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Sample records for mixed simplified p2-p1

  1. Crossed molecular beam-tunable laser determination of velocity dependence of intramultiplet mixing: K(4p2P1/2)+He →K(4p2P3/2)+He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.W.; Goddard, T.P.; Parravano, C.; Warner, J.

    1976-01-01

    The velocity dependence of intramultiplet mixing, K(4p 2 P 1 / 2 ) +He→K(4p 2 P 3 / 2 )+He, has been measured over the relative velocity range v=1.3--3.4 km/sec. The cross section appears to fit a linear function Q (v) =A (v-v 0 ), where a=6.3 x 10 -4 A 2 and v 0 = 7.9 x 10 4 cm/sec. The value of A is obtained by normalization to the literature thermal average cross section. The intramultiplet mixing theory of Nikitin is modified to yield Q (v) for the process. The modified theory correctly exhibits detailed balancing, and it is normalized to provide a very good fit to the observed Q (v). The magnitude of the normalization factor, however, is larger than that predicted from recent pseudopotential calculations of the excited state potentials. The temperature dependence of intramultiplet mixing is predicted. The use of laser polarization to determine the m/subj/ dependence of the process K(4p 2 P 3 / 2 +He→K(4p 2 P 1 / 2 )+He and other collision processes of excited 2 P 3 / 2 states is examined

  2. Determination of the 1s2{\\ell }2{{\\ell }}^{\\prime } state production ratios {{}^{4}P}^{o}/{}^{2}P, {}^{2}D/{}^{2}P and {{}^{2}P}_{+}/{{}^{2}P}_{-} from fast (1{s}^{2},1s2s\\,{}^{3}S) mixed-state He-like ion beams in collisions with H2 targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benis, E. P.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2016-12-01

    New results are presented on the ratio {R}m={σ }{T2p}( {}4P)/{σ }{T2p}({}2P) concerning the production cross sections of Li-like 1s2s2p quartet and doublet P states formed in energetic ion-atom collisions by single 2p electron transfer to the metastable 1s2s {}3S component of the He-like ion beam. Spin statistics predict a value of R m = 2 independent of the collision system in disagreement with most reported measurements of {R}m≃ 1{--}9. A new experimental approach is presented for the evaluation of R m having some practical advantages over earlier approaches. It also allows for the determination of the separate contributions of ground- and metastable-state beam components to the measured spectra. Applying our technique to zero-degree Auger projectile spectra from 4.5 MeV {{{B}}}3+ (Benis et al 2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 064701) and 25.3 MeV {{{F}}}7+ (Zamkov et al 2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 062706) mixed state (1{s}2 {}1S,1s2s {}3S) He-like ion collisions with H2 targets, we report new values of {R}m=3.5+/- 0.4 for boron and {R}m=1.8+/- 0.3 for fluorine. In addition, the ratios of {}2D/{}2P and {{}2P}+/{{}2P}- populations from either the metastable and/or ground state beam component, also relevant to this analysis, are evaluated and compared to previously reported results for carbon collisions on helium (Strohschein et al 2008 Phys. Rev. A 77 022706) including a critical comparison to theory.

  3. Variational derivation of the simplified P2 equations with boundary and interface conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasevic, D.I.; Larsen, E.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Simplified P 2 (SP 2 ) approximation to the transport equation is derived using a variational principle. The variational analysis yields the SP 2 equations, together with interface and Marshak-like boundary conditions. Numerical calculations show that for problems in which the P 1 solution is a reasonably accurate approximation to the transport solution, the corresponding SP 2 Solution is generally more accurate than the P 1 solution, for calculating integral quantities and detailed flux distributions, except in the close vicinity of material interfaces, where the SP 2 solution is discontinuous

  4. A crossed-beam experiment on intramultiplet mixing collisions with short-lived Ne** {(2p)5(3p)} atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, M.P.I.; Ruyten, W.M.J.; van de Beucken, F..J.H.M.; Driessen, J.P.J.; Veugelers, W.J.T.; Kramer, P.H.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; van Hoek, W.B.M.; Sandker, G.J.; Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Verhaar, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    We describe the design, operation, and calibration of a crossed-beam experiment for the study of intramultiplet mixing collisions of short-lived electronically excited Ne{(2p)5(3p)}≡{α} atoms with ground-state atoms/molecules. The excellent performance of almost 1 kHz/Å2 (number of counts per unit

  5. Hyperoxia-induced p47phox activation and ROS generation is mediated through S1P transporter Spns2, and S1P/S1P1&2 signaling axis in lung endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harijith, Anantha; Pendyala, Srikanth; Ebenezer, David L; Ha, Alison W; Fu, Panfeng; Wang, Yue-Ting; Ma, Ke; Toth, Peter T; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; Kanteti, Prasad; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2016-08-01

    Hyperoxia-induced lung injury adversely affects ICU patients and neonates on ventilator assisted breathing. The underlying culprit appears to be reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced lung damage. The major contributor of hyperoxia-induced ROS is activation of the multiprotein enzyme complex NADPH oxidase. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling is known to be involved in hyperoxia-mediated ROS generation; however, the mechanism(s) of S1P-induced NADPH oxidase activation is unclear. Here, we investigated various steps in the S1P signaling pathway mediating ROS production in response to hyperoxia in lung endothelium. Of the two closely related sphingosine kinases (SphKs)1 and 2, which synthesize S1P from sphingosine, only Sphk1(-/-) mice conferred protection against hyperoxia-induced lung injury. S1P is metabolized predominantly by S1P lyase and partial deletion of Sgpl1 (Sgpl1(+/-)) in mice accentuated lung injury. Hyperoxia stimulated S1P accumulation in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs), and downregulation of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (Spns2) or S1P receptors S1P1&2, but not S1P3, using specific siRNA attenuated hyperoxia-induced p47(phox) translocation to cell periphery and ROS generation in HLMVECs. These results suggest a role for Spns2 and S1P1&2 in hyperoxia-mediated ROS generation. In addition, p47(phox) (phox:phagocyte oxidase) activation and ROS generation was also reduced by PF543, a specific SphK1 inhibitor in HLMVECs. Our data indicate a novel role for Spns2 and S1P1&2 in the activation of p47(phox) and production of ROS involved in hyperoxia-mediated lung injury in neonatal and adult mice. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Interstitial deletion 1p as a result of a de novo reciprocal 1p;2p translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Jensen, P H

    1985-01-01

    A 5-month-old female patient with psychomotor retardation and minor dysmorphisms is described. Cytogenetic analysis using high-resolution banding technique revealed an interstitial deletion of the short arm of one chromosome 1 (p21----p22.2) resulting from a de novo translocation t(1;2)(p22;p25)....

  7. Study of TiO2(1 1 0)-p(1x1), p(1x2) and p(1x3) surface structures by impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, E.; Souda, R.

    2000-01-01

    The surface structure of TiO 2 (1 1 0)-p(1x1), p(1x2) and p(1x3) were studied using impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS). We found that (i) the height of bridging oxygen for the p(1x1) is comparative to that of bulk structure, (ii) the p(1x2) surface has the added Ti 2 O 3 unit rows proposed by Onishi et al. and also the oxygen atoms rows between Ti 2 O 3 unit rows and (iii) the p(1x3) surface is constructed with the same added Ti 2 O 3 unit rows as that in the p(1x2) surface, but the bridging oxygen rows exist between the Ti 2 O 3 unit rows

  8. A de-novo interstitial microduplication involving 2p16.1-p15 and mirroring 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome: Clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni-Bloch, Aviva; Yeshaya, Josepha; Kahana, Sarit; Maya, Idit; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2015-11-01

    Microdeletions of various sizes in the 2p16.1-p15 chromosomal region have been grouped together under the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome. Children with this syndrome generally share certain features including microcephaly, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, urogenital and skeletal abnormalities. We present a child with a de-novo interstitial 1665 kb duplication of 2p16.1-p15. Clinical features of this child are distinct from those of children with the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome, specifically the head circumference which is within the normal range and mild intellectual disability with absence of autistic behaviors. Microduplications many times bear milder clinical phenotypes in comparison with corresponding microdeletion syndromes. Indeed, as compared to the microdeletion syndrome patients, the 2p16.1-p15 microduplication seems to have a milder cognitive effect and no effect on other body systems. Limited information available in genetic databases about cases with overlapping duplications indicates that they all have abnormal developmental phenotypes. The involvement of genes in this location including BCL11A, USP34 and PEX13, affecting fundamental developmental processes both within and outside the nervous system may explain the clinical features of the individual described in this report. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tables of Shore and Fano parameters for the helium resonances 2s/sup 2/ /sup 1/S, 2p/sup 2/ /sup 1/D, and 2s 2p /sup 1/P excited in p-He collisions E/sub p/ = 33 to 150 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A.; Merchez, H.

    1976-02-01

    Absolute values of Shore and Fano parameters are tabulated for the helium atom 2s/sup 2/ /sup 1/S, 2p/sup 2/ /sup 1/D, and 2s 2p /sup 1/P resonances produced by a proton beam. Observations were made on the spectra of ejected electrons. The important variation of the shape of the resonances with ejection angle is illustrated for E/sub p/ = 100 keV; the variation with proton energy is shown at 30/sup 0/.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae GTPase complex: Gtr1p-Gtr2p regulates cell-proliferation through Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ran-binding protein, Yrb2p

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yonggang; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Nishimoto, Takeharu

    2005-01-01

    A Gtr1p GTPase, the GDP mutant of which suppresses both temperature-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RanGEF/Prp20p and RanGAP/Rna1p, was presently found to interact with Yrb2p, the S. cerevisiae homologue of mammalian Ran-binding protein 3. Gtr1p bound the Ran-binding domain of Yrb2p. In contrast, Gtr2p, a partner of Gtr1p, did not bind Yrb2p, although it bound Gtr1p. A triple mutant: yrb2Δ gtr1Δ gtr2Δ was lethal, while a double mutant: gtr1Δ gtr2Δ survived well, indicating that Yrb2p protected cells from the killing effect of gtr1Δ gtr2Δ. Recombinant Gtr1p and Gtr2p were purified as a complex from Escherichia coli. The resulting Gtr1p-Gtr2p complex was comprised of an equal amount of Gtr1p and Gtr2p, which inhibited the Rna1p/Yrb2 dependent RanGAP activity. Thus, the Gtr1p-Gtr2p cycle was suggested to regulate the Ran cycle through Yrb2p

  11. Towards secure mobile P2P applications using JXME

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo Prieto, Marc; Prieto Blázquez, Josep; Herrera Joancomartí, Jordi; Arnedo Moreno, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices have become ubiquitous, allowing the integration of new information from a large range of devices. However, the development of new applications requires a powerful framework which simplifies their construction. JXME is the JXTA implementation for mobile devices using J2ME, its main value being its simplicity when creating peer-to-peer (P2P) applications on limited devices. On that regard, an issue that is becoming very important in the recent times is being able to provide ...

  12. Enhanced phytoremediation of mixed heavy metal (mercury)-organic pollutants (trichloroethylene) with transgenic alfalfa co-expressing glutathione S-transferase and human P450 2E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Junhong; Zhou, Yuanming; Gong, Tingyun; Wang, Jing; Ge, Yinlin

    2013-09-15

    Soil contamination is a global environmental problem and many efforts have been made to find efficient remediation methods over the last decade. Moreover, remediation of mixed contaminated soils are more difficult. In the present study, transgenic alfalfa plants pKHCG co-expressing glutathione S-transferase (GST) and human P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) genes were used for phytoremediation of mixed mercury (Hg)-trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminants. Simultaneous expression of GST and CYP2E1 may produce a significant synergistic effect, and leads to improved resistance and accumulation to heavy metal-organic complex contaminants. Based on the tolerance and accumulation assays, pKHCG transgenic plants were more resistant to Hg/TCE complex pollutants and many folds higher in Hg/TCE-accumulation than the non-transgenic control plants in mixed contaminated soil. It is confirmed that GST and CYP2E1 co-expression may be a useful strategy to help achieve mixed heavy metal-organic pollutants phytoremediation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Antiviral T cell competence and restriction specificity of mixed allogeneic (P1 + P2----P1) irradiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueedi, E.S.; Sykes, M.; Ildstad, S.T.; Chester, C.H.; Althage, A.; Hengartner, H.; Sachs, D.H.; Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed irradiation bone marrow chimeras were prepared by reconstituting lethally irradiated C57BL/10 (B10) or B10.D2 mice with T cell-depleted bone marrow cells of B10 plus B10.D2 origin. These chimeras were healthy and survived well under conventional housing conditions and after experimental laboratory infections. Of a total of 17 chimeras tested, 2 died spontaneously or from the injected virus. Twelve of fifteen chimeras mounted a measurable cytotoxic T cell response to virus. Despite approximately equal percentages of B10 and B10.D2 lymphocytes in chimeras, cytotoxic T cell responses to vaccinia virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus were mediated variably by either syngeneic or allogeneic donor lymphocytes; thus the H-2 type of effector T cells frequently did not correspond to the 50:50 distribution of spleen or peripheral blood lymphocytes. Cytotoxic responses were restricted exclusively to recipient H-2 type. All mixed chimeras examined were able to mount a good IgG response to vesicular stomatitis virus. These results confirm previous data suggesting that such mixed chimeras are healthy and immunocompetent and demonstrate strict recipient-determined restriction specificity of effector T cells; they also suggest that if T help is necessary for induction of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, it does not require host-restricted interactions between helper T cells and precursor cytotoxic T cells

  14. Electron impact excitation-autoionisation of the (2s2)1S, (2p2)1D and (2s2p)1P autoionising states of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samardzic, O.; Hurn, J.A.; Weigold, E.; Brunger, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The electron impact excitation of the (2s 2 ) 1 S, (2p 2 ) 1 D and (2s2p) 1 P autoionising states of helium and their subsequent radiationless decay was studied by observation of the ejected electrons. The present work was carried out at an incident energy of 94.6 eV and for ejected electron scattering angles in the range 25-135 deg C. The lineshapes observed in the present ejected electron spectra are analysed using the Shore-Balashov parametrisation. As part of the analysis procedure, numerically rigorous confidence limits were determined for the derived parameters. No previous experimental or theoretical work has been undertaken at the incident energy of the present investigation but, where possible, the resulting parameters are qualitatively compared against the 80 eV results of other experiments and theory. 37 refs., 4 figs

  15. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) induces COX-2 expression and PGE2 formation via S1P receptor 2 in renal mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völzke, Anja; Koch, Alexander; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Huwiler, Andrea; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) formation in renal mesangial cells may provide potential therapeutic targets to treat inflammatory glomerular diseases. Thus, we evaluated the S1P-dependent signaling mechanisms which are responsible for enhanced COX-2 expression and PGE2 formation in rat mesangial cells under basal conditions. Furthermore, we investigated whether these mechanisms are operative in the presence of angiotensin II (Ang II) and of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Treatment of rat and human mesangial cells with S1P led to concentration-dependent enhanced expression of COX-2. Pharmacological and molecular biology approaches revealed that the S1P-dependent increase of COX-2 mRNA and protein expression was mediated via activation of S1P receptor 2 (S1P2). Further, inhibition of Gi and p42/p44 MAPK signaling, both downstream of S1P2, abolished the S1P-induced COX-2 expression. In addition, S1P/S1P2-dependent upregulation of COX-2 led to significantly elevated PGE2 levels, which were further potentiated in the presence of Ang II and IL-1β. A functional consequence downstream of S1P/S1P2 signaling is mesangial cell migration that is stimulated by S1P. Interestingly, inhibition of COX-2 by celecoxib and SC-236 completely abolished the migratory response. Overall, our results demonstrate that extracellular S1P induces COX-2 expression via activation of S1P2 and subsequent Gi and p42/p44 MAPK-dependent signaling in renal mesangial cells leading to enhanced PGE2 formation and cell migration that essentially requires COX-2. Thus, targeting S1P/S1P2 signaling pathways might be a novel strategy to treat renal inflammatory diseases. © 2013.

  16. The time-dependent simplified P2 equations: Asymptotic analyses and numerical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, U.; Miller, W.F. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Using an asymptotic expansion, the authors found that the modified time-dependent simplified P 2 (SP 2 ) equations are robust, high-order, asymptotic approximations to the time-dependent transport equation in a physical regime in which the conventional time-dependent diffusion equation is the leading-order approximation. Using diffusion limit analysis, they also asymptotically compared three competitive time-dependent equations (the telegrapher's equation, the time-dependent SP 2 equations, and the time-dependent simplified even-parity equation). As a result, they found that the time-dependent SP 2 equations contain higher-order asymptotic approximations to the time-dependent transport equation than the other competitive equations. The numerical results confirm that, in the vast majority of cases, the time-dependent SP 2 solutions are significantly more accurate than the time-dependent diffusion and the telegrapher's solutions. They have also shown that the time-dependent SP 2 equations have excellent characteristics such as rotational invariance (which means no ray effect), good diffusion limit behavior, guaranteed positivity in diffusive regimes, and significant accuracy, even in deep-penetration problems. Through computer-running-time tests, they have shown that the time-dependent SP 2 equations can be solved with significantly less computational effort than the conventionally used, time-dependent S N equations (for N > 2) and almost as fast as the time-dependent diffusion equation. From all these results, they conclude that the time-dependent SP 2 equations should be considered as an important competitor for an improved approximately transport equations solver. Such computationally efficient time-dependent transport models are important for problems requiring enhanced computational efficiency, such as neutronics/fluid-dynamics coupled problems that arise in the analyses of hypothetical nuclear reactor accidents

  17. Calculation of parity violating effects in the 62P/sub 1/2/-72P/sub 1/2/ forbidden M1 transition in thallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuffer, D.B.

    1977-05-01

    Calculations are presented of the E1 amplitude expected in forbidden M1 transitions of Tl and Cs if parity is violated in the neutral weak e-N interaction, as proposed in a number of gauge models, including that of Weinberg and Salam. Valence electron wave functions are generated as numerical solutions to the Dirac equation in a modified Tietz central potential. These wave functions are used to calculate allowed E1 transition rates, hfs splittings, and Stark E1 transition ampitudes. These results are compared with experiment and the agreement is generally good. The relativistic Tl 6 2 P/sub 1/2/-7 2 P/sub 1/2/ M1 transition amplitude M is also calculated, and corrections due to interconfiguration interaction, Breit interaction, and hfs mixing are included. The parity violating E1 amplitude E/sub PV/ is calculated and a value for the circular dichroism in the Weinberg model delta = -2.6 x 10 -3 is obtained. Parity violating effects in other Tl transitions are discussed. Contributions to the M1 amplitude for the forbidden Cs 6 2 S/sub 1/2/-7 2 S/sub 1/2/ and 6 2 S/sub 1/2/-8 2 S/sub 1/2/ transitions and to the Cs 6 2 S/sub 1/2/ g-factor anomaly from relativistic effects, Breit interaction, interconfiguration interaction, and hfs mixing are calculated, and it is found that this current theoretical description is not entirely adequate. The parity violating E1 amplitude E/sub PV/ for the 6S/sub 1/2/-7 2 S/sub 1/2/ and 6S/sub 1/2/-8 2 S/sub 1/2/ transitions is evaluated. With a measured value M/sub expt/ and the Weinberg value Q/sub W/ = -99, a circular dichroism delta = 1.64 x 10 -4 for the 6 2 S/sub 1/2/-7 2 S/sub 1/2/ transition is found

  18. Four-wave mixing and parametric four-wave mixing near the 4P-4S transition of the potassium atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katharakis, M; Merlemis, N; Serafetinides, A; Efthimiopoulos, T

    2002-01-01

    Potassium 4S 1/2 -6S 1/2 two-photon excitation initiates the emission of several internally generated photons. For the first time two emission lines, one close to and one below the potassium 4P 3/2 level, are reported for low pumping intensity. Radiation emitted below the 4P 3/2 level is due to a parametric four-wave mixing process that uses the photons emitted at the 5P 3/2 -4S 1/2 transition and a two-step four-wave mixing process generates the line emitted close to the 4P 3/2 level

  19. Evaluation excitation functions for "2"8Si(n,p)"2"8Al, "3"1P(n,p)"3"1Si, and "1"1"3In(n,γ)"1"1"4"mIn reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotarev, K.I.

    2014-10-01

    Cross section data for "2"8Si(n,p)"2"8Al, "3"1P(n,p)"3"1Si and "1"1"3In(n,γ)"1"1"4"mIn reactions are needed for solving a wide spectrum of scientific and technical tasks. The excitation function of "2"8Si(n,p)"2"8Al reaction refers to the nuclear data involved in fusion reactor design calculations. The "2"8Si(n,p)"2"8Al reaction is interesting also as the monitor reaction for measurements at fusion facilities. Activation detectors on the basis of the 31P(n,p)31Si reaction are commonly used in the reactor dosimetry. The "1"1"3In(n,γ)"1"1"4"mIn reaction is promising regarding reactor dosimetry application for two reasons. First, due to the "1"1"4"mIn decay parameters which are rather suitable for activation measurements. Half-life of "1"1"4"mIn is equal to T_1/_2 = (49.51 ± 0.01) days and gamma spectrum accompanying decay has only one line with energy 190.27 keV and intensity (15.56 ± 0.15)%. Second, the "1"1"3In(n,γ)"1"1"4"mIn reaction rate may be measured by using one activation detector simultaneously with the "1"1"5In(n,γ)"1"1"6"mIn reaction. Preliminary analysis of existing evaluated excitation functions for "2"8Si(n,p)"2"8Al, "3"1P(n,p)"3"1Si and "1"1"3In(n,γ)"1"1"4"mIn reactions show that new evaluations are needed for all above mentioned reactions. This report is devoted to the preparation of the new evaluations of cross sections data and related covariance matrixes of uncertainties for the "2"8Si(n,p)"2"8Al, "3"1P(n,p)"3"1Si and "1"1"3In(n,γ)"1"1"4"mIn reactions.

  20. Neuropharmacology of Purinergic Receptors in Human Submucous Plexus: Involvement of P2X1, P2X2, P2X3 Channels, P2Y and A3 Metabotropic Receptors in Neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñán-Rico, A.; Wunderlich, JE.; Enneking, JT.; Tso, DR.; Grants, I.; Williams, KC.; Otey, A.; Michel, K.; Schemann, M.; Needleman, B.; Harzman, A.; Christofi, FL.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale The role of purinergic signaling in the human ENS is not well understood. We sought to further characterize the neuropharmacology of purinergic receptors in human ENS and test the hypothesis that endogenous purines are critical regulators of neurotransmission. Experimental Approach LSCM-Fluo-4-(Ca2+)-imaging of postsynaptic Ca2+ transients (PSCaTs) was used as a reporter of neural activity. Synaptic transmission was evoked by fiber tract electrical stimulation in human SMP surgical preparations. Pharmacological analysis of purinergic signaling was done in 1,556 neurons from 234 separate ganglia 107 patients; immunochemical labeling for P2XRs of neurons in ganglia from 19 patients. Real-time MSORT (Di-8-ANEPPS) imaging was used to test effects of adenosine on fast excitatory synaptic potentials (fEPSPs). Results Synaptic transmission is sensitive to pharmacological manipulations that alter accumulation of extracellular purines. Apyrase blocks PSCaTs in a majority of neurons. An ecto-NTPDase-inhibitor 6-N,N-diethyl-D-β,γ-dibromomethyleneATP or adenosine deaminase augments PSCaTs. Blockade of reuptake/deamination of eADO inhibits PSCaTs. Adenosine inhibits fEPSPs and PSCaTs (IC50=25μM), sensitive to MRS1220-antagonism (A3AR). A P2Y agonist ADPβS inhibits PSCaTs (IC50=111nM) in neurons without stimulatory ADPβS responses (EC50=960nM). ATP or a P2X1,2,2/3 (α,β-MeATP) agonist evokes fast, slow, biphasic Ca2+ transients or Ca2+ oscillations (EC50=400μM). PSCaTs are sensitive to P2X1 antagonist NF279. Low (20nM) or high (5μM) concentrations of P2X antagonist TNP-ATP block PSCaTs in different neurons; proportions of neurons with P2XR-ir follow the order P2X2>P2X1P2X3; P2X1+ P2X2 and P2X3+P2X2 are co-localized. RT-PCR identified mRNA-transcripts for P2X1-7,P2Y1,2,12-14R. Responsive neurons were also identified by HuC/D-ir. Conclusions Purines are critical regulators of neurotransmission in the human enteric nervous system. Purinergic signaling involves

  1. Quenching of I(2P1/2) by O3 and O(3P).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azyazov, Valeriy N; Antonov, Ivan O; Heaven, Michael C

    2007-04-26

    Oxygen-iodine lasers that utilize electrical or microwave discharges to produce singlet oxygen are currently being developed. The discharge generators differ from conventional chemical singlet oxygen generators in that they produce significant amounts of atomic oxygen. Post-discharge chemistry includes channels that lead to the formation of ozone. Consequently, removal of I(2P1/2) by O atoms and O3 may impact the efficiency of discharge driven iodine lasers. In the present study, we have measured the rate constants for quenching of I(2P1/2) by O(3P) atoms and O3 using pulsed laser photolysis techniques. The rate constant for quenching by O3, (1.8 +/- 0.4) x 10(-12) cm3 s-1, was found to be a factor of 5 smaller than the literature value. The rate constant for quenching by O(3P) was (1.2 +/- 0.2) x 10(-11) cm3 s-1.

  2. Microglia P2Y13 Receptors Prevent Astrocyte Proliferation Mediated by P2Y1 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Quintas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral inflammation is a common feature of several neurodegenerative diseases that requires a fine interplay between astrocytes and microglia to acquire appropriate phenotypes for an efficient response to neuronal damage. During brain inflammation, ATP is massively released into the extracellular medium and converted into ADP. Both nucleotides acting on P2 receptors, modulate astrogliosis through mechanisms involving microglia-astrocytes communication. In previous studies, primary cultures of astrocytes and co-cultures of astrocytes and microglia were used to investigate the influence of microglia on astroglial proliferation induced by ADPβS, a stable ADP analog. In astrocyte cultures, ADPβS increased cell proliferation through activation of P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, an effect abolished in co-cultures (of astrocytes with ∼12.5% microglia. The possibility that the loss of the ADPβS-mediated effect could have been caused by a microglia-induced degradation of ADPβS or by a preferential microglial localization of P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors was excluded. Since ADPβS also activates P2Y13 receptors, the contribution of microglial P2Y13 receptors to prevent the proliferative effect of ADPβS in co-cultures was investigated. The results obtained indicate that P2Y13 receptors are low expressed in astrocytes and mainly expressed in microglia. Furthermore, in co-cultures, ADPβS induced astroglial proliferation in the presence of the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS 2211 (3 μM and of the selective P2Y12 antagonist AR-C66096 (0.1 μM, suggesting that activation of microglial P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors may induce the release of messengers that inhibit astroglial proliferation mediated by P2Y1,12 receptors. In this microglia-astrocyte paracrine communication, P2Y12 receptors exert opposite effects in astroglial proliferation as a result of its cellular localization: cooperating in astrocytes with P2Y1 receptors to directly stimulate proliferation and in

  3. Scutellarin inhibits cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 1A2 (CYP1A2) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Tun-Yu; He, Jian-Chang; He, Gong-Hao; Feng, En-Fu; Li, Hong-Liang; Bai, Min; Xu, Gui-Li

    2012-08-01

    Scutellarin is the most important flavone glycoside in the herbal drug Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. It is used frequently in the clinic to treat ischemic vascular diseases in China. However, the direct relationship between scutellarin and cytochrome P450 (CYP450) is unclear. The present study investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of scutellarin on cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP 1A2) metabolism. According to in vitro experiments, scutellarin (10-250 µM) decreased the formation of 4-acetamidophenol in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC₅₀ value of 108.20 ± 0.657 µM. Furthermore, scutellarin exhibited a weak mixed-type inhibition against the activity of CYP1A2 in rat liver microsomes, with a K(i) value of 95.2 µM. Whereas in whole animal studies, scutellarin treatment for 7 days (at 5, 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the clearance (CL), and increased the T(1/2) (at 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), it did not affect the V(d) of phenacetin. Scutellarin treatment (at 5, 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the AUC(0-∞) by 14.3%, 67.3% and 159.2%, respectively. Scutellarin at 30 mg/kg also weakly inhibited CYP1A2 activity, in accordance with our in vitro study. Thus, the results indicate that CYP1A2 is inhibited directly, but weakly, by scutellarin in vivo, and provide useful information on the safe and effective use of scutellarin in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. New superhindered polydentate polyphosphine ligands P(CH2CH2P(t)Bu2)3, PhP(CH2CH2P(t)Bu2)2, P(CH2CH2CH2P(t)Bu2)3, and their ruthenium(II) chloride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Wilson, Ryan; Field, Leslie D; Bhadbhade, Mohan M

    2012-03-05

    The synthesis and characterization of the extremely hindered phosphine ligands, P(CH(2)CH(2)P(t)Bu(2))(3) (P(2)P(3)(tBu), 1), PhP(CH(2)CH(2)P(t)Bu(2))(2) (PhP(2)P(2)(tBu), 2), and P(CH(2)CH(2)CH(2)P(t)Bu(2))(3) (P(3)P(3)(tBu), 3) are reported, along with the synthesis and characterization of ruthenium chloro complexes RuCl(2)(P(2)P(3)(tBu)) (4), RuCl(2)(PhP(2)P(2)(tBu)) (5), and RuCl(2)(P(3)P(3)(tBu)) (6). The bulky P(2)P(3)(tBu) (1) and P(3)P(3)(tBu) (3) ligands are the most sterically encumbered PP(3)-type ligands so far synthesized, and in all cases, only three phosphorus donors are able to bind to the metal center. Complexes RuCl(2)(PhP(2)P(2)(tBu)) (5) and RuCl(2)(P(3)P(3)(tBu)) (6) were characterized by crystallography. Low temperature solution and solid state (31)P{(1)H} NMR were used to demonstrate that the structure of RuCl(2)(P(2)P(3)(tBu)) (4) is probably analogous to that of RuCl(2)(PhP(2)P(2)(tBu)) (5) which had been structurally characterized.

  5. An interesting charmonium state formation and decay: p p-bar → 1 D21 P1γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Caruso, F.; Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ; Murgia, F.; Negrao, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Massless perturbative QCD forbids, at leading order, the exclusive annihilation of proton-antiproton into some charmonium states, which however, have been observed in the pp channel, indicating the significance of higher order and non perturbative effects in the few GeV energy region. The most well known cases are those of the 1 S 0 (η c ) and the 1 P 1 . The case of the 1 D 2 is considered here and a way of detecting such a state through its typical angular distribution in the radiative decay 1 D 2 -> 1 D 2 -> 1 P 1 γ is suggested. Estimates of the branching ratio BR( 1 D 2 ->pp), as given by a quark-diquark model of the nucleon, mass corrections and an instanton induced process are presented. (author). 15 refs

  6. P2X1 receptors and the endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS Harrington

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP is now established as a principle vaso-active mediator in the vasculature. Its actions on arteries are complex, and are mediated by the P2X and P2Y receptor families. It is generally accepted that ATP induces a bi-phasic response in arteries, inducing contraction via the P2X and P2Y receptors on the smooth muscle cells, and vasodilation via the actions of P2Y receptors located on the endothelium. However, a number of recent studies have placed P2X1 receptors on the endothelium of some arteries. The use of a specific P2X1 receptor ligand, a, b methylene ATP has demonstrated that P2X1 receptors also have a bi-functional role. The actions of ATP on P2X1 receptors is therefore dependant on its location, inducing contraction when located on the smooth muscle cells, and dilation when expressed on the endothelium, comparable to that of P2Y receptors.

  7. Quantitative accuracy of the simplified strong ion equation to predict serum pH in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, N J; Koo, S T

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical approach to the assessment of acid-base states should provide a better mechanistic explanation of the metabolic component than methods that consider only pH and carbon dioxide. Simplified strong ion equation (SSIE), using published dog-specific values, would predict the measured serum pH of diseased dogs. Ten dogs, hospitalized for various reasons. Prospective study of a convenience sample of a consecutive series of dogs admitted to the Massey University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (MUVTH), from which serum biochemistry and blood gas analyses were performed at the same time. Serum pH was calculated (Hcal+) using the SSIE, and published values for the concentration and dissociation constant for the nonvolatile weak acids (Atot and Ka ), and subsequently Hcal+ was compared with the dog's actual pH (Hmeasured+). To determine the source of discordance between Hcal+ and Hmeasured+, the calculations were repeated using a series of substituted values for Atot and Ka . The Hcal+ did not approximate the Hmeasured+ for any dog (P = 0.499, r(2) = 0.068), and was consistently more basic. Substituted values Atot and Ka did not significantly improve the accuracy (r(2) = 0.169 to <0.001). Substituting the effective SID (Atot-[HCO3-]) produced a strong association between Hcal+ and Hmeasured+ (r(2) = 0.977). Using the simplified strong ion equation and the published values for Atot and Ka does not appear to provide a quantitative explanation for the acid-base status of dogs. Efficacy of substituting the effective SID in the simplified strong ion equation suggests the error lies in calculating the SID. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Functional and molecular evidence for heteromeric association of P2Y1 receptor with P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors in mouse granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio Carlos; Buri, Marcus Vinicius; Barros, Carlos Castilho; Dreyfuss, Juliana Luporini; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Justo, Giselle Zenker; Craveiro, Rogério Bastos; Pesquero, João Bosco; Miranda, Antonio; Ferreira, Alice Teixeira; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian

    2016-07-07

    All hematopoietic cells express P2 receptors, however pharmacological characteristics such as expression and affinity in granulocytes are unknown. Pharmacological characteristics of P2 receptors were evaluated by Ca(2+) measurements using Fura-2 fluorophore. P2 receptors expression were analyzed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. P2 interaction were shown by coimmunoprecipitation, western blotting and FRET. Granulocytes were responsive to P2Y agonists, whereas P2X agonists were ineffective. Ca(2+) increase, elicited by ADP and UTP was dependent on intracellular stocks and sensitive to G-coupled receptor inhibition. Moreover, MRS2179, a specific antagonist of the P2Y1 receptor, abolished ADP response. Interestingly, ADP and UTP exhibited full heterologous desensitization, suggesting that these agonists interact with the same receptor. The heteromeric association between P2Y1 receptor and the P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors was shown by immunoprecipitation and FRET analysis. Clear evidence of heteromeric association of P2Y receptors was found during the evaluation of P2 receptors present in mice granulocytes, which could impact in the classical pharmacology of P2Y receptors in granulocytes.

  9. Dietary effect on mixed function P450 1A2 activity assayed by estimation of caffeine metabolism in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kall, M A; Clausen, J

    1995-10-01

    Two studies were performed in order to evaluate cytochrome P450 1A2 mediated caffeine metabolism during different nutritional conditions. 1. In the first study, 23 healthy male non-smokers, mean age 25, changed from a customary mixed diet to a standard diet in 6 days. The 6 day's standard diet was based on bread, potatoes, rice and boiled meat. Thus, broccoli, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables, spinach, leeks, onion, parsley, grapefruit, toasted bread, fried and charcoal grilled food, smoked fish and meat, ham and sausages were avoided. 2. In the second study, 33 healthy non-smoking subjects, 24 men and nine women mean age 25 years, volunteered. The study was designed to compare a customary home dietary period with the 6 day period of low dietary P450 induction and with a 5 day supplementary dietary period, i.e. ingestion of known dietary inducers. None of the women were using oral contraceptives or were pregnant during the experimental period. In the period of diet supplementation, the volunteers received charcoal grilled hamburger as a supplement to the standard low induction diet for lunch for 5 days. The hamburgers were made with 150 g beef (18-20% fat) and were grilled on charcoal for 10 min on each side until they were 'well done'. In the present study P450 1A2 activity was estimated from the caffeine metabolic ratio, the so-called CYP 1A2 index:(AFMU + 1-MX + 1-MU/ 17 -DMU) of the caffeine metabolites formed after oral ingestion of 200 mg caffeine. Urine was collected 4-8 h after caffeine ingestion in study 1 and 5 h after caffeine ingestion in study 2. In study 1 the CYP 1A2 index decreased from 4.28 +/- 0.98 in the customary home dietary period to 3.87 +/- 0.69 in the standard dietary period corresponding to 10.6% (P hamburgers as a dietary supplement, the CYP 1A2 index increased to almost the same level as in the customary home dietary period. The index increased to 4.45 +/- 1.57 in the whole group of volunteers, corresponding to a 14.1% (P < 0

  10. Tables of Shore and Fano parameters for the helium resonances 2s21S, 2p21D, and 2s 2p 1P excited in p-He collisions E/sub p/ = 33 to 150 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Benoit-Cattin, P.; Gleizes, A.; Merchez, H.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute values of Shore and Fano parameters are tabulated for the helium atom 2s 2 1 S, 2p 2 1 D, and 2s 2p 1 P resonances produced by a proton beam. Observations were made on the spectra of ejected electrons. The important variation of the shape of the resonances with ejection angle is illustrated for E/sub p/ = 100 keV; the variation with proton energy is shown at 30 0

  11. Measurement of the $\\chi_b(3P)$ mass and of the relative rate of $\\chi_{b1}(1P)$ and $\\chi_{b2}(1P)$ production

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Lespinasse, Mickael; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-10-14

    The production of $\\chi_b$ mesons in proton-proton collisions is studied using a data sample collected by the LHCb detector, at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8$ TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$. The $\\chi_b$ mesons are identified through their decays to $\\Upsilon(1S)\\gamma$ and $\\Upsilon(2S)\\gamma$ using photons that converted to $e^+e^-$ pairs in the detector. The $\\chi_b(3P)$ meson mass, and the relative prompt production rate of $\\chi_{b1}(1P)$ and $\\chi_{b2}(1P)$ mesons as a function of the $\\Upsilon(1S)$ transverse momentum in the $\\chi_b$ rapidity range 2.0< $y$<4.5, are measured. Assuming a mass splitting between the $\\chi_{b1}(3P)$ and the $\\chi_{b2}(3P)$ states of 10.5 MeV/$c^2$, the mass of the $\\chi_{b1}(3P)$ meson is \\begin{equation*} m(\\chi_{b1}(3P))= 10515.7^{+2.2}_{-3.9}(stat) ^{+1.5}_{-2.1}(syst) MeV/c^2. \\end{equation*}

  12. Identification of 6H1 as a P2Y purinoceptor: P2Y5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, T E; Kaplan, M G; Barnard, E A

    1996-02-06

    We have determined the identity of the orphan G-protein coupled receptor cDNA, 6H1, present in activated chicken T cells, as a subtype of P2Y purinoceptor. This identification is based on first on the degree of sequence identity shared with recently cloned members of the P2Y receptor family and second on the pharmacological profile. Upon transient expression in COS-7 cells the 6H1 receptor bound the radiolabel [35S]dATP alpha S specifically and with high affinity (Kd, 10 nM). This specific binding could be competitively displaced by a range of ligands active at P2 purinoceptors, with ATP being the most active (K (i)), 116 nM). Such competition studies have established the following rank order of activity: ATP ADP 2-methylthioATP alpha, beta-methylene ATP, UTP, thus confirming 6H1 as a member of the growing family of P2Y purinoceptors. As the fifth receptor of this type to be identified we suggest that it be named P2Y5.

  13. Hal2p functions in Bdf1p-involved salt stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bdf1p associates with the basal transcription complexes TFIID and acts as a transcriptional regulator. Lack of Bdf1p is salt sensitive and displays abnormal mitochondrial function. The nucleotidase Hal2p detoxifies the toxic compound 3' -phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate (pAp, which blocks the biosynthesis of methionine. Hal2p is also a target of high concentration of Na(+. Here, we reported that HAL2 overexpression recovered the salt stress sensitivity of bdf1Δ. Further evidence demonstrated that HAL2 expression was regulated indirectly by Bdf1p. The salt stress response mechanisms mediated by Bdf1p and Hal2p were different. Unlike hal2Δ, high Na(+ or Li(+ stress did not cause pAp accumulation in bdf1Δ and methionine supplementation did not recover its salt sensitivity. HAL2 overexpression in bdf1Δ reduced ROS level and improved mitochondrial function, but not respiration. Further analyses suggested that autophagy was apparently defective in bdf1Δ, and autophagy stimulated by Hal2p may play an important role in recovering mitochondrial functions and Na(+ sensitivity of bdf1Δ. Our findings shed new light towards our understanding about the molecular mechanism of Bdf1p-involved salt stress response in budding yeast.

  14. Excitation mechanisms of 2s1/2-2p3/2 and 2p1/2-2p3/2 transitions in U82+ through U89+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decaux, V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Osterheld, A.

    1994-01-01

    A model based on detailed calculations of the electron-impact excitation of n = 2 electrons in the Li- to Ne-like uranium ions was developed to interpret and explain measurements on EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap). While only considering the direct excitation process provided a good model for the electric dipole (El) transitions, it was necessary for the magnetic dipole (Ml) spectrum to include various additional excitation processes in the model. In particular, the model was expanded to include electron-impact excitation of n = 3 levels followed by radiative cascades. Moreover, excitation by the ionization of 2s 1/2 , 2p 1/2 , and 2p 3/2 electrons and by radiative capture of beam electrons into excited levels was added. The new model demonstrates that the dipole-forbidden lines are almost exclusively produced by indirect excitation processes

  15. Phase diagram of ZnCr2pA12-2pS(Se)4 and Zn1-pCdpCr2S(Se)4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afif, K.; Benyoussef, A.; Hamedoun, M.; Hourmatallah, A.

    1999-06-01

    We compute the phase diagram of the nonmetallic compounds ZnCr2 p A1 2-2p S(Se) 4 (I[S,Se]) and Zn 1-p Cd p Cr 2 S(Se) 4 (II[S,Se]). We consider the bond-diluted Ising model on the spinel B site (S.B.S.) lattice with competitive exchange interactions, i.e. the ferromagnetic exchange interaction J 1 between nearest neighbours (n.n.) and the antiferromagnetic superexchange interaction J 2 between next-nearest neighbours' (n.n.n.) (and/or the more distant superexchange interactions J i (i > 1). Dilution and competition are found to be responsible for the spill glass phase and the percolation behaviour. (author)

  16. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^* \\rightarrow \\ell^+\\ell^-$ Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2017-10-11

    We present a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle parameter $\\sin^2\\theta_\\text{eff}^{\\ell}$, in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^* \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and corresponding to 8.6 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The measured value of $\\sin^2\\theta_\\text{eff}^{\\ell}[\\mu\\mu]=0.23016 \\pm 0.00064$ is further combined with the result from the D0 measurement in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{*}\\rightarrow e^{+} e^{-}$ events, resulting in $\\sin^2\\theta_\\text{eff}^{\\ell} [\\text{comb.}]=0.23095 \\pm 0.00040$. This combined result is the most precise measurement from a single experiment at a hadron collider and is the most precise determination using the coupling of the $Z/\\gamma^*$ to light quarks.

  17. Measurement of the effective weak mixing angle in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{*}\\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}$ events

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Augsten, Kamil; Avila, Carlos A; Badaud, Frederique; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Begalli, Marcia; Bellantoni, Leo; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Borysova, Maryna; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brock, Raymond L; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Bu, Xue-Bing; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Buszello, Claus Peter; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clutter, Justace Randall; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; Davies, Gavin John; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dominguez, DAaron M; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Edmunds, Daniel L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fiedler, Frank; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Fuess, Stuart C; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gershtein, Yuri S; Ginther, George E; Gogota, Olga; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Liang; Harder, Kristian; Harel, Amnon; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Ito, Albert S; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joshi, Jyoti; Jung, Andreas Werner; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipton, Ronald J; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Mansour, Jason; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miconi, Florian; Mondal, Naba K; Mulhearn, Michael James; Nagy, Elemer; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pal, Arnab; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Popov, Alexey V; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Sajot, Gerard; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santos, Angelo Souza; Savage, David G; Savitskyi, Mykola; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Sekaric, Jadranka; Severini, Horst; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Simak, Vladislav J; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Sonnenschein, Lars; Soustruznik, Karel; Stark, Jan; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Titov, Maxim; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vilanova, Didier; Vokac, Petr; Wahl, Horst D; Wang, Michael HLS; Warchol, Jadwiga; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wobisch, Markus; Wood, Darien Robert; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yang, Siqi; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Jiaming; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle, in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{*}\\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}$ events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of $\\sin^2\\theta_{\\text{eff}}^{\\text{$\\ell$}}=0.23146 \\pm 0.00047$ is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  18. A Mixed-Valent Molybdenum Monophosphate with a Layer Structure: KMo 3P 2O 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesdon, A.; Borel, M. M.; Leclaire, A.; Grandin, A.; Raveau, B.

    1994-03-01

    A new mixed-valent molybdenum monophosphate with a layer structure KMo 3P 2O 14 has been isolated. It crystallizes in the space group P2 1/ m with a = 8.599(2) Å, b = 6.392(2) Å, c = 10.602(1) Å, and β = 111.65(2)°. The layers [Mo 3P 2O 14] ∞ are parallel to (100) and consist of [MoPO 8] ∞ chains running along limitb→ , in which one MoO 6 octahedron alternates with one PO 4 tetrahedron. In fact, four [MoPO 8] ∞ chains share the corners of their polyhedra and the edges of their octahedra, forming [Mo 4P 4O 24] ∞ columns which are linked through MoO 5 bipyramids along limitc→. The K + ions interleaved between these layers are surrounded by eight oxygens, forming bicapped trigonal prisms KO 8. Besides the unusual trigonal bipyramids MoO 5, this structure is also characterized by a tendency to the localization of the electrons, since one octahedral site is occupied by Mo(V), whereas the other octahedral site and the trigonal bipyramid are occupied by Mo(VI). The similarity of this structure with pure octahedral layer structures suggests the possibility of generating various derivatives, and of ion exchange properties.

  19. The pMSSM10 after LHC Run 1

    CERN Document Server

    de Vries, K.J.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M.J.; Ellis, J.R.; Flächer, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; Malik, S.; Marrouche, J.; Martinez Santos, D.; Olive, K.A.; Sakurai, K.; Weiglein, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the pMSSM10, in which the following 10 soft SUSY-breaking parameters are specified independently at the mean scalar top mass scale Msusy = Sqrt[M_stop1 M_stop2]: the gaugino masses M_{1,2,3}, the 1st-and 2nd-generation squark masses M_squ1 = M_squ2, the third-generation squark mass M_squ3, a common slepton mass M_slep and a common trilinear mixing parameter A, the Higgs mixing parameter mu, the pseudoscalar Higgs mass M_A and tan beta. We use the MultiNest sampling algorithm with 1.2 x 10^9 points to sample the pMSSM10 parameter space. A dedicated study shows that the sensitivities to strongly-interacting SUSY masses of ATLAS and CMS searches for jets, leptons + MET signals depend only weakly on many of the other pMSSM10 parameters. With the aid of the Atom and Scorpion codes, we also implement the LHC searches for EW-interacting sparticles and light stops, so as to confront the pMSSM10 parameter space with all relevant SUSY searches. In addition, ou...

  20. Excitation of the (2p2)1D and (2s2p)1P autoionizing states of helium by 200 eV electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godunov, A.L.; McGuire, J.H.; Schipakov, V.S.; Crowe, A.

    2002-01-01

    We report full second Born calculations with inclusion of post-collision interactions for excitation of the (2p 2 ) 1 D and (2s2p) 1 P autoionizing states of helium by 200 eV electron impact. The calculations are compared to (e, 2e) measurements of McDonald and Crowe (McDonald D G and Crowe A 1993 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 26 2887-97) and Lower and Weigold (Lower J and Weigold E 1990 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 23 2819-45). It is shown that post-collision interactions or Coulomb interactions in the final state between the scattered particle, the ejected electron and the recoil ion have a strong influence on both the direct ionization and resonance profiles around the binary lobe. The second-order terms in the amplitude of double electron excitation also play an observable role under these kinematic conditions. Reasonable agreement is found between the full-scale calculations and the experimental data. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  1. Heavy particle excitation of the 2s22p52P3/2-2s22p52P1/2 transition in fluorine-like Fe XVIII and Ni XX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keenan, F.P.; Reid, R.H.G.

    1989-01-01

    Cross sections and rate coefficients for excitation of the 2s 2 2p 52 P 3/2 -2s 2 2p 52 P 1/2 transition in fluorine-like Fe XVIII and Ni XX by proton (p), deuteron (d), triton (t) and α-particle (α) impact have been calculated using the close-coupled impact parameter method. At temperatures close to or below those of maximum Fe XVIII and Ni XX fractional abundance in ionisation equilibrium, the p,d and t rates are found to be comparable and are much greater than the rates due to α collisions. However, at high temperatures the situation is reversed, with the α rates being about a factor of two larger than those due to the other particles. The effects of adopting the present atomic data in calculations of the electron density or ion temperature sensitive emission line ratios are briefly discussed. (author)

  2. p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression and the p53/MDM2 feedback loop in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craanen, M. E.; Blok, P.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Meijer, G. A.; Dekker, W.; Kuipers, E. J.; Meuwissen, S. G.

    1999-01-01

    Data are non-existent regarding coincidental alterations in the expression of p53 and its downstream target genes MDM2 and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in gastric carcinogenesis. An immunohistochemical study was therefore performed to examine the interrelationships of p53, MDM2, and p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression in a

  3. Specialities of the differentiation conditions for the memory cells - either initial or enriched secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors (pCTL-2) specific to the MHC molecule class 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brondz, B.D.; Osipova, T.V.; Aptikaeva, G.F.; Kronin, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The in vivo induced pCTL-2 with phenotype L3T4 - Lyt2 + , specific to the H-2K b molecule, turn into effector CTLs during 4 days in the mixed lymphocyte culture (with heat-treated donor stimulators) much more efficiency when donor and recipient are different from one another not only in MHC class 1 (anti-BIO, MBR BIO.AKM) but in 1+2 (K b +1 b ) anti-C57BL/6 BIAD2(R1O1). The initial pCTL-2 differentiation in enhanced as a result of synergistic effect between the K b alloantigen and rIL2. The anti-K b pCTL-2, being separated from helper T cells by means of absorption onto the macrophage donor monolayer and elution from it, give rise to pronounced differentiation in simplified conditions, irrespective of the stimulator presence and without external rIL2. It is supposed that these phenomena are roused to secrection of the CTL differentiation factor by the eluted pCTL-2 themselves, and besides, rIL2 may promote for secretion of this factor additionally

  4. Reactions of R(2)P-P(SiMe(3))Li with [(R'(3)P)(2)PtCl(2)]. A general and efficient entry to phosphanylphosphinidene complexes of platinum. Syntheses and structures of [(eta(2)-P=(i)Pr(2))Pt(p-Tol(3)P)(2)], [(eta(2)-P=(t)Bu(2))Pt(p-Tol(3)P)(2)], [{eta(2)-P=(N(i)Pr(2))(2)}Pt(p-Tol(3)P)(2)] and [{(Et(2)PhP)(2)Pt}(2)P(2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska-Babul, Wioleta; Chojnacki, Jaroslaw; Matern, Eberhard; Pikies, Jerzy

    2009-01-07

    The reactions of lithium derivatives of diphosphanes R(2)P-P(SiMe(3))Li (R = (t)Bu, (i)Pr, Et(2)N and (i)Pr(2)N) with [(R'(3)P)(2)PtCl(2)] (R'(3)P = Et(3)P, Et(2)PhP, EtPh(2)P and p-Tol(3)P) proceed in a facile manner to afford side-on bonded phosphanylphosphinidene complexes of platinum [(eta(2)-P=R(2))Pt(PR'(3))(2)]. The related reactions of Ph(2)P-P(SiMe(3))Li with [(R'(3)P)(2)PtCl(2)] did not yield [(eta(2)-P=PPh(2))Pt(PR'(3))(2)] and resulted mainly in the formation of [{(R'(3)P)(2)Pt}(2)P(2)], Ph(2)P-PLi-PPh(2), (Me(3)Si)(2)PLi and (Me(3)Si)(3)P. Crystallographic data are reported for the compounds [(eta(2)-P=R(2))Pt(p-Tol(3)P)(2)] (R = (t)Bu, (i)Pr, ((i)Pr(2)N)(2)P) and for [{(Et(2)PhP)(2)Pt}(2)P(2)].

