WorldWideScience

Sample records for mixed neutron-gamma fluence

  1. Feasibility study on using imaging plates to estimate thermal neutron fluence in neutron-gamma mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibuchi, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Sakae, T.; Terunuma, T.; Isobe, T.; Kawamura, H.; Yasuoka, K.; Matsumoto, T.; Harano, H.; Nishiyama, J.; Masuda, A.; Nohtomi, A.

    2011-01-01

    In current radiotherapy, neutrons are produced in a photonuclear reaction when incident photon energy is higher than the threshold. In the present study, a method of discriminating the neutron component was investigated using an imaging plate (IP) in the neutron-gamma-ray mixed field. Two types of IP were used: a conventional IP for beta- and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons. IPs were irradiated in the mixed field, and the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) intensity of the thermal neutron component was discriminated using an expression proposed herein. The PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was proportional to thermal neutron fluence. When additional irradiation of photons was added to constant neutron irradiation, the PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was not affected. The uncertainty of PSL intensities was approximately 11.4 %. This method provides a simple and effective means of discriminating the neutron component in a mixed field. (authors)

  2. Hematologic status of mice submitted to sublethal total body irradiation with mixed neutron-gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herodin, F.; Court, L.

    1989-01-01

    The hematologic status of mice exposed to sublethal whole body irradiation with mixed neutron-gamma radiation (mainly neutrons) is studied. A slight decrease of the blood cell count is still observed below 1 Gy. The recovery of bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors seems to require more time than after pure gamma irradiation [fr

  3. Dosimetry of the Embalse nuclear power plant neutron/gamma mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the method used at the Embalse nuclear power plant for carrying out personal dosimetry of the agents affected to the tasks on the Embalse nuclear power plant neutron-gamma mixed fields. (Author) [es

  4. Simulation of the spherical experimental assemblies for the mixed neutron-gamma reference fields implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluson, J.; Jansky, B.

    2009-01-01

    Reference mixed neutron-gamma fields are used for test and calibration of dosimetric and spectrometric systems, intercomparison measurements, and benchmark tests and represent experimental base for reactor studies. Set of the spherical experimental assemblies for the mixed neutron-gamma reference fields implementation was build in the NRI Rez. Extended sets of measurements and simulation calculations were done to describe the reference mixed field dosimetry and spectral characteristics with best achievable precision. The Monte Carlo technique was used for different experimental setups models description, comparison and verification and field characteristics simulation. Effects (hardly distinguishable experimentally) were also studied ( contributions from individual parts of experimental setup, field individual components and next effects as shadow shield cones transparency, etc.). Some results and main conclusions of these studies and calculations are presented and discussed. (authors)

  5. Simulation of the spherical experimental assemblies for the mixed neutron-gamma reference fields implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluson, J.; Jansky, B.

    2008-01-01

    Reference mixed neutron-gamma fields are used for test and calibration of dosimetric and spectrometric systems, intercomparison measurements, and benchmark tests and represent experimental base for reactor studies. Set of the spherical experimental assemblies for the mixed neutron-gamma reference fields implementation was build in the NRI Rez. Extended sets of measurements and simulation calculations were done to describe the reference mixed field dosimetry and spectral characteristics with best achievable precision. The Monte Carlo technique was used for different experimental setups models description, comparison and verification and field characteristics simulation. Effects (hardly distinguishable experimentally) were also studied ( contributions from individual parts of experimental setup, field individual components and next effects as shadow shield cones transparency, etc.). Some results and main conclusions of these studies and calculations are presented and discussed. (authors)

  6. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  7. Analysis of unstable chromosome alterations frequency induced by neutron-gamma mixed field radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Vale, Carlos H.F.P.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)], e-mail: psouza@cnen.gov.br, e-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.br; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    Nowadays monitoring chromosome alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been used to access the radiation absorbed dose in individuals exposed accidental or occupationally to gamma radiation. However there are not many studies based on the effects of mixed field neutron-gamma. The radiobiology of neutrons has great importance because in nuclear factories worldwide there are several hundred thousand individuals monitored as potentially receiving doses of neutron. In this paper it was observed the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma-neutron mixed field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphases were analyzed for the presence of chromosome alterations by two experienced scorers. The results suggest that there is the possibility of a directly proportional relationship between absorbed dose of neutron-gamma mixed field radiation and the frequency of unstable chromosome alterations analyzed in this paper. (author)

  8. Optimization of electret ionization chambers for dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Pretzsch, G.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of combination dosemeters consisting of two air-filled electret ionization chambers in mixed neutron-gamma fields have been investigated. The first chamber, polyethylene-walled, is sensitive to neutrons and gamma rays, the second, having walls of teflon, is sensitive to gamma rays only. The properties of the dosemeters are determined by the resulting errors and the measuring range. As both properties depend on the dimensions of the electret ionization chambers they have been taken into account in optimizing the dimensions. The results show that with the use of the dosemeters the effective dose equivalent in mixed neutron-gamma fields can be determined nearly independently of the spectra. The lower detection limit is less than 1 mSv and the maximum uncertainty of dose measurements about 12%. (author)

  9. Unilateral irradiation of pigs in a mixed neutrons+gamma field. Early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, Guy; Maas, Jean.

    1982-08-01

    Pigs (16-20kg) were irradiated with 60 Co gamma or in a mixed field (neutron + gamma from the pulsed reactor SILENE). Pigs were unilaterally exposed by the left side. Each experimental group was composed of twelve animals and one control. Within the dose range explored (reference dose is mid-line tissue dose): 4-9.8 Gy of gamma rays only; 4.6 - 5.7 Gy of neutrons and gamma rays, pigs presented the haematopioetic form of the acute radiation sickness. At 5 Gy mixed field was more harmful than gamma rays only. Therefore the numerical value of neutron RBE (lethality 50 p cent within 30 days) is more than one. Experiments will be carried out in order to determine RBE values more accurately. Bone marrow dose will also be determined [fr

  10. Investigation of dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy using N isopropylacrylamide gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavarmegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser [Dept. of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeali, Azim [Medical Education Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Gel dosimeters have unique advantages in comparison with other dosimeters. Until now, these gels have been used in different radiotherapy techniques as a reliable dosimetric tool. Because dose distribution measurement is an important factor for appropriate treatment planning in different radiotherapy techniques, in this study, we evaluated the ability of the N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel to record the dose distribution resulting from the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this regard, a head phantom containing NIPAM gel was irradiated using the Tehran Research Reactor BNCT beam line, and then by a magnetic resonance scanner. Eventually, the R2 maps were obtained in different slices of the phantom by analyzing T2-weighted images. The results show that NIPAM gel has a suitable potential for recording three-dimensional dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry.

  11. Quinolone and glycopeptide therapy for infection in mouse following exposure to mixed-field neutron-[gamma]-photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, I. (Naval Medical Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States) Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)); Tom, S.P.; Ledney, G.D. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1993-12-01

    The effects of increased doses of mixed-field neutron-[gamma]-photon irradiation on bacterial translocation and subsequent sepsis, and the influence of antimicrobial therapy on these events, were studied in the C3H/HeN mouse. The results demonstrate a relationship between the doses of mixed-field radiation and the rates of infection due to Enterobacteriaceae. While L-ofloxacin therapy reduces the infection rate, prolongs survival and prevents mortality, the addition of a glycopeptide can enhance systemic infection by resistant bacteria in the irradiated host. (author).

  12. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2011-01-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to 137 Cs gamma rays at 137 Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after 137 Cs and 241 AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  13. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernanmbuco (CCB/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Genetica

    2011-07-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to {sup 137}Cs gamma rays at {sup 137}Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields and dosimetry devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoqing

    2011-12-22

    Monte Carlo methods based on random sampling are widely used in different fields for the capability of solving problems with a large number of coupled degrees of freedom. In this work, Monte Carlos methods are successfully applied for the simulation of the mixed neutron-gamma field in an interim storage facility and neutron dosimeters of different types. Details are discussed in two parts: In the first part, the method of simulating an interim storage facility loaded with CASTORs is presented. The size of a CASTOR is rather large (several meters) and the CASTOR wall is very thick (tens of centimeters). Obtaining the results of dose rates outside a CASTOR with reasonable errors costs usually hours or even days. For the simulation of a large amount of CASTORs in an interim storage facility, it needs weeks or even months to finish a calculation. Variance reduction techniques were used to reduce the calculation time and to achieve reasonable relative errors. Source clones were applied to avoid unnecessary repeated calculations. In addition, the simulations were performed on a cluster system. With the calculation techniques discussed above, the efficiencies of calculations can be improved evidently. In the second part, the methods of simulating the response of neutron dosimeters are presented. An Alnor albedo dosimeter was modelled in MCNP, and it has been simulated in the facility to calculate the calibration factor to get the evaluated response to a Cf-252 source. The angular response of Makrofol detectors to fast neutrons has also been investigated. As a kind of SSNTD, Makrofol can detect fast neutrons by recording the neutron induced heavy charged recoils. To obtain the information of charged recoils, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes were used for transporting incident neutrons. The response of Makrofol to fast neutrons is dependent on several factors. Based on the parameters which affect the track revealing, the formation of visible tracks was determined. For

  16. The recovery of bone marrow derived GM-CFU in baboons unilaterally exposed to a total body LD50/30d mixed neutron-gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herodin, F.; Orfeuvre, H.; Janodet, D.; Mestries, J.C.; Fatome, M.

    1990-01-01

    The unilateral exposure of baboons to a total body LD 50/30d mixed neutron/gamma irradiation was characterized to be non uniform in dose distribution. The pattern of recovery of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors in bone marrow samples collected from entrance and exit sides respectively is consistent with this observed heterogeneity [fr

  17. Recoil mixing in high-fluence ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littmark, U.; Hofer, W.O.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of recoil mixing on the collection and depth distribution of implanted projectiles during high-fluence irradiation of a random solid is investigated by model calculations based on a previously published transport theoretical approach to the general problem of recoil mixing. The most pronounced effects are observed in the maximum implantable amount of projectiles and in the critical fluence for saturation. Both values are significantly increased by recoil mixing. (Auth.)

  18. Campbell's MSV method the neutron-gamma discrimination in mixed field of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovic, S. J.; Loncar, B.; Avramovic, I.; Osmokrovic, P.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper it is carried out the analysis some capabilities of Campbell's MSV (Mean Square Value) measuring chain on base the principles derived by Campbell's theorem. Nevertheless, measurements have performed with digitized MSV method and results have compared related to they attained with classic measuring chain, when the mean value of signal from detector output has measured. In our case, detector element was uncompensated ionization chamber for mixed n-gamma fields. Thermal neutron flux, absorbed dose rate, equivalent dose rate and exposure rate in surrounding the reactor vessel of system HERBE, at nuclear reactor RB in 'VINCA' Institute, are determined. The examination of discrimination for gamma relate to neutron component in signal of detector output is performed whereby experimental work and the calculation according to linear theoretical model. The dependencies of changes for variance and mean value output detector signal versus four-decade change of fission reactor power, in range from 10 mW to 22W, are obtained. The advantage of MSV method is confirmed and concluded that the order n-gamma discrimination in MSV signal processing is around fifty times larger than classical measuring method. (author)

  19. The anti emetic effect of oral administration of ondansetron or granisetron in macacus cynomolgus exposed to mixed neutron-gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Roman, V.; Martin, S.; Janodet, D.; Fatome, M.

    1995-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the most often observed symptoms in the course of the early radiation syndrome. Their prevention has long been difficult because of the low effectiveness and side-effects of most antiemetics. There is a clear evidence that 5HT 3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron and granisetron are highly effective to prevent radiation-induced emesis without any side-effect. We studied the prophylactic effectiveness of their oral administration to macacus cynomolgus, for mixed neutron-gamma whole-body exposure, tat high dose rates. Doses of 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron were administered before, or after, or both before and after irradiation. The treatment was effective when administered both before and after radiation exposure. It was significant but incomplete if administered once. Post-irradiation administration is interesting, particularly in case of accident. Both antiemetic drugs were well tolerated. Their effectiveness and tolerance are apparently comparable. The 5HT 3 receptor antagonists represent a much improved treatment for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting by completely inhibiting emesis, if administered before and after irradiation. Unwanted sedation and extra-pyramidal side-effects, usually associated with the clinical use of D 2 receptor antagonists, were not observed. (authors). 40 refs., 5 tabs

  20. A simple neutron-gamma discriminating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhongming; Xing Shilin; Wang Zhongmin

    1986-01-01

    A simple neutron-gamma discriminating system is described. A detector and a pulse shape discriminator are suitable for the neutron-gamma discriminating system. The influence of the constant fraction discriminator threshold energy on the neutron-gamma resolution properties is shown. The neutron-gamma timing distributions from an 241 Am-Be source, 2.5 MeV neutron beam and 14 MeV neutron beam are presented

  1. The anti emetic effect of oral administration of ondansetron or granisetron in macacus cynomolgus exposed to mixed neutron-gamma irradiation; Effet antiemetique de l`ondansetron ou du granisetron administres oralement chez le macaque soumis a une irradiation mixte neutron-gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.; Roman, V.; Martin, S.; Janodet, D.; Fatome, M. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, 38 - La Tronche (France)

    1995-10-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the most often observed symptoms in the course of the early radiation syndrome. Their prevention has long been difficult because of the low effectiveness and side-effects of most antiemetics. There is a clear evidence that 5HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists such as ondansetron and granisetron are highly effective to prevent radiation-induced emesis without any side-effect. We studied the prophylactic effectiveness of their oral administration to macacus cynomolgus, for mixed neutron-gamma whole-body exposure, tat high dose rates. Doses of 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron were administered before, or after, or both before and after irradiation. The treatment was effective when administered both before and after radiation exposure. It was significant but incomplete if administered once. Post-irradiation administration is interesting, particularly in case of accident. Both antiemetic drugs were well tolerated. Their effectiveness and tolerance are apparently comparable. The 5HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists represent a much improved treatment for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting by completely inhibiting emesis, if administered before and after irradiation. Unwanted sedation and extra-pyramidal side-effects, usually associated with the clinical use of D{sub 2} receptor antagonists, were not observed. (authors). 40 refs., 5 tabs.

  2. Dose-dependent analysis of acute medical effects of mixed neutron-gamma radiation from selected severe 235U or 239Pu criticality accidents in USSR, United States, and Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabanova, Tatyana; Wiley, Albert L; Bushmanov, Andrey

    2012-04-01

    Eight of the most severe cases of acute radiation disease (ARS) known to have occurred in humans (as the result of criticality accidents) had survival times less than 120 h (herein defined as "early death"). These accidents were analyzed and are discussed with respect to the specific accident scenarios and the resulting accident-specific, mixed neutron-gamma radiation clinical dose distributions. This analysis concludes that the cardiovascular system appears to be the most critical organ system failure for causing "early death" following approximate total body, mixed gamma-neutron radiation doses greater than 40-50 Gy. The clinical data also suggest that there was definite chest dose dependence in the resulting survival times for these eight workers, who unfortunately suffered profound radiation injury and unusual clinical effects from such high dose radiation exposures. In addition, "toxemic syndrome" is correlated with the irradiation of large volumes of soft tissues. Doses to the hands or legs greater than 80-100 Gy or radiation lung injury also play significant but secondary roles in causing "early death" in accidents delivering chest doses greater than 50 Gy.

  3. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Schütz, C.

    2010-01-01

    and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using......To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative......-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation...

  4. Plasma driven neutron/gamma generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Antolak, Arlyn

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for the generation of neutron/gamma rays is described including a chamber which defines an ion source, said apparatus including an RF antenna positioned outside of or within the chamber. Positioned within the chamber is a target material. One or more sets of confining magnets are also provided to create a cross B magnetic field directly above the target. To generate neutrons/gamma rays, the appropriate source gas is first introduced into the chamber, the RF antenna energized and a plasma formed. A series of high voltage pulses are then applied to the target. A plasma sheath, which serves as an accelerating gap, is formed upon application of the high voltage pulse to the target. Depending upon the selected combination of source gas and target material, either neutrons or gamma rays are generated, which may be used for cargo inspection, and the like.

  5. Atomic mixing effects on high fluence Ge implantation into Si at 40 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras-Marti, A.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.; Peon-Fernandez, J.; Rodriguez-Vidal, M.; Tognetti, N.P.; Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Armour, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Ion implanted profiles of 40 keV Ge + into Si at fluences ranging from approx. equal to 10 15 ions/cm 2 up to saturation have been measured using the RBS technique. The profiles compare well with the predictions of an analytical model encompasing sputter erosion plus atomic relocation. (orig.)

  6. Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on the electrical characteristics of thyristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, A. J.; Schwarze, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons, gamma rays, and temperature on the electrical and switching characteristics of phase-control and inverter-type SCR's are presented. The special test fixture built for mounting, heating, and instrumenting the test devices is described. Four SCR's were neutron irradiated at 300 K and four at 365 K for fluences up to 3.2 x 10 exp 13 pn/sq. cm, and eight were gamma irradiated at 300 K only for gamma doses up to 5.1 Mrads. The electrical measurements were made during irradiation and the switching measurements were made only before and after irradiation. Radiation induced crystal defects, resulting primarily from fast neutrons, caused the reduction of minority carrier lifetime through the generation of R-G centers. The reduction in lifetime caused increases in the on-state voltage drop and in the reverse and forward leakage currents, and decreases in the turn-off time.

  7. Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on the electrical characteristics of thyristors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarze, G.E.; Frasca, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, experimental data showing the effects of neutrons, gamma rays, and temperature on the electrical and switching characteristics of phase-control and inverter-type SCRs are presented. The special test fixture built for mounting, heating, and instrumenting the test devices is described. Four SCRs were neutron irradiated at 300 K and four at 365 K for fluences up to 3.2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 , and eight were gamma irradiated at 300 K only for gamma doses up to 5.1 Mrads. The electrical measurements were made during irradiation and the switching measurements were made only before and after irradiation. Radiation induced crystal defects, resulting primarily from fast neutrons, caused the reduction of minority carrier lifetime through the generation of R-G centers. The reduction in lifetime caused increases in the on-state voltage drop and in the reverse and forward leakage currents, and decreases in the turn-off time

  8. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  9. Simulated and measured neutron/gamma light output distribution for poly-energetic neutron/gamma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. A.; Zangian, M.; Aghabozorgi, S.

    2018-03-01

    In the present paper, the light output distribution due to poly-energetic neutron/gamma (neutron or gamma) source was calculated using the developed MCNPX-ESUT-PE (MCNPX-Energy engineering of Sharif University of Technology-Poly Energetic version) computational code. The simulation of light output distribution includes the modeling of the particle transport, the calculation of scintillation photons induced by charged particles, simulation of the scintillation photon transport and considering the light resolution obtained from the experiment. The developed computational code is able to simulate the light output distribution due to any neutron/gamma source. In the experimental step of the present study, the neutron-gamma discrimination based on the light output distribution was performed using the zero crossing method. As a case study, 241Am-9Be source was considered and the simulated and measured neutron/gamma light output distributions were compared. There is an acceptable agreement between the discriminated neutron/gamma light output distributions obtained from the simulation and experiment.

  10. Neutron-Gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination With Ne-213 Liquid Scintillator By Using Digital Signal Processing Combined With Similarity Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardiyanto

    2008-01-01

    Neutron-Gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination with a NE-213 Liquid Scintillator by Using Digital Signal Processing Combined with Similarity Method. Measurement of mixed neutron-gamma radiation is difficult because a nuclear detector is usually sensitive to both radiations. A new attempt of neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination for a NE-213 liquid scintillator is presented by using digital signal processing combined with an off-line similarity method. The output pulse shapes are digitized with a high speed digital oscilloscope. The n-γ discrimination is done by calculating the index of each pulse shape, which is determined by the similarity method, and then fusing it with its corresponding pulse height. Preliminary results demonstrate good separation of neutron and gamma-ray signals from a NE-213 scintillator with a simple digital system. The results were better than those with a conventional rise time method. Figure of Merit is used to determine the quality of discrimination. The figure of merit of the discrimination using digital signal processing combined with off-line similarity method are 1.9; 1.7; 1.1; 1.1; and 0.8; on the other hand by using conventional method the rise time are 0.9; 0.9; 0.9; 0.7; and 0.4 for the equivalent electron energy of 800; 278; 139; 69; and 30 keV. (author)

  11. Radiation hygiene aspects of mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, O.; Hrabovcova, A.

    1982-01-01

    Various possibilities are analyzed of determining the dose equivalent of neutrons, as is the reliability of the techniques and the correct interpretation for the purposes of radiation hygiene. (author)

  12. New detectors of neutron, gamma- and X-radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Lobanov, N S

    2002-01-01

    Paper presents new detectors to record absorbed doses of neutron, gamma- and X-ray radiations within 0-1500 Mrad range. DBF dosimeter is based on dibutyl phthalate. EDS dosimeter is based on epoxy (epoxide) resin, while SD 5-40 detector is based on a mixture of dibutyl phthalate and epoxy resin. Paper describes experimental techniques to calibrate and interprets the measurement results of absorbed doses for all detectors. All three detectors cover 0-30000 Mrad measured does range. The accuracy of measurements is +- 10% independent (practically) of irradiation dose rates within 20-2000 rad/s limits under 20-80 deg C temperature

  13. Preliminary results of a neutron-gamma coincidence experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercey, R.B.; Dunnam, F.E.; Muga, M.L.; Rester, A.C.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hamilton, J.H.; Eberth, J.; Zganjar, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    The recently completed neutron multiplicity detector dubbed PANDA (Pentagonal Annular Neutron Detector Array) is fully described later in this report. The new detector was recently used for the first time on-line at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility to measure neutron-gamma coincidence in the 24 Mg( 58 Ni,xαypzn) reaction. The detector configuration for the experiment is shown. The PANDA was situated in the forward direction, coaxial to the beam line with five gamma-ray detectors placed at +/- 90 0 , +/- 135 0 , and 0 0 . 2 figures

  14. An assessment of the feasibility of using Monte Carlo calculations to model a combined neutron/gamma electronic personal dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Witts, D.; Tanner, R.J.; Bartlett, D.T.; Burgess, P.H.; Edwards, A.A.; More, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    A Monte Carlo facility has been developed for modelling the response of semiconductor devices to mixed neutron-photon fields. This utilises the code MCNP for neutron and photon transport and a new code, STRUGGLE, which has been developed to model the secondary charged particle transport. It is thus possible to predict the pulse height distribution expected from prototype electronic personal detectors, given the detector efficiency factor. Initial calculations have been performed on a simple passivated implanted planar silicon detector. This device has also been irradiated in neutron, gamma and X ray fields to verify the accuracy of the predictions. Good agreement was found between experiment and calculation. (author)

  15. Physical principles of neutron-gamma materials monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarskii, G. Sh.

