; Unes nägin ; Võin ; Sinu silmad ; Sinu silmist pilk ; Kallis, sul on kuldne süda ; Sa kõige armsam mulle ; Oh võiksin ; Lill ; Nõmmelill ; Meie Mihkel ; Koidulale ; Ehitage rahukojad ; Emakeel ; Isamaja ; Väsinud ; Oh kuhu ma lähen? ; Ööbiku surm ; Ei saa mitte vaiki olla ; Ma olen näinud ; Südameta ; Sellepärast ; See oli ilusal õiekuul; Esimese lume ajal ; Mina vaat'sin muru pääle ; Ikka kurjalt sa mind vaatad ; Oh ma isegi ei tea ; Mis on luule paljalt sõnas? ; Oh oleksin ära surnud ; Lee ääres ; Sinu nimi ; Hoia vahest aken lahti ; Jumalaga jättes vaat'sid ; Ma laulan ; Ei oma õnne peita ; Küll oli ilus mu õieke ; Oh ära sa küsi ; Ei tule luule tuulest ; Köögis seisab ; Järv leegib eha paistel ; Sinu vanaema ; Nii ta on ; Tead küll, mu kuldkallis ; Ma lähen üle nõmme ; Lenda, lepatriinuke ; Vesi voolab, vesi kohab ; Üks ainus kord ; Oh kevade, oh õie-aeg ; Suur kontsert ; Kuupaistel ; Mets kohiseb ; Lind läks magama ; Kui sa tuled, too mull' lilli ; Sinilillekesed ; Ei ole sina minu ingel ; Ei mina õnne usu ; Viimast laulu ei saa laulda ; Kõige ilusam luule ; Üks on minul püham koda! ; Sa oled suurem kui su saatus ; Mu kodumaa, kus oled sa? ; Eest ära! ; Kui kandlekeeled katkevad ; Ma kõnnin koiduvalgel ; Mu mured kõik matsin ma maha ; Kui ma sulle armas olen ; Kas tahad tulla minuga? ; Sa vaata ette, süda! ; Truus sõpruses ma tahan ; Su silmade sügavuses ; Siis mine! ; See oli siis ; Mu süda usub ; Sind teretame, kuldapäike ; Mind jumalaga jätsid ; Sääl kord kasvab kaunis kodu ; Me oleme põhjamaa lapsed ; Hilised lilled ; Sa küsid, kus mu kodu ; külm ; Sina vaikiv, sügav öö ; Ju õitsvad kõik hellerheinad ; Öösünges kohab ; Kui saaks mullegi kord kodu ; On püha mulle mu kodumaa muld ; Oma hind vaid vaba

  6. Voltage-sensing phosphatase modulation by a C2 domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Castle

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP is the first example of an enzyme controlled by changes in membrane potential. VSP has four distinct regions: the transmembrane voltage-sensing domain (VSD, the inter-domain linker, the cytosolic catalytic domain and the C2 domain. The VSD transmits the changes in membrane potential through the inter-domain linker activating the catalytic domain which then dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol phosphate lipids. The role of the C2, however, has not been established. In this study, we explore two possible roles for the C2: catalysis and membrane-binding. The Ci-VSP crystal structures show that the C2 residue Y522 lines the active site suggesting a contribution to catalysis. When we mutated Y522 to phenylalanine, we found a shift in the voltage dependence of activity. This suggests hydrogen bonding as a mechanism of action. Going one step further, when we deleted the entire C2 domain, we found voltage-dependent enzyme activity was no longer detectable. This result clearly indicates the entire C2 is necessary for catalysis as well as for modulating activity. As C2s are known membrane-binding domains, we tested whether the VSP C2 interacts with the membrane. We probed a cluster of four positively charged residues lining the top of the C2 and suggested by previous studies to interact with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2 (Kalli et al., 2014. Neutralizing those positive charges significantly shifted the voltage dependence of activity to higher voltages. We tested membrane binding by depleting PI(4,5P2 from the membrane using the 5HT2C receptor and found that the VSD motions as measured by voltage clamp fluorometry were not changed. These results suggest that if the C2 domain interacts with the membrane to influence VSP function it may not occur exclusively through PI(4,5P2. Together, this data advances our understanding of the VSP C2 by demonstrating a necessary and critical role for the C2 domain in

  7. Voltage-sensing phosphatase modulation by a C2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Paul M; Zolman, Kevin D; Kohout, Susy C

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) is the first example of an enzyme controlled by changes in membrane potential. VSP has four distinct regions: the transmembrane voltage-sensing domain (VSD), the inter-domain linker, the cytosolic catalytic domain, and the C2 domain. The VSD transmits the changes in membrane potential through the inter-domain linker activating the catalytic domain which then dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids. The role of the C2, however, has not been established. In this study, we explore two possible roles for the C2: catalysis and membrane-binding. The Ci-VSP crystal structures show that the C2 residue Y522 lines the active site suggesting a contribution to catalysis. When we mutated Y522 to phenylalanine, we found a shift in the voltage dependence of activity. This suggests hydrogen bonding as a mechanism of action. Going one step further, when we deleted the entire C2 domain, we found voltage-dependent enzyme activity was no longer detectable. This result clearly indicates the entire C2 is necessary for catalysis as well as for modulating activity. As C2s are known membrane-binding domains, we tested whether the VSP C2 interacts with the membrane. We probed a cluster of four positively charged residues lining the top of the C2 and suggested by previous studies to interact with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] (Kalli et al., 2014). Neutralizing those positive charges significantly shifted the voltage dependence of activity to higher voltages. We tested membrane binding by depleting PI(4,5)P2 from the membrane using the 5HT2C receptor and found that the VSD motions as measured by voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) were not changed. These results suggest that if the C2 domain interacts with the membrane to influence VSP function it may not occur exclusively through PI(4,5)P2. Together, this data advances our understanding of the VSP C2 by demonstrating a necessary and critical role for the C2 domain in

  8. Modeling of C/EBPalpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia reveals a common expression signature of committed myeloid leukemia-initiating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Schuster, Mikkel B; Bereshchenko, Oksana

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the CEBPA gene are present in 7%-10% of human patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no genetic models exist that demonstrate their etiological relevance. To mimic the most common mutations affecting CEBPA-that is, those leading to loss of the 42 kDa C/EBPalpha isoform (p...... penetrance. p42-deficient leukemia could be transferred by a Mac1+c-Kit+ population that gave rise only to myeloid cells in recipient mice. Expression profiling of this population against normal Mac1+c-Kit+ progenitors revealed a signature shared with MLL-AF9-transformed AML.......42) while retaining the 30kDa isoform (p30)-we modified the mouse Cebpa locus to express only p30. p30 supported the formation of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. However, p42 was required for control of myeloid progenitor proliferation, and p42-deficient mice developed AML with complete...

  9. Solidago canadensis L. Essential Oil Vapor Effectively Inhibits Botrytis cinerea Growth and Preserves Postharvest Quality of Strawberry as a Food Model System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shumin; Shao, Xingfeng; Wei, Yanzhen; Li, Yonghua; Xu, Feng; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the anti-fungal properties of Solidago canadensis L. essential oil (SCLEO) against Botrytis cinerea in vitro, and its ability to control gray mold and maintain quality in strawberry fruits. SCLEO exhibited dose-dependent antifungal activity against B. cinerea and profoundly altered mycelial morphology, cellular ultrastructure, and membrane permeability as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. SCLEO vapor at 0.1 mL/L maintained higher sensory acceptance and reduced decay of fresh strawberry fruit, and also reduced gray mold in artificially inoculated fruit. SCLEO treatment did not, however, stimulate phenylalanin ammonia-lyase, polyphenol oxidase, or chitinase, enzymes related to disease resistance. This suggests that SCLEO reduces gray mold by direct inhibition of pathogen growth. SCLEO vapor may provide a new and effective strategy for controlling postharvest disease and maintaining quality in strawberries.

  10. Characterization of an antagonistic switch between histone H3 lysine 27 methylation and acetylation in the transcriptional regulation of Polycomb group target genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Malatesta, Martina; Jung, Hye Ryung

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors, which regulate proliferation and cell fate decisions during development, and their deregulated expression is a frequent event in human tumours. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes trimethylation (me3) of histone H3 lysine...... are poorly understood. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we have determined the global changes in histone modifications in embryonic stem (ES) cells lacking the PcG protein Suz12 that is essential for PRC2 activity. We show that loss of PRC2 activity results in a global increase in H3K27 acetylation....... The methylation to acetylation switch correlates with the transcriptional activation of PcG target genes, both during ES cell differentiation and in MLL-AF9-transduced hematopoietic stem cells. Moreover, we provide evidence that the acetylation of H3K27 is catalyzed by the acetyltransferases p300 and CBP. Based...

  11. In Vivo RNA Interference Screening Identifies a Leukemia-Specific Dependence on Integrin Beta 3 Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter G.; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Hartwell, Kimberly A.; Chu, Lisa P.; Järås, Marcus; Puram, Rishi V.; Puissant, Alexandre; Callahan, Kevin P.; Ashton, John; McConkey, Marie E.; Poveromo, Luke P.; Cowley, Glenn S.; Kharas, Michael G.; Labelle, Myriam; Shterental, Sebastian; Fujisaki, Joji; Silberstein, Lev; Alexe, Gabriela; Al-Hajj, Muhammad A.; Shelton, Christopher A.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Root, David E.; Scadden, David T.; Hynes, Richard O.; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Jordan, Craig T.; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We used an in vivo short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screening approach to identify genes that are essential for MLL-AF9 acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found that Integrin Beta 3 (Itgb3) is essential for murine leukemia cells in vivo, and for human leukemia cells in xenotransplantation studies. In leukemia cells, Itgb3 knockdown impaired homing, downregulated LSC transcriptional programs, and induced differentiation via the intracellular kinase, Syk. In contrast, loss of Itgb3 in normal HSPCs did not affect engraftment, reconstitution, or differentiation. Finally, we confirmed that Itgb3 is dispensable for normal hematopoiesis and required for leukemogenesis using an Itgb3 knockout mouse model. Our results establish the significance of the Itgb3 signaling pathway as a potential therapeutic target in AML. PMID:23770013

  12. Study on surface geochemistry and microbiology for hydrocarbon exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The test results of the experimental device for extraction of dissolved gases from water show that the device can be utilized for the gas geochemistry of water. The device is capable of determining hydrocarbon gases in water to the concentration of less than 5 x 10{sup -4} ml/l of water. According to the results of microbiological studies, the plate count technique can be a useful supplementary method for hydrocarbon exploration. This is based on the facts that the average survival rate to hydrocarbons (pentane, hexane) for heterotrophs is higher in the area known as containing considerable hydrocarbon gases than other areas in the Pohang region. However, it is still necessary to develop techniques to treat the bacteria with gaseous hydrocarbons. (author). 2 figs., 41 tabs.

  13. Vision for Time-Varying Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Oogoing adaptive evolution of ASPM:, a brain size detetmin.ant in Homo sapiens . Scieoce. 309, 1 no. 20. Bniteoberg, V., & Schiiz, A. (1998). Cortex...D, this decepUw:ly $1mple mechanism not only prodtJCeS a supen·ISE’d dasslfiet, bat 2lso tlllCO’IetS the: $1mll:artty structure el "’lbedded ln the...Six healthy hU~MD vo1unt£erS mte«d an 0.1RI neurolm:tglng :awaratus and viewed :1 $ el of pictures while thele bfaln actl\\’lty (bk)od OX

  14. Measurement of $Z$ boson production in Pb+Pb and $pp$ collisions by the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dumancic, Mirta; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A measurement of $Z$ boson production is performed via the muon decay channel using data samples from the 2015 LHC run obtained at the center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm{NN}}}}=5.02$ TeV with a total integrated luminosity of 0.49 nb$^{-1}$ and 25.3 pb$^{-1}$ in Pb+Pb and $pp$, respectively. Integrated and rapidity differential cross sections are measured in a fiducial detector acceptance defined by the $Z$ boson selection of 66<$m_{ll}$<116 GeV and $|y^{ll}|<2.5$ with correction for FSR effects. Nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ is obtained from the comparison of the Pb+Pb to the $pp$ data and is found to be consistent with unity. The large statistical sample of Pb+Pb collisions also allows a high-precision test of the Glauber model.

  15. Treatment of sugar beet thick juice spent wash by chemical and natural coagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antov Mirjana G.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of treatment of wastewater from bioethanol production by aluminium sulfate and natural coagulant extracted from common bean seed was studied. The highest coagulation activity at pH 6.5 is reached with analum dose of 1 g/l, but only a little lower coagulation activities were obtained by the dose of 0.05 and 0.10 g/l, which is more favorable for economic and environmental reasons. When natural coagulant from common bean was applied the highest coagulation activity, 14.3%, at pH 6.5 is reached with a dose of 0.5 ml/l. However, when common bean natural coagulant was used simultaneously with alum, the highest turbidity removal resulting in 24% coagulation activity was achieved and this was more efficient than when alum or natural coagulant were used.

  16. Primary orbital precursor T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenman, Lisa; Persson, Marta; Enlund, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Primary T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) in the eye region is very rare. The present study described a unique case of T-LBL involving the extraocular muscles. A 22-year-old male patient presented with a 3-week history of headache, reduced visual acuity and edema of the left eye. Clinical...... examination revealed left-sided exophthalmus, periorbital edema, chemosis, and reduced motility of the left eye. A magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed thickening of the left orbital muscles and a positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan also demonstrated activity in a subclavicular lymph....... There was no involvement of the bone marrow. Based on the clinical and histopathological findings, a diagnosis of T-LBL was made. There was no evidence of NOTCH1 mutation or rearrangements of the ETV6 and MLL genes and high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH) analysis revealed a normal...

  17. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Commissioning of the double Penning trap system MLLTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolhinen, V.S.; Bussmann, M.; Gartzke, E.; Habs, D.; Neumayr, J.B.; Schuermann, C.; Szerypo, J.; Thirolf, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    A cylindrical double Penning trap system has been installed and commissioned at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory (MLL) in Garching. This trap system has been designed to isobarically purify low-energy ion beams and perform highly accurate mass measurements. Technical details of the device and the first results of the commissioning measurements will be presented. The mass resolving power achieved in the first trap for 85 Rb ions is R=139(2)x10 3 , while a relative mass uncertainty of δm/m=2.9x10 -8 was reached with the second trap (no analysis of systematic uncertainties included) when using 87 Rb as a reference ion for 85 Rb.

  19. Commissioning of the double Penning trap system MLLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolhinen, V.S. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, LMU Muenchen and Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: veli.kolhinen@physik.uni-muenchen.de; Bussmann, M. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, LMU Muenchen and Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Gartzke, E.; Habs, D.; Neumayr, J.B.; Schuermann, C.; Szerypo, J.; Thirolf, P.G. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, LMU Muenchen and Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-03-01

    A cylindrical double Penning trap system has been installed and commissioned at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory (MLL) in Garching. This trap system has been designed to isobarically purify low-energy ion beams and perform highly accurate mass measurements. Technical details of the device and the first results of the commissioning measurements will be presented. The mass resolving power achieved in the first trap for {sup 85}Rb ions is R=139(2)x10{sup 3}, while a relative mass uncertainty of {delta}m/m=2.9x10{sup -8} was reached with the second trap (no analysis of systematic uncertainties included) when using {sup 87}Rb as a reference ion for {sup 85}Rb.

  20. Flood Protection, Section 4, Ohio River, Southwest Jefferson County, Kentucky. Local Flood Protection Project. Supplement Number 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Contractors, Inc. 208 Dishman Lane Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 k. Stone and Asphalt - Murray Company, Inc. P.O. Box 23410 Anchorage, Kentucky 40223...LAm on~i Fa FLAT BOTTOM flof a a $1N orma Wm IN waasam.m amma mll - sme - tamm. ius as MliS mu "e.a.wIMI. mINI Me em Inicilla am emma atNI L.we -0 uma6L...is 8 17 1? 3 10 14.5- 21.0 43 Z2.0- It is P ILL PATIRIAL CINDERS SOW MVE1. - r WOW BRICK , .. IM-T LONE 1417 a 430 425 12 24 EL7 424.00+ 16.3- 13.4 II

  1. Nutrient fluxes and adaptation to environmental dynamics by phytoplankton in the Gulf of Khambhat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JiyalalRam, M.; Mandalia, A.V.; Narvekar, S.M.; Karangutkar, S.H.

    Figure 3: DO saturation (%) in coastal water of Bhavnagar during March 2007. 123456789 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 Surface Bottom Station DO sa t u r at io n (m l/ l) 16 pH Salinity (ppt) PO 4 3- -P (µmol/l) *** Math Text Error *** NO 3 - -N (µmol....1716, p = 0.1526 pH Salinity (ppt) PO 4 3- -P (µmol/l) *** Math Text Error *** NO 3 - -N (µmol/l) NO 2 - -N (µmol/l) NH 4 + -N (µmol/l) 29 30 31 32 DO (ml/l) Temperature ( C) o Fl Air Eb 25 27 29 31 33 15 16 17 18 19 20 800 1000 1200 1400 1600...

  2. Solidago canadensis L essential oil vapor effectively inhibits Botrytis cinerea growth and preserves postharvest quality of strawberry as a food model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumin Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the anti-fungal properties of Solidago canadensis L essential oil (SCLEO against Botrytis cinerea in vitro, and its ability to control gray mold and maintain quality in strawberry fruits. SCLEO exhibited dose-dependent antifungal activity against B. cinerea and profoundly altered mycelial morphology, cellular ultrastructure, and membrane permeability as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. SCLEO vapor at 0.1 mL/L maintained higher sensory acceptance and reduced decay of fresh strawberry fruit, and also reduced gray mold in artificially inoculated fruit. SCLEO treatment did not however, stimulate phenylalanin ammonia-lyase (PAL, polyphenol oxidase (POD, or chitinase (CHI, enzymes related to disease resistance. This suggests that SCLEO reduces gray mold by direct inhibition of pathogen growth. SCLEO vapor may provide a new and effective strategy for controlling postharvest disease and maintaining quality in strawberries.

  3. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia

    2016-01-01

    /4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11......Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3...... nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations...

  4. Mareas rojas de Mesodinium rubrum (Lohmann) Hamburger y Buddenbrock en el Golfo de California (Invierno de 1998)

    OpenAIRE

    Gárate-Lizárraga, Ismael; Band-Schmidt, Christine; Cervantes-Duarte, Rafael; Escobedo-Urías, Diana

    2002-01-01

    Durante el invierno de 1998 se colectaron un total de 13 muestras de mareas rojas causadas por el protozoario fotosintético Mesodinium rubrum en el Golfo de California. El registro de temperatura del agua varió de 20.3 a 23.2°C. La salinidad, el oxígeno disuelto, el pH, y la concentración de nutrientes se determinaron sólo en los parches observados en las costas de Sinaloa. La salinidad varió entre 34.71 y 35.25. El oxígeno disuelto osciló entre 5.29 y 6.78 ml/l y el pH varió de 8.16 a 8.27. ...

  5. FIB-SEM investigation of trapped intermetallic particles in anodic oxide films on AA1050 aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jariyaboon, Manthana; Møller, Per; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    -containing intermetallic particles incorporated into the anodic oxide films on industrially pure aluminium (AA1050, 99.5 per cent) has been investigated. AA1050 aluminium was anodized in a 100?ml/l sulphuric acid bath with an applied voltage of 14?V at 20°C ±2°C for 10 or 120?min. The anodic film subsequently was analyzed......Purpose - The purpose of this investigation is to understand the structure of trapped intermetallics particles and localized composition changes in the anodized anodic oxide film on AA1050 aluminium substrates. Design/methodology/approach - The morphology and composition of Fe......-shaped particles were embedded in the anodic oxide film as a thin strip structure and located near the top surface of the film, whereas the round-shaped particles were trapped in the film with a spherical structure, but partially dissolved and were located throughout the thickness of the anodic film. The Fe...

  6. Three-Dimensional Propagation and Scattering Around a Conical Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    s) Td . I or, 71 IT +~ f E [ai’D+l + 153j n 1JDJ+Iil (rj) r7 1 ql(Z)Xpij+l[, = ZL ,i2nH1., (,)+ 1, ,, )1 k --f , 1(z) Mll qjk)I,p4z)d1. (4.45) 102...F,t )-I (DH-ljC,,,+’. flj + Ihj ,Cb+’DfIIlj ) f + (Fj) -’ (DIlh,,C a+ lj 7’+1 -, !/,.-fI/’jiC+1lDjJ I) b-’,,+ REJ+ 1 anj+ 1 + Jl R3r, ’ 1,(4|.55...80 , li ,c൓ 400 400 ; :l 200 I/10 0 0 200 -400 -400 -00fO d00 50 50 (a) Td Los, dg) C-SNAP J 0 7 - os s (M), C-SNAP Jx 33 12012 600 110 600 110 400

  7. Differential measurements of Drell-Yan cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenschein, Ulrike; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed high precision measurements at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The measurements are performed for W+, W- and Z/gamma bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the Z/gamma* mass. ATLAS also performed a precise triple differential cross-section measurement as a function of Mll, dilepton rapidity and cosθ∗ defined in the Collins-Soper frame. This measurement provides sensitivity to the PDFs and the Z forward-backward asymmetry, AFB.

  8. Theraplay-vuorovaikutusterapian tunnettavuus ja sen hyödyt Satakunnan ja Pirkanmaan lastensuojelulaitoksissa

    OpenAIRE

    Väkiparta, Tuija

    2009-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on selvittää miten hyvin Satakunnan ja Pirkanmaan lastensuojelulaitoksissa tunnetaan Theraplay-vuorovaikutusterapia ja miten sitä lastensuojelulaitoksissa käytetään. Aiheen työhöni sain siitä, kun olin kesällä 2007 töissä MLL:n Kuntoutus- ja kehittämiskeskus Huvituksessa Yläneellä. Siellä tätä Theraplay-terapiaa käytetään hyvin onnistuneesti. Tutkimuksen tarkoituksena on saada vastaus kysymyksiin: 1. Tunnetaanko ja käytetäänkö Theraplay-vuorovaikutuste...

  9. Tratamento térmico e prochloraz no controle da antracnose em pós-colheita de frutos de banana 'Prata Anã' Thermotherapy and prochloraz to control of anthracnose on 'Prata Anã' bananas in post harvest conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Barreto da Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O controle químico, térmico e a refrigeração são os processos mais utilizados no tratamento pós-colheita das bananas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do tratamento térmico, químico e da combinação dos dois métodos e estes associados à baixa temperatura de conservação no controle da antracnose na pós-colheita da banana. Para tanto os experimentos foram realizados em três épocas quando, bananas (Musa sp da variedade 'Prata Anã' (AAB no estádio pré-climatérico eram coletadas e suas pencas individualizadas. As pencas foram submetidas a quatro tratamentos com cinco repetições cada: 1. Tratamento térmico (imersão em água a 56ºC por seis minutos, seguido de resfriamento em água à temperatura ambiente; 2. Tratamento químico por seis minutos (imersão em calda fungicida (prochloraz 2,5 mL.L-1; 3. Tratamento térmico seguido do químico; 4. Testemunha, imersão em água por seis minutos. Após os tratamentos, as pencas eram divididas em duas partes iguais, sendo que uma parte ficou em câmara fria (14ºC com variação de 2ºC e a outra permaneceu à temperatura ambiente. O tratamento térmico não foi eficiente no controle da doença. O fungicida prochloraz a 2,5 mL.L-1 foi eficiente no controle da podridão pós-colheita. A refrigeração retardou o surgimento da doença em até 12 dias. Os resultados indicam que a baixa temperatura, associada ou não ao controle químico, é capaz de controlar a podridão pós-colheita dos frutos por 12 dias.Chemical control and refrigeration are two processes usually adopted in the treatment of the banana post harvest rot. This work has for objective to evaluate the effect on the control of the anthracnose in banana post harvest of the chemotherapy, of the thermotherapy, of the combination of the two listed methods and these all associated to the low conservation temperature. The experiments were replicate three times where banana fruit (Musa sp of the variety 'Prata An

  10. DOT1L and H3K79 Methylation in Transcription and Genomic Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Katherine; Tellier, Michael; Murphy, Shona

    2018-02-27

    The organization of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin provides challenges for the cell to accomplish basic cellular functions, such as transcription, DNA replication and repair of DNA damage. Accordingly, a range of proteins modify and/or read chromatin states to regulate access to chromosomal DNA. Yeast Dot1 and the mammalian homologue DOT1L are methyltransferases that can add up to three methyl groups to histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79). H3K79 methylation is implicated in several processes, including transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, the DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoint activation. DOT1L is also an important drug target for treatment of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged leukemia where aberrant transcriptional activation is promoted by DOT1L mislocalisation. This review summarizes what is currently known about the role of Dot1/DOT1L and H3K79 methylation in transcription and genomic stability.