  5. LMFBR transducer performance in SLSF tests P1 and P2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, J.J.; Anderson, T.T.; Kuzay, T.M.; Wilson, R.E.; Pedersen, D.R.; Kaiser, W.C.; Klingler, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    The reliability and problem areas of sodium-immersed thermocouples, pressure transducers and flowmeters are presented for experiments P1 and P2 of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF). The SLSF is a doubly-contained sodium loop situated in a core position of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  6. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    The ribosomal "stalk" structure is a distinct lateral protuberance located on the large ribosomal subunit in prokaryotic, as well as in eukaryotic cells. In eukaryotes, this ribosomal structure is composed of the acidic ribosomal P proteins, forming two hetero-dimers (P1/P2) attached...

  7. Efficient mannitol production by wild-type Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1101 is attained at constant pH using a simplified culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Maria Eugenia; Raya, Raúl R; Mozzi, Fernanda

    2015-10-01

    Mannitol is a natural polyol with multiple industrial applications. In this work, mannitol production by Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1101 was studied at free- and controlled-pH (6.0-4.8) fermentations using a simplified culture medium containing yeast and beef extracts and sugarcane molasses. The activity of mannitol 2-dehydrogenase (MDH), the enzyme responsible for mannitol synthesis, was determined. The effect of the initial biomass concentration was further studied. Mannitol production (41.5 ± 1.1 g/l), volumetric productivity (Q Mtl 1.73 ± 0.05 g/l h), and yield (Y Mtl 105 ± 11 %) were maximum at pH 5.0 after 24 h while the highest MDH activity (1.66 ± 0.09 U/mg protein) was obtained at pH 6.0. No correlation between mannitol production and MDH activity was observed when varying the culture pH. The increase (up to 2000-fold) in the initial biomass concentration did not improve mannitol formation after 24 h although a 2-fold higher amount was produced at 8 h using 1 or 2 g cell dry weight/l comparing to the control (0.001 g cell dry weight/l). Finally, mannitol isolation under optimum fermentation conditions was achieved. The mannitol production obtained in this study is the highest reported so far by a wild-type L. reuteri strain and, more interestingly, using a simplified culture medium.

  8. Calculations of resonances parameters for the ((2s2) 1Se, (2s2p) 1,3P0) and ((3s2) 1Se, (3s3p) 1,3P0) doubly excited states of helium-like ions with Z≤10 using a complex rotation method implemented in Scilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gning, Youssou; Sow, Malick; Traoré, Alassane; Dieng, Matabara; Diakhate, Babacar; Biaye, Mamadi; Wagué, Ahmadou

    2015-01-01

    In the present work a special computational program Scilab (Scientific Laboratory) in the complex rotation method has been used to calculate resonance parameters of ((2s2) 1Se, (2s2p) 1,3P0) and ((3s2) 1Se, (3s3p) 1,3P0) states of helium-like ions with Z≤10. The purpose of this study required a mathematical development of the Hamiltonian applied to Hylleraas wave function for intrashell states, leading to analytical expressions which are carried out under Scilab computational program. Results are in compliance with recent theoretical calculations.

  9. Effects of perinatal combined exposure to 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE) and tributyltin (TBT) on rat female reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Yuji

    2008-05-01

    1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE) is the most prevalent metabolite of DDT used as a pesticide before and tributyltin (TBT) compounds are used primarily as antifouling agents on vessels, ships, and aqua culture facilities, as they exert biocidal actions. Currently, p,p'-DDE and TBT are ubiquitously distributed in the environment and bio-accumulated in marine products, especially fish or shellfish. Thus, oral p,p'-DDE and TBT intake through marine products is demonstrated to be rather high in Japan. Consequently, the fetus and neonate will be exposed to p,p'-DDE and TBT via mother. Therefore, effects of perinatal combined exposure to p,p'-DDE and TBT on the female reproductive system after maturation have been investigated in rat female offspring of dams ingesting 125ppm p,p'-DDE (approximately 10mg/kg) and 25ppm TBT (approximately 2mg/kg) during the perinatal period from gestation to lactation. In the present study, no deleterious reproductive outcomes were recognized in p,p'-DDE and/or TBT-treated dams. In contrast, growth retardation had developed in rat female offspring following perinatal exposure to TBT and sustained even after cessation of exposures. Further, reduced ovarian weights with elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations were observed in the reproductive system of matured female offspring following perinatal exposure to TBT. At present, biological relevance of these alterations remains unknown, but there is a possibility that these alterations lead to reproductive malfunctions in matured female offspring. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a 2-D Simplified P3 FEM Solver for Arbitrary Geometry Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Eun Hyun; Joo, Han Gyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    In the calculation of power distributions and multiplication factors in a nuclear reactor, the Finite Difference Method (FDM) and the nodal methods are primarily used. These methods are, however, limited to particular geometries and lack general application involving arbitrary geometries. The Finite Element Method (FEM) can be employed for arbitrary geometry application and there are numerous FEM codes to solve the neutron diffusion equation or the Sn transport equation. The diffusion based FEM codes have the drawback of inferior accuracy while the Sn based ones require a considerable computing time. This work here is to seek a compromise between these two by employing the simplified P3 (SP3) method for arbitrary geometry applications. Sufficient accuracy with affordable computing time and resources would be achieved with this choice of approximate transport solution when compared to full FEM based Pn or Sn solutions. For now only 2-D solver is considered

  11. Sphingosine kinase-1, S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 and S1P2 mRNA expressions are increased in liver with advanced fibrosis in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masaya; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Uranbileg, Baasanjav; Kurano, Makoto; Saigusa, Daisuke; Aoki, Junken; Maki, Harufumi; Kudo, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2016-08-26

    The role of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in liver fibrosis or inflammation was not fully examined in human. Controversy exists which S1P receptors, S1P1 and S1P3 vs S1P2, would be importantly involved in its mechanism. To clarify these matters, 80 patients who received liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 patients for metastatic liver tumor were enrolled. S1P metabolism was analyzed in background, non-tumorous liver tissue. mRNA levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) but not SK2 were increased in livers with fibrosis stages 3-4 compared to those with 0-2 and to normal liver. However, S1P was not increased in advanced fibrotic liver, where mRNA levels of S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) but not S1P-degrading enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, mRNA levels of S1P2 but not S1P1 or S1P3 were increased in advanced fibrotic liver. These increased mRNA levels of SK1, SPNS2 and S1P2 in fibrotic liver were correlated with α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels in liver, and with serum ALT levels. In conclusion, S1P may be actively generated, transported to outside the cells, and bind to its specific receptor in human liver to play a role in fibrosis or inflammation. Altered S1P metabolism in fibrotic liver may be their therapeutic target.

  12. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins P1 and P2 interact and colocalize at the vacuolar membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der M.W.; Carette, J.E.; Reinhoud, P.J.; Haegi, A.; Bol, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Replication of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs depends on the virus-encoded proteins P1 and P2. P1 contains methyltransferase- and helicase-like domains, and P2 contains a polymerase-like domain. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed an interaction between in vitro translated-P1 and P2 and

  13. Near-threshold electron-impact excitation of the (2p53s2)2P3/2,1/2 autoionizing states in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovik, A; Zatsarinny, O; Bartschat, K

    2008-01-01

    The ejected-electron excitation functions of the J = 3/2, 1/2 components of the (2p 5 3s 2 ) 2 P leading autoionizing doublet in sodium atoms were measured at an incident electron energy resolution of 0.25 eV over the incident electron energy range from the lowest excitation threshold up to 36 eV. On the basis of 56-state R-matrix (close-coupling) calculations, the observed strong near-threshold structures were classified as negative-ion resonances with likely configurations 2p 5 3s 2 3p and 2p 5 3s3p 2

  14. pH control and rapid mixing in spinning NMR samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Sunberg, Richard J.; Benedict, James J.

    An apparatus is described which permits the acquisition of NMR spectra from spinning 20-mm sample tubes while: (1) constantly monitoring the pH; (2) adding reagents to maintain constant pH (pH-statting); (3) efficiently mixing the added reagent. The apparatus was built to study the spontaneous precipitation of calcium phosphates from supersaturated solutions using 31P NMR. Other applications include the rapid determination of NMR titration curves, and the minimization of temperature gradients in large sample tubes. The apparatus was used to measure the 31P chemical shift titration of dilute phosphoric acid, which yielded accurate shifts for the three species of protonated orthophosphate ion. The bulk magnetic susceptibility of 85% H 3PO 4 relative to a dilute aqueous sample was also measured, and is shown to contribute significantly to chemical shift measurements.

  15. Improved wavelengths for the 1s2s3S1-1s2p3P0,2 transitions in helium-like Si12+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, I.A.; Myers, E.G.; Silver, J.D.; Traebert, E.; Oxford Univ.

    1979-01-01

    The wavelengths of the 1s2s 3 S 1 -1s2p 3 P 0 , 2 transitions in He-like Si 12+ have been remaesured to be 87.86 +- 0.01 nm and 81.48 +- 0.01 nm. The use of Rydberg lines for the calibration of fast beam spectra is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Simplified P_n transport core calculations in the Apollo3 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of two different neutronics core solvers based on the Simplified P_N transport (SP_N) approximation developed in the context of a new generation nuclear reactor computational system, APOLLO3. Two different approaches have been used. The first one solves the standard SPN system. In the second approach, the SP_N equations are solved as diffusion equations by treating the SP_N flux harmonics like pseudo energy groups, obtained by a change of variable. These two methods have been implemented for Cartesian and hexagonal geometries in the kinetics solver MINOS. The numerical approximation is based on the mixed dual finite formulation and the discretization uses the Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. For the unstructured geometries, the SP_N equations are treated by the SN transport solver MINARET by considering the second SP_N approach. The MINARET solver is based on discontinuous Galerkin finite element approximation on cylindrical unstructured meshes composed of a set of conforming triangles for the radial direction. Numerical applications are presented for both solvers in different core configurations (the Jules Horowitz research reactor (JHR) and the Generation IV fast reactor project ESFR). (author)

  17. The pMSSM10 after LHC Run 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vries, K.J.; Buchmueller, O.

    2015-04-01

    We present a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the pMSSM10, in which the following 10 soft SUSY-breaking parameters are specified independently at the mean scalar top mass scale M SUSY ≡√(m t 1 m t 2 ): the gaugino masses M 1,2,3 , the 1st-and 2nd-generation squark masses m q 1 =m q 2 , the third-generation squark mass m q 3 , a common slepton mass M l and a common trilinear mixing parameter A, the Higgs mixing parameter μ, the pseudoscalar Higgs mass M A and tan β. We use the MultiNest sampling algorithm with ∝1.2 x 10 9 points to sample the pMSSM10 parameter space. A dedicated study shows that the sensitivities to strongly-interacting SUSY masses of ATLAS and CMS searches for jets, leptons+E T signals depend only weakly on many of the other pMSSM10 parameters. With the aid of the Atom and Scorpion codes, we also implement the LHC searches for EW-interacting sparticles and light stops, so as to confront the pMSSM10 parameter space with all relevant SUSY searches. In addition, our analysis includes Higgs mass and rate measurements using the HiggsSignals code, SUSY Higgs exclusion bounds, the measurements B-physics observables, EW precision observables, the CDM density and searches for spin-independent DM scattering. We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a SUSY interpretation of (g-2) μ , unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum χ 2 /d.o.f.=20.5/18 in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a χ 2 probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with χ 2 /d.o.f.=32.8/24(31.1/23)(30.3/22) in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2). We display 1-dimensional likelihood functions for SUSY masses, and show that they may be significantly lighter in the pMSSM10 than in the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. We discuss the discovery potential of future LHC runs, e + e - colliders and direct detection experiments.

  18. Neuropharmacology of purinergic receptors in human submucous plexus: Involvement of P2X₁, P2X₂, P2X₃ channels, P2Y and A₃ metabotropic receptors in neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñán-Rico, A; Wunderlich, J E; Enneking, J T; Tso, D R; Grants, I; Williams, K C; Otey, A; Michel, K; Schemann, M; Needleman, B; Harzman, A; Christofi, F L

    2015-08-01

    The role of purinergic signaling in human ENS is not well understood. We sought to further characterize the neuropharmacology of purinergic receptors in human ENS and test the hypothesis that endogenous purines are critical regulators of neurotransmission. LSCM-Fluo-4/(Ca(2+))-imaging of postsynaptic Ca(2+) transients (PSCaTs) was used as a reporter of synaptic transmission evoked by fiber tract electrical stimulation in human SMP surgical preparations. Pharmacological analysis of purinergic signaling was done in 1,556 neurons (identified by HuC/D-immunoreactivity) in 235 ganglia from 107 patients; P2XR-immunoreactivity was evaluated in 19 patients. Real-time MSORT (Di-8-ANEPPS) imaging tested effects of adenosine on fast excitatory synaptic potentials (fEPSPs). Synaptic transmission is sensitive to pharmacological manipulations that alter accumulation of extracellular purines: Apyrase blocks PSCaTs in a majority of neurons. An ecto-NTPDase-inhibitor 6-N,N-diethyl-D-β,γ-dibromomethyleneATP or adenosine deaminase augments PSCaTs. Blockade of reuptake/deamination of eADO inhibits PSCaTs. Adenosine inhibits fEPSPs and PSCaTs (IC50 = 25 µM), sensitive to MRS1220-antagonism (A3AR). A P2Y agonist ADPβS inhibits PSCaTs (IC50 = 111 nM) in neurons without stimulatory ADPbS responses (EC50 = 960 nM). ATP or a P2X1,2,2/3 (α,β-MeATP) agonist evokes fast, slow, biphasic Ca(2+) transients or Ca(2+) oscillations (ATP,EC50 = 400 mM). PSCaTs are sensitive to P2X1 antagonist NF279. Low (20 nM) or high (5 µM) concentrations of P2X antagonist TNP-ATP block PSCaTs in different neurons; proportions of neurons with P2XR-immunoreactivity follow the order P2X2 > P2X1 > P2X3; P2X1 + P2X2 and P2X3 + P2X2 are co-localized. RT-PCR identified mRNA-transcripts for P2X1-7, P2Y1,2,12-14R. Purines are critical regulators of neurotransmission in human ENS. Purinergic signaling involves P2X1, P2X2, P2X3 channels, P2X1 + P2X2 co-localization and inhibitory P2Y or A3 receptors. These are

  19. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the focal adhesion strength and barrier tightness of brain endothelial cells. xCELLigence biosensor technology was used to measure focal adhesion, which was reduced by S1P acutely and this response was mediated through both S1P1 and S1P2 receptors. S1P increased secretion of several pro-inflammatory mediators from brain endothelial cells. However, the magnitude of this response was small in comparison to that mediated by TNFα or IL-1β. Furthermore, S1P did not significantly increase cell-surface expression of any key cell adhesion molecules involved in leukocyte recruitment, included ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Finally, we reveal that S1P acutely and dynamically regulates microvascular endothelial barrier tightness in a manner consistent with regulated rapid opening followed by closing and strengthening of the barrier. We hypothesise that the role of the S1P receptors in this process is not to cause barrier dysfunction, but is related to controlled opening of the endothelial junctions. This was revealed using real-time measurement of barrier integrity using ECIS ZΘ TEER technology and endothelial viability using xCELLigence technology. Finally, we show that these responses do not occur simply though the pharmacology of a single S1P receptor but involves coordinated action of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

  20. Calculations of resonances parameters for the ((2s2) 1Se, (2s2p) 1,3P0) and ((3s2) 1Se, (3s3p) 1,3P0) doubly excited states of helium-like ions with Z≤10 using a complex rotation method implemented in Scilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gning, Youssou; Sow, Malick; Traoré, Alassane; Dieng, Matabara; Diakhate, Babacar; Biaye, Mamadi; Wagué, Ahmadou

    2015-01-01

    In the present work a special computational program Scilab (Scientific Laboratory) in the complex rotation method has been used to calculate resonance parameters of ((2s 2 ) 1 S e , (2s2p) 1,3 P 0 ) and ((3s 2 ) 1 S e , (3s3p) 1,3 P 0 ) states of helium-like ions with Z≤10. The purpose of this study required a mathematical development of the Hamiltonian applied to Hylleraas wave function for intrashell states, leading to analytical expressions which are carried out under Scilab computational program. Results are in compliance with recent theoretical calculations. - Highlights: • Resonance energy and widths computed for doubly excited states of helium-like ions. • Well-comparable results to the theoretical literature values up to Z=10. • Satisfactory agreements with theoretical calculations for widths

  1. pH-dependent inhibition of K2P3.1 prolongs atrial refractoriness in whole hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarsfeldt, Mark A; Jepps, Thomas A; Bomholtz, Sofia H

    2016-01-01

    In isolated human atrial cardiomyocytes, inhibition of K2P3.1 K(+) channels results in action potential (action potential duration (APD)) prolongation. It has therefore been postulated that K2P3.1 (KCNK3), together with K2P9.1 (KCNK9), could represent novel drug targets for the treatment of atrial...... fibrillation (AF). However, it is unknown whether these findings in isolated cells translate to the whole heart. The purposes of this study were to investigate the expression levels of KCNK3 and KCNK9 in human hearts and two relevant rodent models and determine the antiarrhythmic potential of K2P3.1 inhibition...... displayed a more uniform expression of KCNK3 between atria and ventricle. In voltage-clamp experiments, ML365 and A293 were found to be potent and selective inhibitors of K2P3.1, but at pH 7.4, they failed to prolong atrial APD and refractory period (effective refractory period (ERP)) in isolated perfused...

  2. Production of psi(2S) Mesons in p anti-p Collisions at 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, Jahred A.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, Jaroslav; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    The authors have measured the differential cross section for the inclusive production of {psi}(2S) mesons decaying to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} that were produced in prompt or B-decay processes from p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV. These measurements have been made using a data set from an integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab. For events with transverse momentum p{sub T}({psi}(2S)) > 2 GeV/c and rapidity |y({psi}(2S))| < 0.6 we measure the integrated inclusive cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} {psi}(2S)X) {center_dot} Br({psi}(2S) {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) to be 3.29 {+-} 0.04(stat.) {+-} 0.32(syst.) nb.

  3. An unusual methylene aziridine refined in P2(1)/c and the nonstandard setting P2(1)/n.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feast, George C; Haestier, James; Page, Lee W; Robertson, Jeremy; Thompson, Amber L; Watkin, David J

    2009-12-01

    The unusual methylene aziridine 6-tert-butyl-3-oxa-2-thia-1-azabicyclo[5.1.0]oct-6-ene 2,2-dioxide, C(9)H(15)NO(3)S, was found to crystallize with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure was solved in both the approximately orthogonal and the oblique settings of space group No. 14, viz. P2(1)/n and P2(1)/c, respectively. A comparison of these results clearly displayed an increase in the correlation between coordinates in the ac plane for the oblique cell. The increase in the corresponding covariances makes a significant contribution to the standard uncertainties of derived parameters, e.g. bond lengths. Since there is yet no CIF definition for the full variance-covariance matrix, there are clear advantages to reporting the structure in the nonstandard space-group setting.

  4. Murine K2P5.1 Deficiency Has No Impact on Autoimmune Neuroinflammation due to Compensatory K2P3.1- and KV1.3-Dependent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Bittner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytes express potassium channels that regulate physiological cell functions, such as activation, proliferation and migration. Expression levels of K2P5.1 (TASK2; KCNK5 channels belonging to the family of two-pore domain potassium channels have previously been correlated to the activity of autoreactive T lymphocytes in patients with multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. In humans, K2P5.1 channels are upregulated upon T cell stimulation and influence T cell effector functions. However, a further clinical translation of targeting K2P5.1 is currently hampered by a lack of highly selective inhibitors, making it necessary to evaluate the impact of KCNK5 in established preclinical animal disease models. We here demonstrate that K2P5.1 knockout (K2P5.1−/− mice display no significant alterations concerning T cell cytokine production, proliferation rates, surface marker molecules or signaling pathways. In an experimental model of autoimmune neuroinflammation, K2P5.1−/− mice show a comparable disease course to wild-type animals and no major changes in the peripheral immune system or CNS compartment. A compensatory upregulation of the potassium channels K2P3.1 and KV1.3 seems to counterbalance the deletion of K2P5.1. As an alternative model mimicking autoimmune neuroinflammation, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the common marmoset has been proposed, especially for testing the efficacy of new potential drugs. Initial experiments show that K2P5.1 is functionally expressed on marmoset T lymphocytes, opening up the possibility for assessing future K2P5.1-targeting drugs.

  5. A lifetime measurement of the 1s2p 3P1 level in helium-like Mg and Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, I.A.; Silver, J.D.; Traebert, E.; Oxford Univ.

    1981-01-01

    The lifetimes of the 1s2p 3 P 1 levels of helium-like magnesium and aluminium have been measured by the beam-foil decay curve technique. The 1s 2 -1s2p transitions were observed with a curved-crystal x-ray spectrometer. Decay curves taken under systematically varied conditions have been evaluated using several techniques including a cascade model. The results are in agreement with most of the theoretical predictions. (author)

  6. The calculation of oscillator strengths for the 5s21S0→5s5p1,3P1 transitions in Cd-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangyuan

    1998-01-01

    The screened hydrogenic model is employed to calculate the oscillator strength of the 5s 2 1 S 0 -5s5p 1 P 1 resonance transition in Cd-like ions (Z = 48 -74). The expression for the oscillator strength of the 5s 2 1 S 0 -5s5p 3 P1 is given, with the introduction of the correctional coefficient K and the mixing angle in jj-coupling. The results are compared with that of other authors, and some discussions are also given

  7. Ocean Health X-Prize testing of a Simplified Spectrophotometric pH Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, R. C.; DeGrandpre, M. D.; Spaulding, R. S.; Beck, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Since the Industrial Revolution, the world's oceans have absorbed increasing amounts of CO2, resulting in a >0.1 reduction in the pH of surface waters. This acidification of the oceans has many far reaching impacts on marine life. There is, therefore, great need of quality instrumentation to assess and follow the changing carbonate system. To address this need, we have developed a simplified spectrophotometric pH sensor with accuracy and precision suitable for sea surface measurements with special emphasis on reduced size and cost. The reduced size will allow deployment of sensors on a much wider variety of platforms than are currently possible, and the reduced cost will make the instruments available to a broader research community. This prototype pH instrument was entered into the Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health X-Prize, an incentivized global competition to spur innovation in sensors to monitor ocean acidification's impact on marine ecosystems. Results from the three phases of competition which explored accuracy, precision, and stability culminating in a one month field trial are detailed. The prototype proved to be highly accurate (+/-0.009), with good precision (+/-0.004) and stability showing drift indistinguishable from that of the validation measurements. The innovations that enabled this sensor to succeed in the competition could allow for deployment of spectrophotometric sensors on new platforms such as NOAAs Global Drifter Program, a network of non-recovered surface drifting buoys, which would greatly extend the spatial and temporal resolution of ocean acidification measurements.

  8. Isotope shift of 40,42,44,48Ca in the 4s 2S1/2 → 4p 2P3/2 transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorges, C.; Blaum, K.; Frömmgen, N.; Geppert, Ch; Hammen, M.; Kaufmann, S.; Krämer, J.; Krieger, A.; Neugart, R.; Sánchez, R.; Nörtershäuser, W.

    2015-12-01

    We report on improved isotope shift measurements of the isotopes {}{40,42,{44,48}}Ca in the 4{{s}}{ }2{{{S}}}1/2\\to 4{{p}}{ }2{{{P}}}3/2 (D2) transition using collinear laser spectroscopy. Accurately known isotope shifts in the 4{{s}}{ }2{{{S}}}1/2\\to 4{{p}}{ }2{{{P}}}1/2(D1) transition were used to calibrate the ion beam energy with an uncertainty of {{Δ }}U≈ +/- 0.25 {{V}}. The accuracy in the D2 transition was improved by a factor of 5-10. A King-plot analysis of the two transitions revealed that the field shift factor in the D2 line is about 1.8(13)% larger than in the D1 transition which is ascribed to relativistic contributions of the 4{{{p}}}1/2 wave function.

  9. Multi-species interactions impact the accumulation of weathered 2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, Jason W.; White, Jason C.

    2005-01-01

    The impact of interactions between the earthworms Eisenia foetida and Lumbricus terrestris and the plants Cucurbita pepo and Cucurbita maxima on the uptake of weathered p,p'-DDE from soil was determined. Although some combinations of earthworm and plant species caused significant changes in the p,p'-DDE burden in both organisms, the effects were species specific. Contaminant bioconcentration in C. pepo was increased slightly by E. foetida and by 3-fold when the plant was grown with L. terrestris. E. foetida had no effect on the contaminant BCF by C. maxima, but L. terrestris caused a 2-fold reduction in p,p'-DDE uptake by the plant. Contaminant levels in E. foetida and L. terrestris were unaffected by C. pepo. When grown with C. maxima, the concentration of p,p'-DDE decreased by approximately 4-fold and 7-fold in E. foetida and L. terrestris, respectively. The data suggest that the prediction of contaminant bioavailability should consider interactions among species. - Interactions between earthworms and plants affect both the phytoextraction and bioaccumulation of p,p'-DDE in soil

  10. Berberine reduces fibronectin expression by suppressing the S1P-S1P2 receptor pathway in experimental diabetic nephropathy models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaipeng Huang

    Full Text Available The accumulation of glomerular extracellular matrix (ECM is one of the critical pathological characteristics of diabetic renal fibrosis. Fibronectin (FN is an important constituent of ECM. Our previous studies indicate that the activation of the sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1-sphingosine 1- phosphate (S1P signaling pathway plays a key regulatory role in FN production in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs under diabetic condition. Among the five S1P receptors, the activation of S1P2 receptor is the most abundant. Berberine (BBR treatment also effectively inhibits SphK1 activity and S1P production in the kidneys of diabetic models, thus improving renal injury. Based on these data, we further explored whether BBR could prevent FN production in GMCs under diabetic condition via the S1P2 receptor. Here, we showed that BBR significantly down-regulated the expression of S1P2 receptor in diabetic rat kidneys and GMCs exposed to high glucose (HG and simultaneously inhibited S1P2 receptor-mediated FN overproduction. Further, BBR also obviously suppressed the activation of NF-κB induced by HG, which was accompanied by reduced S1P2 receptor and FN expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that BBR reduces FN expression by acting on the S1P2 receptor in the mesangium under diabetic condition. The role of BBR in S1P2 receptor expression regulation could closely associate with its inhibitory effect on NF-κB activation.

  11. The deexcitation of the Ar (3P2, 3p1 and 1P1) states as measured by absorption both in pure argon and in the presence of additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutuit, Odile

    1974-01-01

    The de-excitation of the 3 P 2 , 3 p 1 and 1 P 1 states of argon was studied in pure argon between 10 and 200 torr and in Ar + CO and Ar + H 2 mixtures. These states are populated after excitation of the gas by a short (20 ns) pulse of 500 keV electrons (FEBETRON). Under our experimental conditions, the relation between the measured optical density of the lines studied and the concentration of absorbing species was found to be: DO = log I 0 /I ∝ (lC) n with n = 0,4. The three body rate constants k 2 were measured for the two resonant states 3 p 1 (k 2 = (1,65 ± 0,3) x 10 -32 cm 6 s -1 ) and 1 P 1 (k 2 = (1,0 ± 0,2) x 10 -32 cm 6 s -1 ); they had not been considered in previous low pressure studies. For the metastable state 3 P 2 , the measured value of k 2 ((1,6 ± 0,3) x 10 -32 cm 6 s -1 ) is in good agreement with those found in the literature. However, our two body rate constant k 1 is about ten times higher than that found in measurements at low pressure. This difference could be due to a collision-induced emission process at high pressure. The rate constants for the quenching by CO and H 2 were measured for the metastable state 3 P 2 (1,85 and 10,5 x 10 -11 cm 3 s -1 ) and for the resonant states 3 P 1 (4,5 and 20 x 10 -11 cm 3 s -1 ) and 1 P 1 (8,5 and 33 X 10 -11 cm 3 s -1 ). Comparison of the de-excitation cross sections of resonant and metastable states should lead to a better understanding of energy transfer processes from these latter. (author) [fr

  12. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor S1P(2) triggers hepatic wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serriere-Lanneau, Valerie; Teixeira-Clerc, Fatima; Li, Liying; Schippers, Marlies; de Wries, Willie; Julien, Boris; Tran-Van-Nhieu, Jeanne; Manin, Sylvie; Poelstra, Klaas; Chun, Jerold; Carpentier, Stephane; Levade, Thierry; Mallat, Ariane; Lotersztajn, Sophie

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid produced by sphingosine kinase (SphK1 and 2). We previously showed that S1P receptors (S1P(1), S1P(2), and S1P(3)) are expressed in hepatic myofibroblasts (hMF), a population of cells that triggers matrix remodeling during liver injury. Here

  13. ZrCu2P2 and HfCu2P2 phosphides and their crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomnitskaya, Ya.F.

    1986-01-01

    Isostructural ZrCu 2 P 2 and HfCu 2 P 2 compounds are prepared for the first time. X-ray diffraction analysis (of powder, DRON-2.0 diffractometer, FeKsub(α) radiation) was used to study crystal structure of HfCu 2 P 2 phosphide belonging to the CaAl 2 Si 2 structural type (sp. group P anti 3 m 1, R=0.095). Lattice parameters the compounds are as follows: for ZrCu 2 P 2 a=0.3810(1), c=0.6184(5); for HfCu 2 P 2 a=0.3799(1), c=0.6160(2) (nm). Atomic parameters in the HfCu 2 P 2 structure and interatomic distances are determined

  14. Testing a Cloud Provider Network for Hybrid P2P and Cloud Streaming Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Cerviño Arriba, Javier; Rodríguez, Pedro; Trajkovska, Irena; Mozo Velasco, Alberto; Salvachúa Rodríguez, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    The number of online real-time streaming services deployed over network topologies like P2P or centralized ones has remarkably increased in the recent years. This has revealed the lack of networks that are well prepared to respond to this kind of traffic. A hybrid distribution network can be an efficient solution for real-time streaming services. This paper contains the experimental results of streaming distribution in a hybrid architecture that consist of mixed connections among P2P and Clou...

  15. Environmentally persistent free radical-containing particulate matter competitively inhibits metabolism by cytochrome P450 1A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, James R., E-mail: rreed@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 533 Bolivar St., New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Cruz, Albert Leo N. dela, E-mail: adelac2@tigers.lsu.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and LSU Superfund Research Center, Louisiana State University A& M College, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Lomnicki, Slawo M., E-mail: slomni1@lsu.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and LSU Superfund Research Center, Louisiana State University A& M College, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Backes, Wayne L., E-mail: wbacke@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 533 Bolivar St., New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Combustion processes generate different types of particulate matter (PM) that can have deleterious effects on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) represent a type of particulate matter that is generated after combustion of environmental wastes in the presence of redox-active metals and aromatic hydrocarbons. Cytochromes P450 (P450/CYP) are membrane-bound enzymes that are essential for the phase I metabolism of most lipophilic xenobiotics. The EPFR formed by chemisorption of 2-monochlorophenol to silica containing 5% copper oxide (MCP230) has been shown to generally inhibit the activities of different forms of P450s without affecting those of cytochrome P450 reductase and heme oxygenase-1. The mechanism of inhibition of rat liver microsomal CYP2D2 and purified rabbit CYP2B4 by MCP230 has been shown previously to be noncompetitive with respect to substrate. In this study, MCP230 was shown to competitively inhibit metabolism of 7-benzyl-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin and 7-ethoxyresorufin by the purified, reconstituted rabbit CYP1A2. MCP230 is at least 5- and 50-fold more potent as an inhibitor of CYP1A2 than silica containing 5% copper oxide and silica, respectively. Thus, even though PM generally inhibit multiple forms of P450, PM interacts differently with the forms of P450 resulting in different mechanisms of inhibition. P450s function as oligomeric complexes within the membrane. We also determined the mechanism by which PM inhibited metabolism by the mixed CYP1A2–CYP2B4 complex and found that the mechanism was purely competitive suggesting that the CYP2B4 is dramatically inhibited when bound to CYP1A2. - Highlights: • Combustion of organic pollutants generates long-lived particulate radicals (EPFRs). • Particulate matter (PM) competitively inhibited CYP1A2 activity. • EPFRs were much more potent CYP1A2 inhibitors than other types of PM. • PM interacts differently with different forms of P450. • PM

  16. Simplified P{sub n} transport core calculations in the Apollo3 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudron, Anne-Marie; Lautard, Jean-Jacques, E-mail: anne-marie.baudron@cea.fr, E-mail: jean-jacques.lautard@cea.fr [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the development of two different neutronics core solvers based on the Simplified P{sub N} transport (SP{sub N}) approximation developed in the context of a new generation nuclear reactor computational system, APOLLO3. Two different approaches have been used. The first one solves the standard SPN system. In the second approach, the SP{sub N} equations are solved as diffusion equations by treating the SP{sub N} flux harmonics like pseudo energy groups, obtained by a change of variable. These two methods have been implemented for Cartesian and hexagonal geometries in the kinetics solver MINOS. The numerical approximation is based on the mixed dual finite formulation and the discretization uses the Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec finite elements. For the unstructured geometries, the SP{sub N} equations are treated by the SN transport solver MINARET by considering the second SP{sub N} approach. The MINARET solver is based on discontinuous Galerkin finite element approximation on cylindrical unstructured meshes composed of a set of conforming triangles for the radial direction. Numerical applications are presented for both solvers in different core configurations (the Jules Horowitz research reactor (JHR) and the Generation IV fast reactor project ESFR). (author)

  17. Simplified models of mixed dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Sanford, David

    2014-01-01

    We explore simplified models of mixed dark matter (DM), defined here to be a stable relic composed of a singlet and an electroweak charged state. Our setup describes a broad spectrum of thermal DM candidates that can naturally accommodate the observed DM abundance but are subject to substantial constraints from current and upcoming direct detection experiments. We identify ''blind spots'' at which the DM-Higgs coupling is identically zero, thus nullifying direct detection constraints on spin independent scattering. Furthermore, we characterize the fine-tuning in mixing angles, i.e. well-tempering, required for thermal freeze-out to accommodate the observed abundance. Present and projected limits from LUX and XENON1T force many thermal relic models into blind spot tuning, well-tempering, or both. This simplified model framework generalizes bino-Higgsino DM in the MSSM, singlino-Higgsino DM in the NMSSM, and scalar DM candidates that appear in models of extended Higgs sectors

  18. Measurement of the ratio of inclusive cross sections $\\sigma (p\\bar{p} \\rightarrow Z+2~b~\\text{jets}) / \\sigma (p\\bar{p} \\rightarrow Z+ \\text{2 jets})$ in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt s=1.96$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V.M.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Augsten, Kamil; Avila, Carlos A; Badaud, Frederique; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Begalli, Marcia; Bellantoni, Leo; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Borysova, Maryna; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brock, Raymond L; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Bu, Xue-Bing; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Buszello, Claus Peter; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clutter, Justace Randall; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; Davies, Gavin John; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dominguez, DAaron M; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Edmunds, Daniel L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fiedler, Frank; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Fuess, Stuart C; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gershtein, Yuri S; Ginther, George E; Gogota, Olga; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Liang; Harder, Kristian; Harel, Amnon; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Ito, Albert S; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joshi, Jyoti; Jung, Andreas Werner; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipton, Ronald J; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Mansour, Jason; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miconi, Florian; Mondal, Naba K; Mulhearn, Michael James; Nagy, Elemer; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pal, Arnab; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Popov, Alexey V; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Gene Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Sajot, Gerard; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santos, Angelo Souza; Savage, David G; Savitskyi, Mykola; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Sekaric, Jadranka; Severini, Horst; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Simak, Vladislav J; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Sonnenschein, Lars; Soustruznik, Karel; Stark, Jan; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Titov, Maxim; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vilanova, Didier; Vokac, Petr; Wahl, Horst D; Wang, Michael HLS; Warchol, Jadwiga; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wobisch, Markus; Wood, Darien Robert; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yang, Siqi; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Jiaming; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2015-03-17

    We measure the ratio of cross sections, $\\sigma(p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z+2~b~\\text{jets})$/$\\sigma(p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z+\\text{2 jets})$, for associated production of a $Z$ boson with at least two jets with transverse momentum $p_T^{\\rm jet} > 20$ GeV and pseudorapidity $|\\eta^{\\rm jet}| < 2.5$. This measurement uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the \\DO experiment in Run II of Fermilab's Tevatron \\ppbar Collider at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The measured integrated ratio of $0.0236\\pm0.0043\\left(\\mbox{stat}\\right)\\pm0.0020\\left(\\mbox{syst}\\right)$ is in agreement with predictions from next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD and the Monte Carlo event generators {\\sc pythia} and {\\sc alpgen}.

  19. PPARγ agonists upregulate sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 expression, which in turn reduces S1P-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in renal mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Alexander; Völzke, Anja; Puff, Bianca; Blankenbach, Kira; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Huwiler, Andrea; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2013-11-01

    We previously identified peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists (thiazolidinediones, TZDs) as modulators of the sphingolipid metabolism in renal mesangial cells. TZDs upregulated sphingosine kinase 1 (SK-1) and increased the formation of intracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which in turn reduced the expression of pro-fibrotic connective tissue growth factor. Since S1P also acts as extracellular ligand at specific S1P receptors (S1PR, S1P1-5), we investigated here the effect of TZDs on S1PR expression in mesangial cells and evaluated the functional consequences by measuring S1P-induced increases in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Treatment with two different TZDs, troglitazone and rosiglitazone, enhanced S1P1 mRNA and protein expression in rat mesangial cells, whereas S1P2-5 expression levels were not altered. Upregulation of S1P1 mRNA upon TZD treatment was also detected in human mesangial cells and mouse glomeruli. PPARγ antagonism and promoter studies revealed that the TZD-dependent S1P1 mRNA induction involved a functional PPAR response element in the S1P1 promoter. Pharmacological approaches disclosed that S1P-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in rat mesangial cells were predominantly mediated by S1P2 and S1P3. Interestingly, the transcriptional upregulation of S1P1 by TZDs resulted in a reduction of S1P-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases, which was reversed by the S1P1/3 antagonist VPC-23019, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor PKC-412, and by S1P1 siRNA. These data suggest that PPARγ-dependent upregulation of S1P1 leads to an inhibition of S1P-induced Ca(2+) signaling in a PKC-dependent manner. Overall, these results reveal that TZDs not only modulate intracellular S1P levels but also regulate S1PR signaling by increasing S1P1 expression in mesangial cells. © 2013.

  20. The emission spectrum of the Li(2p)He{sub 2}:1{sup 2}{pi}{sub u} exciplex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, M; Xu, R; Jungen, M [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2005-04-28

    In order to understand the line broadening of the 2p {yields} 2s transition of Li atoms in He gas as a function of pressure and temperature we have calculated the emission spectra of LiHe and LiHe{sub 2} based on quantum chemically computed potential energy surfaces and transition moment functions. A full quantum treatment of the red wing is compared with the results of simplified methods (e.g., the quasistatic theory) and with recent experiments.

  1. A Randomized Multicenter Clinical Trial of RPH With the Simplified Milligan-Morgan Hemorrhoidectomy in the Treatment of Mixed Hemorrhoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong-Heng; Tang, Zhi-Jun; Xu, Xiang-Tong; Huang, De-Quan; Zhang, Li-Shun; Tang, Qing-Zhu; Fan, Zhi-Min; Zou, Xian-Jun; Zou, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Chong-Yang; Hu, Fan; Xie, Biao; Li, Yan-Hua; Tong, Yao; Liu, Hong-Chang; Li, Ke; Luo, Yu-Lian; Liu, Fei; Situ, Guang-Wei; Liu, Zuo-Long

    2017-12-01

    To explore the safety and efficacy of Ruiyun procedure for hemorrhoids (RPH) or RPH with the simplified Milligan-Morgan hemorrhoidectomy (sMMH) in the treatment of mixed hemorrhoids. This is a randomized, controlled, balanced, multicenter study of 3000 patients with mixed hemorrhoids. The outcomes and postoperative complications were compared between 5 types of surgeries. The efficacy rate was the highest in patients who received RPH+sMMH and decreased in the following order: patients who received RPH alone, MMH alone, procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids (PPH) alone, and PPH+sMMH ( P order: patients who received RPH+sMMH, PPH alone, MMH alone, and PPH+sMMH ( P order: PPH alone, RPH+sMMH, PPH+sMMH, and MMH alone ( P mixed hemorrhoids.

  2. Suppression of Zeeman relaxation in cold collisions of 2P1/2 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Dalgarno, A.; Buchachenko, A. A.; Lu, M.-J.; Weinstein, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of angular momentum depolarization in cold collisions of 2 P atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. We show that collision-induced Zeeman relaxation of Ga( 2 P 1/2 ) and In( 2 P 1/2 ) atoms in cold 4 He gas is dramatically suppressed compared to atoms in 2 P 3/2 states. Using rigorous quantum-scattering calculations based on ab initio interaction potentials, we demonstrate that Zeeman transitions in collisions of atoms in 2 P 1/2 electronic states occur via couplings to the 2 P 3/2 state induced by the anisotropy of the interaction potential. Our results suggest the feasibility of sympathetic cooling and magnetic trapping of 2 P 1/2 -state atoms, such as halogens, thereby opening up exciting areas of research in precision spectroscopy and cold-controlled chemistry.

  3. Identification of the 1s2s2p 4P5/2-->1s22s 2S1/2 magnetic quadrupole inner-shell satellite line in the Ar16+ K-shell x-ray spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Hey, D.; Reed, K. J.

    2002-09-01

    We have identified the dipole-forbidden 1s2s2p 4P5/2-->1s22s 2S1/2 transition in lithiumlike Ar15+ in high-resolution K-shell x-ray emission spectra recorded at the Livermore EBIT-II electron-beam ion trap and the Princeton National Spherical Tokamak Experiment. Unlike other Ar15+ satellite lines, which can be excited by dielectronic recombination, the line is exclusively excited by electron-impact excitation. Its predicted radiative rate is comparable to that of the well-known 1s2p 3P1-->1s2 1S0 magnetic quadrupole transition in heliumlike Ar16+. As a result, it can also only be observed in low-density plasma. We present calculations of the electron-impact excitation cross sections of the innershell excited Ar15+ satellite lines, including the magnetic sublevels needed for calculating the linear line polarization. We compare these calculations to the relative magnitudes of the observed 1s2s2p-->1s22s transitions and find good agreement, confirming the identification of the lithiumlike 1s2s2p 4P5/2-->1s22s 2S1/2 magnetic quadrupole line.

  4. Pregnane X receptor-dependent induction of the CYP3A4 gene by o,p'-1,1,1,-trichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Díaz, Irma M; Arteaga-Illán, Georgina; de León, Mario Bermudez; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Sierra-Santoyo, Adolfo; Vega, Libia; Gonzalez, Frank J; Elizondo, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    CYP3A4, the predominant cytochrome P450 (P450) expressed in human liver and intestine, contributes to the metabolism of approximately half the drugs in clinical use today. CYP3A4 catalyzes the 6beta-hydroxylation of a number of steroid hormones and is involved in the bioactivation of environmental procarcinogens. The expression of CYP3A4 is affected by several stimuli, including environmental factors such as insecticides and pesticides. The o,p'-1,1,1,-trichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) isomer of DDT comprises approximately 20% of technical grade DDT, which is an organochloride pesticide. We have recently shown that o,p'-DDT exposure increases CYP3A4 mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. To determine the mechanism by which o,p'-DDT induces CYP3A4 expression, transactivation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were carried out, revealing that o,p'-DDT activates the CYP3A4 gene promoter through the pregnane X receptor (PXR). CYP3A4 gene promoter activation resulted in both an increase in CYP3A4 mRNA levels and an increase in the total CYP3A4 activity in HepG2 cells. We also observed induction of CYP3A4 and mouse Cyp3a11 mRNA in the intestine of CYP3A4-transgenic mice after exposure to 1 mg/kg o,p'-DDT. At higher doses, a decrease of CYP3A4 inducibility was observed together with an increase in levels of interleukin 6 mRNA, a proinflammatory cytokine that strongly represses CYP3A4 transcription. The present study indicates that regulation of other genes under PXR control may be altered by o,p'-DDT exposure.

  5. Combined use of EPR and 23Na MAS NMR spectroscopy for assessing the properties of the mixed cobalt-nickel-manganese layers of P3-NayCo1-2xNixMnxO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapsazova, M; Ivanova, S; Kukeva, R; Simova, S; Wegner, S; Zhecheva, E; Stoyanova, R

    2017-10-11

    Knowledge on the formation of mixed transition metal layers on lithium and sodium transition metal oxides, Li/Na(Co,Ni,Mn,)O 2 , determines the ability to control their electrochemical properties as electrode materials in alkaline ion batteries. Taking this into account, herein we combine the EPR and 23 Na MAS NMR spectroscopic techniques to gain insights into the structural peculiarities of the mixed cobalt-nickel-manganese layers of Na y Co 1-2x Ni x Mn x O 2 with a three-layer stacking (P3-type) structure. Two types of compositions are examined where diamagnetic Co 3+ and paramagnetic Ni 3+ and Mn 4+ are stabilized: Na 2/3 Co 1/3 Ni 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 and Na 1/2 Ni 1/2 Mn 1/2 O 2 . EPR spectroscopy operating in the X- and Q-band region is applied with an aim to improve the spectra resolution and, on the other hand, to provide straightforward information on the coordination of the transition metal ions inside the layers. The analysis of EPR spectra is based on the reference for the Mn 4+ and Ni 2+ ions occurring simultaneously in oxides with two layer stacking, P2-Na 2/3 Ni 1/3 Mn 2/3 O 2 . Complementary to EPR, 23 Na MAS NMR spectroscopy at high spinning rates is undertaken to assess the local structure of the Na nucleus in the layered P3-Na y Co 1-2x Ni x Mn x O 2 oxides. All results are discussed taking into account the EPR and NMR data for the well-known lithium analogues O3-LiCo 1/3 Ni 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 and O3-LiNi 1/2 Mn 1/2 O 2 . Finally, the structure peculiarities of the transition metal layers extracted from the EPR and NMR methods are demonstrated by electrochemical intercalation of Li + ions into P3-Na y Co 1-2x Ni x Mn x O 2 .

  6. Characterization of a recurrent t(1;2)(p36;p24) in human uterine leiomyoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijk, A. van; Sweers, M.A.; Huys, E.; Kersten, M.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Debiec-Rychter, M.; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are the most common neoplasms in women of reproductive age. Approximately 40% of these neoplasms show recurring structural cytogenetic anomalies, including del(7)(q22), t(12;14)(q15;q24), t(1;2)(p36;p24), and anomalies affecting 6p21 or 10q22. Using positional cloning strategies,

  7. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M.; Howard Berg, R.; Sue Loesch-Fries, L.

    2012-01-01

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  8. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Amr [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Present address: Genomics Facility, Agricultural Genetic Engineering Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Hutchens, Heather M. [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Howard Berg, R. [Integrated Microscopy Facility, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Saint Louis, MO 63132 (United States); Sue Loesch-Fries, L., E-mail: loeschfr@purdue.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  9. Association with the origin recognition complex suggests a novel role for histone acetyltransferase Hat1p/Hat2p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenblatt Jack F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone modifications have been implicated in the regulation of transcription and, more recently, in DNA replication and repair. In yeast, a major conserved histone acetyltransferase, Hat1p, preferentially acetylates lysine residues 5 and 12 on histone H4. Results Here, we report that a nuclear sub-complex consisting of Hat1p and its partner Hat2p interacts physically and functionally with the origin recognition complex (ORC. While mutational inactivation of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT gene HAT1 alone does not compromise origin firing or initiation of DNA replication, a deletion in HAT1 (or HAT2 exacerbates the growth defects of conditional orc-ts mutants. Thus, the ORC-associated Hat1p-dependent histone acetyltransferase activity suggests a novel linkage between histone modification and DNA replication. Additional genetic and biochemical evidence points to the existence of partly overlapping histone H3 acetyltransferase activities in addition to Hat1p/Hat2p for proper DNA replication efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated a dynamic association of Hat1p with chromatin during S-phase that suggests a role of this enzyme at the replication fork. Conclusion We have found an intriguing new association of the Hat1p-dependent histone acetyltransferase in addition to its previously known role in nuclear chromatin assembly (Hat1p/Hat2p-Hif1p. The participation of a distinct Hat1p/Hat2p sub-complex suggests a linkage of histone H4 modification with ORC-dependent DNA replication.

  10. A simplified boron diffusion for preparing the silicon single crystal p-n junction as an educational device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiota, Koki, E-mail: a14510@sr.kagawa-nct.ac.jp; Kai, Kazuho; Nagaoka, Shiro, E-mail: nagaoka@es.kagawa-nct.ac.jp [National Institute of Technology, Kagawa College, Kagawa, Mitoyo, Takuma, Koda 551 (Japan); Tsuji, Takuto [National Institute of Technology, Suzuka College, Mie, Suzuka, Shiroko (Japan); Wakahara, Akihiro [Toyohashi University of Technology, Aichi, Toyohashi, Tenpaku, Hibarigaoka 1-1 (Japan); Rusop, Mohamad [University Technology Mara, Selangor, Shah Alam, 40450 (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    The educational method which is including designing, making, and evaluating actual semiconductor devices with learning the theory is one of the best way to obtain the fundamental understanding of the device physics and to cultivate the ability to make unique ideas using the knowledge in the semiconductor device. In this paper, the simplified Boron thermal diffusion process using Sol-Gel material under normal air environment was proposed based on simple hypothesis and the feasibility of the reproducibility and reliability were investigated to simplify the diffusion process for making the educational devices, such as p-n junction, bipolar and pMOS devices. As the result, this method was successfully achieved making p+ region on the surface of the n-type silicon substrates with good reproducibility. And good rectification property of the p-n junctions was obtained successfully. This result indicates that there is a possibility to apply on the process making pMOS or bipolar transistors. It suggests that there is a variety of the possibility of the applications in the educational field to foster an imagination of new devices.

  11. The amino terminal end determines the stability and assembling capacity of eukaryotic ribosomal stalk proteins P1 and P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Hendricka; Nusspaumer, Gretel; Abia, David; Briceño, Verónica; Remacha, Miguel; Ballesta, Juan P G

    2011-05-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal proteins P1 and P2 bind to protein P0 through their N-terminal domain to form the essential ribosomal stalk. A mutational analysis points to amino acids at positions 2 and 3 as determinants for the drastic difference of Saccharomyces cerevisiae P1 and P2 half-life, and suggest different degradation mechanisms for each protein type. Moreover, the capacity to form P1/P2 heterodimers is drastically affected by mutations in the P2β four initial amino acids, while these mutations have no effect on P1β. Binding of P2β and, to a lesser extent, P1β to the ribosome is also seriously affected showing the high relevance of the amino acids in the first turn of the NTD α-helix 1 for the stalk assembly. The negative effect of some mutations on ribosome binding can be reversed by the presence of the second P1/P2 couple in the ribosome, indicating a stabilizing structural influence between the two heterodimers. Unexpectedly, some mutations totally abolish heterodimer formation but allow significant ribosome binding and, therefore, a previous P1 and P2 association seems not to be an absolute requirement for stalk assembly. Homology modeling of the protein complexes suggests that the mutated residues can affect the overall protein conformation. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Gln3p and Nil1p regulation of invertase activity and SUC2 expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Edna Maria Morais; Mansure, José João; Bon, Elba Pinto da Silva

    2005-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sensing and signalling pathways regulate gene expression in response to quality of carbon and nitrogen sources. One such system, the target of rapamycin (Tor) proteins, senses nutrients and uses the GATA activators Gln3p and Nil1p to regulate translation in response to low-quality carbon and nitrogen. The signal transduction, triggered in response to nitrogen nutrition that is sensed by the Tor proteins, operates via a regulatory pathway involving the cytoplasmic factor Ure2p. When carbon and nitrogen are abundant, the phosphorylated Ure2p anchors the also phosphorylated Gln3p and Nil1p in the cytoplasm. Upon a shift from high- to low-quality nitrogen or treatment with rapamycin all three proteins are dephosphorylated, causing Gln3p and Nil1p to enter the nucleus and promote transcription. The genes that code for yeast periplasmic enzymes with nutritional roles would be obvious targets for regulation by the sensing and signalling pathways that respond to quality of carbon and nitrogen sources. Indeed, previous results from our laboratory had shown that the GATA factors Gln3p, Nil1p, Dal80p, Nil2p and also the protein Ure2 regulate the expression of asparaginase II, coded by ASP3. We also had observed that the activity levels of the also periplasmic invertase, coded by SUC2, were 6-fold lower in ure2 mutant cells in comparison to wild-type cells collected at stationary phase. These results suggested similarities between the signalling pathways regulating the expression of ASP3 and SUC2. In the present work we showed that invertase levels displayed by the single nil1 and gln3 and by the double gln3nil1 mutant cells, cultivated in a sucrose-ammonium medium and collected at the exponential phase, were 6-, 10- and 60-fold higher, respectively, in comparison to their wild-type counterparts. RT-PCR data of SUC2 expression in the double-mutant cells indicated a 10-fold increase in the mRNA(SUC2) levels.