    1986-03-01

    The physical principles of secondary radiation methods in nondestructive testing are discussed. Among the techniques considered are: neutron activation analysis (NAA); the induced-radiation method; and quasialbedo recording of secondary gamma-radiation. Emphasis is given to the neutron-gamma method which consists of exposing test material to a neutron flux and recording the secondary gamma-radiation by means of a spectrometer. The limitations of the method in detecting local inhomogeneous defects (filled pores cracks, and inclusions) in metal layers and multicomponents materials are described, and some advantages of the method over NAA are discussed. Formulas are derived for estimating the optimum density of the gamma-ray flux which is received by the detector.

  16. Neutron-gamma discrimination of boron loaded plastic scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dong; He Bin; Zhang Quanhu; Wu Chuangxin; Luo Zhonghui

    2010-01-01

    Boron loaded plastic scintillator could detect both fast neutrons thanks to hydrogen and thermal neutrons thanks to 10B. Both reactions have large cross sections, and results in high detection efficiency of incident neutrons. However, similar with other organic scintillators, boron loaded plastic scintillator is sensitive to gamma rays and neutrons. So gamma rays must be rejected from neutrons using their different behavior in the scintillator. In the present research zero crossing method was used to test neutron-gamma discrimination of BC454 boron loaded plastic scintillator. There are three Gaussian peaks in the time spectrum, they are corresponding to gamma rays, fast neutrons and flow neutrons respectively. Conclusion could be made that BC454 could clear discriminate slow neutrons and gamma, but the discrimination performance turns poor as the neutrons' energy becomes larger. (authors)

  17. Bulk moisture determination in building materials by fast neutron/gamma technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padron Diaz, I.; Felipe Desdin, L.; Martin Hernandez, G.; Shtejer, K.; Perez Tamayo, N.; Ceballos, C.; Lemus, O.

    1998-01-01

    Fast Neutron/Gamma Transmission technique has been improved to allow to measure moisture content in building materials. In order to improve fast neutron/gamma discrimination in the transmission system employing the NE-213 scintillation detector a pulse shape discrimination system was constructed at the CEADEN. A separate neutron/gamma detection approach was used with neutron transmission measurement using an Am-Be neutron source and a BF 3 detector and gamma transmission measurement using a collimated 137 Cs source and a NaI scintillator

  18. A real-time neutron-gamma discriminator based on the support vector machine method for the time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, ZHANG; Tongyu, WU; Bowen, ZHENG; Shiping, LI; Yipo, ZHANG; Zejie, YIN

    2018-04-01

    A new neutron-gamma discriminator based on the support vector machine (SVM) method is proposed to improve the performance of the time-of-flight neutron spectrometer. The neutron detector is an EJ-299-33 plastic scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) property. The SVM algorithm is implemented in field programmable gate array (FPGA) to carry out the real-time sifting of neutrons in neutron-gamma mixed radiation fields. This study compares the ability of the pulse gradient analysis method and the SVM method. The results show that this SVM discriminator can provide a better discrimination accuracy of 99.1%. The accuracy and performance of the SVM discriminator based on FPGA have been evaluated in the experiments. It can get a figure of merit of 1.30.

  19. Integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitors for nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehlau, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation monitoring is one nuclear-safeguards measure used to protect against the theft of special nuclear materials (SNM) by pedestrians departing from SNM access areas. The integrated neutron/gamma-ray portal monitor is an ideal radiation monitor for the task when the SNM is plutonium. It achieves high sensitivity for detecting both bare and shielded plutonium by combining two types of radiation detector. One type is a neutron-chamber detector, comprising a large, hollow, neutron moderator that contains a single thermal-neutron proportional counter. The entrance wall of each chamber is thin to admit slow neutrons from plutonium contained in a moderating shield, while the other walls are thick to moderate fast neutrons from bare or lead-shielded plutonium so that they can be detected. The other type of detector is a plastic scintillator that is primarily for detecting gamma rays from small amounts of unshielded plutonium. The two types of detector are easily integrated by making scintillators part of the thick back wall of each neutron chamber or by inserting them into each chamber void. The authors compared the influence of the two methods of integration on detecting neutrons and gamma rays, and they examined the effectiveness of other design factors and the methods for signal detection as well

  20. Phototransistor response under a neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Luiz A.P.; Barros, Fabio R.; Ursulino, Luciano C.; Silva Junior, Eronides F.; Antonio Filho, Joao

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to show some effects on a bipolar phototransistor after it has been under a neutron fluence. Unlike a transistor, a phototransistor is designed so that the collector has a large area and consequently it has a higher radiation detection probability. Then, it is possible to have a certain number of interactions so that any changes in the internal structure of the phototransistor can be observed after a neutron irradiation. If a phototransistor is under a certain spectra of neutron fluence the interaction depends on the cross section of the either silicon chip or its encapsulation, and recoil protons could be the charged particle responsible for changes in the semiconductor structure. Furthermore, neutron irradiation could give to the device a state of vanishing in its electrical characteristic which can be performed tracing the current versus voltage curve (I x V). The experimental arrangement basically consists of a photonic device, a neutron-gamma radiation source and a Flip-Flop electrometer second generation (EFF-2G). One of the main parameters of evaluation was the phototransistor dark current. In fact, the first results demonstrate that when the phototransistor is neutron irradiated there is a significant variation in its I x V characteristic curve. (author)

  1. Application of the decoupling scheme on complex neutron-gamma shielding problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feher, S. [Institute of Nuclear Technology, Technical University of Budapest, Budapest (Hungary); Leege, P.F.A. de; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Kloosterman, J.L. [Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2000-03-01

    Coupled neutron-gamma shielding calculations using S{sub n} transport theory can be time consuming, especially for two- and three-dimensional geometries. In general, the CPU time of these calculations increases stronger than linear with increasing number of neutron and gamma energy groups, and depends on the order of Legendre expansion and number of S{sub n} directions used. This fact induced the idea of the decoupling method, which seems applicable to accelerate coupled neutron-gamma shielding calculations. The data included in a combined neutron-gamma library can be readily separated into a library containing neutron data only and another library containing gamma data only. Separate calculations for neutrons and gammas are performed on complex geometries using a different Legendre order expansion for neutrons and gammas. CPU savings of 60 to 85% can be achieved for the two-dimensional DORT and three-dimensional TORT calculations respectively. (author)

  2. Optimized Design of Spacing in Pulsed Neutron Gamma Density Logging While Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Feng;HAN Zhong-yue;WU He;HAN Fei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive source, used in traditional density logging, has great impact on the environment, while the pulsed neutron source applied in the logging tool is more safety and greener. In our country, the pulsed neutron-gamma density logging technology is still in the stage of development. Optimizing the parameters of neutron-gamma density instrument is essential to improve the measuring accuracy. This paper mainly studied the effects of spacing to typical neutron-gamma density logging tool which included one D-T neutron generator and two gamma scintillation detectors. The optimization of spacing were based on measuring sensitivity and counting statistic. The short spacing from 25 to 35 cm and long spacing from 60 to 65 cm were selected as the optimal position for near and far detector respectively. The result can provide theoretical support for design and manufacture of the instrument.

  3. Simultaneous analysis of qualitative parameters of solid fuel using complex neutron gamma method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombrovskij, V.P.; Ajtsev, N.I.; Ryashchikov, V.I.; Frolov, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made on complex neutron gamma method for simultaneous analysis of carbon content, ash content and humidity of solid fuel according to gamma radiation of inelastic fast neutron scattering and radiation capture of thermal neutrons. Metrological characteristics of pulse and stationary neutron gamma methods for determination of qualitative solid fuel parameters were analyzed, taking coke breeze as an example. Optimal energy ranges of gamma radiation detection (2-8 MeV) were determined. The advantages of using pulse neutron generator for complex analysis of qualitative parameters of solid fuel in large masses were shown

  4. Application of neutron-gamma analysis for determination of C/N ratio in compost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutron-gamma analysis is based on the acquisition of gamma rays from neutron irradiated study objects. The intensity and energy of the registered gamma rays gives information on the types and amounts of elements in the studied object. The use of this method for measurements of soil carbon demonstra...

  5. Deficiency in Monte Carlo simulations of coupled neutron-gamma-ray fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maleka, Peane P.; Maucec, Marko; de Meijer, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The deficiency in Monte Carlo simulations of coupled neutron-gamma-ray field was investigated by benchmarking two simulation codes with experimental data. Simulations showed better correspondence with the experimental data for gamma-ray transport only. In simulations, the neutron interactions with

  6. Radiance and particle fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papiez, L.; Battista, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) has defined fluence in terms of the number of the radiation particles crossing a small sampling sphere. A second definition has been proposed in which the length of track segments contained within any sampling volume are used to calculate the incident fluence. This approach is often used in Monte Carlo simulations of individual particle tracks, allowing the fluence to be scored in small volumes of any shape. In this paper we stress that the second definition generalizes the classical (ICRU) concept of fluence. We also identify the assumptions inherent in the two definitions of fluence and prove their equivalence for the case of straight-line particle trajectories. (author)

  7. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations for feasibility study of DISCOMS instrumentation in case of severe accident in a GEN 3 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovchenko, Mariya; Duhamel, Isabelle; Dechenaux, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    The present paper presents the study carried out in the frame of the DISCOMS project, which stands for "DIstributed Sensing for COrium Monitoring and Safety". This study concerns the calculation of the neutron and gamma radiations received by the considered instrumentation during the normal reactor operation as well as in case of a severe accident for the EPR reactor, outside the reactor pressure vessel and in the containment basemat. This paper summarizes the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation outside the vessel during normal reactor operation. The results of the simulations are then presented including the responses for distributed Optical Fiber Sensors (OFS), such as the gamma dose and the fast neutron fluence, and for Self Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNDs), namely the neutron and gamma spectra. Same responses are also evaluated for severe accident situations in order to design the SPNDs being sensitive to the both types of received neutron-gamma radiation. By contrast, fibers, involved as transducers in distributed OFS have to resist to the total radiation gamma dose and neutron fluence received during normal operation and the severe accident.

  8. MCNP capabilities at the dawn of the 21st century: Neutron-gamma applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.; McKinney, G.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code, MCNP, has become an international standard for a wide spectrum of neutron-gamma radiation transport applications. These include nuclear criticality safety, radiation shielding, nuclear safeguards, nuclear well-logging, fission and fusion reactor design, accelerator target design, detector design and analysis, health physics, medical radiation therapy and imaging, radiography, decontamination and decommissioning, and waste storage and disposal. The latest version of the code, MCNP4C, was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) in February 2000.This paper described the new features and capabilities of the code, and discusses the specific applicability to neutron-gamma problems. We will also discuss the future directions for MCNP code development, including rewriting the code in Fortran 90

  9. Guideline of Monte Carlo calculation. Neutron/gamma ray transport simulation by Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This report condenses basic theories and advanced applications of neutron/gamma ray transport calculations in many fields of nuclear energy research. Chapters 1 through 5 treat historical progress of Monte Carlo methods, general issues of variance reduction technique, cross section libraries used in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes. In chapter 6, the following issues are discussed: fusion benchmark experiments, design of ITER, experiment analyses of fast critical assembly, core analyses of JMTR, simulation of pulsed neutron experiment, core analyses of HTTR, duct streaming calculations, bulk shielding calculations, neutron/gamma ray transport calculations of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chapters 8 and 9 treat function enhancements of MCNP and MVP codes, and a parallel processing of Monte Carlo calculation, respectively. An important references are attached at the end of this report.

  10. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Huawei [College of Geo-Resources and Information, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao, Shandong 266555 (China); Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Sun Jianmeng [College of Geo-Resources and Information, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao, Shandong 266555 (China); Wang Jiaxin [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Gardner, Robin P., E-mail: gardner@ncsu.edu [Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes (CEAR), Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties. - Highlights: > Monte Carlo evaluation of pulsed neutron gamma-ray density tools. > Results indicate sensitivity of the tool to standoff and mudcake properties. > Accuracy of far spaced detector is better than near spaced.

  11. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Huawei; Sun Jianmeng; Wang Jiaxin; Gardner, Robin P.

    2011-01-01

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties. - Highlights: → Monte Carlo evaluation of pulsed neutron gamma-ray density tools. → Results indicate sensitivity of the tool to standoff and mudcake properties. → Accuracy of far spaced detector is better than near spaced.

  12. Tests on a digital neutron-gamma pulse shape discriminator with NE213

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Z.W.

    1981-01-01

    A technique using charge sensitive analog-to-digital converters to do neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination is reported. The converters are gated by short (135 ns) pulses so as to reduce pile-up and the timing is such that the slow and total light output from the scintillator are measured. Preliminary tests indicate that the system performs reasonably well but poorer than some reported analog systems employing gated integrators or cross-over techniques. (orig.)

  13. Creation and validation of a neutron-gamma coupled multigroup cross section library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devan, K.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Lee, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The task of creating our own neutron-gamma coupled library was taken up. By using 1985 version of NJOY code system, a coupled set called IGC-DE4-S1 in ANISN format for 25 nuclides has been arrived at based on ENDF/B-IV neutron library and DLC-99 gamma library, with Legendre order of up to 5. The flow chart for the creation of coupled set is given. 5 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  14. Quantitative and qualitative applications of the neutron-gamma borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbucinski, J.; Eisler, P.L.; Borsaru, M.; Aylmer, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Two examples of neutron-gamma borehole logging application are described. In the quantitative application of the PGNAA technique, research was carried out both in the laboratory and at a mine to establish a suitable borehole logging technology for Mn-grade predictions. As an example of qualitative application of PGNAA, use of this method has been demonstrated for determination of lithology. (author). 4 refs, 10 figs, 7 tabs

  15. Application of the neutron gamma method to a study of water seepage under a rice plantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puard, M.; Couchat, P.; Moutonnet, P.

    1980-01-01

    In order to determine the share of percolation in the pollution by pesticides (particularly Lindane) being carried down in the drainage water of rice plantations, an application of the neutron gamma method under rice cultivation in the Camargue is suggested. A preliminary laboratory study enabled a comparison to be made between deuteriated water (DHO) and tritiated water (THO) used as water tracers in the determination of the dispersive phenomena and retention in a column of saturated soil [fr

  16. Use of digital computers for correction of gamma method and neutron-gamma method indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhnyuk, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The program for the NAIRI-S computer is described which is intended for accounting and elimination of the effect of by-processes when interpreting gamma and neutron-gamma logging indications. By means of slight corrections it is possible to use the program as a mathematical basis for logging diagram standardization by the method of multidimensional regressive analysis and estimation of rock reservoir properties

  17. Fluence map segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The lecture addressed the following topics: 'Interpreting' the fluence map; The sequencer; Reasons for difference between desired and actual fluence map; Principle of 'Step and Shoot' segmentation; Large number of solutions for given fluence map; Optimizing 'step and shoot' segmentation; The interdigitation constraint; Main algorithms; Conclusions on segmentation algorithms (static mode); Optimizing intensity levels and monitor units; Sliding window sequencing; Synchronization to avoid the tongue-and-groove effect; Accounting for physical characteristics of MLC; Importance of corrections for leaf transmission and offset; Accounting for MLC mechanical constraints; The 'complexity' factor; Incorporating the sequencing into optimization algorithm; Data transfer to the treatment machine; Interface between R and V and accelerator; and Conclusions on fluence map segmentation (Segmentation is part of the overall inverse planning procedure; 'Step and Shoot' and 'Dynamic' options are available for most TPS (depending on accelerator model; The segmentation phase tends to come into the optimization loop; The physical characteristics of the MLC have a large influence on final dose distribution; The IMRT plans (MU and relative dose distribution) must be carefully validated). (P.A.)

  18. MCNP modelling of a combined neutron/gamma counter

    CERN Document Server

    Bourva, L C A; Ottmar, H; Weaver, D R

    1999-01-01

    A series of Monte Carlo neutron calculations for a combined gamma/passive neutron coincidence counter has been performed. This type of device, part of a suite of non-destructive assay instruments utilised for the enforcement of the Euratom nuclear safeguards within the European Union, is to be used for high accuracy measurements of the plutonium content of small samples of nuclear materials. The multi-purpose Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code version 4B has been used to model in detail the neutron coincidence detector and to investigate the leakage self-multiplication of PuO sub 2 and mixed U-Pu oxide (MOX) reference samples used to calibrate the instrument. The MCNP calculations have been used together with a neutron coincidence counting interpretative model to determine characteristic parameters of the detector. A comparative study to both experimental and previous numerical results has been performed. Sensitivity curves of the variation of the detector's efficiency, epsilon, to, alpha, the ratio of (alpha...

  19. Accuracy and borehole influences in pulsed neutron gamma density logging while drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huawei; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Jiaxin; Gardner, Robin P

    2011-09-01

    A new pulsed neutron gamma density (NGD) logging has been developed to replace radioactive chemical sources in oil logging tools. The present paper describes studies of near and far density measurement accuracy of NGD logging at two spacings and the borehole influences using Monte-Carlo simulation. The results show that the accuracy of near density is not as good as far density. It is difficult to correct this for borehole effects by using conventional methods because both near and far density measurement is significantly sensitive to standoffs and mud properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neutron-gamma discrimination employing pattern recognition of the signal from liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Kohji; Enokido, Uhji; Ogawa, Seiji

    1999-01-01

    A pattern recognition method was applied to the neutron-gamma discrimination of the pulses from the liquid scintillator, NE-213. The circuit for the discrimination is composed of A/D converter, fast SCA, memory control circuit, two digital delay lines and two buffer memories. All components are packed on a small circuit board and are installed into a personal computer. Experiments using a weak 252 Cf n-γ source were undertaken to test the feasibility of the circuit. The circuit is of very easy adjustment and, at the same time, of very economical price when compared with usual discrimination circuits, such as the TAC system

  1. Using a Borated Panel to Form a Dual Neutron-Gamma Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Wilde; Raymond Keegan

    2008-06-20

    A borated polyethylene plane placed between a neutron source and a gamma spectrometer is used to form a dual neutron-gamma detection system. The polyethylene thermalizes the source neutrons so that they are captured by {sup 10}B to produce a flux of 478 keV gamma-rays that radiate from the plane. This results in a buildup of count rate in the detector over that from a disk of the same diameter as the detector crystal (same thickness as the panel). Radiation portal systems are a potential application of this technique.

  2. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  3. Neutron-gamma discrimination employing pattern recognition of the signal from liquid scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Kamada, K; Ogawa, S

    1999-01-01

    A pattern recognition method was applied to the neutron-gamma discrimination of the pulses from the liquid scintillator, NE-213. The circuit for the discrimination is composed of A/D converter, fast SCA, memory control circuit, two digital delay lines and two buffer memories. All components are packed on a small circuit board and are installed into a personal computer. Experiments using a weak sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf n-gamma source were undertaken to test the feasibility of the circuit. The circuit is of very easy adjustment and, at the same time, of very economical price when compared with usual discrimination circuits, such as the TAC system.

  4. The efficient neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination with small active volume scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Van Chuan; Nguyen Duc Hoa; Nguyen Xuan Hai; Nguyen Ngoc Anh; Tuong Thi Thu Huong; Nguyen Nhi Dien; Pham Dinh Khang

    2016-01-01

    A small detector with EJ-301 liquid scintillation was manufactured for the study on the neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination. In this research, four algorithms, including Threshold crossing time (TCT), Pulse gradient analysis (PGA), Charge comparison method (CCM), and Correlation pattern recognition (CPR) were developed and compared in terms of their discrimination effectiveness between neutrons and gamma rays. The figures of merits (FOMs) obtained for 100 ÷ 2000 keVee (keV energy electron equivalent) neutron energy range show the charge comparison method was the most efficient of the four algorithms. (author)

  5. Neutron-gamma discrimination based on bipolar trapezoidal pulse shaping using FPGAs in NE213

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeili-sani, Vahid, E-mail: vaheed_esmaeely80@yahoo.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 4155-4494, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moussavi-zarandi, Ali; Akbar-ashrafi, Nafiseh; Boghrati, Behzad; Afarideh, Hossein [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 4155-4494, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-01

    A technique employing neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system that overcomes pile up limitations of previous methods to distinguish neutrons from gammas in scintillation detectors is described. The output signals of detectors were digitized and processed with a data acquisition system based on bipolar trapezoidal pulse shaping using Field programmable gate arrays (FPGA). FPGAs are capable of doing complex discrete signal processing algorithms with clock rates above 100 MHz. Their low cost, ease of use and selected dedicated hardware make them an ideal option for spectrometer systems.