  11. DOT1L and H3K79 Methylation in Transcription and Genomic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Wood

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The organization of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin provides challenges for the cell to accomplish basic cellular functions, such as transcription, DNA replication and repair of DNA damage. Accordingly, a range of proteins modify and/or read chromatin states to regulate access to chromosomal DNA. Yeast Dot1 and the mammalian homologue DOT1L are methyltransferases that can add up to three methyl groups to histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79. H3K79 methylation is implicated in several processes, including transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, the DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoint activation. DOT1L is also an important drug target for treatment of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-rearranged leukemia where aberrant transcriptional activation is promoted by DOT1L mislocalisation. This review summarizes what is currently known about the role of Dot1/DOT1L and H3K79 methylation in transcription and genomic stability.

  12. WHO HAS THERAPY-RELATED AML?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gale

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Therapy-related leukemia or therapy-related myeloid neoplasm are widely-used terms to designate leukemia developing in persons who previously received anti-cancer therapy (for example, see references 1, 2, especially if the prior anti-cancer therapy included drugs such as alkylators, DNA-intercalators, topoisomerase-2-inhibitors, purines and/or ionizing radiations.   Sometimes specific genes such as AML1, EVI1, NRAS or MLL are mutated by therapy or gene variants are produced which activate mutagens or interfere with DNA repair, such FANC, NQ01 or AML2. 3-5   But how can we know if AML in someone is a therapy-related? Keywords: Therapy-related leukemia; alkylators; ionizing radiations; Topoisomerase Inhibitors; DNA Repair

  13. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-24

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Crosstalk between histone modifications maintains the developmental pattern of gene expression on a tissue-specific locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosey, Alison M; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Brand, Marjorie

    2010-05-16

    Genome wide studies have provided a wealth of information related to histone modifications. Particular modifications, which can encompass both broad and discrete regions, are associated with certain genomic elements and gene expression status. Here we focus on how studies on the beta-globin gene cluster can complement the genome wide effort through the thorough dissection of histone modifying protein crosstalk. The beta-globin locus serves as a model system to study both regulation of gene expression driven at a distance by enhancers and mechanisms of developmental switching of clustered genes. We investigate recent studies, which uncover that histone methyltransferases, recruited at the beta-globin enhancer, control gene expression by long range propagation on chromatin. Specifically, we focus on how seemingly antagonistic complexes, such as those including MLL2, G9a and UTX, can cooperate to functionally regulate developmentally controlled gene expression. Finally, we speculate on the mechanisms of chromatin modifying complex propagation on genomic domains.

  15. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Evaluation of the effects of gamma radiation on physical and chemical characteristics of pineapple (Annanas Comosus (L.) (Meer) cv. smooth Cayenne minimally processed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perecin, Thalita N.; Oliveira, Ana Claudia S.; Silva, Lucia C.A.; Costa, Marcia H.N.; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia e Ambiente], e-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation, polypropylene packaging type and temperature (8 deg C) in the physic-chemical characteristics of pineapple 'Smooth Cayenne' minimally processed. The fruits were selected, washed, peeled, sliced crosswise into four parts and placed in sodium hypochlorite 10 ml/L for three minutes, dried and packaged. Were irradiated in a Cobalt-60 source, type Gammacell -220 (dose rate 0.543 kGy/hour), with doses of 0 (control), 1 and 2 kGy and stored in temperature of 8 deg C. Were analyzed color (L factors, a, b), pH, deg Brix, texture, during 5 days after irradiation. The experiment was entirely at random with 3 replicates for each treatment. For the statistic analysis was used the Tuckey test at 5% level of probability. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the effects of gamma radiation on physical and chemical characteristics of pineapple (Annanas Comosus (L.) (Meer) cv. smooth Cayenne minimally processed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perecin, Thalita N.; Oliveira, Ana Claudia S.; Silva, Lucia C.A.; Costa, Marcia H.N.; Arthur, Valter

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation, polypropylene packaging type and temperature (8 deg C) in the physic-chemical characteristics of pineapple 'Smooth Cayenne' minimally processed. The fruits were selected, washed, peeled, sliced crosswise into four parts and placed in sodium hypochlorite 10 ml/L for three minutes, dried and packaged. Were irradiated in a Cobalt-60 source, type Gammacell -220 (dose rate 0.543 kGy/hour), with doses of 0 (control), 1 and 2 kGy and stored in temperature of 8 deg C. Were analyzed color (L factors, a, b), pH, deg Brix, texture, during 5 days after irradiation. The experiment was entirely at random with 3 replicates for each treatment. For the statistic analysis was used the Tuckey test at 5% level of probability. (author)

  18. Effects of diesel fuel and cellulose paper factory effluent on the development of fresh water phytoplankton of the Kurshskiy Gulf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankavichyute, G.Yu.; Yankyavichyus, K.K.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of 0.01 or 0.05 ml/l diesel fuel and 50% cellulose paper factory effluent on the development of fresh water phytocenosis in Kurshskii Gulf algae were investigated. The greatest toxic effect was observed in green algae, while Euglena and Pyrophyta were stimulated at 5 to 8 days. This indicates their active participation in one of the final steps of pollution self-purification. Competition between added Cladophora and phytoplankton for nutrients depended on the degree of pollution. The toxicants depressed the species specificity of the algae, with Scenedesmus quadricauda, Pediastrum boryanum, Diatoma elongatum, and certain Tribonema and Oocystis species most resistent. Microalgal phytocenosis was visually restored on the 20th day of the experiment.

  19. Clinical and Neurobehavioral Features of Three Novel Kabuki Syndrome Patients with Mosaic KMT2D Mutations and a Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Francesca Romana; Cocciadiferro, Dario; Augello, Bartolomeo; Alfieri, Paolo; Pes, Valentina; Vancini, Alessandra; Caciolo, Cristina; Squeo, Gabriella Maria; Malerba, Natascia; Adipietro, Iolanda; Novelli, Antonio; Sotgiu, Stefano; Gherardi, Renzo; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Merla, Giuseppe

    2017-12-28

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and variable intellectual disability caused by mutations in KMT2D/MLL2 and KDM6A/UTX , two interacting chromatin modifier responsible respectively for 56-75% and 5-8% of the cases. To date, three KS patients with mosaic KMT2D deletions in blood lymphocytes have been described. We report on three additional subjects displaying KMT2D gene mosaics including one in which a single nucleotide change results in a new frameshift mutation (p.L1199HfsX7), and two with already-known nonsense mutations (p.R4484X and p.R5021X). Consistent with previously published cases, mosaic KMT2D mutations may result in mild KS facial dysmorphisms and clinical and neurobehavioral features, suggesting that these characteristics could represent the handles for genetic testing of individuals with slight KS-like traits.

  20. Clinical and Neurobehavioral Features of Three Novel Kabuki Syndrome Patients with Mosaic KMT2D Mutations and a Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Romana Lepri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Kabuki syndrome (KS is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and variable intellectual disability caused by mutations in KMT2D/MLL2 and KDM6A/UTX, two interacting chromatin modifier responsible respectively for 56–75% and 5–8% of the cases. To date, three KS patients with mosaic KMT2D deletions in blood lymphocytes have been described. We report on three additional subjects displaying KMT2D gene mosaics including one in which a single nucleotide change results in a new frameshift mutation (p.L1199HfsX7, and two with already-known nonsense mutations (p.R4484X and p.R5021X. Consistent with previously published cases, mosaic KMT2D mutations may result in mild KS facial dysmorphisms and clinical and neurobehavioral features, suggesting that these characteristics could represent the handles for genetic testing of individuals with slight KS-like traits.

  1. Effects of gamma irradiation on protocorm-like bodies of cattleya alliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thammasiri, K.

    1996-01-01

    Induced mutations by gamma irradiation can be one of the promising methods for orchid breeding. Protocorm - like bodies (PLBs) of Brassolaeliocattleya (Blc.) Alma kee and Blc. Greenwich were established from in vitro apical and axillary buds of young shoots in Vacin and Went (1949) liquid medium supplemented with 150 ml/l coconut water. PLBs were irradiated with gamma rays at 0, 20, 60, 80, 110 and 130 Gray (Gy). Doses between 80 and 110 Gy were suitable to apply for induced mutations in both cultivars. Another experiment with more samples was conducted. Gamma rays were applied at 0, 70, 100 and 130 Gy. The results showed that irradiated PLBs of both cultivars had slow growth rate and some PLBs turned brown and died. A dose of 70 Gy was suitable for induced mutation. More severe effects were observed when higher doses had been applied

  2. Treatment for Relapsed/Refractory AML Based on a High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-11

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  3. Xenopus reduced folate carrier regulates neural crest development epigenetically.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiejing Li

    Full Text Available Folic acid deficiency during pregnancy causes birth neurocristopathic malformations resulting from aberrant development of neural crest cells. The Reduced folate carrier (RFC is a membrane-bound receptor for facilitating transfer of reduced folate into the cells. RFC knockout mice are embryonic lethal and develop multiple malformations, including neurocristopathies. Here we show that XRFC is specifically expressed in neural crest tissues in Xenopus embryos and knockdown of XRFC by specific morpholino results in severe neurocristopathies. Inhibition of RFC blocked the expression of a series of neural crest marker genes while overexpression of RFC or injection of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate expanded the neural crest territories. In animal cap assays, knockdown of RFC dramatically reduced the mono- and trimethyl-Histone3-K4 levels and co-injection of the lysine methyltransferase hMLL1 largely rescued the XRFC morpholino phenotype. Our data revealed that the RFC mediated folate metabolic pathway likely potentiates neural crest gene expression through epigenetic modifications.

  4. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. [Analysis of hydrogen isotopes by gas chromatography using a MnCl2 coated γ-Al2O3 capillary packed column].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Fu, Xiaolong; Hu, Peng; Xiao, Chengjian; Ren, Xingbi; Xia, Xiulong; Wang, Heyi

    2017-07-08

    The conventional packed column gas chromatographic analysis of hydrogen isotopes has low column efficiency, broad peak and long retention time. In this work, a γ -Al 2 O 3 with MnCl 2 coated capillary packed column was tested at cryogenic temperature. The systematic column efficiency analysis and the hydrogen isotopes analytical technique research had been carried out. The results showed that, the γ -Al 2 O 3 with MnCl 2 coating could greatly improve the surface degree of order, pore structure and adsorption properties. Also the o -H 2 peak and p -H 2 peak were eluted in a single area. The γ -Al 2 O 3 with MnCl 2 coating was packed into a 0.53 mm inner diameter and 1.0 m long fused silica capillary column. It had a good linear relationship used this column with thermal conductivity detector (TCD) to detect the volume concentrations of hydrogen isotopes from 1 to 10 mL/L, and the relative error was less than 5% for low concentration sample testing. For H 2 , HD and D 2 , the retention times can be shortened to 39, 46 and 60 s, respectively. The limits of detection were reduced to 0.046, 0.067 and 0.072 mL/L, respectively. Compared with conventional packed column, capillary packed column had sharper peak form, higher separation degree of adjacent components, shorter retention time and lower detection limits. The above results indicate that the capillary packed column with TCD detector can be used for fast detection of low concentration of hydrogen isotopes and their online analysis.

  6. Effect of Dicamba and 2,4 dichlorophenoxiacetic acid on sugarcane somatic embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Alvez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to conserve sugarcane germplasm, produce microbial disease-free material, detect resistance to diseases and pests, etc., in vitro propagation of sugarcane has been established in many commercial varieties. In this sense, the aim of this work was to analyze the efficiency of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4D and 3,6-dichloro -2- methoxybenzoic acid (Dicamba to induce somatic embryogenesis and regeneration of plantlets from sugarcane varieties C26670, RB855546, V99245, V756, V781, V0050, CC8592, CC8475. For induction of embryogenic callus, leaf discs in tillering stage of 1 cm diameter and 2 mm thick, were inoculated on Murashige-Skoog, 1962 medium (MS, supplemented with 50 ml.l-1 coconut water, 30 g.l-1sucrose and two different treatments: 3 mg.l-1 2,4D or 6.63 mg.l-1 Dicamba, both of them in total darkness at 25 °C, during 1 month. For plant regeneration, embryogenic calli were transferred to ½ MS salts supplemented with coconut water 200 ml.l-1 and sucrose 60 g.l-1 and incubated under continuous light, 25 °C, for 2 months. The highest percent of embryogenic callus induction was obtained in media supplemented with Dicamba, an average of 70.83 % of embryogenic callus by variety, while in media with 2,4-D, 62.08 % of embryogenic callus was obtained by variety. An average of 89,00 % of plantlets was obtained from calli induced on media with Dicamba and an average of 66.12% of plantlets was obtained from calli induced on media supplemented with 2,4D. Using Dicamba it was possible to establish an efficient somatic embryogenesis protocol for these sugarcane varieties.

  7. Effect of pH on optimization of photofermentative hydrogen production by co-culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides-NMBL-02 and Bacillus firmus-NMBL-03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, A; Dolly, S; Semwal, D; Pandey, A

    2017-07-31

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides NMBL-02, photosynthetic purple non sulfur (PNS) bacteria and associated Bacillus firmus NMBL-03 were isolated from water sample collected from 15-20 inches beneath the surface of ponds from Northern region of India in modified Sistrom's media (120 ml) containing 3 g/L malate and 1.2 g/L ammonium sulfate. The isolation was done in air tight serum bottles (120 ml) under tungsten bulb (1.8 kLux light intensity) at 30 oC ± 2 oC. The PNS and heterotrophic bacteria associated with the culture was purified by clonal selection method and characterized by 16S rDNA sequencing. The PNS isolate was identified as Rhodobacter sphaeroides NMBL-02 (ID: 1467407, Accession BANKIT: JN256030) and associated heterotroph as Bacillus firmus NMBL-03 (Gene Bank Accession no.: JN 256029). The effect of initial medium pH on optimization of hydrogen production was investigated in batch process. The maximum hydrogen potential and hydrogen production rate was 2310 ± 55 ml/L and 4.75 ml/L culture/h respectively using glutamate (1.7 mmol/L) as nitrogen source and malate (22.38 mmol/L) as carbon source with 76.39% malate conversion efficiency at initial medium pH 5.0. This co-culture has the ability to produce significant amount of hydrogen in the pH range of 5.0 to 10.0 with 76.39% to 35.71% malate conversion respectively.

  8. De Novo Insertions and Deletions of Predominantly Paternal Origin Are Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Dong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Whole-exome sequencing (WES studies have demonstrated the contribution of de novo loss-of-function single-nucleotide variants (SNVs to autism spectrum disorder (ASD. However, challenges in the reliable detection of de novo insertions and deletions (indels have limited inclusion of these variants in prior analyses. By applying a robust indel detection method to WES data from 787 ASD families (2,963 individuals, we demonstrate that de novo frameshift indels contribute to ASD risk (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.0–2.7; p = 0.03, are more common in female probands (p = 0.02, are enriched among genes encoding FMRP targets (p = 6 × 10−9, and arise predominantly on the paternal chromosome (p < 0.001. On the basis of mutation rates in probands versus unaffected siblings, we conclude that de novo frameshift indels contribute to risk in approximately 3% of individuals with ASD. Finally, by observing clustering of mutations in unrelated probands, we uncover two ASD-associated genes: KMT2E (MLL5, a chromatin regulator, and RIMS1, a regulator of synaptic vesicle release. : Insertions and deletions (indels have proven especially difficult to detect in exome sequencing data. Dong et al. now identify indels in exome data for 787 autism spectrum disorder (ASD families. They demonstrate association between de novo indels that alter the reading frame and ASD. Furthermore, by observing clustering of indels in unrelated probands, they uncover two additional ASD-associated genes: KMT2E (MLL5, a chromatin regulator, and RIMS1, a regulator of synaptic vesicle release.

  9. Novel orally bioavailable EZH1/2 dual inhibitors with greater antitumor efficacy than an EZH2 selective inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Daisuke; Kanno, Osamu; Watanabe, Jun; Kinoshita, Junzo; Hirasawa, Makoto; Nosaka, Emi; Shiroishi, Machiko; Takizawa, Takeshi; Yasumatsu, Isao; Horiuchi, Takao; Nakao, Akira; Suzuki, Keisuke; Yamasaki, Tomonori; Nakajima, Katsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Miho; Yamazaki, Takanori; Yadav, Ajay Singh; Adachi, Nobuaki

    2017-10-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) methylates histone H3 lysine 27 and represses gene expression to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) or its close homolog EZH1 functions as a catalytic subunit of PRC2, so there are two PRC2 complexes containing either EZH2 or EZH1. Tumorigenic functions of EZH2 and its synthetic lethality with some subunits of SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complexes have been observed. However, little is known about the function of EZH1 in tumorigenesis. Herein, we developed novel, orally bioavailable EZH1/2 dual inhibitors that strongly and selectively inhibited methyltransferase activity of both EZH2 and EZH1. EZH1/2 dual inhibitors suppressed trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 in cells more than EZH2 selective inhibitors. They also showed greater antitumor efficacy than EZH2 selective inhibitor in vitro and in vivo against diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells harboring gain-of-function mutation in EZH2. A hematological cancer panel assay indicated that EZH1/2 dual inhibitor has efficacy against some lymphomas, multiple myeloma, and leukemia with fusion genes such as MLL-AF9, MLL-AF4, and AML1-ETO. A solid cancer panel assay demonstrated that some cancer cell lines are sensitive to EZH1/2 dual inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. No clear correlation was detected between sensitivity to EZH1/2 dual inhibitor and SWI/SNF mutations, with a few exceptions. Severe toxicity was not seen in rats treated with EZH1/2 dual inhibitor for 14 days at drug levels higher than those used in the antitumor study. Our results indicate the possibility of EZH1/2 dual inhibitors for clinical applications. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Genetically engineered mesenchymal stromal cells produce IL-3 and TPO to further improve human scaffold-based xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, Marco; de Boer, Bauke; Jaques, Jenny; Antonelli, Antonella; Horton, Sarah J; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost D; Groen, Richard W J; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2017-07-01

    Recently, NOD-SCID IL2Rγ -/- (NSG) mice were implanted with human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the presence of ceramic scaffolds or Matrigel to mimic the human bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. This approach allowed the engraftment of leukemic samples that failed to engraft in NSG mice without humanized niches and resulted in a better preservation of leukemic stem cell self-renewal properties. To further improve our humanized niche scaffold model, we genetically engineered human MSCs to secrete human interleukin-3 (IL-3) and thrombopoietin (TPO). In vitro, these IL-3- and TPO-producing MSCs were superior in expanding human cord blood (CB) CD34 + hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. MLL-AF9-transduced CB CD34 + cells could be transformed efficiently along myeloid or lymphoid lineages on IL-3- and TPO-producing MSCs. In vivo, these genetically engineered MSCs maintained their ability to differentiate into bone, adipocytes, and other stromal components. Upon transplantation of MLL-AF9-transduced CB CD34 + cells, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) developed in engineered scaffolds, in which a significantly higher percentage of myeloid clones was observed in the mouse compartments compared with previous models. Engraftment of primary AML, B-cell ALL, and biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) patient samples was also evaluated, and all patient samples could engraft efficiently; the myeloid compartment of the BAL samples was better preserved in the human cytokine scaffold model. In conclusion, we show that we can genetically engineer the ectopic human BM microenvironment in a humanized scaffold xenograft model. This approach will be useful for functional study of the importance of niche factors in normal and malignant human hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2017 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of inoculum and molasses concentration as supplement to vinasse of distillery for the production of biomass of native Candida utilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Cajo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Vinasse is a residue of alcohol distilleries, rich in mineral salts and organic matter, whose use is limited and finally it is poured to the sewage system, causing pollution, nevertheless, can constitute a substrate for the production of biomass yeasts, used in the animal feed. In the present investigation was determined the effect of the concentration of the inoculum and the molasses as supplement of the vinasse, for the production of biomass of native Candida utilis. Yeasts were isolated of leaves of Zea mays L. "maize" in Sabouraud glucosade agar, were identified 40.23 % as C. utilis. Next, were cultivated in vinasse with 30 g/L of molasses, to 28 ºC, during 24 hours, the biomass was weighed and was selected C. utilis MKJ12, because it had the highest biomass value of 7.667 g/L. This yeast in concentration of 25, 50 and 75 mL/L of inoculum was cultivated in bioreactors Batch tank type containing 300 mL of vinasse with 10, 30, and 50 g/L of molasses, with downward air flow (1vvm, and incubation was 28 ºC during 20 hours. With 50 mL/L of inoculum and 50 g/L of molasses was determined the shortest generation time (2.88 h and the highest values in number of generations (6.95, specific rate of growth (0.35 h-1 , weight of biomass (11.78 g/L and percentage of protein (40.15 %. Feasibility was demonstrated of the production of C. utilis biomass with 5 mL of inoculum in vinasse supplemented by molasses.

  12. Morel-Lavallée Lesions of the Knee: MRI Findings Compared With Cadaveric Study Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassalou, Evangelia E; Zibis, Aristeidis H; Raoulis, Vasileios A; Tsifountoudis, Ioannis P; Karantanas, Apostolos H

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the MRI findings and treatment decisions and outcome for Morel-Lavallée lesions (MLLs) of the knee and to investigate whether evidence exists to support an increased frequency of such lesions on the medial or lateral side by performing a cadaveric experiment. In a 4-year period, 24 MRI studies of 24 consecutive patients (16 male patients and eight female patients) with knee MLLs were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographic characteristics, treatment decisions and outcome, and associated injuries were recorded. The location of the MLL was categorized as medial, lateral, or global. Lesions were categorized according to an established MRI classification. During the cadaveric experiment, the compartmental pressures of the medial or lateral aspect of the knee were monitored in 20 cadaveric knees. The chi-square test, t test, and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis. MLLs were located medially in 16 patients, laterally in two patients, and globally in six patients. The medial location was significantly more common than a lateral or global location (p < 0.05). MLLs were classified as type I in 14 patients, type II in eight patients, and type III in two patients. MRI type was correlated with the chronicity of injury (r 2 = 0.614; p = 0.0014). Fractures were the most common associated injuries, occurring in seven of 24 patients. In 17 patients, all of whom had conservatively treated type I or type II lesions, complete resolution of the MLL occurred. The maximum compartmental pressures were significantly higher on the lateral side than on the medial side (p < 0.0001). Knee MLLs have a predilection for the medial side, which may be attributed to the lower resistance in this location, and they have variable patterns on MRI, which correlate with chronicity. Conservative treatment of type I and II lesions seems effective.