  13. Wolf-Hirschhorn (4p-) syndrome: prenatal diagnosis, molecular cytogenetic characterization and association with a 1.2-Mb microduplication at 8p22-p21.3 and a 1.1-Mb microduplication at 10p15.3 in a fetus with an apparently pure 4p deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Su, Yi-Ning; Chen, Yi-Yung; Su, Jun-Wei; Chern, Schu-Rern; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chen, Wen-Lin; Chen, Li-Feng; Wang, Wayseen

    2011-12-01

    To present prenatal diagnosis and molecular cytogenetic characterization of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) associated with microduplications at 8p and 10p in a fetus with an apparently pure 4p deletion. A 35-year-old gravida 2, para 1 woman underwent amniocentesis at 18 weeks of gestation because of advanced maternal age. Her husband was 38 years of age. There was no family history of congenital malformations. Amniocentesis revealed a karyotype of 46,XY,del(4p16.1). The parental karyotypes were normal. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis revealed a 6.5-Mb deletion at 4p16.3-p16.1, a 1.2-Mb microduplication at 8p22-p21.3, and a 1.1-Mb microduplication at 10p15.3, or arr cgh 4p16.3p16.1 (0-6,531,998 bp)×1, 8p22p21.3 (18,705,388-19,940,445 bp)×3, 10p15.3 (0-1,105,065 bp)×3. Polymorphic DNA marker analysis confirmed a paternal origin of 4p deletion. Prenatal ultrasound revealed facial dysmorphism and hypospadias. The aCGH analysis of the parents revealed no genomic imbalance. Fluorescence in situ hybridization study showed an unbalanced reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 4 and 10 at bands 4p16.1 and 10p15.3. The cytogenetic result, thus, was 46,XY,der(4)t(4;10)(p16.1;p15.3),dup(8)(p21.3p22). The parents elected to terminate the pregnancy, and a 470-g malformed fetus was delivered. The present case provides evidence that an apparently pure 4p deletion can be associated with subtle chromosome imbalances in other chromosomes. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in malignant behavior of glioma cells. Differential effects of S1P2 on cell migration and invasiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Nicholas; Van Brocklyn, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that signals through a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P 1-5 . S1P stimulates growth and invasiveness of glioma cells, and high expression levels of the enzyme that forms S1P, sphingosine kinase-1, correlate with short survival of glioma patients. In this study we examined the mechanism of S1P stimulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion by either overexpressing or knocking down, by RNA interference, S1P receptor expression in glioma cell lines. S1P 1 , S1P 2 and S1P 3 all contribute positively to S1P-stimulated glioma cell proliferation, with S1P 1 being the major contributor. Stimulation of glioma cell proliferation by these receptors correlated with activation of ERK MAP kinase. S1P 5 blocks glioma cell proliferation, and inhibits ERK activation. S1P 1 and S1P 3 enhance glioma cell migration and invasion. S1P 2 inhibits migration through Rho activation, Rho kinase signaling and stress fiber formation, but unexpectedly, enhances glioma cell invasiveness by stimulating cell adhesion. S1P 2 also potently enhances expression of the matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61, which has been implicated in tumor cell adhesion, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis. A neutralizing antibody to CCN1 blocked S1P 2 -stimulated glioma invasion. Thus, while S1P 2 decreases glioma cell motility, it may enhance invasion through induction of proteins that modulate glioma cell interaction with the extracellular matrix

  15. Role of Pex21p for Piggyback Import of Gpd1p and Pnc1p into Peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effelsberg, Daniel; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Tonillo, Jason; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Proteins designated for peroxisomal protein import harbor one of two common peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oleate-induced PTS2-dependent import of the thiolase Fox3p into peroxisomes is conducted by the soluble import receptor Pex7p in cooperation with the auxiliary Pex18p, one of two supposedly redundant PTS2 co-receptors. Here, we report on a novel function for the co-receptor Pex21p, which cannot be fulfilled by Pex18p. The data establish Pex21p as a general co-receptor in PTS2-dependent protein import, whereas Pex18p is especially important for oleate-induced import of PTS2 proteins. The glycerol-producing PTS2 protein glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase Gpd1p shows a tripartite localization in peroxisomes, in the cytosol, and in the nucleus under osmotic stress conditions. We show the following: (i) Pex21p is required for peroxisomal import of Gpd1p as well as a key enzyme of the NAD+ salvage pathway, Pnc1p; (ii) Pnc1p, a nicotinamidase without functional PTS2, is co-imported into peroxisomes by piggyback transport via Gpd1p. Moreover, the specific transport of these two enzymes into peroxisomes suggests a novel regulatory role for peroxisomes under various stress conditions. PMID:26276932

  16. Cytochrome P2A13 and P1A1 gene polymorphisms are associated with the occurrence of uterine leiomyoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, D; Bettendorf, H; Denschlag, D; Keck, C; Pietrowski, D

    2006-10-01

    To investigate the association between the occurrence of uterine leiomyoma and two SNPs of the CYP 2A13 and CYP 1A1 genes. Prospective case control study with 132 women with clinically and surgically diagnosed uterine leiomyoma and 260 controls. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based amplification of CYP 2A13 and CYP 1A1 genes, and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Comparing women with uterine leiomyoma and controls, we demonstrate statistical significant differences of allele frequency and genotype distribution for the CYP 1A1 polymorphism (P = 0.025 and P = 0.046, respectively). Furthermore, for the CYP 2A13 polymorphism we found a significant difference concerning allele frequency (P = 0.033). However, for the genotype distribution, only borderline significance was observed (P = 0.064). The CYP 2A13 and CYP 1A1 SNPs are associated with uterine leiomyoma in a Caucasian population and may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of uterine leiomyoma.

  17. Various pfcrt and pfmdr1 Genotypes of Plasmodium falciparum Cocirculate with P. malariae, P. ovale spp., and P. vivax in Northern Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fançony, Cláudia; Gamboa, Dina; Sebastião, Yuri; Hallett, Rachel; Sutherland, Colin; Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy for malaria has become widely available across Africa. Populations of Plasmodium falciparum that were previously dominated by chloroquine (CQ)-resistant genotypes are now under different drug selection pressures. P. malariae, P. ovale curtisi, and P. ovale wallikeri are sympatric with P. falciparum across the continent and are frequently present as coinfections. The prevalence of human Plasmodium species was determined by PCR using DNA from blood spots collected during a cross-sectional survey in northern Angola. P. falciparum was genotyped at resistance-associated loci in pfcrt and pfmdr1 by real-time PCR or by direct sequencing of amplicons. Of the 3,316 samples collected, 541 (16.3%) contained Plasmodium species infections; 477 (88.2%) of these were P. falciparum alone, 6.5% were P. falciparum and P. malariae together, and 1.1% were P. vivax alone. The majority of the remainder (3.7%) harbored P. ovale curtisi or P. ovale wallikeri alone or in combination with other species. Of 430 P. falciparum isolates genotyped for pfcrt, 61.6% carried the wild-type allele CVMNK at codons 72 to 76, either alone or in combination with the resistant allele CVIET. No other pfcrt allele was found. Wild-type alleles dominated at codons 86, 184, 1034, 1042, and 1246 of the pfmdr1 locus among the sequenced isolates. In contrast to previous studies, P. falciparum in the study area comprises an approximately equal mix of genotypes associated with CQ sensitivity and with CQ resistance, suggesting either lower drug pressure due to poor access to treatment in rural areas or a rapid impact of the policy change away from the use of standard monotherapies. PMID:22850519

  18. Frequency metrology on the 4s(2)S(1/2)-4p(2)P(1/2) transition in Ca-40(+) for a comparison with quasar data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, A.L.; van den Berg, S.A.; Gohle, C.; Salumbides, E.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Eikema, K.S.E.

    2008-01-01

    High accuracy frequency metrology on the 4s S 12 2 -4p P 12 2 transition in calcium ions is performed using laser cooled and crystallized ions in a linear Paul trap. Calibration is performed with a frequency comb laser, resulting in a transition frequency of f=755 222 766.2 (1.7) MHz. The accuracy

  19. PPADS and suramin as antagonists at cloned P2Y- and P2U-purinoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, S J; Brown, C A; Weisman, G A; Turner, J T; Erb, L; Boarder, M R

    1996-06-01

    1. The effect of suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) on the stimulation of phospholipase C in 1321N1 cells transfected with the human P2U-purinoceptor (h-P2U-1321N1 cells) or with the turkey P2Y-purinoceptor (t-P2Y-1321N1 cells) was investigated. 2-Methylthioadenosine triphosphate (2MeSATP) was used as the agonist at t-P2Y-1321N1 cells and uridine triphosphate (UTP) at h-P2U-1321N1 cells. 2. Suramin caused a parallel shift to the right of the concentration-response curves for 2MeSATP in the t-P2Y-1321N1 cells, yielding a Schild plot with a slope of 1.16 +/- 0.08 and a pA2 value of 5.77 +/- 0.11. 3. Suramin also caused a shift to the right of concentration-response curves for UTP in the h-P2U-1321N1 cells, and on Schild plots gave a slope different from unity (1.57 +/- 0.19) and an apparent pA2 value of 4.32 +/- 0.13. Suramin was therefore a less potent antagonist at the P2U-purinoceptor than the P2Y-purinoceptor. 4. In the presence of the ectonucleotidase inhibitor, ARL 67156 (6-N,N-diethyl-beta,gamma-dibromomethylene-D-ATP) there was no significant difference in the EC50 or shapes of curves with either cell type, and no difference in pA2 values for suramin. 5. PPADS caused an increase in the EC50 for 2MeSATP in the t-P2Y-1321N1 cells. The Schild plot had a slope different from unity (0.55 +/- 0.15) and an X-intercept corresponding to an apparent pA2 of 5.98 +/- 0.65. 6. PPADS up to 30 microM had no effect on the concentration-response curve for UTP with the h-P2U-1321N1 cells. 7. In conclusion, suramin and PPADS show clear differences in their action at the 2 receptor types, in each case being substantially more effective as an antagonist at the P2Y-purinoceptor than at the P2U-purinoceptor. Ectonucleotidase breakdown had little influence on the nature of the responses at the two receptor types, or in their differential sensitivity to suramin.

  20. Medicinal chemistry of adenosine, P2Y and P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Kenneth A; Müller, Christa E

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological tool compounds are now available to define action at the adenosine (ARs), P2Y and P2X receptors. We present a selection of the most commonly used agents to study purines in the nervous system. Some of these compounds, including A1 and A3 AR agonists, P2Y1R and P2Y12R antagonists, and P2X3, P2X4 and P2X7 antagonists, are potentially of clinical use in treatment of disorders of the nervous system, such as chronic pain, neurodegeneration and brain injury. Agonists of the A2AAR and P2Y2R are already used clinically, P2Y12R antagonists are widely used antithrombotics and an antagonist of the A2AAR is approved in Japan for treating Parkinson's disease. The selectivity defined for some of the previously introduced compounds has been revised with updated pharmacological characterization, for example, various AR agonists and antagonists were deemed A1AR or A3AR selective based on human data, but species differences indicated a reduction in selectivity ratios in other species. Also, many of the P2R ligands still lack bioavailability due to charged groups or hydrolytic (either enzymatic or chemical) instability. X-ray crystallographic structures of AR and P2YRs have shifted the mode of ligand discovery to structure-based approaches rather than previous empirical approaches. The X-ray structures can be utilized either for in silico screening of chemically diverse libraries for the discovery of novel ligands or for enhancement of the properties of known ligands by chemical modification. Although X-ray structures of the zebrafish P2X4R have been reported, there is scant structural information about ligand recognition in these trimeric ion channels. In summary, there are definitive, selective agonists and antagonists for all of the ARs and some of the P2YRs; while the pharmacochemistry of P2XRs is still in nascent stages. The therapeutic potential of selectively modulating these receptors is continuing to gain interest in such fields as cancer, inflammation, pain

  1. Role of Pex21p for Piggyback Import of Gpd1p and Pnc1p into Peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effelsberg, Daniel; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Tonillo, Jason; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-10-16

    Proteins designated for peroxisomal protein import harbor one of two common peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oleate-induced PTS2-dependent import of the thiolase Fox3p into peroxisomes is conducted by the soluble import receptor Pex7p in cooperation with the auxiliary Pex18p, one of two supposedly redundant PTS2 co-receptors. Here, we report on a novel function for the co-receptor Pex21p, which cannot be fulfilled by Pex18p. The data establish Pex21p as a general co-receptor in PTS2-dependent protein import, whereas Pex18p is especially important for oleate-induced import of PTS2 proteins. The glycerol-producing PTS2 protein glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase Gpd1p shows a tripartite localization in peroxisomes, in the cytosol, and in the nucleus under osmotic stress conditions. We show the following: (i) Pex21p is required for peroxisomal import of Gpd1p as well as a key enzyme of the NAD(+) salvage pathway, Pnc1p; (ii) Pnc1p, a nicotinamidase without functional PTS2, is co-imported into peroxisomes by piggyback transport via Gpd1p. Moreover, the specific transport of these two enzymes into peroxisomes suggests a novel regulatory role for peroxisomes under various stress conditions. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. [μ-1,2-Bis(diphenylphosphinoethane-κ2P:P′]bis{[1,2-bis(diphenylphosphinoethane-κ2P,P′]cyanidocopper(I} methanol disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The title centrosymmetric complex, [Cu2(CN2(C26H24P23]·2CH3OH, consists of two five-membered [Cu(dppeCN] rings [dppe is 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphinoethane] bridged by one μ2-dppe ligand, and two methanol solvent molecules. The angles around the central metal atom indicate that each CuI atom is located in the center of a distorted tetrahedron. The coordination sphere of each CuI atom is formed by three P atoms from two dppe ligands, and one C atom from the cyanide ligand. The crystal structure is stabilized by O—H...N hydrogen bonds, which are formed by the O—H donor group from methanol and the N-atom acceptor from a cyanide ligand.

  3. A Survey on Mixed Spin P-Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huai-Liang CHANG; Jun LI; Wei-Ping LI; Chiu-Chu Melissa LIU

    2017-01-01

    The mixed spin P-fields (MSP for short) theory sets up a geometric platform to relate Gromov-Witten invariants of the quintic three-fold and Fan-Jarvis-Ruan-Witten invariants of the quintic polynomial in five variables.It starts with Wittens vision and the P-fields treatment of GW invariants and FJRW invariants.Then it briefly discusses the master space technique and its application to the set-up of the MSP moduli.Some key results in MSP theory are explained and some examples are provided.

  4. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice - implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysgaard, S.; Glud, R. N.; Lennert, K.; Cooper, M.; Halden, N.; Leakey, R. J. G.; Hawthorne, F. C.; Barber, D.

    2012-08-01

    A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air-sea CO2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO3·6H2O) in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km2 (0.5-1 m thick) drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced the ice floe thickness by 0.2 m per week and resulted in an estimated 3.8 ppm decrease of pCO2 in the ocean surface mixed layer. This corresponds to an air-sea CO2 uptake of 10.6 mmol m-2 sea ice d-1 or to 3.3 ton km-2 ice floe week-1. This is markedly higher than the estimated primary production within the ice floe of 0.3-1.3 mmol m-2 sea ice d-1. Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO2 uptake.

  5. Observation of the hadronic transitions χb1,2(2P)→ωΥ(1S)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Park, C.S.; Park, W.; Thayer, J.B.; Thorndike, E.H.; Coan, T.E.; Gao, Y.S.; Liu, F.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Boulahouache, C.; Blusk, S.; Dambasuren, E.; Dorjkhaidav, O.; Mountain, R.; Muramatsu, H.; Nandakumar, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    The CLEO Collaboration has made the first observations of hadronic transitions among bottomonium (bb-bar) states other than the dipion transitions among Υ(nS) states. In our study of Υ(3S) decays, we find a significant signal for Υ(3S)→γωΥ(1S) that is consistent with radiative decays Υ(3S)→γχ b1,2 (2P), followed by χ b1,2 (2P)→ωΥ(1S). The branching ratios we obtain are B[χ b1 (2P)→ωΥ(1S)]=(1.63 -0.31-0.15 +0.35+0.16 )% and B[χ b2 (2P)→ωΥ(1S)]=(1.10 -0.28-0.10 +0.32+0.11 )%, in which the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  6. The oxidation mode of pyranose 2-oxidase is controlled by pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prongjit, Methinee; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Palfey, Bruce A.; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2013-01-01

    Pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) from Trametes multicolor is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of D-glucose and other aldopyranose sugars at the C2 position by using O2 as an electron acceptor to form the corresponding 2-keto-sugars and H2O2. In this study, the effects of pH on the oxidative half-reaction of P2O were investigated using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The results showed that flavin oxidation occurred via different pathways depending on the pH of the environment. At pH values lower than 8.0, reduced P2O reacts with O2 to form a C4a-hydroperoxy-flavin intermediate, leading to elimination of H2O2. At pH 8.0 and higher, the majority of the reduced P2O reacts with O2 via a pathway which does not allow detection of the C4a-hydroperoxy-flavin, and flavin oxidation occurs with decreased rate constants upon the rise in pH. The switching between the two modes of P2O oxidation is controlled by protonation of a group which has a pKa of 7.6 ± 0.1. Oxidation reactions of reduced P2O under rapid pH change as performed by stopped-flow mixing were different from the same reactions performed with enzyme pre-equilibrated at the same specified pH values, implying that the protonation of the group which controls the mode of flavin oxidation cannot be rapidly equilibrated with outside solvent. Using a double-mixing stopped-flow experiment, a rate constant for proton dissociation from the reaction site was determined to be 21.0 ± 0.4 s-1. PMID:23356577

  7. Periodontal disease detection in primary and mixed dentitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, C M Guimarães; Fernandes-Costa, A N; de Melo Soares, M S; Pugliesi, D M Carvalho; de Vasconcelos Gurgel, B C

    2016-10-01

    This was to compare the periodontal status of children with primary and mixed dentition at the time of their first consultation. Children (200), aged 0-12 years (156 with mixed and 44 with primary dentition), were examined by assessing their simplified plaque index (PI) and simplified periodontal record (PSR). Statistical analysis (Chi-square test) was performed with appropriate software to find any significant associations between sex, type of dentition and PI with the PSR codes (0, 1, 2, 3 and 4). There was no statistically significant difference with regard to gender (p = 0.82). Generalised PI was associated more significantly with mixed dentition (p = 0.025 and higher PSR scores (p periodontal examination in children to diagnose and prevent future periodontal disease and maintain their dentition as well as to identify any associated systemic conditions.

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Mediates ICAM-1-Dependent Monocyte Adhesion through p38 MAPK and p42/p44 MAPK-Dependent Akt Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Lee, I-Ta; Hsu, Chun-Hao; Hsu, Chih-Kai; Chi, Pei-Ling; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is frequently implicated in lung inflammation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has been shown to play a key role in inflammation via adhesion molecules induction, and then causes lung injury. However, the mechanisms underlying S1P-induced ICAM-1 expression in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiCs) remain unclear. The effect of S1P on ICAM-1 expression was determined by Western blot and real-time PCR. The involvement of signaling pathways in these responses was investigated by using the selective pharmacological inhibitors and transfection with siRNAs. S1P markedly induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion which were attenuated by pretreatment with the inhibitor of S1PR1 (W123), S1PR3 (CAY10444), c-Src (PP1), EGFR (AG1478), PDGFR (AG1296), MEK1/2 (U0126), p38 MAPK (SB202190), JNK1/2 (SP600125), PI3K (LY294002), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) and transfection with siRNA of S1PR1, S1PR3, c-Src, EGFR, PDGFR, p38, p42, JNK1, c-Jun, or c-Fos. We observed that S1P-stimulated p42/p44 MAPK and p38 MAPK activation was mediated via a c-Src/EGFR and PDGFR-dependent pathway. S1P caused the c-Src/EGFR/PDGFR complex formation. On the other hand, we demonstrated that S1P induced p42/p44 MAPK and p38 MAPK-dependent Akt activation. In addition, S1P-stimulated JNK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated by SP600125 or PP1. Finally, S1P enhanced c-Fos mRNA levels and c-Jun phosphorylation. S1P-induced c-Jun activation was reduced by PP1, AG1478, AG1296, U0126, SP600125, SB202190, or LY294002. These results demonstrated that S1P-induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion were mediated through S1PR1/3/c-Src/EGFR, PDGFR/p38 MAPK, p42/p44 MAPK/Akt-dependent AP-1 activation. PMID:25734900

  9. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curve of the iodine weakly bound 1u state correlating with the I(2P1/2) + I(2P1/2) dissociation limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopyan, M E; Baturo, V V; Lukashov, S S; Poretsky, S A; Pravilov, A M

    2015-01-01

    The stepwise three-step three-color laser population of the I 21 g , ν β , J β ) rovibronic states via the B0 u + , ν B , J B rovibronic states and rovibronic levels of the 1 u (bb) and 0 g + (bb) states mixed by hyperfine interaction is used for determination of rovibronic level energies of the weakly bound I 2 (1 u (bb)) state. Dunham coefficients of the state, Y i0 (i = 0–3), Y i1 (i = 0–2), Y 02 and Y 12 for the v 1 u  = 1–5, 8, 10, 15 and J 1 u  ≈ 9–87 ranges, the dissociation energy of the state, D e , and equilibrium I–I distance, R e , as well as the potential energy curve are determined. There are aperiodicities in the excitation spectrum corresponding to the β, ν β  = 23, J β  ← 1 u (bb), ν 1u  = 4, 5, J 1u progressions in the I 2  + Rg = He, Ar mixture, namely, a great number of lines which do not coincide with the R or P line progressions. Their positions conflict with the ΔJ-even selection rule. Furthermore, they do not correspond to the ΔJ-odd progression. (paper)

  10. Oxidation mode of pyranose 2-oxidase is controlled by pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prongjit, Methinee; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Palfey, Bruce A; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2013-02-26

    Pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) from Trametes multicolor is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of d-glucose and other aldopyranose sugars at the C2 position by using O₂ as an electron acceptor to form the corresponding 2-keto-sugars and H₂O₂. In this study, the effects of pH on the oxidative half-reaction of P2O were investigated using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The results showed that flavin oxidation occurred via different pathways depending on the pH of the environment. At pH values lower than 8.0, reduced P2O reacts with O₂ to form a C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate, leading to elimination of H₂O₂. At pH 8.0 and higher, the majority of the reduced P2O reacts with O₂ via a pathway that does not allow detection of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin, and flavin oxidation occurs with decreased rate constants upon the rise in pH. The switching between the two modes of P2O oxidation is controlled by protonation of a group which has a pK(a) of 7.6 ± 0.1. Oxidation reactions of reduced P2O under rapid pH change as performed by stopped-flow mixing were different from the same reactions performed with enzyme pre-equilibrated at the same specified pH values, implying that the protonation of the group which controls the mode of flavin oxidation cannot be rapidly equilibrated with outside solvent. Using a double-mixing stopped-flow experiment, a rate constant for proton dissociation from the reaction site was determined to be 21.0 ± 0.4 s⁻¹.

  11. A role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-S1P receptor 2 pathway in epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Sayaka; Yako, Yuta; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Kajita, Mihoko; Kameyama, Takeshi; Kon, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Susumu; Ohba, Yusuke; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2016-02-01

    At the initial step of carcinogenesis, transformation occurs in single cells within epithelia, where the newly emerging transformed cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells. A recent study revealed that normal epithelial cells have an ability to sense and actively eliminate the neighboring transformed cells, a process named epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC). However, the molecular mechanism of this tumor-suppressive activity is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated a role for the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) pathway in EDAC. First, we show that addition of the S1PR2 inhibitor significantly suppresses apical extrusion of RasV12-transformed cells that are surrounded by normal cells. In addition, knockdown of S1PR2 in normal cells induces the same effect, indicating that S1PR2 in the surrounding normal cells plays a positive role in the apical elimination of the transformed cells. Of importance, not endogenous S1P but exogenous S1P is involved in this process. By using FRET analyses, we demonstrate that S1PR2 mediates Rho activation in normal cells neighboring RasV12-transformed cells, thereby promoting accumulation of filamin, a crucial regulator of EDAC. Collectively these data indicate that S1P is a key extrinsic factor that affects the outcome of cell competition between normal and transformed epithelial cells. © 2016 Yamamoto, Yako, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. The 5s25p2 - (5s25p5d + 5s5p3 + 5s25p6s + 5s25p7s) transitions in Sb II and 5s25p - (5s5p2 + 5s2nl) transitions in Sb III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcimowicz, B.; Joshi, Y.N.; Kaufman, V.

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of antimony was photographed in the 575-2300 A region (1A 10 -10 m) using a hollow cathode and a triggered spark source. The analysis of the 5s 2 5p 2 - (5s 2 5p5d + 5s5p 3 + 5s 2 5p6s + 5s 2 5p7s) transitions in Sb II spectrum was revised and interpreted on the basis of multiconfiguration interaction calculations. Accurate wavelength measurements of Sb III lines lead to a revised ground-state 5s 2 5p 2 P interval value of 6574.5 cm -1 . (author). 15 refs., 9 tabs., 1 fig

  13. pH-metric studies on the mixed ligand-chelates of oxovanadium(IV) with 2,2'-bipyridyl and dicarboxylic or hydroxy acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.K.; Kumari, V.; Chaturvedi, G.K.

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of vanadyl ion with 2,2'-bipyridyl and some dicarboxylic or hydroxy acids (where dicarboxylic acid = oxalic (OX), malonic (MALN), phthalic (PHA), maleic (MAL) acids; hydroxy acids salicylic (SA), 5-sulfosalicylic (5-SSA), mandelic (MAND) and glycollic (HG) acids was studied potentiometrically. pH-titrations of the reaction mixtures containing vanadyl sulphate, 2,2'-bipyridyl and one of the dicarboxylic or hydroxy acids (OX, MALN, PHA, MAL, SA, 5-SSA, MAND and HG acids) in equimolar ratio exhibited the formation of 1:1:1 mixed ligand chelates. The formation constants of the resulting biligand chelates were calculated, at 35 + -1 0 and 45 + -1 0 and also the thermodynamic functions viz. ΔF, ΔH and ΔS (μ=0.1M KNO 3 ) (auth.)

  14. A recurrent deletion syndrome at chromosome bands 2p11.2-2p12 flanked by segmental duplications at the breakpoints and including REEP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Servi J C; Blom, Eveline W; Siegelaer, Ingrid T J; Smeets, Eric E J G L

    2015-04-01

    We identified an identical and recurrent 9.4-Mbp deletion at chromosome bands 2p11.2-2p12, which occurred de novo in two unrelated patients. It is flanked at the distal and proximal breakpoints by two homologous segmental duplications consisting of low copy repeat (LCR) blocks in direct orientation, which have >99% sequence identity. Despite the fact that the deletion was almost 10 Mbp in size, the patients showed a relatively mild clinical phenotype, that is, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, a happy disposition, speech delay and delayed motor development. Their phenotype matches with that of previously described patients. The 2p11.2-2p12 deletion includes the REEP1 gene that is associated with spastic paraplegia and phenotypic features related to this are apparent in most 2p11.2-2p12 deletion patients, but not in all. Other hemizygous genes that may contribute to the clinical phenotype include LRRTM1 and CTNNA2. We propose a recurrent but rare 2p11.2-2p12 deletion syndrome based on (1) the identical, non-random localisation of the de novo deletion breakpoints in two unrelated patients and a patient from literature, (2) the patients' phenotypic similarity and their phenotypic overlap with other 2p deletions and (3) the presence of highly identical LCR blocks flanking both breakpoints, consistent with a non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR)-mediated rearrangement.

  15. Study of the quasi-free scattering at the reaction 2H(p,2p)n at Esub(p)0 = 14.1 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helten, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    The breakup reaction 2 H(p,2p)n was studied at Ep = 14.1 MeV in complete coincidence experiments on quasifree pp scattering in a systematic range of cinematic situations of the pp-subsystem for c.m. production angles between 90 0 and 140 0 and different violation of the quasifree condition as well on interferences with final-state interaction processes. The absolute differential breakup cross section was compared with approximate solutions of the Faddeev equations with separable s-wave potentials without explicite Coulomb interaction according to Ebenhoeh. The agreement is generally good referring to the form of the spectra, but the theoretical amplitude is in the mean 20% to high. The permanent independence of the quasifree breakup from the scattering parameter asub(pp) doesn't suggest to use this process for the determination of nn-scattering lengths from the mirror reaction 2 H(n,2n)p. (orig.)

  16. Observation of $\\eta_{c}(2S) \\to p \\bar p$ and search for $X(3872) \\to p \\bar p$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel

    2017-06-10

    The first observation of the decay $\\eta_{c}(2S) \\to p \\bar p$ is reported using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0\\rm \\, fb^{-1}$ recorded by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The $\\eta_{c}(2S)$ resonance is produced in the decay $B^{+} \\to [c\\bar c] K^{+}$. The product of branching fractions normalised to that for the $J/\\psi$ intermediate state, ${\\cal R}_{\\eta_{c}(2S)}$, is measured to be \\begin{align*} {\\cal R}_{\\eta_{c}(2S)}\\equiv\\frac{{\\mathcal B}(B^{+} \\to \\eta_{c}(2S) K^{+}) \\times {\\mathcal B}(\\eta_{c}(2S) \\to p \\bar p)}{{\\mathcal B}(B^{+} \\to J/\\psi K^{+}) \\times {\\mathcal B}(J/\\psi\\to p \\bar p)} =~& (1.58 \\pm 0.33 \\pm 0.09)\\times 10^{-2}, \\end{align*} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. No signals for the decays $B^{+} \\to X(3872) (\\to p \\bar p) K^{+}$ and $B^{+} \\to \\psi(3770) (\\to p \\bar p) K^{+}$ are seen, and the 95\\% confidence level upper limits on their relative branching ratios ar...

  17. Correlation between expression of p53, p21/WAF1, and MDM2 proteins and their prognostic significance in primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Jia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor Protein p53 (p53, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21/WAF1, and murine double minute 2 (MDM2 participate in the regulation of cell growth. Altered expression of these gene products has been found in malignant tumors and has been associated with poor prognosis. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the 3 proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and their prognostic significance. Methods We examined p53, p21/WAF1, and MDM2 expression in 181 pairs of HCC tissues and the adjacent hepatic tissues by performing immunohistochemistry and examined the expression of the 3 proteins in 7 pairs of HCC tissues and the adjacent hepatic tissues by using western blot analysis. Results The expression of p53, p21/WAF1, and MDM2 in the HCC tissues was significantly higher than those in the adjacent hepatic tissues (P P = 0.008. A statistical correlation was observed between expression of p53 and p21/WAF1 (R = 0.380, P = 0.000, p53 and MDM2 (R = 0.299, P = 0.000, p21/WAF1 and MDM2 (R = 0.285, P = 0.000 in 181 liver tissues adjacent to the tumor. Patients with a low pathologic grade HCC (I+II had a higher tendency to express p53 on tumor cells than the patients with high pathologic grade HCC (III+IV (P = 0.007. Survival analysis showed that positive p21/WAF1 expression or/and negative MDM2 expression in HCC was a predictor of better survival of patients after tumor resection (P Conclusions The proteins p53, p21/WAF1, and MDM2 were overexpressed in all the HCC cases in this study, and p53 and p21/WAF1 overexpression were positively correlated. The expression of p21/WAF1 and MDM2 can be considered as 2 useful indicators for predicting the prognosis of HCC.

  18. Towards P2P XML Database Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhang (Ying)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTo ease the development of data-intensive P2P applications, we envision a P2P XML Database Management System (P2P XDBMS) that acts as a database middle-ware, providing a uniform database abstraction on top of a dynamic set of distributed data sources. In this PhD work, we research which

  19. Identification of rabbit cytochromes P450 2C1 and 2C2 as arachidonic acid epoxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laethem, R M; Koop, D R

    1992-12-01

    Microsomes prepared from COS-1 cells transiently expressing rabbit cytochromes P450 2C1 and 2C2 catalyzed the metabolism of arachidonic acid to predominantly 11,12- and 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) when microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity was inhibited by 0.2 mM 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane. P450 2C2 catalyzed the formation of 11,12-EET and 14,15-EET at a ratio of 3.0 and also produced 19-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (19-HETE). The 11,12-EET, 14,15-EET, and 19-HETE represented 48.3, 15.9, and 12.8%, respectively, of the total metabolites formed. P450 2C1 produced a similar but distinct ratio of 11,12-EET to 14,15-EET (2.0) and did not produce any detectable 19-HETE. The 11,12-EET and 14,15-EET represented 63.0 and 31.1%, respectively, of the total metabolites formed. The 8,9- and 5,6-EETs were not detected with either enzyme. The ratio of the 11,12-EET to 14,15-EET was 1.5 with P450 2CAA, a P450 arachidonic acid epoxygenase (P450 2CAA) that had an amino-terminal sequence identical to that of P450 2C2 [J. Biol. Chem. 267:5552-5559 (1992)]. P450 2C1, 2C2, and 2CAA metabolized lauric acid. The ratio of omega-1- to omega-hydroxylated laurate was 3.6, 3.4, and 2.4 for P450 2CAA, P450 2C2, and P450 2C1, respectively. Purified P450 2CAA had a slightly greater apparent molecular weight than expressed P450 2C2 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The results clearly establish that rabbit P450 2C1 and 2C2 are arachidonic acid epoxygenases, and they suggest that P450 2CAA and 2C2 are very similar but may not be identical isoforms.

  20. Microscopic model accounting of 2p2p configurations in magic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamerdzhiev, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    A model for account of the 2p2h configurations in magic nuclei is described in the framework of the Green function formalism. The model is formulated in the lowest order in the phonon production amplitude, so that the series are expansions not over pure 2p2h configurations, but over con figurations of the type ''1p1h+phonon''. Equations are obtained for the vertex and the density matrix, as well as an expression for the transition probabilities, that are extensions of the corresponding results of the theory of finite Fermi systems, or of the random-phase approximation to the case where the ''1p1h+phonon'' configurations are taken into account. Corrections to the one-particle phenomenological basis which arise with account for complicated configurations are obtained. Comparison with other approaches, using phonons, has shown that they are particular cases of the described model

  1. Local vs Nonlocal States in FeTiO3 Probed with 1s2pRIXS: Implications for Photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunault, Myrtille O J Y; Khan, Wilayat; Minár, Jan; Kroll, Thomas; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zimmermann, Patric; Delgado-Jaime, Mario U; de Groot, Frank M F

    2017-09-18

    Metal-metal charge transfer (MMCT) is expected to be the main mechanism that enables the harvesting of solar light by iron-titanium oxides for photocatalysis. We have studied FeTiO 3 as a model compound for MMCT with 1s2pRIXS at the Fe K-edge. The high-energy resolution XANES enables distinguishing five pre-edge features. The three first well distinct RIXS features are assigned to electric quadrupole transitions to the localized Fe* 3d states, shifted to lower energy by the 1s core-hole. Crystal field multiplet calculations confirm the speciation of divalent iron. The contribution of electric dipole absorption due to local p-d mixing allowed by the trigonal distortion of the cation site is supported by DFT and CFM calculations. The two other nonlocal features are assigned to electric dipole transitions to excited Fe* 4p states mixed with the neighboring Ti 3d states. The comparison with DFT calculations demonstrates that MMCT in ilmenite is favored by the hybridization between the Fe 4p and delocalized Ti 3d orbitals via the O 2p orbitals.

  2. Regulation of P2Y1 receptor traffic by sorting Nexin 1 is retromer independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Shaista; Kelly, Eamonn; Cullen, Pete J; Mundell, Stuart J

    2010-04-01

    The activity and traffic of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is tightly controlled. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) responsiveness is rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets and that the underlying mechanism requires receptor trafficking as an essential part of this process. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying P2Y receptor traffic. Sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) has been shown to regulate the endosomal sorting of cell surface receptors either to lysosomes where they are downregulated or back to the cell surface. These functions may in part be due to interactions of SNX1 with the mammalian retromer complex. In this study, we investigated the role of SNX1 in P2Y receptor trafficking. We show that P2Y(1) receptors recycle via a slow recycling pathway that is regulated by SNX1, whereas P2Y(12) receptors return to the cell surface via a rapid route that is SNX1 independent. SNX1 inhibition caused a dramatic increase in the rate of P2Y(1) receptor recycling, whereas inhibition of Vps26 and Vps35 known to be present in retromer had no effect, indicating that SNX1 regulation of P2Y(1) receptor recycling is retromer independent. In addition, inhibition of SNX4, 6 and 17 proteins did not affect P2Y(1) receptor recycling. SNX1 has also been implicated in GPCR degradation; however, we provide evidence that P2Y receptor degradation is SNX1 independent. These data describe a novel function of SNX1 in the regulation of P2Y(1) receptor recycling and suggest that SNX1 plays multiple roles in endocytic trafficking of GPCRs.

  3. Anisotropic p-f mixing mechanism explaining anomalous magnetic properties in Ce monopnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Kasuya, T.

    1985-01-01

    The crystal-field splittings in CeP, PrP and NdP are calculated by considering the point-charge Coulomb interaction, the intra-atomic d-f Coulomb interaction, and the p-f and d-f mixings. The p-f mixing mechanisms, not only between the occupied 4f states and the conduction bands, but also between the unoccupied 4f states and the valence bands make an important contribution to the crystal-field splitting. The fact that the crystal-field potential in CeP is smaller than those in PrP and NdP is due to the occupied 4f level in CeP being shallower. The values of the Slater-Koster integrals, (pfσ) and (pfπ), are determined uniquely from the crystal-field fitting for PrP and NdP. (author)

  4. DRD2 A1 allele and P300 abnormalities in obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, K. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)]|[PATH Foundation, Princeton, NJ (United States); Wood, R.; Sheridan, L.P.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous and prevalent disorder having both inheritable and environmental components. The role of the dopamine system in P300 has been implicated. We genotyped 193 neuropsychiatrically ill patients with and without comorbid drug and alcohol/abuse/dependence and obesity for the prevalence of the A1 allele of the DRD2 gene. We found a significant linear trend ({chi}{sup 2} = 40.4, df=1, p<0.00001) where the percent prevalence of the A1 increased with increasing polysubstance abuse. Where the A1 allele was found in 44% of 40 obese subjects, the A1 allele prevalence was found in as much as 91% of 11 obese subjects with comorbid polysubstance abuse. 53 obese subjects having a mean body weight (BMI) of 34.6{+-}8.2 were mapped for brain electrical activity and compared with 15 controls with a BMI of 22.3{+-}3.0 (P<.001). The P3 amplitude was significantly different (two tailed; t=3.24, df=16.2, P = 0.005), whereas P3 latency was not significant. Preliminarily, we found a significant decreased P3 amplitude correlated with parental polysubstance abuse (p=0.4) with prolongation of P3 latency correlated with the three risk factors of parental substance abuse, chemical dependency and carbohydrate bingeing (P<0.02). Finally, in a small sample, the A1 allele was present in 25% of probands having 0 risk compared to 66% in those obese subjects with any risk. This work represents the first electrophysiological data to implicate P3 abnormalities in a subset of obesity and further confirms an association of the DRD2 gene and a electrophysiological marker previously indicated to have predictive value in vulnerability to addictive behaviors.

  5. Synergistic action between inhibition of P2Y12/P2Y1 and P2Y12/thrombin in ADP- and thrombin-induced human platelet activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylander, Sven; Mattsson, Christer; Ramström, Sofia; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if there is a synergistic effect of a combination of P2Y12 and P2Y1 inhibition and P2Y12 and thrombin inhibition, on ADP- and thrombin-induced platelet activation, respectively. The rationale being that these combinations will cause a concurrent inhibition of both Gαq and Gαi signalling.Blood from healthy volunteers was preincubated with AR-C69931MX, a reversible P2Y12 antagonist; MRS2179, a reversible P2Y1 antagonist; or melagatran, a direct reversible thrombin inhibitor; alone or in various combinations prior to activation with ADP or thrombin. Platelet function in whole blood was assessed by flow cytometry using the antibody PAC-1 to estimate the expression of active αIIbβ3 (the fibrinogen receptor GPIIb/IIIa). A synergistic effect was evaluated by comparing the concentrations in the different combinations with those of corresponding equipotent concentrations of each single inhibitor alone. The equipotent single concentrations were experimentally obtained from concentration response curves performed in parallel.A synergistic effect regarding inhibition of ADP-induced platelet activation (10 μM) was obtained with different combinations of AR-C69931MX and MRS2179.Inhibition of thrombin-induced platelet activation (2 nM) with combinations of AR-C69931MX and the thrombin inhibitor melagatran did also result in a strong synergistic effect.To our knowledge, this is the first time that data supporting a synergistic effect has been published for the inhibitor combinations described.Whether this synergistic effect in vitro also results in an improved antithrombotic effect in vivo with or without an increased risk of bleeding remains to be studied in well-conducted clinical studies. PMID:15265806

  6. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Receptors 1 and 2 Coordinately Induce Mesenchymal Cell Migration through S1P Activation of Complementary Kinase Pathways*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, Patrick; Ruan, Ming; Pederson, Larry; Kassem, Moustapha; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo

    2013-01-01

    Normal bone turnover requires tight coupling of bone resorption and bone formation to preserve bone quantity and structure. With aging and during several pathological conditions, this coupling breaks down, leading to either net bone loss or excess bone formation. To preserve or restore normal bone metabolism, it is crucial to determine the mechanisms by which osteoclasts and osteoblast precursors interact and contribute to coupling. We showed that osteoclasts produce the chemokine sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which stimulates osteoblast migration. Thus, osteoclast-derived S1P may recruit osteoblasts to sites of bone resorption as an initial step in replacing lost bone. In this study we investigated the mechanisms by which S1P stimulates mesenchymal (skeletal) cell chemotaxis. S1P treatment of mesenchymal (skeletal) cells activated RhoA GTPase, but this small G protein did not contribute to migration. Rather, two S1P receptors, S1PR1 and S1PR2, coordinately promoted migration through activation of the JAK/STAT3 and FAK/PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, respectively. These data demonstrate that the chemokine S1P couples bone formation to bone resorption through activation of kinase signaling pathways. PMID:23300082

  7. S1P transporter SPNS2 regulates proper postnatal retinal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chao; Bian, Ganlan; Ren, Pan; Xiang, Jie; Song, Jun; Yu, Caiyong; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Ling; Chen, Kun; Liu, Fangfang; Zhang, Kun; Wu, Chunfeng; Sun, Ruixia; Hu, Dan; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2018-02-08

    Spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2) is the membrane transporter of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and it participates in several physiologic processes by activating different S1P receptors (S1PRs). However, its functions in the nervous system remain largely unclear. We explored the important role of SPNS2 in the process of retinal morphogenesis using a spns2-deficient rat model. In the absence of the functional SPNS2 transporter, we observed progressively aggravating laminar disorganization of the epithelium at the postnatal stage of retinal development. Disrupted cell polarity, delayed cell-cycle exit of retinal progenitor cells, and insufficient migration of newborn neurons were proposed in this study as potential mechanisms accounting for this structural disorder. In addition, we analyzed the expression profiles of spns2 and s1prs, and proposed that SPNS2 regulated retinal morphogenesis by establishing the S1P level in the eye and activating S1PR3 signaling. These data indicate that SPNS2 is indispensable for normal retinal morphogenesis and provide new insights on the role of S1P in the developing retina using an established in vivo model.-Fang, C., Bian, G., Ren, P., Xiang, J., Song, J., Yu, C., Zhang, Q., Liu, L., Chen, K., Liu, F., Zhang, K., Wu, C., Sun, R., Hu, D., Ju, G., Wang, J. S1P transporter SPNS2 regulates proper postnatal retinal morphogenesis.

  8. Synthesis of P1-(11-phenoxyundecyl)-P2-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-α-D-rhamnopyranosyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl) diphosphate and P1-(11-phenoxyundecyl)-P2-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-α-D-galactopyranosyl) diphosphate for the investigation of biosynthesis of O-antigenic polysaccharides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli O104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgov, Vladimir; Danilov, Leonid; Utkina, Natalia; Veselovsky, Vladimir; Brockhausen, Inka

    2017-12-01

    Two new phenoxyundecyl diphosphate sugars were synthesized for the first time: P 1 -(11-phenoxyundecyl)-P 2 - (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-α-D-rhamnopyranosyl-α-D-glucopyranosyl) diphosphate and P 1 -(11-phenoxyundecyl)-P 2 -(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-α-D-galactopyranosyl) diphosphate to study the third step of biosynthesis of the repeating units of O-antigenic polysaccharides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E.coli O104 respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ikaite crystals in melting sea ice – implications for pCO2 and pH levels in Arctic surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. G. Leakey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A major issue of Arctic marine science is to understand whether the Arctic Ocean is, or will be, a source or sink for air–sea CO2 exchange. This has been complicated by the recent discoveries of ikaite (a polymorph of CaCO3·6H2O in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, which indicate that multiple chemical transformations occur in sea ice with a possible effect on CO2 and pH conditions in surface waters. Here, we report on biogeochemical conditions, microscopic examinations and x-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals from a melting 1.7 km2 (0.5–1 m thick drifting ice floe in the Fram Strait during summer. Our findings show that ikaite crystals are present throughout the sea ice but with larger crystals appearing in the upper ice layers. Ikaite crystals placed at elevated temperatures disintegrated into smaller crystallites and dissolved. During our field campaign in late June, melt reduced the ice floe thickness by 0.2 m per week and resulted in an estimated 3.8 ppm decrease of pCO2 in the ocean surface mixed layer. This corresponds to an air–sea CO2 uptake of 10.6 mmol m−2 sea ice d−1 or to 3.3 ton km−2 ice floe week−1. This is markedly higher than the estimated primary production within the ice floe of 0.3–1.3 mmol m−2 sea ice d−1. Finally, the presence of ikaite in sea ice and the dissolution of the mineral during melting of the sea ice and mixing of the melt water into the surface oceanic mixed layer accounted for half of the estimated pCO2 uptake.

  10. Andrographolide induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis through a SHP-1-PP2A-p38MAPK-p53 cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ying; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lu, Wan-Jung; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-07-10

    The abnormal growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is considered a critical pathogenic process in inflammatory vascular diseases. We have previously demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A)-mediated NF-κB dephosphorylation contributes to the anti-inflammatory properties of andrographolide, a novel NF-κB inhibitor. In this study, we investigated whether andrographolide causes apoptosis, and characterized its apoptotic mechanisms in rat VSMCs. Andrographolide activated the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), leading to p53 phosphorylation. Phosphorylated p53 subsequently transactivated the expression of Bax, a pro-apoptotic protein. Transfection with pp2a small interfering RNA (siRNA) suppressed andrographolide-induced p38MAPK activation, p53 phosphorylation, and caspase 3 activation. Andrographolide also activated the Src homology 1 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-1), and induced PP2A dephosphorylation, both of which were inhibited by the SHP-1 inhibitor sodium stibogluconate (SSG) or shp-1 siRNA. SSG or shp-1 siRNA prevented andrographolide-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that andrographolide activates the PP2A-p38MAPK-p53-Bax cascade, causing mitochondrial dysfunction and VSMC death through an SHP-1-dependent mechanism.

  11. Novel elastic, lattice dynamics and thermodynamic properties of metallic single-layer transition metal phosphides: 2H-M 2P (Mo2P, W2P, Nb2P and Ta2P)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiuren; Wu, Bozhao; Wang, Yanggang; Li, Zhimi; Yao, Yuanpeng; Jiang, Yong; Ding, Yanhuai; Xu, Fu; Zhang, Ping

    2018-04-01

    Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the research of two-dimensional (2D) phosphides due to their unique physical properties and wide applications. Transition metal phosphides 2H-M 2Ps (Mo2P, W2P, Nb2P and Ta2P) show considerable catalytic activity and energy storage potential. However, the electronic structure and mechanical properties of 2D 2H-M 2Ps are still unrevealed. Here, first-principles calculations are employed to investigate the lattice dynamics, elasticity and thermodynamic properties of 2H-M 2Ps. Results show that M 2Ps with lower stiffness exhibit remarkable lateral deformation under unidirectional loads. Due to the largest average Grüneisen parameter, single-layer Nb2P has the strongest anharmonic vibrations, resulting in the highest thermal expansion coefficient. The lattice thermal conductivities of Ta2P, W2P and Nb2P contradict classical theory, which would predict a smaller thermal conductivity due to the much heavier atom mass. Moreover, the calculations also demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of Ta2P is the highest as well as the lowest thermal expansion, owing to its weak anharmonic phonon scattering and the lowest average Grüneisen parameter. The insight provided by this study may be useful for future experimental and theoretical studies concerning 2D transition metal phosphide materials.

  12. Bottomonium spectroscopy and radiative transitions involving the chi(bJ)(1P, 2P) states at BABAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Campagnari, C.; Sevilla, M. Franco; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Roehrken, M.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Gioi, L. Li; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Gruenber, O.; Hess, M.; Leddig, T.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wulsin, H. W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.

    2014-01-01

    We use (121±1) million Υ(3S) and (98±1) million Υ(2S) mesons recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e− collider at SLAC to perform a study of radiative transitions involving the χbJ(1P,2P) states in exclusive decays with μ+μ−γγ final states. We reconstruct twelve channels in four cascades

  13. Intracellular S1P generation is essential for S1P-induced motility of human lung endothelial cells: role of sphingosine kinase 1 and S1P lyase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny V Berdyshev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Earlier we have shown that extracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P induces migration of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs through the activation of S1P(1 receptor, PKCε, and PLD2-PKCζ-Rac1 signaling cascade. As endothelial cells generate intracellular S1P, here we have investigated the role of sphingosine kinases (SphKs and S1P lyase (S1PL, that regulate intracellular S1P accumulation, in HPAEC motility. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Inhibition of SphK activity with a SphK inhibitor 2-(p-Hydroxyanilino-4-(p-Chlorophenyl Thiazole or down-regulation of Sphk1, but not SphK2, with siRNA decreased S1P(int, and attenuated S1P(ext or serum-induced motility of HPAECs. On the contrary, inhibition of S1PL with 4-deoxypyridoxine or knockdown of S1PL with siRNA increased S1P(int and potentiated motility of HPAECs to S1P(ext or serum. S1P(ext mediates cell motility through activation of Rac1 and IQGAP1 signal transduction in HPAECs. Silencing of SphK1 by siRNA attenuated Rac1 and IQGAP1 translocation to the cell periphery; however, knockdown of S1PL with siRNA or 4-deoxypyridoxine augmented activated Rac1 and stimulated Rac1 and IQGAP1 translocation to cell periphery. The increased cell motility mediated by down-regulation was S1PL was pertussis toxin sensitive suggesting "inside-out" signaling of intracellularly generated S1P. Although S1P did not accumulate significantly in media under basal or S1PL knockdown conditions, addition of sodium vanadate increased S1P levels in the medium and inside the cells most likely by blocking phosphatases including lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs. Furthermore, addition of anti-S1P mAb to the incubation medium blocked S1P(ext or 4-deoxypyridoxine-dependent endothelial cell motility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest S1P(ext mediated endothelial cell motility is dependent on intracellular S1P production, which is regulated, in part, by SphK1 and S1PL.

  14. Benzazole derivatives: V. The reactivity of some 2-p-tolyl-and 2-p-methylstyryl-benzimidazolium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cernatescu Corina

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of the p-substituted methyl group in 1-methyl-2-p-tolylbenzimidazolium and 1-methyl-2-p-methylstyrylbenzimidazolium iodides with p-nitroso-dimethylaniline (p-NDMA and aromatic aldehydes was studied. According to literature data on the steric effects produced by the bulky N-l methyl group, the 2-p-tolyl substituted salt does not react with p-NDMA. On the other hand, 2-p-methylstyryl substituted salts give condensation reactions, similarly to 1,2,3-trimethylbenzimidazolium iodides. The compounds obtained from the reaction with aromatic aldehydes can be used as dyeing substances, photosensitizers or as dienic monomers, due to the conjugated chain from C-2.