  6. Investigation about decoupling capacitors of PMT voltage divider effects on neutron-gamma discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divani, Nazila; Firoozabadi, Mohammad M.; Bayat, Esmail

    2014-01-01

    Scintillators are almost used in any nuclear laboratory. These detectors combine of scintillation materials, PMT and a voltage divider. Voltage dividers are different in resistive ladder design. But the effect of decoupling capacitors and damping resistors haven’t discussed yet. In this paper at first a good equilibrium circuit designed for PMT, and it was used for investigating about capacitors and resistors in much manner. Results show that decoupling capacitors have great effect on PMT output pulses. In this research, it was tried to investigate the effect of Capacitor’s value and places on PMT voltage divider in Neutron-Gamma discrimination capability. Therefore, the voltage divider circuit for R329-02 Hamamatsu PMT was made and Zero Cross method used for neutron-gamma discrimination. The neutron source was a 20Ci Am-Be. Anode and Dynode pulses and discrimination spectrum were saved. The results showed that the pulse height and discrimination quality change with the value and setting of capacitors

  7. A method to describe inelastic gamma field distribution in neutron gamma density logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Quanying; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Xinguang; Wu, He; Jia, Wenbao; Ti, Yongzhou; Qiu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyang

    2017-11-01

    Pulsed neutron gamma density logging (NGD) is of great significance for radioprotection and density measurement in LWD, however, the current methods have difficulty in quantitative calculation and single factor analysis for the inelastic gamma field distribution. In order to clarify the NGD mechanism, a new method is developed to describe the inelastic gamma field distribution. Based on the fast-neutron scattering and gamma attenuation, the inelastic gamma field distribution is characterized by the inelastic scattering cross section, fast-neutron scattering free path, formation density and other parameters. And the contribution of formation parameters on the field distribution is quantitatively analyzed. The results shows the contribution of density attenuation is opposite to that of inelastic scattering cross section and fast-neutron scattering free path. And as the detector-spacing increases, the density attenuation gradually plays a dominant role in the gamma field distribution, which means large detector-spacing is more favorable for the density measurement. Besides, the relationship of density sensitivity and detector spacing was studied according to this gamma field distribution, therefore, the spacing of near and far gamma ray detector is determined. The research provides theoretical guidance for the tool parameter design and density determination of pulsed neutron gamma density logging technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improved neutron-gamma discrimination for a 3He neutron detector using subspace learning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. L.; Funk, L. L.; Riedel, R. A.; Berry, K. D.

    2017-05-01

    3He gas based neutron Linear-Position-Sensitive Detectors (LPSDs) have been used for many neutron scattering instruments. Traditional Pulse-height Analysis (PHA) for Neutron-Gamma Discrimination (NGD) resulted in the neutron-gamma efficiency ratio (NGD ratio) on the order of 105-106. The NGD ratios of 3He detectors need to be improved for even better scientific results from neutron scattering. Digital Signal Processing (DSP) analyses of waveforms were proposed for obtaining better NGD ratios, based on features extracted from rise-time, pulse amplitude, charge integration, a simplified Wiener filter, and the cross-correlation between individual and template waveforms of neutron and gamma events. Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA) and three Multivariate Analyses (MVAs) of the features were performed. The NGD ratios are improved by about 102-103 times compared with the traditional PHA method. Our results indicate the NGD capabilities of 3He tube detectors can be significantly improved with subspace-learning based methods, which may result in a reduced data-collection time and better data quality for further data reduction.

  9. Neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination in plastic scintillators: Preparation and characterization of various compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, Pauline; Hamel, Matthieu; Dehé-Pittance, Chrystèle; Rocha, Licinio; Pansu, Robert B.; Normand, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with the preparation and evaluation of plastic scintillators for neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD). We succeeded in developing a plastic scintillator with good neutron/gamma discrimination properties in the range of what is already being commercialized. Several combinations of primary and secondary fluorophores were implemented in chemically modified polymers. These scintillators were fully characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy and under neutron irradiation. The materials proved to be stable for up to 5 years without any degradation of PSD properties. They were then classified in terms of their PSD capabilities and light yield. Our best candidate, 28.6 wt% of primary fluorophore with a small amount of secondary fluorophore, shows promising PSD results and is particularly suited to industrial development, because its preparation does not involve the use of expensive or exotic compounds. Furthermore, even at the highest prepared concentration, high stability over time was observed. As a proof of concept, one sample with dimensions 109 mm ∅×114 mm height (≈1 L) was prepared

  10. Neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination in plastic scintillators: Preparation and characterization of various compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, Pauline [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Électroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Photophysique et Photochimie Supramoléculaires et Macromoléculaires (CNRS UMR 8531), École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 61 Avenue du Président Wilson, F-94235 Cachan cedex (France); Hamel, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.hamel@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Électroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dehé-Pittance, Chrystèle; Rocha, Licinio [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Électroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pansu, Robert B. [Laboratoire de Photophysique et Photochimie Supramoléculaires et Macromoléculaires (CNRS UMR 8531), École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 61 Avenue du Président Wilson, F-94235 Cachan cedex (France); Normand, Stéphane [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Électroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-06-01

    This work deals with the preparation and evaluation of plastic scintillators for neutron/gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD). We succeeded in developing a plastic scintillator with good neutron/gamma discrimination properties in the range of what is already being commercialized. Several combinations of primary and secondary fluorophores were implemented in chemically modified polymers. These scintillators were fully characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy and under neutron irradiation. The materials proved to be stable for up to 5 years without any degradation of PSD properties. They were then classified in terms of their PSD capabilities and light yield. Our best candidate, 28.6 wt% of primary fluorophore with a small amount of secondary fluorophore, shows promising PSD results and is particularly suited to industrial development, because its preparation does not involve the use of expensive or exotic compounds. Furthermore, even at the highest prepared concentration, high stability over time was observed. As a proof of concept, one sample with dimensions 109 mm ∅×114 mm height (≈1 L) was prepared.

  11. Neutron fluence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    For research reactor work dealing with such subjects as radiation effects on solids and such disciplines as radiochemistry and radiobiology, the radiation dose or neutron fluence is an essential parameter in evaluating results. Unfortunately it is very difficult to determine. Even when the measurements have been accurate, it is difficult to compare results obtained in different experiments because present methods do not always reflect the dependence of spectra or of different types of radiation on the induced processes. After considering the recommendations of three IAEA Panels, on 'In-pile dosimetry' held in July 1964, on 'Neutron fluence measurements' in October 1965, and on 'In-pile dosimetry' in November 1966, the Agency established a Working Group on Reactor Radiation Measurements. This group consisted of eleven experts from ten different Member States and two staff members of the Agency. In the measurement of energy absorbed by materials from neutrons and gamma rays, there are various reports and reviews scattered throughout the literature. The group, however, considered that the time was ripe for all relevant information to be evaluated and gathered together in the form of a practical guide, with the aim of promoting consistency in the measurement and reporting of reactor radiation. The group arranged for the material to be divided into two manuals, which are expected to be useful both for experienced workers and for beginners

  12. Radiation effect on silicon transistors in mixed neutrons-gamma environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, J.; Shweikani, R.; Ghazi, N.

    2014-10-01

    The effects of gamma and neutron irradiations on two different types of transistors, Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) and Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT), were investigated. Irradiation was performed using a Syrian research reactor (RR) (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR)) and a gamma source (Co-60 cell). For RR irradiation, MCNP code was used to calculate the absorbed dose received by the transistors. The experimental results showed an overall decrease in the gain factors of the transistors after irradiation, and the JFETs were more resistant to the effects of radiation than BJTs. The effect of RR irradiation was also greater than that of gamma source for the same dose, which could be because neutrons could cause more damage than gamma irradiation.

  13. Geiger-Mueller counter for mixed neutron-gamma beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.C.; Ma, I.-C.

    1978-01-01

    A Geiger-Mueller (G-M) dosimeter has been constructed and employed to measure the gamma-ray component of absorbed dose in a cyclotron produced fast neutron field. This instrument is waterproof for measurements in a liquid medium, and read-out is accompanied with any standard scaler. (Auth.)

  14. Neutron-gamma discrimination in mixed field by pulse shape discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharghi Ido, A.; Shahriari, M.; Etaati, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a pulse shape discriminator, incorporating zero-crossing method has been developed. The separate measurements with 241 Am-Be and 252 Cf sources undertaken by BC501A liquid have shown that the purposed and the common-used pulse shape discriminator's are in good agreement. The improved characteristics of the presented pulse shape discriminator are FOM=1.36 at a threshold of 60 ke Vee and 1.5μsec dead time which allows the count rates up to 50 k Hz

  15. Measurement and assessment of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields around the reconstructed HWRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changmao; Xie Jianlun; Chun Yuqing; Lin Nairong; Liu Jinhua; Su Jingling; Wei Zemin

    1987-01-01

    The neutron spectra around the HWRR (Heavy Water Research Reactor) of the Institute of Atomic Energy of China were measured. For the neutron spectra at different measuring points, the mean neutron energies ranged from 11 to 201 keV, the maximum energies were below 5 MeV, the effective quality factors were between 2.5 and 5, and the fast neutron dose equivalents mostly contributed the large fraction. During normal operation of the reactor, the n-γ dose equivalent rates in working areas were measured as well. In the experimental hall and the basement of the reactor, the mean values of the n/γ dose equivalent ratios were 15% and 31%, respectively; the γ dose equivalents were predominant. The annual dose equivalents to the persons working in the areas mentioned above possibly exceed the dose equivalent limit

  16. Formulation of the relationship between indices of neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma method and the percentrage of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majorowicz, J.

    1973-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the possibility of a complex utilization of radiometric logging methods, neutron-gamma profiling and gamma-gamma density logging for determining percentage of iron and establishing geophysical possibilities of identifying zones of economically profitable ores in borehole profiles. Figures present the correlations between indices of neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma logging methods and the percentage of iron, as well as the correlation of neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma indices for zones minerallized with iron ores. The article presents the correlational analyses of the results: the correlational coefficients are given as well as total error in determining iron content on the basis of each of the methods described. Next, a multidimensional statistical analysis is carried out on the results obtained. On the basis of the two-dimensional correlational coefficients calculated and the average standard deviation, an equation of linear regression was formulated, simultaneously involving three parameters - the indices of neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma logging and the percentage of iron. The multiple correlational coefficient obtained markedly exceeds the two-dimentional correlation coefficient (r=0.974>rsub(xz)>rsub(yz)>rsub(xy)). The given method of utilizing multidimensional statistics in borehole geophysics for identifying iron ores is an efficient one. On the basis of several relationships among independent variables which are less obvious (smaller values of correlational coefficient), it is possible to obtain a single distinct relationship involving all variables simultaneously. (author)

  17. The Neutron-Gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination Method for Neutron Flux Detection in the ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiufeng; Li Shiping; Cao Hongrui; Yin Zejie; Yuan Guoliang; Yang Qingwei

    2013-01-01

    The neutron flux monitor (NFM), as a significant diagnostic system in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will play an important role in the readings of a series of key parameters in the fusion reaction process. As the core of the main electronic system of the NFM, the neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination (n-γ PSD) can distinguish the neutron pulse from the gamma pulse and other disturbing pulses according to the thresholds of the rising time and the amplitude pre-installed on the board, the double timing point CFD method is used to get the rising time of the pulse. The n-γ PSD can provide an accurate neutron count. (magnetically confined plasma)

  18. Analysis of coupled neutron-gamma radiations, applied to shieldings in multigroup albedo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunley, Leonardo Souza

    2002-01-01

    The principal mathematical tools frequently available for calculations in Nuclear Engineering, including coupled neutron-gamma radiations shielding problems, involve the full Transport Theory or the Monte Carlo techniques. The Multigroup Albedo Method applied to shieldings is characterized by following the radiations through distinct layers of materials, allowing the determination of the neutron and gamma fractions reflected from, transmitted through and absorbed in the irradiated media when a neutronic stream hits the first layer of material, independently of flux calculations. Then, the method is a complementary tool of great didactic value due to its clarity and simplicity in solving neutron and/or gamma shielding problems. The outstanding results achieved in previous works motivated the elaboration and the development of this study that is presented in this dissertation. The radiation balance resulting from the incidence of a neutronic stream into a shielding composed by 'm' non-multiplying slab layers for neutrons was determined by the Albedo method, considering 'n' energy groups for neutrons and 'g' energy groups for gammas. It was taken into account there is no upscattering of neutrons and gammas. However, it was considered that neutrons from any energy groups are able to produce gammas of all energy groups. The ANISN code, for an angular quadrature order S 2 , was used as a standard for comparison of the results obtained by the Albedo method. So, it was necessary to choose an identical system configuration, both for ANISN and Albedo methods. This configuration was six neutron energy groups and eight gamma energy groups, using three slab layers (iron aluminum - manganese). The excellent results expressed in comparative tables show great agreement between the values determined by the deterministic code adopted as standard and, the values determined by the computational program created using the Albedo method and the algorithm developed for coupled neutron-gamma

  19. Fabrication of gamma sources using the neutron-gamma reactions of 238Pu13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solinhac, I.; Maillard, C.; Donnet, L.

    2004-01-01

    A production campaign for 238 Pu 13 C sources with gamma fluence ranging from 2500 to 4500 gamma/s/4π at 6.13 MeV was carried out in 2002 in Atalante. An experimental study was undertaken to prepare the 238 PuC mixture, which is the most delicate step. This procedure is described together with the other steps in the source fabrication process: purification of a plutonium oxide batch, preparation of a nitric solution of 238 Pu, measurement of the gamma fluence of the PuC mixture before and after insertion into each of the two stainless steel capsules that constitute a PuN 2 O package, welding of the second envelope followed by leak testing, final measurement of the gamma fluence of the sealed source. This PuC sources fabrication procedure is effective: all the sources include the required gamma activity with an uncertainty on the gamma fluence of less than 10%. (authors)

  20. Anti emetic effect of 5HT3 receptor antagonists in macaques exposed to a neutron-gamma radiation; Effet antiemetique d`antiserotoninergiques de type 3 chez le macaque soumis a une irradiation neutron-gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agay, D.; Martin, C.; Martin, S.; Roman, V.; Fatome, M.

    1994-12-31

    Ondansetron and granisetron were tested as antiemetics in cynomolgus macaques weighing 4 kg and submitted to a neutron-gamma irradiation with a high neutronic component. Compounds were delivered by oral way, each administration dose being 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron. The effect was complete when were delivered before and after the irradiation. It was incomplete when there was a single administration be fore or after the exposure. No adverse side-effects were noted. (author). 4 refs.

  1. Fluence determination by scattering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Albergo, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Pillon, M; Angarano, M M; Creanza, D; De Palma, M

    2000-01-01

    An alternative method to determine particle fluence is proposed, which is particularly suitable for irradiations with low-energy charged-particle beams. The fluence is obtained by measuring the elastic scattering produced by a composite thin target placed upstream of the sample. The absolute calibration is performed by comparison with the measured radioactivation of vanadium and copper samples. The composite thin target, made of aluminium, carbon and gold, allows not only the fluence to be measured, but also a continuous monitoring of the beam space distribution. Experimental results with a 27 MeV proton beam are reported and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. (7 refs).

  2. Three-dimensional reconstruction of neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray sources using spherical harmonic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volegov, P. L.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D.; Geppert-Kleinrath, V.; Grim, G.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.

    2017-11-01

    Neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray imaging are important diagnostic tools at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measuring the two-dimensional (2D) size and shape of the neutron producing region, for probing the remaining ablator and measuring the extent of the DT plasmas during the stagnation phase of Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. Due to the difficulty and expense of building these imagers, at most only a few two-dimensional projections images will be available to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) sources. In this paper, we present a technique that has been developed for the 3D reconstruction of neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray sources from a minimal number of 2D projections using spherical harmonics decomposition. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from experimental neutron and x-ray data collected at OMEGA and NIF.

  3. Neutron-gamma discrimination based on pulse shape discrimination in a Ce:LiCaAlF{sub 6} scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Atsushi, E-mail: a-yamazaki@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University (Japan); Watanabe, Kenichi; Uritani, Akira [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University (Japan); Iguchi, Tetsuo [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University (Japan); Kawaguchi, Noriaki [Tokuyama Corporation (Japan); Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yokota, Yuui; Kamada, Kei [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University (Japan); Fukuda, Kentaro; Suyama, Toshihisa [Tokuyama Corporation (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    We demonstrate neutron-gamma discrimination based on a pulse shape discrimination method in a Ce:LiCAF scintillator. We have tried neutron-gamma discrimination using a difference in the pulse shape or the decay time of the scintillation light pulse. The decay time is converted into the rise time through an integrating circuit. A {sup 252}Cf enclosed in a polyethylene container is used as the source of thermal neutrons and prompt gamma-rays. Obvious separation of neutron and gamma-ray events is achieved using the information of the rise time of the scintillation light pulse. In the separated neutron spectrum, the gamma-ray events are effectively suppressed with little loss of neutron events. The pulse shape discrimination is confirmed to be useful to detect neutrons with the Ce:LiCAF scintillator under an intense high-energy gamma-ray condition.

  4. Anti emetic effect of 5HT3 receptor antagonists in macaques exposed to a neutron-gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agay, D.; Martin, C.; Martin, S.; Roman, V.; Fatome, M.

    1994-01-01

    Ondansetron and granisetron were tested as antiemetics in cynomolgus macaques weighing 4 kg and submitted to a neutron-gamma irradiation with a high neutronic component. Compounds were delivered by oral way, each administration dose being 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron. The effect was complete when were delivered before and after the irradiation. It was incomplete when there was a single administration be fore or after the exposure. No adverse side-effects were noted. (author)

  5. Effect of liposome entrapped Cu/Zn bovine superoxide dismutase in rat after total body (neutron-gamma) irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamproglou, I.; Martin, S.; Lambert, F.; Fontanille, P.; Fessi, H.; Puisieux, F.; Colas-Linhart, N.; Bok, B.; Fatome, M.; Martin, C.

    1998-01-01

    Our purpose was, to study in rat the effects of (neutron-gamma) exposure and of LIPSOD treatment (liposomal Cu/Zn super-oxide dismutase) on cognitive functions. Our data demonstrate that whole-body irradiation induces in Sprague-Dawley rats some cognitive dysfunction. Treatment using LIPSOD corrects in a significantly way this trend. Moreover, in sham-irradiated rats, this treatment shows an inhibitory effect. (authors)

  6. Application of Nonnegative Tensor Factorization for neutron-gamma discrimination of Monte Carlo simulated fission chamber’s output signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounia Laassiri

    Full Text Available For efficient exploitation of research reactors, it is important to discern neutron flux distribution inside the reactor with the best possible precision. For this reason, fission and ionization chambers are used to measure the neutron field. In these arrays, the sequences of the neutron interaction points in the fission chamber can correctly be identified in order to obtain true neutron energies emitted by nuclei of interest. However, together with the neutrons, gamma-rays are also emitted from nuclei and thereby affect neutron spectra. The originality of this study consists in the application of tensor based blind source separation methods to extract independent components from signals recorded at the fission chamber preamplifier’s output. The objective is to achieve software neutron-gamma discrimination using Nonnegative Tensor Factorization tools. For reasons of nuclear safety, we first simulate the neutron flux inside the TRIGA Mark II Reactor using Monte Carlo methods under Geant4 platform linked to Garfield++. Geant4 simulations allow the fission chamber construction whereas linking the model to Garfield++ permits to simulate drift parameters from the ionization of the filling gas, which is not possible otherwise. Keywords: Fission chamber (FC, Geant4, Garfield++, Neutron-gamma discrimination, Nonnegative Tensor Factorization (NTF

  7. Effects of neutron-gamma or gamma irradiations on plasma clotting factors. Effect of a treatment by substituted factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestries, J.C.; Martin, S.; Janodet, D.; Herodin, F.; Gourmelon, P.; Fatome, M.

    1991-01-01

    Neutron-gamma irradiation of the baboon at lethal dose altered the plasma clotting factors and induced a fibrinoformation alteration which occurred shortly before death. These disturbances, which were not found after gamma irradiation, could explain the importance of the haemorrhagic syndrome. Treatment by P.P.S.B. (factors II, VII, X and IX) counteracted the alterations of the plasma clotting factors, but had no influence on the lethality nor on the fibrinoformation alteration which seems to be an important cause of death [fr

  8. Dependence of the neutron-gamma log on the porosity of Malmian limestones from the central part of the Nida Trough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczerba, A.