  13. Evaluación inicial de parámetros de campo en un biodigestor anaeróbico para el tratamiento de aguas residuales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonieta Sánchez Góngora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El biodigestor anaerobio utilizado en este estudio, se diseñó para tratar agua residual doméstica en un sanitario de prueba, que se caracteriza por ser de: flujo continuo, baja carga orgánica y tener cuatro etapas de proceso. La importancia del prototipo estudiado radicó en las condiciones reales en que se probó. La primera etapa consistió en la selección del sitio, construcción del prototipo en ferrocemento con capacidad de 1m3, impermeabilización y carga. En esta etapa se inoculó el reactor con materia orgánica procedente de las descargas del sanitario, durante el periodo de agosto a diciembre de 2011. La evaluación de este periodo consistió en la medición de parámetros de campo: pH, conductividad eléctrica, sólidos sedimentables, temperatura del influente y efluente del sistema que permitieron verificar el comportamiento del proceso del digestor durante la fase de arranque. Los resultados obtenidos para estas determinaciones a la entrada y salida del biodigestor respectivamente son los siguientes: pH (8.03; 8.43, conductividad eléctrica (1510.83 µS/cm; 1207.00 µS/cm, temperatura del proceso (19.2°C; 20.1°C, sólidos sedimentables (144.5mL/L; 0.02mL/L, oxígeno disuelto (4.5992 mg/L; 0.1924 mg/L estos datos proporcionaron un punto de partida para el tratamiento de aguas residuales de tipo doméstica.

  14. Length limits fail to restructure a Largemouth Bass population: A 28‐year case history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Colvin, M.E.; Shamaskin, A. C.; Bull, L. A.; Holman, T.; Jones, R.

    2017-01-01

    Length limits have been implemented by fisheries management agencies to achieve population density, size structure, and angler satisfaction objectives. By redirecting harvest towards or away from particular length‐ or age‐groups, length limits rely on harvest by anglers to maintain a population at or near a desired state. The fish population changes that follow the implementation of harvest regulations may take several years to manifest, so long‐term monitoring may be needed to adequately evaluate length limits. We used an innovative application of cluster analysis to facilitate evaluation of the effects of three consecutive length limits on a population of Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides over a 28‐year period in Ross Barnett Reservoir, Mississippi. A 13–16‐in protected slot length limit (10 years), followed by a 15‐in minimum length limit (MLL; 11 years), followed by a 12‐in MLL (7 years) failed to restructure the Largemouth Bass population due to what we suggest was the expansion of a voluntary catch‐and‐release attitude that started in the first decade of the study period. Various population metrics shifted towards values expected in an unharvested population, and the observed shifts can be attributed to a harvest deficit created by the prevailing catch‐and‐release attitude. Largemouth Bass harvest regulations may no longer be relevant in many waters. The utility of regulations for restructuring Largemouth Bass populations is largely dependent on harvesting attitudes that vary geographically, depending on cultural characteristics and demographics.

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Clove ( Syzigium aromaticum L .) Essential Oil and Gamma Irradiation against Some Food-Borne Pathogens in Minced Chicken Meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibriel, A.Y.; ALI, H.G.M.; Abdeldaiem, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of clove essential oil ( Syzigium aromaticum L.) against five strains of pathogenic bacteria namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus was investigated in vitro. The essential oil of clove exhibited antibacterial activity against tested microorganisms. Comparatively, 25, 50 and 100 ml/l concentrations of clove essential oil were of less inhibitory effect than 200, 300 and 500 ml/l concentrations. However, S. aureus showed less sensitivity towards clove essential oil inhibition; however Salmonella typhimurium was strongly inhibited by clove essential oil. Then, the effect of clove essential oil at two concentrations (3 and 5% v/w) and combined treatments between gamma irradiation at doses of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 kGy and clove essential oil at concentrations as formerly on inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium , Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus inoculated into chicken minced meat was investigated. Addition of clove essential oil to samples of chicken minced meat inoculated with three pathogens reduced the counts of these pathogens, proportionally with increasing concentration. The irradiated samples at doses of 3, 4, 5 and 6 kGy and that irradiated at doses 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 kGy of chicken minced and containing 3 and 5% completely inactivation of inoculated pathogens and not detected during cold storage at 4±1°C for 7 days. Accordingly, clove essential oil can be used as natural antimicrobial additive or in combination treatments with gamma irradiation for incorporation in various food products. Also, there is a possibility of using low doses gamma irradiation and low concentrations clove essential oil for treatment of meat products in order to this to reduce the economic cost of products and improving hygienic quality and extend its shelf-life. Therefore clove essential oil could be used as preservative ingredients in

  16. Pesticide Degrading Bacteria in Aquatic Environment: Bioprospecting and Evaluation of Biotechnological Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rodrigues dos Santos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides play an important role in the increase of productivity in agro-industry and the extensive use of these substances cause environmental, economic and social damage in time. Microbial activity is an essential part in the dynamics and the destination of pesticides in the environment. This research focuses in prospecting and characterizing bacterial strains which are potentially able to degrade/tolerate Atrazine, Chlorpyrifos, Methyl parathion and Picloram. Bacteria were isolated from water samples collected according to the degree of salinity along the Pacoti River's estuary (Ceara, located in the semi-arid region of northeastern Brazil. A total of 49 bacterial strains were isolated, all of which tolerated/ downgraded concentrations up to 200mg/L of picloram, atrazine and methyl parathion. Tested in pesticide mixtures, the percentage and tolerance level showed that 73% grew in concentrations up to 200mg/L, 17,4% tolerated/ downgraded up to 150ml/L and the remainder only grew in concentrations under 100ml/L. The strains which had the best performance against pesticides, by points, were P1 (13Db e 14D; P2 (10E; P3 (2M, 9M, 10M, 12Mb, 14M, 17M 18Mp 19M e 20M. A high percentage of isolates (67% expressed luminescence when exposed to the pesticides atrazine and methyl parathion in concentrations between 150 and 200ml/L. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v8i4.748

  17. Genetic evaluation of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Iraq using FTA cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kzayer, Lika'a Fasih Y; Sakashita, Kazuo; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Al-Hadad, Salma Abbas; Al-Jadiry, Mazin Faisal; Abed, Wisam Majeed; Abdulkadhim, Jaafar M H; Al-Shujairi, Tariq Abadi; Hasan, Janan Ghalib; Al-Abdullah, Hussam M Salih; Al-Ani, Mouroge H; Saber, Paiman Ali I; Inoshita, Toshi; Kamata, Minoru; Koike, Kenichi

    2012-09-01

    Genetic examination of childhood leukemia has not been available in Iraq. We here report the frequency of TEL-AML1, E2A-PBX1, MLL-AF4, and BCR-ABL chimeric transcripts in 264 Iraqi children newly diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), using FTA cards impregnated with bone marrow aspirate or whole blood. The diagnosis of ALL was made according to standard French-American-British morphologic criteria. Based on the results of storage temperature and duration, most of the FTA samples were preserved at 4°C for up to 6 weeks in five Iraqi hospitals and then transferred to Japan for molecular analysis. Nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was adopted for the analysis. TEL-AML1 chimeric transcript product was found in 32 (12.1%) of 264 ALL patients. Eleven (4.2%) patients, 4 (1.5%) patients, and 11 (4.2%) patients had E2A-PBX1 mRNA, MLL-AF4 mRNA, and BCR-ABL mRNA, respectively. One patient had both TEL-AML1 and E2A-PBX1 fusion genes. The incidence of TEL-AML1 in Iraqi ALL children appears to be similar to or slightly higher than those of Jordan (12%) and Kuwait (7%). The prevalence and clinical findings of ALL patients with either E2A-PBX1 or BCR-ABL were comparable to the data reported elsewhere. International collaboration via FTA cards may be helpful to improve diagnosis and management of patients with hematological malignancies in low-income and underdeveloped countries. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Unraveling the effect of structurally different classes of insecticide on germination and early plant growth of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Sanjeev Kumar; Kim, Il-Doo; Kwak, Hwa-Sook; Shin, Dong-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Although a considerable number of studies about the effect of different insecticides on plant physiology and metabolism have been carried out, research work about the comparative action of structurally different classes of insecticide on physiological and biochemical properties of soybean seed germination and early growth has not been found. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different classes of insecticides on soybean seed germination and early plant growth. Soybean seeds of Bosuk cultivar were soaked for 24h in distilled water or recommended dose (2mLL(-1), 1mLL(-1), 0.5gL(-1), and 0.5gL(-1) water for insecticides Mepthion, Myungtaja, Actara, and Stonate, respectively) of pesticide solutions of four structurally different classes of insecticides - Mepthion (fenitrothion; organophosphate), Myungtaja (etofenprox; pyrethroid), Actara (thiamethoxam; neonicotinoid), and Stonate (lambda-cyhalothrin cum thiamethoxam; pyrethroid cum neonicotinoid) - which are used for controlling stink bugs in soybean crop. Insecticides containing thiamethoxam and lamda-cyhalothrin cum thiamethoxam showed positive effects on seedling biomass and content of polyphenol and flavonoid, however fenitrothion insecticide reduced the seed germination, seed and seedling vigor, and polyphenol and flavonoid contents in soybean. Results of this study reveal that different classes of insecticide have differential influence on physiologic and metabolic actions like germination, early growth, and antioxidant activities of soybean and this implies that yield and nutrient content also might be affected with the application of different types of insecticide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ectopic Expression of Homeobox Gene NKX2-1 in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Is Mediated by Aberrant Chromatin Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Tomasch, Jürgen; Quentmeier, Hilmar; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcription factors ubiquitously involved in basic developmental processes, deregulation of which promotes cell transformation in multiple cancers including hematopoietic malignancies. In particular, NKL-family homeobox genes TLX1, TLX3 and NKX2-5 are ectopically activated by chromosomal rearrangements in T-cell neoplasias. Here, using transcriptional microarray profiling and RQ-PCR we identified ectopic expression of NKL-family member NKX2-1, in a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell line SU-DHL-5. Moreover, in silico analysis demonstrated NKX2-1 overexpression in 5% of examined DLBCL patient samples. NKX2-1 is physiologically expressed in lung and thyroid tissues where it regulates differentiation. Chromosomal and genomic analyses excluded rearrangements at the NKX2-1 locus in SU-DHL-5, implying alternative activation. Comparative expression profiling implicated several candidate genes in NKX2-1 regulation, variously encoding transcription factors, chromatin modifiers and signaling components. Accordingly, siRNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression studies confirmed involvement of transcription factor HEY1, histone methyltransferase MLL and ubiquitinated histone H2B in NKX2-1 deregulation. Chromosomal aberrations targeting MLL at 11q23 and the histone gene cluster HIST1 at 6p22 which we observed in SU-DHL-5 may, therefore, represent fundamental mutations mediating an aberrant chromatin structure at NKX2-1. Taken together, we identified ectopic expression of NKX2-1 in DLBCL cells, representing the central player in an oncogenic regulative network compromising B-cell differentiation. Thus, our data extend the paradigm of NKL homeobox gene deregulation in lymphoid malignancies. PMID:23637834

  20. Hif-1α and Hif-2α synergize to suppress AML development but are dispensable for disease maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Milica; Guitart, Amelie V; Sepulveda, Catarina; Villacreces, Arnaud; O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Panagopoulou, Theano I; Ivens, Alasdair; Menendez-Gonzalez, Juan; Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Allen, Lewis; Glykofrydis, Fokion; Subramani, Chithra; Armesilla-Diaz, Alejandro; Post, Annemarie E M; Schaak, Katrin; Gezer, Deniz; So, Chi Wai Eric; Holyoake, Tessa L; Wood, Andrew; O'Carroll, Dónal; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Kranc, Kamil R

    2015-12-14

    Leukemogenesis occurs under hypoxic conditions within the bone marrow (BM). Knockdown of key mediators of cellular responses to hypoxia with shRNA, namely hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) or HIF-2α, in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples results in their apoptosis and inability to engraft, implicating HIF-1α or HIF-2α as therapeutic targets. However, genetic deletion of Hif-1α has no effect on mouse AML maintenance and may accelerate disease development. Here, we report the impact of conditional genetic deletion of Hif-2α or both Hif-1α and Hif-2α at different stages of leukemogenesis in mice. Deletion of Hif-2α accelerates development of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) and shortens AML latency initiated by Mll-AF9 and its downstream effectors Meis1 and Hoxa9. Notably, the accelerated initiation of AML caused by Hif-2α deletion is further potentiated by Hif-1α codeletion. However, established LSCs lacking Hif-2α or both Hif-1α and Hif-2α propagate AML with the same latency as wild-type LSCs. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of the HIF pathway or HIF-2α knockout using the lentiviral CRISPR-Cas9 system in human established leukemic cells with MLL-AF9 translocation have no impact on their functions. We therefore conclude that although Hif-1α and Hif-2α synergize to suppress the development of AML, they are not required for LSC maintenance. © 2015 Vukovic et al.

  1. Protective effect of hydroferrate fluid, MRN-100, against lethality and hematopoietic tissue damage in γ-radiated Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoneum, Mamdooh; Elbaghdady, Heba Allah M.; El-Shebly, Abdallah A.; Pan, Deyu; Assanah, Edward; Lawson, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Hydroferrate fluid, MRN-100, an iron-based compound derived from bivalent and trivalent ferrates, is a potent antioxidant compound. Therefore, we examined the protective effect of MRN-100 against γ-radiation-induced lethality and damage to hematopoietic tissues in fish. A total of 216 Nile tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus) were randomly divided into four groups. Group 1 served as a control that was administered no radiation and no MRN-100 treatment. Group 2 was exposed only to γ-radiation (15 Gy). Groups 3 and 4 were pre-treated with MRN-100 at doses of either 1 ml/l or 3 ml/l in water for 1 week, and subsequently exposed to radiation while continuing to receive MRN-100 for 27 days. The survival rate was measured, and biochemical and histopathological analyses of hematopoietic tissues were performed for the different treatment groups at 1 and 4 weeks post-radiation. Exposure to radiation reduced the survival rate to 27.7%, while treatment with MRN-100 maintained the survival rate at 87.2%. In addition, fish exposed to γ-radiation for 1 week showed a significant decrease in the total number of white blood cells (WBCs) and red blood cells (RBCs) series. However, treatment with MRN-100 protected the total WBC count and the RBCs series when compared with irradiated fish. Furthermore, significant histological lesions were observed in the hepatopancreas, spleen and gills of irradiated fish. However, treatment with MRN-100 protected the histopathology of various organs. We conclude that MRN-100 is a radioprotective agent in fish and may be useful as an adjuvant treatment to counteract the adverse side effects associated with radiation exposure. (author)

  2. Observation of Z decays to four leptons with the CMS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Velde, C. Vander; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Junior, M. Correa Martins; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Jorge, L. Soares; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Oliveros, A. F. Osorio; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Lingemann, J.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. 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S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Dell’Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. 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S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; La Cruz, I. Heredia-de; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Villalba, R. Magaña; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Moreno, S. Carrillo; Valencia, F. Vazquez; Ibarguen, H. A. Salazar; Linares, E. Casimiro; Pineda, A. Morelos; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Parracho, P. G. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Maestre, J. Alcaraz; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Llatas, M. Chamizo; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Peris, A. Delgado; Vázquez, D. Domínguez; Bedoya, C. Fernandez; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Lopez, O. Gonzalez; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Pelayo, J. Puerta; Olmeda, A. Quintario; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Menendez, J. Fernandez; Folgueras, S.; Caballero, I. Gonzalez; Iglesias, L. Lloret; Gomez, J. Piedra; Cifuentes, J. A. Brochero; Cabrillo, I. 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Gomez-Reino; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y. -J.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Cortezon, E. Palencia; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Antunes, J. Rodrigues; Rolandi, G.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Rikova, M. Ivova; Mejias, B. Millan; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, Z. K.; Lu, Y. 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J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Acosta, M. Vazquez; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; John, J. St.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Sierra, R. Vasquez; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D’Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Azzolini, V.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Heyburn, B.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O’Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Ceballos, G. Gomez; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Brownson, E.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Marono, M. Vidal; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-12-01

    The first observation of the Z boson decaying to four leptons in proton-proton collisions is presented. The analyzed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.02 inverse femtobarns at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. A pronounced resonance peak, with a statistical significance of 9.7 sigma, is observed in the distribution of the invariant mass of four leptons (electrons and/or muons) with mass and width consistent with expectations for Z boson decays. The branching fraction and cross section reported here are defined by phase space restrictions on the leptons, namely, 80 < m[4l] < 100 GeV, where m[4l] is the invariant mass of the four leptons, and m[ll] > 4 GeV for all pairs of leptons, where m[ll] is the two-lepton invariant mass. The measured branching fraction is B(Z to 4l) = (4.2 /+0.9/-0.8 (stat.) +/- 0.2 (syst.)) 10E-6 and agrees with the standard model prediction of 4.45 10E-6. The measured cross section times branching fraction is sigma(pp to Z) B(Z to 4 l) = 112 +23/-20 (stat.) +7/-5 (syst.) +3/-2 (lumi.) fb, also consistent with the standard model prediction of 120 fb. The four-lepton mass peak arising from Z to 4 l decays provides a calibration channel for the Higgs boson search in the H to ZZ to 4 l decay mode.

  3. Nutritional Requirements for the Mycelial Biomass and Exopolymer Production by Hericium erinaceus CZ-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daming Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of medium composition and fermentation parameters on the simultaneous production of mycelial biomass and exopolymer by medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus CZ-2 were investigated in shake flask cultures using one-factor-at-a-time method and orthogonal array design. Results showed that the most suitable carbon, nitrogen, mineral sources, and cofactors for the mycelial biomass and exopolymer production were: corn flour combined with 1 % glucose, yeast extract, KH2PO4 and corn steep liquor. The intuitive analysis of orthogonal array design results indicated that the effects of nutritional requirement on the mycelial growth of Hericium erinaceus CZ-2 were in regular sequence of corn flour combined with 1 % glucose > yeast extract > corn steep liquor > KH2PO4, and those on exopolymer production were in the order of corn flour combined with glucose > KH2PO4 > yeast extract > corn steep liquor. The maximal yield of mycelial biomass (16.07 g/L was obtained when the composition of the culture medium was (in g/L: corn flour 30, glucose 10, yeast extract 3, KH2PO4 1, CaCO3 0.5, and 15 mL/L of corn steep liquor; while the maximal exopolymer yield (1.314 g/L was achieved when the composition of medium was (in g/L: corn flour 30, glucose 10, yeast extract 5, KH2PO4 3, CaCO3 0.5, and 15 mL/L of corn steep liquor. In the 15-litre scale-up fermentation, the maximum mycelial biomass yield of 20.50 g/L was achieved using the optimized medium.

  4. Mutational landscape of MCPyV-positive and MCPyV-negative Merkel cell carcinomas with implications for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Gerald; Walradt, Trent; Markarov, Vladimir; Blom, Astrid; Riaz, Nadeem; Doumani, Ryan; Stafstrom, Krista; Moshiri, Ata; Yelistratova, Lola; Levinsohn, Jonathan; Chan, Timothy A; Nghiem, Paul; Lifton, Richard P; Choi, Jaehyuk

    2016-01-19

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but highly aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, associated with the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in 80% of cases. To define the genetic basis of MCCs, we performed exome sequencing of 49 MCCs. We show that MCPyV-negative MCCs have a high mutation burden (median of 1121 somatic single nucleotide variants (SSNVs) per-exome with frequent mutations in RB1 and TP53 and additional damaging mutations in genes in the chromatin modification (ASXL1, MLL2, and MLL3), JNK (MAP3K1 and TRAF7), and DNA-damage pathways (ATM, MSH2, and BRCA1). In contrast, MCPyV-positive MCCs harbor few SSNVs (median of 12.5 SSNVs/tumor) with none in the genes listed above. In both subgroups, there are rare cancer-promoting mutations predicted to activate the PI3K pathway (HRAS, KRAS, PIK3CA, PTEN, and TSC1) and to inactivate the Notch pathway (Notch1 and Notch2). TP53 mutations appear to be clinically relevant in virus-negative MCCs as 37% of these tumors harbor potentially targetable gain-of-function mutations in TP53 at p.R248 and p.P278. Moreover, TP53 mutational status predicts death in early stage MCC (5-year survival in TP53 mutant vs wild-type stage I and II MCCs is 20% vs. 92%, respectively; P = 0.0036). Lastly, we identified the tumor neoantigens in MCPyV-negative and MCPyV-positive MCCs. We found that virus-negative MCCs harbor more tumor neoantigens than melanomas or non-small cell lung cancers (median of 173, 65, and 111 neoantigens/sample, respectively), two cancers for which immune checkpoint blockade can produce durable clinical responses. Collectively, these data support the use of immunotherapies for virus-negative MCCs.

  5. Use of Sodium Hypochlorite for the Control of Bakanae Disease in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Bum Shin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For application of sodium hypochlorite as a seed disinfectant to the control of bakanae disease caused by Gibberella fujikuroi in rice, we investigated the effects of sodium hypochlorite for antifungal activity, eliminating fungus from seeds and reducing disease occurrence in vitro and greenhouse. The viability of the pathogen was significantly reduced at 80 ml/l concentration of sodium hypochlorite, and the pathogens did not grow at over 100 ml/l concentration of sodium hypochlorite. The effect of eliminating fungus was 90% at treatment of 0.3% sodium hypochlorite solution to infected rice seeds for eight hours. When the rice seeds were soaked into 0.5% and 0.3% sodium hypochlorite solutions for twelve hours, the disease incidences of rice seedling were remarkably reduced to 4.3% and 4.7%, respectively, compared to 97.3% of non-treatment control. The rates of seedling stand were 29.1% and 26.9% higher with the sodium hypochlorite treatment than that of non-treatment control. When prochloraz and sodium hypochlorite was treated to naturally severely infested rice seeds with bakanae disease, the disinfection effect was higher than that of prochloraz alone treatment. When the seeds were soaked in sodium hypochlorite before or after prochloraz, the rate of seed contamination was low as 4.0% or 6.3%, respectively, compared to prochloraz alone as 13.7%. The disease incidence was low as 3.7% or 8.3%, respectively, compared to prochloraz alone as 14.3%. The disinfection effect of treatment with prochloraz after sodium hypochlorite was higher than that of treatment with prochloraz before sodium hypochlorite.

  6. HAEMATOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF WATER SOLUBLE FRACTION (WSF OF BONNY LIGHT CRUDE OIL (BLCO TO THE AFRICAN FRESHWATER CATFISH CLARIAS GARIEPINUS (BURCHELL, 1822

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Three hundred and sixty (360 juveniles of Clarias gariepinus were collected from Luis Fish Farm Warri, Delta State and transported to the Departmental Laboratory of Fisheries and Aquaculture, Ebonyi State University Abakaliki (latitude 60, 20\\' 49\\'\\'N, longitude 80 06\\' 11\\'\\'E, Nigeria. The experimental fish were exposed to 6 treatment concentrations (20, 10, 5, 2.5, 1.25 and 0.00 ml/l of WSF of BLCO in triplicate replications of 60 fish per treatment for 10 weeks. Mean cell count of red blood cell (RBC reduced significantly (P and lt;0.05 from 2.09 and plusmn;0.06 x 106 /mm3 in the control group to 1.4971 and plusmn;0.06x106 /mm3 in the highest concentration exposed group (20ml/L. Similarly, significant reduction in packed cell volume (PCV and haemoglobin content of RBC resulted to anaemic conditions in exposed fish. PCV decreased from 24.33 and plusmn;0.26% to 16.50 and plusmn;0.89% while haemoglobin decreased to 7.73 and plusmn;0.29g/dl from 12.05 and plusmn;0.11g/dl. Total white blood cell (WBC count suffered significant reduction than control and in the amount of its lymphocytes but increased significantly than control in the number of neutrophils. WBC reduced from 51.44 and plusmn;0.47x103 /mm3 to 43.48 and plusmn;1.09x103 /mm3 , and lymphocytes from 91.55 and plusmn;2.24% to 78.0 and plusmn;0.5% while neutrophil increased to 11.52 and plusmn;1.3% from 3.58 and plusmn;0.27%. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV, MCH and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC did not differ significantly (P and gt;0.05 with control group.