  15. Network-Aware DHT-Based P2P Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayçal, Marguerite; Serhrouchni, Ahmed

    P2P networks lay over existing IP networks and infrastructure. This chapter investigates the relation between both layers, details the motivations for network awareness in P2P systems, and elucidates the requirements P2P systems have to meet for efficient network awareness. Since new P2P systems are mostly based on DHTs, we also present and analyse DHT-based architectures. And after a brief presentation of different existing network-awareness solutions, the chapter goes on effective cooperation between P2P traffic and network providers' business agreements, and introduces emerging DHT-based P2P systems that are network aware through a semantic defined for resource sharing. These new systems ensure also a certain context-awareness. So, they are analyzed and compared before an open end on prospects of network awareness in P2P systems.

  16. pH-metric studies on the mixed ligand-chelates of oxovanadium(IV) with 2,2'-bipyridyl and dicarboxylic or hydroxy acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, A K; Kumari, V; Chaturvedi, G K [Agra Coll. (India)

    1978-12-01

    The interaction of vanadyl ion with 2,2'-bipyridyl and some dicarboxylic or hydroxy acids (where dicarboxylic acid = oxalic (OX), malonic (MALN), phthalic (PHA), maleic (MAL) acids; hydroxy acids salicylic (SA), 5-sulfosalicylic (5-SSA), mandelic (MAND) and glycollic (HG) acids was studied potentiometrically. pH-titrations of the reaction mixtures containing vanadyl sulphate, 2,2'-bipyridyl and one of the dicarboxylic or hydroxy acids (OX, MALN, PHA, MAL, SA, 5-SSA, MAND and HG acids) in equimolar ratio exhibited the formation of 1:1:1 mixed ligand chelates. The formation constants of the resulting biligand chelates were calculated, at 35/sup +/-1/sup 0/ and 45/sup +/-1/sup 0/ and also the thermodynamic functions viz. ..delta..F, ..delta..H and ..delta..S (..mu..=0.1M KNO/sub 3/) (auth.).

  17. Theoretical investigation of the Omega(g,u)(+/-) states of K2 dissociating adiabatically up to K(4p 2P(3/2)) + K(4p 2P(3/2)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jraij, A; Allouche, A R; Magnier, S; Aubert-Frécon, M

    2009-06-28

    A theoretical investigation of the electronic structure of the K(2) molecule, including spin-orbit effects, has been performed. Potential energies have been calculated over a large range of R up to 75a(0) for the 88 Omega(g,u)(+/-) states dissociating adiabatically into the limits up to K(4p (2)P(3/2))+K(4p (2)P(3/2)). Equilibrium distances, transition energies, harmonic frequencies, as well as depths for wells and heights for barriers are reported for all of the bound Omega(g,u)(+/-) states. Present ab initio calculations are shown to be able to reproduce quite accurately the small structures (wells and barrier) displayed at very long-range (R>50a(0)) by the (2,3)1(u) and (2)0(g)(-) purely long-range states. As the present data could help experimentalists, we make available extensive tables of energy values versus internuclear distances in our database at the web address http://www-lasim.univ-lyon1.fr/spip.php?rubrique99.

  18. De novo duplication of 17p13.1-p13.2 in a patient with intellectual disability and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Tominaga, Makiko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-Ichi; Ida, Kazumi; Naruto, Takuya; Masuno, Mitsuo; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2014-06-01

    17p13.1 Deletion encompassing TP53 has been described as a syndrome characterized by intellectual disability and dysmorphic features. Only one case with a 17p13.1 duplication encompassing TP53 has been reported in a patient with intellectual disability, seizures, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. Here, we present a patient with a 17p13.1 duplication who exhibited obesity and intellectual disability, similar to the previous report. The 9-year-old proposita was referred for the evaluation of intellectual disability and obesity. She also exhibited insulin resistance and liver dysfunction. She had wide palpebral fissures, upturned nostrils, a long mandible, short and slender fingers, and skin hyperpigmentation. Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) detected a 3.2 Mb duplication of 17p13.1-p13.2 encompassing TP53, FXR2, NLGN2, and SLC2A4, which encodes the insulin-responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) associated with insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes and muscle. We suggest that 17p13.1 duplication may represent a clinically recognizable condition characterized partially by a characteristic facial phenotype, developmental delay, and obesity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Backup Expression of the PhaP2 Phasin Compensates for phaP1 Deletion in Herbaspirillum seropedicae, Maintaining Fitness and PHB Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Luis P S; Teixeira, Cícero S; Tirapelle, Evandro F; Donatti, Lucélia; Tadra-Sfeir, Michelle Z; Steffens, Maria B R; de Souza, Emanuel M; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fabio; Chubatsu, Leda S; Müller-Santos, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Phasins are important proteins controlling poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules formation, their number into the cell and stability. The genome sequencing of the endophytic and diazotrophic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 revealed two homologous phasin genes. To verify the role of the phasins on PHB accumulation in the parental strain H. seropedicae SmR1, isogenic strains defective in the expression of phaP1, phaP2 or both genes were obtained by gene deletion and characterized in this work. Despite of the high sequence similarity between PhaP1 and PhaP2, PhaP1 is the major phasin in H. seropedicae, since its deletion reduced PHB accumulation by ≈50% in comparison to the parental and ΔphaP2. Upon deletion of phaP1, the expression of phaP2 was sixfold enhanced in the ΔphaP1 strain. The responsive backup expression of phaP2 partially rescued the ΔphaP1 mutant, maintaining about 50% of the parental PHB level. The double mutant ΔphaP1.2 did not accumulate PHB in any growth stage and showed a severe reduction of growth when glucose was the carbon source, a clear demonstration of negative impact in the fitness. The co-occurrence of phaP1 and phaP2 homologous in bacteria relatives of H. seropedicae, including other endophytes, indicates that the mechanism of phasin compensation by phaP2 expression may be operating in other organisms, showing that PHB metabolism is a key factor to adaptation and efficiency of endophytic bacteria.

  20. An analysis of pH, pO2 and pCO2 in the peritoneal fluid of dogs with ascites of various etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glińska-Suchocka, K; Sławuta, P; Jankowski, M; Kubiak, K; Spużak, J; Borusewicz, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess pH, pO2 and pCO2 in peritoneal fluid. The study was conducted on a group of 22 dogs with symptoms of ascites. Group 1 consisted of 4 dogs with adenocarcinoma, group 2--of 6 dogs with glomerulonephritis, group 3 of 8 dogs with hepatic cirrhosis and group 4 of 4 dogs with bacterial peritonitis. An abdominal cavity puncture was performed in all dogs and the fluid was drawn into a heparinized syringe in order to assess pH, pO2 and pCO2 . The analysis of pH in the peritoneal fluid revealed statistically significant differences between group 4 and groups 1 (p=0.01), 2 (p=0.01), and 3 (p=0.01). The lowest pH value compared to the other studied groups was recorded in group 4. In group 4, the pO2 was the lowest compared to the other groups (group 1 p=0.01, group 2 p=0.01, group 3 p=0.01). The value of pCO2 was the highest in group 4 compared to groups 1, 2, and 3. The study found statistically significant differences in pH, pCO2 and pCO2 between group 4 (the group of dogs with bacterial peritonitis) and the other groups of dogs. This was probably linked to the pathogenesis of peritonitis. As a result of an inflammatory reaction within the peritoneal cavity, there is an increase in fibrin accumulations leading to a decreased oxygen supply causing the oxidative glucose metabolism to change into a non-oxidative glucose metabolism. This, in turn, causes a decrease in pH, acidosis, and a low oxidoreduction potential. It also impairs phagocytosis and activates proteolytic enzymes which create ideal conditions for the growth of anaerobic bacteria. The obtained results indicate that the pH, pO2 and pCO2 may be used to differentiate bacterial peritonitis from ascites of other etiologies.

  1. Bcl-2 protein expression is associated with p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Shinichi; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Kosuke; Takeuchi, Hideya; Nishizaki, Takashi; Higashi, Hidefumi; Era, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Recent experimental studies have shown that Bcl-2, which has been established as a key player in the control of apoptosis, plays a role in regulating the cell cycle and proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between Bcl-2 and p27 protein expression, p53 protein expression and the proliferation activity as defined by the MIB-1 counts. The prognostic implication of Bcl-2 protein expression in relation to p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts for breast cancer was also evaluated. The immunohistochemical expression of Bcl-2 protein was evaluated in a series of 249 invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast, in which p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts had been determined previously. The Bcl-2 protein expression was found to be decreased in 105 (42%) cases. A decreased Bcl-2 protein expression was significantly correlated with a nuclear grade of III, a negative estrogen receptor, a decreased p27 protein expression, a positive p53 protein expression, positive MIB-1 counts and a positive HER2 protein expression. The incidence of a nuclear grade of III and positive MIB-1 counts increased as the number of abnormal findings of Bcl-2, p27 and p53 protein expressions increased. A univariate analysis indicated a decreased Bcl-2 protein expression to be significantly (p = 0.0089) associated with a worse disease free survival (DFS), while a multivariate analysis indicated the lymph node status and MIB-1 counts to be independently significant prognostic factors for the DFS. The Bcl-2 protein expression has a close correlation with p27 and p53 protein expressions and the proliferation activity determined by MIB-1 counts in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. The prognostic value of Bcl-2 as well as p27 and p53 protein expressions was dependent on the proliferation activity in breast cancer

  2. Bcl-2 protein expression is associated with p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishizaki Takashi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental studies have shown that Bcl-2, which has been established as a key player in the control of apoptosis, plays a role in regulating the cell cycle and proliferation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between Bcl-2 and p27 protein expression, p53 protein expression and the proliferation activity as defined by the MIB-1 counts. The prognostic implication of Bcl-2 protein expression in relation to p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts for breast cancer was also evaluated. Methods The immunohistochemical expression of Bcl-2 protein was evaluated in a series of 249 invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast, in which p27 and p53 protein expressions and MIB-1 counts had been determined previously. Results The Bcl-2 protein expression was found to be decreased in 105 (42% cases. A decreased Bcl-2 protein expression was significantly correlated with a nuclear grade of III, a negative estrogen receptor, a decreased p27 protein expression, a positive p53 protein expression, positive MIB-1 counts and a positive HER2 protein expression. The incidence of a nuclear grade of III and positive MIB-1 counts increased as the number of abnormal findings of Bcl-2, p27 and p53 protein expressions increased. A univariate analysis indicated a decreased Bcl-2 protein expression to be significantly (p = 0.0089 associated with a worse disease free survival (DFS, while a multivariate analysis indicated the lymph node status and MIB-1 counts to be independently significant prognostic factors for the DFS. Conclusion The Bcl-2 protein expression has a close correlation with p27 and p53 protein expressions and the proliferation activity determined by MIB-1 counts in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. The prognostic value of Bcl-2 as well as p27 and p53 protein expressions was dependent on the proliferation activity in breast cancer.

  3. Evidence of the 2s2p(1P) doubly excited state in the harmonic generation spectrum of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoko Djiokap, J. M.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2011-01-01

    By solving the two-active-electron time-dependent Schroedinger equation in an intense, ultrashort laser field, we investigate evidence of electron correlations in the high-order harmonic generation spectrum of helium. As the frequency of the driving laser pulse varies from 4.6 to 6.6 eV, the 13th, 11th, and 9th harmonics sequentially become resonant with the transition between the ground state and the isolated 2s2p( 1 P) autoionizing state of helium, which dramatically enhances these harmonics and changes their profiles. When each of the 9th and 13th harmonics are in resonance with this autoionizing state, there is also a low-order multiphoton resonance with a Rydberg state, resulting in a particularly large enhancement of these harmonics relative to neighboring harmonics. When the 11th harmonic is in resonance with the 2s2p( 1 P) autoionizing state, the 13th harmonic is simultaneously in resonance with numerous higher-energy autoionizing states, resulting in a competition between these two harmonics for intensity. These results demonstrate that even electron correlations occurring over a narrow energy interval can have a significant effect on strong-field processes such as harmonic generation.

  4. Cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p, a negative regulator of the MEC1 pathway, coincides with the compartmentalization of Rnr2p–Rnr4p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, William B. [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Hughes, Bridget Todd; Au, Wei Chun; Sakelaris, Sally [Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kerscher, Oliver [Biology Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Benton, Michael G., E-mail: benton@lsu.edu [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Basrai, Munira A., E-mail: basraim@mail.nih.gov [Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Hug1p overexpression sensitizes wild-type cells to DNA damage and hydroxyurea (HU). •Expression of Hug1p in response to HU treatment is delayed relative to Rnr3p. •MEC1 pathway genes are required for cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p. •Hug1p subcellular compartmentalization to the cytoplasm coincides with Rnr2p–Rnr4p. -- Abstract: The evolutionarily conserved MEC1 checkpoint pathway mediates cell cycle arrest and induction of genes including the RNR (Ribonucleotide reductase) genes and HUG1 (Hydroxyurea, ultraviolet, and gamma radiation) in response to DNA damage and replication arrest. Rnr complex activity is in part controlled by cytoplasmic localization of the Rnr2p–Rnr4p subunits and inactivation of negative regulators Sml1p and Dif1p upon DNA damage and hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. We previously showed that a deletion of HUG1 rescues lethality of mec1Δ and suppresses dun1Δ strains. In this study, multiple approaches demonstrate the regulatory response of Hug1p to DNA damage and HU treatment and support its role as a negative effector of the MEC1 pathway. Consistent with our hypothesis, wild-type cells are sensitive to DNA damage and HU when HUG1 is overexpressed. A Hug1 polyclonal antiserum reveals that HUG1 encodes a protein in budding yeast and its MEC1-dependent expression is delayed compared to the rapid induction of Rnr3p in response to HU treatment. Cell biology and subcellular fractionation experiments show localization of Hug1p-GFP to the cytoplasm upon HU treatment. The cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p-GFP is dependent on MEC1 pathway genes and coincides with the cytoplasmic localization of Rnr2p–Rnr4p. Taken together, the genetic interactions, gene expression, and localization studies support a novel role for Hug1p as a negative regulator of the MEC1 checkpoint response through its compartmentalization with Rnr2p–Rnr4p.

  5. Managing P2P services via the IMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liotta, A.; Lin, L.

    2007-01-01

    The key aim of our work was to illustrate the benefits and means to deploy P2P services via the IMS. Having demonstrated the technical viability of P2P-IMS we have also found a way to add a new management dimension to existing P2P systems. P2P-IMS comes with a natural "data management" mechanism,

  6. E2F-1-Induced p53-independent apoptosis in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Christian Henrik; Helin, K.; Sehested, M.

    1998-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are key targets for the retinoblastoma protein, pRB. By inactivation of E2Fs, pRB prevents progression to the S phase. To test proliferative functions of E2F, we generated transgenic mice expressing human E2F-1 and/or human DP-1. When the hydroxymethyl glutaryl...... involving increased apoptosis in the germinal epithelium. This effect was potentiated by simultaneous overexpression of DP-1. Testicular atrophy as a result of overexpression of E2F-1 and DP-1 is independent of functional p53, since p53-nullizygous transgenic mice overexpressing E2F-1 and DP-1 also suffered...

  7. P2. A fused silica Cherenkov detector for the high precision determination of the weak mixing angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerz, Kathrin; Becker, Dominik; Jennewein, Thomas; Baunack, Sebastian [Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Kumar, Krishna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook (United States); Maas, Frank [Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The weak mixing angle is a central parameter of the standard model and its high precision determination is tantamount to probing for new physics effects. The P2 experiment at the MESA accelerator in Mainz will perform such a measurement of the weak mixing angle via parity violating electron-proton scattering. We aim to determine sin{sup 2}(Θ{sub W}) to a relative precision of 0.13%. Since the weak charge of the proton is small compared to its electric charge, the measurable asymmetry is only 33 ppb, requiring a challenging measurement to a precision of only 0.44 ppb. In order to achieve this precision we need to collect very high statistics and carefully minimize interfering effects like apparatus induced false asymmetries. We present the status of the development of an integrating fused-silica Cherenkov detector, which is suitable for a high precision and high intensity experiment like P2. The contribution will focus on the investigation of the detector's response to incoming signal and background particles both by simulations and by beam tests at the MAMI accelerator.

  8. Backup expression of the PhaP2 phasin compensates for phaP1 deletion in Herbaspirillum seropedicae, maintaining fitness and PHB accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Paulo Silveira Alves

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Phasins are important proteins controlling PHB granules formation, their number into the cell and stability. The genome sequencing of the endophytic and diazotrophic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 revealed two homologous phasin genes. To verify the role of the phasins on PHB accumulation in the parental strain H. seropedicae SmR1, isogenic strains defective in the expression of phaP1, phaP2 or both genes were obtained by gene deletion and characterized in this work. Despite of the high sequence similarity between PhaP1 and PhaP2, PhaP1 is the major phasin in H. seropedicae, since its deletion reduced PHB accumulation by ≈ 50 % in comparison to the parental and ΔphaP2. Upon deletion of phaP1, the expression of phaP2 was 6-fold enhanced in the ΔphaP1 strain. The responsive backup expression of phaP2 partially rescued the ΔphaP1 mutant, maintaining about 50% of the parental PHB level. The double mutant ΔphaP1.2 did not accumulate PHB in any growth stage and showed a severe reduction of growth when glucose was the carbon source, a clear demonstration of negative impact in the fitness. The co-occurrence of phaP1 and phaP2 homologous in bacteria relatives of H. seropedicae, including other endophytes, indicates that the mechanism of phasin compensation by phaP2 expression may be operating in other organisms, showing that PHB metabolism is a key factor to adaptation and efficiency of endophytic bacteria.

  9. Tungsten phosphanylarylthiolato complexes [W{PhP(2-SC6H4)2-kappa3S,S',P} 2] and [W{P(2-SC6H4)3-kappa4S,S',S",P}2]: synthesis, structures and redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Alexandra; Lönnecke, Peter; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Luminita; Hey-Hawkins, Evamarie

    2008-09-14

    PhP(2-SHC6H4)2 (PS2H2) reacts with WCl6 with reduction of tungsten to give the air-sensitive tungsten(IV) complex [W{PhP(2-SC6H4)2-kappa(3)S,S',P}2] (1). 1 is oxidised in air to [WO{PhPO(2-SC6H4)2-kappa(3)S,S',O}{PhP(2-SC6H4)2-kappa(3)S,S',P}] (2). The attempted synthesis of 2 by reaction of 1 with iodosobenzene as oxidising agent was unsuccessful. [W{P(2-SC6H4)3-kappa(4)S,S',S",P}2] (3) was formed in the reaction of P(2-SHC6H4)3 (PS3H3) with WCl6. The W(VI) complex 3 contains two PS3(3-) ligands, each coordinated in a tetradentate fashion resulting in a tungsten coordination number of eight. The reaction of 3 with AgBF4 yields the dinuclear tungsten complex [W2{P(2-SC6H4)3-kappa(4)S,S',S",P}3]BF4 (4). Complexes 1-4 were characterised by spectral methods and X-ray structure determination.

  10. Fenofibrate activates Nrf2 through p62-dependent Keap1 degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Su; Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Da Hyun; Bae, Soo Han

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) activates the β-oxidation of fatty acids in the liver. Fenofibrate is a potent agonist of PPARα and is used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. Fenofibrate treatment often induces the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway is an essential component of the defense mechanism against oxidative stress. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway in fenofibrate-induced cell death is not known. In this study, we demonstrated that fenofibrate induces Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. This fenofibrate-mediated Keap1 degradation is partly dependent on autophagy. Furthermore, fenofibrate-induced Keap1 degradation followed by Nrf2 activation is mainly mediated by p62, which functions as an adaptor protein in the autophagic pathway. Consistent with these findings, ablation of p62 increased fenofibrate-mediated apoptotic cell death associated with ROS accumulation. These results strongly suggest that p62 plays a crucial role in preventing fenofibrate-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Fenofibrate induces cell death by increasing ROS production. • The underlying defense mechanism against this effect is unknown. • Fenofibrate induces autophagy-dependent Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. • This process is p62-dependent; lack of p62 enhanced fenofibrate-mediated apoptosis. • p62 plays a crucial role in preventing fenofibrate-induced cell death

  11. Fenofibrate activates Nrf2 through p62-dependent Keap1 degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Su [Severance Biomedical Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dong Hoon [Department of Life Science and Ewha Research Center for Systems Biology (Korea, Republic of); The Research Center for Cell Homeostasis, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 127-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Da Hyun [Severance Biomedical Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Soo Han, E-mail: soohanbae@yuhs.ac [Severance Biomedical Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-25

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) activates the β-oxidation of fatty acids in the liver. Fenofibrate is a potent agonist of PPARα and is used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. Fenofibrate treatment often induces the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway is an essential component of the defense mechanism against oxidative stress. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway in fenofibrate-induced cell death is not known. In this study, we demonstrated that fenofibrate induces Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. This fenofibrate-mediated Keap1 degradation is partly dependent on autophagy. Furthermore, fenofibrate-induced Keap1 degradation followed by Nrf2 activation is mainly mediated by p62, which functions as an adaptor protein in the autophagic pathway. Consistent with these findings, ablation of p62 increased fenofibrate-mediated apoptotic cell death associated with ROS accumulation. These results strongly suggest that p62 plays a crucial role in preventing fenofibrate-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Fenofibrate induces cell death by increasing ROS production. • The underlying defense mechanism against this effect is unknown. • Fenofibrate induces autophagy-dependent Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. • This process is p62-dependent; lack of p62 enhanced fenofibrate-mediated apoptosis. • p62 plays a crucial role in preventing fenofibrate-induced cell death.

  12. [Role and related mechanism of S1P/S1P1 signal pathway during post conditioning of hypertrophic cardiomyocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X H; Li, H X; Tao, J; Li, X M; Yang, Y N; Ma, Y T; Chen, B D

    2016-05-24

    To study the role and mechanism of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/ sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1(S1P1) signal pathway during post conditioning of hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were isolated and cultured, then stimulated by norepinephrine (NE) to induce cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. Using tri-gas incubator to create hypoxia and reoxygenation enviroment to mimic ischemia-reperfusion and postconditioning. Hypertrophic cardiomyoctyes were divided into five groups according to the presence or absence of various drugs and postconditiong and relevant signal pathways changes were detected: (1) IPost group (hypoxia+ postconditioning); (2) IPost+ S1P group (cells were pretreated with S1P (1 μmol/L) for 2 h before IPost); (3) IPost+ W-146+ S1P group (cells in IPost+ W-146+ S1P group were pretreated with S1P1 inhibitor W-146 (0.4 μmol/L) for 20 min); (4) IPost+ PD98059+ S1P group (cells in IPost+ S1P group were pretreated with MAPK antagonist PD98059 (125 μmol/L) for 20 min); (5) IPost+ LY-294002+ S1P group (cells in IPost+ S1P group were pretreated with PI3K antagonist LY294002 (0.1 μmol/L) for 20 min). Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and protein expression of relevant signal pathways were detected by Western blot. (1)Apoptosis rate was significantly increased in hypoxia/reoxygenation (27.90±4.49)% group compared with normal control group (7.97±2.18)%, which could be significantly reduced in IPost group (15.90±1.77)% (all PS1P and IPost+ S1P+ LY-294002 groups than in IPost and IPost+ S1P+ W-146 and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 group (all PS1P and IPost+ S1P+ LY-294002 group than in IPost and IPost+ S1P+ W-146 group and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 group (all PS1P+ W-146 and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 groups. p-ERK1/2 and p-Akt levels in IPost+ S1P+ W-146 group and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 were similar as in IPost group. S1P can play protective role on NE induced cardiomyocytes hypertrophy during post conditioning through downregulating caspase-3 expression and

  13. Cryptocurrency Networks: A New P2P Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Delgado-Segura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available P2P networks are the mechanism used by cryptocurrencies to disseminate system information while keeping the whole system as much decentralized as possible. Cryptocurrency P2P networks have new characteristics that propose new challenges and avoid some problems of existing P2P networks. By characterizing the most relevant cryptocurrency network, Bitcoin, we provide details on different properties of cryptocurrency networks and their similarities and differences with standard P2P network paradigms. Our study allows us to conclude that cryptocurrency networks present a new paradigm of P2P networks due to the mechanisms they use to achieve high resilience and security. With this new paradigm, interesting research lines can be further developed, both in the focused field of P2P cryptocurrency networks and also when such networks are combined with other distributed scenarios.

  14. Anonymity in P2P Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares-Lopez, Pilar; Muñoz-Gea, Juan Pedro; Malgosa-Sanahuja, Josemaria; Sanchez-Aarnoutse, Juan Carlos

    In the last years, the use of peer-to-peer (P2P) applications to share and exchange knowledge among people around the world has experienced an exponential growth. Therefore, it is understandable that, like in any successful communication mechanism used by a lot of humans being, the anonymity can be a desirable characteristic in this scenario. Anonymity in P2P networks can be obtained by means of different methods, although the most significant ones are broadcast protocols, dining-cryptographer (DC) nets and multiple-hop paths. Each of these methods can be tunable in order to build a real anonymity P2P application. In addition, there is a mathematical tool called entropy that can be used in some scenarios to quantify anonymity in communication networks. In some cases, it can be calculated analytically but in others it is necessary to use simulation to obtain the network entropy.

  15. Impaired P2X1 Receptor-Mediated Adhesion in Eosinophils from Asthmatic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn; Symon, Fiona; Sylvius, Nicolas; Ran, Shaun; Bafadhel, Mona; Muessel, Michelle; Bradding, Peter; Wardlaw, Andrew; Vial, Catherine

    2016-06-15

    Eosinophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma and can be activated by extracellular nucleotides released following cell damage or inflammation. For example, increased ATP concentrations were reported in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of asthmatic patients. Although eosinophils are known to express several subtypes of P2 receptors for extracellular nucleotides, their function and contribution to asthma remain unclear. In this article, we show that transcripts for P2X1, P2X4, and P2X5 receptors were expressed in healthy and asthmatic eosinophils. The P2X receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-meATP; 10 μM) evoked rapidly activating and desensitizing inward currents (peak 18 ± 3 pA/pF at -60 mV) in healthy eosinophils, typical of P2X1 homomeric receptors, which were abolished by the selective P2X1 antagonist NF449 (1 μM) (3 ± 2 pA/pF). α,β-meATP-evoked currents were smaller in eosinophils from asthmatic patients (8 ± 2 versus 27 ± 5 pA/pF for healthy) but were enhanced following treatment with a high concentration of the nucleotidase apyrase (17 ± 5 pA/pF for 10 IU/ml and 11 ± 3 pA/pF for 0.32 IU/ml), indicating that the channels are partially desensitized by extracellular nucleotides. α,β-meATP (10 μM) increased the expression of CD11b activated form in eosinophils from healthy, but not asthmatic, donors (143 ± 21% and 108 ± 11% of control response, respectively). Furthermore, α,β-meATP increased healthy (18 ± 2% compared with control 10 ± 1%) but not asthmatic (13 ± 1% versus 10 ± 0% for control) eosinophil adhesion. Healthy human eosinophils express functional P2X1 receptors whose activation leads to eosinophil αMβ2 integrin-dependent adhesion. P2X1 responses are constitutively reduced in asthmatic compared with healthy eosinophils, probably as the result of an increase in extracellular nucleotide concentration. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride under oxygen-deficient conditions over V-P-O mixed oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, H.; Bruggink, A.A.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride over V-P-O mixed oxides was studied under oxygen deficient conditions. The mixed oxides were prepared with P/V atomic ratios ranging from 0.7 to 1.0. Catalysts with P/V <1.0 did not show any selectivity to maleic anhydride formation, regardless

  17. Upper bound on the non-colorability threshold of the 2+p-COL problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, R.

    2004-10-01

    The 2p-COL problem introduced by Walsh, smoothly interpolates between P and NP by mixing together the polynornial 2-coloring problem and the NP complete 3-coloring problem. A natural upper bound on the non colorability of the 2+p-COL problem in min {r-bar 2 /(1 - p)r-bar 3 }, where r-bar 2 and r-bar 3 are the upper bounds on 2-COL and 3-COL thresholds respectively. In this paper we improve this upper-bound for each 0.73 ≤ p 1. This means that for p ≥ 0.73 the 2+p-COL problem does not behave like the 2-COL problem. We use the method developed by Kaporis et al., which combines the concept of legal rigid colorings introduced by Achlioptas and Molloy with the occupancy problem for random allocations of balls into bins. (author)

  18. Exclusive interactions in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Andrew; Alberta U.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents two exclusive production processes in p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, using the Collider Detector Facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. An observation of exclusive e + e - production through γγ → e + e - is presented, as well as evidence for exclusive production of γγ through gg → γγ (via a quark loop). The exclusive e + e - production observation is based on 16 candidate events, with a background estimate of 2.1 -0.3 +0.7 . Each event has an e + e - pair (E T (e) > 5 GeV, |η(e)| -0.3 +0.5 (stat) ± 0.3(sys) pb, while the predicted cross section is 1.711 ± 0.008 pb. The kinematic properties of the events are consistent with the predictions of the LPAIR Monte Carlo. The evidence for exclusive γγ production consists of 3 candidate events, with a background estimate of 0.0 -0.0 +0.2 events. Each event has two photons (E T γ) > 5 GeV, |η(γ)| -0.04 +0.14 (stat) ± (sys) pb. It agrees with the theoretical prediction of 0.04 pb with a factor 3 to 5 theoretical uncertainty

  19. A mixed iron-manganese based pyrophosphate cathode, Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7, for rechargeable sodium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Rana A; Park, Chan Sun; Raja, Arsalan A; Shin, Jaeho; Kahraman, Ramazan

    2016-02-07

    The development of secondary batteries based on abundant and cheap elements is vital. Among various alternatives to conventional lithium-ion batteries, sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) are promising due to the abundant resources and low cost of sodium. While there are many challenges associated with the SIB system, cathode is an important factor in determining the electrochemical performance of this battery system. Accordingly, ongoing research in the field of SIBs is inclined towards the development of safe, cost effective cathode materials having improved performance. In particular, pyrophosphate cathodes have recently demonstrated decent electrochemical performance and thermal stability. Herein, we report the synthesis, electrochemical properties, and thermal behavior of a novel Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 cathode for SIBs. The material was synthesized through a solid state process. The structural analysis reveals that the mixed substitution of manganese and iron has resulted in a triclinic crystal structure (P1[combining macron] space group). Galvanostatic charge/discharge measurements indicate that Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 is electrochemically active with a reversible capacity of ∼80 mA h g(-1) at a C/20 rate with an average redox potential of 3.2 V. (vs. Na/Na(+)). It is noticed that 84% of initial capacity is preserved over 90 cycles showing promising cyclability. It is also noticed that the rate capability of Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 is better than Na2MnP2O7. Ex situ and CV analyses indicate that Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 undergoes a single phase reaction rather than a biphasic reaction due to different Na coordination environment and different Na site occupancy when compared to other pyrophosphate materials (Na2FeP2O7 and Na2MnP2O7). Thermogravimetric analysis (25-550 °C) confirms good thermal stability of Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7 with only 2% weight loss. Owing to promising electrochemical properties and decent thermal stability, Na2Fe0.5Mn0.5P2O7, can be an attractive cathode for SIBs.

  20. The P2P approach to interorganizational workflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Weske, M.H.; Dittrich, K.R.; Geppert, A.; Norrie, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes in an informal way the Public-To-Private (P2P) approach to interorganizational workflows, which is based on a notion of inheritance. The approach consists of three steps: (1) create a common understanding of the interorganizational workflow by specifying a shared public

  1. Radiative lifetimes of the 2s2p2(4P) metastable levels of N III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z.; Kwong, Victor H. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative decay rates of N III 175 nm intersystem lines were measured in the laboratory by recording the time dependence of photon intensities emitted as the 2s2p2(4P) metastable term of N(2+) ions decay to the 2s22p(2P0) ground term. A cylindrical radio frequency ion trap was used to store the electron impact-produced N(2+) ions. The radiative decay signals were analyzed by multiexponential least-squares fits to the data. The measured radiative decay rates to the ground term are 1019(+/- 64)/s for 4P sub 1/2, 74.5(+/- 5.4)/s for 4P sub 3/2, and 308( +/- 22)/s for 4P sub 5/2. Comparisons of the measured values with theoretical values are presented.

  2. Transition probabilities for the 3s2 3p(2P0)-3s3p2(4P) intersystem lines of Si II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamai, Anthony G.; Smith, Peter L.; Bergeson, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    Intensity ratios of lines of the spin-changing 'intersystem' multiplet of S II (4P yields 2P0) at 234 nm have been used to determine electron densities and temperatures in a variety of astrophysical environments. However, the accuracy of these diagnostic calculations have been limited by uncertainties associated with the available atomic data. We report the first laboratory measurement, using an ion-trapping technique, of the radiative lifetimes of the three metastable levels of the 3s3p2 4P term of Si II. Our results are 104 +/- 16, 406 +/- 33, and 811 +/- 77 micro-s for lifetimes of the J = 1/2, 5/2, and 3/2 levels, respectively. A-values were derived from our lifetimes by use of measured branching fractions. Our A-values, which differ from calculated values by 30 percent or more, should give better agreement between modeled and observed Si II line ratios.

  3. Nuclear effects in protonium formation low-energy three-body reaction: p̄ + (pμ1s → (p̄pα + μ−: Strong p̄–p interaction in p̄ + (pμ1s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultanov Renat A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-charge-particle system (p̄, μ−, p+ with an additional matter-antimatter, i.e. p̄–p+, nuclear interaction is the subject of this work. Specifically, we carry out a few-body computation of the following protonium formation reaction: p̄ + (p+μ−1s → (p̄p+1s + μ−, where p+ is a proton, p̄ is an antiproton, μ− is a muon, and a bound state of p+ and its counterpart p̄ is a protonium atom: Pn = (p̄p+. The low-energy cross sections and rates of the Pn formation reaction are computed in the framework of a Faddeev-like equation formalism. The strong p̄–p+ interaction is approximately included in this calculation.

  4. Strategies for P2P connectivity in reconfigurable converged wired/wireless access networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto, Gustavo; Mora, José; Ortega, Beatriz; Capmany, José

    2010-12-06

    This paper presents different strategies to define the architecture of a Radio-Over-Fiber (RoF) Access networks enabling Peer-to-Peer (P2P) functionalities. The architectures fully exploit the flexibility of a wavelength router based on the feedback configuration of an Arrayed Waveguide Grating (AWG) and an optical switch to broadcast P2P services among diverse infrastructures featuring dynamic channel allocation and enabling an optical platform for 3G and beyond wireless backhaul requirements. The first architecture incorporates a tunable laser to generate a dedicated wavelength for P2P purposes and the second architecture takes advantage of reused wavelengths to enable the P2P connectivity among Optical Network Units (ONUs) or Base Stations (BS). While these two approaches allow the P2P connectivity in a one at a time basis (1:1), the third architecture enables the broadcasting of P2P sessions among different ONUs or BSs at the same time (1:M). Experimental assessment of the proposed architecture shows approximately 0.6% Error Vector Magnitude (EVM) degradation for wireless services and 1 dB penalty in average for 1 x 10(-12) Bit Error Rate (BER) for wired baseband services.

  5. Quasimolecular emission near the Xe(5p 56s 1,3 P 1 - 5p 6 1 S 0) and Kr (4p 55s 1,3 P 1 - 4p 6 1 S 0) resonance lines induced by collisions with He atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, O. S.; Devdariani, A. Z.; Grigorian, G. M.; Lednev, M. G.; Zagrebin, A. L.

    2017-02-01

    This study is devoted to the theoretical investigation of the quasimolecular emission of Xe*-He and Kr*-He collision pairs near the Xe (5p 56s 1,3 P 1 - 5p 6 1 S 0) and Kr (4p 55s 1,3 P 1 - 4p 6 1 S 0) resonance atomic lines. The potential curves of the quasimolecules Xe(5p 56s) + He and Kr(4p 55s) + He have been obtained with the use of the effective Hamiltonian and pseudopotential methods. Based on these potential curves the processes of quasimolecular emission of Xe*+He and Kr*+He mixtures have been considered and the spectral distributions I(ħΔω) of photons emitted have been obtained in the framework of quasistatic approximation.

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) displays sustained S1P1 receptor agonism and signaling through S1P lyase-dependent receptor recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatfield, John; Monnier, Lucile; Studer, Rolf; Bolli, Martin H; Steiner, Beat; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-07-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) type 1 receptor (S1P1R) is a novel therapeutic target in lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune diseases. S1P1 receptor desensitization caused by synthetic S1P1 receptor agonists prevents T-lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid organs into the circulation. The selective S1P1 receptor agonist ponesimod, which is in development for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, efficiently reduces peripheral lymphocyte counts and displays efficacy in animal models of autoimmune disease. Using ponesimod and the natural ligand S1P, we investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to different signaling, desensitization and trafficking behavior of S1P1 receptors. In recombinant S1P1 receptor-expressing cells, ponesimod and S1P triggered Gαi protein-mediated signaling and β-arrestin recruitment with comparable potency and efficiency, but only ponesimod efficiently induced intracellular receptor accumulation. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), ponesimod and S1P triggered translocation of the endogenous S1P1 receptor to the Golgi compartment. However, only ponesimod treatment caused efficient surface receptor depletion, receptor accumulation in the Golgi and degradation. Impedance measurements in HUVEC showed that ponesimod induced only short-lived Gαi protein-mediated signaling followed by resistance to further stimulation, whereas S1P induced sustained Gαi protein-mediated signaling without desensitization. Inhibition of S1P lyase activity in HUVEC rendered S1P an efficient S1P1 receptor internalizing compound and abrogated S1P-mediated sustained signaling. This suggests that S1P lyase - by facilitating S1P1 receptor recycling - is essential for S1P-mediated sustained signaling, and that synthetic agonists are functional antagonists because they are not S1P lyase substrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Population of the 3P2,1,0 fine-structure states in the 3s and 3p photoionization of atomic chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.O.; Caldwell, C.D.; Whitfield, S.B.; de Lange, C.A.; van der Meulen, P.

    1993-01-01

    In a high-resolution photoelectron-spectrometry study of the photoionization of chlorine atoms in both the 3s and 3p subshells, we were able to resolve contributions from ionic states with specific J values and measure the relative populations of these fine-structure components. Our photoelectron spectra, recorded at hν=29.2 eV, give ratios of 3 P 2 : 3 P 1 : 3 P 0 =100:40.59.5 for 3p photoionization and 3 P 2 : 3 P 1 =100:31 for 3s photoionization. While the results for 3p ionization are in accord with predictions based on a simple geometric analysis, the contribution of the 3 P 1 state in 3s photoionization is larger than that predicted by this simple model. The geometric predictions are also compared with results from a similar measurement of the population of the 4p -1 ( 3 P J ) states produced in the 4p ionization of Br and with earlier work on the production of 3 D 2,1,0 states in d-shell photoionization of Cu and Ag

  8. Familial partial duplication (1)(p21p31)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoechstetter, L.; Soukup, S.; Schorry, E.K. [Children`s Hospital Research Foundation, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-11-20

    A partial duplication (1)(p21p31), resulting from a maternal direct insertion (13,1) (q22p21p31), was found in a 30-year-old woman with mental retardation, cleft palate, and multiple minor anomalies. Two other affected and deceased relatives were presumed to have the same chromosome imbalance. Duplication 1p cases are reviewed. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Controlling P2P File-Sharing Networks Traffic

    OpenAIRE

    García Pineda, Miguel; HAMMOUMI, MOHAMMED; Canovas Solbes, Alejandro; Lloret, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Since the appearance of Peer-To-Peer (P2P) file-sharing networks some time ago, many Internet users have chosen this technology to share and search programs, videos, music, documents, etc. The total number of P2P file-sharing users has been increasing and decreasing in the last decade depending on the creation or end of some well known P2P file-sharing systems. P2P file-sharing networks traffic is currently overloading some data networks and it is a major headache for netw...

  10. A mixed-pH dual-electrolyte microfluidic aluminum–air cell with high performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Binbin; Leung, Dennis Y.C.; Xuan, Jin; Wang, Huizhi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A mix-pH dual-electrolyte Al–air cell is proposed. • Cells with dual-electrolyte exhibit higher performance. • Cell performance increases with increasing electrolyte concentration and flow rate. • Optimized channel thickness is 0.3 mm. • A restriction of reaction activation on the Al side is observed. - Abstract: Energy storage capacity has been a major limiting factor in pursuit of increasing functionality and mobility for portable devices. To increase capacity limits, novel battery designs with multi-electron redox couples and increased voltages have been listed as a priority research direction by the US Department of Energy. This study leverages the benefits of microfluidics technology to develop a novel mixed-pH media aluminum–air cell which incorporates the advantages of the trivalence of aluminum and mixed-pH thermodynamics. Experimentally, the new cell exhibited an open circuit potential of 2.2 V and a maximum power density of 176 mW cm −2 , which are respectively 37.5% and 104.6% higher than conventional single alkaline aluminum–air cell under similar conditions. With further optimization of channel thickness, a power density of 216 mW cm −2 was achieved in the present study.

  11. Extending an Afrikaans pronunciation dictionary using Dutch resources and P2P/GP2P

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loots, L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available . This is compared to the more common approach of extending the Afrikaans dictionary by means of graphemeto-phoneme (G2P) conversion. The results indicate that the Afrikaans pronunciations obtained by P2P and GP2P from the Dutch dictionary are more accurate than...

  12. Mesoporous mixed metal oxides derived from P123-templated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Zhou Jideng; Li Zhanshuang; He Yang; Lin Shuangshuang; Liu Qi; Zhang Milin; Jiang Zhaohua

    2010-01-01

    We report the preparation of mesoporous mixed metal oxides (MMOs) through a soft template method. Different amounts of P123 were used as structure directing agent to synthesize P123-templated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs). After calcination of as-synthesized LDHs at 500 o C, the ordered mesopores were obtained by removal of P123. The mesoporous Mg-Al MMOs fabricated by using 2 wt% P123 exhibited a high specific surface area of 108.1 m 2 /g, and wide distribution of pore size (2-18 nm). An investigation of the 'memory effect' of the mesoporous MMOs revealed that they were successfully reconstructed to ibuprofen intercalated LDHs having different gallery heights, which indicated different intercalation capacities. Due to their mesoporosity these unique MMOs have particular potential as drug or catalyst carriers. - Graphical abstract: Ordered mesoporous Mg-Al MMOs can be obtained through the calcination of P123-templated Mg-Al-CO 3 LDHs. The pore diameter is 2.2 nm. At the presence of ibuprofen, the Mg-Al MMOs can recover to Mg-Al-IBU LDHs, based on its 'remember effect'. Display Omitted

  13. (p,2p) study of high-momentum components at 2.1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treuhaft, R.N.

    1982-07-01

    A (p,2p) experiment designed to isolate interactions with small numbers of fast nuclear constituents is described. Special attention is paid to the experimental manifestation and description of a correlated pair of nucleons in the nucleus. Phase space calculations are presented for the proton-pair three-body final state and for final states with larger number of particles. The Two Armed Spectrometer System (TASS) is described in detail. The data suggest the possibility of isolating an interaction with one or two nucleons in the nucleus which may have momenta far in excess of those described in a Fermi gas model

  14. (p,2p) study of high-momentum components at 2. 1 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treuhaft, R.N.

    1982-07-01

    A (p,2p) experiment designed to isolate interactions with small numbers of fast nuclear constituents is described. Special attention is paid to the experimental manifestation and description of a correlated pair of nucleons in the nucleus. Phase space calculations are presented for the proton-pair three-body final state and for final states with larger number of particles. The Two Armed Spectrometer System (TASS) is described in detail. The data suggest the possibility of isolating an interaction with one or two nucleons in the nucleus which may have momenta far in excess of those described in a Fermi gas model.

  15. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P1 receptor by a novel competitive S1P1-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effect of a newly developed S1P 1 -selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. ► S1P 1 is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. ► S1P 1 -selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. ► S1P 1 -selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. ► The efficacy of S1P 1 -selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P 1 ) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P 1 and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P 1 -selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P 1 antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P 1 is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  16. [1,4-Bis(diphenylphosphanylbutane-κ2P,P′]dibromidopalladium(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Ha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [PdBr2(C28H28P2], the PdII ion has a distorted cis-Br2P2 square-planar coordination geometry defined by two P atoms from the chelating 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphanylbutane ligand and two Br− anions. The four phenyl rings are inclined to the least-squares plane of the PdBr2P2 unit [maximum deviation = 0.1294 (7 Å], making dihedral angles of 66.3 (2, 87.2 (2, 68.8 (2 and 86.8 (2°. The butylene chain is in a gauche conformation, with a C—C—C—C torsion angle of 57.0 (8°. Intermolecular C—H...Br hydrogen bonds link the complex molecules into supramolecular layers in the ab plane. Weak π–π interactions, both intra- and intermolecular [shortest inter-centroid distance = 4.598 (5 Å], are also noted in the three-dimensional architecture.

  17. Common variation at 3q26.2, 6p21.33, 17p11.2 and 22q13.1 influences multiple myeloma risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Peter; Chen, Bowang; Johnson, David C; Försti, Asta; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Migliorini, Gabriele; Dobbins, Sara E; Holroyd, Amy; Hose, Dirk; Walker, Brian A; Davies, Faith E; Gregory, Walter A; Jackson, Graham H; Irving, Julie A; Pratt, Guy; Fegan, Chris; Fenton, James AL; Neben, Kai; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Eisele, Lewin; Ross, Fiona M; Straka, Christian; Einsele, Hermann; Langer, Christian; Dörner, Elisabeth; Allan, James M; Jauch, Anna; Morgan, Gareth J; Hemminki, Kari; Houlston, Richard S; Goldschmidt, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    To identify variants for multiple myeloma risk, we conducted a genome-wide association study with validation in additional series totaling 4,692 cases and 10,990 controls. We identified four risk loci at 3q26.2 (rs10936599, P=8.70x10-14), 6p21.33 (rs2285803, PSORS1C2; P= 9.67x10-11), 17p11.2 (rs4273077, TNFRSF13B; P=7.67x10-9) and 22q13.1 (rs877529, CBX7; P=7.63x10-16). These data provide further evidence for genetic susceptibility to this B-cell hematological malignancy and insight into the biological basis of predisposition. PMID:23955597

  18. The effect of lycopene on the total cytochrome P450, CYP1A2 and CYP2E1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melva Louisa

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Some carotenoids such as canthaxantin, astaxanthin and beta apo-8’-carotenal were reported to have modulatoryeffect on the cytochrome P450. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of lycopene, a nonprovitamin A carotenoid, on microsomal cytochrome P450, CYP1A2 and CYP2E1.Methods: Total cytochrome P450 levels, CYP1A2 and CYP2E1-catalyzed reactions (acetanilide 4-hydroxylation and p-nitrophenol hydroxylation were studied in the liver microsomes of male Sprague Dawley rats. Microsomes were prepared using differential centrifugation combined with calcium aggregation method. Lycopene was orally administered in the dosages of 0, 25, 50 or 100 mg/kgBW/day for 14 days in a repeated fashion. Data were analyzed using ANOVA test.Results: Total cytochrome P450 level and acetanilide 4-hydroxylase activity were unaffected by any of the treatments. The CYP2E1 probe enzyme (p-nitrophenol hydroxylase was significantly reduced by repeated administration of 100mg/ kgBW/day lycopene (7.88 + 2.04 vs 12.26 + 2.77 n mol/min/mg prot.Conclusion: The present results suggest that lycopene does not affect the total cytochrome P450 or CYP1A2 activity but it inhibits the activity of CYP2E1 (p-nitrophenol hydroxylase in the rat. (Med J Indones 2009; 18: 233-8Keywords: lycopene, cytochrome P450, CYP1A2, CYP2E1

  19. The 2s1/22p1/2 + one photon transition in hydrogen and hydrogenlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    The 2s 1 / 22p 1 / 2 + one photon transition rate is calculated and discussed for hydrogen and hydrogenlike ions. It is noted that the induced transition rather than the spontaneous transition is of primary importance since it is the basis of many of the precision Lamb-shift measurements. The lack of a calculation of the transition rate other than a heuristic nonrelativistic derivation which requires a nontrivial assumption motivates the calculation presented here based on the external field approximation to quantum electrodynamics. It is found that the heuristic answer is correct in lowest order. In this derivation we see that the 2s 1 / 22p 1 / 2 + one photon transition gives an apparent contradiction to the often-stated remark that for the electric dipole matrix element there exist three equivalent representations, the ''length,'' ''velocity,'' and ''acceleration'' forms. The difficulties of an experimental determination of this transition rate using induced transitions in hydrogenlike ions are briefly noted as well as the somewhat different case of heavy muonic atoms where the spontaneous 2s 1 / 22p 1 / 2 + one photon transition has been observed

  20. Energies and E1, M1, E2, and M2 transition rates for states of the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 3}, 2s2p{sup 4}, and 2p{sup 5} configurations in nitrogen-like ions between F III and Kr XXX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rynkun, P., E-mail: pavel.rynkun@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Information Technologies, Lithuanian University of Educational Science, Studentu 39, LT-08106 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jönsson, P. [Group for Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö University, 20506 Malmö (Sweden); Gaigalas, G. [Department of Physics and Information Technologies, Lithuanian University of Educational Science, Studentu 39, LT-08106 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vilnius University, Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, A. Goštauto 12, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Froese Fischer, C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8420 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Based on relativistic wavefunctions from multiconfiguration Dirac–Hartree–Fock and configuration interaction calculations, E1, M1, E2, and M2 transition rates, weighted oscillator strengths, and lifetimes are evaluated for the states of the (1s{sup 2})2s{sup 2}2p{sup 3},2s2p{sup 4}, and 2p{sup 5} configurations in all nitrogen-like ions between F III and Kr XXX. The wavefunction expansions include valence, core–valence, and core–core correlation effects through single–double multireference expansions to increasing sets of active orbitals. The computed energies agree very well with experimental values, with differences of only 300–600 cm{sup −1} for the majority of the levels and ions in the sequence. Computed transitions rates are in close agreement with available data from MCHF-BP calculations by Tachiev and Froese Fischer [G.I. Tachiev, C. Froese Fischer, A and A 385 (2002) 716].

  1. A distributed incentive compatible pricing mechanism for P2P networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Zheng; Xiong, Xiao; Shi, Qingwei

    2007-09-01

    Peer-to-Peer (P2P) systems are currently receiving considerable interest. However, as experience with P2P networks shows, the selfish behaviors of peers may lead to serious problems of P2P network, such as free-riding and white-washing. In order to solve these problems, there are increasing considerations on reputation system design in the study of P2P networks. Most of the existing works is concerning probabilistic estimation or social networks to evaluate the trustworthiness for a peer to others. However, these models can not be efficient all the time. In this paper, our aim is to provide a general mechanism that can maximize P2P networks social welfare in a way of Vickrey-Clarke-Groves family, while assuming every peer in P2P networks is rational and selfish, which means they only concern about their own outcome. This mechanism has some desirable properties using an O(n) algorithm: (1) incentive compatibility, every peer truly report its connection type; (2) individually rationality; and (3) fully decentralized, we design a multiple-principal multiple-agent model, concerning about the service provider and service requester individually.

  2. μ-1,2-Bis(diphenylphosphinoethane-κ2P:P′-bis{[1,2-bis(diphenylphosphinoethane-κ2P,P′]bromidocopper(I} acetone disolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Juan Shi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, [Cu2Br2(dppe3]·2CH3COCH3 [dppe is 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphinoethane, C26H24P2], the two Cu centers are bridged by a dppe ligand and each metal center carries one chelating dppe unit, with the fourth coordination site available for the Br− anion. The molecule is centrosymmetric, with the center of symmetry located between the methylene C atoms of the bridging dppe ligand. The crystal structure is stabilized by intramolecular C—H...Br hydrogen bonds and intermolecular π–π interactions, with a centroid-to-centroid distance of 3.2055 (1 Å.