    1974-01-01

    Results of correlation-regression analysis of the relationship of the prosity Kp to the relative intensity of neutron-induced gamma radiation dIng are reviewed. The geophysical results and laboratory tests of Malmian carbonate rocks from 10 boreholes from the central part of the Nida trough have been utilized to study this relationship. The regression equation dIng=∫(Kp) and the nomogram to determine the porosity Kp on the basis of neutron-gamma log or neutron-gamma and gamma logs, when the correction for the content is to be considered, have been also presented. (author)

  9. Study of sampling rate influence on neutron-gamma discrimination with stilbene coupled to a silicon photomultiplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinglong; Moore, Michael E; Wang, Zhonghai; Rong, Zhou; Yang, Chaowen; Hayward, Jason P

    2017-10-01

    Choosing a digitizer with an appropriate sampling rate is often a trade-off between performance and economy. The influence of sampling rates on the neutron-gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) with a solid stilbene scintillator coupled to a Silicon Photomultiplier was investigated in this work. Sampling rates from 125MSPS to 2GSPS from a 10-bit digitizer were used to collect detector pulses produced by the interactions of a Cf-252 source. Due to the decreased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the PSD performance degraded with reduced sampling rates. The reason of PSD performance degradation was discussed. Then, an efficient combination of filtering and digital signal processing (DSP) was then applied to suppress the timing noise and electronic background noise. The results demonstrate an improved PSD performance especially at low sampling rates, down to 125MSPS. Using filtering and DSP, the ascribed Figure of Merit (FOM) at 125keV ee (± 10keV ee ) increased from 0.95 to 1.02 at 125MSPS. At 300keV ee and above, all the FOMs are better than 2.00. Our study suggests that 250MSPS is a good enough sampling rate for neutron-gamma discrimination in this system in order to be sensitive to neutrons at and above ~ 125keV ee . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarze, G.E.; Frasca, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the electrical and switching characteristics of power semiconductor switches must be known and understood by the designer of the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. The SP-100 radiation requirements at 25 m from the nuclear source are a neutron fluence of 10 13 n/cm 2 and a gamma dose of 0.5 Mrads. Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are given in this paper. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed

  11. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of neutron and gamma rays on the electrical and switching characteristics of power semiconductor switches must be known and understood by the designer of the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. The SP-100 radiation requirements at 25 m from the nuclear source are a neutron fluence of 10(exp 13) n/sq cm and a gamma dose of 0.5 Mrads. Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are presented. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  12. Fast-neutron gamma-ray production from elemental iron: E/sub n/ approx. < 2 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1976-05-01

    A Ge(Li) detector and a fission detector were used to measure elemental differential cross section excitation functions for fast neutron gamma-ray production from iron relative to fast neutron fission of 235 U. Data were acquired at approximately 50 keV intervals with approximately 50 keV neutron-energy resolution from near threshold to approximately 2 MeV. Angular distributions for the 0.847 MeV gamma ray were measured at 0.93, 0.98, 1.08, 1.18, 1.28, 1.38, 1.59, 1.68, 1.79, 1.85 and 2.03 MeV. Significant fourth-order terms were required for the Legendre polynomial expansions used in fitting several of these angular distributions. This casts doubt on the accuracy of the commonly used approximation that the integrated gamma-ray production cross section is essentially equal to 4π times the 55 0 (or 125 0 ) differential cross section. The method employed in processing these data is described. Comparison is made between results from the present work and some previously reported data sets. The uncertainties associated with energy scales, neutron-energy resolution and other experimental factors for these various measurements make it difficult to draw conclusions concerning the observed differences in the values reported for these fluctuating cross sections. 6 tables, 7 figures

  13. Fast-neutron gamma-ray production from elemental iron: E/sub n/ < or approx. = 2 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1976-05-01

    A Ge(Li) detector and a fission detector were used to measure elemental differential cross section excitation functions for fast-neutron gamma-ray production from iron relative to fast-neutron fission of 235 U. Data were acquired at approximately 50 keV intervals with approximately 50 keV neutron-energy resolution from near threshold to approximately 2 MeV. Angular distributions for the 0.847-MeV gamma ray were measured at 0.93, 0.98, 1.08, 1.18, 1.28, 1.38, 1.59, 1.68, 1.79, 1.85 and 2.03 MeV. Significant fourth-order terms were required for the Legendre polynomial expansions used in fitting several of these angular distributions. This casts doubt on the accuracy of the commonly used approximation that the integrated gamma-ray production cross section is essentially equal to 4π times the 55-degree (or 125-degree) differential cross section. The method employed in processing these data is described. Comparison is made between results from the present work and some previously reported data sets. The uncertainties associated with energy scales, neutron-energy resolution and other experimental factors for these various measurements make it difficult to draw conclusions concerning the observed differences in the values reported for these fluctuating cross sections

  14. AMPX: a modular code system for generating coupled multigroup neutron-gamma libraries from ENDF/B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, N.M.; Lucius, J.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Ford, W.E. III; White, J.E.; Wright, R.Q.

    1976-03-01

    AMPX is a modular system for producing coupled multigroup neutron-gamma cross section sets. Basic neutron and gamma cross-section data for AMPX are obtained from ENDF/B libraries. Most commonly used operations required to generate and collapse multigroup cross-section sets are provided in the system. AMPX is flexibly dimensioned; neutron group structures, and gamma group structures, and expansion orders to represent anisotropic processes are all arbitrary and limited only by available computer core and budget. The basic processes provided will (1) generate multigroup neutron cross sections; (2) generate multigroup gamma cross sections; (3) generate gamma yields for gamma-producing neutron interactions; (4) combine neutron cross sections, gamma cross sections, and gamma yields into final ''coupled sets''; (5) perform one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport or diffusion theory calculations for neutrons and gammas and, on option, collapse the cross sections to a broad-group structure, using the one-dimensional results as weighting functions; (6) plot cross sections, on option, to facilitate the ''evaluation'' of a particular multigroup set of data; (7) update and maintain multigroup cross section libraries in such a manner as to make it not only easy to combine new data with previously processed data but also to do it in a single pass on the computer; and (8) output multigroup cross sections in convenient formats for other codes. (auth)

  15. Novel discrimination parameters for neutron-gamma discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors using wavelet transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.; Singh, S.

    2015-01-01

    It has been observed that the discrimination performance of the wavelet transform method strongly depends on definition of discrimination parameters. These parameters are usually obtained from a combination of scaling functions at different scales, which represents the energy density of the wavelet coefficients. In this paper, the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) at minimum possible values of scale was investigated. Novel pulse shape discrimination parameters have been proposed for neutron and gamma discrimination in a mixed radiation field and tested with modeled pulses. The performance of these parameters was also validated in terms of quality of discrimination using experimental data of mixed events from an AmBe source collected with BC501 liquid scintillation detector. The quality of discrimination was evaluated by calculating a figure of merit (FOM) with all parameters under same experimental and simulation conditions. The FOM obtained with the proposed novel parameters was also compared with the charge comparison method. The proposed parameters exhibit better FOM as compared to the charge comparison method when high levels of noise are present in the data

  16. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho L, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant 'Laguna Verde'. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the 'Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes' of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author)

  17. Problem Oriented Neutron-Gamma Cross Sections Libraries for WWER-440 and WWER-1000 Shielding and Reactor Vessel Dosimetry Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, S.; Antonov, S.; Ilieva, K.

    1997-01-01

    The 47 neutron and 20 gamma group libraries BGL-440 and BGL-1000 for the shielding and reactor vessel dosimetry application have been generated for WWER-440 and WWER-1000 by collapsing the VITAMIN-B6 library (199 neutron and 42 gamma groups on the base of ENDF/B-6). The first parts of the libraries for neutron-gamma transport calculation, BGL-440-1 (150 nuclides) and BGL-1000-1 (140 nuclides), have been generated by a modified version of SAS1X control module of the SCALE system. The appropriate zone-average neutron flux had been used for these sub-libraries collapsing. The BGL-440-2 and BGL-1000-2 sub-libraries consist of cross sections for all 120 nuclides of VITAMIN-B6, for calculation of the transport through non-reactor materials of dosimeters, capsules, specimens which may be placed in the cavity behind the reactor vessel. The neutron spectrum just beyond the RPV had been used for this collapsing. As the first test the comparative calculations of the neutron flux on/behind the WWER-1000 reactor vessel have been realised using the libraries BGL-1000 and BUGLE, intended for the American PWR reactors. The integral neutron flux values by BGL-1000 and BUGLE differ by 3% onto the vessel, and 5% behind the vessel. This result shows that the calculations of the neutron flux responses for the WWER vessel surveillance, especially in locations behind the WWER vessel have to be done by the appropriate BGL library. Key words: neutron transport, multigroup neutron cross section libraries

  18. Neutron/gamma dose separation by the multiple-ion-chamber technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Many mixed n/γ dosimetry systems rely on two dosimeters, one composed of a tissue-equivalent material and the other made from a non-hydrogenous material. The paired chamber technique works well in fields of neutron radiation nearly identical in spectral composition to that in which the dosimeters were calibrated. However, this technique is drastically compromised in phantom due to the degradation of the neutron spectrum. The three-dosimeter technique allows for the fall-off in neutron sensitivity of the two non-hydrogenous dosimeters. Precise and physically meaningful results were obtained with this technique with a D-T source in air and in phantom and with simultaneous D-T neutron and 60 Co gamma ray irradiation in air. The MORSE-CG coupled n/γ three-dimensional Monte Carlo code was employed to calculate neutron and gamma doses in a water phantom. Gamma doses calculated in phantom with this code were generally lower than corresponding ion chamber measurements. This can be explained by the departure of irradiation conditions from ideal narrow-beam geometry. 97 references

  19. Three-dimensional RAMA fluence methodology benchmarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S. P.; Carter, R. G.; Watkins, K. E.; Jones, D. B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the benchmarking of the RAMA Fluence Methodology software, that has been performed in accordance with U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.190. The RAMA Fluence Methodology has been developed by TransWare Enterprises Inc. through funding provided by the Electric Power Research Inst., Inc. (EPRI) and the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP). The purpose of the software is to provide an accurate method for calculating neutron fluence in BWR pressure vessels and internal components. The Methodology incorporates a three-dimensional deterministic transport solution with flexible arbitrary geometry representation of reactor system components, previously available only with Monte Carlo solution techniques. Benchmarking was performed on measurements obtained from three standard benchmark problems which include the Pool Criticality Assembly (PCA), VENUS-3, and H. B. Robinson Unit 2 benchmarks, and on flux wire measurements obtained from two BWR nuclear plants. The calculated to measured (C/M) ratios range from 0.93 to 1.04 demonstrating the accuracy of the RAMA Fluence Methodology in predicting neutron flux, fluence, and dosimetry activation. (authors)

  20. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevestam, Goeran; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas; Tagziria, Hamid; Vanhavere, Filip; Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm -2 s -1 , where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm -2 s -1 , again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved

  1. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevestam, Goeran [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: goeran.loevestam@ec.europa.eu; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Tagziria, Hamid [EC-JRC-Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen (IPSC), Via E. Fermi 1, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); Vanhavere, Filip [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2009-01-15

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved.

  2. Analysis of the ITER computational shielding benchmark with the Monte Carlo TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} neutron gamma coupled calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yi-Kang, E-mail: yi-kang.lee@cea.fr

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Verification and validation of TRIPOLI-4 radiation transport calculations for ITER shielding benchmark. • Evaluation of CEA-V5.1.1 and FENDL-3.0 nuclear data libraries on D–T fusion neutron continuous energy transport calculations. • Advances in nuclear analyses for nuclear heating and radiation damage in iron. • This work also demonstrates that the “safety factors” concept is necessary in the nuclear analyses of ITER. - Abstract: With the growing interest in using the continuous-energy TRIPOLI-4{sup ®} Monte Carlo radiation transport code for ITER applications, a key issue that arises is whether or not the released TRIPOLI-4 code and its associated nuclear data libraries are verified and validated for the D–T fusion neutronics calculations. Previous published benchmark results of TRIPOLI-4 code on the ITER related activities have concentrated on the first wall loading, the reactor dosimetry, the nuclear heating, and the tritium breeding ratio. To enhance the TRIPOLI-4 verification and validation on neutron-gamma coupled calculations for fusion device application, the computational ITER shielding benchmark of M. E. Sawan was performed in this work by using the 2013 released TRIPOLI-4.9S code and the associated CEA-V5.1.1 data library. First wall, blanket, vacuum vessel and toroidal field magnet of the inboard and outboard components were fully modelled in this 1-D toroidal cylindrical benchmark. The 14.1 MeV source neutrons were sampled from a uniform isotropic distribution in the plasma zone. Nuclear responses including neutron and gamma fluxes, nuclear heating, and material damage indicator were benchmarked against previous published results. The capabilities of the TRIPOLI-4 code on the evaluation of above physics parameters were presented. The nuclear data library from the new FENDL-3.0 evaluation was also benchmarked against the CEA-V5.1.1 results for the neutron transport calculations. The results show that both data libraries

  3. Analysis of the ITER computational shielding benchmark with the Monte Carlo TRIPOLI-4® neutron gamma coupled calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yi-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Verification and validation of TRIPOLI-4 radiation transport calculations for ITER shielding benchmark. • Evaluation of CEA-V5.1.1 and FENDL-3.0 nuclear data libraries on D–T fusion neutron continuous energy transport calculations. • Advances in nuclear analyses for nuclear heating and radiation damage in iron. • This work also demonstrates that the “safety factors” concept is necessary in the nuclear analyses of ITER. - Abstract: With the growing interest in using the continuous-energy TRIPOLI-4 ® Monte Carlo radiation transport code for ITER applications, a key issue that arises is whether or not the released TRIPOLI-4 code and its associated nuclear data libraries are verified and validated for the D–T fusion neutronics calculations. Previous published benchmark results of TRIPOLI-4 code on the ITER related activities have concentrated on the first wall loading, the reactor dosimetry, the nuclear heating, and the tritium breeding ratio. To enhance the TRIPOLI-4 verification and validation on neutron-gamma coupled calculations for fusion device application, the computational ITER shielding benchmark of M. E. Sawan was performed in this work by using the 2013 released TRIPOLI-4.9S code and the associated CEA-V5.1.1 data library. First wall, blanket, vacuum vessel and toroidal field magnet of the inboard and outboard components were fully modelled in this 1-D toroidal cylindrical benchmark. The 14.1 MeV source neutrons were sampled from a uniform isotropic distribution in the plasma zone. Nuclear responses including neutron and gamma fluxes, nuclear heating, and material damage indicator were benchmarked against previous published results. The capabilities of the TRIPOLI-4 code on the evaluation of above physics parameters were presented. The nuclear data library from the new FENDL-3.0 evaluation was also benchmarked against the CEA-V5.1.1 results for the neutron transport calculations. The results show that both data libraries can be

  4. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  5. A fluence device for precise radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, R.G.T.; Peak, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    An instrument is described which has been designed to ensure precise positioning of samples and sensing devices in three dimensions at all times during irradiation procedures. The system, which is both robust and sensitive, overcomes difficulties experienced when slight variations in the positioning of a sample under irradiation results in large changes in fluence. (UK)

  6. Study of the reservoirs of Jurassic and Cretaceous periods in the south-cast slope of Central Kara-Kum vault using combination of acoustic logging, neutron-gamma logging, gamma logging, and electrical logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredov, T.M.; Baranov, M.I.

    1978-01-01

    Considered is the possibility of application of the combination of neutron-gamma logging, gamma logging al partitioncoustic logging and electrical logging to lithologica of sections, discovery reservoir layers in carbonate and terrigeneous sections as well as quantitative estimation of the porosity coefficients values at prospecting areas in the south-east slope of Central Kara-Kum vault. Neutron-gamma logging mostly makes it possible to partition carbonate rocks into limestones, dolomites and their interstitial variaties and to indicate sand stone layers with different degree of carbonate content

  7. Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Baya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remenat (Catalan (Mixed, "revoltillo" (Scrambled in Spanish, is a dish which, in Catalunya, consists of a beaten egg cooked with vegetables or other ingredients, normally prawns or asparagus. It is delicious. Scrambled refers to the action of mixing the beaten egg with other ingredients in a pan, normally using a wooden spoon Thought is frequently an amalgam of past ideas put through a spinner and rhythmically shaken around like a cocktail until a uniform and dense paste is made. This malleable product, rather like a cake mixture can be deformed pulling it out, rolling it around, adapting its shape to the commands of one’s hands or the tool which is being used on it. In the piece Mixed, the contortion of the wood seeks to reproduce the plasticity of this slow heavy movement. Each piece lays itself on the next piece consecutively like a tongue of incandescent lava slowly advancing but with unstoppable inertia.

  8. The fluence research of filter material for fast neutron fluence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiding

    2010-01-01

    When the fast neutron fluence is measured by radioactivation techniques in the nuclear reactor the fast neutron is also filtered a little by the thermal neutron filter material, and if the filter material thickness increase the filtered fast neutron increases therewith. For fast neutron fluenc measurement, there are only cadmium, boron and gadolinium three elements filtering fluence can be calculated ordinarily. In order to calculate the filtered fast neutron fluence of the all elements in the filter material, the many total cross sections of nuclides had checked out from nuclear cross section data library, converted them into the same energy group structure, then element's total cross section, compound's total cross section and multilayer filters' total cross section had calculated from these total cross sections with same energy group structure, a new cross section data library can be obtained lastly through merging these cross sections into the old cross section data library used for neutron fluence measurement. The calculation analysis indicates that the results of the unit 2 surveillance capsule U of DAYA Bay NPP and the unit 1 surveillance capsule A of the Second Nuclear Power Plant of Qinshan by considering the all elements subtracting iron are smaller about 1.5% and 2.6% respectively than the ones only to consider cadmium, boron. The old measured results accord with the new values under the measurement uncertainty, are reliable. The new results are more accuracy. (authors)

  9. Thick-target neutron, gamma-ray, and radionuclide production for protons below 12 MeV on nickel and carbon beam-stops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.; Wilson, W.B.

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear model calculations using the GNASH code are described for protons below 12 MeV incident on nickel and carbon isotopes, for beam stop design in the Los Alamos Accelerator Production of Tritium Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) project. The GNASH calculations apply Hauser-Feshbach and preequilibrium reaction theories and can make use of pre-calculated direct reaction cross sections to low-lying residual nucleus states. From calculated thin target cross sections, thick target 6.7 MeV and 12 MeV proton-induced production of neutrons, gamma rays, and radionuclides are determined. Emission spectra of the secondary neutrons and gamma rays are also determined. The model calculations are validated through comparisons with experimental thin- and thick-target measurements. The results of this work are being utilized as source terms in MCNP analyses for LEDA

  10. IMRT fluence map editing to control hot and cold spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor Cook, J.; Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Watson, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    Manually editing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence maps effectively controls hot and cold spots that the IMRT optimization cannot control. Many times, re-optimizing does not reduce the hot spots or increase the cold spots. In fact, re-optimizing only places the hot and cold spots in different locations. Fluence-map editing provides manual control of dose delivery and provides the best treatment plan possible. Several IMRT treatments were planned using the Varian Eclipse planning system. We compare the effects on dose distributions between fluence-map editing and re-optimization, discuss techniques for fluence-map editing, and analyze differences between fluence editing on one beam vs. multiple beams. When editing a beam's fluence map, it is essential to choose a beam that least affects dose to the tumor and critical structures. Editing fluence maps gives an advantage in treatment planning and provides controlled delivery of IMRT dose

  11. Isotopic dependence of GCR fluence behind shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Hu, Xiaodong; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (±100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (∼170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past; however, less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies

  12. A neutron source of variable fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachet, Guy; Demichel, Pascal; Prigent, Yvon; Riche, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns a variable fluence neutron source, like those that use in the known way a reaction between a radioactive emitter and a target, particularly of type (α,n). The emitter being in powder form lies in a carrier fluid forming the target, inside a closed containment. Facilities are provided to cause the fluidisation of the emitter by the carrier fluid in the containment. The fluidisation of the emitting powder is carried out by a booster with blades, actuated from outside by a magnetic coupling. The powder emitter is a α emitter selected in the group of curium, plutonium, thorium, actinium and americium oxides and the target fluid is formed of compounds of light elements selected from the group of beryllium, boron, fluorine and oxygen 18. The target fluid is a gas used under pressure or H 2 O water highly enriched in oxygen 18 [fr

  13. Studies for improvement of WWER-440 neutron fluence determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, Kr.; Belousov, S.; Apostolov, T.

    2001-01-01

    For assessment of radiation embrittlement and prediction of reactor vessel lifetime with reasonable conservatism a 'best estimated' neutron fluence is necessary. New studies purposed to improve the fluence determination are presented: 1) study on the reliability of multigroup presentation of the neutron cross sections, and 2) impact of negative gradient of reactor power in the periphery assemblies on the neutron fluence evaluation. The results of these studies are base for improvement of neutron fluence determination methodology applied by the INRNE, BAS at Kozloduy NPP. (author)

  14. Vectorial and plane energy fluences - useful concepts in radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, C.A.

    1977-06-01

    The vectorial physical quantities describing the radiation field are defined in this report. The use of these quantities is rare in the radiation dosimetry literature since a knowledge of the directions of motion of the ionizing particle is often uninteresting when determining absorbed doses. However the plane energy fluence rate is a useful quantity in cases with plane irradiation geometries. The plane energy fluence rate is closely related to the vectorial energy fluence rate. The backscattering properties of a medium can be expressed in terms either of its albedo or its reflection-coefficient (backscatter-coefficient). These quantities are discussed in order to derive useful relations between the plane energy fluence and the energy fluence at points on an extended plane surface. Examples are also given of erroneous use of energy fluence instead of vectorial or plane energy fluence. The examples are taken from roentgen diagnostic examinations. To prevent further mistakes it could be valuable if the quantities of vectorial and plane fluences were introduced in text books in radiation dosimetry. Awaiting for this, this report may hopefully be useful. (E.R.)