  7. Dichlorvos’un (DDVP Allium cepa L. Kök Ucu Meristem Hücrelerinde Mitoz Bölünme ve Kromozomlar Üzerine Etkileri

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    Hatice Soykan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Özet. Çalışmamızda, DDVP’nin A. cepa’da kök uzunluğu, kök sayısı, mitoz bölünme ve kromozomlar üzerine olan etkileri araştırılmıştır. DDVP’nin 2ml/L, 4ml/L, 6 ml/L dozları 12, 24 ve 48 saat olmak üzere üç farklı süre ile A. cepa bitkisinin köklerine uygulanmıştır. Uygulama sonucu her soğandaki kökler sayılmış ve kök uzunlukları ölçülmüştür. Yapılan değerlendirmeler sonucu kontrol gruplarına göre uygulama gruplarının kök sayısının süreye bağlı olarak azalma gösterdiği görülmüştür. Uygulama gruplarının kök uzunlukları kontrol grupları ile karşılaştırıldıklarında uzunluğun genellikle doz ve süreye bağlı olarak azalma gösterdiği belirlenmiştir. Mikroskobik gözlemler sonucu elde edilen veriler tablolara aktarılmış ve SPSS 12.0 programında yapılan istatistiksel analizler ile sonuçlar değerlendirilmiştir. Elde edilen verilere göre DDVP’nin A.cepa bitkisinin köklerinde mitotik indeksi azalttığı saptanmıştır. Mitotik indeksin azalması süre artışına bağlı bir paralellik gösterirken, doz artışına bağlı bir paralellik göstermemektedir. İnsektisitin A.cepa bitkisinin köklerine uygulanması sonucu kromozomlarda hasarlar meydana gelmiştir. En fazla gözlenen kromozom hasarları yapışkanlık, yanlış kutuplaşma ve fragment oluşumudur. Bundan başka anafaz köprüsü ve mikronükleus oluşumları da görülmüştür. Abstract. In our study, effects of DDVP on A.cepa root length, root number, mitosis and chromosomes are determined.  Different doses of DDVP (2ml/L, 4 ml/L, 6 ml/L were applied to A. cepar oots with three different application periods (12h, 24h, 48h. Roots of tubers were counted and root lengths were measured after applications. Our results show that root numbers of application groups are decreased correlated with application time. When root length of application groups with control group is compared, root length decrease

  8. Fosfito de potássio na indução de resistência a Verticillium dahliae Kleb., em mudas de cacaueiro (Theobroma cacao L. Effect of potassium phosphite on the induction of resistance in cocoa seedlings (Theobroma cacao L. against Verticillium dahliae Kleb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Martins Ribeiro Júnior

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Há vários relatos da utilização de fosfitos no controle de doenças de plantas, por meio de ação direta, antifúngica e indireta por indução de resistência. Essa atuação como indutor é questionada, não sendo encontradas, em muitos desses trabalhos, evidências de respostas de defesa ativadas pelos sais de fosfito. Com o presente trabalho, objetivou-se estudar o efeito de doses (0,62; 1,25; 2,5 e 5 mL.L-1 de água de fosfito de potássio na indução de resistência em mudas de cacaueiro a V. dahliae, além de investigar os possíveis mecanismos envolvidos na resposta de defesa. Foram realizados experimentos no Laboratório de Fisiologia do Parasitismo e casa-de-vegetação do Departamento de Fitopatologia UFLA. A aplicação foliar do fosfito foi realizada 7 dias antes das inoculações e as avaliações de severidade foram realizadas aos 20, 30, 40, 50 e 60 dias após a inoculação. Foi realizado também um experimento para verificar o efeito tóxico direto e outro para avaliar a atividade das enzimas peroxidases e polifenoloxidases e a concentração de lignina. O tratamento com o fosfito de potássio (1,25 mL.L-1 de água proporcionou 10% de redução na área abaixo da curva de progresso da severidade da murcha-de-Verticillium (AACPD, 60 dias após aplicação foliar, não diferindo de nenhuma das doses, nem da testemunha. Todas as doses utilizadas apresentaram efeito fungitóxico, inibindo a germinação de V. dahliae. A aplicação do fosfito de potássio (1,25 mL.L-1 de água não induziu aumento na atividade das enzimas peroxidases e polifenoloxidases em relação à testemunha. Plantas tratadas com esse produto apresentaram um pequeno incremento na concentração de lignina, não apresentando diferença significativa da testemunha absoluta.There are several reports concerning with the use of phosphites for controlling of plant diseases, through direct action, antifungal, and indirect, by resistance induction. The

  9. Evaluation of Bio-phosphor and HumicAcid on Growth Parameters and Oil Content in Evening Primrose (Oenotherabiennis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Aghakhani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evening primrose (OenotherabiennisL. is a relatively new and valuable oilseed crop for temperate region. Its oilseed is important because of high levels of unsaturated fatty acids, especially gamma-linolenic acid. Seeds contain 20-30% oil which includes 70% linoleic acid (LA and 10% gamma linolenic acid (GLA. Oil content in O. biennis is a quantitative trait which controlled by many genes and similar to any other quantitative traits varies with environmental conditionssuch factors as age of seed and growth conditions. Evening primrose oil, especially gamma-linolenic acid, has many therapeutic properties, and it uses as cure for many diseases such as Diabetes, Eczema, inflammation, Cardiovascular, Cancer, Autoimmune diseases, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Depression. Studies on Medicinal Plants in nature and farmlands show that the use of sustainable agriculturae andnatural sources are two suitable methods for producing healthy plants.Additionally, the use of bio-fertilizers lead to maximum yield and quality in these plants. Azizi et al.(6 showed that interactions of vermicompost and plant density had significant effect on oil content, oil density and refractive index of evening primrose oil. The best treatments were also including 2 Kg/m2 of vermicompost,20 plants/ m2in terms of oil production,9 plants/ m2in terms of oil quality and ratio of unsaturated fatty acids to saturated, respectively. Material and Method: The aim of this research was to determine the effect of humic acid and bio-phosphor application on growth parameters in O. biennis. The experiment was conducted based on randomized complete block design with 8 treatments and three replicates during 2013-2014 growing season, at the experimental farm of the faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad.. Treatments consisted of 4 levels of humic acid (0, 1, 3, 5 ml/L and 2 levels of bio-phosphor (without bio-phosphor or with bio-phosphor. Liquid form of humic acid was used

  10. "Kes kaunis on, peab andma vastse võsu..." : [sonetid] / William Shakespeare ; tlk. Harald Rajamets, Ants Oras

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616

    2006-01-01

    Sisu: "Kes kaunis on, peab andma vastse võsu..." ; "Sa peeglist näed: need palgejooned nüüd..." ; "Seesama aeg, mis kunstipeenelt voolib..." ; "Miks muusika teeb nukraks sind, kes ise..." ; "Ei, armastust ei tunne sinu rind..." ; "Nii ruttu, kui sa hääbud, uueks sirgud..." ; "Kui kuulen, kuidas aega mõõdab kell..." ; "Kuid miks sa ise tõhusamal moel..." ; "Kas suvepäeva sarnaseks sind kiita?..." ; "Aeg, õgard, küüned lõvil tömbiks kääna... ; "Ei veena peegel mind, et olen vana..." ; "Just nagu näitleja, kel kinni keel..." ; "Mu silm kui taidur võttis pilti teha..." ; "Mu armu isand, kelle truu vasall..." ; "Ma reisist väsinuna heidan sängi..." ; "Kui õnnest hüljatuna nutan sala..." ; "Kui vaikse leebe mõtte kohtu ette..." ; "Ma olen näinud küll, kuis tõusev päike..." ; "Ma tunnistan, et meid on siiski kaks..." ; "Nii nagu isa, vanadusest nõrka..." ; "Kui sulen laud, mu silmad hästi näevad..." ; "Nii ränk on reisida mul tüütul teel..." ; "Mis on su olemus, mis tuum su, miks..." ; "Ei kuningate uhked marmorsambad..." ; "Arm, uuenda end, nii et öelda sust..." ; "Kui uut ei olegi, vaid kõik on sama..." ; "Nii nagu lained ulgumerelt randa..." ; "Neiks päeviks, kui kord aeg mu armsal palge..." ; "Et näen, kuis aja käsi kõike lõhub..." ; "Kui pronksi, kivi, maad ja merd võib neelda..." ; "Mu tusk on ränk, nüüd surma kutsuks küll..." ; "Kui suren, ära leina mind sa kaua..." ; "Sa minus seda aastaaega näed..." ; "Mul sinust kirjutades arg on meel..." ; "Oo hüvasti! Liig kallis mul su hind..." ; "Siis vihka mind, kui pead, ja kohe praegu..." ; "Mõnd uhkeks teeb ta kunst, mõnd sünnipära..." ; "Sust eemal olin kevadel, mu arm..." ; "Kui möödaläinud aja kroonikais..." ; "Mis on veel ajul paberile kanda..." ; "Jah, tõsi, olen käinus siin ja seal..." ; "Ma uskuda ei saa, et murda suudab..." ; "On parem olla halb kui halvaks peetud..." ; "Ei, aeg, sa ära hoople, et mind muudad..." ; "Mu muusika, kui muusikat sa teed

  11. A comparative analysis of genetic variation in rootstocks and scions of old olive trees – a window into the history of olive cultivation practices and past genetic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Past clonal propagation of olive trees is intimately linked to grafting. However, evidence on grafting in ancient trees is scarce, and not much is known about the source of plant material used for rootstocks. Here, the Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) marker technique was used to study genetic diversity of rootstocks and scions in ancient olive trees from the Levant and its implications for past cultivation of olives. Leaf samples were collected from tree canopies (scions) and shoots growing from the trunk base (suckers). A total of 310 trees were sampled in 32 groves and analyzed with 14 SSR markers. Results In 82.7% of the trees in which both scion and suckers could be genotyped, these were genetically different, and thus suckers were interpreted to represent the rootstock of grafted trees. Genetic diversity values were much higher among suckers than among scions, and 194 and 87 multi-locus genotypes (MLGs) were found in the two sample groups, respectively. Only five private alleles were found among scions, but 125 among suckers. A frequency analysis revealed a bimodal distribution of genetic distance among MLGs, indicating the presence of somatic mutations within clones. When assuming that MLGs differing by one mutation are identical, scion and sucker MLGs were grouped in 20 and 147 multi-locus lineages (MLLs). The majority of scions (90.0%) belonged to a single common MLL, whereas 50.5% of the suckers were single-sample MLLs. However, one MLL was specific to suckers and found in 63 (22.6%) of the samples. Conclusions Our results provide strong evidence that the majority of olive trees in the study are grafted, that the large majority of scions belong to a single ancient cultivar containing somatic mutations, and that the widespread occurrence of one sucker genotype may imply rootstock selection. For the majority of grafted trees it seems likely that saplings were used as rootstocks; their genetic diversity probably is best explained as the result of a

  12. Efeito de nutrientes combinados com indutores de resistência na proteção contra a vassoura-de-bruxa no cacaueiro Effect of nutrients combined with inducers of resistance on the protection of cocoa seedlings against witches' broom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Lettiere do Socorro Santos da Silva

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Na busca por novos indutores de resistência contra a vassoura-de-bruxa no cacaueiro avaliou-se o efeito de vários nutrientes, acibenzolar-S-metil (ASM e a combinação desses nutrientes com ASM. Os produtos e as misturas foram pulverizados 30 dias antes da inoculação nas mudas do clone SIC-23. Foram utilizados os produtos comerciais Supa-potássio®(silicato de potássio, Hortifós® PK (fosfito de potássio e Broadacre® Mn (sulfato de manganês, testados nas dosagens 2,5 mL; 5,0 mL; 10 mL/L de água, isoladamente ou combinados com ASM (0,2g/L. O experimento foi conduzido no delineamento de blocos ao acaso, no esquema fatorial, com quatro repetições de doze plantas/parcela. A incidência da doença foi avaliada 60 dias após a inoculação. Somente o ASM promoveu controle significativo da vassoura-de-bruxa. Os nutrientes aplicados isoladamente não apresentaram efeito na severidade da doença. Por outro lado, o efeito protetor do ASM desapareceu quando este foi misturado ao Supa-potássio®, na dose de 5 ou 10 mL/L.Aiming at improving the level of induction of resistance in cocoa, various nutrients, acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM and their combination were tested on cocoa seedlings, clone SIC-23, 30 days before inoculation. The commercial products Supa-potássio® (potassium silicate, Hortifós® PK (potassium phosphite and Broadacre® Mn (manganese sulfate were sprayed at doses of 2.5, 5.0 mL and 10.0 mL per liter of water, combined or not, with ASM® (0.2 g/L. The experiment was set in a randomized block design, in a factorial scheme, with four replicates of twelve plants each. Disease incidence was assessed 60 days after inoculation. Only ASM promoted significant control of the disease. Nutrients alone had no effect on disease incidence. On the other hand, the protective effect of ASM disappeared when this product was mixed to Supa-potássio at 5 or 10 mL/L.

  13. Design of an efficient medium for heterologous protein production in Yarrowia lipolytica: case of human interferon alpha 2b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Najla; Ayed, Atef; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Kallel, Héla

    2011-05-20

    The non conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica has aroused a strong industrial interest for heterologous protein production. However most of the studies describing recombinant protein production by this yeast rely on the use of complex media, such media are not convenient for large scale production particularly for products intended for pharmaceutical applications. In addition medium composition can also affect the production yield. Hence it is necessary to design an efficient medium for therapeutic protein expression by this host. Five different media, including four minimal media and a complex medium, were assessed in shake flasks for the production of human interferon alpha 2b (hIFN α2b) by Y. lipolytica under the control of POX2 promoter inducible with oleic acid. The chemically defined medium SM4 formulated by Invitrogen for Pichia pastoris growth was the most suitable. Using statistical experimental design this medium was further optimized. The selected minimal medium consisting in SM4 supplemented with 10 mg/l FeCl₃, 1 g/l glutamate, 5 ml/l PTM1 (Pichia Trace Metals) solution and a vitamin solution composed of myo-inositol, thiamin and biotin was called GNY medium. Compared to shake flask, bioreactor culture in GNY medium resulted in 416-fold increase of hIFN α2b production and 2-fold increase of the biological activity. Furthermore, SM4 enrichment with 5 ml/l PTM1 solution contributed to protect hIFN α2b against the degradation by the 28 kDa protease identified by zymography gel in culture supernatant. The screening of the inhibitory effect of the trace elements present in PTM1 solution on the activity of this protease was achieved using a Box-Behnken design. Statistical data analysis showed that FeCl₃ and MnSO₄ had the most inhibitory effect. We have designed an efficient medium for large scale production of heterologous proteins by Y. lipolytica. The optimized medium GNY is suitable for the production of hIFN α2b with the advantage that no

  14. Microbes in crystalline bedrock. Assimilation of CO2 and introduced organic compounds by bacterial populations in groundwater from deep crystalline bedrock at Laxemar and Stripa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.; Ekendahl, S.; Arlinger, J.

    1991-12-01

    The assimilation of CO 2 and of introduced organic compounds by bacterial populations in deep groundwater from fractured crystalline bedrock has been studied. Three depth horizons of the subvertical boreholes KLZ01 at Laxemar in southeastern Sweden, 830-841 m, 910-921 m and 999-1078 m, and V2 in the Stripa mine, 799-807m 812-820 m and 970-1240 m were sampled. The salinity profile of the KLX01 borehole is homogeneous and the groundwater had the following physico-chemical characteristics: pH values of 8.2, 8.4 and 8.5; Eh values of 270, no data and -220 mV; sulphide: 2.3, 11.0 and 5.6 μM; CO 3 2- : 104, 98 and 190 μM; CH 4 : 26, 27 and 31 μl/l and N 2 : 47, 25 and 18 ml/l, respectively. The groundwater in V2 in Stripa were obtained from fracture systems without close hydraulic connections and had the following physico-chemical characteristics: pH values of 9.5, 9.4 and 10.2; Eh values of +205, +199 and -3 mV; sulphide: 0, 106 and 233 μM; CO 3 2- : 50, 57 and 158 μM; CH 4 : 245, 170 and 290 μl/l and N 2 : 25, 31 and 25 ml/l, respectively. Biofilm reactors with hydrophilic glass surfaces were connected to the flowing groundwaters from each of the 3 depths with flow rates of approximately 3x10 -3 m sec -1 over 19 days in Laxemar and 27 to 161 days in Stripa. There were between 0.15 to 0.68 x 10 5 unattached bacteria ml -1 groundwater and 0.94 to 1.2 x 10 5 attached bacteria cm -2 on the surface in Laxemar and from 1.6 x 10 3 up to 3.2 x 10 5 bacteria ml -1 groundwater and from 2.4 x 10 5 up to 1.1 x 10 7 bacteria cm -2 of colonized test surfaces in Stripa. Assuming a mean channel width of 0.1 mm, our results imply that there would be from 10 3 up to 10 6 more attached than unattached bacteria in a water conducting channel in crystalline bedrock. (54 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.) (au)

  15. Analysis of functional germline variants in APOBEC3 and driver genes on breast cancer risk in Moroccan study population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marouf, Chaymaa; Göhler, Stella; Filho, Miguel Inacio Da Silva; Hajji, Omar; Hemminki, Kari; Nadifi, Sellama; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most prevalent cancer in women and a major public health problem in Morocco. Several Moroccan studies have focused on studying this disease, but more are needed, especially at the genetic and molecular levels. Therefore, we investigated the potential association of several functional germline variants in the genes commonly mutated in sporadic breast cancer. In this case–control study, we examined 36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13 genes (APOBEC3A, APOBEC3B, ARID1B, ATR, MAP3K1, MLL2, MLL3, NCOR1, RUNX1, SF3B1, SMAD4, TBX3, TTN), which were located in the core promoter, 5’-and 3’UTR or which were nonsynonymous SNPs to assess their potential association with inherited predisposition to breast cancer development. Additionally, we identified a ~29.5-kb deletion polymorphism between APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B and explored possible associations with BC. A total of 226 Moroccan breast cancer cases and 200 matched healthy controls were included in this study. The analysis showed that12 SNPs in 8 driver genes, 4 SNPs in APOBEC3B gene and 1 SNP in APOBEC3A gene were associated with BC risk and/or clinical outcome at P ≤ 0.05 level. RUNX1-rs8130963 (odds ratio (OR) = 2.25; 95 % CI 1.42-3.56; P = 0.0005; dominant model), TBX3-rs8853 (OR = 2.04; 95 % CI 1.38-3.01; P = 0.0003; dominant model), TBX3-rs1061651 (OR = 2.14; 95 % CI1.43-3.18; P = 0.0002; dominant model), TTN-rs12465459 (OR = 2.02; 95 % confidence interval 1.33-3.07; P = 0.0009; dominant model), were the most significantly associated SNPs with BC risk. A strong association with clinical outcome were detected for the genes SMAD4 -rs3819122 with tumor size (OR = 0.45; 95 % CI 0.25-0.82; P = 0.009) and TTN-rs2244492 with estrogen receptor (OR = 0.45; 95 % CI 0.25-0.82; P = 0.009). Our results suggest that genetic variations in driver and APOBEC3 genes were associated with the risk of BC and may have impact on clinical outcome. However, the reported association between the

  16. Reliable multi-label learning via conformal predictor and random forest for syndrome differentiation of chronic fatigue in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huazhen Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic Fatigue (CF still remains unclear about its etiology, pathophysiology, nomenclature and diagnostic criteria in the medical community. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM adopts a unique diagnostic method, namely 'bian zheng lun zhi' or syndrome differentiation, to diagnose the CF with a set of syndrome factors, which can be regarded as the Multi-Label Learning (MLL problem in the machine learning literature. To obtain an effective and reliable diagnostic tool, we use Conformal Predictor (CP, Random Forest (RF and Problem Transformation method (PT for the syndrome differentiation of CF. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In this work, using PT method, CP-RF is extended to handle MLL problem. CP-RF applies RF to measure the confidence level (p-value of each label being the true label, and then selects multiple labels whose p-values are larger than the pre-defined significance level as the region prediction. In this paper, we compare the proposed CP-RF with typical CP-NBC(Naïve Bayes Classifier, CP-KNN(K-Nearest Neighbors and ML-KNN on CF dataset, which consists of 736 cases. Specifically, 95 symptoms are used to identify CF, and four syndrome factors are employed in the syndrome differentiation, including 'spleen deficiency', 'heart deficiency', 'liver stagnation' and 'qi deficiency'. THE RESULTS: CP-RF demonstrates an outstanding performance beyond CP-NBC, CP-KNN and ML-KNN under the general metrics of subset accuracy, hamming loss, one-error, coverage, ranking loss and average precision. Furthermore, the performance of CP-RF remains steady at the large scale of confidence levels from 80% to 100%, which indicates its robustness to the threshold determination. In addition, the confidence evaluation provided by CP is valid and well-calibrated. CONCLUSION: CP-RF not only offers outstanding performance but also provides valid confidence evaluation for the CF syndrome differentiation. It would be well applicable to TCM practitioners and

  17. Paleoceanographic changes on the Farallon Escarpment off central California during the last 16,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, M.