  3. Deficiency of G1 regulators P53, P21Cip1 and/or pRb decreases hepatocyte sensitivity to TGFβ cell cycle arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison David J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TGFβ is critical to control hepatocyte proliferation by inducing G1-growth arrest through multiple pathways leading to inhibition of E2F transcription activity. The retinoblastoma protein pRb is a key controller of E2F activity and G1/S transition which can be inhibited in viral hepatitis. It is not known whether the impairment of pRb would alter the growth inhibitory potential of TGFβ in disease. We asked how Rb-deficiency would affect responses to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. Results Primary hepatocytes isolated from Rb-floxed mice were infected with an adenovirus expressing CRE-recombinase to delete the Rb gene. In control cells treatment with TGFβ prevented cells to enter S phase via decreased cMYC activity, activation of P16INK4A and P21Cip and reduction of E2F activity. In Rb-null hepatocytes, cMYC activity decreased slightly but P16INK4A was not activated and the great majority of cells continued cycling. Rb is therefore central to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest in hepatocytes. However some Rb-null hepatocytes remained sensitive to TGFβ-induced cell cycle arrest. As these hepatocytes expressed very high levels of P21Cip1 and P53 we investigated whether these proteins regulate pRb-independent signaling to cell cycle arrest by evaluating the consequences of disruption of p53 and p21Cip1. Hepatocytes deficient in p53 or p21Cip1 showed diminished growth inhibition by TGFβ. Double deficiency had a similar impact showing that in cells containing functional pRb; P21Cip and P53 work through the same pathway to regulate G1/S in response to TGFβ. In Rb-deficient cells however, p53 but not p21Cip deficiency had an additive effect highlighting a pRb-independent-P53-dependent effector pathway of inhibition of E2F activity. Conclusion The present results show that otherwise genetically normal hepatocytes with disabled p53, p21Cip1 or Rb genes respond less well to the antiproliferative effects of TGFβ. As the function of

  4. Intracellular S1P Generation Is Essential for S1P-Induced Motility of Human Lung Endothelial Cells: Role of Sphingosine Kinase 1 and S1P Lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; Gorshkova, Irina; Usatyuk, Peter; Kalari, Satish; Zhao, Yutong; Pyne, Nigel J.; Pyne, Susan; Sabbadini, Roger A.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2011-01-01

    Background Earlier we have shown that extracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induces migration of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) through the activation of S1P1 receptor, PKCε, and PLD2-PKCζ-Rac1 signaling cascade. As endothelial cells generate intracellular S1P, here we have investigated the role of sphingosine kinases (SphKs) and S1P lyase (S1PL), that regulate intracellular S1P accumulation, in HPAEC motility. Methodology/Principal Findings Inhibition of SphK activity with a SphK inhibitor 2-(p-Hydroxyanilino)-4-(p-Chlorophenyl) Thiazole or down-regulation of Sphk1, but not SphK2, with siRNA decreased S1Pint, and attenuated S1Pext or serum-induced motility of HPAECs. On the contrary, inhibition of S1PL with 4-deoxypyridoxine or knockdown of S1PL with siRNA increased S1Pint and potentiated motility of HPAECs to S1Pext or serum. S1Pext mediates cell motility through activation of Rac1 and IQGAP1 signal transduction in HPAECs. Silencing of SphK1 by siRNA attenuated Rac1 and IQGAP1 translocation to the cell periphery; however, knockdown of S1PL with siRNA or 4-deoxypyridoxine augmented activated Rac1 and stimulated Rac1 and IQGAP1 translocation to cell periphery. The increased cell motility mediated by down-regulation was S1PL was pertussis toxin sensitive suggesting “inside-out” signaling of intracellularly generated S1P. Although S1P did not accumulate significantly in media under basal or S1PL knockdown conditions, addition of sodium vanadate increased S1P levels in the medium and inside the cells most likely by blocking phosphatases including lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs). Furthermore, addition of anti-S1P mAb to the incubation medium blocked S1Pext or 4-deoxypyridoxine-dependent endothelial cell motility. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest S1Pext mediated endothelial cell motility is dependent on intracellular S1P production, which is regulated, in part, by SphK1 and S1PL. PMID:21304987

  5. Measurement of sin2θefflept using e+e- pairs from γ*/Z bosons produced in p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    At the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton (p p ¯) collider, Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process p p ¯→e+e-+X through an intermediate γ*/Z boson. The forward-backward asymmetry in the polar-angle distribution of the e- as a function of the e+e--pair mass is used to obtain sin2θefflept, the effective leptonic determination of the electroweak-mixing parameter sin2θW. The measurement sample, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponds to 9.4 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV, and is the full CDF Run II data set. The value of sin2θefflept is found to be 0.23248 ±0.00053 . The combination with the previous CDF measurement based on μ+μ- pairs yields sin2θefflept=0.23221±0.00046 . This result, when interpreted within the specified context of the standard model assuming sin2θW=1 - MW2/MZ2 and that the W - and Z -boson masses are on-shell, yields sin2θW=0.22400 ±0.00045 , or equivalently a W -boson mass of 80.328 ±0.024 GeV /c2 .

  6. Reliable measurement of the Li-like 2248Ti 1s2s2p 4P5/2o level lifetime by beam-foil and beam-two-foil experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, T.; Ahmad, Nissar; Wani, A. A.; Marketos, P.

    2006-01-01

    We have determined the lifetime of the Li-like 22 48 Ti 1s2s2p 4 P 5/2 o level (210.5±13.5 ps) using data from its x-ray decay channel through beam single- and two-foil experiments, coupled to a multicomponent iterative growth and decay analysis. Theoretical lifetime estimates for this zero-nuclear-spin ion lies within the uncertainty range of our experimental results, indicating that blending contributions to this level from the He-like 1s2p 3 P 2 o and 1s2s 3 S 1 levels are eliminated within the current approach. A previously reported discrepancy between experimental and theoretical 1s2s2p 4 P 5/2 o level lifetimes in 23 51 V may, as a result, be attributed to hyperfine quenching

  7. Laser spectroscopy of the 4s4p(3) P-2-4s3d(1) D-2 transition on magnetically trapped calcium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammalapati, U.; Norris, I.; Burrows, C.; Riis, E.

    2011-01-01

    Laser excitation of the 4s4p(3) P-2-4s3d(1) D-2 transition in atomic calcium has been observed and the wavelength determined to 1530.5298(6) nm. The metastable 4s4p(3) P-2 atoms were magnetically trapped in the quadrupole magnetic field of a magneto-optical trap. This state represents the only

  8. Design, synthesis, X-ray studies, and biological evaluation of novel macrocyclic HIV-1 protease inhibitors involving the P1'-P2' ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Sean Fyvie, W.; Brindisi, Margherita; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Aoki, Manabu; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2017-11-01

    Design, synthesis, and evaluation of a new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors containing diverse flexible macrocyclic P1'-P2' tethers are reported. Inhibitor 5a with a pyrrolidinone-derived macrocycle exhibited favorable enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity (Ki = 13.2 nM, IC50 = 22 nM). Further incorporation of heteroatoms in the macrocyclic skeleton provided macrocyclic inhibitors 5m and 5o. These compounds showed excellent HIV-1 protease inhibitory (Ki = 62 pM and 14 pM, respectively) and antiviral activity (IC50 = 5.3 nM and 2.0 nM, respectively). Inhibitor 5o also remained highly potent against a DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant.

  9. 40 CFR 704.33 - P-tert-butylbenzoic acid (P-TBBA), p-tert-butyltoluene (P-TBT) and p-tert-butylbenzaldehyde (P-TBB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-tert-butyltoluene (P-TBT) and p-tert-butylbenzaldehyde (P-TBB). 704.33 Section 704.33 Protection of... (P-TBBA), p-tert-butyltoluene (P-TBT) and p-tert-butylbenzaldehyde (P-TBB). (a) Definitions. (1) P..., CAS No. 98-73-7. (2) P-TBT means the substance p-tert-butyltoluene, also identified as 1-(1,1...

  10. [1,3-Bis(diphenylphosphinopentane-κ2P,P′]tetracarbonylchromium(0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Cr(C29H30P2(CO4], the Cr atom is octahedrally coordinated by four carbonyl ligands and one bidentate phosphine ligand, which is bounded as a chelate in a cis position. The average Cr—P and Cr—C bond lengths are 2.377 and 1.865 Å, respectively.

  11. Modulation of the TGF-β1-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) mediated by P1 and P2 purine receptors in MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Giuliani, Patricia; Buccella, Silvana; Di Liberto, Valentina; Mudò, Giuseppa; Belluardo, Natale; Carluccio, Marzia; Rossini, Margherita; Condorelli, Daniele Filippo; Rathbone, Michel Piers; Caciagli, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Renata; Di Iorio, Patrizia

    2017-12-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs during embryogenesis or under pathological conditions such as hypoxia, injury, chronic inflammation, or tissue fibrosis. In renal tubular epithelial cells (MDCK), TGF-β1 induces EMT by reducing or increasing epithelial or mesenchymal marker expression, respectively. In this study, we confirmed that the cAMP analogues, 8-CPT-cAMP or N6-Ph-cAMP, inhibited the TGF-β1-driven overexpression of the mesenchymal markers ZEB-1, Slug, Fibronectin, and α-SMA. Furthermore, we showed that A1, A2A, P2Y1, P2Y11, and P2X7 purine receptor agonists modulated the TGF-β1-induced EMT through the involvement of PKA and/or MAPK/ERK signaling. The stimulation of A2A receptor reduced the overexpression of the EMT-related markers, mainly through the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway, as confirmed by cell pre-treatment with Myr-PKI. Both A1 and P2Y1 receptor stimulation exacerbated the TGF-β1-driven effects, which were reduced by cell pre-treatment with the MAPK inhibitor PD98059, according to the increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation upon receptor activation. The effects induced by P2Y11 receptor activation were oppositely modulated by PKA or MAPK inhibition, in line with the dual nature of the Gs- and Gq-coupled receptor. Differently, P2X7 receptor induced, per se, similar and not additive effects compared to TGF-β1, after prolonged cell exposure to BzATP. These results suggest a putative role of purine receptors as target for anti-fibrotic agents.

  12. P2P-based botnets: structural analysis, monitoring, and mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Guanhua [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eidenbenz, Stephan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ha, Duc T [UNIV AT BUFFALO; Ngo, Hung Q [UNIV AT BUFFALO

    2008-01-01

    Botnets, which are networks of compromised machines that are controlled by one or a group of attackers, have emerged as one of the most serious security threats on the Internet. With an army of bots at the scale of tens of thousands of hosts or even as large as 1.5 million PCs, the computational power of botnets can be leveraged to launch large-scale DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attacks, sending spamming emails, stealing identities and financial information, etc. As detection and mitigation techniques against botnets have been stepped up in recent years, attackers are also constantly improving their strategies to operate these botnets. The first generation of botnets typically employ IRC (Internet Relay Chat) channels as their command and control (C&C) centers. Though simple and easy to deploy, the centralized C&C mechanism of such botnets has made them prone to being detected and disabled. Against this backdrop, peer-to-peer (P2P) based botnets have emerged as a new generation of botnets which can conceal their C&C communication. Recently, P2P networks have emerged as a covert communication platform for malicious programs known as bots. As popular distributed systems, they allow bots to communicate easily while protecting the botmaster from being discovered. Existing work on P2P-based hotnets mainly focuses on measurement of botnet sizes. In this work, through simulation, we study extensively the structure of P2P networks running Kademlia, one of a few widely used P2P protocols in practice. Our simulation testbed incorporates the actual code of a real Kademlia client software to achieve great realism, and distributed event-driven simulation techniques to achieve high scalability. Using this testbed, we analyze the scaling, reachability, clustering, and centrality properties of P2P-based botnets from a graph-theoretical perspective. We further demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that monitoring bot activities in a P2P network is difficult

  13. Determinants of Default in P2P Lending.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Serrano-Cinca

    Full Text Available This paper studies P2P lending and the factors explaining loan default. This is an important issue because in P2P lending individual investors bear the credit risk, instead of financial institutions, which are experts in dealing with this risk. P2P lenders suffer a severe problem of information asymmetry, because they are at a disadvantage facing the borrower. For this reason, P2P lending sites provide potential lenders with information about borrowers and their loan purpose. They also assign a grade to each loan. The empirical study is based on loans' data collected from Lending Club (N = 24,449 from 2008 to 2014 that are first analyzed by using univariate means tests and survival analysis. Factors explaining default are loan purpose, annual income, current housing situation, credit history and indebtedness. Secondly, a logistic regression model is developed to predict defaults. The grade assigned by the P2P lending site is the most predictive factor of default, but the accuracy of the model is improved by adding other information, especially the borrower's debt level.

  14. Determinants of Default in P2P Lending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Cinca, Carlos; Gutiérrez-Nieto, Begoña; López-Palacios, Luz

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies P2P lending and the factors explaining loan default. This is an important issue because in P2P lending individual investors bear the credit risk, instead of financial institutions, which are experts in dealing with this risk. P2P lenders suffer a severe problem of information asymmetry, because they are at a disadvantage facing the borrower. For this reason, P2P lending sites provide potential lenders with information about borrowers and their loan purpose. They also assign a grade to each loan. The empirical study is based on loans' data collected from Lending Club (N = 24,449) from 2008 to 2014 that are first analyzed by using univariate means tests and survival analysis. Factors explaining default are loan purpose, annual income, current housing situation, credit history and indebtedness. Secondly, a logistic regression model is developed to predict defaults. The grade assigned by the P2P lending site is the most predictive factor of default, but the accuracy of the model is improved by adding other information, especially the borrower's debt level.

  15. Mono(p-tolyl)platinum(II) and bis(p-tolyl)platinum(II) complexes of diethylsulfide as reagents for organoplatinum synthesis. Structures of [Pt(p-Tol)2(µ-SEt2)]2 and PtCl(p-Tol)(bpy) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Casado Lacabra, M.A.; Canty, A.J.; Lutz, M.H.; Patel, J.; Spek, A.L.; Sun, H.

    2001-01-01

    The complex trans-PtCl(p-Tol)(SEt{2}){2} is obtained from the reaction of [Pt(p-Tol){2}(SEt{2})]{2} with PtCl{2}(SEt{2}){2} and SEt{2} in mole ratio 1:2:2. The mono(p-tolyl)platinum(II) and bis(p-tolyl)platinum(II) complexes of diethylsulfide react with 2, 2'-bipyridine to form the complexes

  16. Polarization of J / psi and psi(2S) mesons produced in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U.; Affolder, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Anikeev, K.; /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Tsukuba U.

    2007-04-01

    The authors have measured the polarizations of J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) mesons as functions of their transverse momentum p{sub T} when they are produced promptly in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 with p{sub T} {ge} 5 GeV/c. The analysis is performed using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of about 800 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector. For both vector mesons, they find that the polarizations become increasingly longitudinal as p{sub T} increases from 5 to 30 GeV/c. These results are compared to the predictions of non-relativistic quantum chromo-dynamics and other contemporary models. The polarizations of J/{psi} and {psi}(2S) mesons from B-hadron decays are also reported.

  17. Cord lactate, pH, and blood gases from healthy neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, T; St Pierre, J; Winkelman, J

    1996-01-01

    Lactate, pH, pO2, and pCO2 were determined in arterial, venous, and free-flowing mixed umbilical cord blood obtained from deliveries of apparently healthy neonates. The goals of this study were to establish reference ranges for lactate and pH against which results in cases of high-risk labor and delivery could be compared, to see how the gases correlated with these values, and to determine whether easily accessible mixed umbilical cord blood can serve as the sample in lieu of cord arterial or cord venous blood. Arterial and venous cord lactates were 2.98 mmol/l (+/- 1.40) and 2.80 mmol/l (+/- 1.35), respectively, from 85 cords obtained from vaginal and cesarean deliveries. Mixed cord blood lactate, obtained on 48 cords, was 2.72 mmol/l (+/- 1.28) versus 3.14 and 2.97 mmol/l for the arterial and venous samples from those cords, respectively, and correlated quite well with lactate from the venous specimens (r = 0.97). Differences of > 0.5 mmol/l occurred between mixed and arterial cord bloods in 21 patients, and between mixed and venous cord bloods in 6 of the 48 patients, respectively. We conclude that (1) less than 2.5% of deliveries of apparently healthy neonates have arterial, venous, or mixed cord lactates > or = 7.0 mmol/l and pH pO2 nor pCO2 correlate well with cord venous lactate, and (3) readily available mixed cord blood is a satisfactory specimen for the measurement of venous cord latate.

  18. Meiotic and pedigree segregation analyses in carriers of t(4;8)(p16;p23.1) differing in localization of breakpoint positions at 4p subband 4p16.3 and 4p16.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midro, Alina T; Zollino, Marcella; Wiland, Ewa; Panasiuk, Barbara; Iwanowski, Piotr S; Murdolo, Marina; Śmigiel, Robert; Sąsiadek, Maria; Pilch, Jacek; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare meiotic segregation in sperm cells from two carriers with t(4;8)(p16;p23.1) reciprocal chromosome translocations (RCTs), differing in localization of the breakpoint positions at the 4p subband-namely, 4p16.3 (carrier 1) and 4p16.1 (carrier 2)-and to compare data of the pedigree analyses performed by direct method. Three-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm cells and FISH mapping for the evaluation of the breakpoint positions, data from pedigrees, and direct segregation analysis of the pedigrees were performed. Similar proportions of normal/balanced and unbalanced sperm cells were found in both carriers. The most common was an alternate type of segregation (about 52 % and about 48 %, respectively). Unbalanced adjacent I and adjacent II karyotypes were found in similar proportions about 15 %. The direct segregation analysis (following Stengel-Rutkowski) of the pedigree of carriers of t(4;8)(p16.1;p23.1) was performed and results were compared with the data of the pedigree segregation analysis obtained earlier through the indirect method. The probability of live-born progeny with unbalanced karyotype for carriers of t(4;8)(p16.1;p23.1) was moderately high at 18.8 %-comparable to the value obtained using the indirect method for the same carriership, which was 12 %. This was, however, markedly lower than the value of 41.2 % obtained through the pedigree segregation indirect analysis estimated for carriers of t(4;8)(p16.3;p23.1), perhaps due to the unique composition of genes present within the 4p16.1-4p 16.3 region. Revealed differences in pedigree segregation analysis did not correspond to the very similar profile of meiotic segregation patterns presented by carrier 1 and carrier 2. Most probably, such discordances may be due to differences in embryo survival rates arising from different genetic backgrounds.

  19. Correlation Among Six Biologic Factors (p53, p21WAF1, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2) and Clinical Outcomes After Curative Chemoradiation Therapy in Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Murakami, Naoya; Asari, Takao; Okuma, Kae; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The expressions of six cell-cycle-associated proteins were analyzed in cervical squamous cell carcinomas in correlation in a search for prognostic correlations in tumors treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (cCRT). Methods and Materials: The expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, molecular immunology borstel-1 (MIB-1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and Bcl-2 were studied using an immunohistochemical method in 57 cases of cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with cCRT. Patients received cCRT between 1998 and 2005. The mean patient age was 61 years (range, 27-82 years). The number of patients with Stage II, III, and IVA disease was 18, 29, and 10, respectively. Results: The number of patients with tumors positive for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2 was 26, 24, 49, 26, 13, and 11, respectively; no significant correlation was noted. The 5-year overall survival rates of HER2-positive and -negative patients was 76% vs. 44%, which was of borderline significance (p = 0.0675). No significant correlation was noted between overall survival and expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2. No correlation was observed between local control and expression of any of the proteins. Conclusion: Expression of HER2 protein had a weak impact of borderline significance on overall survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with cCRT. However, no clinical associations could be established for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2 protein expressions.

  20. [1,2-Bis(diisopropyl-phosphan-yl)ethane-κ(2) P,P'](carbonato-κ(2) O,O')nickel(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Becerril, Illan; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; Garcia, Juventino J

    2013-04-01

    In the crystal of the title compound, [Ni(CO3)(C14H32P2)], the metal center in each of three independent mol-ecules shows slight tetra-hedral distortion from ideal square-planar coordination geometry, with angles between the normals to the planes defined by the cis-P-Ni-P and cis-O-Ni-O fragments of 3.92 (17), 0.70 (16) and 2.17 (14)° in the three mol-ecules. In the crystal, there are inter-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds that show a laminar growth in the ab plane.

  1. pO2 and pCO2 increment in post-dialyzer blood: the role of dialysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sombolos, Kostas I; Bamichas, Gerasimos I; Christidou, Fotini N; Gionanlis, Lazaros D; Karagianni, Anna C; Anagnostopoulos, Theodoros C; Natse, Taïsir A

    2005-11-01

    Blood returning from a dialyzer during hemodialysis has a higher pO2 and pCO2 content than blood entering the dialyzer, and this has been attributed to the dialysate. The present study investigates this phenomenon. Acid-base and blood-gas parameters (pH, pO2, pCO2 and HCO3) were measured in three groups of stable chronic hemodialysis patients (A, B, and C) undergoing high-flux hemodialysis. In group A (n = 15), "arterial" (a) and "venous" (v) samples were withdrawn simultaneously before dialysis (samples A0), 5 min after circulation of the blood with the dialysate in the by-pass mode (samples A5), and 5 min after high-flux hemodialysis at a zero ultrafiltration rate (samples A10). In group B (n = 11) (a) and (v) samples were withdrawn simultaneously before dialysis (samples B0), 5 min after isolated-ultrafiltration with closed dialysate ports ("isolated-closed" ultrafiltration) (samples B5), and 5 min after high-flux hemodialysis at a zero ultrafiltration rate (samples B10). In group C (n = 14), after an initial arterial blood sample withdrawal before hemodialysis (sample C0), high-flux hemodialysis at a zero ultrafiltration rate was initiated. Five minutes later, blood and dialysate samples were withdrawn simultaneously from the hemodialysis lines (samples C5). In all cases blood and dialysate (bicarbonate) flow rates were set at 0.300 and 0.700 L/min, respectively. FLX-18 hemodialyzers (membrane PEPA 1.8 m2) were used in this study. Analysis of variance revealed significant changes only in venous samples. A comparison of arterial and venous samples revealed no differences between groups A and B before the initiation of dialysis (A0a vs. A0v and B0a vs. B0v, P = NS). The pO2 content was higher in A5v samples than in A5a samples (83.5 +/- 11.2 vs. 88.8 +/- 14.0 mm Hg, P pO2, pCO2, and HCO3 in comparison to A10v samples (P pO2 and pCO2 values in A5v and A10v samples increased by 6.3% and 12.1% and by 1.29% and 52% in comparison to corresponding values of A5a and A10

  2. Computing pKa Values with a Mixing Hamiltonian Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Fan, Xiaoli; Jin, Yingdi; Hu, Xiangqian; Hu, Hao

    2013-09-10

    Accurate computation of the pKa value of a compound in solution is important but challenging. Here, a new mixing quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) Hamiltonian method is developed to simulate the free-energy change associated with the protonation/deprotonation processes in solution. The mixing Hamiltonian method is designed for efficient quantum mechanical free-energy simulations by alchemically varying the nuclear potential, i.e., the nuclear charge of the transforming nucleus. In pKa calculation, the charge on the proton is varied in fraction between 0 and 1, corresponding to the fully deprotonated and protonated states, respectively. Inspired by the mixing potential QM/MM free energy simulation method developed previously [H. Hu and W. T. Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 2005, 123, 041102], this method succeeds many advantages of a large class of λ-coupled free-energy simulation methods and the linear combination of atomic potential approach. Theory and technique details of this method, along with the calculation results of the pKa of methanol and methanethiol molecules in aqueous solution, are reported. The results show satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  3. The tumor suppressors p33ING1 and p33ING2 interact with alien in vivo and enhance alien-mediated gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegers, Inga; Kob, Robert; Eckey, Maren; Schmidt, Oliver; Goeman, Frauke; Papaioannou, Maria; Escher, Niko; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Melle, Christian; Baniahmad, Aria

    2007-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p33ING1 is involved in DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. Furthermore, p33ING1 is a transcriptional silencer that recognizes the histone mark for trimethylated lysine 4 at histone H3. Interestingly, expression of p33ING1 and p33ING2 is able to induce premature senescence in primary human fibroblasts. The corepressor Alien is involved in gene silencing mediated by selected members of nuclear hormone receptors. In addition, Alien acts as a corepressor for E2F1, a member of the E2F cell cycle regulatory family. Furthermore, recent findings suggest that Alien is complexed with transcription factors participating in DNA repair and chromatin. Here, using a proteomic approach by surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization and mass spectrometry (SELDI-MS) combined with immunological techniques, we show that Alien interacts in vivo with the tumor suppressor p33ING1 as well as with the related tumor suppressor candidate p33ING2. The interaction of Alien with p33ING1 and p33ING2 was confirmed in vitro with GST-pull-down, suggesting a direct binding of Alien to these factors. The binding domain was mapped to a central region of Alien. Functionally, the expression of p33ING1 or p33ING2 enhances the Alien-mediated silencing, suggesting that the interaction plays a role in transcriptional regulation. Thus, the findings suggest that the identified interaction between Alien and the tumor suppressors p33ING1 and p33ING2 reveals a novel cellular protein network.

  4. Effect of pH and sulfate concentration on hydrogen production using anaerobic mixed microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jeong-A.; Bhatnagar, Amit; Kumar, Eva; Jeon, Byong-Hun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do, 220-710 (Korea); Abou-Shanab, R.A.I. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do, 220-710 (Korea); Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Mubarak City for Scientific Research, Alexandria (Egypt); Min, Booki [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea); Song, Hocheol; Kim, Yong Je [Geologic Environment Division, KIGAM, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea); Choi, Jaeyoung [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea); Lee, Eung Seok [Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701-2979 (United States); Um, Sukkee [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-Dong, Seongdong-Gu, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea); Lee, Dae Sung [Petroleum and Marine Research Department, KIGAM, Daejeon (Korea)

    2009-12-15

    The effects of varying sulfate concentrations with pH on continuous fermentative hydrogen production were studied using anaerobic mixed cultures growing on a glucose substrate in a chemostat reactor. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 2.8 L/day at pH 5.5 and sulfate concentration of 3000 mg/L. Hydrogen production and residual sulfate level decreased with increasing the pH from 5.5 to 6.2. The volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and ethanol fractions in the effluent were in the order of butyric acid (HBu) > acetic acid (HAc) > ethanol > propionic acid (HPr). Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed the presence of hydrogen producing bacteria (HPB) under all pH ranges while sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) were present at pH 5.8 and 6.2. The inhibition in hydrogen production by SRB at pH 6.2 diminished entirely by lowering to pH 5.5, at which activity of SRB is substantially suppressed. (author)

  5. Sim@P1: Using Cloudscheduler for offline processing on the ATLAS HLT farm

    CERN Document Server

    Berghaus, Frank; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Simulation at Point1 (Sim@P1) project was built in 2013 to take advantage of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition High Level Trigger (HLT) farm. The HLT farm provides more than 2,000 compute nodes, which are critical to ATLAS during data taking. When ATLAS is not recording data, this large compute resource is used to generate and process simulation data for the experiment. The Sim@P1 system uses virtual machines, deployed by OpenStack, in order to isolate the resources from the ATLAS technical and control network. During the upcoming long shutdown in 2019 (LS2), the HLT farm including the Sim@P1 infrastructure will be upgraded. A previous paper on the project emphasized the need for “simple, reliable, and efficient tools” to quickly switch between data acquisition operation and offline processing.In this contribution we assess various options for updating and simplifying the provisional tools. Cloudscheduler is a tool for provisioning cloud resources for batch computing that has been managing cloud ...

  6. Data Sharing in DHT Based P2P Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncancio, Claudia; Del Pilar Villamil, María; Labbé, Cyril; Serrano-Alvarado, Patricia

    The evolution of peer-to-peer (P2P) systems triggered the building of large scale distributed applications. The main application domain is data sharing across a very large number of highly autonomous participants. Building such data sharing systems is particularly challenging because of the “extreme” characteristics of P2P infrastructures: massive distribution, high churn rate, no global control, potentially untrusted participants... This article focuses on declarative querying support, query optimization and data privacy on a major class of P2P systems, that based on Distributed Hash Table (P2P DHT). The usual approaches and the algorithms used by classic distributed systems and databases for providing data privacy and querying services are not well suited to P2P DHT systems. A considerable amount of work was required to adapt them for the new challenges such systems present. This paper describes the most important solutions found. It also identifies important future research trends in data management in P2P DHT systems.

  7. Search for stopped gluinos from p-anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš; Šimák, Vladislav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 13 (2007), 131801/1-131801/7 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P04LA210; GA MŠk 1P05LA257 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : supersymmetry * gluino * neutralino * D0 * DZero Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particle s and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 6.944, year: 2007

  8. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Jian-Ying; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. → Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. → Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  9. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Jian-Ying [Department of Pharmacology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hung, Jan-Jong, E-mail: petehung@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Pharmacology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Biosignal Transduction, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. {yields} Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  10. Photoassociation spectroscopy of 87Rb2 (5s1/2+5p1/2)0u+ long-range molecular states: Coupling with the (5s1/2+5p3/2)0u+ series analyzed using the Lu-Fano approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelassi, H.; Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Pruvost, L.

    2006-01-01

    We report on photoassociation of cold 87 Rb atoms providing the spectroscopy of (5s 1/2 +5p 1/2 )0 u + long-range molecular states, in the energy range of [-12.5, -0.7 cm -1 ] below the dissociation limit. A Lu-Fano approach coupled to the LeRoy-Bernstein formula is used to analyze the data. The Lu-Fano graph exhibits the coupling of the molecular series with the (5s 1/2 +5p 3/2 )0 u + one, which is due to spin effects in the molecule. A two-channel model involving an improved LeRoy-Bernstein formula allows us to characterize the molecular series, to localize (5s 1/2 +5p 3/2 )0 u + levels, to evaluate the coupling, and to predict the energy and width of the first predissociated level of (5s 1/2 +5p 3/2 )0 u + series. An experimental spectrum confirms the prediction

  11. Sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor axis is involved in ovarian cancer angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lan; Liu, Yixuan; Xie, Lei; Wu, Xia; Qiu, Lihua; Di, Wen

    2017-09-26

    Sphingosine kinase (SphK)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor (S1PR) signaling pathway has been implicated in a variety of pathological processes of ovarian cancer. However, the function of this axis in ovarian cancer angiogenesis remains incompletely defined. Here we provided the first evidence that SphK1/S1P/S1PR 1/3 pathway played key roles in ovarian cancer angiogenesis. The expression level of SphK1, but not SphK2, was closely correlated with the microvascular density (MVD) of ovarian cancer tissue. In vitro , the angiogenic potential and angiogenic factor secretion of ovarian cancer cells could be attenuated by SphK1, but not SphK2, blockage and were restored by the addition of S1P. Moreover, in these cells, we found S1P stimulation induced the angiogenic factor secretion via S1PR 1 and S1PR 3 , but not S1PR 2 . Furthermore, inhibition of S1PR 1/3 , but not S1PR 2 , attenuated the angiogenic potential and angiogenic factor secretion of the cells. in vivo , blockage of SphK or S1PR 1/3 could attenuate ovarian cancer angiogenesis and inhibit angiogenic factor expression in mouse models. Collectively, the current study showed a novel role of SphK1/S1P/S1PR 1/3 axis within the ovarian cancer, suggesting a new target to block ovarian cancer angiogenesis.

  12. A Distributed Dynamic Super Peer Selection Method Based on Evolutionary Game for Heterogeneous P2P Streaming Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to high efficiency and good scalability, hierarchical hybrid P2P architecture has drawn more and more attention in P2P streaming research and application fields recently. The problem about super peer selection, which is the key problem in hybrid heterogeneous P2P architecture, is becoming highly challenging because super peers must be selected from a huge and dynamically changing network. A distributed super peer selection (SPS algorithm for hybrid heterogeneous P2P streaming system based on evolutionary game is proposed in this paper. The super peer selection procedure is modeled based on evolutionary game framework firstly, and its evolutionarily stable strategies are analyzed. Then a distributed Q-learning algorithm (ESS-SPS according to the mixed strategies by analysis is proposed for the peers to converge to the ESSs based on its own payoff history. Compared to the traditional randomly super peer selection scheme, experiments results show that the proposed ESS-SPS algorithm achieves better performance in terms of social welfare and average upload rate of super peers and keeps the upload capacity of the P2P streaming system increasing steadily with the number of peers increasing.

  13. Vorinostat enhances protein stability of p27 and p21 through negative regulation of Skp2 and Cks1 in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Norihisa; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Tsubura, Airo

    2012-07-01

    Vorinostat is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that blocks cancer cell proliferation through the regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. We, herein, examined the involvement of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) and cyclin-dependent kinase subunit 1 (Cks1), the components of the SCFSkp2-Cks1 (Skp1/Cul1/F-box protein) ubiquitin ligase complex, in the regulation of p27 and p21 during vorinostat-induced growth arrest of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Vorinostat significantly reduced BrdU incorporation in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, which was associated with increased p27 and p21 protein levels without concomitant induction of p27 mRNA. Vorinostat-induced accumulation of p27 and p21 proteins was inversely correlated with the mRNA and protein levels of Skp2 and Cks1. Cycloheximide chase analysis revealed that vorinostat increased the half-life of p27 and p21 proteins. The accumulation of p27 and p21 proteins was attenuated by forced expression of Skp2 and Cks1, which conferred resistance to the vorinostat-induced S-phase reduction. These results suggest that vorinostat-induced growth arrest may be in part due to the enhanced protein stability of p27 and p21 through the downregulation of Skp2 and Cks1.

  14. How well do we know the quantum numbers of possible anti p p → M1M2 states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanou, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Information is available to completely analyze the p anti p → ππ reaction, allowing more global, large-scale, phenomenological analyses which combine the two experimental data sets in an energy independent, amplitude analysis which also includes pion-nucleon data. It would appear from the preliminary analyses of p anti p → M 1 M 2 angular distributions and polarizations the T-region may indeed contain some very interesting activity

  15. Strong decays of the 1 P and 2 D doubly charmed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li-Ye; Lü, Qi-Fang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2018-04-01

    We perform a systematical investigation of the strong decay properties of the low-lying 1 P - and 2 D -wave doubly charmed baryons with the 3P0 quark pair creation model. The main predictions include: (i) in the Ξc c and Ωc c family, the 1 P ρ mode excitations with JP=1 /2- and 3 /2- should be the fairly narrow states, while, for the 1 P λ mode excitations, they are most likely to be moderate states with a width of Γ ˜100 MeV . (ii) The 2 Dρ ρ states mainly decay via emitting a heavy-light meson and the decay widths can reach several tens MeV if their masses are above the threshold of ΛcD or ΞcD , respectively. The 2 Dλ λ states may be broad states with a width of Γ >100 MeV .

  16. Music2Share - Copyright-Compliant Music Sharing in P2P Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalker, Ton; Epema, Dick H.J.; Hartel, Pieter H.; Lagendijk, R. (Inald) L.; van Steen, Martinus Richardus; van Steen, Maarten

    Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks are generally considered to be free havens for pirated content, in particular with respect to music. We describe a solution for the problem of copyright infringement in P2P networks for music sharing. In particular, we propose a P2P protocol that integrates the functions

  17. Music2Share --- Copyright-Compliant Music Sharing in P2P Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalker, T.; Epema, D.; Hartel, P.; Lagendijk, I.; van Steen, M.R.

    2004-01-01

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) networks are generally considered to be free havens for pirated content, in particular with respect to music. We describe a solution for the problem of copyright infringement in P2P networks for music sharing. In particular, we propose a P2P protocol that integrates the functions

  18. Resource trade-off in P2P streaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alhaisoni, M.; Liotta, A.; Ghanbari, M.

    2009-01-01

    P2P TV has emerged as a powerful alternative solution for multimedia streaming over the traditional client-server paradigm. It has proven to be a valid substitute for online applications which offer video-on-demand and real-time video. This is mainly due to the scalability and resiliency that P2P

  19. Downregulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 by dexamethasone inhibits S1P-induced mesangial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Alexander; Jäger, Manuel; Völzke, Anja; Grammatikos, Georgios; Zu Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer; Huwiler, Andrea; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2015-06-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is generated by sphingosine kinase (SK)-1 and -2 and acts mainly as an extracellular ligand at five specific receptors, denoted S1P1-5. After activation, S1P receptors regulate important processes in the progression of renal diseases, such as mesangial cell migration and survival. Previously, we showed that dexamethasone enhances SK-1 activity and S1P formation, which protected mesangial cells from stress-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that dexamethasone treatment lowered S1P1 mRNA and protein expression levels in rat mesangial cells. This effect was abolished in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486. In addition, in vivo studies showed that dexamethasone downregulated S1P1 expression in glomeruli isolated from mice treated with dexamethasone (10 mg/kg body weight). Functionally, we identified S1P1 as a key player mediating S1P-induced mesangial cell migration. We show that dexamethasone treatment significantly lowered S1P-induced migration of mesangial cells, which was again reversed in the presence of RU-486. In summary, we suggest that dexamethasone inhibits S1P-induced mesangial cell migration via downregulation of S1P1. Overall, these results demonstrate that dexamethasone has functional important effects on sphingolipid metabolism and action in renal mesangial cells.

  20. PF-4708671, a specific inhibitor of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1, activates Nrf2 by promoting p62-dependent autophagic degradation of Keap1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Su [Severance Biomedical Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dong Hoon [Department of Life Science and Ewha Research Center for Systems Biology (Korea, Republic of); The Research Center for Cell Homeostasis, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 127-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Da Hyun [Severance Biomedical Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Soo Han, E-mail: soohanbae@yuhs.ac [Severance Biomedical Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-23

    p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) is an important serine/threonine kinase and downstream target of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway. PF-4708671 is a specific inhibitor of S6K1, and prevents S6K1-mediated phosphorylation of the S6 protein. PF-4708671 treatment often leads to apoptotic cell death. However, the protective mechanism against PF-4708671-induced cell death has not been elucidated. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway is essential for protecting cells against oxidative stress. p62, an adaptor protein in the autophagic process, enhances Nrf2 activation through the impairment of Keap1 activity. In this study, we showed that PF-4708671 induces autophagic Keap1 degradation-mediated Nrf2 activation in p62-dependent manner. Furthermore, p62-dependent Nrf2 activation plays a crucial role in protecting cells from PF-4708671-mediated apoptosis. - Highlights: • PF-4708671, a S6K1-specific inhibitor, prevents S6K1-mediated S6 phosphorylation. • However, PF-4708671 treatment often leads to apoptotic cell death. • Protective mechanism against PF-4708671-induced cell death remains to be elucidated. • PF-4708671 induced p62-dependent, autophagic Keap1 degradation-mediated Nrf2 activation. • p62-dependent Nrf2 activation protects cells from PF-4708671-mediated apoptosis.

  1. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Yasuyuki, E-mail: y.fujii@po.rd.taisho.co.jp [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Igarashi, Yasuyuki [Laboratory of Biomembrane and Biofunctional Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Goitsuka, Ryo [Division of Development and Aging, Research Institute for Biological Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  2. Measurement of the 22S1/2-22P3/2 fine structure interval in muonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettell, S.H.

    1990-08-01

    The (2 2 S 1/2 - 2 2 P 3/2 ) fine structure transition in muonium has been observed for the first time. The measured value is 9895 -30 +35 MHz. This measurement, when included with the theoretical value for the 2 2 P 1/2 - 2 2 P 3/2 fine structure interval, gives a value for the Lamb shift (2 2 S 1/2 - 2 2 P 1/2 ) independent of previous direct measurements. From the theoretical value for the fine structure interval, 10921.833(3) MHz, the value for the Lamb shift determined from this experiment is 1027 -35 +30 MHz and is in agreement with the prediction of quantum electrodynamics (QED) of 1047.5(3) MHz. Previous experimental values for the Lamb shift (2 2 S 1/2 -2 2 P 1/2 ) in muonium are 1070 -15 + 12 MHz and 1042 -23 +21 MHz. Combining this result with these previous results gives a new experimental value of 1058 -12 +10 for the Lamb shift in muonium. Muonium, the bound state of two structureless leptons (μ + e - ), is an ideal system for testing bound state QED because of the lack of hadronic structure as exists in the hydrogen system. The measurement makes use of the techniques of atomic beam microwave spectroscopy. Muonium atoms (μ + e - ) in the 2S states are produced by the beam-foil technique at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility with a low momentum, sub-surface muon beam. A variable frequency microwave field is applied to drive the atoms from the 2S to the 2P states, with the subsequent observation of the Lyman alpha photon from the decay of the 2P state to the 1S ground state. The frequency is varied from 9.0--11.0 GHz, driving the F = 0 → F = 1, F = 1, F = 1 and F = 1 → F = 2 transitions

  3. Acidic pH facilitates peripheral αβmeATP-mediated nociception in rats: differential roles of P2X, P2Y, ASIC and TRPV1 receptors in ATP-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyoung-Sig; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kang, Suk-Yun; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2011-03-01

    Peripheral ischemia is commonly associated with an increase in tissue ATP concentration and a decrease in tissue pH. Although in vitro data suggest that low tissue pH can affect ATP-binding affinities to P2 receptors, the mechanistic relationship between ATP and low pH on peripheral nociception has not been fully examined. This study was designed to investigate the potential role of an acidified environment on intraplantar αβmeATP-induced peripheral pain responses in rats. The mechanical allodynia (MA) produced by injection of αβmeATP was significantly increased in animals that received the drug diluted in pH 4.0 saline compared to those that received the drug diluted in pH 7.0 saline. Moreover, animals injected with αβmeATP (100 nmol) in pH 4.0 saline developed thermal hyperalgesia (TH), which did not occur in animals treated with αβmeATP diluted in pH 7.0 saline. To elucidate which receptors were involved in this pH-related facilitation of αβmeATP-induced MA and TH, rats were pretreated with PPADS (P2 antagonist), TNP-ATP (P2X antagonist), MRS2179 (P2Y1 antagonist), AMG9810 (TRPV1 antagonist) or amiloride (ASIC blocker). Both PPADS and TNP-ATP dose-dependently blocked pH-facilitated MA, while TH was significantly reduced by pre-treatment with MRS2179 or AMG9810. Moreover, amiloride injection significantly reduced low pH-induced facilitation of αβmeATP-mediated MA, but not TH. These results demonstrate that low tissue pH facilitates ATP-mediated MA via the activation of P2X receptors and ASICs, whereas TH induced by ATP under low pH conditions is mediated by the P2Y1 receptor and TRPV1, but not ASIC. Thus distinct mechanisms are responsible for the development of MA and TH under conditions of tissue acidosis and increased ATP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Femtosecond induced transparency and absorption in the extreme ultraviolet by coherent coupling of the He 2s2p (1Po) and 2p2 (1Se) double excitation states with 800 nm light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, Z.-H.; Greene, C.H.; Leone, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Femtosecond high-order harmonic transient absorption spectroscopy is used to observe electromagnetically induced transparency-like behavior as well as induced absorption in the extreme ultraviolet by laser dressing of the He 2s2p ( 1 P 0 ) and 2p 2 ( 1 S e ) double excitation states with an intense 800 nm field. Probing in the vicinity of the 1s 22s2p transition at 60.15 eV reveals the formation of an Autler-Townes doublet due to coherent coupling of the double excitation states. Qualitative agreement with the experimental spectra is obtained only when optical field ionization of both double excitation states into the N = 2 continuum is included in the theoretical model. Because the Fano q-parameter of the unperturbed probe transition is finite, the laser-dressed He atom exhibits both enhanced transparency and absorption at negative and positive probe energy detunings, respectively

  5. Synthesis and molecular structures of 1-hydroxyethyl-2-(p-substituted) phenoxymethyl benzimidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.W.; Zhao, L.; Wang, Z.; Gu, H.; Chen, W.; Zhao, C.

    2016-01-01

    Five novel 1-hydroxyethyl-2-(p-substituted) phenoxymethyl benzimidazoles were synthesized by a three-step route. Under microwave irradiation, the p-substituted phenols were firstly O-carboxymethylated to prepare the corresponding p-substituted phenoxymethyl acids, which then reacted with o-phenylendiamine to get the key intermediates 2-(p-substituted) phenoxymethyl benzimidazole. Finally, the solid-liquid phase transfer catalysis method, where tetrabutyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) was used as the catalyst, was applied to synthesize the target compounds c/sub 1/-c/sub 5/ by the N-hydroxyethylation reaction with 2-chloroethyl alcohol. The structures of the obtained compounds were well characterized and confirmed by elemental analysis, MS, IR, /sup 1/H NMR, /sup 13/C NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. (author)

  6. Arithmetically Cohen-Macaulay sets of points in P^1 x P^1

    CERN Document Server

    Guardo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents a solution to the interpolation problem for arithmetically Cohen-Macaulay (ACM) sets of points in the multiprojective space P^1 x P^1.  It collects the various current threads in the literature on this topic with the aim of providing a self-contained, unified introduction while also advancing some new ideas.  The relevant constructions related to multiprojective spaces are reviewed first, followed by the basic properties of points in P^1 x P^1, the bigraded Hilbert function, and ACM sets of points.  The authors then show how, using a combinatorial description of ACM points in P^1 x P^1, the bigraded Hilbert function can be computed and, as a result, solve the interpolation problem.  In subsequent chapters, they consider fat points and double points in P^1 x P^1 and demonstrate how to use their results to answer questions and problems of interest in commutative algebra.  Throughout the book, chapters end with a brief historical overview, citations of related results, and, where relevan...

  7. Metabolism of styrene to styrene oxide and vinylphenols in cytochrome P450 2F2- and P450 2E1-knockout mouse liver and lung microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuijie; Li, Lei; Ding, Xinxin; Zheng, Jiang

    2014-01-21

    Pulmonary toxicity of styrene is initiated by cytochromes P450-dependent metabolic activation. P450 2E1 and P450 2F2 are considered to be two main cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for styrene metabolism in mice. The objective of the current study was to determine the correlation between the formation of styrene metabolites (i.e., styrene oxide and 4-vinylphenol) and pulmonary toxicity of styrene, using Cyp2e1- and Cyp2f2-null mouse models. A dramatic decrease in the formation of styrene glycol and 4-vinylphenol was found in Cyp2f2-null mouse lung microsomes relative to that in the wild-type mouse lung microsomes; however, no significant difference in the production of the styrene metabolites was observed between lung microsomes obtained from Cyp2e1-null and the wild-type mice. The knockout and wild-type mice were treated with styrene (6.0 mmol/kg, ip), and cell counts and LDH activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were monitored to evaluate the pulmonary toxicity induced by styrene. Cyp2e1-null mice displayed a susceptibility to lung toxicity of styrene similar to that of the wild-type animals; however, Cyp2f2-null mice were resistant to styrene-induced pulmonary toxicity. In conclusion, both P450 2E1 and P450 2F2 are responsible for the metabolic activation of styrene. The latter enzyme plays an important role in styrene-induced pulmonary toxicity. Both styrene oxide and 4-vinylphenol are suggested to participate in the development of lung injury induced by styrene.

  8. The uptake of phosphorus from mixed fertilizer ammonium bicarbonate and 32P-calcium superphosphate by corn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xianfang; Zhang Xizhong; Li Dongyang

    1985-01-01

    In this experiment the effect of different nitrogen contents in mixed and separeted fertilizers on the utilization rate of phosphyrus by corn has been stutied by using 32 P trcer. It is shown that the utilization rate of phosphorus of mixed fertilizer is higher than that of (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 and Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 4 applied separately when the content of nitrogen in fertilizer is 2.5-4.5%. There are no significant differences, when the contents of nitrogen in fertilizer are 12.4-14.1%. But the utilization rate of phosphorus of mixed fertilizer is lower than that of (NH 4 )CO 3 and Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 applied separately, when the contents of nitrogen in fertilizer is 10%

  9. Risk Management of P2P Internet Financing Service Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalei, Li

    2017-09-01

    Since 2005, the world’s first P2P Internet financing service platform Zopa in UK was introduced, in the development of “Internet +” trend, P2P Internet financing service platform has been developed rapidly. In 2007, China’s first P2P platform “filming loan” was established, marking the P2P Internet financing service platform to enter China and the rapid development. At the same time, China’s P2P Internet financing service platform also appeared in different forms of risk. This paper focuses on the analysis of the causes of risk of P2P Internet financing service platform and the performance of risk management process. It provides a solution to the Internet risk management plan, and explains the risk management system of the whole P2P Internet financing service platform and the future development direction.

  10. StreetTiVo: Using a P2P XML Database System to Manage Multimedia Data in Your Living Room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ying; de Vries, A.P.; Boncz, P.; Hiemstra, Djoerd; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; Li, Qing; Feng, Ling; Pei, Jian; Wang, Sean X.

    StreetTiVo is a project that aims at bringing research results into the living room; in particular, a mix of current results in the areas of Peer-to-Peer XML Database Management System (P2P XDBMS), advanced multimedia analysis techniques, and advanced information re- trieval techniques. The project

  11. 2s 2p 3P10 → 2s21S0 intercombination line in beryllium-like krypton, molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.

    1979-01-01

    Transition probabilities are evaluated for the 2s 2p 3 P 1 0 → 2s 2 1 S 0 transition in beryllium-like ions for krypton, molybdenum and tungsten, using configuration-interaction wavefunctions. The importance of the 2s 3p 1 P 1 0 configuration is considered

  12. Measurements of charm mixing and $C\\!P$ violation using $D^0 \\to K^\\pm \\pi^\\mp$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-03-23

    Measurements of charm mixing and $C\\!P$ violation parameters from the decay-time-dependent ratio of $ D^0 \\to K^+ \\pi^- $ to $ D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+ $ decay rates and the charge-conjugate ratio are reported. The analysis uses $\\overline{B}\\to D^{*+} \\mu^- X$, and charge-conjugate decays, where $D^{*+}\\to D^0 \\pi^+$, and $D^0\\to K^{\\mp} \\pi^{\\pm}$. The $pp$ collision data are recorded by the LHCb experiment at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$. The data are analyzed under three hypotheses: (i) mixing assuming $C\\!P$ symmetry, (ii) mixing assuming no direct $C\\!P$ violation in the Cabibbo-favored or doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay amplitudes, and (iii) mixing allowing either direct $C\\!P$ violation and/or $C\\!P$ violation in the superpositions of flavor eigenstates defining the mass eigenstates. The data are also combined with those from a previous LHCb study of $D^0\\to K \\pi$ decays from a disjoint set of $ D^{*+} $ candidates produced direct...

  13. Association of Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P Receptor-1 Pathway with Cell Proliferation and Survival in Canine Hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A M; Graef, A J; LeVine, D N; Cohen, I R; Modiano, J F; Kim, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a key biolipid signaling molecule that regulates cell growth and survival, but it has not been studied in tumors from dogs. S1P/S1P1 signaling will contribute to the progression of hemangiosarcoma (HSA). Thirteen spontaneous HSA tissues, 9 HSA cell lines, 8 nonmalignant tissues, including 6 splenic hematomas and 2 livers with vacuolar degeneration, and 1 endothelial cell line derived from a dog with splenic hematoma were used. This was a retrospective case series and in vitro study. Samples were obtained as part of medically necessary diagnostic procedures. Microarray, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting were performed to examine S1P1 expression. S1P concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. S1P signaling was evaluated by intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization; proliferation and survival were evaluated using the MTS assay and Annexin V staining. Canine HSA cells expressed higher levels of S1P1 mRNA than nonmalignant endothelial cells. S1P1 protein was present in HSA tissues and cell lines. HSA cells appeared to produce low levels of S1P, but they selectively consumed S1P from the culture media. Exogenous S1P induced an increase in intracellular calcium as well as increased proliferation and viability of HSA cells. Prolonged treatment with FTY720, an inhibitor of S1P1 , decreased S1P1 protein expression and induced apoptosis of HSA cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling pathway functions to maintain HSA cell viability and proliferation. The data suggest that S1P1 or the S1P pathway in general could be targets for therapeutic intervention for dogs with HSA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Toxicological analysis of 1-P-tholiloxi-3-morpholino-2-propanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimov, I.F.; Kimsanov, A.B.; Khaydarov, K.; Kimsanov, B.

    2005-01-01

    We have researched the toxicological analyse of 1-p-tholiloxi-3-morpholino-2-propanol on white rats during the chronic infusion. The influence of, the preparation 1-p-tholiloxi-3-morpholino-2-propanol on exponents, of the whole stable of the existence of tested animals was observed. It obviously shows that during 30 days in 25 and 50 mg/kg doses the masses of the body of the animals didn't show any phenomenon of the organisms, (allergy, anaphylaxis). The mass of a body of the tested and controlled groups of animals in same extent increased. The changes in blood there quite normal

  15. n-p Short-Range Correlations from (p,2p+n) Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, A.; Watson, J. W.; Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Asryan, G.; Averichev, Y.; Barton, D.; Baturin, V.; Bukhtoyarova, N.; Carroll, A.; Gushue, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Leksanov, A.; Makdisi, Y.; Malki, A.; Minina, E.; Navon, I.; Nicholson, H.; Ogawa, A.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Piasetzky, E.; Schetkovsky, A.; Shimanskiy, S.; Zhalov, D.