  15. Effects of mixed neutron-gamma beams in both sequential and simultaneous irradiation modalities on chromosomal aberrations of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in-vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, P.K.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Meisner, L.F.; Gould, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    Initial irradiations have been performed in preparation for testing the independent action hypothesis for chromosomal abnormality production between low- and high-LET radiation. Results of these irradiations are compared with typical dose response curves. Lessons learned and proposed experiments for the future are discussed. 25 refs., 3 figs

  16. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  17. Passive detectors for neutron fluence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    The use of neutron activation detectors (slow neutron detectors and threshold detectors) and fission track detectors for radiological protection purposes, principally in criticality dosimetry, dosimetry of pulsed accelerators and calibration of neutron fluxes is discussed. References are given to compilations of cross sections. For the determination of the activity induced, either beta ray or gamma ray counting may be used. For beta-ray counting, thin foils are usually necessary which result in low neutron sensitivity. When fission track detectors are used, it is necessary to know the efficiency of track registration. Alternatively, a detector-counter system may be calibrated by exposure to a known flux of monoenergetic neutrons. Usually, the sensitivity of activation detectors is low because small foils are used. For criticality dosimetry, calibration work and shielding studies on accelerators, low sensitivity is acceptable. However, there are some instances where, by the use of long integration times, or very large quantities of detector material with gamma ray detection, neutron fluences in operational areas have been measured. (author)

  18. Comparison of sources of exit fluence variation for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, Joseph K; Gordon, J James; Wang Song; Siebers, Jeffrey V; Clews, Luke; Greer, Peter B

    2009-01-01

    The fluence exiting a patient during beam delivery can be used as treatment delivery quality assurance, either by direct comparison with expected exit fluences or by backprojection to reconstruct the patient dose. Multiple possible sources of measured exit fluence deviations exist, including changes in the beam delivery and changes in the patient anatomy. The purpose of this work is to compare the deviations caused by these sources. Machine delivery-related variability is measured by acquiring multiple dosimetric portal images (DPIs) of several test fields without a patient/phantom in the field over a time period of 2 months. Patient anatomy-related sources of fluence variability are simulated by computing transmission DPIs for a prostate patient using the same incident fluence for 11 different computed tomography (CT) images of the patient anatomy. The standard deviation (SD) and maximum deviation of the exit fluence, averaged over 5 mm x 5 mm square areas, is calculated for each test set. Machine delivery fluence SDs as large as 1% are observed for a sample patient field and as large as 2.5% for a picket-fence dMLC test field. Simulations indicate that day-to-day patient anatomy variations induce exit fluence SDs as large as 3.5%. The largest observed machine delivery deviations are 4% for the sample patient field and 7% for the picket-fence field, while the largest difference for the patient anatomy-related source is 8.5%. Since daily changes in patient anatomy can result in substantial exit fluence deviations, care should be taken when applying fluence back-projection to ensure that such deviations are properly attributed to their source. (note)

  19. Fluence complexity for IMRT field and simplification of IMRT verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanushova, Tereza; Vondarchek, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) requires dosimetric verification of each patient’s plan, which is time consuming. This work deals with the idea of minimizing the number of fields for control, or even replacing plan verification by machine quality assurance (QA). We propose methods for estimation of fluence complexity in an IMRT field based on dose gradients and investigate the relation between results of gamma analysis and this quantity. If there is a relation, it might be possible to only verify the most complex field of a plan. We determine the average fluence complexity in clinical fields and design a test fluence corresponding to this amount of complexity which might be used in daily QA and potentially replace patient-related verification. Its applicability is assessed in clinical practice. The relation between fluence complexity and results of gamma analysis has been confirmed for plans but not for single fields. There is an agreement between the suggested test fluence and clinical fields in the average gamma parameter. A critical value of average gamma has been specified for the test fluence as a criterion for distinguishing between poorly and well deliverable plans. It will not be possible to only verify the most complex field of a plan but verification of individual plans could be replaced by a morning check of the suggested test fluence, together with a well-established set of QA tests. (Author)

  20. Probability model for worst case solar proton event fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xapsos, M.A.; Summers, G.P.; Barth, J.L.; Stassinopoulos, E.G.; Burke, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    The effects that solar proton events have on microelectronics and solar arrays are important considerations for spacecraft in geostationary orbits, polar orbits and on interplanetary missions. A predictive model of worst case solar proton event fluences is presented. It allows the expected worst case event fluence to be calculated for a given confidence level and for periods of time corresponding to space missions. The proton energy range is from >1 to >300 MeV, so that the model is useful for a variety of radiation effects applications. For each proton energy threshold, the maximum entropy principle is used to select the initial distribution of solar proton event fluences. This turns out to be a truncated power law, i.e., a power law for smaller event fluences that smoothly approaches zero at a maximum fluence. The strong agreement of the distribution with satellite data for the last three solar cycles indicates this description captures the essential features of a solar proton event fluence distribution. Extreme value theory is then applied to the initial distribution of events to obtain the model of worst case fluences

  1. Accuracy of helium accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    A helium (He) accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for fast reactor dosimetry. In order to evaluate the measurement accuracy of neutron fluence by the HAFM method, the HAFMs of enriched boron (B) and beryllium (Be) were irradiated in the Fast Neutron Source Reactor `YAYOI`. The number of He atoms produced in the HAFMs were measured and compared with the calculated values. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the neutron fluence could be measured within 5 % by the HAFM method, and that met the required accuracy for fast reactor dosimetry. (author)

  2. Development and testing of the VITAMIN-B7/BUGLE-B7 coupled neutron-gamma multigroup cross-section libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risner, J.M.; Wiarda, D.; Miller, T.M.; Peplow, D.E.; Patton, B.W.; Dunn, M.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS 6170, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States); Parks, B.T. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, Mail Stop O10-B3, 11555 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.190 states that calculational methods used to estimate reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fluence should use the latest version of the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF). The VITAMIN-B6 fine-group library and BUGLE-96 broad-group library, which are widely used for RPV fluence calculations, were generated using ENDF/B-VI.3 data, which was the most current data when Regulatory Guide 1.190 was issued. We have developed new fine-group (VITAMIN-B7) and broad-group (BUGLE-B7) libraries based on ENDF/B-VII.0. These new libraries, which were processed using the AMPX code system, maintain the same group structures as the VITAMIN-B6 and BUGLE-96 libraries. Verification and validation of the new libraries were accomplished using diagnostic checks in AMPX, 'unit tests' for each element in VITAMIN-B7, and a diverse set of benchmark experiments including critical evaluations for fast and thermal systems, a set of experimental benchmarks that are used for SCALE regression tests, and three RPV fluence benchmarks. The benchmark evaluation results demonstrate that VITAMIN-B7 and BUGLE-B7 are appropriate for use in RPV fluence calculations and meet the calculational uncertainty criterion in Regulatory Guide 1.190. (authors)

  3. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  4. Fast fluence measurement for JOYO irradiation field using niobium dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikara

    2004-03-01

    Neutron fluence and spectrum are key parameters in various irradiation tests and material surveillance tests so they need to be evaluated accurately. The reactor dosimetry test has been conducted by the multiple foil activation method, and a niobium dosimeter has been developed for measurement of fast neutron fluence in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The inelastic scattering reaction of 93 Nb has a low threshold energy, about 30 keV, and the energy distribution of reaction cross section is similar to the displacement cross section for iron. Therefore, a niobium dosimeter is suitable for evaluation of the fast neutron fluence and the displacement per atom for iron. Moreover, a niobium dosimeter is suited to measure neutron fluence in long-term irradiation test because 93 Nb, which is produced by the reaction, has a long half-life (16.4 years). This study established a high precision measurement technique using the niobium reaction rate. The effect of self-absorption was decreased by the solution and evaporation to dryness of niobium dosimeter. The dosimeter weight was precisely measured using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This technique was applied to JOYO dosimetry. The fast neutron fluences (E > 0.1 MeV) found by measuring the reaction rate in the niobium dosimeter were compared with the values evaluated using the multiple foil activation method. The ratio of measured fast neutron fluences by means of niobium dosimeter and multiple foil activation method range from 0.97 to 1.03 and agree within the experimental uncertainty. The measurement errors of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeter range from 4.5% (fuel region) to 10.1% (in-vessel storage rack). As a result of this study, the high precision measurement of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeters was confirmed. The accuracy of fast reactor dosimetry will be improved by application of niobium dosimeters to the irradiation tests in the JOYO MK-III core. (author)

  5. Neutron dosimetry intercomparison run for verification of the neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, I.; Kinova, L.

    2001-01-01

    For the neutron fluence verification the intercomparison runs Balakovo and KORPUS have been carried out. The participation in the international intercomparison runs shows that in order to more precisely verify the calculated values of the neutron fluence more intercomparison exercises are necessary. Due to such exercises the results improved after calibration of Nb performed and are in a very good agreement with RIIAR results in spite of the different approaches in the determination of its activity

  6. SU-F-T-540: Comprehensive Fluence Delivery Optimization with Multileaf Collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weppler, S; Villarreal-Barajas, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); McGeachy, P [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Khan, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf sequencing is performed via commercial black-box implementations, on which a user has limited to no access. We have developed an explicit, generic MLC sequencing model to serve as a tool for future investigations of fluence map optimization, fluence delivery optimization, and rotational collimator delivery methods. Methods: We have developed a novel, comprehensive model to effectively account for a variety of transmission and penumbra effects previously treated on an ad hoc basis in the literature. As the model is capable of quantifying a variety of effects, we utilize the asymmetric leakage intensity across each leaf to deliver fluence maps with pixel size smaller than the narrowest leaf width. Developed using linear programming and mixed integer programming formulations, the model is implemented using state of the art open-source solvers. To demonstrate the versatility of the algorithm, a graphical user interface (GUI) was developed in MATLAB capable of accepting custom leaf specifications and transmission parameters. As a preliminary proof-ofconcept, we have sequenced the leaves of a Varian 120 Leaf Millennium MLC for five prostate cancer patient fields and one head and neck field. Predetermined fluence maps have been processed by data smoothing methods to obtain pixel sizes of 2.5 cm{sup 2}. The quality of output was analyzed using computer simulations. Results: For the prostate fields, an average root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.82 and gamma (0.5mm/0.5%) of 91.4% were observed compared to RMSE and gamma (0.5mm/0.5%) values of 7.04 and 34.0% when the leakage considerations were omitted. Similar results were observed for the head and neck case. Conclusion: A model to sequence MLC leaves to optimality has been proposed. Future work will involve extensive testing and evaluation of the method on clinical MLCs and comparison with black-box leaf sequencing algorithms currently used by commercial treatment planning systems.

  7. Measurement of thermal neutron fluence with CaSO4 thermoluminescent phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinhua; Su Jingling; Wei Zemin

    1984-01-01

    During neutron irradiation, some TL phosphors were activated. After leaving the irradiation field the TL phosphor produced self-irradiation. The TL output of self-dose was only related to the original neutron fluence and independent of the γ-radiation. Several CaSO 4 TL phosphors were made. They were CaSO 4 :Dy, CaSO 4 :Dy-Teflon, CaSO 4 :Dy mixed with Dy 2 O 3 , CaSO 4 :Mn mixed with Dy 2 O 3 . The linearity, and lower detection limits of these TL phosphors were measured. The thermal neutron response of CaSO 4 :Mn mixed with Dy 2 O 3 was 64 R/(10 10 cm -2 ) and the lower detection limit was 1.3x10 5 cm -2

  8. Statistical analysis on the fluence factor of surveillance test data of Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeong Geun; Kim, Min Chul; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Bong Sang; Lim, Sang Yeob; Kwon, Jun Hyun [Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The transition temperature shift (TTS) of the reactor pressure vessel materials is an important factor that determines the lifetime of a nuclear power plant. The prediction of the TTS at the end of a plant’s lifespan is calculated based on the equation of Regulatory Guide 1.99 revision 2 (RG1.99/2) from the US. The fluence factor in the equation was expressed as a power function, and the exponent value was determined by the early surveillance data in the US. Recently, an advanced approach to estimate the TTS was proposed in various countries for nuclear power plants, and Korea is considering the development of a new TTS model. In this study, the TTS trend of the Korean surveillance test results was analyzed using a nonlinear regression model and a mixed-effect model based on the power function. The nonlinear regression model yielded a similar exponent as the power function in the fluence compared with RG1.99/2. The mixed-effect model had a higher value of the exponent and showed superior goodness of fit compared with the nonlinear regression model. Compared with RG1.99/2 and RG1.99/3, the mixed-effect model provided a more accurate prediction of the TTS.

  9. Development and Testing of the VITAMIN-B7/BUGLE-B7 Coupled Neutron-Gamma Multigroup Cross-Section Libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risner, Joel M.; Wiarda, Dorothea; Miller, Thomas Martin; Peplow, Douglas E.; Patton, Bruce W.; Dunn, Michael E.; Parks, Benjamin T.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.190 states that calculational methods used to estimate reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fluence should use the latest version of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). The VITAMIN-B6 fine-group library and BUGLE-96 broad-group library, which are widely used for RPV fluence calculations, were generated using ENDF/B-VI data, which was the most current data when Regulatory Guide 1.190 was issued. We have developed new fine-group (VITAMIN-B7) and broad-group (BUGLE-B7) libraries based on ENDF/B-VII. These new libraries, which were processed using the AMPX code system, maintain the same group structures as the VITAMIN-B6 and BUGLE-96 libraries. Verification and validation of the new libraries was accomplished using diagnostic checks in AMPX, unit tests for each element in VITAMIN-B7, and a diverse set of benchmark experiments including critical evaluations for fast and thermal systems, a set of experimental benchmarks that are used for SCALE regression tests, and three RPV fluence benchmarks. The benchmark evaluation results demonstrate that VITAMIN-B7 and BUGLE-B7 are appropriate for use in LWR shielding applications, and meet the calculational uncertainty criterion in Regulatory Guide 1.190.

  10. Proton Neutron Gamma-X Detection (PNGXD): An introduction to contrast agent detection during proton therapy via prompt gamma neutron activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, James L.

    2017-09-01

    experimental work are required to determine the feasibility of this new technique termed Proton Neutron Gamma-X Detection (PNGXD). The initial concept of this procedure is presented in this paper as well as future research directions.

  11. Comprehensive fluence model for absolute portal dose image prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytyk, K.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) continue to be investigated as treatment verification tools, with a particular focus on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This verification could be accomplished through a comparison of measured portal images to predicted portal dose images. A general fluence determination tailored to portal dose image prediction would be a great asset in order to model the complex modulation of IMRT. A proposed physics-based parameter fluence model was commissioned by matching predicted EPID images to corresponding measured EPID images of multileaf collimator (MLC) defined fields. The two-source fluence model was composed of a focal Gaussian and an extrafocal Gaussian-like source. Specific aspects of the MLC and secondary collimators were also modeled (e.g., jaw and MLC transmission factors, MLC rounded leaf tips, tongue and groove effect, interleaf leakage, and leaf offsets). Several unique aspects of the model were developed based on the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the linear accelerator including (1) use of a non-Gaussian extrafocal fluence source function, (2) separate energy spectra used for focal and extrafocal fluence, and (3) different off-axis energy spectra softening used for focal and extrafocal fluences. The predicted energy fluence was then convolved with Monte Carlo generated, EPID-specific dose kernels to convert incident fluence to dose delivered to the EPID. Measured EPID data were obtained with an a-Si EPID for various MLC-defined fields (from 1x1 to 20x20 cm 2 ) over a range of source-to-detector distances. These measured profiles were used to determine the fluence model parameters in a process analogous to the commissioning of a treatment planning system. The resulting model was tested on 20 clinical IMRT plans, including ten prostate and ten oropharyngeal cases. The model predicted the open-field profiles within 2%, 2 mm, while a mean of 96.6% of pixels over all

  12. Fluence scan: an unexplored property of a laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupsky, Jaromir; Hajkova, Vera; Burian, Tomas; Juha, Libor; Polcar, Tomas; Gaudin, Jerome; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Yabashi, Makina; Sobierajski, Ryszard; Krzywinski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We present an extended theoretical background of so-called fluence scan (f-scan or F-scan) method, which is frequently being used for offline characterization of focused short-wavelength (EUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray) laser beams [J. Chalupsky et al., Opt. Express 18, 27836 (2010)]. The method exploits ablative imprints in various solids to visualize iso-fluence beam contours at different fluence and/or clip levels. An f-scan curve (clip level as a function of the corresponding iso-fluence contour area) can be generated for a general non-Gaussian beam. As shown in this paper, fluence scan encompasses important information about energy distribution within the beam profile, which may play an essential role in laser-matter interaction research employing intense non-ideal beams. Here we for the first time discuss fundamental properties of the f-scan function and its inverse counterpart (if-scan). Furthermore, we extensively elucidate how it is related to the effective beam area, energy distribution, and to the so called Liu's dependence [J.M. Liu, Opt. Lett. 7, 196 (1982)]. A new method of the effective area evaluation based on weighted inverse f-scan fit is introduced and applied to real data obtained at the SCSS (SPring-8 Compact SASE Source) facility. (authors)

  13. Investigation of neutron fluence using fluence monitors for irradiation test at WWR-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, N.K.; Takemoto, N.

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation test of a Si ingot is planned using WWR-K in Institute of Nuclear Physics Republic of Kazakhstan (INP RK) to develop an irradiation technology for Si semiconductor production by Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) method in the framework of an international cooperation between INP RK and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Japan. It is possible to irradiate the Si ingot of 6 inch in diameter at the K-23 irradiation channel in the WWR-K. The preliminary irradiation test using 4 Al ingots was performed to evaluate the actual neutronic irradiation field at the K-23 channel in the WWR-K. Each Al ingot has the same dimension as the Si ingot, and 15 fluence monitors are equipped in it. Iron wire and aluminum-cobalt wire are inserted into them, and it is possible to evaluate both fast and thermal neutron fluxes by measurement of these radiation activities after irradiation. This report described the results of the preliminary irradiation test and the neutronic calculations by Monte Carlo method in order to evaluate the neutronic irradiation field in the irradiation position for the silicon ingot at the channel in the WWR-K. (authors)

  14. Fluence dependence of disorder depth profiles in Pb implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, C.E.; Kadhim, N.J.; Carter, G.

    1980-01-01

    The total, depth integrated disorder, induced by Pb implantation into Si at room temperature, initially increases rapidly with implantation fluence and then reaches a quasi saturation level where the increase with fluence is slow. Measurements of the depth distributions of the disorder, using high resolution low angle exit Rutherford Backscattering/Channelling analysis, suggest that the quasi saturation results from overlapping of disordered zones generated deep in the tail of the disorder-depth profiles. The depth of the disordered solid-crystal boundary, xsub(D), increases with ion fluence PHI, according to the relation xsub(D) = x bar + f(PHI).σ, where x bar is the most probable projected depth and σ the projected standard deviation of disorder generation. It is shown that this relationship is consistent with an approximately Gaussian depth distribution of disorder production. (author)

  15. Safety factors for neutron fluences in NPP safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demekhin, V.L.; Bukanov, V.N.; Il'kovich, V.V.; Pugach, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with global practice and a number of existing regulations, the use of conservative approach is required for the calculations related to nuclear safety assessment of NPP. It implies the need to consider the determination of neutron fluence errors that is rather complicated. It is proposed to carry out the consideration by the way of multiplying the neutron fluences obtained with transport calculations by safety factors. The safety factor values are calculated by the developed technique based on the theory of errors, features of the neutron transport calculation code and the results obtained with the code. It is shown that the safety factor value is equal 1.18 with the confidence level of not less than 0.95 for the majority of VVER-1000 reactor places where neutron fluences are determined by MCPV code, and its maximum value is 1.25

  16. Spectral fluence of neutrons generated by radiotherapeutic Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Smoldasova, Jana; Vondracek, Vladimir; Farkasova, Estera; Ticha, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Spectral fluences of neutrons generated in the heads of the radiotherapeutic linacs Varian Clinac 2100 C/D and Siemens ARTISTE were measured by means of the Bonner spheres spectrometer whose active detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by an activation detector, i.e. a tablet made of pure manganese. Measurements with different collimator settings reveal an interesting dependence of neutron fluence on the area defined by the collimator jaws. The determined neutron spectral fluences were used to derive ambient dose equivalent rate along the treatment coach. To clarify at which components of the linac neutrons are mainly created, the measurements were complemented with MCNPX calculations based on a realistic model of the Varian Clinac. (authors)

  17. The irradiation creep characteristics of graphite to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Cundy, M.; Kleist, G.

    1988-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have massive blocks of graphite with thermal and neutron-flux gradients causing high internal stresses. Thermal stresses are transient; however, stresses generated by differential growth due to neutron damage continue to increase with time. Fortunately, graphite also experiences creep under irradiation allowing relaxation of stresses to nominally safe levels. Because of complexity of irradiation creep experiments, data demonstrating this phenomenon are generally limited to fairly low fluences compared to the overall fluences expected in most reactors. Notable exceptions have been experiments at 300/degree/C and 500/degree/C run at Petten under tension and compression creep stresses to fluences greater than 4 /times/ 10 26 (E > 50 keV) neutrons/m 2 . This study complements the previous results by extending the irradiation temperature to 900/degree/C. 2 refs., 3 figs

  18. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo

    2017-01-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D tis ) and dose-to-water (D w ). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the 125 I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  19. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: pacrisguian@gmail.com [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), University of Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D{sub tis}) and dose-to-water (D{sub w}). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the {sup 125}I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  20. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klupák Vít

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  1. RAMA Methodology for the Calculation of Neutron Fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villescas, G.; Corchon, F.

    2013-01-01

    he neutron fluence plays an important role in the study of the structural integrity of the reactor vessel after a certain time of neutron irradiation. The NRC defined in the Regulatory Guide 1.190, the way must be estimated neutron fluence, including uncertainty analysis of the validation process (creep uncertainty is ? 20%). TRANSWARE Enterprises Inc. developed a methodology for calculating the neutron flux, 1,190 based guide, known as RAMA. Uncertainty values obtained with this methodology, for about 18 vessels, are less than 10%.