    2011-01-01

    New benthic and planktic foraminiferal assemblage census data and Benthic Foraminiferal Oxygen Index (BFOI) values, previously published marine climate proxy data (stable isotopes and Ca/Cd), and unpublished results of total carbon, organic carbon, and calcium carbonate analyses of sediments recovered off central California on the Farallon Escarpment (1605m water depth; 37??13.4???N, 123??14.6???W; core F-8-90-G21) document paleoceanographic changes during the latest Quaternary which reflect the intensity and source of North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) and surface productivity. Accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates of both benthic and planktic species provide an excellent age-depth model for the last 16,000 years, covering the latest glacial, B??lling-Aller??d, Younger Dryas, and early, middle, and late Holocene intervals. A Q-mode cluster analysis separated the benthic fauna into three clusters, one Pleistocene and two Holocene, whereas the planktic fauna was divided only into Pleistocene and Holocene clusters. Stable oxygen isotope values show an increase in water temperature of ~1??C from the late glacial to late Holocene and a change in faunal composition of the planktic assemblage implies surface waters warmed as well. A general trend of decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration from the Pleistocene (high oxic; 3.0-6.0+ ml/l O2) to the Holocene (low oxic; 1.5-3.0ml/l O2) suggested by the BFOI and Cd/Ca data reflect decreased ventilation as the source of the NPIW shifted from the Sea of Okhotsk to the tropical east Pacific at ~11,000 cal BP. The middle Holocene cooling reported in other central and northern California margin studies is not apparent in F-8-90-G21, which compares more favorably with studies from southern California and British Columbia. Total carbon and organic carbon values are highest in the B??lling-Aller??d, early Holocene, and late Holocene. Similarly, calcium carbonate values are high in the B??lling-Aller??d and peak in the

  18. Application of diethanolamide surfactant derived from palm oil to improve the performance of biopesticide from neem oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisya, F. N.; Prijono, D.; Nurkania, A.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to improve the performance of organic pesticide derived from neem plant using diethanolamide surfactant (DEA) derived from palm oil in controlling armyworms. The pesticide was made of neem oil. Neem oil is a neem plant product containing several active components, i.e. azadirachtin, salanin, nimbin, and meliantriol which act as a pesticide. DEA surfactant acts as a wetting, dispersing and spreading agent in neem oil pesticide. The neem oil was obtained by pressing neem seeds using a screw press machine and a hydraulic press machine. DEA surfactant was synthesized from methyl esters of palm oil olein. Pesticide formulation was conducted by stirring the ingredients by using a homogenizer at 5,000 rpm for 30 minutes. Surfactant was added to the formulation by up to 5%. Glycerol, as an emulsifier, was added in to pesticide formulations of neem oil. The efficacy of the pesticides in controlling armyworms fed soybean leaves in laboratory was measured at six concentrations, i.e. 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, and 25 ml/L. Results showed that the neem oil used in this study had a density of 0.91 g/cm3, viscosity of 58.94 cPoise, refractive index of 1.4695, surface tension of 40.69 dyne/cm, azadirachtin content of 343.82-1.604 ppm. Meanwhile, the azadirachtin content of neem seed cake was 242.20 ppm. It was also found that palmitic (31.4%) and oleic (22.5%) acids were the main fatty acids contained in neem oil. As the additive material used in neem oil in this study, diethanolamide surfactant had a pH of 10.6, density of 0.9930 g/cm3, viscosity of 708.20 cP, and surface tension of 25.37 dyne/cm. Results of CMC, contact angle, and droplet size analyzes showed that diethanolamide surfactant could be added into insecticide formulation by 5%. Results of LC tests showed that on Spodoptera litura the LC50 and LC95 values were 13 and 22 ml/L, respectively. Neem oil was found to inhibit the development of Spodoptera litura and its larval molting process.

  19. Characterization of nano-bubbles as an oxygen carrier for in-situ bioremediation of organic pollutants in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, E.; Jung, J.; Kang, S.; Choi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation using bubbles as an oxygen carrier has shown its applicability for aerobic biodegradation of organic pollutants in the subsurface. By recent progresses, generation of nano-sized bubbles is possible, which have enhanced oxygen transfer efficiencies due to their high interfacial area and stability. We are developing an in-situ bioremediation technique using nano-bubbles as an oxygen carrier. In this study, nano-bubbles were characterized for their size and oxygen supply capacity. Nano-bubbles were generated with pure oxygen and pure helium gas. The stable nano-bubbles suspended in water were sonicated to induce the bubbles to coalesce, making them to rise and be released out of the water. By removing the bubbles, the water volume was decreased by 0.006%. The gas released from the bubble suspension was collected to measure the amount of gas in the nano-bubbles. For sparingly soluble helium gas 17.9 mL/L was released from the bubble suspension, while for oxygen 46.2 mL/L was collected. For the oxygen nano-bubble suspension, it is likely that the release of dissolved oxygen (DO) contributed to the collected gas volume. After removing the oxygen nano-bubbles, 36.0 mg/L of DO was still present in water. Altogether, the oxygen nano-bubble suspension was estimated to have 66.2 mg/L of oxygen in a dissolved form and 25.6 mg/L as nano-bubbles. A high DO level in the water was possible because of their large Laplace pressure difference across the fluid interface. Applying Young-Laplace equation and ideal gas law, the bubble diameter was estimated to be approximately 10 nm, having an internal pressure of 323 atm. Considering the saturation DO of 8.26 mg/L for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere, the total oxygen content of 91.8 mg/L in the nano-bubble suspension suggests its great potential as an oxygen carrier. Studies are underway to verify the enhanced aerobic biodegradation of organic pollutants in soils by injecting nano-bubble suspensions.

  20. A comparative analysis of genetic variation in rootstocks and scions of old olive trees - a window into the history of olive cultivation practices and past genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazani, Oz; Westberg, Erik; Hanin, Nir; Dag, Arnon; Kerem, Zohar; Tugendhaft, Yizhar; Hmidat, Mohammed; Hijawi, Thameen; Kadereit, Joachim W

    2014-05-28

    Past clonal propagation of olive trees is intimately linked to grafting. However, evidence on grafting in ancient trees is scarce, and not much is known about the source of plant material used for rootstocks. Here, the Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) marker technique was used to study genetic diversity of rootstocks and scions in ancient olive trees from the Levant and its implications for past cultivation of olives. Leaf samples were collected from tree canopies (scions) and shoots growing from the trunk base (suckers). A total of 310 trees were sampled in 32 groves and analyzed with 14 SSR markers. In 82.7% of the trees in which both scion and suckers could be genotyped, these were genetically different, and thus suckers were interpreted to represent the rootstock of grafted trees. Genetic diversity values were much higher among suckers than among scions, and 194 and 87 multi-locus genotypes (MLGs) were found in the two sample groups, respectively. Only five private alleles were found among scions, but 125 among suckers. A frequency analysis revealed a bimodal distribution of genetic distance among MLGs, indicating the presence of somatic mutations within clones. When assuming that MLGs differing by one mutation are identical, scion and sucker MLGs were grouped in 20 and 147 multi-locus lineages (MLLs). The majority of scions (90.0%) belonged to a single common MLL, whereas 50.5% of the suckers were single-sample MLLs. However, one MLL was specific to suckers and found in 63 (22.6%) of the samples. Our results provide strong evidence that the majority of olive trees in the study are grafted, that the large majority of scions belong to a single ancient cultivar containing somatic mutations, and that the widespread occurrence of one sucker genotype may imply rootstock selection. For the majority of grafted trees it seems likely that saplings were used as rootstocks; their genetic diversity probably is best explained as the result of a long history of sexual

  1. Wilms’ Tumor 1 Gene Mutations Independently Predict Poor Outcome in Adults With Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschka, Peter; Marcucci, Guido; Ruppert, Amy S.; Whitman, Susan P.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Maharry, Kati; Langer, Christian; Baldus, Claudia D.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Powell, Bayard L.; Baer, Maria R.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the prognostic impact of Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) gene mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods We studied 196 adults younger than 60 years with newly diagnosed primary CN-AML, who were treated similarly on Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) protocols 9621 and 19808, for WT1 mutations in exons 7 and 9. The patients also were assessed for the presence of FLT3 internal tandem duplications (FLT3-ITD), FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain mutations (FLT3-TKD), MLL partial tandem duplications (MLL-PTD), NPM1 and CEBPA mutations, and for the expression levels of ERG and BAALC. Results Twenty-one patients (10.7%) harbored WT1 mutations. Complete remission rates were not significantly different between patients with WT1 mutations and those with unmutated WT1 (P = .36; 76% v 84%). Patients with WT1 mutations had worse disease-free survival (DFS; P < .001; 3-year rates, 13% v 50%) and overall survival (OS; P < .001; 3-year rates, 10% v 56%) than patients with unmutated WT1. In multivariable analyses, WT1 mutations independently predicted worse DFS (P = .009; hazard ratio [HR] = 2.7) when controlling for CEBPA mutational status, ERG expression level, and FLT3-ITD/NPM1 molecular-risk group (ie, FLT3-ITDnegative/NPM1mutated as low risk v FLT3-ITDpositive and/or NPM1wild-type as high risk). WT1 mutations also independently predicted worse OS (P < .001; HR = 3.2) when controlling for CEBPA mutational status, FLT3-ITD/NPM1 molecular-risk group, and white blood cell count. Conclusion We report the first evidence that WT1 mutations independently predict extremely poor outcome in intensively treated, younger patients with CN-AML. Future trials should include testing for WT1 mutations as part of molecularly based risk assessment and risk-adapted treatment stratification of patients with CN-AML. PMID:18559874

  2. Avaliação in vitro da eficiência de inóculos no tratamento anaeróbio de efluentes líquidos de suinocultura Efficiency of seeding material in anaerobic treatment of swine liquid waste: an in vitro trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Rodrigues

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito de inóculos (tratamentos na degradação dos dejetos líquidos de suínos, em diferentes tempos de detenção hidráulica (0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 horas. Foram utilizados um inóculo comercial, na dose recomendada pelo fabricante, três inóculos alternativos à base de esterco bovino, cama de frango e esgoto doméstico, todos aplicados na dose de 5ml/l, e um tratamento-controle, sem inóculo. Foi utilizado o delineamento inteiramente ao acaso, em esquema de parcelas subdivididas, empregando-se três repetições. Após cada tempo de detenção foram realizadas as seguintes análises: pH, demanda bioquímica de oxigênio (DBO, demanda química de oxigênio, sólidos totais, sólidos totais voláteis e sólidos sedimentáveis, temperaturas do ar e do líquido. Os inóculos comercial e alternativo à base de cama de frango promoveram maior redução de DBO que os demais, 68,5% e 67,5%, respectivamente.The effect of seeding material (treatments upon degrading liquid waste of swine was evaluated at different hydraulic retention times (0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 hours. A commercial seeding material according to the recommended manufacture dosage, three alternative seeding materials based on bovine manure, chicken manure, and domestic sewage, all of them applied at the dosage of 5ml/l, and a control treatment (without seeding material were used. An entirely randomized design was set to study the subdivided fragments using three repetitions. After each detention time, the following analyses have been performed: pH, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, chemical oxygen demand, total solids, total volatile solid, settling solids, air and liquid temperatures. The commercial and alternative seeding materials based on chicken waste promoted a higher reduction of BOD than the other ones, 68.5% and 67.5%, respectively.

  3. Development based on microcantilever biosensor for detection of ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann Junior, Paulo Sergio de Paula; Margarido, Alexandre, E-mail: paulo.herrmann@embrapa.br [Embrapa Instrumentacao, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Moreira, Fernando M. Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil); Goncalves, Renato Vitalino [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-07-01

    Full text: A biosensor using a microcantilever from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was developed to detected ethanol. The microcantilevers were initially cleaned and oxidised with Piranha solution and activated with (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) steam, followed by immersion in phosphate buffer pH 8.6 containing 2% glutaraldehyde. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase enzyme was dissolved in phosphate buffer solution pH8.6 and microcantilevers were immersed in this solution for 6 h at room temperature, and then washed with buffer to remove unbound enzymes. The activation process was characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques and the functional layer characterized by AFM techniques, in which topographical images were made of the functional layer with and without the presence of the target analytic steam. The biosensor was put to test at ambient conditions, and analysed its sensitivity, selectivity, useful life, repetitiveness and others. Through the trials in XPS, it was possible to prove the activation of the microcantilever, with oxidation in 39.45% of the surface and connection 27.65% of APTES. The thickness of the functional layer reached around 14.68 ±1,19nm, and would be expected around 10nm. The analyse the topography showed that the enzyme has altered its conformation around 30% in the presence of ethanol steam and the height of the functional layer had an additional 22%, the maximum surface tension was measured 458,21mJ/m{sup 2}. The biosensor was evaluated with several organic volatiles and even with a mixture of various volatile was only possible to detect ethanol. From the experimental results, was suggest that the conformational change of the enzyme when to bind to the substrate, may be indicative of strong change of surface tension. The sensitivity of the biosensor ranged from 100 to 240.000ppm, and was found adsorption to the concentration of 0.4mL/L, and after increased surface tension to 2.2mL/L, and shown to be stable for 22

  4. Evaluation of pyraclostrobin and acibenzolar-S-methyl on common bacterial blight of snap beanAvaliação de pyraclostrobin e acibenzolar-S-methyl sobre o crestamento bacteriano comum do feijão-vagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Cássia Camara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Assays were done under greenhouse conditions in order to evaluate the effect of pyraclostrobin (0.0375, 0.0750 and 0.150 mL.L-1 and acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM (0.025 g.L-1 in common bacterial blight, using leaves of snap beans cultivar Bragança. These chemicals were sprayed at three different times: five days before; five days before + five days after; and five days after leaf inoculation with an isolate of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli. They were determinate the levels of polyphenoloxidase, peroxidase and total soluble proteins on inoculated and non-inoculated leaves of snap beans sprayed with pyraclostrobin (0.075 g.L-1 and ASM (0.025 g.L-1. All concentration of pyraclostrobin and ASM reduced the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC on leaves of snap beans, and the least AUDPC value was observed when this products were sprayed five days before + five days after inoculation. Higher levels of polyphenoloxidase, peroxidase and the total soluble proteins were observed on leaves sprayed with pyraclostrobin or ASM.Ensaios foram conduzidos sob condições de casa-de-vegetação para avaliar o efeito de pyraclostrobin (0,0375; 0.0750 e 0,150 mL.L-1 e acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM (0.025 g.L-1 sobre o crestamento bacteriano comum, em folhas de feijão-vagem cultivar Bragança. Os produtos foram pulverizados em três diferentes períodos: cinco dias antes, cinco dias antes + cinco dias após e cinco dias após a inoculação dos folíolos com um isolado de Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli. Foram determinados os teores de polifenoloxidase, peroxidase e proteínas solúveis totais em folhas inoculadas e não-inoculadas de feijão-vagem pulverizadas com pyraclostrobin (0,075 g.L-1 e ASM (0,025 g.L-1. Todas as concentrações de pyraclostrobin e ASM reduziram os valores da área abaixo da curva do progresso da doença (AUPDC e o menor valor da AUPDC foi observado para a aplicação dos produtos cinco dias antes + cinco dias após a inocula

  5. Cytogenetic Profile and Gene Mutations of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf Alkhayat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is characterized by recurrent genetic aberrations. The identification of those abnormalities is clinically important because they are considered significant risk-stratifying markers. Aims: There are insufficient data of cytogenetic profiles in Saudi Arabian patients with childhood ALL leukemia. We have examined a cohort of 110 cases of ALL to determine the cytogenetic profiles and prevalence of FLT3 mutations and analysis of the more frequently observed abnormalities and its correlations to other biologic factors and patient outcomes and to compare our results with previously published results. Materials and methods: Patients —We reviewed all cases from 2007 to 2016 with an established diagnosis of childhood ALL. Of the 110 patients, 98 were B-lineage ALL and 12 T-cell ALL. All the patients were treated by UKALL 2003 protocol and risk stratified according previously published criteria. Cytogenetic analysis —Chromosome banding analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization were used to detect genetic aberrations. Analysis of FLT3 mutations —Bone marrow or blood samples were screened for FLT3 mutations (internal tandem duplications, and point mutations, D835 using polymerase chain reaction methods. Result: Cytogenetic analysis showed chromosomal anomalies in 68 out of 102 cases with an overall incidence 66.7%. The most frequent chromosomal anomalies in ALL were hyperdiploidy, t(9;22, t(12;21, and MLL gene rearrangements. Our data are in accordance with those published previously and showed that FLT3 mutations are not common in patients with ALL (4.7% and have no prognostic relevance in pediatric patients with ALL. On the contrary, t(9;22, MLL gene rearrangements and hypodiploidy were signs of a bad prognosis in childhood ALL with high rate of relapse and shorter overall survival compared with the standard-risk group ( P  = .031.The event-free survival was also found to be worse ( P

  6. Fitoplancton y zooplancton en el área marina protegida de Isla Gorgona, Colombia, y su relación con variables oceanográficas en estaciones lluviosa y seca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Giraldo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Se estableció la variación en la abundancia y biomasa del fitoplancton y zooplancton en el ambiente pelágico de isla Gorgona durante octubre 2010 (época lluviosa y marzo 2011 (época seca, y se evaluó su grado de correlación con las condiciones hidrográficas de temperatura, salinidad, oxígeno disuelto y transparencia. Las aguas superficiales en los dos periodos fueron cálidas (>26°C y de bajas salinidades (34 y con bajas concentraciones de oxígeno (3.0ml/l. Se registraron 61 géneros de fitoplancton y 30 grupos de zooplancton, con mayores valores para la riqueza de géneros y abundancia del fitoplancton, y para la abundancia y biomasa del zooplancton en marzo que en octubre. Bacteriastrum, Chaetoceros, Coscinodiscus, Guinardia, Rhizosolenia y Skeletonema fueron los generous de fitoplancton más frecuentes durante ambos periodos de muestreo. Para el zooplancton los copépodos fueron el grupo dominante, seguido por los quetognatos y las apendicularias. Adicionalmente, la biomasa del zooplancton presentó una asociación positiva significativa con la temperatura superficial, la salinidad a 10m y la transparencia, y negativa con la concentración de oxígeno disuelto en superficie y a 10m.

  7. Isolation, identification, and characterization of an Aspergillus niger bioflocculant-producing strain using potato starch wastewater as nutrilite and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Shengyan; Ma, Hui; Deng, Daili; Xue, Shengyang; Zhu, Rongxin; Zhou, Yan; Xiong, Xingying

    2018-01-01

    A bioflocculant (MBFA18) was produced by Aspergillus niger (A18) using potato starch wastewater (PSW) as nutrients. The cultivation processes and flocculating treatment for PSW purification were systematically studied. The flocculating rate of the MBFA 18 achieved 90.06% (kaolin clay) under the optimal cultivation condition (PSW with 5950 mg/L COD, 20 g/L glucose, 0.2 g/L urea and without phosphorus source addition and pH adjustment). Furthermore, effects of flocculant dosage, initial pH, coagulant aid (CaCl2) addition and sedimentation time on the PSW treatment were discussed and studied in detail. The optimum flocculation treatment conditions were determined according to the treatment efficiency, cost and flocculation conditions. During the PSW treatment, 2 mL/L bioflocculant (1.89 g/L) dosage and 0.5 mol/L coagulant aid addition were applied without pH adjustment and 91.15% COD and 60.22% turbidity removal rate could be achieved within 20 min. The comparative study between the bioflocculant and conventional chemical flocculants showed excellent flocculating efficiency of MBFA 18 with lower cost (4.7 yuan/t), which indicated that the bioflocculant MBFA 18 produced in PSW substrate has a great potential to be an alternative flocculant in PSW treatment.

  8. Measurement of the $W\\to l\

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B.S.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, J.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V.V.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, S.R.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D.C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bobrovnikov, V.B.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boddy, C.R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C.N.; Booth, P.; Booth, J.R.A.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozhko, N.I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Braccini, S.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Brambilla, E.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N.D.; Bright-Thomas, P.G.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N.J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R.M.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E.J.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urban, S.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camard, A.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Caprio, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Cazzato, A.; Ceradini, F.; Cerna, C.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cervetto, M.; Cetin, S.A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M.V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R.W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C.D.; Colas, J.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muino, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M.C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Correard, S.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cuneo, S.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P.V.M.; Da Via, C; Dabrowski, W.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S.J.; Daly, C.H.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D.S.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J.P.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J.W.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P.E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; De La Taille, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Oliveira Branco, M.; De Pedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D.V.; Defay, P.O.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; 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Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzamarioudaki, E.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D.G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J.J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Ventura, S.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vertogardov, L.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A.P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vovenko, A.S.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.C.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S.J.; Whitaker, S.P.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H.G.; Will, J.Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yabsley, B.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, S.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V.G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo.K.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P.F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A.V.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V.V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-01-01

    First measurements of the W -> lnu and Z/gamma* -> ll (l = e, mu) production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV are presented using data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The results are based on 2250 W -> lnu and 179 Z/gamma* -> ll candidate events selected from a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 320 nb-1. The measured total W and Z/gamma*-boson production cross sections times the respective leptonic branching ratios for the combined electron and muon channels are $\\stotW$ * BR(W -> lnu) = 9.96 +- 0.23(stat) +- 0.50(syst) +- 1.10(lumi) nb and $\\stotZg$ * BR(Z/gamma* -> ll) = 0.82 +- 0.06(stat) +- 0.05(syst) +- 0.09(lumi) nb (within the invariant mass window 66 < m_ll < 116 GeV). The W/Z cross-section ratio is measured to be 11.7 +- 0.9(stat) +- 0.4(syst). In addition, measurements of the W+ and W- production cross sections and of the lepton charge asymmetry are reported. Theoretical predictions based on NNLO QCD calculations are f...

  9. [Characteristics of porcine thoracic arteries fixed with polyepoxy compound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xi-Xun; Chen, Huai-Qing

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the characteristics of porcine thoracic arteries fixed with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EX-810) and to provide the proper scaffold materials for tissue-engineered blood vessel. The porcine thoracic arteries were respectively treated with 40 ml/L EX-810 and 6.25 g/L glutaraldehyde, and then they were examined with naked-eye, light microscope and scanning electron microscope. The fixation index determination, the amino acid analysis and the biomechanics test were also performed. The antigenicity of vascular tissues can be diminished by EX-810 through getting rid of cell in the vascular tissues or reducing the level of free amino groups in the vascular tissues. The structural integrity of vascular tissues can be preserved after treatment with EX-810. It was also found that the EX-810-fixed porcine vascular tissues appeared more similar to the natural vascular tissues in color and mechanical properties, and were more pliable than the glutaraldehyde-fixed tissues. The EX-810-fixed porcine thoracic arteries with low cytotoxicity and low antigenicity showed favorable characteristic similar to those of natural vessel, and it should be a promising material for fabricating scaffold of tissue-engineered blood vessel.

  10. Studies of the 198Hg(d,d') and 198Hg(d,p) reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz Varela, Alejandra; Garrett, P. E.; Rand, E. T.; Ball, G. C.; Bilstein, V.; Laffoley, A. T.; Maclean, A. D.; Svensson, C. E.; Faestermann, T.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2017-09-01

    Limits on the electric dipole moment (EDM) continue to decrease for 199Hg, the most stringent upper limit for a nuclear EDM to date. The experimental limit on the observed atomic EDM for 199Hg is converted to a limit on the nuclear EDM via a calculation of the Schiff moment, requiring knowledge of the nuclear structure of 199Hg. The E 3 and E 1 strength distributions to the ground state of 199Hg, and E 2 transitions amongst excited states, would be ideal information to further constrain 199Hg Schiff moment theoretical models. The high level density of 199Hg makes those determinations challenging, however the similar information can be obtained from exploring surrounding even-even Hg isotopes. As part of a campaign to study the Hg isotopes near 199Hg, two experiments, 198Hg(d,d') 198Hg and 198Hg(d,p)199Hg reaction were performed using the Q3D spectrograph at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory (MLL) at Garching, Germany. A 22 MeV deuterium beam was used to impinge a 198Hg32S target. The (d,d') reaction allows us to probe the desired E 2 and E 3 matrix elements, while the (d,p) reaction provides information on the neutron single-particle states of 199Hg.