    2003-01-01

    We studied the 12C(p,2p+n) reaction at beam momenta of 5.9, 8.0, and 9.0 GeV/c. For quasielastic (p,2p) events pf, the momentum of the knocked-out proton before the reaction, was compared (event by event) with pn, the coincident neutron momentum. For |pn|>kF=0.220 GeV/c (the Fermi momentum) a strong back-to-back directional correlation between pf and pn was observed, indicative of short-range n-p correlations. From pn and pf we constructed the distributions of c.m. and relative motion in the longitudinal direction for correlated pairs. We also determined that 49±13% of events with |pf|>kF had directionally correlated neutrons with |pn|>kF.

  16. Fluctuating seawater pH/pCO2 regimes are more energetically expensive than static pH/pCO2 levels in the mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Stephanie; Urbina, Mauricio A; Findlay, Helen S; Wilson, Rod W; Lewis, Ceri

    2017-10-25

    Ocean acidification (OA) studies typically use stable open-ocean pH or CO 2 values. However, species living within dynamic coastal environments can naturally experience wide fluctuations in abiotic factors, suggesting their responses to stable pH conditions may not be reflective of either present or near-future conditions. Here we investigate the physiological responses of the mussel Mytilus edulis to variable seawater pH conditions over short- (6 h) and medium-term (2 weeks) exposures under both current and near-future OA scenarios. Mussel haemolymph pH closely mirrored that of seawater pH over short-term changes of 1 pH unit with acidosis or recovery accordingly, highlighting a limited capacity for acid-base regulation. After 2 weeks, mussels under variable pH conditions had significantly higher metabolic rates, antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation than those exposed to static pH under both current and near-future OA scenarios. Static near-future pH conditions induced significant acid-base disturbances and lipid peroxidation compared with the static present-day conditions but did not affect the metabolic rate. These results clearly demonstrate that living in naturally variable environments is energetically more expensive than living in static seawater conditions, which has consequences for how we extrapolate future OA responses in coastal species. © 2017 The Authors.

  17. P2P Network Lending, Loss Given Default and Credit Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyou Zhou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Peer-to-peer (P2P network lending is a new mode of internet finance that still holds credit risk as its main risk. According to the internal rating method of the New Basel Accord, in addition to the probability of default, loss given default is also one of the important indicators of evaluation credit risks. Proceeding from the perspective of loss given default (LGD, this paper conducts an empirical study on the probability distribution of LGDs of P2P as well as its influencing factors with the transaction data of Lending Club. The results show that: (1 the LGDs of P2P loans presents an obvious unimodal distribution, the peak value is relatively high and tends to concentrate with the decrease of the borrower’s credit rating, indicating that the distribution of LGDs of P2P lending is similar to that of unsecured bonds; (2 The total asset of the borrower has no significant impact on LGD, the credit rating and the debt-to-income ratio exert a significant negative impact, while the term and amount of the loan produce a relatively strong positive impact. Therefore, when evaluating the borrower’s repayment ability, it is required to pay more attention to its assets structure rather than the size of its total assets. When carrying out risk control for the P2P platform, it is necessary to give priority to the control of default rate.

  18. (p,2p) experiments at the University of Maryland cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, P.G.

    1976-11-01

    Some of the (p,2p) work which has been carried out at the Maryland Cyclotron is discussed. A brief introduction to the (p,2p) reaction is presented, and the types of experimental techniques utilized in (p,2p) studies are discussed. A brief introduction is given to the various theoretical treatments presently available to analyze (p,2p) reaction data. Secondly, experimental and theoretical studies of (p,2p) on d, 3 He, and 4 He carried out by the Maryland group are presented. Thirdly, (p,2p) results are discussed for 6 Li, 7 Li, and 12 C at 100 MeV. Fourthly, the effects of distortion on the experimental data are considered by presenting theoretical calculations for 12 C and 40 Ca at various bombarding energies

  19. High Glucose Concentration Stimulates NHE-1 Activity in Distal Nephron Cells: the Role of the Mek/Erk1/2/p90RSK and p38MAPK Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Martins da Costa-Pessoa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In models of diabetes, distal nephron cells contribute to glucose uptake and oxidation. How these cells contribute to the use of glucose for the regulation of H+ extrusion remains unknown. We used Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK cells to investigate the effect of acute or chronic high glucose concentration on the abundance and activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE-1. Methods: Using RT-PCR, we also evaluated the mRNA expression for sodium glucose co-transporters SGLT1 and SGLT2. Protein abundance was analyzed using immunoblotting, and intracellular pH (pHi recovery was evaluated using microscopy in conjunction with the fluorescent probe BCECF/AM. The Na+-dependent pHi recovery rate was monitored with HOE-694 (50 µM and/or S3226 (10 µM, specific NHE-1 and NHE-3 inhibitors. Results: MDCK cells did not express the mRNA for SGLT1 or SGLT2 but did express the GLUT2, NHE-1 and NHE-3 proteins. Under control conditions, we observed a greater contribution of NHE-1 to pHi recovery relative to the other H+ transporters. Acute high glucose treatment increased the HOE-694-sensitive pHi recovery rate and p-Erk1/2 and p90RSK abundance. These parameters were reduced by PD-98059, a Mek inhibitor (1 µM. Chronic high glucose treatment also increased the HOE-694-sensitive pHi recovery rate and p-p38MAPK abundance. Both parameters were reduced by SB-203580, a p38MAPK inhibitor (10 µM. Conclusion: These results suggested that extracellular high glucose stimulated NHE-1 acutely and chronically through Mek/Erk1/2/p90RSK and p38MAPK pathways, respectively.

  20. Deletion of P2X2 and P2X3 receptor subunits does not alter motility of the mouse colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew DeVries

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic P2X receptors contribute to neurotransmission in the gut. P2X receptors are ligand-gated cation channels that mediate synaptic excitation in subsets of enteric neurons. The present study evaluated colonic motility in vitro and in vivo in wild type (WT and P2X2 and P2X3 subunit knockout (KO mice. The muscarinic receptor agonist, bethanechol (0.3-3 micromolar, caused similar contractions of the longitudinal muscle in colon segments from WT, P2X2 and P2X3 subunit KO mice. Nicotine (1-300 micromolar, acting at neuronal nicotinic receptors, caused similar longitudinal muscle relaxations in colonic segments from WT and P2X2 and P2X3 subunit KO mice. Nicotine-induced relaxations were inhibited by nitro-L-arginine (NLA, 100 micromolar and apamin (0.1 micromolar which block inhibitory neuromuscular transmission. ATP (1-1000 micromolar caused contractions only in the presence of NLA and apamin. ATP-induced contractions were similar in colon segments from WT, P2X2 and P2X3 KO mice. The mouse colon generates spontaneous migrating motor complexes (MMCs in vitro. The MMC frequency was higher in P2X2 KO compared to WT tissues; other parameters of the MMC were similar in colon segments from WT, P2X2 and P2X3 KO mice. 5-Hydroxytryptophan-induced fecal output was similar in WT, P2X2 and P2X3 KO mice. These data indicate that nicotinic receptors are located predominately on inhibitory motor neurons supplying the longitudinal muscle in the mouse colon. P2X2 or P2X3 subunit containing receptors are not localized to motorneurons supplying the longitudinal muscle. Synaptic transmission mediated by P2X2 or P2X3 subunit containing receptors is not required for propulsive motility in the mouse colon.

  1. Kinetics of an oxygen – iodine active medium with iodine atoms optically pumped on the {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} – {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagidullin, M V; Azyazov, V N [Samara Branch of the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Samara (Russian Federation); Malyshev, M S [S.P. Korolev Samara State Aerospace University, Samara (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-31

    The kinetics of the processes occurring in an O{sub 2} – I{sub 2} – He – H{sub 2}O gas flow in which photodissociation of molecular iodine at a wavelength close to 500 nm and excitation of atomic iodine on the {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} – {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} transition by narrow-band radiation near 1315 nm are implemented successively has been analysed. It is shown that implementation of these processes allows one to form an oxygen – iodine medium with a high degree of dissociation of molecular iodine and a relative content of singlet oxygen O{sub 2}(a{sup 1}Δ) exceeding 10%. Having formed a supersonic gas flow with a temperature ∼100 K from this medium, one can reach a small-signal gain of about 10{sup -2} cm{sup -1} on the {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} – {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} transition in iodine atoms. The specific power per unit flow cross section in the oxygen – iodine laser with this active medium may reach ∼100 W cm{sup -2}. (active media)

  2. Measurement of the production cross section ratio $\\sigma(\\chi_{b2}(1\\mathrm{P}))/ \\sigma(\\chi_{b1}(1\\mathrm{P}))$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Song; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Montecassiano, Fabio; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Dujany, Giulio; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Korenkov, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Mitsyn, Valeri Valentinovitch; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Tikhonenko, Elena; Yuldashev, Bekhzod S; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Bahtiyar, Hüseyin; Barlas, Esra; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarli, Fuat Ilkehan; Yücel, Mete; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Cheng, Tongguang; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-04-09

    A measurement of the production cross section ratio $\\sigma(\\chi_{b2}(1\\mathrm{P}))/ \\sigma(\\chi_{b1}(1\\mathrm{P}))$ is presented. The $\\chi_{b1}(1\\mathrm{P})$ and $\\chi_{b2}(1\\mathrm{P})$ bottomonium states, promptly produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV, are detected by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC through their radiative decays $\\chi_{b1,2}(1\\mathrm{P}) \\rightarrow \\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S}) + \\gamma$. The emitted photons are measured through their conversion to e$^+$e$^-$ pairs, whose reconstruction allows the two states to be resolved. The $\\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S})$ is measured through its decay to two muons. An event sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.7 fb$^{-1}$ is used to measure the cross section ratio in a phase-space region defined by the photon pseudorapidity, |$\\eta^\\gamma$| < 1.0; the $\\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S})$ rapidity, |$y^\\Upsilon$| < 1.5; and the $\\Upsilon(1\\mathrm{S})$ transverse momentum, 7 < $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^\\Upsilon$ < 40 GeV. The cross section ratio sh...

  3. Evaluation of P availability from Fe and A1 labelled (32P) phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittencourt, V.S.

    1975-07-01

    Synthetically Fe and A1 labelled phosphates ( 32 P) show a certain amount of available P to the plants when applied to Sao Paulo State soils. This availability decreases from considered amorphous A1-phosphate (A1-P sub(am)) to A1 phosphate with a certain cristalinity grade (A1-P sub(cr)) and than from this to Fe-P sub(am) followed by Fe-P sub(cr), and it is influenced by both the soil characteristics and mainly by the iron constituents of the samples. In this way, one can not expect that the 0,05 N 2 H SO 4 and the CHANG and JACKSON (1957a) solutions can define properly the available P of these soils. The addition of lime to the soils do not drive to a better P absorption by the plants and its effects are dubious

  4. Lithium superionic conductor Li9.42Si1.02P2.1S9.96O2.04 with Li10GeP2S12-type structure in the Li2S–P2S5–SiO2 pseudoternary system: Synthesis, electrochemical properties, and structure–composition relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hori

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lithium superionic conductors with the Li10GeP2S12 (LGPS-type structure are promising materials for use as solid electrolytes in next-generation lithium batteries. A novel member of the LGPS family, Li9.42Si1.02P2.1S9.96O2.04, and its solid solutions were synthesised by quenching from 1273 K in the Li2S–P2S5–SiO2 pseudoternary system. The material exhibited an ionic conductivity as high as 3.2×10−4 S cm−1 at 298 K, as well as the high electrochemical stability to lithium metal, which was improved by the introduction of oxygen into the LGPS-type structure. An all-solid-state cell with a lithium metal anode and Li9.42Si1.02P2.1S9.96O2.04 as the separator showed excellent performance with a high coulomb efficiency of 100%. Thus, oxygen doping is an effective way of improving the electrochemical stability of LGPS-type structure.

  5. PPADS: an antagonist at endothelial P2Y-purinoceptors but not P2U-purinoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C; Tanna, B; Boarder, M R

    1995-11-01

    1. Bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells contain two co-existing receptors for extracellular ATP, the P2Y and P2U-purinoceptors. Here we have determined whether the proposed P2X-purinoceptor antagonist, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) could distinguish between these two receptor subtypes. 2. Cells labelled with myo-[2-3H]-inositol were stimulated with increasing concentrations of either the P2Y-agonist, 2MeSATP, or the P2U-agonist, UTP in the absence or presence of 30 microM PPADS. The accumulation of total [3H]-inositol (poly)phosphates mediated by 2MeSATP was markedly attenuated by PPADS, whereas the response to UTP was not significantly affected. 3. Stimulation of BAE cells with increasing concentrations of ATP showed a reduced response in the presence of 10 microM PPADS, but this effect of the antagonist was not significant. By contrast, inhibition of the response to ADP was profound and highly significant. 4. These observations show that PPADS is not a selective P2X-purinoceptor antagonist, but is able to distinguish between P2Y- and P2YU-purinoceptors in BAE cells, and indicate that this compound may provide a useful tool in the study of multiple subtypes of P2-purinoceptors. Furthermore the results are consistent with the hypothesis that ATP interacts with both receptor subtypes, but that the action of ADP is primarily at the P2Y-purinoceptor in these endothelial cells.

  6. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) and S1P Signaling Pathway: Therapeutic Targets in Autoimmunity and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsing-Chuan; Han, May H

    2016-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptors (S1PR) are ubiquitously expressed. S1P-S1PR signaling has been well characterized in immune trafficking and activation in innate and adaptive immune systems. However, the full extent of its involvement in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is not well understood. FTY720 (fingolimod), a non-selective S1PR modulator, significantly decreased annualized relapse rates in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). FTY720, which primarily targets S1P receptor 1 as a functional antagonist, arrests lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid tissues and reduces neuroinflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that FTY720 also decreases astrogliosis and promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation within the CNS and may have therapeutic benefit to prevent brain atrophy. Since S1P signaling is involved in multiple immune functions, therapies targeting S1P axis may be applicable to treat autoimmune diseases other than MS. Currently, over a dozen selective S1PR and S1P pathway modulators with potentially superior therapeutic efficacy and better side-effect profiles are in the pipeline of drug development. Furthermore, newly characterized molecules such as apolipoprotein M (ApoM) (S1P chaperon) and SPNS2 (S1P transporter) are also potential targets for treatment of autoimmune diseases. Finally, the application of therapies targeting S1P and S1P signaling pathways may be expanded to treat several other immune-mediated disorders (such as post-infectious diseases, post-stroke and post-stroke dementia) and inflammatory conditions beyond their application in primary autoimmune diseases.

  7. Comparing Pedophile Activity in Different P2P Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Raphaël Fournier; Thibault Cholez; Matthieu Latapy; Isabelle Chrisment; Clémence Magnien; Olivier Festor; Ivan Daniloff

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Peer-to-peer (P2P) systems are widely used to exchange content over the Internet. Knowledge of pedophile activity in such networks remains limited, despite having important social consequences. Moreover, though there are different P2P systems in use, previous academic works on this topic focused on one system at a time and their results are not directly comparable. We design a methodology for comparing KAD and eDonkey, two P2P systems among the most prominent ones and ...

  8. Homoleptic diphosphacyclobutadiene complexes [M(η(4)-P2C2R2)2]x- (M = Fe, Co; x = 0, 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Robert; Ehlers, Andreas W; Khusniyarov, Marat M; Hartl, František; de Bruin, Bas; Long, Gary J; Grandjean, Fernande; Schappacher, Falko M; Pöttgen, Rainer; Slootweg, J Chris; Lutz, Martin; Spek, Anthony L; Lammertsma, Koop

    2010-12-27

    The preparation and comprehensive characterization of a series of homoleptic sandwich complexes containing diphosphacyclobutadiene ligands are reported. Compounds [K([18]crown-6)(thf)(2)][Fe(η(4)-P(2)C(2)tBu(2))(2)] (K1), [K([18]crown-6)(thf)(2)][Co(η(4)-P(2)C(2)tBu(2))(2)] (K2), and [K([18]crown-6)(thf)(2)][Co(η(4)-P(2)C(2)Ad(2))(2)] (K3, Ad = adamantyl) were obtained from reactions of [K([18]crown-6)(thf)(2)][M(η(4)-C(14)H(10))(2)] (M = Fe, Co) with tBuC[triple bond]P (1, 2), or with AdC[triple bond]P (3). Neutral sandwiches [M(η(4)-P(2)C(2)tBu(2))(2)] (4: M = Fe 5: M = Co) were obtained by oxidizing 1 and 2 with [Cp(2)Fe]PF(6). Cyclic voltammetry and spectro-electrochemistry indicate that the two [M(η(4)-P(2)C(2)tBu(2))(2)](-)/[M(η(4)-P(2)C(2)tBu(2))(2)] moieties can be reversibly interconverted by one electron oxidation and reduction, respectively. Complexes 1-5 were characterized by multinuclear NMR, EPR (1 and 5), UV/Vis, and Mössbauer spectroscopies (1 and 4), mass spectrometry (4 and 5), and microanalysis (1-3). The molecular structures of 1-5 were determined by using X-ray crystallography. Essentially D(2d)-symmetric structures were found for all five complexes, which show the two 1,3-diphosphacyclobutadiene rings in a staggered orientation. Density functional theory calculations revealed the importance of covalent metal-ligand π bonding in 1-5. Possible oxidation state assignments for the metal ions are discussed.

  9. S1P lyase in thymic perivascular spaces promotes egress of mature thymocytes via up-regulation of S1P receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Hideki; Takemoto, Kana; Utsumi, Hiroyuki; Fukunari, Atsushi; Sugahara, Kunio; Masuko, Takashi; Chiba, Kenji

    2014-05-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) play an important role in the egress of mature CD4 or CD8 single-positive (SP) thymocytes from the thymus. Fingolimod hydrochloride (FTY720), an S1P1 functional antagonist, induced significant accumulation of CD62L(high)CD69(low) mature SP thymocytes in the thymic medulla. Immunohistochemical staining using anti-S1P1 antibody revealed that S1P1 is predominantly expressed on thymocytes in the thymic medulla and is strongly down-regulated even at 3h after FTY720 administration. 2-Acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI), an S1P lyase inhibitor, also induced accumulation of mature SP thymocytes in the thymic medulla with an enlargement of the perivascular spaces (PVS). At 6h after THI administration, S1P1-expressing thymocytes reduced partially as if to form clusters and hardly existed in the proximity of CD31-expressing blood vessels in the thymic medulla, suggesting S1P lyase expression in the cells constructing thymic medullary PVS. To determine the cells expressing S1P lyase in the thymus, we newly established a mAb (YK19-2) specific for mouse S1P lyase. Immunohistochemical staining with YK19-2 revealed that S1P lyase is predominantly expressed in non-lymphoid thymic stromal cells in the thymic medulla. In the thymic medullary PVS, S1P lyase was expressed in ER-TR7-positive cells (reticular fibroblasts and pericytes) and CD31-positive vascular endothelial cells. Our findings suggest that S1P lyase expressed in the thymic medullary PVS keeps the tissue S1P concentration low around the vessels and promotes thymic egress via up-regulation of S1P1.

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) Lyase Inhibition Causes Increased Cardiac S1P Levels and Bradycardia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher M; Mittelstadt, Scott; Banfor, Patricia; Bousquet, Peter; Duignan, David B; Gintant, Gary; Hart, Michelle; Kim, Youngjae; Segreti, Jason

    2016-10-01

    Inhibition of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-catabolizing enzyme S1P lyase (S1PL) elevates the native ligand of S1P receptors and provides an alternative mechanism for immune suppression to synthetic S1P receptor agonists. S1PL inhibition is reported to preferentially elevate S1P in lymphoid organs. Tissue selectivity could potentially differentiate S1PL inhibitors from S1P receptor agonists, the use of which also results in bradycardia, atrioventricular block, and hypertension. But it is unknown if S1PL inhibition would also modulate cardiac S1P levels or cardiovascular function. The S1PL inhibitor 6-[(2R)-4-(4-benzyl-7-chlorophthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylpiperazin-1-yl]pyridine-3-carbonitrile was used to determine the relationship in rats between drug concentration, S1P levels in select tissues, and circulating lymphocytes. Repeated oral doses of the S1PL inhibitor fully depleted circulating lymphocytes after 3 to 4 days of treatment in rats. Full lymphopenia corresponded to increased levels of S1P of 100- to 1000-fold in lymph nodes, 3-fold in blood (but with no change in plasma), and 9-fold in cardiac tissue. Repeated oral dosing of the S1PL inhibitor in telemeterized, conscious rats resulted in significant bradycardia within 48 hours of drug treatment, comparable in magnitude to the bradycardia induced by 3 mg/kg fingolimod. These results suggest that S1PL inhibition modulates cardiac function and does not provide immune suppression with an improved cardiovascular safety profile over fingolimod in rats. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Self-broadening and shifting of the Li(2s-2p) and K(4s-4p) line cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reggami, L.; Bouledroua, M.; Allouche, A.R.; Aubert-Frecon, M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine quantum mechanically the width Γ and the shift Δ of the lithium Li(2p→2s) and potassium K(4p→4s) resonance lines when these atoms are evolving in their parent gases. The interaction potentials along which the atoms Li(2p)+Li(2s) and K(4p)+K(4s) approach each other are constructed from reliable data. The radial wave equation is then solved numerically by using these potentials to compute the elastic phase shifts. By adopting the simplified Baranger model for the pressure broadening, which assumes the impact approximation, the cross sections effective in linewidth and lineshift are analyzed. The analysis leads in particular to the determination of the width and shift rates and the computations show that these rates have constant values and, mainly, do not depend on temperature. An approximate method is further applied to the calculations of the cross sections. The results reveal the influence of the long-range -C 3 /R 3 interactions and confirm the universality of the obtained formulas of Γ and Δ

  12. Optogalvanic transients in the 1s2,4→2p1,3 excitations of radio frequency neon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, X.; Kumar, D.; McGlynn, S.P.

    1999-01-01

    The optogalvanic effects (OGE) induced by pulsed laser excitation of Ne 1s 2,4 →2p 1,3 transitions in a low power, ∼30 MHz radio frequency Ne discharge at ∼5 Torr are described. The polarity (sign) of the OGE signal is controlled by perturbations of the 1s j populations. The steady state 1s 4 population is ∼10 1 times larger than the 1s 2 population and the OGE signals for 1s 4 →2p 1,3 excitations are correspondingly stronger than those for 1s 22p 1,3 excitations. The plasma temperature is found to be ∼1000 K. The excitations 1s 2,4 →2p 3 are more efficient at signal production than the 1s 2,4 →2p 1 excitations, which is contrary to prediction. The OGE signals are consequences of: (1) perturbation and reequilibration of the metastable 1s 3 and 1s 5 populations; (2) radiatively trapped 1s 21 S 0 photons; and (3) collisionally induced 1s 2 , 1s 4 ↔1s 3 , 1s 5 energy transfer. The OGE signal components, both the ionization and photoacoustic constituents, are temporally coincident only when the immediate causative agents are trapped photons. When otherwise produced, the photoacoustic part is delayed relative to the ionization component by the time required for the acoustic wave to travel from the locus of excitation to the sensitive region(s) of the plasma. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  13. Genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450-1A2 (CYP1A2 among Emiratis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M Al-Ahmad

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2 is one of the CYP450 mixed-function oxidase system that is of clinical importance due to the large number of drug interactions associated with its induction and inhibition. In addition, significant inter-individual differences in the elimination of drugs metabolized by CYP1A2 enzyme have been observed which are largely due to the highly polymorphic nature of CYP1A2 gene. However, there are limited studies on CYP1A2 phenotypes and CYP1A2 genotypes among Emiratis and thus this study was carried out to fill this gap. Five hundred and seventy six non-smoker Emirati subjects were asked to consume a soft drink containing caffeine (a non-toxic and reliable probe for predicting CYP1A2 phenotype and then provide a buccal swab along with a spot urine sample. Taq-Man Real Time PCR was used to determine the CYP1A2 genotype of each individual. Phenotyping was carried out by analyzing the caffeine metabolites using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC analysis. We found that 1.4%, 16.3% and 82.3% of the Emirati subjects were slow, intermediate and rapid CYP1A2 metabolizers, respectively. In addition, we found that 1.4% of the subjects were homozygote for derived alleles while 16.1% were heterozygote and 82.5% were homozygote for the ancestral allele. The genotype frequency of the ancestral allele, CYP1A2*1A/*1A, is the highest in this population, followed by CYP1A2 *1A/*1C and CYP1A2 *1A/*1K genotypes, with frequencies of 0.825, 0.102 and 0.058, respectively. The degree of phenotype/genotype concordance was equal to 81.6%. The CYP1A2*1C/*1C and CYP1A2*3/*3 genotypes showed significantly the lowest enzyme phenotypic activity. The frequency of slow activity CYP1A2 enzyme alleles is very low among Emiratis which correlates with the presence of low frequencies of derived alleles in CYP1A2 gene.

  14. P2Y2 Receptor and EGFR Cooperate to Promote Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion via ERK1/2 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Hua; Qiu, Ying; Zhang, Hong-Quan; Tian, Xin-Xia; Fang, Wei-Gang

    2015-01-01

    As one member of G protein-coupled P2Y receptors, P2Y2 receptor can be equally activated by extracellular ATP and UTP. Our previous studies have proved that activation of P2Y2 receptor by extracellular ATP could promote prostate cancer cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo via regulating the expressions of some epithelial-mesenchymal transition/invasion-related genes (including IL-8, E-cadherin, Snail and Claudin-1), and the most significant change in expression of IL-8 was observed after P2Y2 receptor activation. However, the signaling pathway downstream of P2Y2 receptor and the role of IL-8 in P2Y2-mediated prostate cancer cell invasion remain unclear. Here, we found that extracellular ATP/UTP induced activation of EGFR and ERK1/2. After knockdown of P2Y2 receptor, the ATP -stimulated phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK1/2 was significantly suppressed. Further experiments showed that inactivation of EGFR and ERK1/2 attenuated ATP-induced invasion and migration, and suppressed ATP-mediated IL-8 production. In addition, knockdown of IL-8 inhibited ATP-mediated invasion and migration of prostate cancer cells. These findings suggest that P2Y2 receptor and EGFR cooperate to upregulate IL-8 production via ERK1/2 pathway, thereby promoting prostate cancer cell invasion and migration. Thus blocking of the P2Y2-EGFR-ERK1/2 pathway may provide effective therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer.

  15. The 2s2p 4P0sub(5/2) - 2p24Psup(e)sub(5/2)-transition in O VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoedin, R.; Pihl, J.; Hallin, R.; Lindskog, J.; Marelius, A.

    1976-03-01

    The Li-like doubly excited transitions 2s2p 4 P 0 sub(5/2) - 2p 2 4 Psup(e)sub(5/2) in O VI has been studied with the beam-foil technique. Oxygen ion beams with energies between 4.5 to 9 MeV were used. The wavelength of the transition was measured to 944.0+-0.5 A and the lifetime for the upper level 2p 2 4 Psup(e) was measured to be 0.51+-0.04 ns. (Auth.)

  16. Apaf-1 is a transcriptional target for E2F and p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moroni, M C; Hickman, E S; Lazzerini Denchi, E

    2001-01-01

    between the deregulation of the pRB pathway and apoptosis. Furthermore, because the pRB pathway is functionally inactivated in most cancers, the identification of Apaf-1 as a transcriptional target for E2F might explain the increased sensitivity of tumour cells to chemotherapy. We also show that......, independently of the pRB pathway, Apaf-1 is a direct transcriptional target of p53, suggesting that p53 might sensitize cells to apoptosis by increasing Apaf-1 levels....

  17. B1-induced caspase-independent apoptosis in MCF-7 cells is mediated by down-regulation of Bcl-2 via p53 binding to P2 promoter TATA box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xin; Xu Ke; Xu Yufang; Liu Jianwen; Qian Xuhong

    2011-01-01

    The Bcl-2 family contains a panel of proteins which are conserved regulators of apoptosis in mammalian cells, like the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. According to its significant role in altering susceptibility to apoptosis, the deciphering of the mechanism of Bcl-2 expression modulation may be crucial for identifying therapeutics strategies for cancer. Treatment with naphthalimide-based DNA intercalators, including M2-A and R16, generally leads to a decrease in Bcl-2 intracellular amounts. Whereas the interest for these chemotherapeutics is accompanied by advances in the fundamental understanding of their anticancer properties, the molecular mechanism underlying changes in Bcl-2 expression remains poorly understood. We report here that p53 contributes to Bcl-2 down-regulation induced by B1, a novel naphthalimide-based DNA intercalating agent. Indeed, the decrease in Bcl-2 protein levels observed during B1-induced apoptosis was correlated to the decrease in mRNA levels, as a result of the inhibition of Bcl-2 transcription and promoter activity. In this context, we evaluated p53 contribution in the Bcl-2 transcriptional down-regulation. We found a significant increase of p53 binding to P 2 promoter TATA box in MCF7 cells by chromatin immunoprecipitation. These data suggest that B1-induced caspase-independent apoptosis in MCF-7 cells is associated with the activation of p53 and the down-regulation of Bcl-2. Our study strengthens the links between p53 and Bcl-2 at a transcriptional level, upon naphthalimide-based DNA intercalator treatment. - Research highlights: → B1 induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, following a transcriptional decrease in Bcl-2. → B1 treatment triggered p53 activation and leads to a p53-dependent down-regulation of Bcl-2. → B1 induced significant increase of p53 binding to Bcl-2 P 2 promoter TATA box.

  18. Quantum state-to-state dynamics for the quenching process of Br(2P1/2) + H2(v(i) = 0, 1, j(i) = 0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Jiang, Bin; Xie, Daiqian; Sun, Zhigang

    2012-03-21

    Quantum state-to-state dynamics for the quenching process Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2)(v(i) = 0, 1, j(i) = 0) → Br((2)P(3/2)) + H(2)(v(f), j(f)) has been studied based on two-state model on the recent coupled potential energy surfaces. It was found that the quenching probabilities have some oscillatory structures due to the interference of reflected flux in the Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2) and Br((2)P(3/2)) + H(2) channels by repulsive potential in the near-resonant electronic-to-vibrational energy transfer process. The final vibrational state resolved integral cross sections were found to be dominated by the quenching process Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2)(v) → Br((2)P(3/2)) + H(2)(v+1) and the nonadiabatic reaction probabilities for Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2)(v = 0, 1, j(i) = 0) are quite small, which are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental results. Our calculated total quenching rate constant for Br((2)P(1/2)) + H(2)(v(i) = 0, j(i) = 0) at room temperature is in good agreement with the available experimental data. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  19. Expression analysis of the speech-related genes FoxP1 and FoxP2 and their relation to singing behavior in two songbird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianqian; Heston, Jonathan B.; Burkett, Zachary D.; White, Stephanie A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Humans and songbirds are among the rare animal groups that exhibit socially learned vocalizations: speech and song, respectively. These vocal-learning capacities share a reliance on audition and cortico-basal ganglia circuitry, as well as neurogenetic mechanisms. Notably, the transcription factors Forkhead box proteins 1 and 2 (FoxP1, FoxP2) exhibit similar expression patterns in the cortex and basal ganglia of humans and the zebra finch species of songbird, among other brain regions. Mutations in either gene are associated with language disorders in humans. Experimental knock-down of FoxP2 in the basal ganglia song control region Area X during song development leads to imprecise copying of tutor songs. Moreover, FoxP2 levels decrease naturally within Area X when zebra finches sing. Here, we examined neural expression patterns of FoxP1 and FoxP2 mRNA in adult Bengalese finches, a songbird species whose songs exhibit greater sequence complexity and increased reliance on audition for maintaining their quality. We found that FoxP1 and FoxP2 expression in Bengalese finches is similar to that in zebra finches, including strong mRNA signals for both factors in multiple song control nuclei and enhancement of FoxP1 in these regions relative to surrounding brain tissue. As with zebra finches, when Bengalese finches sing, FoxP2 is behaviorally downregulated within basal ganglia Area X over a similar time course, and expression negatively correlates with the amount of singing. This study confirms that in multiple songbird species, FoxP1 expression highlights song control regions, and regulation of FoxP2 is associated with motor control of song. PMID:24006346

  20. The need to accessorize: Molecular roles of HTLV-1 p30 and HTLV-2 p28 accessory proteins in the viral life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaneesh eAnupam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 over the last three decades have provided detailed knowledge on viral transformation, host-viral interactions and pathogenesis. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL and multiple neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases while HTLV-2 disease association remains elusive, with few infected individuals displaying neurodegenerative diseases similar to HTLV-1. The HTLV group of oncoretroviruses has a genome that encodes structural and enzymatic proteins Gag, Pro and Env, regulatory proteins Tax and Rex, and several accessory proteins from the pX region. Of these proteins, HTLV-1 p30 and HTLV-2 p28 are encoded by the open reading frame (ORF II of the pX region. Like most other accessory proteins, p30 and p28 are dispensable for in vitro viral replication and transformation but are required for efficient viral replication and persistence in vivo. Both p30 and p28 regulate viral gene expression at the post-transcriptional level whereas p30 can also function at the transcriptional level. Recently, several reports have implicated p30 and p28 in multiple cellular processes, which provide novel insight into HTLV spread and survival and ultimately pathogenesis. In this review we summarize and compare what is known about p30 and p28, highlighting their roles in viral replication and viral pathogenesis.

  1. Posttranscriptional regulation of the karyogamy gene by Kem1p/Xrn1p exoribonuclease and Rok1p RNA helicase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaehee; Jeon, Soonmee; Yang, Yun-Seok; Kim, Jinmi

    2004-01-01

    The major biochemical activities ascribed to Kem1p/Xrn1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are 5'-3' exoribonuclease functioning in RNA turnover and a microtubule-binding protein. Mutational analysis has shown that Kem1p/Xrn1p participates in microtubule-related functions such as nuclear fusion (karyogamy) during mating, chromosome transmission, and spindle pole body duplication. Here, evidence is presented that Kem1p plays a specific role in nuclear fusion by affecting, at the posttranscriptional level, the pheromone induction of the karyogamy-specific transcription factor Kar4p and the expression of Rok1p, a putative RNA helicase. We found that Rok1p itself also affects the pheromone induction of Kar4p and thereby participates in nuclear fusion. Analysis of the active-site mutations, xrn1-D206A or D208A, shows that nuclear fusion as well as the Rok1p synthesis do not require the exoribonuclease activity of Kem1p. Our data provide an important insight into the gene-specific regulatory function mediated by the general RNA-modulating enzymes

  2. Quadrupole and monopole generalized oscillator strength for 2p-3p, 2p-4p transition of neon atomic in the velocity formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomis, L; Diedhiou, I; Tall, M S; Diallo, S; Diatta, C S; Niassy, B

    2007-01-01

    The quadrupole and monopole generalized oscillator strengths (GOS) as a function of momentum transfer are calculated for the 2p-3p and 2p-4p transitions of the neon atom using the analytical Hartree-Fock (HF) wavefunctions for the ground-state and the wavefunctions for the excited states which are obtained numerically from the modified HF Slater equation. Calculations are carried out by using the HF method and random phase approximation with exchange in the velocity formulation. The positions and the number of the extrema in the GOS have received particular attention in the evaluation. Our calculated monopole GOS of 2p-3p transition in velocity form reveals one maximum located between the experimental and theoretical results of other authors. The disagreement between our first maximum of the quadrupole GOS 2p-3p transition with the experimental and other theoretical ones is unimportant. The extrema of the monopole and quadrupole GOS of 2p-4p transition are given in this paper. The results of velocity form study also show that the electron correlation effects are important around the maxima and are found to influence the positions of the extrema insignificantly

  3. Measurement of the relative yields of ψ (2 S ) to ψ (1 S ) mesons produced at forward and backward rapidity in p +p , p +Al , p +Au , and 3He+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alfred, M.; Andrieux, V.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Asano, H.; Ayuso, C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Blau, D. S.; Boer, M.; Bok, J. S.; Bownes, E. K.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butler, C.; Campbell, S.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cervantes, R.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Chujo, T.; Citron, Z.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Dixit, D.; Do, J. H.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dumancic, M.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dusing, J. P.; Elder, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fan, W.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukuda, Y.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Goto, Y.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, K.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ito, Y.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Ji, Z.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Jorjadze, V.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapukchyan, D.; Karthas, S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kimball, M. L.; Kimelman, B.; Kincses, D.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Kotler, J. R.; Kotov, D.; Kudo, S.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lallow, E. O.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leung, Y. H.; Lewis, N. A.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, M. X.; Loggins, V.-R.; Loggins, V.-R.; Lovasz, K.; Lynch, D.; Majoros, T.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malaev, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masuda, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendez, A. R.; Mendoza, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mihalik, D. E.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Morrow, S. I. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagai, K.; Nagashima, K.; Nagashima, T.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Novotny, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ottino, G. J.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Peng, W.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perezlara, C. E.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Phipps, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Press, C. J.; Pun, A.; Purschke, M. L.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richford, D.; Rinn, T.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Runchey, J.; Safonov, A. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shioya, T.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silva, J. A.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, K. L.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stepanov, M.; Stien, H.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Syed, S.; Sziklai, J.; Takeda, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnai, G.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Ueda, Y.; Ujvari, B.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Carson, S.; Velkovska, J.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vukman, N.; Wang, X. R.; Wang, Z.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; White, A. S.; Wong, C. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xu, C.; Xu, Q.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamamoto, H.; Yanovich, A.; Yin, P.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zharko, S.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration has measured the ratio of the yields of ψ (2 S ) to ψ (1 S ) mesons produced in p +p , p +Al , p +Au , and 3He+Au collisions at √{s NN}=200 GeV over the forward and backward rapidity intervals 1.2 <|y |<2.2 . We find that the ratio in p +p collisions is consistent with measurements at other collision energies. In collisions with nuclei, we find that in the forward (p -going or 3He-going) direction, the relative yield of ψ (2 S ) mesons to ψ (1 S ) mesons is consistent with the value measured in p +p collisions. However, in the backward (nucleus-going) direction, the ψ (2 S ) meson is preferentially suppressed by a factor of ˜2 . This suppression is attributed in some models to the breakup of the weakly bound ψ (2 S ) meson through final-state interactions with comoving particles, which have a higher density in the nucleus-going direction. These breakup effects may compete with color screening in a deconfined quark-gluon plasma to produce sequential suppression of excited quarkonia states.

  4. Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-06-01

    We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} < x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} < 10{sup -1} and 10{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, respectively. Results are presented for the region of {bar p}-momentum-loss fraction 0.03 < {zeta}{sub {bar p}} < 0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared t{sub {bar p}} > -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

  5. Evolution of pH during in-situ leaching in small concrete cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saguees, A.A. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Moreno, E.I. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering]|[CINVESTAV Merida-Unit (Mexico); Andrade, C. [CSIC, Madrid (Spain). Inst. Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion

    1997-11-01

    Small amounts (0.4 cc) of neutral water placed in small cylindrical cavities (5 mm diameter) in concrete exposed to 100% relative humidity first developed a pH comparable to that of a saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solution. The pH then increased over a period of days-weeks toward a higher terminal value. A micro pH electrode arrangement was used. This behavior was observed in samples of 12 different concrete mix designs, including some with pozzolanic additions. The average terminal cavity pH closely approached that of expressed pore water from the same concretes. A simplified mathematical model reproduced the experimentally observed behavior. The model assumed inward diffusional transport of the pH-determining species in the surrounding concrete pore solution. The experimental results were consistent with the model predictions when using diffusion parameters on the order of those previously reported for alkali cations in concrete. The cavity size, cavity water content, and exposure to atmospheric CO{sub 2} should be minimized when attempting to obtain cavity pH values approaching those of the surrounding pore water.

  6. A Genome-wide Association Study Provides Evidence of Sex-specific Involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46 With Diabetic Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Meng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is defined as pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or a disease affecting the somatosensory system and it affects around 1 in 4 diabetic patients in the UK. The purpose of this genome-wide association study (GWAS was to identify genetic contributors to this disorder. Cases of neuropathic pain were defined as diabetic patients with a multiple prescription history of at least one of five drugs specifically indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Controls were diabetic individuals who were not prescribed any of these drugs, nor amitriptyline, carbamazepine, or nortriptyline. Overall, 961 diabetic neuropathic pain cases and 3260 diabetic controls in the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research Tayside (GoDARTS cohort were identified. We found a cluster in the Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P with a lowest P value of 2.74 × 10−7 at rs71647933 in females and a cluster in the Chr8p23.1, next to HMGB1P46 with a lowest P value of 8.02 × 10−7 at rs6986153 in males. Sex-specific narrow sense heritability was higher in males (30.0% than in females (14.7%. This GWAS on diabetic neuropathic pain provides evidence for the sex-specific involvement of Chr1p35.1 (ZSCAN20-TLR12P and Chr8p23.1 (HMGB1P46 with the disorder, indicating the need for further research.

  7. Comparing Pedophile Activity in Different P2P Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Fournier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Peer-to-peer (P2P systems are widely used to exchange content over the Internet. Knowledge of pedophile activity in such networks remains limited, despite having important social consequences. Moreover, though there are different P2P systems in use, previous academic works on this topic focused on one system at a time and their results are not directly comparable. We design a methodology for comparing KAD and eDonkey, two P2P systems among the most prominent ones and with different anonymity levels. We monitor two eDonkey servers and the KAD network during several days and record hundreds of thousands of keyword-based queries. We detect pedophile-related queries with a previously validated tool and we propose, for the first time, a large-scale comparison of pedophile activity in two different P2P systems. We conclude that there are significantly fewer pedophile queries in KAD than in eDonkey (approximately 0.09% vs. 0.25%.

  8. pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 expression enhances nitrogen uptake efficiency and grain yield in transgenic rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingguang; Fan, Xiaoru; Qian, Kaiyun; Zhang, Yong; Song, Miaoquan; Liu, Yu; Xu, Guohua; Fan, Xiaorong

    2017-10-01

    The nitrate (NO3-) transporter has been selected as an important gene maker in the process of environmental adoption in rice cultivars. In this work, we transferred another native OsNAR2.1 promoter with driving OsNAR2.1 gene into rice plants. The transgenic lines with exogenous pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 constructs showed enhanced OsNAR2.1 expression level, compared with wild type (WT), and 15 N influx in roots increased 21%-32% in response to 0.2 mm and 2.5 mm 15NO3- and 1.25 mm 15 NH 4 15 NO 3 . Under these three N conditions, the biomass of the pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 transgenic lines increased 143%, 129% and 51%, and total N content increased 161%, 242% and 69%, respectively, compared to WT. Furthermore in field experiments we found the grain yield, agricultural nitrogen use efficiency (ANUE), and dry matter transfer of pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 plants increased by about 21%, 22% and 21%, compared to WT. We also compared the phenotypes of pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 and pOsNAR2.1:OsNRT2.1 transgenic lines in the field, found that postanthesis N uptake differed significantly between them, and in comparison with the WT. Postanthesis N uptake (PANU) increased approximately 39% and 85%, in the pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 and pOsNAR2.1:OsNRT2.1 transgenic lines, respectively, possibly because OsNRT2.1 expression was less in the pOsNAR2.1:OsNAR2.1 lines than in the pOsNAR2.1:OsNRT2.1 lines during the late growth stage. These results show that rice NO 3 - uptake, yield and NUE were improved by increased OsNAR2.1 expression via its native promoter. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of new N-(diphenylphosphino)-naphthylamine chalcogenides: X-ray structures of (1-NHC 10H 7)P(Se)Ph 2 and Ph 2P(S)OP(S)Ph 2

    KAUST Repository

    Tomah Al-Masri, Harbi; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Al-Talla, Zeyad; Al Kordi, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of 1-naphthylamine with one equivalent of chlorodiphenylphosphine in the presence of triethylamine gave the (1-NHC 10H 7)PPh 2 (1) ligand. Refluxing of 1 with elemental sulfur or grey selenium in toluene (1:1 molar ratio) afforded (1-NHC 10H 7)P(S)Ph 2 (2) and (1-NHC 10H 7)P(Se)Ph 2 (3), respectively. Moreover, the byproduct {Ph 2P(S)} 2O (4) was isolated from the reaction of 1 with elemental sulfur. Compounds 1-3 were identified and characterized by multinuclear ( 1H, 13C, 31P, 77Se) NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and elemental analysis. Crystal structure determinations of 3 and 4 were carried out. Copyright © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of new N-(diphenylphosphino)-naphthylamine chalcogenides: X-ray structures of (1-NHC 10H 7)P(Se)Ph 2 and Ph 2P(S)OP(S)Ph 2

    KAUST Repository

    Tomah Al-Masri, Harbi

    2012-09-01

    The reaction of 1-naphthylamine with one equivalent of chlorodiphenylphosphine in the presence of triethylamine gave the (1-NHC 10H 7)PPh 2 (1) ligand. Refluxing of 1 with elemental sulfur or grey selenium in toluene (1:1 molar ratio) afforded (1-NHC 10H 7)P(S)Ph 2 (2) and (1-NHC 10H 7)P(Se)Ph 2 (3), respectively. Moreover, the byproduct {Ph 2P(S)} 2O (4) was isolated from the reaction of 1 with elemental sulfur. Compounds 1-3 were identified and characterized by multinuclear ( 1H, 13C, 31P, 77Se) NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and elemental analysis. Crystal structure determinations of 3 and 4 were carried out. Copyright © 2012 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  11. Interaction of integrin β4 with S1P receptors in S1P- and HGF-induced endothelial barrier enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiuqin; Epshtein, Yulia; Chen, Weiguo; Zhou, Tingting; Xie, Lishi; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2014-06-01

    We previously reported sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) augment endothelial cell (EC) barrier function and attenuate murine acute lung inury (ALI). While the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood, S1P and HGF both transactivate the S1P receptor, S1PR1 and integrin β4 (ITGB4) at membrane caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs). In the current study, we investigated the roles of S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC signaling and their associations with ITGB4. Our studies confirmed ITGB4 and S1PR2/3 are recruited to CEMs in human lung EC in response to either S1P (1 µM, 5 min) or HGF (25 ng/ml, 5 min). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments identified an S1P/HGF-mediated interaction of ITGB4 with both S1PR2 and S1PR3. We then employed an in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) to confirm a direct ITGB4-S1PR3 association induced by S1P/HGF although a direct association was not detectable between S1PR2 and ITGB4. S1PR1 knockdown (siRNA), however, abrogated S1P/HGF-induced ITGB4-S1PR2 associations while there was no effect on ITGB4-S1PR3 associations. Moreover, PLA confirmed a direct association between S1PR1 and S1PR2 induced by S1P and HGF. Finally, silencing of S1PR2 significantly attenuated S1P/HGF-induced EC barrier enhancement as measured by transendothelial resistance while silencing of S1PR3 significantly augmented S1P/HGF-induced barrier enhancement. These results confirm an important role for S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC barrier responses that are associated with their complex formation with ITGB4. Our findings elucidate novel mechanisms of EC barrier regulation that may ultimately lead to new therapeutic targets for disorders characterized by increased vascular permeability including ALI. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2015-09-01

    HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1 receptor antagonist, NF

  13. THE EFFECT OF A TWISTED MAGNETIC FIELD ON THE PERIOD RATIO P{sub 1}/P{sub 2} OF NONAXISYMMETRIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahari, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: K.Bahari@razi.ac.ir [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    We consider nonaxisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a zero-beta cylindrical compressible thin magnetic flux tube modeled as a twisted core surrounded by a magnetically twisted annulus, with both embedded in a straight ambient external field. The dispersion relation is derived and solved analytically and numerically to obtain the frequencies of the nonaxisymmetric MHD waves. The main result is that the twisted magnetic annulus does affect the period ratio P{sub 1}/P{sub 2} of the kink modes. For the kink modes, the magnetic twist in the annulus region can achieve deviations from P{sub 1}/P{sub 2} = 2 of the same order of magnitude as in the observations. Furthermore, the effect of the internal twist on the fluting modes is investigated.

  14. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin increases reactive oxygen species production in human endothelial cells via induction of cytochrome P4501A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopf, P.G.; Walker, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that subchronic 2,3,7,8,-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure of adult mice results in hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and reduced nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation. Moreover, increased superoxide anion production was observed in cardiovascular organs of TCDD-exposed mice and this increase contributed to the reduced NO-mediated vasodilation. Since cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) can contribute to some TCDD-induced toxicity, we tested the hypothesis that TCDD increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) in endothelial cells by the induction of CYP1A1. A concentration-response to 24 h TCDD exposure (10 pM-10 nM) was performed in confluent primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Oxidant-sensitive fluorescent probes dihydroethidium (DHE) and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA), were used to measure superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical, respectively. NO was also measured using the fluorescent probe diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA). These assessments were conducted in HAECs transfected with siRNA targeting the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), CYP1A1, or CYP1B1. TCDD concentration-dependently increased CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity. Moreover, 1 nM TCDD maximally increased DHE (Cont = 1.0 ± 0.3; TCDD = 5.1 ± 1.0; p = 0.002) and DCFH-DA (Cont = 1.0 ± 0.2; TCDD = 4.1 ± 0.5; p = 0.002) fluorescence and maximally decreased DAF-2DA fluorescence (Cont = 1.0 ± 0.4; TCDD = 0.68 ± 0.1). siRNA targeting AhR and CYP1A1 significantly decreased TCDD-induced DHE (siAhR: Cont = 1.0 ± 0.1; TCDD = 1.3 ± 0.2; p = 0.093) (siCYP1A1: Cont = 1.0 ± 0.1; TCDD = 1.1 ± 0.1; p = 0.454) and DCFH-DA (siAhR: Cont = 1.0 ± 0.2; TCDD = 1.3 ± 0.3; p = 0.370) (siCYP1A1: Cont = 1.0 ± 0.1; TCDD = 1.3 ± 0.2; p = 0.114) fluorescence and increased DAF-2DA fluorescence (siAhR: Cont = 1.00 ± 0.03; TCDD = 0.97 ± 0.03; p = 0.481) (siCYP1A1: Cont = 1.00 ± 0.03; TCDD = 0.92 ± 0

  15. Characterization of P1 promoter activity of the β-galactoside α2,6 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-05

    Apr 5, 2012 ... The level of β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltransferase I (ST6Gal I) mRNA, encoded by the gene siat1, is increased in malignant tissues. Expression is regulated by different promoters – P1, P2 and P3 – generating three mRNA isoforms. H, X and YZ. In cervical cancer tissue the mRNA isoform H, which results ...

  16. Observation of the Decays Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-} and Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baryshnikov, F; Baszczyk, M; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Beiter, A; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Beranek, S; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Birnkraut, A; Bitadze, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Bordyuzhin, I; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Dembinski, H-P; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Nezza, P; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziewiecki, M; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Déléage, N; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez, G; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gabriel, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruber, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hatch, M; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Z-C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozachuk, A; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Morris, A P; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Mussini, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, C; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Ravonel Salzgeber, M; Reboud, M; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Gonzalo, D; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubert, K; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stevens, H; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M A; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zonneveld, J B; Zucchelli, S

    2017-08-11

    The first observation of the decays Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-} and Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-} is reported using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb^{-1}, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-})/B(Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψpK^{-})=0.242±0.014±0.013±0.009,B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-})/B(Λ_{b}^{0}→J/ψpK^{-})=0.248±0.020±0.014±0.009,B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c2}pK^{-})/B(Λ_{b}^{0}→χ_{c1}pK^{-})=1.02±0.10±0.02±0.05,where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic, and the third due to the uncertainty on the branching fractions of the χ_{c1}→J/ψγ and χ_{c2}→J/ψγ decays. Using both decay modes, the mass of the Λ_{b}^{0} baryon is also measured to be m_{Λ_{b}^{0}}=5619.44±0.28±0.26  MeV/c^{2}, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  17. Mobile P2P Web Services Using SIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Gehlen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Telecommunication networks and the Internet are growing together. Peer-to-Peer (P2P services which are originally offered by network providers, like telephony and messaging, are provided through VoIP and Instant Messaging (IM by Internet service providers, too. The IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS is the answer of the telecommunication industry to this trend and aims at providing Internet P2P and multimedia services controlled by the network operators. The IMS provides mobility and session management as well as message routing, security, and billing.