  2. The development report of an intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zongbing; Wei Ying

    1996-10-01

    An intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor is introduced. It is used to measure the received neutron fluence of the monocrystalline silicon in reactor radiation channel. The significance of study and specifications of the instrument are briefly described. The emphasis is on the working principle, structure and characteristics of the instrument is intelligent due to use of monolithic microcomputer. It has many advantages proved in the actual practice, such as powerful function, high accuracy, diversity of application, high level automatization, easy to operate, high reliability, etc. After using this instrument the monocrystalline silicon radiation technology is improved and the efficiency of production is raised. (1 fig.)

  3. SU-E-T-521: Investigation of the Uncertainties Involved in Secondary Neutron/gamma Production in Geant4/MCNP6 Monte Carlo Codes for Proton Therapy Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzakhanian, L; Enger, S; Giusti, V

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A major concern in proton therapy is the production of secondary neutrons causing secondary cancers, especially in young adults and children. Most utilized Monte Carlo codes in proton therapy are Geant4 and MCNP. However, the default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 do not have suitable cross sections or physical models to properly handle secondary particle production in proton energy ranges used for therapy. In this study, default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 were modified to better handle production of secondaries by adding the TENDL-2012 cross-section library. Methods: In-water proton depth-dose was measured at the “The Svedberg Laboratory” in Uppsala (Sweden). The proton beam was mono-energetic with mean energy of 178.25±0.2 MeV. The measurement set-up was simulated by Geant4 version 10.00 (default and modified version) and MCNP6. Proton depth-dose, primary and secondary particle fluence and neutron equivalent dose were calculated. In case of Geant4, the secondary particle fluence was filtered by all the physics processes to identify the main process responsible for the difference between the default and modified version. Results: The proton depth-dose curves and primary proton fluence show a good agreement between both Geant4 versions and MCNP6. With respect to the modified version, default Geant4 underestimates the production of secondary neutrons while overestimates that of gammas. The “ProtonInElastic” process was identified as the main responsible process for the difference between the two versions. MCNP6 shows higher neutron production and lower gamma production than both Geant4 versions. Conclusion: Despite the good agreement on the proton depth dose curve and primary proton fluence, there is a significant discrepancy on secondary neutron production between MCNP6 and both versions of Geant4. Further studies are thus in order to find the possible cause of this discrepancy or more accurate cross-sections/models to handle the nuclear

  4. Development and characterization of multi-sensory fluence rate probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie; Lilge, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    Multi-sensory fluence rate probes (MSPs) yield several simultaneous measurements of photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment light fluence from a single interstitial probe. Fluorescent sensors are embedded at desired positions along the axis of the optical fibre. A single fluorescence emission spectrum is obtained and decomposed using a partial least squares (PLS)-based analysis to yield the fluence at each sensor's location. The responsivity, linearity and possible photodegradation of each fluorophore chosen for the MSPs were evaluated using single-sensor probes. The performance of two- and three-sensor MSPs was evaluated experimentally. Individual fluorescence spectra collected from each sensor on the MSP were used to construct the training set necessary for the PLS-based analysis. The MSPs' responsivity, spatial resolution and accuracy were evaluated relative to a single scattering-tip detector. Three-fluorophore MSPs permitted three simultaneous measurements of the fluence rate gradient in a tissue-like phantom, with an average accuracy of 6.7%. No appreciable photodegradation or cross-talk was observed

  5. Nonlocal ultrafast magnetization dynamics in the high fluence limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, K.C.; Malinowski, G.; Dalla Longa, F.; Koopmans, B.

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain a number of recent experimental observations of laser-induced femtosecond demagnetization in the large fluence limit, we discuss the consequences of a recently proposed nonlocal approach. A microscopic description of spin flip scattering is implemented in an effective three

  6. Development of a Secondary Neutron Fluence Standard at GELINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyse, Jan; Eykens, Roger; Moens, Andre; Plompen, Arjan J.M.; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Wynants, Ruud; Anastasiou, Maria

    2013-06-01

    The MetroFission project, a Joint Research Project within the European Metrology Research Program, aims at addressing a number of metrological problems involved in the design of proposed Generation IV nuclear reactors. One of the objectives of this multidisciplinary project is the improvement of neutron cross section measurement techniques in order to arrive at uncertainties as required for the design and safety assessment of new generation power plants and fuel cycles. This objective is in line with the 'Uncertainty and target accuracy assessment for innovative systems using recent covariance data evaluations' published by a working party of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in 2008. These requests are often very challenging, being at or beyond the state-of-the-art in neutron measurements, which is set by self-normalizing methods and the neutron data standards used at laboratories where the data are measured. A secondary neutron fluence standard has been developed and calibrated at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA of the JRC's Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). It consists of a flux monitor, a reference ionization chamber containing a 10 B layer and a 235 U layer, and a parallel plate ionization chamber with 8 well characterized 235 U deposits. These devices are used to determine the neutron fluence, based on the well-known neutron induced fission reaction on 235 U. All deposits have been prepared and characterized at the IRMM target preparation lab. The secondary fluence standard at the GELINA facility can be used for reliable determination of the efficiency of fluence measurement devices used in neutron data measurements at IRMM and elsewhere. It is an essential tool to reliably calibrate fluence normalization devices used in neutron time-of-flight cross section measurements. (authors)

  7. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  8. Controlling Fluences of Reactive Species Produced by Multipulse DBDs onto Wet Tissue: Frequency and Liquid Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    Tissue covered by a thin liquid layer treated by atmospheric pressure plasmas for biomedical applications ultimately requires a reproducible protocol for human healthcare. The outcomes of wet tissue treatment by dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) depend on the plasma dose which determines the integral fluences of radicals and ions onto the tissue. These fluences are controlled in part by frequency and liquid thickness. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of multipulse DBDs interacting with wet tissue. The DBDs were simulated for 100 stationary or random streamers at different repetition rates and liquid thicknesses followed by 10 s to 2 min of afterglow. At 100 Hz, NOaq and OHaq are mixed by randomly striking streamers, although they have different rates of solvation. NOaq is nearly completely consumed by reactions with OHaq at the liquid surface. Only H2O2aq, produced through OHaq mutual reactions, survives to reach the tissue. After 100 pulses, the liquid becomes ozone-rich, in which the nitrous ion, NO2-aq, is converted to the nitric ion, NO3-aq. Reducing the pulse frequency to 10 Hz results in significant fluence of NOaq to the tissue as NOaq can escape during the interpulse period from the liquid surface where OHaq is formed. For the same reason, NO2-aq can also reach deeper into the liquid at lower frequency. Frequency and thickness of the liquid are methods to control the plasma produced aqueous species to the underlying tissue. Work supported by DOE (DE-SC0001319) and NSF (CHE-1124724).

  9. Fluence-dependent sputtering yield of micro-architectured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthes, Christopher S.R.; Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@ucla.edu; Li, Gary Z.; Matlock, Taylor S.; Goebel, Dan M.; Dodson, Chris A.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Sputtering yield is shown to be transient and heavily dependent on surface architecture. • Fabricated nano- and Microstructures cause geometric re-trapping of sputtered material, which leads to a self-healing mechanism. • Initially, the sputtering yield of micro-architectured Mo is approximately 1/2 the value as that of a planar surface. • The study demonstrates that the sputtering yield is a dynamic property, dependent on the surface structure of a material. • A developed phenomenological model mathematically describes the transient behavior of the sputtering yield as a function of plasma fluence. - Abstract: We present an experimental examination of the relationship between the surface morphology of Mo and its instantaneous sputtering rate as function of low-energy plasma ion fluence. We quantify the dynamic evolution of nano/micro features of surfaces with built-in architecture, and the corresponding variation in the sputtering yield. Ballistic deposition of sputtered atoms as a result of geometric re-trapping is observed, and re-growth of surface layers is confirmed. This provides a self-healing mechanism of micro-architectured surfaces during plasma exposure. A variety of material characterization techniques are used to show that the sputtering yield is not a fundamental property, but that it is quantitatively related to the initial surface architecture and to its subsequent evolution. The sputtering yield of textured molybdenum samples exposed to 300 eV Ar plasma is roughly 1/2 of the corresponding value for flat samples, and increases with ion fluence. Mo samples exhibited a sputtering yield initially as low as 0.22 ± 5%, converging to 0.4 ± 5% at high fluence. The sputtering yield exhibits a transient behavior as function of the integrated ion fluence, reaching a steady-state value that is independent of initial surface conditions. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain the observed transient sputtering phenomenon, and to

  10. The activation method for determining neutron spectra and fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogel, J.; Vespalec, R.

    1980-01-01

    3 mm thick foils of 4 and 17 mm in diameter were used for measurements. NaI scintillation detectors 45 mm in diameter by 50 mm thick and 40 mm in diameter by 1 mm thick, and a Ge-Li spectrometer of 53 cm 3 in volume were used for gamma detection. A photopeak or a certain part of the integral spectrum was measured for each radionuclide. Computer code PIKAR was applied in automatic calculation of a simple gamma spectrum obtained using the semiconductor spectrometer. The FACT code was used for calculating foil activity. Codes SAND II and RFSP were used for neutron spectra unfolding. Ge-Li detector spectrometry was used for determining neutron fluence. Code FLUE was used for determining the mean value of neutron flux density and fluence. (J.P.)

  11. Determination of fast neutron fluence at WWER-1000 pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenta, V. et al.

    1989-01-01

    The influence function method is an effective tool making it possible, by means of tabulated values to rapidly perform three-dimensional calculations of fast neutron fluences for various reactor core loadings and for various nuclear power plant units. The procedure for determining the spatial dependence of the fast neutron fluences in a WWER-1000 pressure vessel is described. For this, the reactor core is divided into sufficiently fine volume elements within which the neutron source can be regarded as coordinate-independent. The influence functions point to a substantial role of sources lying at the reactor core periphery. In WWER-1000 reactors, only 1 or 2 rows of peripheral assemblies are important. The influence function method makes possible a rapid and easy determination of preconditions for the assessment of the residual lifetime of the pressure vessel based on the actual reactor core loadings. (Z.M.). 7 figs., 8 refs

  12. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  13. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drury Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  14. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Thomas H.

    2016-02-01

    Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa) via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV) neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  15. Status of the design concepts for a high fluence fast pulse reactor (HFFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philbin, J.S.; Nelson, W.E.; Rosenstroch, B.

    1978-10-01

    The report describes progress that has been made on the design of a High Fluence Fast Pulse Reactor (HFFPR) through the end of calendar year 1977. The purpose of this study is to present design concepts for a test reactor capable of accommodating large scale reactor safety tests. These concepts for reactor safety tests are adaptations of reactor concepts developed earlier for DOE/OMA for the conduct of weapon effects tests. The preferred driver core uses fuel similar to that developed for Sandia's ACPR upgrade. It is a BeO/UO 2 fuel that is gas cooled and has a high volumetric heat capacity. The present version of the design can drive large (217) pin bundles of prototypically enriched mixed oxide fuel well beyond the fuel's boiling point. Applicability to specific reactor safety accident scenarios and subsequent design improvements will be presented in future reports on this subject

  16. Investigating multi-objective fluence and beam orientation IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; Fiege, Jason; Biagioli, Matthew; Poleszczuk, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Radiation Oncology treatment planning requires compromises to be made between clinical objectives that are invariably in conflict. It would be beneficial to have a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ perspective of the full spectrum of treatment plans that represent the possible trade-offs between delivering the intended dose to the planning target volume (PTV) while optimally sparing the organs-at-risk (OARs). In this work, the authors demonstrate Pareto-aware radiotherapy evolutionary treatment optimization (PARETO), a multi-objective tool featuring such bird’s-eye-view functionality, which optimizes fluence patterns and beam angles for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. The problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization is managed as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. To achieve this, PARETO is built around a powerful multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called Ferret, which simultaneously optimizes multiple fitness functions that encode the attributes of the desired dose distribution for the PTV and OARs. The graphical interfaces within PARETO provide useful information such as: the convergence behavior during optimization, trade-off plots between the competing objectives, and a graphical representation of the optimal solution database allowing for the rapid exploration of treatment plan quality through the evaluation of dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions. PARETO was evaluated for two relatively complex clinical cases, a paranasal sinus and a pancreas case. The end result of each PARETO run was a database of optimal (non-dominated) treatment plans that demonstrated trade-offs between the OAR and PTV fitness functions, which were all equally good in the Pareto-optimal sense (where no one objective can be improved without worsening at least one other). Ferret was able to produce high quality solutions even though a large number of parameters

  17. Expected Particle Fluences and Performance of the LHCb Trigger Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Siegler, M; Needham, M; Steinkamp, O

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expected 1 MeV-neutron equivalent fluence in the Trigger Tracker (TT) station of the LHCb detector have been used to investigate the effect of radiation damage on the performance of the detector. The build-up of leakage currents and the corresponding increase in electronic noise has been investigated, as well as the effect of bulk damage on the full-depletion voltage of the sensors and the risk of thermal runaway due to the power generated due to the leakage currents.

  18. Estimates of neutron fluence for the SDC detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Job, P.K.; Price, L.E.; Handler, T.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The high energy and high luminosity of SSC cause radiation problems to detectors. Almost all the radiation in the SDC detector comes from the 20 TeV on 20 TeV pp collisions. The design luminosity corresponds to 10 8 collisions per second. This luminosity is maintained for 10 7 seconds (one SSC year). It is important to know the radiation fields experienced by the tracking volume, calorimeter, electronics and the phototubes. The loss of light due to the radiation damage to the scintillators can adversely affect the physics performance of the calorimeter. Studies have been carried out earlier to estimate the radiation dose in the SDC detector. In this note the authors use ISAJET in combination with CALOR89 to make an accurate prediction of neutron fluence at the various locations of the SDC detector. The low energy neutrons are important because they can produce radioactive nuclides in large quantities. In CALOR89 the low energy neutron fluence is accurately estimated by MORSE code

  19. Application of the adjoint function methodology for neutron fluence determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighat, A.; Nanayakkara, B.; Livingston, J.; Mahgerefteh, M.; Luoma, J.

    1991-01-01

    In previous studies, the neutron fluence at a reactor pressure vessel has been estimated based on consolidation of transport theory calculations and experimental data obtained from in-vessel capsules and/or cavity dosimeters. Normally, a forward neutron transport calculation is performed for each fuel cycle and the neutron fluxes are integrated over the reactor operating time to estimate the neutron fluence. Such calculations are performed for a geometrical model which is composed of one-eighth (0 to 45 deg) of the reactor core and its surroundings; i.e., core barrel, thermal shield, downcomer, reactor vessel, cavity region, concrete wall, and instrumentation well. Because the model is large, transport theory calculations generally require a significant amount of computer memory and time; hence, more efficient methodologies such as the adjoint transport approach have been proposed. These studies, however, do not address the necessary sensitivity studies needed for adjoint function calculations. The adjoint methodology has been employed to estimate the activity of a cavity dosimeter and that of an in-vessel capsule. A sensitivity study has been performed on the mesh distribution used in and around the cavity dosimeter and the in-vessel capsule. Further, since a major portion of the detector response is due to the neutrons originated in the peripheral fuel assemblies, a study on the use of a smaller calculational model has been performed

  20. On-Site Determination and Monitoring of Real-Time Fluence Delivery for an Operating UV Reactor Based on a True Fluence Rate Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Li, Wentao; Qiang, Zhimin; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2017-07-18

    At present, on-site fluence (distribution) determination and monitoring of an operating UV system represent a considerable challenge. The recently developed microfluorescent silica detector (MFSD) is able to measure the approximate true fluence rate (FR) at a fixed position in a UV reactor that can be compared with a FR model directly. Hence it has provided a connection between model calculation and real-time fluence determination. In this study, an on-site determination and monitoring method of fluence delivery for an operating UV reactor was developed. True FR detectors, a UV transmittance (UVT) meter, and a flow rate meter were used for fundamental measurements. The fluence distribution, as well as reduction equivalent fluence (REF), 10th percentile dose in the UV fluence distribution (F 10 ), minimum fluence (F min ), and mean fluence (F mean ) of a test reactor, was calculated in advance by the combined use of computational fluid dynamics and FR field modeling. A field test was carried out on the test reactor for disinfection of a secondary water supply. The estimated real-time REF, F 10 , F min , and F mean decreased 73.6%, 71.4%, 69.6%, and 72.9%, respectively, during a 6-month period, which was attributable to lamp output attenuation and sleeve fouling. The results were analyzed with synchronous data from a previously developed triparameter UV monitoring system and water temperature sensor. This study allowed demonstration of an accurate method for on-site, real-time fluence determination which could be used to enhance the security and public confidence of UV-based water treatment processes.

  1. Constant-Fluence Area Scaling for Laser Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinko, John E.

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on polyoxymethylene (POM, trade name Delrin registered ) propellants in air at atmospheric pressure. A TEA CO 2 laser with maximum output power up to 20 J was used to deliver 300 ns pulses of 10.6 μm radiation to POM targets. Ablation at a constant fluence and a range of spot areas was achieved by varying combinations of the laser energy and spot size. Relevant empirical scaling laws governing laser propulsion parameters such as the momentum coupling coefficient (C m ) and specific impulse (I sp ) for spot areas within a range of about 0.05-0.25 cm 2 are presented. Experimental measurements of imparted impulse, C m , I sp , and ablated mass per pulse were made using dynamic piezoelectric force sensors and a scientific balance. Finally, Schlieren ICCD imaging of shock waves and vapor plumes was performed and analyzed

  2. Database of episode-integrated solar energetic proton fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Zachary D.; Adams, James H.; Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.

    2018-04-01

    A new database of proton episode-integrated fluences is described. This database contains data from two different instruments on multiple satellites. The data are from instruments on the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP8) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) series. A method to normalize one set of data to one another is presented to create a seamless database spanning 1973 to 2016. A discussion of some of the characteristics that episodes exhibit is presented, including episode duration and number of peaks. As an example of what can be understood about episodes, the July 4, 2012 episode is examined in detail. The coronal mass ejections and solar flares that caused many of the fluctuations of the proton flux seen at Earth are associated with peaks in the proton flux during this episode. The reasoning for each choice is laid out to provide a reference for how CME and solar flares associations are made.

  3. Effects of high thermal neutron fluences on Type 6061 aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Farrell, K.

    1992-01-01

    The control rod drive follower tubes of the High Flux Beam Reactor are contructed from precipitation-hardened 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and they operate in the high thermal neutron flux regions of the core. It is shown that large thermal neutron fluences up to ∼4 x 10 23 n/cm 2 at 333K cause large increases in tensile strength and relatively modest decreases in tensile elongation while significantly reducing the notch impact toughness at room temperature. These changes are attributed to the development of a fine distribution of precipitates of amorphous silicon of which about 8% is produced radiogenically. A proposed role of thermal-to-fast flux ratio is discussed

  4. The Meteoroid Fluence at Mars Due to Comet Siding Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Althea V.

    2014-01-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is headed for a close encounter with Mars on 2014 Oct 19. A collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comets coma may envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. We present an analytic model of the dust component of cometary comae that describes the spatial distribution of cometary dust and meteoroids and their size distribution. If the coma reaches Mars, we estimate a total incident particle fluence on the planet and its satellites of 0.01 particles per square meter. We compare our model with numerical simulations, data from past comet missions, and recent Siding Spring observations.

  5. Database of episode-integrated solar energetic proton fluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Zachary D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new database of proton episode-integrated fluences is described. This database contains data from two different instruments on multiple satellites. The data are from instruments on the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP8 and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES series. A method to normalize one set of data to one another is presented to create a seamless database spanning 1973 to 2016. A discussion of some of the characteristics that episodes exhibit is presented, including episode duration and number of peaks. As an example of what can be understood about episodes, the July 4, 2012 episode is examined in detail. The coronal mass ejections and solar flares that caused many of the fluctuations of the proton flux seen at Earth are associated with peaks in the proton flux during this episode. The reasoning for each choice is laid out to provide a reference for how CME and solar flares associations are made.

  6. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A.

    2004-01-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centers with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The Centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV

  7. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A. [Torino Univ., Torino (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale; Bourhaleb, F. [TERA Foundation, Novara (Italy)] [and others

    2004-10-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centers with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The Centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV.

  8. Application of damage functions to CTR component fluence limit predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.; Doran, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    Material behavior observed under irradiation conditions in test reactors is not always directly applicable to the design of reactor components such as CTR first wall because of differences in the damage effectiveness of test reactor and service spectra. The interpolation and, under some conditions, extrapolation of material property change data from test conditions to different neutron spectra in service conditions can be accomplished using semi-empirical damage functions. The derivation and application of damage functions to CTR conditions is reviewed. Since limited amounts of data are available for applications to CTR design spectra, considerable attention is placed on the effectiveness of various available and proposed neutron sources in determining a damage function and subsequent fluence limit prediction. Neutron sources included in this study were EBR-II, HIFR, LAMPF (Be and Cu targets), high energy deuterons incident on Be (D-Be), and 14 MeV neutrons (D-T)

  9. High fluence effects on ion implantation stopping and range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvi, S.; Tek, Z.; Oeztarhan, A.; Akbas, N.; Brown, I.G.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a code STOPPO which can be used to modify the more-widely used ion implantation codes to more accurately predict the mean nuclear and electronic stopping power, preferential sputtering and range of heavy ions in monatomic target materials. In our simulations an effective atomic number and effective atomic mass are introduced into conveniently available analytical stopping cross-sections and a better fitting function for preferential sputtering yield is carefully evaluated for each ion implantation. The accuracy of the code confirmed experimentally by comparison with measured Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) concentration profiles for 130 keV Zr ions implanted into Be to fluences of 1 x 10 17 , 2 x 10 17 and 4 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 . We find a steady increase in the mean nuclear and electronic stopping powers of the target; the increase in nuclear stopping power is much greater than the increase in electronic stopping power

  10. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cornelius, I.; Cuttone, G.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Guérin, L.; La Rosa, A.; Luparia, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, F.; Meyroneinc, S.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2004-09-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centres with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV.This kind of treatments need high-resolution monitor systems and for this reason we have developed a 256-strip segmented ionisation chamber, each strip being 400 μm wide, with a total sensitive area 13×13 cm2. The Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay (CPO) has been operational since 1991 and features a synchrocyclotron used for eye and head and neck tumours with proton beams up to 200 MeV. The monitor system has to work on a large surface and for this purpose we have designed a pixel-segmented ionisation chamber, each pixel being 5×5 mm2, for a total active area of 16×16 cm2. The results obtained with two prototypes of the pixel and strip chambers demonstrate that the detectors allow the measurement of fluence and centre of gravity as requested by clinical specifications.