  11. PECTIMORF and BIOBRAS-16 utilization in the potato somatic embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime R. Hidrobo Luna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available With the application of PECTIMORF and BIOBRAS-16, somatic embryos were obtained in potato (Solanum tuberosum, L c.v. Desirèe, of 40 days old callus obtained from stem micropropagated plants. These were used as possible substitutes for crop regulators used in culture media for the induction of somatic embryos. The culture media was composed for 10ml.l-1 of Murashige and Skoog salt, 0.1mg.l-1 ANA, 0.1mg.l-1 kinetin, 0.5mg.l-1 thiamine, 2.5mg.l-1 cistein, 100mg.l-1 mioinositol, 20g.l-1 sucrose and 2.0g.l-1 agar. Four culture medias were tested in distinct combinations that contained different concentration of PECTIMOR and BIOBRAS-16 as substitute of auxins and cytokinins. After 90 days, the results obtained showed the possibility of substituting the auxins (0.5mg.l-1 ANA and the cytokinins (0.5mg.l-1 kinetin in the culture media, because the application of PECTIMORF at 3.2mg.l-1 and BIOBRAS-16 at 1.0mg.l-1, gave friable callus, high fresh weight (more than 1.4g and a brownish color at the end of the process, moment in which the somatic embryos of different phases, appeared at the surface of the callus. Keywords: brasinoesteroids, callus, oligopectate, somatic embryo

  12. THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID MALIGNANCIES IN MYELOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenofon Papanikolaou

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Therapy related myeloid malignancies are an increasingly recognized treatment complication in patients undergoing therapy for multiple myeloma. The main predisposing factors are the alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors and radiotherapy, but recently questions have been raised regarding the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide. Little is known about the new antimyeloma agents in the context of therapy related myeloid malignanices. The duration of treatment and the time from diagnosis are the main contributing factors in alkylating induced myeloid malignancies which occur 5-10 years after treatment, chromosome 5 and 7 abnormalities being the characteristic finding. High dose therapy (HDT does not seem to be a major contributing factor per se in multiple myeloma. In a number of large published series, all the factors related with therapy-induced myelodysplasia were defined prior to HDT. Topoisomerase II inhibitors induce mainly acute leukemias which invariably correlate with dysregulation of the MLL gene. Radiotherapy causes therapy related myelodysplasia if applied in bone marrow producing areas, especially if combined with chemotherapy. Therapy related myeloid malignancies generally herald a poor prognosis. Karyotypic abnormalities seem to be the main prognostic factor. In all cases the risk for therapy related myeloid malignancies drops sharply by 10 years after the treatment.

  13. THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID MALIGNANCIES IN MYELOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Barlogie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Therapy related myeloid malignancies are an increasingly recognized treatment complication in patients undergoing therapy for multiple myeloma. The main predisposing factors are the alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors and radiotherapy, but recently questions have been raised regarding the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide. Little is known about the new antimyeloma agents in the context of therapy related myeloid malignanices. The duration of treatment and the time from diagnosis are the main contributing factors in alkylating induced myeloid malignancies which occur 5-10 years after treatment, chromosome 5 and 7 abnormalities being the characteristic finding. High dose therapy (HDT does not seem to be a major contributing factor per se in multiple myeloma. In a number of large published series, all the factors related with therapy-induced myelodysplasia were defined prior to HDT. Topoisomerase II inhibitors induce mainly acute leukemias which invariably correlate with dysregulation of the MLL gene. Radiotherapy causes therapy related myelodysplasia if applied in bone marrow producing areas, especially if combined with chemotherapy. Therapy related myeloid malignancies generally herald a poor prognosis. Karyotypic abnormalities seem to be the main prognostic factor. In all cases the risk for therapy related myeloid malignancies drops sharply by 10 years after the treatment.

  14. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Final report, January 1--December 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    It has been clear for the last 15 years that cloning translocation breakpoints in both AML de novo and t-AML would provide the DNA probes required to determine whether the breakpoints in cytogenetically apparently similar translocations were identical at the level of DNA. Therefore the author has pursued an analysis of rearrangements in both types of leukemia simultaneously. She has also cloned and sequenced several translocations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and in chronic lymphatic leukemia. Recently she cloned the breakpoint in a number of translocations involving chromosome bands 11q23 and 21q22. She has cloned the gene which she called MLL, that is located in 11q23 that is involved in the 6;11, 9;11, and 11;19 translocations that are seen in AML de novo as well as in t-AML. She has evidence that the breakpoint in 11q23 and in the t(9;11) is relatively similar in de novo and secondary AML. In addition, she has cloned the gene at the breakpoint in chromosome 21 in the t(3;21). These studies have provided DNA probes that will be very important for diagnosis and for monitoring the patient's response to treatment

  15. Targeting HDAC3, a new partner protein of AKT in the reversal of chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia via DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J; Fang, W Y; Chang, L; Gao, W H; Shen, Y; Jia, M Y; Zhang, Y X; Wang, Y; Dou, H B; Zhang, W J; Zhu, J; Liang, A B; Li, J M; Hu, Jiong

    2017-12-01

    Resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs remains as the major cause of treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia. Histone deacetylases (HDAC) are important regulators to maintain chromatin structure and control DNA damage; nevertheless, how each HDAC regulates genome stability remains unclear, especially under genome stress conditions. Here, we identified a mechanism by which HDAC3 regulates DNA damage repair and mediates resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In addition to inducing DNA damage, chemotherapy drugs trigger upregulation of HDAC3 expression in leukemia cells. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we show that HDAC3 contributes to chemotherapy resistance by regulating the activation of AKT, a well-documented factor in drug resistance development. HDAC3 binds to AKT and deacetylates it at the site Lys20, thereby promoting the phosphorylation of AKT. Chemotherapy drug exposure enhances the interaction between HDAC3 and AKT, resulting in decrease in AKT acetylation and increase in AKT phosphorylation. Whereas HDAC3 depletion or inhibition abrogates these responses and meanwhile sensitizes leukemia cells to chemotoxicity-induced apoptosis. Importantly, in vivo HDAC3 suppression reduces leukemia progression and sensitizes MLL-AF9 + leukemia to chemotherapy. Our findings suggest that combination therapy with HDAC3 inhibitor and genotoxic agents may constitute a successful strategy for overcoming chemotherapy resistance.

  16. Precision measurements of electroweak observables with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vittori, Camilla; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration measured the di-lepton mass range up to the TeV scale as well as the triple differential cross-section measurement as a function of Mll, dilepton rapidity and cosθ defined in the Collins-Soper frame. This measurement provides sensitivity to the PDFs and the weak mixing angle. The latest results of the ATLAS collaboration will be presented. A second important observable in the electroweak sector is the W boson mass in order to test the overall consistency of the Standard Model. Since the discovery of a Higgs Boson, the the W boson mass is predicted to 7 MeV precision, while the world average of all measurements is 15 MeV, making the improved measurement an important goal. Large samples of leptonic decays of W and Z bosons were collected with efficient single lepton triggers in the 7 TeV data set correspo...

  17. Utilization of brewery wastewater for culturing yeast cells for use in river water remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Su-Yun; Sun, Jing-Mei; Song, Shu-Qiang; Sun, Bao-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Successful in situ bio-augmentation of contaminated river water involves reducing the cost of the bio-agent. In this study, brewery wastewater was used to culture yeast cells for degrading the COD(Cr) from a contaminated river. The results showed that 15 g/L of yeast cells could be achieved after being cultured in the autoclaved brewery wastewater with 5 mL/L of saccharified starch and 9 g/L of corn steep liquor. The COD(Cr) removal efficiency was increased from 22% to 33% when the cells were cultured using the mentioned method. Based on the market price of materials used in this method, the cost of the medium for remediating 1 m3 of river water was 0.0076 US dollars. If the additional cost of field implementation is included, the total cost is less than 0.016 US dollars for treating 1 m3 of river water. The final cost was dependent on the size of remediation: the larger the scale, the lower the cost. By this method, the nutrient in the brewery wastewater was reused, the cost of brewery wastewater treatment was saved and the cost of the remediation using bio-augmentation was reduced. Hence, it is suggested that using brewery wastewater to culture a bio-agent for bio-augmentation is a cost-effective method.

  18. Biohydrogen production from a novel alkalophilic isolate Clostridium sp. IODB-O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anil Kumar; Debroy, Arundhati; Sharma, Sandeep; Saini, Reetu; Mathur, Anshu; Gupta, Ravi; Tuli, Deepak Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen producing bacteria IODB-O3 was isolated from sludge and identified as Clostridium sp. by 16S rDNA gene analysis. In this study, biohydrogen production process was developed using low-cost agro-waste. Maximum H2 was produced at 37°C and pH 8.5. Maximum H2 yield was obtained 2.54±0.2mol-H2/mol-reducing sugar from wheat straw pre-hydrolysate (WSPH) and 2.61±0.1mol-H2/mol-reducing sugar from pre-treated wheat straw enzymatic-hydrolysate (WSEH). The cumulative H2 production (ml/L), 3680±105 and 3270±100, H2 production rate (ml/L/h), 153±5 and 136±5, and specific H2 production (ml/g/h), 511±5 and 681±10 with WSPH and WSEH were obtained, respectively. Biomass pre-treatment via steam-explosion generates ample amount of WSPH which remains unutilized for bioethanol production due to non-availability of efficient C5-fermenting microorganisms. This study shows that Clostridium sp. IODB-O3 is capable of utilizing WSPH efficiently for biohydrogen production. This would lead to reduced economic constrain on the overall cellulosic ethanol process and also establish a sustainable biohydrogen production process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. TRATAMIENTO DE AGUA RESIDUAL MUNICIPAL POR UN SISTEMA FISICOQUÍMICO Y OXIDACIÓN QUÍMICA EN FLUJO CONTINUO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina A. Bernal-Martínez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue la remoción de contaminantes de un efluente de aguas residuales municipales, mediante tratamientos fisicoquímicos de coagulación-floculación, sedimentación, filtración, oxidación química y desinfección en un tren de tratamiento en flujo continúo a 1.65 mL/s. Para el proceso de coagulación-floculación se utilizó una dosis de 1mL/L de Al2(SO43 0.01 M, los filtros fueron empacados de arena sílice natural y carbón activado proveniente de concha de coco, en el proceso de oxidación química se aplicó una concentración de 3 mg/L de ozono con un tiempo de contacto de 10 a 15 min, la desinfección se realizó mediante radiación ultravioleta a una longitud de onda de 253-260 nm. La remoción obtenida fue del 98% de color, 94% de turbiedad, 93% de DQO, 93% de DBO5, el 84 de SAAMS, el 63% de NH3, el 98% de coliformes totales y fecales.

  20. Hypoxia-Like Signatures Induced by BCR-ABL Potentially Alter the Glutamine Uptake for Maintaining Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Sontakke

    Full Text Available The Warburg effect is probably the most prominent metabolic feature of cancer cells, although little is known about the underlying mechanisms and consequences. Here, we set out to study these features in detail in a number of leukemia backgrounds. The transcriptomes of human CB CD34+ cells transduced with various oncogenes, including BCR-ABL, MLL-AF9, FLT3-ITD, NUP98-HOXA9, STAT5A and KRASG12V were analyzed in detail. Our data indicate that in particular BCR-ABL, KRASG12V and STAT5 could impose hypoxic signaling under normoxic conditions. This coincided with an upregulation of glucose importers SLC2A1/3, hexokinases and HIF1 and 2. NMR-based metabolic profiling was performed in CB CD34+ cells transduced with BCR-ABL versus controls, both cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. Lactate and pyruvate levels were increased in BCR-ABL-expressing cells even under normoxia, coinciding with enhanced glutaminolysis which occurred in an HIF1/2-dependent manner. Expression of the glutamine importer SLC1A5 was increased in BCR-ABL+ cells, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES. Oxygen consumption rates also decreased upon BPTES treatment, indicating a glutamine dependency for oxidative phosphorylation. The current study suggests that BCR-ABL-positive cancer cells make use of enhanced glutamine metabolism to maintain TCA cell cycle activity in glycolytic cells.

  1. In vivo transcriptional profile analysis reveals RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling as prominent processes for adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Daniel A; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Naef, Felix; Hacker, Coleen R; Menn, Benedicte; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Magnasco, Marcelo; Patil, Nila; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2006-01-01

    Neural stem cells and neurogenesis persist in the adult mammalian brain subventricular zone (SVZ). Cells born in the rodent SVZ migrate to the olfactory bulb (Ob) where they differentiate into interneurons. To determine the gene expression and functional profile of SVZ neurogenesis, we performed three complementary sets of transcriptional analysis experiments using Affymetrix GeneChips: (1) comparison of adult mouse SVZ and Ob gene expression profiles with those of the striatum, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus; (2) profiling of SVZ stem cells and ependyma isolated by fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS); and (3) analysis of gene expression changes during in vivo SVZ regeneration after anti-mitotic treatment. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of data from these three separate approaches showed that in adult SVZ neurogenesis, RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling are biological processes as statistically significant as cell proliferation, transcription, and neurogenesis. In non-neurogenic brain regions, RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling were not prominent processes. Fourteen mRNA splicing factors including Sf3b1, Sfrs2, Lsm4, and Khdrbs1/Sam68 were detected along with 9 chromatin remodeling genes including Mll, Bmi1, Smarcad1, Baf53a, and Hat1. We validated the transcriptional profile data with Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. The data greatly expand the catalogue of cell cycle components, transcription factors, and migration genes for adult SVZ neurogenesis and reveal RNA splicing and chromatin remodeling as prominent biological processes for these germinal cells.

  2. Flotation removal of the microalga Nannochloropsis sp. using Moringa protein-oil emulsion: A novel green approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Ganesan; Shaleh, Sitti Raehanah Muhamad

    2018-01-01

    A new approach to recover microalgae from aqueous medium using a bio-flotation method is reported. The method involves utilizing a Moringa protein extract - oil emulsion (MPOE) for flotation removal of Nannochloropsis sp. The effect of various factors has been assessed using this method, including operating parameters such as pH, MPOE dose, algae concentration and mixing time. A maximum flotation efficiency of 86.5% was achieved without changing the pH condition of algal medium. Moreover, zeta potential analysis showed a marked difference in the zeta potential values when increase the MPOE dose concentration. An optimum condition of MPOE dosage of 50ml/L, pH 8, mixing time 4min, and a flotation efficiency of greater than 86% was accomplished. The morphology of algal flocs produced by protein-oil emulsion flocculant were characterized by microscopy. This flotation method is not only simple, but also an efficient method for harvesting microalgae from culture medium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Delivery of vitamins E and C from parenteral alimentation solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenai, J P; Borum, P R; Duke, E A

    1982-01-01

    We have previously shown that substantial losses of fat-soluble (FS) vitamin A from parenteral alimentation solution occur due to adsorption in the intravenous tubing and photodegradation in the bottle. This study assessed the delivery of other vitamins, viz, FS vitamin E and water-soluble (WS) vitamin C, from parenteral alimentation solution. The solution containing 2.0 ml/L of an aqueous multivitamin infusion was infused at a constant rate of 10 ml/h using a standard intravenous administration set. Multiple aliquots of the solution from the bottle and the effluent obtained sequentially in a 24-h period were analyzed for concentrations of vitamins E and C. Both vitamins remained relatively stable in the bottle. A significant amount (12%) of vitamin E was lost in the intravenous tubing. No losses of vitamin C were incurred in the intravenous tubing. The data suggest that delivery of FS vitamin E from parenteral alimentation solutions is less than optimum because of adsorptive losses. Similar losses are not encountered with WS vitamin C.

  4. Synergistic effect of Candida maltosa HY-35 and Enterobacter aerogenes W-23 on hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wenyu; Wen, Jianping; Chen, Yu.; Sun, Bing; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Minghui; Caiyin, Qinggele [Department of Biochemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2007-06-15

    An aciduric high-yielding hydrogen yeast named Candida maltosa HY-35 was screened, which can grow and produce hydrogen at pH 1.3. Further research was carried out batchwise to measure the hydrogen-producing ability of a mixed culture of C. maltosa HY-35 and a facultative anaerobe Enterobacter aerogenes W-23. In this method, with the mixed culture of these two strains at 35 {sup circle} C for 28 h, the hydrogen yield was 1735 ml/l, which was 17.15% and 119.90% higher than those of the monoculture of E. aerogenes W-23 and C. maltosa HY-35, respectively. Meanwhile, the average hydrogen production rate with the mixed culture was 261.1 ml/h/l, which was 7.85% and 146.23% higher than those of the monoculture of E. aerogenes W-23 and C. maltosa HY-35, respectively. The results suggested that mixed culture of these two strains had the synergistic effect on hydrogen production. The optimum fermentation medium and operation conditions for hydrogen production with mixed culture were also investigated. (author)

  5. Bio-hydrogen production by Enterobacter asburiae SNU-1 isolated from a landfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong-Hwan Shin; Jong Hyun Yoon; Tai Hyun Park [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744, (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    A new fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterium was isolated from a landfill, and it was identified as Enterobacter asburiae strain using a genomic DNA hybridization method. Environmental factors and metabolic flux influencing the hydrogen production were investigated, including pH, initial glucose and formate concentrations. The major hydrogen production pathway of this strain is considered to be a formate pathway by using formate hydrogen lyase (FHL). Optimum pH for the hydrogen production was pH 7.0 in PYG medium, at which hydrogen production/unit volume and overall hydrogen productivity were 2615 ml/l and 174 ml H{sub 2}/l/hr, respectively, at 25 g glucose/l. The maximum hydrogen productivity was estimated to be 417 ml H{sub 2}/l/hr at 15 g glucose/l. This strain produced bio-hydrogen mostly in the stationary phase, in which formate concentration was high. In this paper, hydrogen production was tried in formate medium after cell harvest. (authors)

  6. Bio-hydrogen production by Enterobacter asburiae SNU-1 isolated from a landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong-Hwan Shin; Jong Hyun Yoon; Tai Hyun Park

    2006-01-01

    A new fermentative hydrogen-producing bacterium was isolated from a landfill, and it was identified as Enterobacter asburiae strain using a genomic DNA hybridization method. Environmental factors and metabolic flux influencing the hydrogen production were investigated, including pH, initial glucose and formate concentrations. The major hydrogen production pathway of this strain is considered to be a formate pathway by using formate hydrogen lyase (FHL). Optimum pH for the hydrogen production was pH 7.0 in PYG medium, at which hydrogen production/unit volume and overall hydrogen productivity were 2615 ml/l and 174 ml H 2 /l/hr, respectively, at 25 g glucose/l. The maximum hydrogen productivity was estimated to be 417 ml H 2 /l/hr at 15 g glucose/l. This strain produced bio-hydrogen mostly in the stationary phase, in which formate concentration was high. In this paper, hydrogen production was tried in formate medium after cell harvest. (authors)

  7. A crab swarm at an ecological hotspot: patchiness and population density from AUV observations at a coastal, tropical seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Pineda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A research cruise to Hannibal Bank, a seamount and an ecological hotspot in the coastal eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Panama, explored the zonation, biodiversity, and the ecological processes that contribute to the seamount’s elevated biomass. Here we describe the spatial structure of a benthic anomuran red crab population, using submarine video and autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV photographs. High density aggregations and a swarm of red crabs were associated with a dense turbid layer 4–10 m above the bottom. The high density aggregations were constrained to 355–385 m water depth over the Northwest flank of the seamount, although the crabs also occurred at lower densities in shallower waters (∼280 m and in another location of the seamount. The crab aggregations occurred in hypoxic water, with oxygen levels of 0.04 ml/l. Barcoding of Hannibal red crabs, and pelagic red crabs sampled in a mass stranding event in 2015 at a beach in San Diego, California, USA, revealed that the Panamanian and the Californian crabs are likely the same species, Pleuroncodes planipes, and these findings represent an extension of the southern endrange of this species. Measurements along a 1.6 km transect revealed three high density aggregations, with the highest density up to 78 crabs/m2, and that the crabs were patchily distributed. Crab density peaked in the middle of the patch, a density structure similar to that of swarming insects.

  8. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  9. AF10 plays a key role in the survival of uncommitted hematopoietic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Chamorro-Garcia

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a complex process regulated by both cell intrinsic and cell extrinsic factors. Alterations in the expression of critical genes during hematopoiesis can modify the balance between stem cell differentiation and proliferation, and may ultimately give rise to leukemia and other diseases. AF10 is a transcription factor that has been implicated in the development of leukemia following chromosomal rearrangements between the AF10 gene and one of at least two other genes, MLL and CALM. The link between AF10 and leukemia, together with the known interactions between AF10 and hematopoietic regulators, suggests that AF10 may be important in hematopoiesis and in leukemic transformation. Here we show that AF10 is important for proper hematopoietic differentiation. The induction of hematopoietic differentiation in both human hematopoietic cell lines and murine total bone marrow cells triggers a decrease of AF10 mRNA and protein levels, particularly in stem cells and multipotent progenitors. Gain- and loss-of-function studies demonstrate that over- or under-expression of AF10 leads to apoptotic cell death in stem cells and multipotent progenitors. We conclude that AF10 plays a key role in the maintenance of multipotent hematopoietic cells.

  10. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béné, Marie C; Porwit, Anna

    2012-02-01

    The 2008 edition of the WHO Classification of Tumors of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues recognizes a special category called "leukemias of ambiguous lineage." The vast majority of these rare leukemias are classified as mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), although acute undifferentiated leukemias and natural killer lymphoblastic leukemias are also included. The major immunophenotypic markers used by the WHO 2008 to determine the lineage for these proliferations are myeloperoxidase, CD19, and cytoplasmic CD3. However, extensive immunophenotyping is necessary to confirm that the cells indeed belong to 2 different lineages or coexpress differentiation antigens of more than 1 lineage. Specific subsets of MPAL are defined by chromosomal anomalies such as the t(9;22) Philadelphia chromosome BCR-ABL1 or involvement of the MLL gene on chromosome 11q23. Other MPAL are divided into B/myeloid NOS, T/myeloid NOS, B/T NOS, and B/T/myeloid NOS. MPAL are usually of dire prognosis, respond variably to chemotherapy of acute lymphoblastic or acute myeloblastic type, and benefit most from rapid allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  12. Influence of C3H8O3 in the electrolyte on characteristics and corrosion resistance of the microarc oxidation coatings formed on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Di; Liu Xiangdong; Lu Kai; Zhang Yaping; Wang Huan

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic coatings were fabricated on AZ91D Mg-alloy substrate by microarc oxidation in Na 2 SiO 3 -NaOH-Na 2 EDTA electrolytes with and without C 3 H 8 O 3 addition. The effects of different concentrations of C 3 H 8 O 3 contained in the electrolyte on coatings thickness were investigated. The surface morphologies, RMS roughness, phase compositions and corrosion resistance property of the ceramic coatings were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electrochemical corrosion test respectively. It is found that the addition of C 3 H 8 O 3 into silicate electrolyte leads to increase of the unit-area adsorptive capacity of the negative ions at anode-electrolyte interface and thus improves the compactness and corrosion resistance of the MAO coating. The coating thickness decreases gradually with the increase of concentrations of C 3 H 8 O 3 in the electrolyte. The oxide coating formed in base electrolyte containing 4 mL/L C 3 H 8 O 3 exhibits the best surface appearance, the lowest surface RMS roughness (174 nm) and highest corrosion resistance. In addition, both ceramic coatings treated in base electrolyte with and without C 3 H 8 O 3 are mainly composed of periclase MgO and forsterite Mg 2 SiO 4 phase, but no diffraction peak of Mg phase is found in the patterns.

  13. Precise Alignment and Permanent Mounting of Thin and Lightweight X-ray Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskach, Michael P.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Hong, Melinda N.; Mazzarella, James R.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Norman, Michael J.; Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    To provide observations to support current research efforts in high energy astrophysics. future X-ray telescope designs must provide matching or better angular resolution while significantly increasing the total collecting area. In such a design the permanent mounting of thin and lightweight segments is critical to the overall performance of the complete X-ray optic assembly. The thin and lightweight segments used in the assemhly of the modules are desigued to maintain and/or exceed the resolution of existing X-ray telescopes while providing a substantial increase in collecting area. Such thin and delicate X-ray segments are easily distorted and yet must be aligned to the arcsecond level and retain accurate alignment for many years. The Next Generation X-ray Optic (NGXO) group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has designed, assembled. and implemented new hardware and procedures mth the short term goal of aligning three pairs of X-ray segments in a technology demonstration module while maintaining 10 arcsec alignment through environmental testing as part of the eventual design and construction of a full sized module capable of housing hundreds of X-ray segments. The recent attempts at multiple segment pair alignment and permanent mounting is described along with an overview of the procedure used. A look into what the next year mll bring for the alignment and permanent segment mounting effort illustrates some of the challenges left to overcome before an attempt to populate a full sized module can begin.