  18. Kinetics of the Reactions of O((sup 3)P) and Cl((sup 2)P) with HBr and Br2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A laser flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique has been employed to study the kinetics of reactions (1)-(4) as a function of temperature. (1) O((sup 3)P) + Br2 yields BrO + Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) at 255-350 K; (2) Cl((sup 2)P) + Br2 yields BrCl + Br((sup 2)P(sub 3/2)) at 298-401 K; (3) O((sup 3)P) + HBr yields OH + Br((sup 2)P(sub J)) at 250-402 K; (4) Cl((sup 2)P) + HBr yields HCl + Br((sup 2)P(sub J)) at 257-404 K. In all cases, the concentration of the excess reagent, i.e, HBr or Br2, was measured in situ in the slow flow system by UV-visible photometry. Heterogeneous dark reactions between XBr (X equals H or Br) and the photolytic precursors for Cl((sup 2)P) and O((sup 3)P) (Cl2 and O3, respectively) were avoided by injecting minimal amounts of precursor into the reaction mixture immediately upstream from the reaction zone. The following Arrhenius expressions summarize our results (errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only, units are cu cm/(molecule.s): k(sub 1) = (1.76 +/- 0.80) x 10(exp -11 exp[(40 +/- 100)/T]; k(sub 2) = (2.40 +/- 1.25) x 12(exp -10) exp[-(144 +/- 176)/T]; k(sub 3) = (5.11 +/- 2.82) x 10(exp -12) exp[-(1450 +/- 160)/T]; k(sub 4) = (2.25 +/- 0.56) x 10(exp -11) exp[-(400 +/- 80)/T]. The consistency (or lack thereof) of our results with those reported in previous kinetics and dynamics studies of reactions (1)-(4) is discussed.

  19. Lost P1 allele in sh2 sweet corn: quantitative effects of p1 and a1 genes on concentrations of maysin, apimaysin, methoxymaysin, and chlorogenic acid in maize silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B Z; Zhang, Z J; Butrón, A; Widstrom, N W; Snook, M E; Lynch, R E; Plaisted, D

    2004-12-01

    In the United States, insecticide is used extensively in the production of sweet corn due to consumer demand for zero damage to ears and to a sweet corn genetic base with little or no resistance to ear-feeding insects. Growers in the southern United States depend on scheduled pesticide applications to control ear-feeding insects. In a study of quantitative genetic control over silk maysin, AM-maysin (apimaysin and methoxymaysin), and chlorogenic acid contents in an F2 population derived from GE37 (dent corn, P1A1) and 565 (sh2 sweet corn, p1a1), we demonstrate that the P1 allele from field corn, which was selected against in the development of sweet corn, has a strong epistatic interaction with the a1 allele in sh2 sweet corn. We detected that the p1 gene has significant effects (P silk maysin concentrations but also on AM-maysin, and chlorogenic acid concentrations. The a1 gene also has significant (P silk antibiotic chemicals. Successful selection from the fourth and fifth selfed backcrosses for high-maysin individuals of sweet corn homozygous for the recessive a1 allele (tightly linked to sh2) and the dominant P1 allele has been demonstrated. These selected lines have much higher (2 to 3 times) concentrations of silk maysin and other chemicals (AM-maysin and chlorogenic acid) than the donor parent GE37 and could enhance sweet corn resistance to corn earworm and reduce the number of applications of insecticide required to produce sweet corn.

  20. MMP2 and MMP9 participate in S1P-induced invasion of follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, Veronica; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-03-15

    The bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has emerged as a potent inducer of cancer cell migration and invasion. Previously, we have shown that S1P induces invasion of ML-1 follicular thyroid cancer cells via S1P receptors 1 and 3 (S1P1,3). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes used by cells for degradation of the extracellular matrix during invasion and migration. In the present study, we examined the role of MMP2 and MMP9 for S1P-induced invasion of ML-1 cells, and found that S1P regulates the secretion and activity of MMP2 and MMP9 via S1P1,3. Both pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA knockdown of MMP2 and MMP9 could attenuate S1P-induced invasion. Additionally, we show that calpains and Rac1 mediate S1P-induced secretion of MMP2 and MMP9. In conclusion, MMP2 and MMP9 participate in S1P-evoked follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cell invasion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p 4P state of the helium negative ion He-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Li, Chun; Yan, Zong-Chao; Drake, G W F

    2014-12-31

    The fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p (4)P state of the helium negative ion He(-) are calculated in Hylleraas coordinates, including relativistic and QED corrections up to O(α(4)mc(2)), O((μ/M)α(4)mc(2)), O(α(5)mc(2)), and O((μ/M)α(5)mc(2)). Higher order corrections are estimated for the ionization energy. A comparison is made with other calculations and experiments. We find that the present results for the fine structure splittings agree with experiment very well. However, the calculated ionization energy deviates from the experimental result by about 1 standard deviation. The estimated theoretical uncertainty in the ionization energy is much less than the experimental accuracy.

  2. Epigenetic regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in acute lung injury: Role of S1P lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, David L; Fu, Panfeng; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Zhao, Yutong; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2017-01-01

    Cellular level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), the simplest bioactive sphingolipid, is tightly regulated by its synthesis catalyzed by sphingosine kinases (SphKs) 1 & 2 and degradation mediated by S1P phosphatases, lipid phosphate phosphatases, and S1P lyase. The pleotropic actions of S1P are attributed to its unique inside-out (extracellular) signaling via G-protein-coupled S1P1-5 receptors, and intracellular receptor independent signaling. Additionally, S1P generated in the nucleus by nuclear SphK2 modulates HDAC1/2 activity, regulates histone acetylation, and transcription of pro-inflammatory genes. Here, we present data on the role of S1P lyase mediated S1P signaling in regulating LPS-induced inflammation in lung endothelium. Blocking S1P lyase expression or activity attenuated LPS-induced histone acetylation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Degradation of S1P by S1P lyase generates Δ2-hexadecenal and ethanolamine phosphate and the long-chain fatty aldehyde produced in the cytoplasmic compartment of the endothelial cell seems to modulate histone acetylation pattern, which is different from the nuclear SphK2/S1P signaling and inhibition of HDAC1/2. These in vitro studies suggest that S1P derived long-chain fatty aldehyde may be an epigenetic regulator of pro-inflammatory genes in sepsis-induced lung inflammation. Trapping fatty aldehydes and other short chain aldehydes such as 4-hydroxynonenal derived from S1P degradation and lipid peroxidation, respectively by cell permeable agents such as phloretin or other aldehyde trapping agents may be useful in treating sepsis-induced lung inflammation via modulation of histone acetylation. . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bandwidth Reduction via Localized Peer-to-Peer (P2P Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kerpez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents recent research into P2P distribution of video that can be highly localized, preferably sharing content among users on the same access network and Central Office (CO. Models of video demand and localized P2P serving areas are presented. Detailed simulations of passive optical networks (PON are run, and these generate statistics of P2P video localization. Next-Generation PON (NG-PON is shown to fully enable P2P video localization, but the lower rates of Gigabit-PON (GPON restrict performance. Results here show that nearly all of the traffic volume of unicast video could be delivered via localized P2P. Strong growth in video delivery via localized P2P could lower overall future aggregation and core network bandwidth of IP video traffic by 58.2%, and total consumer Internet traffic by 43.5%. This assumes aggressive adoption of technologies and business practices that enable highly localized P2P video.

  4. Spectroscopic constants and the potential energy curve of the iodine weakly bound 0+g state correlating with the I(2P1/2) + I(2P1/2) dissociation limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopyan, M E; Baturo, V V; Lukashov, S S; Poretsky, S A; Pravilov, A M

    2013-01-01

    The stepwise three-step three-colour aser excitation scheme and rotational as well as rovibrational energy transfer processes in the 0 + g state induced by collisions with He and Ar atoms are used for determination of rovibronic level energies of the weakly bound 0 + g state correlating with the I( 2 P 1/2 ) + I( 2 P 1/2 ) dissociation limit. Dunham coefficients of the state, Y i0 (i = 0–3), Y i1 (i = 0–3) and Y 02 for the v 0 g + = 0–16 and J 0 g + ≈ 14–135 ranges as well as the dissociation energy of the state, D e , and equilibrium I–I distance of the state, R e , are determined. The potential energy curve of the state constructed using these constants is also reported. (paper)

  5. Metal extraction by alkyl substituted diphosphonic acids. Part 1. P,P'-Di(2-ethylhexyl) methanediphosphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Rickert, P.G.; Herlinger, A.W.

    1996-01-01

    Two novel extractants, p,p'-di(2-ethylhexyl) methanediphosphonic acid (H 2 DEH[MDP]) and p,p'-dioctyl methanediphosphonic acid (H 2 DO[MDP]) have been synthesized at high purity and yield. H 2 DEH[MDP] was selected for metal extraction studies because of its better physical properties. An investigation of the extraction of alkaline earth cations, Fe(111) and representative tri-, tetra- and hexavalent actinide ions from nitric acid solutions into o-xylene solutions of H 2 DEH[MDP] at different concentrations was performed. With a few exceptions, the acid dependencies of the extraction of the above metal species strongly resembles those measured in the uptake of the same metals by the chelating ion exchange resin Diphonix R , which contains gem-diphosphonic acid groups chemically attached to a polymeric matrix. The almost lack of acid dependency observed with Fe(III) and tetra- and hexavalent actinides indicates that these ions are chelated by H 2 DEH[MDP] mostly through the P=O groups of the extractant. With Fe(111) and the actinides, variable slopes of the extractant dependencies were measured, their values being strongly dependent on the acidity of the aqueous phase. H 2 DEH[MDP] possesses an extraordinary affinity for actinides and Fe(111). 26 refs., 7 figs

  6. Performance comparison of two efficient genomic selection methods (gsbay & MixP) applied in aquacultural organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hailin; Li, Hengde; Wang, Shi; Wang, Yangfan; Bao, Zhenmin

    2017-02-01

    Genomic selection is more and more popular in animal and plant breeding industries all around the world, as it can be applied early in life without impacting selection candidates. The objective of this study was to bring the advantages of genomic selection to scallop breeding. Two different genomic selection tools MixP and gsbay were applied on genomic evaluation of simulated data and Zhikong scallop ( Chlamys farreri) field data. The data were compared with genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) method which has been applied widely. Our results showed that both MixP and gsbay could accurately estimate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker effects, and thereby could be applied for the analysis of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV). In simulated data from different scenarios, the accuracy of GEBV acquired was ranged from 0.20 to 0.78 by MixP; it was ranged from 0.21 to 0.67 by gsbay; and it was ranged from 0.21 to 0.61 by GBLUP. Estimations made by MixP and gsbay were expected to be more reliable than those estimated by GBLUP. Predictions made by gsbay were more robust, while with MixP the computation is much faster, especially in dealing with large-scale data. These results suggested that both algorithms implemented by MixP and gsbay are feasible to carry out genomic selection in scallop breeding, and more genotype data will be necessary to produce genomic estimated breeding values with a higher accuracy for the industry.

  7. Updated determination of $D^0-\\overline{D}^0$ mixing and $C\\!P$ violation parameters with $D^0 \\to K^+\\pi^-$ decays

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The first observation of $D^0-\\overline{D}^0$ mixing from a single experiment was reported by LHCb already six years ago. Since then, experimental efforts have been focussing on improving the knowledge of the mixing parameters and searching for $C\\!P$-violating effects in mixing. In this seminar we report on the latest measurements of charm-mixing parameters based on the decay-time-dependent ratio of $D^0 \\to K^+\\pi^-$ to $D^0 \\to K^-\\pi^+$ rates. The analysis uses a data sample of proton-proton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $5.0\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ recorded by the LHCb experiment from 2011 through 2016. Assuming $C\\!P$ symmetry, the mixing parameters are determined with unprecedented precision. Without this assumption, the measurement is performed separately for $D^0$ and $\\overline{D}^0$ mesons, yielding the direct $C\\!P$-violating asymmetry and the magnitude of the ratio of mixing parameters |q/p|. No evidence for $C\\!P$ violation in charm mixing is observed yet, but the quest is p...

  8. P2P Data Management in Mobile Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Sahar Sayeda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth in wireless technologies has made wireless communication an important source for transporting data across different domains. In the same way, there are possibilities of many potential applications that can be deployed using WSNs (Wireless Sensor Networks. However, very limited applications are deployed in real life due to the uncertainty and dynamics of the environment and scare resources. This makes data management in WSN a challenging area to find an approach that suits its characteristics. Currently, the trend is to find efficient data management schemes using evolving technologies, i.e. P2P (Peer-to-Peer systems. Many P2P approaches have been applied in WSNs to carry out the data management due to similarities between WSN and P2P. With the similarities, there are differences too that makes P2P protocols inefficient in WSNs. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency and to exploit the delay tolerant nature of WSNs, where ever possible, the mobile WSNs are gaining importance. Thus, creating a three dimensional problem space to consider, i.e. mobility, WSNs and P2P. In this paper, an efficient algorithm is proposed for data management using P2P techniques for mobile WSNs. The real world implementation and deployment of proposed algorithm is also presented

  9. Influence of paraoxonase-1 Q192R and cytochrome P450 2C19 polymorphisms on clopidogrel response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Rolf P Kreutz1,2, Perry Nystrom2, Yvonne Kreutz2, Jia Miao2, Zeruesenay Desta2, Jeffrey A Breall1, Lang Li2, ChienWei Chiang2, Richard Kovacs1, David A Flockhart2, Yan Jin21Krannert Institute of Cardiology, 2Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: The metabolic activation of clopidogrel is a two-step process. It has been suggested that paraoxonase-1 (PON1 is a rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of 2-oxo-clopidogrel to an active thiol metabolite. Conflicting results have been reported in regard to (1 the association of a common polymorphism of PON1 (Q192R with reduced rates of coronary stent thrombosis in patients taking clopidogrel and (2 its effects on platelet inhibition in patient populations of European descent. Methods: Blood samples from 151 subjects of mixed racial background with established coronary artery disease and who received clopidogrel were analyzed. Platelet aggregation was determined with light transmittance aggregometry and VerifyNow® P2Y12 assay. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19*2 and *3 and PON1 (Q192R polymorphisms was performed.Results: Carriers of CYP2C19*2 alleles exhibited lower levels of platelet inhibition and higher on-treatment platelet aggregation than noncarriers. There was no significant difference in platelet aggregation among PON1 Q192R genotypes. Homozygous carriers of the wild-type variant of PON1 (QQ192 had similar on-treatment platelet reactivity to carriers of increased-function variant alleles during maintenance clopidogrel dosing, as well as after administration of a clopidogrel 600 mg loading dose.Conclusion: CYP2C19*2 allele is associated with impaired platelet inhibition by clopidogrel and high on-treatment platelet aggregation. PON1 (Q192R polymorphism does not appear to be a significant determinant of clopidogrel response.Keywords: PON1, platelet, aggregation, cytochrome P450 enzymes

  10. Electron Excitation Rate Coefficients for Transitions from the IS21S Ground State to the 1S2S1,3S and 1S2P1,3P0 Excited States of Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, K. M.; Kingston, A. E.; McDowell, M. R. C.

    1984-03-01

    The available experimental and theoretical electron impact excitation cross section data for the transitions from the 1s2 1S ground state to the 1s2s 1,3S and 1s2p 1,3P0 excited states of helium are assessed. Based on this assessed data, excitation rate coefficients are calculated over a wide electron temperature range below 3.0×106K. A comparison with other published results suggests that the rates used should be lower by a factor of 2 or more.

  11. Functional characterisation of an engineered multidomain human P450 2E1 by molecular Lego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhead, Michael; Giannini, Silva; Gillam, Elizabeth M J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2005-12-01

    The human cytochrome P450s constitute an important family of monooxygenase enzymes that carry out essential roles in the metabolism of endogenous compounds and foreign chemicals. We present here results of a fusion between a human P450 enzyme and a bacterial reductase that for the first time is shown does not require the addition of lipids or detergents to achieve wild-type-like activities. The fusion enzyme, P450 2E1-BMR, contains the N-terminally modified residues 22-493 of the human P450 2E1 fused at the C-terminus to residues 473-1049 of the P450 BM3 reductase (BMR). The P450 2E1-BMR enzyme is active, self-sufficient and presents the typical marker activities of the native human P450 2E1: the hydroxylation of p-nitrophenol (KM=1.84+/-0.09 mM and kcat of 2.98+/-0.04 nmol of p-nitrocatechol formed per minute per nanomole of P450) and chlorzoxazone (KM=0.65+/-0.08 mM and kcat of 0.95+/-0.10 nmol of 6-hydroxychlorzoxazone formed per minute per nanomole of P450). A 3D model of human P450 2E1 was generated to rationalise the functional data and to allow an analysis of the surface potentials. The distribution of charges on the model of P450 2E1 compared with that of the FMN domain of BMR provides the ground for the understanding of the interaction between the fused domains. The results point the way to successfully engineer a variety of catalytically self-sufficient human P450 enzymes for drug metabolism studies in solution.

  12. Supporting Collaboration and Creativity Through Mobile P2P Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Adam; Datta, Anwitaman; Żaczek, Łukasz; Rzadca, Krzysztof

    Among many potential applications of mobile P2P systems, collaboration applications are among the most prominent. Examples of applications such as Groove (although not intended for mobile networks), collaboration tools for disaster recovery (the WORKPAD project), and Skype's collaboration extensions, all demonstrate the potential of P2P collaborative applications. Yet, the development of such applications for mobile P2P systems is still difficult because of the lack of middleware.

  13. An investigation into the 2 Si(p,gamma)30P reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberholzer, P.

    1978-01-01

    In the experiment reported here, information was obtained on the energy levels of 30 P by means of the 2 Si(p,gamma) 30 P-reaction. The experimental work was done with two accelerators, the 3 MV Van de Graaff- accelerator of the AEB and the 2,5 MV Van de Graaff-accelerator of the P.U. for C.H.E. A 60 cm 3 - and a 80 cm 3 Ge(Li)-detector were used. The excitation curve of the 2 Si + p-reaction was measured in the 1,3 - 2,0 MeV energy range. In order to calculate proton energies which were more accurate, the Q-value of the reaction was redetermined. The gamma decay of 12 resonances in the energy range l,l - 1,9 MeV was studied. The branching ratios of 25 bound levels in 30 P were determined, as well as the excitation energy and branching ratios of two new bound levels. A different value for the excitation energy of one bound level was found. The mean lifetimes of 12 bound levels were measured by means of the doppler shift attenuation method and the results were compared to those of other groups using different methods of lifetime measurement. Spin and parity assignments based on Weisskopf estimates were made for a number of resonance states, as well as for one new bound state. The experimental results were compared with the results of two models

  14. Observation of the 1P1 state of charmonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.A.; Bettoni, D.; Bharadwaj, V.; Biino, C.; Borreani, G.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Ceccucci, A.; Cester, R.; Church, M.; Dalpiaz, P.; Dalpiaz, P.F.; Dibenedetto, R.; Dimitroyannis, D.; Fabbri, M.G.; Fast, J.; Gianoli, A.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Gollwitzer, K.; Hahn, A.; Hasan, M.; Hsueh, S.; Lewis, R.; Luppi, E.; Macri, M.; Majewska, A.M.; Mandelkern, M.; Marchetto, F.; Marinelli, M.; Marques, J.; Marsh, W.; Martini, M.; Masuzawa, M.; Menichetti, E.; Migliori, A.; Mussa, R.; Palestini, S.; Pallavicini, M.; Pastrone, N.; Patrignani, C.; Peoples, J. Jr.; Pesando, L.; Petrucci, F.; Pia, M.G.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.; Ray, R.; Reid, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roccuzzo, B.; Rosen, J.; Santroni, A.; Sarmiento, M.; Savrie, M.; Scalisi, A.; Schultz, J.; Seth, K.K.; Smith, A.; Smith, G.A.; Sozzi, M.; Trokenheim, S.; Weber, M.F.; Werkema, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zioulas, G.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed a search for the 1 P 1 state of charmonium resonantly formed in bar pp annihilations, close to the center of gravity of the 3 P J states. We report results from the study of the J/ψ+π 0 and J/ψ+2π final states. We have observed a statistically significant enhancement in the bar p+p→J/ψ+π 0 cross section at √s congruent 3526.2 MeV. This enhancement has the characteristics of a narrow resonance of mass, total width, and production cross section consistent with what is expected for the 1 P 1 state. In our search we have found no candidates for the reactions bar p+p→J/ψ+π 0 +π 0 and bar p+p→J/ψ+π + +π -

  15. Fabrication of P3HT/gold nanoparticle LB films by P3HT templating Langmuir monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang-Huei; Hsu, Wen-Ping; Chan, Han-Wen; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Addition of ODA into the P3HT monolayer can significantly improve the dispersion ability of P3HT molecules. • The adsorption ability of the P3HT monolayer to the dispersed AuNPs can also be enhanced by the presence of ODA. - Abstract: Regioregular poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (rr-P3HT) and mixed P3HT/octadecyl amine (ODA) were used as template monolayers to adsorb the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dispersed in subphase. The behaviors of P3HT and P3HT/ODA monolayers were investigated by surface pressure area per molecule (π–A) isotherms, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental results show that P3HT does not form a homogeneous film and tends to aggregate at the air/water interface. Meanwhile, the amount of AuNPs adsorbed by the P3HT monolayers is low, attributable to the weak interaction between AuNPs and P3HT. By introduction of ODA molecules into the P3HT monolayer, the spreading of P3HT molecules at the air/water interface is improved and the aggregation of P3HT is significantly inhibited. A nearly uniform and homogeneously mixed P3HT/ODA monolayer can be obtained when 50% of ODA is introduced. It is also found that the introduction of ODA can significantly increase the adsorption of AuNPs. For the mixed monolayer with low ratio of ODA (P3HT/ODA = 1/0.2), a higher concentration of adsorbed AuNPs was observed on the corresponding monolayer. However, when the ODA/P3HT ratio increases to 1/1, the AuNPs tend to form three-dimensional (3D) aggregates and the AuNPs cannot distribute well as a homogeneous monolayer. This result is ascribed to the increasing hydrophobicity of the adsorbed AuNPs because of capping of more ODA molecules

  16. The (2p, 2p) 11Δg state of 6Li2: Fourier transform spectrum of the 11Δg-B1IIu transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linton, C.; Martin, F.; Crozet, P.; Ross, A.J.; Bacis, R.

    1993-01-01

    The 1 1 Δ g -B 1 II u transition of 6 Li 2 has been observed in collisionally induced fluorescence following single frequency optical-optical double resonance excitation of the F 1 Σ g + state using a ring dye laser with DCM dye. Spectra of the s and a symmetry levels were obtained separately, at high resolution, in the near-infrared region using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The molecular constants (Dunham coefficients) of the 1 1 Δ g state have been calculated. Comparison of the constants and dissociation energy with ab initio calculations has shown that the 1 1 Δ g state correlates with Li(2p) + Li(2p) and has a dissociation energy of 9,579 ± 1 cm -1 . The energy transfer process responsible for excitation of the 1 1 Δ g state is discussed

  17. Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effects in Mn1.2Fe0.8P1-xGex compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Z Q; Wang, G F; Lin Song; Tegus, O; Brueck, E; Buschow, K H J

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effects in the Mn 1.2 Fe 0.8 P 1-x Ge x compounds with x = 0.2, 0.22, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the Mn 1.2 Fe 0.8 P 1-x Ge x compounds crystallize in the hexagonal Fe 2 P-type crystal structure. The magnetic moments of the Mn 1.2 Fe 0.8 P 1-x Ge x compounds measured at 5 K and 5 T increase with increasing Ge content. The Curie temperature increases strongly and the magnetic entropy change has a maximum around 233 K for the compound with x = 0.22, which is about 19 and 31 J kg -1 K -1 for a field change of 2 and 5 T, respectively

  18. PENERAPAN METODE RETAD UNTUK MENGURANGI WAKTU SET UP PADA MESIN MILLING P1 DAN P2 DEPARTEMEN MACHINING PT. KUBOTA INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriyanto Sriyanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Pengurangan waktu produksi dalam suatu proses produksi dapat dilakukan dengan meminimalkan waktu setup pada proses produksi tersebut. Untuk mengurangi waktu setup diperlukan suatu cara untuk membantu operator dalam melaksanakan proses milling sehingga dapat meminimalkan waktu setup serta dapat menghilangkan elemen kerja yang tidak produktif tersebut. Metode RETAD (Rapid Exchange of Tooling and Dies merupakan pengembangan dari metode SMED (Single Minuite Exchange of Dies yang bertujuan mengurangi waktu setup, menghapus scrap dan rework. Dari hasil pengolahan data dan analisis untuk proses milling pada mesin Milling Vertikal P1, waktu elemen kerja membersihkan jig dari geram dapat dikurangi dari 5.53 detik sebelum perbaikan menjadi 1.54 detik setelah perbaikan dan untuk mesin Milling Vertikal P2, waktu elemen kerja membersihkan jig dari geram dapat  dikurangi dari 5.15 detik menjadi 1.54 detik. Dari hasil di atas maka dapat disimpulkan bahwa terjadi perbaikan waktu setup pada proses milling pada Mesin Milling Vertikal P1 dan P2 di Cylinder Head Line, perbandingan waktu standar proses milling dari 258.505 detik sebelum perbaikan menjadi 254.518 detik setelah perbaikan pada mesin Milling Vertikal P1 dan 256.002 detik sebelum perbaikan menjadi 252.392 detik setelah perbaikan pada mesin Milling Vertikal P2 Untuk penelitian ini hasil tersebut merupakan hasil maksimal yang dapat dicapai, namun dapat dikembangkan lebih lanjut pada mesin-mesin produksi lainnya. Kata kunci           : RETAD, waktu setup, elemen kerja

  19. Common variants on 2p16.1, 6p22.1 and 10q24.32 are associated with schizophrenia in Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H; Yan, H; Li, J; Li, Z; Zhang, X; Ma, Y; Mei, L; Liu, C; Cai, L; Wang, Q; Zhang, F; Iwata, N; Ikeda, M; Wang, L; Lu, T; Li, M; Xu, H; Wu, X; Liu, B; Yang, J; Li, K; Lv, L; Ma, X; Wang, C; Li, L; Yang, F; Jiang, T; Shi, Y; Li, T; Zhang, D; Yue, W

    2017-07-01

    Many schizophrenia susceptibility loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in European populations. However, until recently, schizophrenia GWASs in non-European populations were limited to small sample sizes and have yielded few loci associated with schizophrenia. To identify genetic risk variations for schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population, we performed a two-stage GWAS of schizophrenia comprising 4384 cases and 5770 controls, followed by independent replications of 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in an additional 4339 schizophrenia cases and 7043 controls of Han Chinese ancestry. Furthermore, we conducted additional analyses based on the results in the discovery stage. The combined analysis confirmed evidence of genome-wide significant associations in the Han Chinese population for three loci, at 2p16.1 (rs1051061, in an exon of VRK2, P=1.14 × 10 -12 , odds ratio (OR)=1.17), 6p22.1 (rs115070292 in an intron of GABBR1, P=4.96 × 10 -10 , OR=0.77) and 10q24.32 (rs10883795 in an intron of AS3MT, P=7.94 × 10 -10 , OR=0.87; rs10883765 at an intron of ARL3, P=3.06 × 10 -9 , OR=0.87). The polygenic risk score based on Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia GWAS data modestly predicted case-control status in the Chinese population (Nagelkerke R 2 : 1.7% ~5.7%). Our pathway analysis suggested that neurological biological pathways such as GABAergic signaling, dopaminergic signaling, cell adhesion molecules and myelination pathways are involved in schizophrenia. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population. Further studies are needed to establish the biological context and potential clinical utility of these findings.

  20. Purinergic control of inflammation and thrombosis: Role of P2X1 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Oury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation shifts the hemostatic mechanisms in favor of thrombosis. Upon tissue damage or infection, a sudden increase of extracellular ATP occurs, that might contribute to the crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis. On platelets, P2X1 receptors act to amplify platelet activation and aggregation induced by other platelet agonists. These receptors critically contribute to thrombus stability in small arteries. Besides platelets, studies by our group indicate that these receptors are expressed by neutrophils. They promote neutrophil chemotaxis, both in vitro and in vivo. In a laser-induced injury mouse model of thrombosis, it appears that neutrophils are required to initiate thrombus formation and coagulation activation on inflamed arteriolar endothelia. In this model, by using P2X1−/− mice, we recently showed that P2X1 receptors, expressed on platelets and neutrophils, play a key role in thrombus growth and fibrin generation. Intriguingly, in a model of endotoxemia, P2X1−/− mice exhibited aggravated oxidative tissue damage, along with exacerbated thrombocytopenia and increased activation of coagulation, which translated into higher susceptibility to septic shock. Thus, besides its ability to recruit neutrophils and platelets on inflamed endothelia, the P2X1 receptor also contributes to limit the activation of circulating neutrophils under systemic inflammatory conditions. Taken together, these data suggest that P2X1 receptors are involved in the interplay between platelets, neutrophils and thrombosis. We propose that activation of these receptors by ATP on neutrophils and platelets represents a new mechanism that regulates thrombo-inflammation.

  1. Anisotropic p-f mixing mechanism explaining anomalous magnetic properties in Ce monopnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Kasuya, T.

    1985-01-01

    An anomalously small crystal-field splitting in the paramagnetic region in CeSb and CeBi compared with those in CeP and CeAs is explained by the mixing mechanism between the occupied 4f states and the valence band holes. In the paramagnetic regions, the above p-f mixing gives the effective crystal-field splitting, which is estimated to nearly cancel the normal splittings extrapolated from CeP and CeAs in good agreement with experiment. The formula for the second-order transition temperature, at which the population ratio of the 4f GAMMA 8 states begins to be unbalanced, is also derived. In CeBi the second-order transition may occur, while in CeSb the first-order transition should occur in agreement with experiments. (author)

  2. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal cancer: a report of thirty cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo; Li, Dechuan; Chen, Yinbo

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy (EERPE) has gained popularity for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. However, prior complex lower abdominal or pelvic surgery can complicate subsequent EERPE. To date, there have been few reports on patients who underwent EERPE after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal cancer. To present our experience with EERPE in patients after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal carcinoma and introduce a simple and effective way to create an extraperitoneal working space. Thirty patients after radical resection of pT1-pT2 rectal carcinoma were treated with EERPE for biopsy-proven localized prostate cancer. Operation time, estimated blood loss, conversion to open surgery rate, transfusion rate and transurethral catheter time were recorded. Meanwhile, functional outcome (continence and potency) and oncological outcome were reviewed. The average operative time was 168 min. Mean blood loss was 195 ml. There was no need for conversion to open surgery or transfusion. The catheter was removed on postoperative day (POD) 7.8. After a mean follow-up time of 53.1 months, 3 patients had a prostate-specific antigen level relapse over 0.1 ng/ml. At the follow-up time, 26 patients were completely continent, and 4 needed 1-2 pads/day. Of the 6 patients who underwent neurovascular bundle preservation, none have experienced return of erections at the last follow-up time. Endoscopic extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy after radical resection of rectal carcinoma appears promising, with feasibility in experienced hands. The operative data, postoperative urinary incontinence and oncological outcomes appear encouraging, but the rate of erectile dysfunction seems to be disappointing.

  3. p - n junction diodes fabricated from isolated electrospun fibers of (P(NDI2ODT2)) and an inorganic p-doped semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Alexander; Pinto, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    A simple method to fabricate, under ambient conditions and within seconds, p - n diodes using an individual electrospun poly{[N, N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene)}-(P(NDI2ODT2)) fiber and a commercially available p-doped Si/SiO2 substrate is presented. Band bending at the fiber/Si+ interface leads to asymmetric I-V characteristic curves resembling that of a diode. The diode turn-on voltage was in the range 1V and was unaffected via UV light irradiation. The rectification ratio however could be tuned reversibly thereby making this device multifunctional. In addition to being a rectifier, the advantage of our design is the complete exposure of the rectifying junction to the surrounding environment. This has the advantage of making them attractive candidates in the potential fabrication of low power, sensitive and rapid response photo-sensors. NSF

  4. Theoretical investigations of open-shell systems: 1. Spectral simulation of the 2s(2)p(2) (2)D <- 2s(2)2p (2)P(o) valence transition in the boron diargon cluster, and 2. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of boron in solid molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumrine, Jennifer Rebecca

    This dissertation is concerned in part with the construction of accurate pairwise potentials, based on reliable ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES's), which are fully anisotropic in the sense that multiple PES's are accessible to systems with orientational electronic properties. We have carried out several investigations of B (2s 22p 2Po) with spherical ligands: (1)an investigation of the electronic spectrum of the BAr2 complex and (2)two related studies of the equilibrium properties and spectral simulation of B embedded in solid pH 2. Our investigations suggest that it cannot be assumed that nuclear motion in an open-shell system occurs on a single PES. The 2s2p2 2 D modeled theoretically; the excited potential energy surfaces of the five-fold degenerate B(2s2p2 2D) state within the ternary complex are computed using a pairwise-additive model. A collaborative path integral molecular dynamics investigation of the equilibrium properties of boron trapped in solid para-hydrogen (pH2) and a path integral Monte Carlo spectral simulation. Using fully anisotropic pair potentials, coupling of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom is observed, and is found to be an essential feature in understanding the behavior and determining the energy of the impure solid, especially in highly anisotropic matrices. We employ the variational Monte Carlo method to further study the behavior of ground state B embedded in solid pH2. When a boron atom exists in a substitutional site in a lattice, the anisotropic distortion of the local lattice plays a minimal role in the energetics. However, when a nearest neighbor vacancy is present along with the boron impurity, two phenomena are found to influence the behavior of the impure quantum solid: (1)orientation of the 2p orbital to minimize the energy of the impurity and (2)distortion of the local lattice structure to promote an energetically favorable nuclear configuration. This research was supported by the Joint Program for Atomic

  5. P SETT2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. P SETT2,. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 41 Issue 2 April 2018 pp 60. Magnetic measurements, Raman and infrared spectra of metal–ligand complex derived from CoCl 2 · 6H 2 O and 2-benzoyl pyridine · S DATTA A S MAHAPATRA P SETT2, ...

  6. Measurement of the spin-forbidden decay rate (3s3d)1D2¿(3s3p)3 P2,1 in 24Mg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K. T.; Jensen, Brian Bak; Ryder, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the spin-forbidden decay rate from (3s3d)D12¿(3s3p)P32,1 in M24g atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap. The total decay rate, summing up both exit channels (3s3p)P31 and (3s3p)P32 , yields 196±10s-1 in excellent agreement with resent relativistic many-body calculations of Porse...

  7. The Hog1p kinase regulates Aft1p transcription factor to control iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Telma S; Pereira, Clara; Canadell, David; Vilaça, Rita; Teixeira, Vítor; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc; Costa, Vítor

    2018-01-01

    Iron acquisition systems have to be tightly regulated to assure a continuous supply of iron, since it is essential for survival, but simultaneously to prevent iron overload that is toxic to the cells. In budding yeast, the low‑iron sensing transcription factor Aft1p is a master regulator of the iron regulon. Our previous work revealed that bioactive sphingolipids modulate iron homeostasis as yeast cells lacking the sphingomyelinase Isc1p exhibit an upregulation of the iron regulon. In this study, we show that Isc1p impacts on iron accumulation and localization. Notably, Aft1p is activated in isc1Δ cells due to a decrease in its phosphorylation and an increase in its nuclear levels. Consistently, the expression of a phosphomimetic version of Aft1p-S210/S224 that favours its nuclear export abolished iron accumulation in isc1Δ cells. Notably, the Hog1p kinase, homologue of mammalian p38, interacts with and directly phosphorylates Aft1p at residues S210 and S224. However, Hog1p-Aft1p interaction decreases in isc1Δ cells, which likely contributes to Aft1p dephosphorylation and consequently to Aft1p activation and iron overload in isc1Δ cells. These results suggest that alterations in sphingolipid composition in isc1Δ cells may impact on iron homeostasis by disturbing the regulation of Aft1p by Hog1p. To our knowledge, Hog1p is the first kinase reported to directly regulate Aft1p, impacting on iron homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptional profiling of extracellular amino acid sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the role of Stp1p and Stp2p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Nielsen, P.S.; Friis, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Tdh1p and glucokinase (Glk1p), shows increased transcription levels in either or both of the mutants. Also, most of the structural genes involved in trehalose and glycogen synthesis and a few genes in the glyoxylate cycle and the pentose phosphate pathway are derepressed in the ssy1 and stp1 stp2...

  9. Transformation of Astrocytes to a Neuroprotective Phenotype by Microglia via P2Y1 Receptor Downregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Shinozaki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microglia and astrocytes become reactive following traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, the coordination of this reactivity and its relation to pathophysiology are unclear. Here, we show that microglia transform astrocytes into a neuroprotective phenotype via downregulation of the P2Y1 purinergic receptor. TBI initially caused microglial activation in the injury core, followed by reactive astrogliosis in the peri-injured region and formation of a neuroprotective astrocyte scar. Equivalent changes to astrocytes were observed in vitro after injury. This change in astrocyte phenotype resulted from P2Y1 receptor downregulation, mediated by microglia-derived cytokines. In mice, astrocyte-specific P2Y1 receptor overexpression (Astro-P2Y1OE counteracted scar formation, while astrocyte-specific P2Y1 receptor knockdown (Astro-P2Y1KD facilitated scar formation, suggesting critical roles of P2Y1 receptors in the transformation. Astro-P2Y1OE and Astro-P2Y1KD mice showed increased and reduced neuronal damage, respectively. Altogether, our findings indicate that microglia-astrocyte interaction, involving a purinergic signal, is essential for the formation of neuroprotective astrocytes.

  10. Semiconducting La2AuP3, the metallic conductor Ce2AuP3, and other rare-earth gold phosphides Ln2AuP3 with two closely related crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschen, M.; Kotzyba, G.; Kuennen, B.; Jeitschko, W.

    2001-01-01

    The compounds Ln 2 AuP 3 were synthesized by reaction of the elemental components in evacuated silica tubes. Their crystal structures were determined from single-crystal diffractometer data. The compounds with Ln = La, Ce, and Pr crystallize with an orthorhombic U 2 NiC 3 type structure (Pnma, Z = 4). The structure refinement for Ce 2 AuP 3 resulted in a = 774.14(6) pm, b = 421.11(4) pm, c = 1612.3(1) pm, R = 0.019 for 1410 structure factors and 38 variable parameters. For Pr 2 AuP 3 a residual of R = 0.024 was obtained. Nd 2 AuP 3 crystallizes with a monoclinic distortion of this structure: P2 1 /c, Z = 4, a = 416.14(4) pm, b = 768.87(6) pm, c = 1647.1(2) pm, β = 104.06(1) , R = 0.022 for 1361 F values and 56 variables. The near-neighbor coordinations of the two structures are nearly the same. In both structures the gold and phosphorus atoms form two-dimensionally infinite nets, where the gold atoms are tetrahedrally coordinated by phosphorus atoms with Au-P distances varying between 245.8 and 284.2 pm. Two thirds of the phosphorus atoms form pairs with single-bond distances varying between 217.7 and 218.9 pm. Thus, using oxidation numbers the structures can be rationalized with the formulas (Ln +3 ) 2 [AuP 3 ] -6 and (Ln +3 ) 2 Au +1 (P 2 ) -4 P -3 . Accordingly, La 2 AuP 3 is a diamagnetic semiconductor. Pr 2 AuP 3 is semi-conducting with an antiferromagnetic ground state, showing metamagnetism with a critical field of B c = 0.5(±0.1) T. In contrast, the cerium compound is a metallic conductor, even though its cell volume indicates that the cerium atoms are essentially trivalent, as is also suggested by the ferro- or ferrimagnetic behavior of the compound. (orig.)

  11. Ceramide synthase 2 facilitates S1P-dependent egress of thymocytes into the circulation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieck, Michael; Kremser, Christiane; Jobin, Katarzyna; Mettke, Elisabeth; Kurts, Christian; Gräler, Markus; Willecke, Klaus; Kolanus, Waldemar

    2017-04-01

    Well-defined gradients of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) direct chemotactic egress of mature thymocytes from the thymus into the circulation. Although it is known that these gradients result from low S1P levels in the thymic parenchyma and high S1P concentrations at the exit sites and in the plasma, the biochemical mechanisms that regulate these differential S1P levels remain unclear. Several studies demonstrated that ceramide synthase 2 (Cers2) regulates the levels of the S1P precursor sphingosine. We, therefore, investigated whether Cers2 is involved in the regulation of S1P gradients and S1P-dependent egress into the circulation. By analyzing Cers2-deficient mice, we demonstrate that Cers2 limits the levels of S1P in thymus and blood to maintain functional S1P gradients that mediate thymocyte emigration into the circulation. This function is specific for Cers2, as we also show that Cers4 is not involved in the regulation of thymic egress. Our study identified Cers2 as an important regulator of S1P-dependent thymic egress, and thus contributes to the understanding of how S1P gradients are maintained in vivo. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Pilocarpine-Induced Status Epilepticus Increases the Sensitivity of P2X7 and P2Y1 Receptors to Nucleotides at Neural Progenitor Cells of the Juvenile Rodent Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmer, Katalin; Gao, Po; Araújo, Michelle G L; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Liu, Juan; Rong, Weifang; Tang, Yong; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute; Fernandes, Maria José S; Illes, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Patch-clamp recordings indicated the presence of P2X7 receptors at neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in hippocampal brain slices prepared from transgenic nestin reporter mice. The activation of these receptors caused inward current near the resting membrane potential of the NPCs, while P2Y1 receptor activation initiated outward current near the reversal potential of the P2X7 receptor current. Both receptors were identified by biophysical/pharmacological methods. When the brain slices were prepared from mice which underwent a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus or when brain slices were incubated in pilocarpine-containing external medium, the sensitivity of P2X7 and P2Y1 receptors was invariably increased. Confocal microscopy confirmed the localization of P2X7 and P2Y1 receptor-immunopositivity at nestin-positive NPCs. A one-time status epilepticus in rats caused after a latency of about 5 days recurrent epileptic fits. The blockade of central P2X7 receptors increased the number of seizures and their severity. It is hypothesized that P2Y1 receptors after a status epilepticus may increase the ATP-induced proliferation/ectopic migration of NPCs; the P2X7 receptor-mediated necrosis/apoptosis might counteract these effects, which would otherwise lead to a chronic manifestation of recurrent epileptic fits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Electron-impact excitation of multiply-charged ions using energy loss in merged beams: e + Si3+(3s2S1/2) → e + Si3+(3p2P1/2,3/2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlin, E.K.; Thompson, J.S.; Dunn, G.H.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Gregory, D.C.; Smith, A.C.H.

    1990-01-01

    For the first time absolute total cross sections for electron-impact excitation of a multiply-charged ion have been measured using an electron-energy-loss technique. Measurements were made near threshold for the process e + Si 3+ (3s 2 S 1/2 ) → e + Si 3+ (3p 2 P 1/2 , 3/2 ) -- 8.88 eV. The 10 -15 cm 2 measured cross section agrees with results of 7-state close coupling calculations to better than the ±20% (90% CL) total uncertainty of the measurements. Convoluting the theoretical curve with a Gaussian energy distribution indicates an energy width of 0.15 approx-lt ΔE approx-lt 0.20 eV. 12 refs., 2 figs

  14. On the non-existence of orthogonal instanton bundles on P^{2n+1}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łucja Farnik

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we prove that there do not exist orthogonal instanton bundles on P^{2n+1} . In order to demonstrate this fact, we propose a new way of representing the invariant, introduced by L. Costa and G. Ottaviani, related to a rank 2n instanton bundle on P^{2n+1}.

  15. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induced cell cycle arrest and growth inhibition in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via regulation of Skp2, p53, p21Cip1 and p27Kip1

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hui-Ping; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Hsiao, Ping-Hsuan; Su, Liang-Cheng; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chan, Tzu-Min; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Wang, Horng-Dar; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving the androgen ablation therapy ultimately develop recurrent castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) within 1?3 years. Treatment with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppressed cell survival and proliferation via induction of G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1, DU-145, 22Rv1, and C4?2 CRPC cells. CAPE treatment also inhibited soft agar colony formation and retarded nude mice xenograft growth of LNCaP 104-R1 cells. We identified that CAP...

  16. Novel 1,3-diacylamidopropane-2-[bis-(2-dimethylaminoethane)] carbamate pH-sensitive lipids for cationic liposome-mediated transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelios, Michael G.

    A novel series of 1,3-diacylamidopropane-2-[bis(2-dimethylaminoethane)] carbamate analogs (1,3lb) were designed for cationic lipid-assisted transfection (lipofection). First, their physicochemical properties in self-assemblies with and without plasmid DNA (pDNA) were evaluated to examine the effects of hydrophobic tail length and degree of saturation on gene delivery and expression. Significant in vitro lipofection was induced at a nitrogen:phosphate ratio (N:P) of 4:1 by the dimyristoyl, dipalmitoyl, and dioleoyl analogs 1,3lb2, 1,3lb3, and 1,3lb5, respectively, without inclusion of neutral "lipofection enhancing" co-lipids in the cationic lipid formulations. Lipofection was reduced in the presence of co-lipids except for 1,3lb5 which maintained reporter gene expression levels at N:P 4:1 and yielded increased bioactivity at a lower NP of 2:1. Physicochemical characterization of the bioactive transfection agents (cytofectins) revealed: high hydration and in-plane elasticity of lipid monolayers by Langmuir film balance measurements; fluid lipid bilayers, with gel---liquid crystalline phase transitions below physiological temperature, by fluorescence anisotropy; lipid mixing with biomembrane-mimicking vesicles by fluorescence resonance energy transfer; efficient pDNA binding and compaction by ethidium bromide displacement; cationic liposome---nucleic acid complexes (lipoplexes) with large particle sizes (mean diameter ≥ 500 nm) and zeta potentials of positive values by dynamic light scattering and electrophoretic mobility, respectively. The results suggest that well hydrated and elastic cationic lipids forming fluid lamellar assemblies are extremely potent and minimally toxic cytofectins. Second, a comparison was made between 1,3lb2 and two derivatives, one an isomer with a shorter space between the myristoyl chains and the other the monovalent form, in an effort to delineate the biological effects of interchain distance and pH-induced polar headgroup expandability

  17. Deletion of GOLGA2P3Y but not GOLGA2P2Y is a risk factor for oligozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sanjukta; Agarwal, Rupesh; Ambulkar, Prafulla; Hinduja, Indira; Zaveri, Kusum; Gokral, Jyotsna; Pal, Asoke; Modi, Deepak

    2016-02-01

    The AZFc locus on the human Y chromosome harbours several multicopy genes, some of which are required for spermatogenesis. It is believed that deletion of one or more copies of these genes is a cause of infertility in some men. GOLGA2LY is one of the genes in the AZFc locus and it exists in two copies, GOLGA2P2Y and GOLGA2P3Y. The involvement of GOLGA2LY gene copy deletions in male infertility, however, is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association of deletions of GOLGA2P2Y and GOLGA2P3Y gene copies with male infertility and with sperm concentration and motility. The frequency of GOLGA2P3Y deletion was significantly higher in oligozoospermic men compared with normozoospermic men (7.7% versus 1.2%; P = 0.0001), whereas the frequency of GOLGA2P2Y deletion was comparable between oligozoospermic and normozoospermic men (10.3% versus 11.3%). The deletion of GOLGA2P3Y but not GOLGA2P2Y was significantly higher (P = 0.03) in men with gr/gr rearrangements, indicating that GOLGA2P3Y deletions increase the susceptibility of men with gr/gr rearrangements to oligozoospermia. Furthermore, men with GOLGA2P3Y deletion had reduced sperm concentration and motility compared with men without deletion or with deletion of GOLGA2P2Y. These findings indicate GOLGA2P3Y gene copy may be candidate AZFc gene for male infertility. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. P2P-Based Data System for the EAST Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yantai; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Weifeng; Chen, Haiming; Luo, Jiarong

    2006-06-01

    A peer-to-peer (P2P)-based EAST Data System is being designed to provide data acquisition and analysis support for the EAST superconducting tokamak. Instead of transferring data to the servers, all collected data are stored in the data acquisition subsystems locally and the PC clients can access the raw data directly using the P2P architecture. Both online and offline systems are based on Napster-like P2P architecture. This allows the peer (PC) to act both as a client and as a server. A simulation-based method and a steady-state operational analysis technique are used for performance evaluation. These analyses show that the P2P technique can significantly reduce the completion time of raw data display and real-time processing on the online system, and raise the workload capacity and reduce the delay on the offline system.

  19. (+-Chlorido[(1,2,3,4-η;κP2′-2′-diphenylphosphanyl-2-diphenylphosphoryl-1,1′-binaphthyl]rhodium(I methanol monosolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Joachim Drexler

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [RhCl(C44H32OP2]·CH3OH, the RhI ion is coordinated by a naphthyl group of a partially oxidized 2,2′-bis(diphenylphosphanyl-1,1′-binaphthyl (BINAP ligand in a η4 mode, one P atom of the diphenylphosphanyl group and one Cl atom. The P=O group does not interact with the RhI ion but accepts an O—H...O hydrogen bond from the methanol solvent molecule.

  20. Differential S1P Receptor Profiles on M1- and M2-Polarized Macrophages Affect Macrophage Cytokine Production and Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jan; von Bernstorff, Wolfram; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Schulze, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Introduction . Macrophages are key players in complex biological processes. In response to environmental signals, macrophages undergo polarization towards a proinflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lysophospholipid that acts via 5 G-protein coupled receptors (S1P 1-5 ) in order to influence a broad spectrum of biological processes. This study assesses S1P receptor expression on macrophages before and after M1 and M2 polarization and performs a comparative analysis of S1P signalling in the two activational states of macrophages. Methods . Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) from C57 BL/6 mice were cultured under either M1- or M2-polarizing conditions. S1P-receptor expression was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Influence of S1P on macrophage activation, migration, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion was assessed in vitro. Results . All 5 S1P receptor subclasses were expressed in macrophages. Culture under both M1- and M2-polarizing conditions led to significant downregulation of S1P 1 . In contrast, M1-polarized macrophages significantly downregulated S1P 4 . The expression of the remaining three S1P receptors did not change. S1P increased expression of iNOS under M2-polarizing conditions. Furthermore, S1P induced chemotaxis in M1 macrophages and changed cytokine production in M2 macrophages. Phagocytosis was not affected by S1P-signalling. Discussion . The expression of different specific S1P receptor profiles may provide a possibility to selectively influence M1- or M2-polarized macrophages.

  1. Application of nanodisc technology for direct electrochemical investigation of plant cytochrome P450s and their NADPH P450 oxidoreductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavishi, Krutika; Laursen, Tomas; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Direct electrochemistry of cytochrome P450 containing systems has primarily focused on investigating enzymes from microbes and animals for bio-sensing applications. Plant P450s receive electrons from NADPH P450 oxidoreductase (POR) to orchestrate the bio-synthesis of a plethora of commercially...... was electro-catalytically active while the P450s generated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). These nanodisc-based investigations lay the prospects and guidelines for construction of a simplified platform to perform mediator-free, direct electrochemistry of non-engineered cytochromes P450 under native-like conditions...

  2. Low pCO2 under sea-ice melt in the Canada Basin of the western Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Naohiro; Sasano, Daisuke; Ishii, Masao; Nishino, Shigeto; Uchida, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa-Inoue, Hisayuki

    2017-12-01

    In September 2013, we observed an expanse of surface water with low CO2 partial pressure (pCO2sea) (Ocean. The large undersaturation of CO2 in this region was the result of massive primary production after the sea-ice retreat in June and July. In the surface of the Canada Basin, salinity was low ( 20 µmol kg-1) in the subsurface low pCO2sea layer in the Canada Basin indicated significant net primary production undersea and/or in preformed condition. If these low pCO2sea layers surface by wind mixing, they will act as additional CO2 sinks; however, this is unlikely because intensification of stratification by sea-ice melt inhibits mixing across the halocline.

  3. pCO2 And pH regulation of cerebral blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SeongHun eYoon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CO2 Serves as one of the fundamental regulators of cerebral blood flow. It is widely considered that this regulation occurs through pCO2-driven changes in pH of the cerebral spinal fluid, with elevated and lowered pH causing direct relaxation and contraction of the smooth muscle, respectively. However, some findings also suggest that pCO2 acts independently of and/or in conjunction with altered pH. This action may be due to a direct effect of cerebral spinal fluid pCO2 on the smooth muscle as well as on the endothelium, nerves, and astrocytes. Findings may also point to an action of arterial pCO2 on the endothelium to regulate smooth muscle contractility. Thus, the effects of pH and pCO2 may be influenced by the absence/presence of different cell types in the various experimental preparations. Results may also be influenced by experimental parameters including myogenic tone as well as solutions containing significantly altered HCO3- concentrations, i.e., solutions routinely employed to differentiate the effects of pH from pCO2. In sum, it appears that pCO2, independently and in conjunction with pH, may regulate cerebral blood flow.