  11. Simulation of high fluence swelling behavior in technological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Powell, R.W.; Diamond, S.; Lauritzen, T.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Sprague, J.A.; Keefer, D.

    1977-06-01

    The U.S. Breeder Reactor Program is employing charged particle irradiation experiments at accelerated displacement rates to simulate neutron-induced microstructural changes in materials of technological interest. Applications of the simulation technique range from the study of fundamental microstructural mechanisms to the development of predictions of the high fluence swelling behavior of candidate alloys for breeder reactor ducts and fuel cladding. An exact equivalence probably cannot be established between all facets of the microstructural evolution which occurs in the disparate charged-particle and neutron environments. To aid in the correlation of data developed in the two environments an assessment has been made of the factors influencing the simulation process. A series of intercorrelation programs and analysis activities have been conducted to identify and explore the relevant phenomena. The factors found to exert substantial influence on the correlation process fall into two categories, one which deals with those variables which are atypical of the neutron environment and one which deals with the additional factors which arise due to the large differences in displacement rate of the two irradiation environments. While the various simulation techniques have been invaluable in determining the basic mechanisms and parametric dependencies of swelling, the potential of these tools in the confident prediction of swelling at high neutron fluence has yet to be realized. The basic problem lies in the inability of the simulation technique to reproduce the early microstructural development in the period that precedes and encompasses the incubation of voids. The concepts of temperature shift and dose equivalency have also been found to be more complicated than previously imagined. Preconditioning of metals in a neutron environment prior to simulation testing is now being employed in order to provide more appropriate starting microstructures

  12. Fractal characterization of the silicon surfaces produced by ion beam irradiation of varying fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, R.P. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kumar, T. [Department of Physics, Central University of Haryana, Jant-Pali, Mahendergarh, Haryana 123029 (India); Mittal, A.K. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Dwivedi, S., E-mail: suneetdwivedi@gmail.com [K Banerjee Centre of Atmospheric and Ocean Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, UP 211002 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, PO Box 10502, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Fractal analysis of Si(1 0 0) surface morphology at varying ion fluences. • Autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function as fractal measures. • Surface roughness and lateral correlation length increases with ion fluence. • Ripple pattern of the surfaces is found at higher ion fluences. • Wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each fluence. - Abstract: Si (1 0 0) is bombarded with 200 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam at oblique incidence with fluences ranging from 3 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} to 3 × 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. The surface morphology of the irradiated surfaces is captured by the atomic force microscopy (AFM) for each ion fluence. The fractal analysis is performed on the AFM images. The autocorrelation function and height–height correlation function are used as fractal measures. It is found that the average roughness, interface width, lateral correlation length as well as roughness exponent increase with ions fluence. The analysis reveals the ripple pattern of the surfaces at higher fluences. The wavelength of the ripple surfaces is computed for each ion fluence.

  13. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  14. Irradiation embrittlement of some 15Kh2MFA pressure vessel steels under varying neutron fluence rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valo, M; Bars, B [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Ahlstrand, A [Imatran Voima Oy (IVO), Helsinki (Finland)

    1994-12-31

    Irradiation sensitivity of two forging materials was measured with Charpy-V and fracture mechanic tests, and with different fluence, fluence rate and irradiation time values. Irradiation sensitivity of the materials was found to be less or equal to the current Russian standard, and appears to be well described by the fluence parameter only. A slight additional effect on embrittlement from a long term low fluence irradiation is noticed, but it stays within the total scatter band of data. 7 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets of NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with fluence. The SEU cross section decreased with increasing fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, heavy ion irradiation of devices with variable upset sensitivity distribution using typical fluence levels may underestimate the cross section and on-orbit event rate.

  16. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon: Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwanath, V. [Applied Materials, 3225 Oakmead Village Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95052 (United States); Demenev, E. [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Department of Molecular Science and Nanosystems, Ca’Foscari University, Dorsoduro 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Giubertoni, D., E-mail: giuberto@fbk.eu [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Vanzetti, L. [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Koh, A.L. [Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Stanford University, 476 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Steinhauser, G. [Colorado State University, Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institut für Radioökologie und Strahlenschutz, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M. [Center for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Meirer, F., E-mail: f.meirer@uu.nl [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Utrecht University, Utrecht 3584 CG (Netherlands); Foad, M.A. [Applied Materials, 3225 Oakmead Village Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95052 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Samples prepared by high fluence, low-energy PIII of AsH{sub 3}{sup +} on Si(1 0 0) were studied. • PIII is of high technological interest for ultra-shallow doping and activation. • We used a multi-technique approach to study the As-implanted surface. • We show that PIII presents a new set of problems that needs to be tackled. • The presented study goes toward understanding the root mechanisms involved. - Abstract: High fluence (>10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}) low-energy (<2 keV) plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of AsH{sub 3}{sup +} on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon indicates that the layer is not only a result of deposition, but predominantly ion mixing. High fluence PIII introduces high concentration of arsenic, modifying the stopping power for incoming ions resulting in an increased deposition. When exposed to atmosphere, the arsenic rich layer spontaneously evolves forming arsenolite As{sub 2}O{sub 3} micro-crystals at the surface. The micro-crystal formation was monitored over several months and exhibits typical crystal growth kinetics. At the same time, a continuous growth of native silicon oxide rich in arsenic was observed on the exposed surface, suggesting the presence of oxidation enhancing factors linked to the high arsenic concentration at the surface.

  17. Microstructural interpretation of the fluence and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of irradiated AISI 316

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.; Fish, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of annealed and 20% cold-worked AISI 316 irradiated in EBR-II were determined for the temperature regime of 370 to 760 0 C for fluences up to 8.4 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). At irradiation temperatures below about 500 0 C, both annealed and cold-worked material exhibit a substantial increase in the flow stress with increasing fluence. Furthermore, both materials eventually exhibit the same flow stress, which is independent of fluence. At temperatures in the range of 538 to 650 0 C, the cold-worked material exhibits a softening with increasing fluence. Annealed AISI 316 in this temperature regime exhibits hardening and at a fluence of 2 to 3 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) reaches the same value of flow stress as the cold-worked material

  18. Ge nano-layer fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Tiecheng; Dun Shaobo; Hu Qiang; Zhang Songbao; An Zhu; Duan Yanmin; Zhu Sha; Wei Qiangmin; Wang Lumin

    2006-01-01

    A Ge nano-layer embedded in the surface layer of an amorphous SiO 2 film was fabricated by high-fluence low-energy ion implantation. The component, phase, nano-structure and luminescence properties of the nano-layer were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering, glancing incident X-ray diffraction, laser Raman scattering, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence. The relation between nano-particle characteristics and ion fluence was also studied. The results indicate that nano-crystalline Ge and nano-amorphous Ge particles coexist in the nano-layer and the ratio of nano-crystalline Ge to nano-particle Ge increases with increasing ion fluence. The intensity of photoluminescence from the nano-layer increases with increasing ion fluence also. Prepared with certain ion fluences, high-density nano-layers composed of uniform-sized nano-particles can be observed

  19. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  20. THE FLUENCE AND DISTANCE DISTRIBUTIONS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Ravi, V.; Hallinan, G.; Shannon, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB) are millisecond-duration radio pulses with apparent extragalactic origins. All but two of the FRBs have been discovered using the Parkes dish, which employs multiple beams formed by an array of feed horns on its focal plane. In this paper, we show that (i) the preponderance of multiple-beam detections and (ii) the detection rates for varying dish diameters can be used to infer the index α of the cumulative fluence distribution function (the log N –log F function: α = 1.5 for a non-evolving population in a Euclidean universe). If all detected FRBs arise from a single progenitor population, multiple-beam FRB detection rates from the Parkes telescope yield the constraint 0.52 < α < 1.0 with 90% confidence. Searches at other facilities with different dish sizes refine the constraint to 0.5 < α < 0.9. Our results favor FRB searches with smaller dishes, because for α < 1 the gain in field of view for a smaller dish is more important than the reduction in sensitivity. Further, our results suggest that (i) FRBs are not standard candles, and (ii) the distribution of distances to the detected FRBs is weighted toward larger distances. If FRBs are extragalactic, these results are consistent with a cosmological population, which would make FRBs excellent probes of the baryonic content and geometry of the universe.

  1. Comparison of embrittlement trend curves to high fluence surveillance results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, A.S.; Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In the regulatory justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) for long term operation, use is made of predictive formulas (also called trend curves) to evaluate the RPV embrittlement (expressed in terms of RTNDT shifts) in function of fluence, chemical composition and in some cases temperature, neutron flux or product form. It has been shown recently that some of the existing or proposed trend curves tend to underpredict high dose embrittlement. Due to the scarcity of representative surveillance data at high dose, some test reactor results were used in these evaluations and raise the issue of representativeness of the accelerated test reactor irradiations (dose rate effects). In Belgium the surveillance capsules withdrawal schedule was modified in the nineties in order to obtain results corresponding to 60 years of operation or more with the initial surveillance program. Some of these results are already available and offer a good opportunity to test the validity of the predictive formulas at high dose. In addition, advanced surveillance methods are used in Belgium like the Master Curve, increased tensile tests, and microstructural investigations. These techniques made it possible to show the conservatism of the regulatory approach and to demonstrate increased margins, especially for the first generation units. In this paper the surveillance results are compared to different predictive formulas, as well as to an engineering hardening model developed at SCK.CEN. Generally accepted property-to-property correlations are critically revisited. Conclusions are made on the reliability and applicability of the embrittlement trend curves. (authors)

  2. Flux and fluence determination using the material scrapings approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basha, H.S.; Manahan, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    The conventional approach to flux determination is to use high-purity dosimeters to characterize the neutron field. This paper presents an alternative approach called the scraping method. This method consists of taking scraping samples from an in-service component and using this material to measure the specific activity for various reactions. This approach enables the determination of the neutron flux and fluence incident on any component for which small chips of material can be safely obtained. It offers a capability for determining the neutron flux for components such as reactor internals without destructively removing them from service. The scrapings methodology was benchmarked by comparison with the results obtained using conventional dosimetry data from the San Onofre nuclear generation station Unit 2 (SONGS-2). Additionally, since the goal of any reactor physics analysis is to reduce uncertainty to the extent practical, it is important that the best available cross-section library be used. The fast flux calculated-to-experimental (C/E) ratios at the SONGS-297-deg in-vessel surveillance capsule and the REACTOR-X 90-deg ex-vessel dosimetry positions were studied for several cross-section libraries, including BIGLE-80, SAILOR, and ELXSIR. REACTOR-X is a pressurized water reactor power plant currently operating in the US

  3. Solid phase epitaxy of amorphous silicon carbide: Ion fluence dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, I.-T.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of radiation damage and impurity concentration on solid phase epitaxial growth of amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) as well as microstructures of recrystallized layer using transmission electron microscopy. Single crystals of 6H-SiC with (0001) orientation were irradiated with 150 keV Xe ions to fluences of 10 15 and 10 16 /cm 2 , followed by annealing at 890 deg. C. Full epitaxial recrystallization took place in a specimen implanted with 10 15 Xe ions, while retardation of recrystallization was observed in a specimen implanted with 10 16 /cm 2 Xe ions. Atomic pair-distribution function analyses and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results suggested that the retardation of recrystallization of the 10 16 Xe/cm 2 implanted sample is attributed to the difference in amorphous structures between the 10 15 and 10 16 Xe/cm 2 implanted samples, i.e., more chemically disordered atomistic structure and higher Xe impurity concentration in the 10 16 Xe/cm 2 implanted sample

  4. Deuterium trapping in carbon fiber composites under high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetov, A.A.; Begrambekov, L.B.; Kuzmin, A.A.; Shigin, P.A.; Zakharov, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of deuterium trapping in CFC, dance graphite MPG-8 and pyrolytic graphite (PG) under plasma ion- and electron irradiation. Number of specific features of deuterium trapping and retention under plasma ion and electron irradiation is presented and discussed. In particular it is shown that 1) deuterium trapping takes place even when energy of impinging ions approaches zero; 2) deuterium is trapped under irradiation by plasma electrons; 3) under irradiation at equal fluences deuterium trapping is higher, when ion flux is smaller. High energy ion penetrating the surfaces are trapped in the traps created at the expense of their kinetic energy. The process may be named 'kinetic trapping'. Under low energy (smaller than 200 eV) electron and/or ion irradiation the energy of inelastic interaction on the surface provides creation of active centers, which initiate dissociation of deuterium sorbed on the surface, penetration of deuterium atoms into graphite and their trapping in specific low energy traps. The term 'potential trapping' is proposed for this type of trapping. Under high energy irradiation such atoms can fill the traps formed through kinetic mechanism. Origination of moveable deuterium atoms from the layer of surface sorption seems to be time dependent process and it is a reason of increase of trapping along with irradiation time. New features of deuterium trapping and retention in graphite evaluated in this study offer new opportunities for analysis and correct estimation of hydrogen isotope trapping and retention in tokamaks having graphite tiles. (authors)

  5. Fluence-convolution broad-beam (FCBB) dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Weiguo; Chen Mingli, E-mail: wlu@tomotherapy.co [TomoTherapy Inc., 1240 Deming Way, Madison, WI 53717 (United States)

    2010-12-07

    IMRT optimization requires a fast yet relatively accurate algorithm to calculate the iteration dose with small memory demand. In this paper, we present a dose calculation algorithm that approaches these goals. By decomposing the infinitesimal pencil beam (IPB) kernel into the central axis (CAX) component and lateral spread function (LSF) and taking the beam's eye view (BEV), we established a non-voxel and non-beamlet-based dose calculation formula. Both LSF and CAX are determined by a commissioning procedure using the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) method as the standard dose engine. The proposed dose calculation involves a 2D convolution of a fluence map with LSF followed by ray tracing based on the CAX lookup table with radiological distance and divergence correction, resulting in complexity of O(N{sup 3}) both spatially and temporally. This simple algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than the CCCS method. Without pre-calculation of beamlets, its implementation is also orders of magnitude smaller than the conventional voxel-based beamlet-superposition (VBS) approach. We compared the presented algorithm with the CCCS method using simulated and clinical cases. The agreement was generally within 3% for a homogeneous phantom and 5% for heterogeneous and clinical cases. Combined with the 'adaptive full dose correction', the algorithm is well suitable for calculating the iteration dose during IMRT optimization.

  6. Production and Testing of the VITAMIN-B7 Fine-Group and BUGLE-B7 Broad-Group Coupled Neutron/Gamma Cross-Section Libraries Derived from ENDF/B-VII.0 Nuclear Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risner, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wiarda, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dunn, M. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, T. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peplow, D. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, B. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-09-30

    New coupled neutron-gamma cross-section libraries have been developed for use in light water reactor (LWR) shielding applications, including pressure vessel dosimetry calculations. The libraries, which were generated using Evaluated Nuclear Data File/B Version VII Release 0 (ENDF/B-VII.0), use the same fine-group and broad-group energy structures as the VITAMIN-B6 and BUGLE-96 libraries. The processing methodology used to generate both libraries is based on the methods used to develop VITAMIN-B6 and BUGLE-96 and is consistent with ANSI/ANS 6.1.2. The ENDF data were first processed into the fine-group pseudo-problem-independent VITAMIN-B7 library and then collapsed into the broad-group BUGLE-B7 library. The VITAMIN-B7 library contains data for 391 nuclides. This represents a significant increase compared to the VITAMIN-B6 library, which contained data for 120 nuclides. The BUGLE-B7 library contains data for the same nuclides as BUGLE-96, and maintains the same numeric IDs for those nuclides. The broad-group data includes nuclides which are infinitely dilute and group collapsed using a concrete weighting spectrum, as well as nuclides which are self-shielded and group collapsed using weighting spectra representative of important regions of LWRs. The verification and validation of the new libraries includes a set of critical benchmark experiments, a set of regression tests that are used to evaluate multigroup crosssection libraries in the SCALE code system, and three pressure vessel dosimetry benchmarks. Results of these tests confirm that the new libraries are appropriate for use in LWR shielding analyses and meet the requirements of Regulatory Guide 1.190.

  7. Organic liquid scintillation detectors for on-the-fly neutron/gamma alarming and radionuclide identification in a pedestrian radiation portal monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paff, Marc Gerrit; Ruch, Marc L.; Poitrasson-Riviere, Alexis; Sagadevan, Athena; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-07-01

    We present new experimental results from a radiation portal monitor based on the use of organic liquid scintillators. The system was tested as part of a 3He-free radiation portal monitor testing campaign at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, in February 2014. The radiation portal monitor was subjected to a wide range of test conditions described in ANSI N42.35, including a variety of gamma-ray sources and a 20,000 n/s 252Cf source. A false alarm test tested whether radiation portal monitors ever alarmed in the presence of only natural background. The University of Michigan Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Group's system triggered zero false alarms in 2739 trials. It consistently alarmed on a variety of gamma-ray sources travelling at 1.2 m/s at a 70 cm source to detector distance. The neutron source was detected at speeds up to 3 m/s and in configurations with up to 8 cm of high density polyethylene shielding. The success of on-the-fly radionuclide identification varied with the gamma-ray source measured as well as with which of two radionuclide identification methods was used. Both methods used a least squares comparison between the measured pulse height distributions to library spectra to pick the best match. The methods varied in how the pulse height distributions were modified prior to the least squares comparison. Correct identification rates were as high as 100% for highly enriched uranium, but as low as 50% for 241Am. Both radionuclide identification algorithms produced mixed results, but the concept of using liquid scintillation detectors for gamma-ray and neutron alarming in radiation portal monitor was validated.

  8. Neutron fluence in a 18 MeV Electron Accelerator for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.

    2001-01-01

    An investigation was made on the theoretical fundamentals for the determination of the neutron fluence in a linear electron accelerator for radiotherapy applications and the limit values of leakage neutron radiation established by guidelines and standards in radiation protection for these type of accelerators. This investigation includes the following parts: a) Exhaustive bibliographical review on the topics mentioned above, in order to combine and to update the necessary basic information to facilitate the understanding of this subject; b) Analysis of the accelerator operation and identification of its main components, specially in the accelerator head; c) Study of different types of targets and its materials for the Bremsstrahlung production which is based on the electron initial energy, the thickness of the target, and its angular distribution and energy, which influences in the neutron generation by means of the photonuclear and electro disintegration reactions; d) Analysis of the neutron yield based on the target type and its thickness, the energy of electrons and photons; e) Analysis of the neutron energy spectra generated in the accelerator head, inside and outside the treatment room; f) Study of the dosimetry fundamentals for neutron and photon mixed fields, the dosimeter selection criteria and standards applied for these applications, specially the Panasonic U D-809 thermoluminescent dosemeter and C R-39 nuclear track dosimeter; g) Theoretical calculation of the neutron yield using a simplified geometric model for the accelerator head with spherical cell, which considers the target, primary collimator, flattener filter, movable collimators and the head shielding as the main components for radiation production. The cases with W and Pb shielding for closed movable collimators and an irradiation field of 20 x 20 cm 2 were analyzed and, h) Experimental evaluation of the leakage neutron radiation from the patient and head planes, observing that the accelerator

  9. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Ziegenhein, P.; Oelfke, U.

    2014-03-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ~ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ~ 15-70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  10. Ultra-fast fluence optimization for beam angle selection algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangert, M; Ziegenhein, P; Oelfke, U

    2014-01-01

    Beam angle selection (BAS) including fluence optimization (FO) is among the most extensive computational tasks in radiotherapy. Precomputed dose influence data (DID) of all considered beam orientations (up to 100 GB for complex cases) has to be handled in the main memory and repeated FOs are required for different beam ensembles. In this paper, the authors describe concepts accelerating FO for BAS algorithms using off-the-shelf multiprocessor workstations. The FO runtime is not dominated by the arithmetic load of the CPUs but by the transportation of DID from the RAM to the CPUs. On multiprocessor workstations, however, the speed of data transportation from the main memory to the CPUs is non-uniform across the RAM; every CPU has a dedicated memory location (node) with minimum access time. We apply a thread node binding strategy to ensure that CPUs only access DID from their preferred node. Ideal load balancing for arbitrary beam ensembles is guaranteed by distributing the DID of every candidate beam equally to all nodes. Furthermore we use a custom sorting scheme of the DID to minimize the overall data transportation. The framework is implemented on an AMD Opteron workstation. One FO iteration comprising dose, objective function, and gradient calculation takes between 0.010 s (9 beams, skull, 0.23 GB DID) and 0.070 s (9 beams, abdomen, 1.50 GB DID). Our overall FO time is < 1 s for small cases, larger cases take ∼ 4 s. BAS runs including FOs for 1000 different beam ensembles take ∼ 15–70 min, depending on the treatment site. This enables an efficient clinical evaluation of different BAS algorithms.