  14. INFLUENCIA DE LA SALINIDAD Y LA IRRADIANCIA SOBRE EL CRECIMIENTO Y COMPOSICIÓN BIOQUÍMICA DE UNA NUEVA CEPA DE Dunaliella salina, PROVENIENTE DE LAS SALINAS DE ARAYA, VENEZUELA | INFLUENCE OF SALINITY AND IRRADIANCE ON GROWTH AND BIOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF A NEW STRAIN of Dunaliella salina FROM THE ARAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Guevara

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dunaliella salina is a microalga used for the production of metabolites of high industrial and pharmaceutical value. The combined effect of irradiance and salinity on growth, pigment production and biochemical composition of this strain were evaluated in order to contribute to the knowledge of the physiological responses of this new isolate of D. salina from Araya saltworks, to changes in the conditions of its environment. It was aslo intendend to increase the variety of native microalgae species which can serve as sources of bioproduction for bioactive compounds, biomass and metabolites of application in pharmaceuticals and biomedical industries. Batch cultures of the strain of D. salina were conducted for 22 d at f/2 medium Guillard (0.88 mmol.L-1 of nitrogen at 27 ± 2°C, pH 7.8; photoperiod 12 h light: 12 h darkness, continuous aeration (150 mL.L-1 in two salinities (40 and 250 UPS and irradiances (195 and 295 µmolphotons.m-2.s-1. Population growth was evaluated daily and at the end of the trial the contents of biomass, pigments, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and cell size were determined. The growth rate of the new strain of D. salina decreased with increasing salinity and irradiance. However, cell size, biomass, content of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, total carotenoids and β-carotene increased with increasing irradiance and salinity. In addition, the potential of this strain for the production of β-carotene was shown.

  15. Effect of type of suckling and polyunsaturated fatty acid use on lamb production. 1. Productive performances and quanti-qualitative characteristics of the carcass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bozzo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of artificial rearing and of the addition of polyunsaturated fatty acids(PUFA to an acidified milk replacer on the productive performances and on the quanti-qualitative characteristics of thecarcass. Fifty one twin-born Gentile di Puglia lambs were subdivided into three homogenous groups (9 females and 8males assigned the following feeding treatments: maternal milk (MM; acidified milk replacer (MR; acidified milk replacer+ 10 ml/l of a mixture of linseed and fish oil rich in PUFA (MR+PUFA.Milk consumptions and live weights were recorded weekly. Seven males from each group were slaughtered at 45 days ofage and the net warm dressing percentage, the composition of the carcass and the colorimetric characteristics of theLongissimus lumborum muscle were estimated. Artificial rearing improved the daily weight gain (0.182-0.172 vs 0.128Kg; PThe addition of omega-3 fatty acids to the diet did not influence the weight gain, the feed conversion index, the net warmdressing percentage and the incidence of the different meat cuts of the half carcass. However, it significantly increasedthe half carcass length (37.86 vs 35.0 cm; Pto the MR group reduced the proportion of lean (63.21 vs 53.98 %; PP<0.01 in the lumbar region.

  16. Determination of free radical scavenger agent efficiency in Syrian consumed sunflower oil using FT-IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaf, A. W.; Al-Zier, A.

    2013-06-01

    Edible oils can be oxidized spontaneously by thermal process in the presence of atmospheric oxygen causing an oxidation to these oils and forming the hydroperoxides; this oxidative process is a major cause of cooking oils deterioration. Many synthetic or natural antioxidants additives have been used as free radical scavenger agent. In this work, Eugenol methylether has been used as free radical scavenger agent at three different concentrations to heated sunflower oil at 160°C for ten hours using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for analysis and evaluations. Before any additives, three characteristic absorption bands were observed at 3544, 3473 and 3290 cm-1 in heated oil. The recorded bands were assigned to 7Tthe unbounded7T, 7Tbounded 7Thydroperoxide or free alcohols 7Tgroups7T and to the O-H stretching alcohol associated group, respectively. After the addition of Eugenol methylether at 0.8 mL/L concentration, the bands intensity of hydroperoxide formation content is reduced. It has been shown that the free radical scavenger agent plays an acceptable role in reducing the hydroperoxide formation content as the result of thermal oxidation. It is proved that FTIR spectroscopy is an effective analytical tool for such investigatio (author).

  17. Proteinase-Activated Receptor 1 (PAR1 regulates leukemic stem cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bäumer

    Full Text Available External signals that are mediated by specific receptors determine stem cell fate. The thrombin receptor PAR1 plays an important role in haemostasis, thrombosis and vascular biology, but also in tumor biology and angiogenesis. Its expression and function in hematopoietic stem cells is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed expression and function of PAR1 in primary hematopoietic cells and their leukemic counterparts. AML patients' blast cells expressed much lower levels of PAR1 mRNA and protein than CD34+ progenitor cells. Constitutive Par1-deficiency in adult mice did not affect engraftment or stem cell potential of hematopoietic cells. To model an AML with Par1-deficiency, we retrovirally introduced the oncogene MLL-AF9 in wild type and Par1-/- hematopoietic progenitor cells. Par1-deficiency did not alter initial leukemia development. However, the loss of Par1 enhanced leukemic stem cell function in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of PAR1 in Par1-/- leukemic stem cells delayed leukemogenesis in vivo. These data indicate that Par1 contributes to leukemic stem cell maintenance.

  18. The allosteric communication pathways in KIX domain of CBP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzesi, Ferruccio; Barducci, Alessandro; Tollinger, Martin; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Allosteric regulation plays an important role in a myriad of biomacromolecular processes. Specifically, in a protein, the process of allostery refers to the transmission of a local perturbation, such as ligand binding, to a distant site. Decades after the discovery of this phenomenon, models built on static images of proteins are being reconsidered with the knowledge that protein dynamics plays an important role in its function. Molecular dynamics simulations are a valuable tool for studying complex biomolecular systems, providing an atomistic description of their structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, their predictive power has been limited by the complexity of the biomolecule free-energy surface and by the length of the allosteric timescale (in the order of milliseconds). In this work, we are able to probe the origins of the allosteric changes that transcription factor mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) causes to the interactions of KIX domain of CREB-binding protein (CBP) with phosphorylated kinase inducible domain (pKID), by combing all-atom molecular dynamics with enhanced sampling methods recently developed in our group. We discuss our results in relation to previous NMR studies. We also develop a general simulations protocol to study allosteric phenomena and many other biological processes that occur in the micro/milliseconds timescale. PMID:23940332

  19. miR-99 regulates normal and malignant hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaj, Mona; Woolthuis, Carolien M; Hu, Wenhuo; Durham, Benjamin H; Chu, S Haihua; Qamar, Sarah; Armstrong, Scott A; Park, Christopher Y

    2017-07-21

    The microRNA-99 ( miR-99 ) family comprises a group of broadly conserved microRNAs that are highly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (LSCs) compared with their differentiated progeny. Herein, we show that miR-99 regulates self-renewal in both HSCs and LSCs. miR-99 maintains HSC long-term reconstitution activity by inhibiting differentiation and cell cycle entry. Moreover, miR-99 inhibition induced LSC differentiation and depletion in an MLL-AF9-driven mouse model of AML, leading to reduction in leukemia-initiating activity and improved survival in secondary transplants. Confirming miR-99 's role in established AML, miR-99 inhibition induced primary AML patient blasts to undergo differentiation. A forward genetic shRNA library screen revealed Hoxa1 as a critical mediator of miR-99 function in HSC maintenance, and this observation was independently confirmed in both HSCs and LSCs. Together, these studies demonstrate the importance of noncoding RNAs in the regulation of HSC and LSC function and identify miR-99 as a critical regulator of stem cell self-renewal. © 2017 Khalaj et al.

  20. Etching characteristics of nuclear tracks in CR-39 plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Takao; Isobe, Ginko.

    1984-01-01

    In using CR-39 plastics for individual neutron dosimeters, changes of etching efficiency cause significant error in dose estimation. Etching efficiency is subject to a number of parameters. In this study the influences of the parameters were examined by measuring the diameters of etch-pits formed by alpha-particles and enlarged by aqueous solutions of 25-35% KOH at 55-65 0 C for 4 hr. It has been observed that diameter changes at the rate of 8.3%/ 0 C in temperature, 8.2%/wt% in concentration and -0.60%/day in time after preparation of etchant. The diameter is unaffected by the supplying of up to 280ml/l, of distilled water for evaporation of etchant or by increase up to 5g/l of CR-39 dissolved in etchant. The magnitude of possible error has been estimated by parameter as well as in general, so as to obtain suggestions for improving etching treatment. (author)

  1. Measurements of the Vector boson production with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kordas, Kostas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The electroweak sector of the Standard Model can be tested by precision measurements of its fundamental parameters, such as the W boson mass or the electroweak mixing angle. In this talk, we present the first measurement of the W boson mass, based on the 7 TeV data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb$^{-1}$. With these samples the detector and physics modelling has been studied in great detail, leading to an overall uncertainty of 19 MeV. The ATLAS collaboration also performed a new precise triple differential cross-section measurement as a function of M(ll), dilepton rapidity and $cos\\theta^{*}$ defined in the Collins-Soper frame. This measurement provides sensitivity to the PDFs and the Z forward-backward asymmetry, $A_{FB}$, which is derived and will be presented. The later builds the foundation for a possible future extraction of the weak-mixing angle. The production of jets in association with vector bosons is an important process to study perturbative QCD in a multi-scale environment...

  2. Effects of Wine by-Products on Growth Performance, Complete Blood Count and Total Antioxidant Status in Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Pascariu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to investigate the effect of whole grape pomace (GP, grape seed (GS and grape pomace polyphenolic extract (GPEP on growth performance, total antioxidant status (TAS and complete blood count (CBC of 40-day-old chicks (hybrid Cobb 500. A total of 432 unsexed one-day-old chicks were divided into six groups: control (CON and five experimental groups, 10 g/kg GP, 20 g/kg GP, 5 g/kg GS, 10 g/kg GS and 15 mL/L GPEP. The results showed a higher increase in growing rate in 5 g/kg GS group, from the first week of the chicks’ life throughout their growth, the average body weight of the chicks being significantly higher (p0.05 at 40 days of age. As a conclusion, the amount of 5 g/kg seeds, 10 g/kg and 20 g/kg pomace, can be added to the diet of the broilers, the dose of 5 g/kg seeds in the diet offering advantages in growing rate and feed valorization in weight gain.

  3. Hyperhydricity Phenomena Problem in Embryonic Callus of Date Palm, Solving by Glutamine and NH4+: No3- Ratio in Basal Nutrient Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dawayaty, M.M.; Zayed, Z.E.; Abdel-Gelil, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperhydricity is a serious problem faced in vitro date palm propagation which directly effects on the commercial production. So we try to solve this problem by studying, the effect of glutamine as the organic source of nitrogen and NH 4 + :NO 3- ratio as the inorganic source of nitrogen to decrease hyperhydricity phenomena and to produce normal somatic embryos of date palm cv. Gondila.Vitrified embryonic callus were inoculated on MS basal nutrient medium modified with glutamine levels and NH 4 + : NO 3 - ratio. Five concentration ratios of NH 4 : NO 3 (10:15, 15:10, 0:20, 20:0, 0:0 ml/l) were used with 0.1 mg/l NAA for 8 weeks throughout 2 recultures. There were gradually increasing in the percentage of vitrified embryonic callus differentiation to normal somatic embryos by increasing glutamine levels from 0.0 to 400 mg/l. Glutamine at the lowest level (50 mg/l) increased significantly the number of vitrified somatic embryos. Ammonium as the sole source of N resulted in depression in somatic embryos differentiation and escalated the frequency of hyperhydricity whereas,if nitrate was used as the sole N source, somatic embryos good quality were produced and hyperhydricity was eliminated

  4. Disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like (DOT1L): disclosing a new class of non-nucleoside inhibitors by means of ligand-based and structure-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Manuela; Rotili, Dante; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Forgione, Mariantonietta; Tomaselli, Daniela; Alby, Fréderic; Arimondo, Paola B; Mai, Antonello; Ragno, Rino

    2018-03-01

    Chemical inhibition of chromatin-mediated signaling involved proteins is an established strategy to drive expression networks and alter disease progression. Protein methyltransferases are among the most studied proteins in epigenetics and, in particular, disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like (DOT1L) lysine methyltransferase plays a key role in MLL-rearranged acute leukemia Selective inhibition of DOT1L is an established attractive strategy to breakdown aberrant H3K79 methylation and thus overexpression of leukemia genes, and leukemogenesis. Although numerous DOT1L inhibitors have been several structural data published no pronounced computational efforts have been yet reported. In these studies a first tentative of multi-stage and LB/SB combined approach is reported in order to maximize the use of available data. Using co-crystallized ligand/DOT1L complexes, predictive 3-D QSAR and COMBINE models were built through a python implementation of previously reported methodologies. The models, validated by either modeled or experimental external test sets, proved to have good predictive abilities. The application of these models to an internal library led to the selection of two unreported compounds that were found able to inhibit DOT1L at micromolar level. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of quantitative LB and SB DOT1L inhibitors models and their application to disclose new potential epigenetic modulators.

  5. Disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like (DOT1L): disclosing a new class of non-nucleoside inhibitors by means of ligand-based and structure-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Manuela; Rotili, Dante; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Forgione, Mariantonietta; Tomaselli, Daniela; Alby, Fréderic; Arimondo, Paola B.; Mai, Antonello; Ragno, Rino

    2018-03-01

    Chemical inhibition of chromatin-mediated signaling involved proteins is an established strategy to drive expression networks and alter disease progression. Protein methyltransferases are among the most studied proteins in epigenetics and, in particular, disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like (DOT1L) lysine methyltransferase plays a key role in MLL-rearranged acute leukemia Selective inhibition of DOT1L is an established attractive strategy to breakdown aberrant H3K79 methylation and thus overexpression of leukemia genes, and leukemogenesis. Although numerous DOT1L inhibitors have been several structural data published no pronounced computational efforts have been yet reported. In these studies a first tentative of multi-stage and LB/SB combined approach is reported in order to maximize the use of available data. Using co-crystallized ligand/DOT1L complexes, predictive 3-D QSAR and COMBINE models were built through a python implementation of previously reported methodologies. The models, validated by either modeled or experimental external test sets, proved to have good predictive abilities. The application of these models to an internal library led to the selection of two unreported compounds that were found able to inhibit DOT1L at micromolar level. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of quantitative LB and SB DOT1L inhibitors models and their application to disclose new potential epigenetic modulators.

  6. Industrial development of beef and pork cecina with different flavors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. Nuñez-Gonzalez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cecina used traditional technique for salting and preserving meat as well as to impart flavor; however, addition of spices is a viable alternative to diversify the flavors of the product. The objective of this research was to develop beef and pork cecina of flavors and evaluate lipid oxidation after 30 days of storage. Beef and pork cecina were distributed independently in four treatments: Formulation 1 or base (10.7% salt, 1.3% sugar, 0.5% nitrite and seasoning 0.1%; formulation 2, base plus 10 g of mixture of coriander, celery, parsley dehydrated/kg meat; formulation 3, base plus 10 g dry mirasol chilli/kg of meat and liquid smoke (2 mL/L and formulation 4, base plus 0.80 mL of essential oregano oil/L. Beef cecina was dried at 80 °C for 150 minutes and pork cecina for 180 minutes until these achieved a water activity (aw of 0.75. Beef cecina was packaged in cellophane bag, while for pork cecina in vacuum bags. Lipid oxidation was determined using thiobarbituric acid test (TBA. The results revealed that only beef cecina presented fat rancidity.

  7. The stability of a novel weakly alkaline slurry of copper interconnection CMPfor GLSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caihong; Wang, Chenwei; Niu, Xinhuan; Wang, Yan; Tian, Shengjun; Jiang, Zichao; Liu, Yuling

    2018-02-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is one of the important machining procedures of multilayered copper interconnection for GLSI, meanwhile polishing slurry is a critical factor for realizing the high polishing performance such as high planarization efficiency, low surface roughness. The effect of slurry components such as abrasive (colloidal silica), complexing agent (glycine), inhibitor (BTA) and oxidizing agent (H2O2) on the stability of the novel weakly alkaline slurry of copper interconnection CMP for GLSI was investigated in this paper. First, the synergistic and competitive relationship of them in a peroxide-based weakly alkaline slurry during the copper CMP process was studied and the stability mechanism was put forward. Then 1 wt% colloidal silica, 2.5 wt% glycine, 200 ppm BTA, 20 mL/L H2O2 had been selected as the appropriate concentration to prepare copper slurry, and using such slurry the copper blanket wafer was polished. From the variations of copper removal rate, root-mean square roughness (Sq) value with the setting time, it indicates that the working-life of the novel weakly alkaline slurry can reach more than 7 days, which satisfies the requirement of microelectronics further development. Project supported by the Major National Science and Technology Special Projects (No. 2016ZX02301003-004-007), the Professional Degree Teaching Case Foundation of Hebei Province, China (No. KCJSZ2017008), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (No. F2015202267), and the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin, China (No. 16JCYBJC16100).

  8. Transcriptional changes in epigenetic modifiers associated with gene silencing in the intestine of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka), during aestivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianming; Yang, Hongsheng; Zhao, Huan; Chen, Muyan; Wang, Bing

    2011-11-01

    The sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, undergoes aestivation to improve survival during periods of high-temperature. During aestivation, the metabolic rate is depressed to reduce the consumption of reserved energy. We evaluated the role of epigenetic modification on global gene silencing during metabolic rate depression in the sea cucumber. We compared the expression of epigenetic modifiers in active and aestivating sea cucumbers. The expression of three genes involved in DNA methylation and chromatin remodeling (DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1, Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2), and Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 5) was significantly higher during aestivation (Days 20 and 40). Similarly, we observed an increase in the expression of genes involved in histone acetylation (Histone deacetylase 3) and Histone-binding protein RBBP4) during the early (Days 5 and 10) and late phases (Days 20 and 40) of aestivation. There was no change in the expression of KAT2B, a histone acetyltransferase. However, the expression of histone methylation associated modifiers (Histone-arginine methyltransferase CARMER and Histone-lysine N-methyltransferase MLL5) was significantly higher after 5 d in the aestivating group. The results suggest that the expression of epigenetic modifiers involved in DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, histone acetylation, and histone methylation is upregulated during aestivation. We hypothesize that these changes regulate global gene silencing during aestivation in A. japonicus.

  9. Results from the commissioning of the double Penning trap system MLLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolhinen, Veli; Gartzke, Eva; Habs, Dietrich; Neumayr, Juergen; Schuermann, Christian; Szerypo, Jerzy; Thirolf, Peter [Fakultaet fuer Physik, LMU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Garching (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    A cylindrical double Penning trap has been installed and successfully commissioned at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory (MLL) in Garching. This trap system has been designed to isobarically purify low energy ion beams and perform highly accurate mass measurements. Test measurements were performed by using an offline Rb surface ion source producing singly charged {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb ions. A mass resolving power of 139(2).10{sup 3} has been reached with the purification trap for {sup 85}Rb ions and a relative mass uncertainty of the order of {delta}m/m=2.9.10{sup -8} with the measurement trap for {sup 85}Rb ions by using {sup 87}Rb as reference ions. This value does not yet include systematic uncertainties. Detailed studies of systematic uncertainties arising from magnetic field changes caused by short term temperature and pressure fluctuations in the experimental area and from the long term decay of the magnetic field strength have been performed and the result of the analysis is presented. Mass measurements with offline actinide alpha recoil ion sources providing heavy radioactive species (e.g. {sup 240}U) are in preparation.

  10. Commissioning of the double Penning trap system MLLTRAP and first studies on mass-dependent systematic uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, Kevin; Weber, Christine; Thirolf, Peter G.; Szerypo, Jerzy; Gartzke, Eva; Habs, Dietrich [Fakultaet fuer Physik, LMU Muenchen (Germany); Kolhinen, Veli [Fakultaet fuer Physik, LMU Muenchen (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    The cylindrical double Penning trap system MLLTRAP in its commissioning phase at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory (MLL) Tandem accelerator in Garching is designed to perform high-accuracy mass measurements on fusion-reaction products. As the mass uncertainty is inversely proportional to the ionic charge state, the ions of interest will be charge bred prior to injection into the Penning trap system. In the future setup, both traps are foreseen to be operated as measurement traps with a relative homogeneity of the magnetic field at the trapping sites of {delta}B/B{<=}0.3 ppm. In the commissioning phase, an offline surface ionization source is used for iterative optimization of the apparatus and studies on mass-dependent systematic uncertainties. Mass measurements via the time-of-flight ion cyclotron resonance method (TOF-ICR) of reference ions with well-known masses ({sup 85}Rb, {sup 87}Rb, {sup 39}K, {sup 133}Cs) were carried out to analyze mass-dependent systematic effects. Together with previous studies on the uncertainty due to magnetic-field fluctuations the current status with respect to the limits of mass accuracy of the apparatus is presented.

  11. Studies on the influence of metallurgical variables on the stress corrosion behavior of AISI 304 stainless steel in sodium chloride solution using the fracture mechanics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatak, H.S.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B.; Rodriguez, P.

    1996-01-01

    Stress corrosion data on a nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel in a boiling solution of 5M NaCl + 0.15M Na 2 SO 4 + 3 mL/L HCl (bp 381 K) for various metallurgical conditions of the steel are presented in this article. The metallurgical conditions used are solution annealing, sensitization, 10 pct cold work, 20 pct cold work, solution annealing + sensitization, 10 pct cold work + sensitization, and 20 pct cold work + sensitization. The fracture mechanics approach has been used to obtain quantitative data on the stress corrosion crack growth rates. The stress intensity factor, K I , and J integral, J I , have been used as evaluation parameters. The crack growth rates have been measured using compact tension type samples under both increasing and decreasing stress intensity factors. A crack growth rate of 5 x 10 -11 m/s was chosen for the determination of threshold parameters. Results of the optical microscopic and fractographic examinations are presented. Acoustic signals were recorded during crack growth. Data generated from acoustic emissions, activation energy measurements, and fractographic features indicate hydrogen embrittlement as the possible mechanism of cracking

  12. W and Z Production in pp Collisions at 7 TeV with the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Outschoorn, V I Martinez

    2010-01-01

    The observation of W and Z bosons and a measurement of the production cross sections in proton proton collisions at E_CM = 7 TeV are presented using data from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Results are based on 118 W -> lnu and 125 Z/gamma* -> ll (l=e,mu) candidate events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 17 nb^-1 and 225 nb^-1 respectively. The measured values of sigma_W x BR(W -> lnu) = 9.3 \\pm 0.9 (stat) \\pm 0.6 (syst) \\pm 1.0 (lumi) nb and sigma_Z/gamma* x BR(Z/gamma* -> ll, 66<m_ll<116) = 0.83 \\pm 0.07 (stat) \\pm 0.06 (syst) \\pm 0.09 (lumi) nb. A measurement of the W lepton charge asymmetry is also reported. A comparison with theoretical predictions based on NNLO QCD calculations shows agreement with the measurements.