  4. Resilience to audiogenic seizures is associated with p-ERK1/2 dephosphorylation in the subiculum of Fmr1 knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eCuria

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Young, but not adult, Fmr1 knockout (KO mice display audiogenic seizures (AGS that can be prevented by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In order to identify the cerebral regions involved in these phenomena, we characterized the response to AGS in Fmr1 KO mice and wild type (WT controls at postnatal day (P 45 and P90. To characterize the diverse response to AGS in various cerebral regions, we evaluated the activity markers FosB/ΔFosB and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2. Wild running (100% of tested mice followed by clonic/tonic seizures (30% were observed in P45 Fmr1 KO mice, but not in WT mice. In P90 Fmr1 KO mice, wild running was only present in 25% of tested animals. Basal FosB/ΔFosB immunoreactivity was higher (P<0.01 vs WT in the CA1 and subiculum of P45 Fmr1 KO mice. Following the AGS test, FosB/ΔFosB expression consistently increased in most of the analyzed regions in both groups at P45, but not at P90. Interestingly, FosB/ΔFosB immunoreactivity was significantly higher in P45 Fmr1 KO mice in the medial geniculate body (P<0.05 vs WT and CA3 (P<0.01. Neurons presenting with immunopositivity to p-ERK1/2 were more abundant in the subiculum of Fmr1 KO mice in control condition (P<0.05 vs WT, in both age groups. In this region, p-ERK1/2-immunopositive cells significantly decreased (-75%, P<0.01 in P90 Fmr1 KO mice exposed to the AGS test, but no changes were found in P45 mice or in other brain regions. In both age groups of WT mice, p-ERK1/2-immunopositive cells increased in the subiculum after exposure to the acoustic test. Our findings illustrate that FosB/ΔFosB markers are overexpressed in the medial geniculate body and CA3 in Fmr1 KO mice experiencing AGS, and that p-ERK1/2 is markedly decreased in the subiculum of Fmr1 KO mice resistant to AGS induction. These findings suggest that resilience to AGS is associated with dephosphorylation of p-ERK1/2 in the subiculum of mature Fmr1 KO mice.

  5. Conjugation of nitrated acetaminophen to Der p1 amplifies peripheral blood monocyte response to Der p1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan G Thomas

    Full Text Available An association of acetaminophen use and asthma was observed in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study. However there are no clear mechanisms to explain an association between acetaminophen use and immunologic pathology. In acidic conditions like those in the stomach and inflamed airway, tyrosine residues are nitrated by nitrous and peroxynitrous acids. The resulting nitrotyrosine is structurally similar to 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, known haptens that enhance immune responses by covalently binding proteins. Nitrated acetaminophen shares similar molecular structure.We hypothesized the acetaminophen phenol ring undergoes nitration under acidic conditions, producing 3-nitro-acetaminophen which augments allergic responses by acting as a hapten for environmental allergens.3-nitro-acetaminophen was formed from acetaminophen in the presence of acidified nitrite, purified by high performance liquid chromatography, and assayed by gas-chromatography mass spectrometry. Purified 3-nitro-acetaminophen was reacted with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p1 and analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify the modification site. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation response was measured in response to 3-nitro-acetaminophen and to 3-nitro-acetaminophen-modified Der p1.Acetaminophen was modified by nitrous acid forming 3-nitro-acetaminophen over a range of different acidic conditions consistent with airway inflammation and stomach acidity. The Der p1 protein-hapten adduct creation was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry proteomics modifying cysteine 132. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to 3-nitro-acetaminophen-modified Der p1 had increased proliferation and cytokine production compared to acetaminophen and Der p1 alone (n = 7; p < 0.05.These data suggests 3-nitro-acetaminophen formation and reaction with Der p1 provides a mechanism by which stomach acid or infection

  6. Measuring interstitial pH and pO2 in mouse tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rakesh K; Munn, Lance L; Fukumura, Dai

    2013-07-01

    This protocol outlines methods to measure two extravascular parameters, interstitial pH and partial pressure of oxygen (pO2), in mouse tumors. The method for measuring interstitial pH uses fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy (FRIM) of the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). The method for measuring interstitial pO2 is based on the oxygen-dependent quenching of the phosphorescence of albumin-bound palladium meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin, and can be used to measure microvascular as well as interstitial pO2. In addition, the two methods can be used sequentially to measure both pH and pO2 in the same tissues.

  7. Search for high-mass resonances decaying to e mu in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst.

    2006-03-01

    The authors describe a general search for resonances decaying to a neutral e{mu} final state in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Using a data sample representing 344 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the CDF II experiment, they compare Standard Model predictions with the number of observed events for invariant masses between 50 and 800 GeV/c{sup 2}. Finding no significant excess (5 events observed vs. 7.7 {+-} 0.8 expected for M{sub e{mu}} > 100 GeV/c{sup 2}), they set limits on sneutrino and Z{prime} masses as functions of lepton family number violating couplings.

  8. Protein kinase C-mediated ATP stimulation of Na(+)-ATPase activity in LLC-PK1 cells involves a P2Y2 and/or P2Y4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengert, M; Ribeiro, M C; Abreu, T P; Coutinho-Silva, R; Leão-Ferreira, L R; Pinheiro, A A S; Caruso-Neves, C

    2013-07-15

    ATP-activated P2Y receptors play an important role in renal sodium excretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the modulation of ATPase-driven sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule by ATP or adenosine (Ado). LLC-PK1 cells, a model of porcine proximal tubule cells, were used. ATP (10(-6)M) or Ado (10(-6)M) specifically stimulated Na(+)-ATPase activity without any changes in (Na(+)+K(+))-ATPase activity. Our results show that the Ado effect is mediated by its conversion to ATP. Furthermore, it was observed that the effect of ATP was mimicked by UTP, ATPγS and 2-thio-UTP, an agonist of P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptors. In addition, ATP-stimulated Na(+)-ATPase activity involves protein kinase C (PKC). Our results indicate that ATP-induced stimulation of proximal tubule Na(+)-ATPase activity is mediated by a PKC-dependent P2Y2 and/or P2Y4 pathway. These findings provide new perspectives on the role of the effect of P2Y-mediated extracellular ATP on renal sodium handling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduction of Aromatic and Heterocyclic Aromatic N-Hydroxylamines by Human Cytochrome P450 2S1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2013-01-01

    Many aromatic amines and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) are known carcinogens for animals and there is also strong evidence for some in human cancer. The activation of these compounds, including some arylamine drugs, involves N-hydroxylation, usually by cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450) in Family 1 (1A2, 1A1, and 1B1). We previously demonstrated that the bioactivation product of the anti-cancer agent 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203), an N-hydroxylamine, can be reduced by P450 2S1 to its amine precursor under anaerobic conditions and, to a lesser extent, under aerobic conditions (Wang, K., and Guengerich, F. P. (2012) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 25, 1740–1751). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that P450 2S1 is involved in the reductive biotransformation of known carcinogenic aromatic amines and HAAs. The N-hydroxylamines of 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), 2-naphthylamine (2-NA), and 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) were synthesized and found to be reduced by P450 2S1 under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The formation of amines due to P450 2S1 reduction also occurred under aerobic conditions but was less apparent because the competitive disproportionation reactions (of the N-hydroxylamines) also yielded amines. Further, some nitroso and nitro derivatives of the arylamines could also be reduced by P450 2S1. None of the amines tested were oxidized by P450 2S1. These results suggest that P450 2S1 may be involved in the reductive detoxication of several of the activated products of carcinogenic aromatic amines and HAAs. PMID:23682735

  10. SGK1 (glucose transport), dishevelled2 (wnt signaling), LC3/p62 (autophagy) and p53 (apoptosis) proteins are unaltered in Lafora disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, P.; Israelian, L.; Xue, Y.; Song, S.; Attisano, L.; Minassian, B.

    2016-07-01

    Glycogen forms through the concerted actions of glycogen synthase (GS) which elongates glycogen strands, and glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal neurodegenerative epilepsy that results from neuronal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated glycogen with excessively long strands (called polyglucosans). There is no GBE deficiency in LD. Instead, the disease is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes, encoding, respectively, a phosphatase, laforin, and an E3 ubiquiting ligase, malin. A number of experimentally derived hypotheses have been published to explain LD, including: The SGK1 hypothesis - Phosphorylated SGK1 (pSGK1) raises cellular glucose uptake and levels, which would activate GS. Based on observing increased pSGK1 in LD mice it was proposed that raised pSGK1 leads to polyglucosan generation through GS hyperactivation. The Dishevelled2 hypothesis - Downregulating malin in cell culture was reported to increase levels of dishevelled2, which through the wnt/glycogen synthase kinase-3 pathway would likewise overactivate GS. The Autophagic defect hypothesis - Polyglucosans may be natural byproducts of normal glycogen metabolism. LD mice were reported to be autophagy-defective. LD would arise from failed autophagy leading to failed polyglucosan clearance. Finally, the p53 hypothesis - laforin and malin were reported to downregulate p53, their absence leading to increased p53, which would activate apoptosis, leading to the neurodegeneration of LD. In the present work we repeat key experiments that underlie these four hypotheses. We are unable to confirm increased pSGK1, dishevelled2, or p53 in LD mice, nor the reported autophagic defects. Our work does not support the above hypotheses in understanding this unique and severe form of epilepsy.

  11. SGK1 (glucose transport), dishevelled2 (wnt signaling), LC3/p62 (autophagy) and p53 (apoptosis) proteins are unaltered in Lafora disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.; Israelian, L.; Xue, Y.; Song, S.; Attisano, L.; Minassian, B.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen forms through the concerted actions of glycogen synthase (GS) which elongates glycogen strands, and glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal neurodegenerative epilepsy that results from neuronal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated glycogen with excessively long strands (called polyglucosans). There is no GBE deficiency in LD. Instead, the disease is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes, encoding, respectively, a phosphatase, laforin, and an E3 ubiquiting ligase, malin. A number of experimentally derived hypotheses have been published to explain LD, including: The SGK1 hypothesis - Phosphorylated SGK1 (pSGK1) raises cellular glucose uptake and levels, which would activate GS. Based on observing increased pSGK1 in LD mice it was proposed that raised pSGK1 leads to polyglucosan generation through GS hyperactivation. The Dishevelled2 hypothesis - Downregulating malin in cell culture was reported to increase levels of dishevelled2, which through the wnt/glycogen synthase kinase-3 pathway would likewise overactivate GS. The Autophagic defect hypothesis - Polyglucosans may be natural byproducts of normal glycogen metabolism. LD mice were reported to be autophagy-defective. LD would arise from failed autophagy leading to failed polyglucosan clearance. Finally, the p53 hypothesis - laforin and malin were reported to downregulate p53, their absence leading to increased p53, which would activate apoptosis, leading to the neurodegeneration of LD. In the present work we repeat key experiments that underlie these four hypotheses. We are unable to confirm increased pSGK1, dishevelled2, or p53 in LD mice, nor the reported autophagic defects. Our work does not support the above hypotheses in understanding this unique and severe form of epilepsy.

  12. Ground-based multiwavelength observations of comet 103P/Hartley 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gicquel, A.; Villanueva, G. L.; Cordiner, M. A.; Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B.; Remijan, A. J.; Coulson, I. M.; Chuang, Y.-L.; Kuan, Y.-J.

    2014-01-01

    The Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2 (103P) was the target of the NASA EPOXI mission. In support of this mission, we conducted observations from radio to submillimeter wavelengths of comet 103P in the three weeks preceding the spacecraft rendezvous on UT 2010 November 4.58. This time period included the passage at perihelion and the closest approach of the comet to the Earth. Here, we report detections of HCN, H 2 CO, CS, and OH and upper limits for HNC and DCN toward 103P using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12 m telescope (ARO 12 m) and submillimeter telescope (SMT), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The water production rate, Q H 2 O = (0.67-1.07) × 10 28 s –1 , was determined from the GBT OH data. From the average abundance ratios of HCN and H 2 CO relative to water (0.13 ± 0.03% and 0.14 ± 0.03%, respectively), we conclude that H 2 CO is depleted and HCN is normal with respect to typically observed cometary mixing ratios. However, the abundance ratio of HCN with water shows a large diversity with time. Using the JCMT data, we measured an upper limit for the DCN/HCN ratio <0.01. Consecutive observations of ortho-H 2 CO and para-H 2 CO on November 2 (from data obtained at the JCMT) allowed us to derive an ortho:para ratio (OPR) of ≈2.12 ± 0.59 (1σ), corresponding to T spin > 8 K (2σ).

  13. Ground-based multiwavelength observations of comet 103P/Hartley 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gicquel, A.; Villanueva, G. L.; Cordiner, M. A. [Catholic University of America, Physics Department, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC (United States); Milam, S. N.; Charnley, S. B. [Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Remijan, A. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Coulson, I. M. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 North A' ohoku Place University Park, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Chuang, Y.-L.; Kuan, Y.-J., E-mail: adeline.gicquel@nasa.gov, E-mail: stefanie.n.milam@nasa.gov, E-mail: geronimo.l.villanueva@nasa.gov, E-mail: steven.b.charnley@nasa.gov, E-mail: martin.a.cordiner@nasa.gov, E-mail: aremijan@nrao.edu, E-mail: i.coulson@jach.hawaii.edu, E-mail: ylchuang@std.ntnu.edu.tz, E-mail: kuan@ntnu.edu.tw [National Taiwan Normal University, 88 Sec. 4 Ting-Chou Road, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-10

    The Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2 (103P) was the target of the NASA EPOXI mission. In support of this mission, we conducted observations from radio to submillimeter wavelengths of comet 103P in the three weeks preceding the spacecraft rendezvous on UT 2010 November 4.58. This time period included the passage at perihelion and the closest approach of the comet to the Earth. Here, we report detections of HCN, H{sub 2}CO, CS, and OH and upper limits for HNC and DCN toward 103P using the Arizona Radio Observatory Kitt Peak 12 m telescope (ARO 12 m) and submillimeter telescope (SMT), the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The water production rate, Q{sub H{sub 2O}} = (0.67-1.07) × 10{sup 28} s{sup –1}, was determined from the GBT OH data. From the average abundance ratios of HCN and H{sub 2}CO relative to water (0.13 ± 0.03% and 0.14 ± 0.03%, respectively), we conclude that H{sub 2}CO is depleted and HCN is normal with respect to typically observed cometary mixing ratios. However, the abundance ratio of HCN with water shows a large diversity with time. Using the JCMT data, we measured an upper limit for the DCN/HCN ratio <0.01. Consecutive observations of ortho-H{sub 2}CO and para-H{sub 2}CO on November 2 (from data obtained at the JCMT) allowed us to derive an ortho:para ratio (OPR) of ≈2.12 ± 0.59 (1σ), corresponding to T {sub spin} > 8 K (2σ).

  14. PrP mRNA and protein expression in brain and PrP(c) in CSF in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease MM1 and VV2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Franc; Ansoleaga, Belén; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Zafar, Saima; Grau-Rivera, Oriol; López-González, Irene; Blanco, Rosi; Carmona, Margarita; Yagüe, Jordi; Nos, Carlos; Del Río, José Antonio; Gelpí, Ellen; Zerr, Inga; Ferrer, Isidre

    2013-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a heterogenic neurodegenerative disorder associated with abnormal post-translational processing of cellular prion protein (PrP(c)). CJD displays distinctive clinical and pathological features which correlate with the genotype at the codon 129 (methionine or valine: M or V respectively) in the prion protein gene and with size of the protease-resistant core of the abnormal prion protein PrP(sc) (type 1: 20/21 kDa and type 2: 19 kDa). MM1 and VV2 are the most common sporadic CJD (sCJD) subtypes. PrP mRNA expression levels in the frontal cortex and cerebellum are reduced in sCJD in a form subtype-dependent. Total PrP protein levels and PrP(sc) levels in the frontal cortex and cerebellum accumulate differentially in sCJD MM1 and sCJD VV2 with no relation between PrP(sc) deposition and spongiform degeneration and neuron loss, but with microgliosis, and IL6 and TNF-α response. In the CSF, reduced PrP(c), the only form present in this compartment, occurs in sCJD MM1 and VV2. PrP mRNA expression is also reduced in the frontal cortex in advanced stages of Alzheimer disease, Lewy body disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and frontotemporal lobe degeneration, but PrP(c) levels in brain varies from one disease to another. Reduced PrP(c) levels in CSF correlate with PrP mRNA expression in brain, which in turn reflects severity of degeneration in sCJD.

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Neochamaejasmin B on P-Glycoprotein in MDCK-hMDR1 Cells and Molecular Docking of NCB Binding in P-Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanying Pan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae is widely distributed in Mongolia, Tibet and the northern parts of China. Its roots are commonly used as “Langdu”, which is embodied in the Pharmacopoeia of the P.R. China (2010 as a toxic Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is claimed to have antivirus, antitumor and antibacterial properties in China and other Asian countries. Studies were carried out to characterize the inhibition of neochamaejasmin B (NCB on P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1, MDR1. Rhodamine-123 (R-123 transport and accumulation studies were performed in MDCK-hMDR1 cells. ABCB1 (MDR1 mRNA gene expression and P-gp protein expression were analyzed. Binding selectivity studies based on molecular docking were explored. R-123 transport and accumulation studies in MDCK-hMDR1 cells indicated that NCB inhibited the P-gp-mediated efflux in a concentration-dependent manner. RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated that the P-gp expression was suppressed by NCB. To investigate the inhibition type of NCB on P-gp, Ki and Ki’ values were determined by double-reciprocal plots in R-123 accumulation studies. Since Ki was greater than Ki’, the inhibition of NCB on P-gp was likely a mixed type of competitive and non-competitive inhibition. The results were confirmed by molecular docking in our current work. The docking data indicated that NCB had higher affinity to P-gp than to Lig1 ((S-5,7-dihydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenylchroman-4-one.

  16. Symmetry-Breaking Transitions in RECuAs2-xPx (RE=Sm, Gd, Ho, and Er)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozharivskyj, Yurij [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Structural changes resulting in lower symmetries can be understood in terms of electronic instabilities and Coulomb interactions. The interplay of these two interrelated factors is complicated and difficult to analyze. The RECuAs2-xP x phases, because of the variation in the chemical content (As/P substitution), allow, with the aid of band structures, Madelung energies and Landau theory, a partial unraveling of the forces important in the symmetry-breaking transitions in RECuAs2-xP x (RE = Sm, Gd, Ho and Er). Distortions of the P layers in SmCu1.15P2, GdCuP2.20 and ErCuP2 are usefully thought of as generalized Peierls distortions, i.e., they lower the electronic (and total) energy and lead to more stable structures. On the other hand, the P4/nmm → Pmmn transitions, which are observed in all studied arsenophosphide series and occur upon substitution of P for As, originate from the B1g vibrational mode and are structural adaptations to smaller P atoms. These transitions provide tighter atomic packing and better Coulomb interactions. Configurational contribution to the entropy becomes important in stabilizing the mixed occupancy in the RECuAs 2-xP x arsenophosphides. While geometric and electronic factors favor separation of the As and P atoms over two different crystallographic sites, configurational entropy stabilizes the As/P mixing on these two sites.;Progress in the research on RECuAs2-xP x was dependent upon the ability of Landau theory to predict, explain and dismiss structural models and transitions. The space group Pmmn (arising from the B 1g vibrational mode) in all mixed arsenophosphides and the existence of these mixed arsenophosphides followed from the analysis of GdCuAs 2 and GdCuP2, using Landau theory. The impossibility of obtaining the high-symmetry structure (P4/nmm) and the low symmetry structure

  17. Optical frequency measurements of 6s 2S1/2-6p 2P3/2 transition in a 133Cs atomic beam using a femtosecond laser frequency comb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerginov, V.; Tanner, C.E.; Diddams, S.; Bartels, A.; Hollberg, L.

    2004-01-01

    Optical frequencies of the hyperfine components of the D 2 line in 133 Cs are determined using high-resolution spectroscopy and a femtosecond laser frequency comb. A narrow-linewidth probe laser excites the 6s 2 S 1/2 (F=3,4)→6p 2 P 3/2 (F=2,3,4,5) transition in a highly collimated atomic beam. Fluorescence spectra are taken by scanning the laser frequency over the excited-state hyperfine structure. The laser optical frequency is referenced to a Cs fountain clock via a reference laser and a femtosecond laser frequency comb. A retroreflected laser beam is used to estimate and minimize the Doppler shift due to misalignment between the probe laser and the atomic beam. We achieve an angular resolution on the order of 5x10 -6 rad. The final uncertainties (∼±5 kHz) in the frequencies of the optical transitions are a factor of 20 better than previous results [T. Udem et al., Phys. Rev. A 62, 031801 (2000).]. We find the centroid of the 6s 2 S 1/2 →6p 2 P 3/2 transition to be f D2 =351 725 718.4744(51) MHz

  18. NLO NRQCD disfavors the interpretation of X(3872) as {chi}{sub c1}(2P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butenschoen, Mathias [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; He, Zhi-Guo; Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-03-15

    We study {chi}{sub c1}(2P) inclusive hadroproduction at next-to-leading order (NLO) within the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD), including both the color-singlet {sup 3}P{sub 1}{sup [1]} and color-octet {sup 3}S{sub 1}{sup [8]} c anti c Fock states. Assuming the recently discovered X(3872) hadron to be the 2P (1{sup ++}) charmonium state, we perform a fit to the cross sections measured by the CDF, CMS, and LHCb Collaborations. We either obtain an unacceptably high value of {chi}{sup 2} or a value of vertical stroke R{sub 2P}{sup '}(0) vertical stroke incompatible with well-established potential models. We thus conclude that NLO NRQCD is incompatible with the hypothesis X(3872){identical_to}{chi}{sub c1}(2P).

  19. Search for anomalous production of multi-lepton events in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a search for the anomalous production of events with multiple charged leptons in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 346 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The search is divided into three-lepton and four-or-more-lepton data samples. They observe six events in the three-lepton sample and zero events in the {ge}4-lepton sample. Both numbers of events are consistent with standard model background expectations. Within the framework of an R-parity violating supergravity model, the results are interpreted as mass limits on the lightest neutralino ({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) and chargino ({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) particles. For one particular choice of model parameters, the limits are M({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) > 110 GeV/c{sup 2} and M({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) > 203 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level; the variation of these mass limits with model parameters is presented.

  20. Measurement of Analyzing Powers for the Reaction \\vec{p}+CH_2 at p_p = 1.75-5.3 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Azhgirey, L S; Basilev, S N; Bushuev, Yu P; Glagolev, V V; Kirillov, D A; Korovin, P P; Manyakov, P K; Piskunov, N M; Sitnik, I M; Slepnev, V M; Muvsinsky, J; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Punjabi, V; Jones, M K; Kumbartzki, G F; Atanasov, I

    2004-01-01

    We report a new measurement of analyzing powers for the reaction \\vec{p}+CH_2\\to one charged particle+X at proton momenta of 1.75, 3.8, 4.5 and 5.3 GeV/c. These results extend the existing data basis, necessary for proton polarimetry at intermediate energy, and confirm the feasibility of a large acceptance polarimeter based on this process.

  1. Anisotropic p-f mixing mechanism explaining anomalous magnetic properties in Ce monopnictides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Kasuya, T.

    1985-01-01

    The indirect f-f-interaction derived from fourth-order perturbation theory with respect to the p-f mixing is calculated using the valence bands obtained by the APW band calculations. The type of the f-f-interactions is described as the coupling through the symmetry exchange under the cubic crystal field, which cannot be written as a simple bilinear type of 4f spin operator. It is necessary to consider the short-range-ordering effect as well as the non-linear effect of the p-f mixing to explain the fact that a type-I antiferromagnetic ordering is established by the second-order transition in CeBi. (author)

  2. Bis{2-[(diisopropylphosphanylamino]pyridine-κ2N1,P}copper(I hexafluoridophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Öztopcu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, [Cu(C11H19N2P2]PF6, is composed of discrete [Cu(PN-iPr2]+ cations [PN-iPr is 2-(diisopropylphosphanylaminopyridine] and PF6− anions. The Cu(I atom is bis-chelated by two independent PN-iPr ligands. It has a distorted tetrahedral coordination by two P atoms [Cu—P = 2.2277 (4 and 2.2257 (4 Å] and two pyridine N atoms [Cu—N = 2.0763 (11 and 2.0845 (12 Å]. Bond angles about Cu vary from 85.11 (3 (P—Cu—N to 130.37 (2° (P—Cu—P. In the crystal, N—H...F hydrogen bonds link the Cu complexes and the PF6− anions into continuous chains, which show a cross-bedded spatial arrangement. In addition, several weaker C—H...F interactions contribute to the coherence of the structure.

  3. Observation of the strongest 5s2 5p6 5d-(5s2 5p5 5d6s+5s25p6 7p) transitions in Au XI to Bi XV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churilov, S.S.; Joshi, Y.N.

    2001-01-01

    The spectra of gold till bismuth were studied in the 90-135 A region. Nine most intense lines belonging to the 5s 2 5p 6 5d-5s 2 5p 5 5d6s array were identified in Au XI to Bi XV ions. The 5s 2 5p 6 7p 2 P 3/2,1/2 levels in Au XI and the 5s 2 5p 6 7p 2 P 3/2 level in Hg XII were also identified. The observed wavelengths and intensities agree quite well with the Hartree-Fock calculations. (orig.)

  4. Lithium Superionic Conductor Li9.42Si1.02P2.1S9.96O2.04 with Li10GeP2S12-Type Structure in the Li2S–P2S5–SiO2 Pseudoternary System: Synthesis, Electrochemical Properties, and Structure–Composition Relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kota; Hirayama, Masaaki; Kato, Yuki; Kanno, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Lithium superionic conductors with the Li 10 GeP 2 S 12 (LGPS)-type structure are promising materials for use as solid electrolytes in the next-generation lithium batteries. A novel member of the LGPS family, Li 9.42 Si 1.02 P 2.1 S 9.96 O 2.04 (LSiPSO), and its solid solutions were synthesized by quenching from 1273 K in the Li 2 S–P 2 S 5 –SiO 2 pseudoternary system. The material exhibited an ionic conductivity as high as 3.2 × 10 −4 S cm −1 at 298 K, as well as the high electrochemical stability to lithium metal, which was improved by the introduction of oxygen into the LGPS-type structure. An all-solid-state cell with a lithium metal anode and LSiPSO as the separator showed excellent performance with a high reversibility of 100%. Thus, oxygen doping is an effective way of improving the electrochemical stability of LGPS-type structure.

  5. On the TAP Free Energy in the Mixed p-Spin Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Kuo; Panchenko, Dmitry

    2018-05-01

    Thouless et al. (Phys Mag 35(3):593-601, 1977), derived a representation for the free energy of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, called the TAP free energy, written as the difference of the energy and entropy on the extended configuration space of local magnetizations with an Onsager correction term. In the setting of mixed p-spin models with Ising spins, we prove that the free energy can indeed be written as the supremum of the TAP free energy over the space of local magnetizations whose Edwards-Anderson order parameter (self-overlap) is to the right of the support of the Parisi measure. Furthermore, for generic mixed p-spin models, we prove that the free energy is equal to the TAP free energy evaluated on the local magnetization of any pure state.

  6. Impact of ticagrelor on P2Y1 and P2Y12 localization and on cholesterol levels in platelet plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabani, Vahideh; Montange, Damien; Meneveau, Nicolas; Davani, Siamak

    2017-10-11

    Ticagrelor is an antiplatelet agent that inhibits platelet activation via P2Y12 antagonism. There are several studies showing that P2Y12 needs lipid rafts to be activated, but there are few data about how ticagrelor impacts lipid raft organization. Therefore, we aimed to investigate how ticagrelor could impact the distribution of cholesterol and consequently alter the organization of lipid rafts on platelet plasma membranes. We identified cholesterol-enriched raft fractions in platelet membranes by quantification of their cholesterol levels. Modifications in cholesterol and protein profiles (Flotillin 1, Flotillin 2, CD36, P2Y1, and P2Y12) were studied in platelets stimulated by ADP, treated by ticagrelor, or both. In ADP-stimulated and ticagrelor-treated groups, we found a decreased level of cholesterol in raft fractions of platelet plasma membrane compared to the control group. In addition, the peak of cholesterol in different experimental groups changed its localization on membrane fractions. In the control group, it was situated on fraction 2, while in ADP-stimulated platelets, it was located in fractions 3 to 5, and in fraction 4 in ticagrelor-treated group. The proteins studied also showed changes in their level of expression and localization in fractions of plasma membrane. Cholesterol levels of plasma membranes have a direct role in the organization of platelet membranes and could be modified by stimulation or drug treatment. Since ticagrelor and ADP both changed lipid composition and protein profile, investigating the lipid and protein composition of platelet membranes is of considerable importance as a focus for further research in anti-platelet management.

  7. P2P XQuery and the StreetTiVo application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); Y. Zhang (Ying)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn the AmbientDB project, we are building MonetDB/XQuery, an open-source XML DBMS (XDBMS) with support for distributed querying and P2P services. Our work is motivated by the hypothesis that P2P is a disruptive paradigm that should change the nature of database technology. Most of the

  8. Blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels similarly attenuates postischemic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros-Mejorado, Abraham; Gottlieb, Miroslav; Cavaliere, Fabio; Magnus, Tim; Koch-Nolte, Friederich; Scemes, Eliana; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    The role of P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels in ischemic damage remains controversial. Here, we analyzed their contribution to postanoxic depolarization after ischemia in cultured neurons and in brain slices. We observed that pharmacological blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels delayed the onset of postanoxic currents and reduced their slope, and that simultaneous inhibition did not further enhance the effects of blocking either one. These results were confirmed in acute cortical slices from P2X7 and pannexin-1 knockout mice. Oxygen-glucose deprivation in cortical organotypic cultures caused neuronal death that was reduced with P2X7 and pannexin-1 blockers as well as in organotypic cultures derived from mice lacking P2X7 and pannexin 1. Subsequently, we used transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to monitor the neuroprotective effect of those drugs in vivo. We found that P2X7 and pannexin-1 antagonists, and their ablation in knockout mice, substantially attenuated the motor symptoms and reduced the infarct volume to ~50% of that in vehicle-treated or wild-type animals. These results show that P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels are major mediators of postanoxic depolarization in neurons and of brain damage after ischemia, and that they operate in the same deleterious signaling cascade leading to neuronal and tissue demise.

  9. Unexpectedly large difference of the electron density at the nucleus in the 4p ^2{P}_{{1}/{2},{3}/{2}} fine-structure doublet of Ca^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, C.; Gebert, F.; Gorges, C.; Kaufmann, S.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Sahoo, B. K.; Surzhykov, A.; Yerokhin, V. A.; Berengut, J. C.; Wolf, F.; Heip, J. C.; Schmidt, P. O.

    2017-01-01

    We measured the isotope shift in the ^2{S}_{{1}/{2}} → ^2{P}_{{3}/{2}} (D2) transition in singly ionized calcium ions using photon recoil spectroscopy. The high accuracy of the technique enables us to compare the difference between the isotope shifts of this transition to the previously measured isotopic shifts of the ^2{S}_{{1}/{2}} → ^2{P}_{{1}/{2}} (D1) line. This so-called splitting isotope shift is extracted and exhibits a clear signature of field shift contributions. From the data, we were able to extract the small difference of the field shift coefficient and mass shifts between the two transitions with high accuracy. This J-dependence is of relativistic origin and can be used to benchmark atomic structure calculations. As a first step, we use several ab initio atomic structure calculation methods to provide more accurate values for the field shift constants and their ratio. Remarkably, the high-accuracy value for the ratio of the field shift constants extracted from the experimental data is larger than all available theoretical predictions.

  10. Time-resolved pH/pO2 mapping with luminescent hybrid sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Claudia R; Polerecky, Lubos; Klimant, Ingo

    2007-01-01

    A method for simultaneous and referenced 2D mapping of pH and pO2 is described. The experimental setup combines a fast gateable CCD camera as detector, a LED as excitation light source and a single-layer sensor membrane as optical transducer. The planar optode comprises a lipophilic fluorescein derivative (lifetime approximately 5 ns) and platinum(II) mesotetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (approximately 70 micros in the absence of a quencher) immobilized in a hydrogel matrix. Depending on the fluorescent pH indicator, a pH transition in the physiological range (pH 6-pH 8) or in the near-basic region (pH 7-pH 9) can be achieved. The measuring scheme involves the time-resolved acquisition of images in three windows during a series of square-shaped excitation pulses. A method allowing the calculation of both parameters from these three images is presented. The pH/pO2 hybrid sensor incorporating the pH indicator 2',7'-dihexyl-5(6)-N-octadecyl-carboxamidofluorescein was characterized in detail. The pH and pO2 were determined with a maximum deviation of 0.03 pH unit and 6.5 hPa pO2, respectively, within the range of pH 7.6-pH 8.7 and 0-200 hPa pO2 in test measurements. The ionic strength (IS) cross-sensitivity was found to be relatively small (pH/IS pO2/IS pO2 images obtained in natural marine sediment are presented.

  11. Polypropylene (P P) /polystyrene (P S) blends modified by radiation induced methods. I. transparency and structure morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nagger, A.M.; Ibrahim, M.S.; Said, H.M.; Zahran, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    The compatibility of polypropylene (P P)/polystyrene (P S) polymer blends modified through gamma radiation or accelerated electrons has been investigated. Two methods were suggested; either by exposing pp component or by exposing the melt extruded mixed polymers to both type of radiation. The modified blends were characterized by measuring the colour interceptions and observing the structure morphology by scanning electron microscope (SEM). A method was proposed depending on the measurement of the transparency (L * ) of the films of pure polymers and their blend before and after they had been modified by high-energy radiation. The transparency values were used to calculate quantitatively the percentage compatibility of pp/ps blends. The results showed that irradiation process through the two methods used in this work improved the compatibility of P P/P S blends. However, modification through exposing the mixed polymers is more effective than exposing pp component prior to melt extrusion mixing. The modification through irradiating mixed blends gamma radiation tends to yield improved modification than with E B radiation. On the other hand, the fracture surfaces of the blends examined by SEM gives further supports to the results of transparency measurements

  12. The simplified P3 approach on a trigonal geometry in the nodal reactor code DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerigen, S.; Fridman, E.

    2011-01-01

    DYN3D is a three-dimensional nodal diffusion code for steady-state and transient analyses of Light-Water Reactors with square and hexagonal fuel assembly geometries. Currently, several versions of the DYN3D code are available including a multi-group diffusion and a simplified P 3 (SP 3 ) neutron transport option. In this work, the multi-group SP 3 method based on trigonal-z geometry was developed. The method is applicable to the analysis of reactor cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies and allows flexible mesh refinement, which is of particular importance for WWER-type Pressurized Water Reactors as well as for innovative reactor concepts including block type High-Temperature Reactors and Sodium Fast Reactors. In this paper, the theoretical background for the trigonal SP 3 methodology is outlined and the results of a preliminary verification analysis are presented by means of a simplified WWER-440 core test example. The accordant cross sections and reference solutions were produced by the Monte Carlo code SERPENT. The DYN3D results are in good agreement with the reference solutions. The average deviation in the nodal power distribution is about 1%. (Authors)

  13. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition and characterization of ZnGe(1-x)Si(x)P2-Ge alloys on GaP substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, G. C.; Bachmann, Klaus J.; Posthill, J. B.; Timmons, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of ZnGe(1-x)Si(x)P2-Ge alloys on GaP substrates by open tube organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) is reported. The chemical composition of the alloys characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy shows that alloys with x up to 0.13 can be deposited on (001) GaP. Epitaxial growth with mirror smooth surface morphology was achieved for x less than or equal to 0.05. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs of these alloys show specular epitaxy and the absence of microstructural defects indicating a defect density of less than 10(exp 7) cm(sup -2). Selected area electron diffraction pattern of the alloy shows that the epitaxial layer crystallizes in the chalcopyrite structure with relatively weak superlattice reflections indicating certain degree of randomness in the cation sublattice. Hall measurements show that the alloys are p-type, like the unalloyed films; the carrier concentration, however, dropped about 10 times from 2 x 10(exp 18) to 2 x 10(exp 17) cm(sup -3). Absorption measurements indicate that the band tailing in the absorption spectra of the alloy was shifted about 0.04 eV towards shorter wavelength as compared to the unalloyed material. Diodes fabricated from the n(+)-GaP/p-ZnSiP2-ZnGeP2-Ge heterostructure at x = 0.05 have a reverse break-down voltage of -10.8 V and a reverse saturation current density of approximately 6 x 10(exp -8) A/sq cm.

  14. Role of Sphingosine Kinase 1 and S1P Transporter Spns2 in HGF-mediated Lamellipodia Formation in Lung Endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Panfeng; Ebenezer, David L; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; Bronova, Irina A; Shaaya, Mark; Harijith, Anantha; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2016-12-30

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling via c-Met is known to promote endothelial cell motility and angiogenesis. We have previously reported that HGF stimulates lamellipodia formation and motility of human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs) via PI3K/Akt signal transduction and reactive oxygen species generation. Here, we report a role for HGF-induced intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) generation catalyzed by sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), S1P transporter, spinster homolog 2 (Spns2), and S1P receptor, S1P 1 , in lamellipodia formation and perhaps motility of HLMVECs. HGF stimulated SphK1 phosphorylation and enhanced intracellular S1P levels in HLMVECs, which was blocked by inhibition of SphK1. HGF enhanced co-localization of SphK1/p-SphK1 with actin/cortactin in lamellipodia and down-regulation or inhibition of SphK1 attenuated HGF-induced lamellipodia formation in HLMVECs. In addition, down-regulation of Spns2 also suppressed HGF-induced lamellipodia formation, suggesting a key role for inside-out S1P signaling. The HGF-mediated phosphorylation of SphK1 and its localization in lamellipodia was dependent on c-Met and ERK1/2 signaling, but not the PI3K/Akt pathway; however, blocking PI3K/Akt signaling attenuated HGF-mediated phosphorylation of Spns2. Down-regulation of S1P 1 , but not S1P 2 or S1P 3 , with specific siRNA attenuated HGF-induced lamellipodia formation. Further, HGF enhanced association of Spns2 with S1P 1 that was blocked by inhibiting SphK1 activity with PF-543. Moreover, HGF-induced migration of HLMVECs was attenuated by down-regulation of Spns2 . Taken together, these results suggest that HGF/c-Met-mediated lamellipodia formation, and perhaps motility is dependent on intracellular generation of S1P via activation and localization of SphK1 to cell periphery and Spns2-mediated extracellular transportation of S1P and its inside-out signaling via S1P 1 . © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Energy, fine structure, and hyperfine structure of the core-excited states 1s2s2pnp 5P (n = 2-5) and 1s2p2mp 5S (m = 2-5) for Li- ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.B.; Gou, B.C.; Chen, F.

    2006-01-01

    The relativistic energies, the oscillator strength, and the lifetimes of high-lying core-excited states 1s2s2pnp 5 P (n=2-5) and 1s2p 2 mp 5 S 0 (m=2-5) of Li - ion are calculated with the saddle-point variational method and restricted variation method. The fine structure and the hyperfine structure of the core-excited states for this system are also explored. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental data in the literature. The energy obtained in this work are much lower than the others previously published whereas the wavelengths and radiative life-times are in agreement

  16. SMV1 virus-induced CRISPR spacer acquisition from the conjugative plasmid pMGB1 in Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdmann, Susanne; Shah, Shiraz Ali; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2013-01-01

    Organisms of the crenarchaeal order Sulfolobales carry complex CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) adaptive immune systems. These systems are modular and show extensive structural and functional diversity, especially in their interference complexes. The primary...... targets are an exceptional range of diverse viruses, many of which propagate stably within cells and follow lytic life cycles without producing cell lysis. These properties are consistent with the difficulty of activating CRISPR spacer uptake in the laboratory, but appear to conflict with the high...... complexity and diversity of the CRISPR immune systems that are found among the Sulfolobales. In the present article, we re-examine the first successful induction of archaeal spacer acquisition in our laboratory that occurred exclusively for the conjugative plasmid pMGB1 in Sulfolobus solfataricus P2...

  17. Aspirin Reduces Cardiac Interstitial Fibrosis by Inhibiting Erk1/2-Serpine2 and P-Akt Signalling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuelian; Wang, GuoYuan; QiLi, MuGe; Liang, HaiHai; Li, TianShi; E, XiaoQiang; Feng, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xiao; Qian, Ming; Xu, BoZhi; Shen, ZhiHang; Gitau, Samuel Chege; Zhao, DanDan; Shan, HongLi

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac interstitial fibrosis is an abnormality of various cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, hypertrophy, and atrial fibrillation, and it can ultimately lead to heart failure. However, there is a lack of practical therapeutic approaches to treat fibrosis and reverse the damage to the heart. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term aspirin administration on pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis in mice and reveal the underlying mechanisms of aspirin treatment. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC), and treated with 10 mg·kg-1·day-1 of aspirin for 4 weeks. Masson staining and a collagen content assay were used to detect the effects of aspirin on cardiac fibrosis in vivo and in vitro. Western blot and qRT-PCR were applied to examine the impact of aspirin on extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erks), p-Akt/β-catenin, SerpinE2, collagen I, and collagen III levels in the mice heart. Aspirin significantly suppressed the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA; 1.19±0.19-fold) and collagen I (0.95±0.09-fold) in TAC mice. Aspirin, at doses of 100 and 1000 µM, also significantly suppressed angiotensin II-induced α-SMA and collagen I in cultured CFs. The enhanced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 caused by TAC (p-Erk1, 1.49±0.19-fold; p-Erk2, 1.96±0.68-fold) was suppressed by aspirin (p-Erk1, 1.04±0.15-fold; p-Erk2, 0.87±0.06-fold). SerpinE2 levels were suppressed via the Erk1/2 signalling pathway following treatment with aspirin (1.36±0.12-fold for TAC; 1.06±0.07-fold for aspirin+TAC). The p-Akt and β-catenin levels were also significantly inhibited in vivo and in vitro. Our study reveals a novel mechanism by which aspirin alleviates pressure overload-induced cardiac interstitial fibrosis in TAC mice by suppressing the p-Erk1/2 and p-Akt/β-catenin signalling pathways. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Kinetics of a mixed spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 Ising ferrimagnetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa; Canko, Osman

    2009-01-01

    We present a study, within a mean-field approach, of the kinetics of a mixed ferrimagnetic model on a square lattice in which two interpenetrating square sublattices have spins that can take two values, σ=±1/2 , alternated with spins that can take the four values, S=±3/21/2 . We use the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics to describe the time evolution of the system with a crystal-field interaction in the presence of a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field. The nature (continuous and discontinuous) of transition is characterized by studying the thermal behaviors of average order parameters in a period. The dynamic phase transition points are obtained and the phase diagrams are presented in the reduced magnetic field amplitude (h) and reduced temperature (T) plane, and in the reduced temperature and interaction parameter planes, namely in the (h, T) and (d, T) planes, d is the reduced crystal-field interaction. The phase diagrams always exhibit a tricritical point in (h, T) plane, but do not exhibit in the (d, T) plane for low values of h. The dynamic multicritical point or dynamic critical end point exist in the (d, T) plane for low values of h. Moreover, phase diagrams contain paramagnetic (p), ferromagnetic (f), ferrimagnetic (i) phases, two coexistence or mixed phase regions, (f+p) and (i+p), that strongly depend on interaction parameters

  19. Kinetics of a mixed spin-1/2 and spin-3/2 Ising ferrimagnetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviren, Bayram [Institute of Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr; Canko, Osman [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    We present a study, within a mean-field approach, of the kinetics of a mixed ferrimagnetic model on a square lattice in which two interpenetrating square sublattices have spins that can take two values, {sigma}={+-}1/2 , alternated with spins that can take the four values, S={+-}3/2 ,{+-}1/2 . We use the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics to describe the time evolution of the system with a crystal-field interaction in the presence of a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field. The nature (continuous and discontinuous) of transition is characterized by studying the thermal behaviors of average order parameters in a period. The dynamic phase transition points are obtained and the phase diagrams are presented in the reduced magnetic field amplitude (h) and reduced temperature (T) plane, and in the reduced temperature and interaction parameter planes, namely in the (h, T) and (d, T) planes, d is the reduced crystal-field interaction. The phase diagrams always exhibit a tricritical point in (h, T) plane, but do not exhibit in the (d, T) plane for low values of h. The dynamic multicritical point or dynamic critical end point exist in the (d, T) plane for low values of h. Moreover, phase diagrams contain paramagnetic (p), ferromagnetic (f), ferrimagnetic (i) phases, two coexistence or mixed phase regions, (f+p) and (i+p), that strongly depend on interaction parameters.

  20. Isoelectronic comparison of the Al-like 3s23p 2P-3s3p24P transitions in the ions P III-Mo XXX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jupen, C.; Curtis, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    New observations of the 3s 2 3p 2 P-3s3p 2 4 P intercombination transitions in Al-like ions have been made for Cl V from spark spectra recorded at Lund and for Kr XXIV and Mo XXX from spectra obtained at the JET tokamak. The new results have been combined with other identifications of these transitions along the sequence and empirically systematized and compared with theoretical calculations. A set of smoothed and interpolated values for the excitation energies of the 3s3p 2 4 P levels in P III-Mo XXX is presented. (orig.)

  1. Deletion of P399E401 in NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase results in partial mixed oxidase deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mallet, Delphine; Hofer, Gaby; Samara-Boustani, Dinane; Leger, Juliane; Polak, Michel; Morel, Yves; Pandey, Amit V.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia. → We are reporting a novel 3 amino acid deletion mutation in POR P399 E 401del. → POR mutation P399 E 401del decreased P450 activities by 60-85%. → Impairment of steroid metabolism may be caused by multiple hits. → Severity of aromatase inhibition is related to degree of in utero virilization. -- Abstract: P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the electron donor for all microsomal P450s including steroidogenic enzymes CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2. We found a novel POR mutation P399 E 401del in two unrelated Turkish patients with 46,XX disorder of sexual development. Recombinant POR proteins were produced in yeast and tested for their ability to support steroid metabolizing P450 activities. In comparison to wild-type POR, the P399 E 401del protein was found to decrease catalytic efficiency of 21-hydroxylation of progesterone by 68%, 17α-hydroxylation of progesterone by 76%, 17,20-lyase action on 17OH-pregnenolone by 69%, aromatization of androstenedione by 85% and cytochrome c reduction activity by 80%. Protein structure analysis of the three amino acid deletion P399 E 401 revealed reduced stability and flexibility of the mutant. In conclusion, P399 E 401del is a novel mutation in POR that provides valuable genotype-phenotype and structure-function correlation for mutations in a different region of POR compared to previous studies. Characterization of P399 E 401del provides further insight into specificity of different P450s for interaction with POR as well as nature of metabolic disruptions caused by more pronounced effect on specific P450s like CYP17A1 and aromatase.

  2. HIF transport issues for P>10-3 Torr and Z>1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Final transport schemes for HIF are examined, with emphasis on transport for p>10 -3 Torr and Z>1 since this should simplify the reactor design and reduce the length of the accelerator. Specifically the question of charge neutralization is addressed. We find (1) the fractional neutralization f needed scales as f/sub i/ = (1-Z -2 ) which means f/sub i/>0.89 is needed for Z>3; (2) axially-trapped electrons limit the net beam potential to ephi/sub min/ = α(1/2 m/sub e/v/sub i/ 2 ) with 1≤αapprox. <4; (3) radially-expelled plasma ions increase f/sub i/ especially near the pellet; (4) radially-oscillating plasma electrons have and adiabatic limit of f/sub i/≅0.5; and (5) as f/sub i/ approaches unity, plasma particle trajectories may involve drift motions along and radially away from the ion beam. Also, criteria are given for the maximum Z/A allowed for transporting very large currents. For the HIF parameters used, it appears that neutralization will probably be adequte for Zapprox. <3

  3. Hurricane Arthur and its effect on the short term variation of pCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Jonathan; Thomas, Helmuth; Craig, Susanne; Greenan, Blair; Fennel, Katja

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal changes in carbon cycling over the years have become better understood on the Scotian Shelf, however little is resolved in short term variation. Hourly measurements were collected from an autonomous moored instrument (CARIOCA) stationed at Halifax Line 2 (HL2), roughly 30km off the coast of Halifax for the 2014 year. Data from the 2007 deployment of the SeaHorse vertical sampling mooring at HL2 was also collected. Focusing on the storm event, Hurricane Arthur, July 5th 2014 reveals a significant drop in pCO2. With the shelf having carbon rich deep water, a reduction of pCO2 due to mixing went against current understanding. It was revealed that slightly above the mixed layer there is a sustained population of phytoplankton. When wind mixing from storms occurs, this population moves to the surface allowing greater light and nutrients for short term growth. This growth then reduces pCO2 for a short period of time until wind speeds slow down reducing mixing of the water column.

  4. The reaction of TcCl3(Me2PhP)3 with dithio ligands. Synthesis, characterization and X-ray crystal structures of [TcCl2(Me2PhP)2(Me2dtp)]and [Tc(Me2PhP)(Etxan)3](Me2PhP=dimethylphenylphosphine, Me2dtp-=O,O'-dimethyldithiophosphate, Etxan-=ethylxanthate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B.; Schmidt, K.; Hiller, W.; Abram, U.; Huebener, R.

    1993-01-01

    Trichlorotris (dimethylphenylphosphine)technetium(III); [TcCl 3 (Me 2 PhP) 3 ], reacts with dithio ligands to form chelate complexes of different compositions and coordinations geometries. The reaction with ethylxanthate (Etxan - ) yields the diamagnetic seven-coordinate [Tc(Me 2 PhP)(Etxan) 3 ], which crystallizes monoclinic in the space group P2 2 /c with Z = 4 (a = 18.44(5), b = 9.2(1), c = 15.36(6) A, β = 104.3(2) ). The final R value is 0.029. The metal has a pentagonal-bipyramidal environment. With ammonium dimethyldithiophosphate, (NH 4 )Me 2 dtp, [TcCl 3 (Me 2 PhP) 3 ] forms the paramagnetic [TcCl 2 (Me 2 PhP) 2 (Me 2 dtp) in which the technetium atom has a distorted octahedral coordination sphere. The compound crystallizes orthorhombic, space group Pbcn, with Z = 4 (a = 16.20(1), b = 10.445(1), c 14.878(1)). The final R value is 0.031. The chloro ligands are in trans arrangement. (orig.)

  5. Effective nucleon-nucleon t matrix in the (p,2p) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Y.; Kanayama, N.; Wakasugi, T.

    1989-01-01

    The cross sections and the analyzing powers for the /sup 40/Ca(p-arrow-right,2p) reactions at E/sub p/ = 76.1, 101.3, and 200 MeV are calculated in the distorted-wave impulse approximation using the Love-Franey effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. It is shown that the calculated individual contributions of the central, spin-orbit, and tensor parts in the Love-Franey interaction to the cross sections and the analyzing powers strongly depend on the incident proton energies. The spectroscopic factors extracted are consistent with the other reaction studies

  6. Measurement and analysis of P2P IPTV program resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenxian; Chen, Xingshu; Wang, Haizhou; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of P2P technology, P2P IPTV applications have received more and more attention. And program resource distribution is very important to P2P IPTV applications. In order to collect IPTV program resources, a distributed multi-protocol crawler is proposed. And the crawler has collected more than 13 million pieces of information of IPTV programs from 2009 to 2012. In addition, the distribution of IPTV programs is independent and incompact, resulting in chaos of program names, which obstructs searching and organizing programs. Thus, we focus on characteristic analysis of program resources, including the distributions of length of program names, the entropy of the character types, and hierarchy depth of programs. These analyses reveal the disorderly naming conventions of P2P IPTV programs. The analysis results can help to purify and extract useful information from chaotic names for better retrieval and accelerate automatic sorting of program and establishment of IPTV repository. In order to represent popularity of programs and to predict user behavior and popularity of hot programs over a period, we also put forward an analytical model of hot programs.

  7. Measurement and Analysis of P2P IPTV Program Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxian Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of P2P technology, P2P IPTV applications have received more and more attention. And program resource distribution is very important to P2P IPTV applications. In order to collect IPTV program resources, a distributed multi-protocol crawler is proposed. And the crawler has collected more than 13 million pieces of information of IPTV programs from 2009 to 2012. In addition, the distribution of IPTV programs is independent and incompact, resulting in chaos of program names, which obstructs searching and organizing programs. Thus, we focus on characteristic analysis of program resources, including the distributions of length of program names, the entropy of the character types, and hierarchy depth of programs. These analyses reveal the disorderly naming conventions of P2P IPTV programs. The analysis results can help to purify and extract useful information from chaotic names for better retrieval and accelerate automatic sorting of program and establishment of IPTV repository. In order to represent popularity of programs and to predict user behavior and po