  13. Extraction of palm tree cellulose and its functionalization via graft copolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hoqbani, Abdulmajeed A; Abdel-Halim, E S; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2014-09-01

    The work in this paper was planned with the aim of extracting the cellulosic component of palm tree waste and functionalizing this cellulose through graft copolymerization with acrylic acid. The cellulose extraction included hot alkali treatment with aqueous sodium hydroxide to remove the non-cellulosic binding materials. The alkali treatment was followed by an oxidative bleaching using peracid/hydrogen peroxide mixture with the aim of removing the rest of non-cellulosic materials to improve the fiber hydrophilicity and accessibility towards further grafting reaction. Optimum conditions for cellulose extraction are boiling in 5% (W/V) NaOH in a material to liquor ratio of 1:20 for 1 h then bleaching with 60 ml/l bleaching mixture at initial pH value of 6.5 for 30 min. The pH of the bleaching medium is turned to the alkaline range 11 and bleaching continues for extra 30 min. Graft copolymerization reaction was initiated by potassium bromate/thiourea dioxide redox system. Optimum conditions for grafting are 30 mmol of potassium bromate, 30 mmol of thiourea dioxide and 150 g of acrylic acid (each per 100 g of cellulose). The polymerization reaction was carried out for 120 min at 50°C using a material to liquor ratio of 1:20. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of textile dyehouse effluent using ceramic membrane based process in combination with chemical pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Ghosh, Sourja; Majumdar, Swachchha; Bandyopadhyay, Sibdas

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of highly concentrated dyebath effluent and comparatively dilute composite effluent having mixture of various reactive dyes collected from a cotton fabric dyeing unit was undertaken in the present study. Ceramic microfiltration membrane prepared from a cost effective composition of alumina and clay was used. Prior to microfiltration, a chemical pretreatment was carried out with aluminium sulphate in combination with a polymeric retention aid. An optimum dose of 100 mg/L of aluminium sulphate and 1 ml/L of a commercial flocculant Afilan RAMF was found effective for dye removal (> 98%) from the synthetic solutions of reactive dyes with initial concentration of 150 mg/L in both the single component and two component systems. In the microfiltration study, effect of operating pressure in the permeate flux was observed for both the pretreated and untreated effluents and permeate samples were analyzed for dye concentration, COD, turbidity, TSS, etc. during constant pressure filtration. About 98-99% removal of dyes was obtained in the combined process with COD reduction of 54-64%.

  15. Cationization and gamma irradiation effects on the dyeability of polyester fabric towards disperse dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohdy, Maged H. [Department of Radiation Chemistry, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)]. E-mail: mhzohdy@yahoo.com

    2005-06-01

    The effect of hydrazine hydrate (HZH) treatment and/or gamma irradiation on the dyeing, mechanical and thermal properties of polyester fabrics (PET) was studied. The different factors that may affect the dyeing performance, such as concentrations of HZH, benzyl alcohol and pH values, were investigated. In this regard, the colour strength of untreated polyester fabrics dyed with the dyestuffs Dispersol blue BR, Dispersol orange B2R and Dispersol red B2B was found to be 10.34, 10.76 and 10.12 compared to 24.61, 24.90 and 23.00 in the case of irradiated and HZH-treated polyester fabrics, respectively. These colour strength values were achieved by preirradiation at a dose of 75kGy followed by treatment with 15mll-1 of HZH. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the thermal decomposition stability was improved by using gamma irradiation and the treatment with HZH as indicated by the calculated activation energies. FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the treatment with HZH acts as cationizer prior to dyeing with disperse dyes.

  16. Cationization and gamma irradiation effects on the dyeability of polyester fabric towards disperse dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zohdy, Maged H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of hydrazine hydrate (HZH) treatment and/or gamma irradiation on the dyeing, mechanical and thermal properties of polyester fabrics (PET) was studied. The different factors that may affect the dyeing performance, such as concentrations of HZH, benzyl alcohol and pH values, were investigated. In this regard, the colour strength of untreated polyester fabrics dyed with the dyestuffs Dispersol blue BR, Dispersol orange B2R and Dispersol red B2B was found to be 10.34, 10.76 and 10.12 compared to 24.61, 24.90 and 23.00 in the case of irradiated and HZH-treated polyester fabrics, respectively. These colour strength values were achieved by preirradiation at a dose of 75kGy followed by treatment with 15mll-1 of HZH. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the thermal decomposition stability was improved by using gamma irradiation and the treatment with HZH as indicated by the calculated activation energies. FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the treatment with HZH acts as cationizer prior to dyeing with disperse dyes

  17. Spectroscopic Factors from the Single Neutron Pickup Reaction ^64Zn(d,t)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Kyle; Garrett, P. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bangay, J. C.; Bianco, L.; Demand, G. A.; Faestermann, T.; Finlay, P.; Green, K. L.; Hertenberger, R.; Krücken, R.; Phillips, A. A.; Rand, E. T.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Triambak, S.; Wirth, H.-F.; Wong, J.

    2009-10-01

    A great deal of attention has recently been paid towards high-precision superallowed β-decay Ft values. With the availability of extremely high-precision (<0.1%) experimental data, precision on the individual Ft values are now dominated by the ˜1% theoretical corrections^[1]. This limitation is most evident in heavier superallowed nuclei (e.g. ^62Ga) where the isospin-symmetry-breaking (ISB) correction calculations become more difficult due to the truncated model space. Experimental spectroscopic factors for these nuclei are important for the identification of the relevant orbitals that should be included in the model space of the calculations. Motivated by this need, the single-nucleon transfer reaction ^64Zn(d,t)^63Zn was conducted at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory (MLL) of TUM/LMU in Munich, Germany, using a 22 MeV polarized deuteron beam from the tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and the TUM/LMU Q3D magnetic spectrograph, with angular distributions from 10^o to 60^o. Results from this experiment will be presented and implications for calculations of ISB corrections in the superallowed &+circ; decay of ^62Ga will be discussed.^[1] I.S. Towner and J.C. Hardy, Phys. Rev. C 77, 025501 (2008).

  18. Spectroscopic Factors from the Single Neutron Pickup ^64Zn(d,t)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Kyle; Garrett, P. E.; Demand, G. A.; Finlay, P.; Green, K. L.; Phillips, A. A.; Rand, E. T.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Triambak, S.; Wong, J.; Towner, I. S.; Ball, G. C.; Faestermann, T.; Krücken, R.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.

    2010-11-01

    A great deal of attention has recently been paid towards high-precision superallowed β-decay Ft values. With the availability of extremely high-precision (<0.1%) experimental data, precision on the individual Ft values are now dominated by the ˜1% theoretical corrections. This limitation is most evident in heavier superallowed nuclei (e.g. ^62Ga) where the isospin-symmetry-breaking (ISB) correction calculations become more difficult due to the truncated model space. Experimental spectroscopic factors for these nuclei are important for the identification of the relevant orbitals that should be included in the model space of the calculations. Motivated by this need, the single-nucleon transfer reaction ^64Zn(d,t)^63Zn was conducted at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory (MLL) of TUM/LMU in Munich, Germany, using a 22 MeV polarized deuteron beam from the tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and the TUM/LMU Q3D magnetic spectrograph, with angular distributions from 10^o to 60^o. Results from this experiment will be presented and implications for calculations of ISB corrections in the superallowed ° decay of ^62Ga will be discussed.

  19. A genetic screen in Drosophila implicates Sex comb on midleg (Scm) in tissue overgrowth and mechanisms of Scm degradation by Wds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiwei; Jin, Dan

    2015-05-01

    The sex comb on midleg (scm) gene encodes a transcriptional repressor and belongs to the Polycomb group (PcG) of genes, which regulates growth in Drosophila. Scm interacts with Polyhomeotic (a PcG protein) in vitro by recognizing its SPM domain. The homologous human protein, Sex comb on midleg-like 2 (Scml2), has been implicated in malignant brain tumors. Will die slowly (Wds) is another factor that regulates Drosophila development, and its homologous human protein, WD repeat domain 5(Wdr5), is part of the mixed lineage leukemia 1(MLL1) complex that promotes histone H3Lys4 methylation. Like Scml2, Wdr5 has been implicated in certain cancers; this protein plays an important role in leukemogenesis. In this study, we find that loss-of-function mutations in Scm result in non-autonomous tissue overgrowth in Drosophila, and determine that Scm is essential for ommatidium development and important for cell survival in Drosophila. Furthermore, our research suggests a relationship between Wds and Scm; Wds promotes Scm degradation through ubiquitination in vitro in Drosophila. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of Multilabel Learning Using the Relevant Feature for Each Label in Chronic Gastritis Syndrome Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Ping; Yan, Jian-Jun; Wang, Yi-Qin; Fu, Jing-Jing; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Guo, Rui; Qian, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Background. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), most of the algorithms are used to solve problems of syndrome diagnosis that only focus on one syndrome, that is, single label learning. However, in clinical practice, patients may simultaneously have more than one syndrome, which has its own symptoms (signs). Methods. We employed a multilabel learning using the relevant feature for each label (REAL) algorithm to construct a syndrome diagnostic model for chronic gastritis (CG) in TCM. REAL combines feature selection methods to select the significant symptoms (signs) of CG. The method was tested on 919 patients using the standard scale. Results. The highest prediction accuracy was achieved when 20 features were selected. The features selected with the information gain were more consistent with the TCM theory. The lowest average accuracy was 54% using multi-label neural networks (BP-MLL), whereas the highest was 82% using REAL for constructing the diagnostic model. For coverage, hamming loss, and ranking loss, the values obtained using the REAL algorithm were the lowest at 0.160, 0.142, and 0.177, respectively. Conclusion. REAL extracts the relevant symptoms (signs) for each syndrome and improves its recognition accuracy. Moreover, the studies will provide a reference for constructing syndrome diagnostic models and guide clinical practice. PMID:22719781

  1. Application of Multilabel Learning Using the Relevant Feature for Each Label in Chronic Gastritis Syndrome Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Ping Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, most of the algorithms are used to solve problems of syndrome diagnosis that only focus on one syndrome, that is, single label learning. However, in clinical practice, patients may simultaneously have more than one syndrome, which has its own symptoms (signs. Methods. We employed a multilabel learning using the relevant feature for each label (REAL algorithm to construct a syndrome diagnostic model for chronic gastritis (CG in TCM. REAL combines feature selection methods to select the significant symptoms (signs of CG. The method was tested on 919 patients using the standard scale. Results. The highest prediction accuracy was achieved when 20 features were selected. The features selected with the information gain were more consistent with the TCM theory. The lowest average accuracy was 54% using multi-label neural networks (BP-MLL, whereas the highest was 82% using REAL for constructing the diagnostic model. For coverage, hamming loss, and ranking loss, the values obtained using the REAL algorithm were the lowest at 0.160, 0.142, and 0.177, respectively. Conclusion. REAL extracts the relevant symptoms (signs for each syndrome and improves its recognition accuracy. Moreover, the studies will provide a reference for constructing syndrome diagnostic models and guide clinical practice.

  2. Statistical culture-based strategies to enhance chlamydospore production by Trichoderma harzianum SH2303 in liquid fermentation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-qian; Song, Kai; Li, Ya-chai; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma-based formulations are applied as commercial biocontrol agents for soil-borne plant pathogens. Chlamydospores are active propagules in Trichoderma spp., but their production is currently limited due to a lack of optimal liquid fermentation technology. In this study, we explored response surface methodologies for optimizing fermentation technology in Trichoderma SH2303. Our initial studies, using the Plackett-Burman design, identified cornmeal, glycerol, and initial pH levels as the most significant factors (P<0.05) for enhancing the production of chlamydospores. Subsequently, we applied the Box-Behnken design to study the interactions between, and optimal levels of, a number of factors in chlamydospore production. These statistically predicted results indicated that the highest number of chlamydospores (3.6×108 spores/ml) would be obtained under the following condition: corn flour 62.86 g/L, glycerol 7.54 ml/L, pH 4.17, and 6-d incubation in liquid fermentation. We validated these predicted values via three repeated experiments using the optimal culture and achieved maximum chlamydospores of 4.5×108 spores/ml, which approximately a 8-fold increase in the number of chlamydospores produced by T. harzianum SH2303 compared with that before optimization. These optimized values could help make chlamydospore production cost-efficient in the future development of novel biocontrol agents. PMID:27487807

  3. Statistical culture-based strategies to enhance chlamydospore production by Trichoderma harzianum SH2303 in liquid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Qian; Song, Kai; Li, Ya-Chai; Chen, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Trichoderma-based formulations are applied as commercial biocontrol agents for soil-borne plant pathogens. Chlamydospores are active propagules in Trichoderma spp., but their production is currently limited due to a lack of optimal liquid fermentation technology. In this study, we explored response surface methodologies for optimizing fermentation technology in Trichoderma SH2303. Our initial studies, using the Plackett-Burman design, identified cornmeal, glycerol, and initial pH levels as the most significant factors (P<0.05) for enhancing the production of chlamydospores. Subsequently, we applied the Box-Behnken design to study the interactions between, and optimal levels of, a number of factors in chlamydospore production. These statistically predicted results indicated that the highest number of chlamydospores (3.6×10(8) spores/ml) would be obtained under the following condition: corn flour 62.86 g/L, glycerol 7.54 ml/L, pH 4.17, and 6-d incubation in liquid fermentation. We validated these predicted values via three repeated experiments using the optimal culture and achieved maximum chlamydospores of 4.5×10(8) spores/ml, which approximately a 8-fold increase in the number of chlamydospores produced by T. harzianum SH2303 compared with that before optimization. These optimized values could help make chlamydospore production cost-efficient in the future development of novel biocontrol agents.

  4. Advanced landfill leachate treatment using iron-carbon microelectrolysis- Fenton process: Process optimization and column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zeng, Guangming; Li, Zhijun; Deng, Yongchao; Liu, Jun; Yi, Kaixin

    2016-11-15

    A novel hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor was proposed for the pretreatment of mature landfill leachate. This reactor, combining microelectrolysis with Fenton process, revealed high treatment efficiency. The operating variables, including Fe-C dosage, H2O2 concentration and initial pH, were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM), regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and biochemical oxygen demand: chemical oxygen demand (BOD5/COD) as the responses. The highest COD removal (74.59%) and BOD5/COD (0.50) was obtained at optimal conditions of Fe-C dosage 55.72g/L, H2O2 concentration 12.32mL/L and initial pH 3.12. Three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular weight (MW) distribution demonstrated that high molecular weight fractions such as refractory fulvic-like substances in leachate were effectively destroyed during the combined processes, which should be attributed to the combination oxidative effect of microelectrolysis and Fenton. The fixed-bed column experiments were performed and the breakthrough curves at different flow rates were evaluated to determine the practical applicability of the combined process. All these results show that the hydrogen peroxide-enhanced iron-carbon (Fe-C) microelectrolysis reactor is a promising and efficient technology for the treatment of mature landfill leachate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative study on heat pipe performance using aqueous solutions of alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, R.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Sivaraman, B. [Annamalai University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Annamalai Nagar, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2012-12-15

    This paper deals with the performance characterization of heat pipes using an aqueous solution of long chain alcohols like n-Butanol, n-Pentanol, n-Hexanol and n-Heptanol as working mediums. These solutions are called as self-rewetting fluids, since these fluid mixtures possess a non-linear dependence of the surface tension with temperature. A cylindrical heat pipe made up of copper with two layers of wrapped screen is used as a wick material and partially filled with the self-rewetting fluid water mixture and tested for its heat transport capability like thermal efficiency and thermal resistance at different inclinations and input power levels. A number of tests have been performed with heat pipes, filled with various aqueous solutions of alcohols with a concentration of 2 ml/l in de-ionized water (DI water) on volume basis. The results obtained for heat pipes using self rewetting fluids show improved performances, when compared to DI water heat pipes. (orig.)

  6. Determination of captopril in biological samples by high-performance liquid chromatography with ThioGlo 3 derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykin, N; Neal, R; Yusof, M; Ercal, N

    2001-11-01

    Captopril, a well-known angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, is widely used for treatment of arterial hypertension. Recent studies suggest that it may also act as a scavenger of free radicals because of its thiol group. Therefore, the present study describes a rapid, sensitive and relatively simple method for the detection of captopril in biological tissues with reverse-phase HPLC. Captopril was first derivatized with ThioGlo 3 [3H-Naphto[2,1-b]pyran,9-acetoxy-2-(4-(2,5-dihydro-2,5-dioxo-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)phenyl-3-oxo-)]. It was then detected by fluorescence-HPLC using an Astec C(18) column as the stationary phase and a water:acetonitrile:acetic acid:phosphoric acid mixture (50:50; 1 mL/L acids) as the mobile phase (excitation wavelength, 365 nm; emission wavelength, 445 nm). The calibration curve for captopril was linear over a range of 10-2500 nM and the coefficient of variation acquired for the within- and between-run precision for captopril was 0.5 and 3.8%, respectively. The detection limit of captopril with this method was found to be 200 fmol/20 microL injection volume. Its relative recovery from biological samples was determined to the range from 93.3 to 105.3%. Based on these results, we believe that our method is advantageous for captopril determination. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Mapping cellular hierarchy by single-cell analysis of the cell surface repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guoji; Luc, Sidinh; Marco, Eugenio; Lin, Ta-Wei; Peng, Cong; Kerenyi, Marc A; Beyaz, Semir; Kim, Woojin; Xu, Jian; Das, Partha Pratim; Neff, Tobias; Zou, Keyong; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H

    2013-10-03

    Stem cell differentiation pathways are most often studied at the population level, whereas critical decisions are executed at the level of single cells. We have established a highly multiplexed, quantitative PCR assay to profile in an unbiased manner a panel of all commonly used cell surface markers (280 genes) from individual cells. With this method, we analyzed over 1,500 single cells throughout the mouse hematopoietic system and illustrate its utility for revealing important biological insights. The comprehensive single cell data set permits mapping of the mouse hematopoietic stem cell differentiation hierarchy by computational lineage progression analysis. Further profiling of 180 intracellular regulators enabled construction of a genetic network to assign the earliest differentiation event during hematopoietic lineage specification. Analysis of acute myeloid leukemia elicited by MLL-AF9 uncovered a distinct cellular hierarchy containing two independent self-renewing lineages with different clonal activities. The strategy has broad applicability in other cellular systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of some organic compounds and NAA application on the in vitro growth of the black orchid (Coelogyne pandurata Lindl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RINI UNTARI

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Coelogyne pandurata Lindl. is a lowland epiphytic orchid that has pale green flowers with typically black markings on the lips. This species conventionally propagated asexually by rhizome. This orchid is now facing a great conservation problem and threatened to extinction due to human exploitation. That is why conservation activities such as developing proper cultivation, are urgently required. An in vitro experiment was conducted at the Laboratory of Tissue Culture at Bogor Botanic Garden. The experiment was carried out using a completely randomized design with two factors and ten replications. The treatments were the supplementation of the basal media i.e. Vacin and Went added with sugar, activated charcoal and agar, with 30 different combinations of organic compounds i.e., coconut water 250 mL/L, banana 150 g/L, potato 200 g/L, sweet potato 150 g/L, soybean 150 g/L and no organic compound as a control, and application of NAA (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 ppm. The result showed that there was a significant effect of the organic compounds and NAA application on the length and the number of roots, height, number of leaves and number of shoots produced by the explants. The combination of sweet potato 150 g/L without NAA application showed the best result.

  9. The Role of Histone Protein Modifications and Mutations in Histone Modifiers in Pediatric B-Cell Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczar, Szymon; Janczar, Karolina; Pastorczak, Agata; Harb, Hani; Paige, Adam J. W.; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Danilewicz, Marian; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    While cancer has been long recognized as a disease of the genome, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in neoplasia was acknowledged more recently. The most active epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone protein modifications and they are involved in basic biological phenomena in every cell. Their role in tumorigenesis is stressed by recent unbiased large-scale studies providing evidence that several epigenetic modifiers are recurrently mutated or frequently dysregulated in multiple cancers. The interest in epigenetic marks is especially due to the fact that they are potentially reversible and thus druggable. In B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) there is a relative paucity of reports on the role of histone protein modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation) as compared to acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell ALL, or other hematologic cancers, and in this setting chromatin modifications are relatively less well studied and reviewed than DNA methylation. In this paper, we discuss the biomarker associations and evidence for a driver role of dysregulated global and loci-specific histone marks, as well as mutations in epigenetic modifiers in BCP-ALL. Examples of chromatin modifiers recurrently mutated/disrupted in BCP-ALL and associated with disease outcomes include MLL1, CREBBP, NSD2, and SETD2. Altered histone marks and histone modifiers and readers may play a particular role in disease chemoresistance and relapse. We also suggest that epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation may have parallel roles in leukemogenesis. PMID:28054944

  10. New and emerging prognostic and predictive genetic biomarkers in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Anthony V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease at the genetic level. Chromosomal abnormalities are used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers to provide subtype, outcome and drug response information. t(12;21)/ETV6-RUNX1 and high hyper-diploidy are good-risk prognostic biomarkers whereas KMT2A (MLL) translocations, t(17;19)/TCF3-HLF, haploidy or low hypodiploidy are high-risk biomarkers. t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 patients require targeted treatment (imatinib/dasatinib), whereas iAMP21 patients achieve better outcomes when treated intensively. High-risk genetic biomarkers are four times more prevalent in adults compared to children. The application of genomic technologies to cases without an established abnormality (B-other) reveals copy number alterations which can be used either individually or in combination as prognostic biomarkers. Transcriptome sequencing studies have identified a network of fusion genes involving kinase genes - ABL1, ABL2, PDGFRB, CSF1R, CRLF2, JAK2 and EPOR. In vitro and in vivo studies along with emerging clinical observations indicate that patients with a kinase-activating aberration may respond to treatment with small molecular inhibitors like imatinib/dasatinib and ruxolitinib. Further work is required to determine the true frequency of these abnormalities across the age spectrum and the optimal way to incorporate such inhibitors into protocols. In conclusion, genetic biomarkers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of patients with ALL. PMID:27033238

  11. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Progress Through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pieters, Rob; Schrappe, Martin; Biondi, Andrea; Vora, Ajay; Baruchel, André; Silverman, Lewis B.; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Escherich, Gabriele; Horibe, Keizo; Benoit, Yves C.M.; Izraeli, Shai; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Liang, Der-Cherng; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. Methods A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was reviewed and revised by the committee chairs of the major ALL study groups. Results With long-term survival rates for ALL approaching 90% and the advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses, several international study groups or consortia were established to conduct collaborative research to further improve outcome. As a result, treatment strategies have been improved for several subtypes of ALL, such as infant, MLL-rearranged, Philadelphia chromosome–positive, and Philadelphia chromosome–like ALL. Many recurrent genetic abnormalities that respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multiple genetic determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. Conclusion The information gained from collaborative studies has helped decipher the heterogeneity of ALL to help improve personalized treatment, which will further advance the current high cure rate and the quality of life for children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26304874

  12. Effect of Media on Algae Growth for Bio-Fuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriharsha KARAMPUDI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bio-fuels are commonly produced from oleaginous crops, such as rapeseed, soybean, sunflower and oil palm. However, microalgae can be an attractive alternative feedstock for future biofuels because some of the species contain very high amounts of oil, which can be used to extract and be processed into transportation fuels. Their growth rate is very high and faster, can be cultivated in non-agricultural land and waste water. In addition, production of microalgae is not seasonal and they can be harvested routinely as needed. Two strains of Scenedesmus dimorphus (fresh water microalgae were tested for their growth in proteose medium and Modified Bold 3N medium with different levels of nitrogen and glycerol and growth rates were measured using cell count, fresh and dry weight. The growth of S. dimorphus was better in proteose medium with half of the nitrogen source recommended by the UTEX than other media tested. ANOVA table showed significant differences between days, between media, and day media interaction. When compared to d