  11. Relating Solar Energetic Particle Event Fluences to Peak Intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Stephen W.; Ling, Alan G.

    2018-02-01

    Recently we (Kahler and Ling, Solar Phys. 292, 59, 2017: KL) have shown that time-intensity profiles [I(t)] of 14 large solar energetic particle (SEP) events can be fitted with a simple two-parameter fit, the modified Weibull function, which is characterized by shape and scaling parameters [α and β]. We now look for a simple correlation between an event peak energy intensity [Ip] and the time integral of I(t) over the event duration: the fluence [F]. We first ask how the ratio of F/Ip varies for the fits of the 14 KL events and then examine that ratio for three separate published statistical studies of SEP events in which both F and Ip were measured for comparisons of those parameters with various solar-flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) parameters. The three studies included SEP energies from a 4 - 13 MeV band to E > 100 MeV. Within each group of SEP events, we find a very robust correlation (CC > 0.90) in log-log plots of F versus Ip over four decades of Ip. The ratio increases from western to eastern longitudes. From the value of Ip for a given event, F can be estimated to within a standard deviation of a factor of {≤} 2. Log-log plots of two studies are consistent with slopes of unity, but the third study shows plot slopes of { 10 MeV to {>} 100 MeV. This difference is not explained.

  12. Motion-encoded dose calculation through fluence/sinogram modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Weiguo; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy treatment planning systems rely on a static computed tomography (CT) image for planning and evaluation. Intra/inter-fraction patient motions may result in significant differences between the planned and the delivered dose. In this paper, we develop a method to incorporate the knowledge of intra/inter-fraction patient motion directly into the dose calculation. By decomposing the motion into a parallel (to beam direction) component and perpendicular (to beam direction) component, we show that the motion effects can be accounted for by simply modifying the fluence distribution (sinogram). After such modification, dose calculation is the same as those based on a static planning image. This method is superior to the 'dose-convolution' method because it is not based on 'shift invariant' assumption. Therefore, it deals with material heterogeneity and surface curvature very well. We test our method using extensive simulations, which include four phantoms, four motion patterns, and three plan beams. We compare our method with the 'dose-convolution' and the 'stochastic simulation' methods (gold standard). As for the homogeneous flat surface phantom, our method has similar accuracy as the 'dose-convolution' method. As for all other phantoms, our method outperforms the 'dose-convolution'. The maximum motion encoded dose calculation error using our method is within 4% of the gold standard. It is shown that a treatment planning system that is based on 'motion-encoded dose calculation' can incorporate random and systematic motion errors in a very simple fashion. Under this approximation, in principle, a planning target volume definition is not required, since it already accounts for the intra/inter-fraction motion variations and it automatically optimizes the cumulative dose rather than the single fraction dose

  13. Biphasic Fluence-Response Curves for Phytochrome-Mediated Kalanchoë Seed Germination 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethy, Roger; Dedonder, Andrée; De Petter, Edwin; Van Wiemeersch, Luc; Fredericq, Henri; De Greef, Jan; Steyaert, Herman; Stevens, Hilde

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curves for the effect of two red pulses separated by 24 hours on the germination of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Vesuv seeds, incubated on gibberellic acid (GA3) are biphasic for suboptimal concentrations. The response in the low fluence range corresponds with a classical red/far-red reversible phytochrome mediated reaction. GA3 induces an additional response in the very low fluence range, which is also phytochrome mediated. The sensitivity to phytochrome-far-red absorbing form (Pfr), however, is increased about 20,000-fold, so that even far-red fluences become saturating. Both in the very low and low fluence response range, the maximal responses induced by saturating fluences are modulated by the GA3 concentration. GA3 having no direct influence on the phytochrome phototransformations, alters the Pfr requirement and determines the responding seed population fraction in the very low and low fluence range. The effet of GA3 appears to be on the transduction chain of the phytochrome signal. PMID:16665187

  14. Experimental investigation into the effects of irradiation with mixed neutron-gamma-rays on the immune system as demonstrated by the model of immunity to Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1984-01-01

    Using the model of immunisation of rabbits with Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B the influence of neutron radiation on the antibody response was investigated. Four groups were formed, which differed by the moment of irradiation with regard to the moment of immunisation and re-immunisation, and were irradiated with neutron-rays of 200 rad and 300 rad doses. Both doses were each given before and after vaccination, respectively before and after re-vaccination. The antibody response has been evaluated by the Radio-Immuno-Assay (RIA): Neutron-radiation given 24 hours before vaccination effects a stronger immune suppression than given 24 hours after vaccination. By pre-antigenic radiation a secondary immune response is more suppressed than by radiation following the antigen; the recovery of lymphoid tissue, however, takes place in a shorter time than in case of radiation before or after a primary vaccination. The secondary antibody response to a re-vaccination is not influenced by a subsequent neutron-radiation. The formation of secondary antibodies is not as radiosensitive as the formation of primary ones. By a neutron-radiation preformed antibodies are hardly damaged. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Incorporating the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence, into compensator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, P.J.; Hoban, P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In this study we extended ideas developed by Faddegon and Pfalzner on the construction of patient specific compensating filters. Their research was essentially focused on formulating a general method for creating compensators using a 3D planning system. In their work Faddegon and Pfalzner utilized a simple attenuation model to convert transmission arrays into filter thickness arrays. The compensators constructed from these arrays produce the primary fluence required to give a uniform dose distribution at a specified depth. This technique does not account for local geometric variations hi compensator scattering conditions. Therefore we have devised a method to incorporate the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence passing through the compensating filter. A 2D Gaussian kernel, generated from Monte Carlo measurements, was used to model the spread of the primary fluence in the compensating filter. A 'maximum likelihood' optimisation algorithm was employed to deconvolve the kernel from the desired primary fluence to produce a more realistic incident fluence and compensator thickness array. The CMS FOCUS planning system was used to generate transmission maps corresponding to the desired influence of the compensating filter. Two compensating filters were constructed for each map, one using the standard attenuation method and the other with our method. For each method, an assessment was made using film dosimetry, on the degree of correlation between the desired primary fluence and the primary fluence produced by the compensating filter. Our results indicate that for compensating filters which are relatively uniform in thickness, there is good agreement between desired and delivered fluence maps for both methods. For non-uniform compensating filters the attenuation method deviates more notably from the desired fluence map. As expected, both methods also show significant deviations around the edges of the filter. It is anticipated that the work done here

  16. SU-F-T-261: Reconstruction of Initial Photon Fluence Based On EPID Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, T; Engenhart-Cabillic, R [Philipp University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Czarnecki, D; Maeder, U; Zink, K [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen - University of Applied Sciences, Giessen (Germany); Kussaether, R [MedCom GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Poppe, B [University Hospital for Medical Radiation Physics, Pius-Hospital, Medical Campus, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Verifying an algorithm to reconstruct relative initial photon fluence for clinical use. Clinical EPID and CT images were acquired to reconstruct an external photon radiation treatment field. The reconstructed initial photon fluence could be used to verify the treatment or calculate the applied dose to the patient. Methods: The acquired EPID images were corrected for scatter caused by the patient and the EPID with an iterative reconstruction algorithm. The transmitted photon fluence behind the patient was calculated subsequently. Based on the transmitted fluence the initial photon fluence was calculated using a back-projection algorithm which takes the patient geometry and its energy dependent linear attenuation into account. This attenuation was gained from the acquired cone-beam CT or the planning CT by calculating a water-equivalent radiological thickness for each irradiation direction. To verify the algorithm an inhomogeneous phantom consisting of three inhomogeneities was irradiated by a static 6 MV photon field and compared to a reference flood field image. Results: The mean deviation between the reconstructed relative photon fluence for the inhomogeneous phantom and the flood field EPID image was 3% rising up to 7% for off-axis fluence. This was probably caused by the used clinical EPID calibration, which flattens the inhomogeneous fluence profile of the beam. Conclusion: In this clinical experiment the algorithm achieved good results in the center of the field while it showed high deviation of the lateral fluence. This could be reduced by optimizing the EPID calibration, considering the off-axis differential energy response. In further progress this and other aspects of the EPID, eg. field size dependency, CT and dose calibration have to be studied to realize a clinical acceptable accuracy of 2%.

  17. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a open-quotes best estimateclose quotes of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards

  18. Review of the Palisades pressure vessel accumulated fluence estimate and of the least squares methodology employed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, P.J.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides a review of the Palisades submittal to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requesting endorsement of their accumulated neutron fluence estimates based on a least squares adjustment methodology. This review highlights some minor issues in the applied methodology and provides some recommendations for future work. The overall conclusion is that the Palisades fluence estimation methodology provides a reasonable approach to a {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes} of the accumulated pressure vessel neutron fluence and is consistent with the state-of-the-art analysis as detailed in community consensus ASTM standards.

  19. Dependence of laser assisted cleaning of clad surfaces on the laser fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilaya, J.P.; Raote, P.; Sai Prasad, M.B.; Biswas, D.J.; Aniruddha Kumar

    2005-01-01

    The decontamination factor is studied as a function of laser fluence for three kinds of clad surfaces viz., plain zircaloy, autoclaved zircaloy and SS with cesium as the test contamination. It has been found that the decontamination factor exhibits a maximal behaviour with the laser fluence and its maximum value occurs at different laser fluences in the three cases. The maximal behaviour is attributed to reduced coupling of energy from the laser beam to the substrate due to the initiation of surface-assisted optical breakdown. The results obtained in the experiment carried out in helium environment qualitatively support this explanation (author)

  20. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements at high neutron fluence and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.

    1985-01-01

    Solid State Track Recorder (SSTR) techniques have been used to measure 239-Pu, 235-U, and 237-Np fission rates for total neutron fluences approaching 5 x 10 17 n/cm 2 at temperatures in the range 680 to 830 0 F. Natural quartz crystal SSTRs were used to withstand the high temperature environment and ultra low-mass fissionable deposits of the three isotopes were required to yield scannable track densities at the high neutron fluences. The results of these high temperature, high neutron fluence measurements are reported

  1. Superconductivity in irradiated A-15 compounds at low fluences. I. Neutron-irradiated V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Caton, R.; Pande, C.S.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of the superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/ of single-crystal and polycrystalline V 3 Si was investigated as a function of low-fluence neutron irradiation. It is found that the initial degradation of T/sub c/ is sample-dependent, some specimens showing no degradation in T/sub c/ up to a fluence of 2 x 10 18 n/cm 2 . This and many other earlier observations on low-fluence behavior are explained in terms of a recently proposed model of radiation damage in A-15 compounds

  2. The determination of fast neutron fluence in radiation stability tests of steel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogel, J.; Vespalec, R.

    1979-01-01

    The activation method is described of determining fast neutron fluence. Samples of steel designed for WWER type reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the CHOUCA-rigs in the core of the WWR-S reactor. The neutron spectrum was measured by the multiple activation foil method and the effective cross sections of fluence monitors were calculated. The fluences obtained from the reactions 54 Fe(n,p) 54 Mn and 63 Cu(n,α) 60 Co are presented and the method is discussed. (author)

  3. Time-resolved angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    Even at moderate fluence (0.6 -2.4 J/cm2) laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ions emitted from the surface. The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. We have irradiated silver...... in a vacuum chamber (~ 10-7 mbar) with a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 355 nm and made detailed measurements of the time-resolved angular distribution. The ion flow in different directions has been measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes, by which the time-of-flight spectra, as well...

  4. Interior point algorithms: guaranteed optimality for fluence map optimization in IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, Dionne M [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada); Glaser, Daniel [Division of Optimization and Systems Theory, Department of Mathematics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Romeijn, H Edwin [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2117 (United States); Dempsey, James F, E-mail: aleman@mie.utoronto.c, E-mail: romeijn@umich.ed, E-mail: jfdempsey@viewray.co [ViewRay, Inc. 2 Thermo Fisher Way, Village of Oakwood, OH 44146 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    One of the most widely studied problems of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning problem is the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem, the problem of determining the amount of radiation intensity, or fluence, of each beamlet in each beam. For a given set of beams, the fluences of the beamlets can drastically affect the quality of the treatment plan, and thus it is critical to obtain good fluence maps for radiation delivery. Although several approaches have been shown to yield good solutions to the FMO problem, these solutions are not guaranteed to be optimal. This shortcoming can be attributed to either optimization model complexity or properties of the algorithms used to solve the optimization model. We present a convex FMO formulation and an interior point algorithm that yields an optimal treatment plan in seconds, making it a viable option for clinical applications.

  5. Interior point algorithms: guaranteed optimality for fluence map optimization in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, Dionne M; Glaser, Daniel; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2010-01-01

    One of the most widely studied problems of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning problem is the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem, the problem of determining the amount of radiation intensity, or fluence, of each beamlet in each beam. For a given set of beams, the fluences of the beamlets can drastically affect the quality of the treatment plan, and thus it is critical to obtain good fluence maps for radiation delivery. Although several approaches have been shown to yield good solutions to the FMO problem, these solutions are not guaranteed to be optimal. This shortcoming can be attributed to either optimization model complexity or properties of the algorithms used to solve the optimization model. We present a convex FMO formulation and an interior point algorithm that yields an optimal treatment plan in seconds, making it a viable option for clinical applications.

  6. Development of neutron fluence measurement and evaluation technology for the test materials in the capsule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, U.; Choi, S. H.; Kang, H. D. [Kyungsan University, Kyungsan (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The four kinds of the fluence monitor considered by self-shielding are design and fabricated for evaluation of neutron irradiation fluence. They are equipped with dosimeters consisting of Ni, Fe and Ti wires and so forth. The nuclear reaction rate is obtained by measurement on dosimeter using the spectroscopic analysis of induced {gamma}-ray. We established the nuetron fluence evaluating technology that is based on the measurement of the reaction rate considering reactor's irradiation history, burn-out, self-shielding in fluence monitor, and the influence of impurity in dosimeter. The distribution of high energy neutron flux on the vertical axis of the capsule shows fifth order polynomial equation and is good agree with theoretical value in the error range of 30% by MCNP/4A code. 22 refs., 50 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  7. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Nathala, Chandra Sekher; Ajami, Ali Asghar; Husinsky, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm-2 was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  8. Deduction of solar neutron fluences from large gamma-ray flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimori, Masato; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Solar neutron fluences from large gamma-ray flares are deduced from accelerated proton spectra and numbers derived from the gamma-ray observations. The deduced solar neutron fluences range from 1 to 200 neutrons cm -2 . The present result indicates a possibility that high sensitivity ground-based neutron monitors can detect solar neutron events, just as detected by the Jungfraujoch and Rome neutron monitors. (author)

  9. Femtosecond laser fluence based nanostructuring of W and Mo in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore (Pakistan); Nathala, Chandra Sekher [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Ajami, Ali Asghar [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Physics, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Husinsky, Wolfgang [Institute of Applied Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    The effect of femtosecond laser fluence on nanostructuring of Tungsten (W) and Molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated after ablation in ethanol environment. A Ti: Sapphire laser (800 nm, 30 fs) at fluences ranging from 0.6 to 5.7 J cm{sup −2} was employed to ablate targets. The growth of structures on the surface of irradiated targets is investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) analysis. The SEM was performed for both central as well as the peripheral ablated regions. It is observed that both the development and shape of nanoscale features is dependent upon deposited energies to the target surface as well as nature of material. Nanostructures grown on Mo are more distinct and well defined as compared to W. At central ablated areas of W, unorganized Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) are grown at low fluences, whereas, nonuniform melting along with cracking is observed at higher fluences. In case of Mo, well-defined and organized LIPSS are observed for low fluences. With increasing fluence, LIPSS become unorganized and broken with an appearance of cracks and are completely vanished with the formation of nanoscale cavities and conical structures. In case of peripheral ablated areas broken and bifurcated LIPSS are grown for all fluences for both materials. The, ablated diameter, ablation depth, ablation rate and the dependence of periodicity of LIPSS on the laser fluence are also estimated for both W and Mo. Parametric instabilities of laser-induced plasma along with generation and scattering of surface plasmons is considered as a possible cause for the formation of LIPSS. For ethanol assisted ablation, the role of bubble cavitation, precipitation, confinement and the convective flow is considered to be responsible for inducing increased hydrodynamic instabilities at the liquid-solid interface.

  10. Optical properties tailoring by high fluence implantation of Ag ions on sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, C.; Silva, R.C. da; Wemans, A.; Maneira, M.J.P.; Kozanecki, A.; Alves, E.

    2006-01-01

    Optical and structural properties of single crystalline α-Al 2 O 3 were changed by the implantation of high fluences of Ag ions. Colourless transparent (101-bar 0) sapphire samples were implanted at room temperature with 160keV silver ions and fluences up to 1x10 17 Agcm -2 . Surface amorphization is observed at the fluence of 6x10 16 Agcm -2 . Except for the lower fluences (below 6x10 16 Agcm -2 ) the optical absorption spectra reveal the presence of a band peaking in the region 450-500nm, depending on the retained fluence. This band has been attributed to the presence of silver colloids, being thus 1x10 16 Agcm -2 below the threshold for colloid formation during the implantation. Annealing in oxidizing atmosphere promotes the recrystallization along with segregation of Ag followed by loss through evaporation. Recrystallization is retarded for annealing in reducing atmosphere and the Ag profile displays now a double peak structure after evaporation. Playing with the implantation fluence, temperature and annealing atmosphere controllable shifts of the position and intensity of the optical bands in the visible were achieved

  11. Protocol for Determining Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diode (UV-LED) Fluence for Microbial Inactivation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyrandish, Ataollah; Mohseni, Madjid; Taghipour, Fariborz

    2018-06-15

    Determining fluence is essential to derive the inactivation kinetics of microorganisms and to design ultraviolet (UV) reactors for water disinfection. UV light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) are emerging UV sources with various advantages compared to conventional UV lamps. Unlike conventional mercury lamps, no standard method is available to determine the average fluence of the UV-LEDs, and conventional methods used to determine the fluence for UV mercury lamps are not applicable to UV-LEDs due to the relatively low power output, polychromatic wavelength, and specific radiation profile of UV-LEDs. In this study, a method was developed to determine the average fluence inside a water suspension in a UV-LED experimental setup. In this method, the average fluence was estimated by measuring the irradiance at a few points for a collimated and uniform radiation on a Petri dish surface. New correction parameters were defined and proposed, and several of the existing parameters for determining the fluence of the UV mercury lamp apparatus were revised to measure and quantify the collimation and uniformity of the radiation. To study the effect of polychromatic output and radiation profile of the UV-LEDs, two UV-LEDs with peak wavelengths of 262 and 275 nm and different radiation profiles were selected as the representatives of typical UV-LEDs applied to microbial inactivation. The proper setup configuration for microorganism inactivation studies was also determined based on the defined correction factors.

  12. Neutron Fluence Evaluation using an Am-Be Neutron Sources Assembly and P ADC Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddik, U.

    2008-01-01

    An assembly of four 241 Am-Be sources has been constructed at Nuclear Reactions Unit (NRU) of Nuclear Research Center (NRU) to perform analysis of different materials using thermal and fast neutrons. In the present paper, we measure the value of transmittance (T) in percentage of etched CR-39 detectors using a spectrophotometer at different neutron fluences ,to relate the transmittance of the detector with the neutron fluence values. The exposed samples to neutrons with accumulated fluence of order between 10 10 and 10 12 cm -2 were etched for 15 time intervals between 10-600 min in 6.25 N NaOH at 70 degree C. The etched samples were analyzed using Tech 8500 II spectrophotometer. A trend of the sample transmission and the etching time is observed which is different for each fluence value. A linear relation between the transmittance decay constant and the neutron fluence is observed which could be used as a calibration to determine unknown neutron fluence

  13. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities.; Medicion de flujos de neutrones en instalaciones nucleares.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho L, M E

    1997-12-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant `Laguna Verde`. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the `Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes` of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author).

  14. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ∼0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ∼50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  15. Neutron gamma competition in fast fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frehaut, J.

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper we analyse the data we have obtained on the distribution of the gamma-ray energy per fission, as well as on the average energy E-barγ released per fission for the neutron induced fission of several isotopes, in the energy range up to 15 MeV. 6 refs, 9 figs

  16. SU-F-T-289: MLC Fluence Sonogram Based Delivery Quality Assurance for Bilateral Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Karrthick, KP; Kataria, Tejinder; Mahendran, Ramu; Selvan, Tamil; Duraikannu, Palani [Division of Radiation Oncology, Medanta The Medicity, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Raj, Nambi [Department of Physics, School of Advanced sciences, VIT University, Vellore (India); Arunai, N

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Performing DQA for Bilateral (B-L) breast tomotherapy is a challenging task due to the limitation of any commercially available detector array or film. Aim of this study is to perform DQA for B-L breast tomotherapy plan using MLC fluence sinogram. Methods: Treatment plan was generated on Tomotherapy system for B-L breast tumour. B-L breast targets were given 50.4 Gy prescribed over 28 fractions. Plan is generated with 6 MV photon beam & pitch was set to 0.3. As the width of the total target is 39 cm (left & right) length is 20 cm. DQA plan delivered without any phantom on the mega voltage computed tomography (MCVT) detector system. The pulses recorded by MVCT system were exported to the delivery analysis software (Tomotherapy Inc.) for reconstruction. The detector signals are reconstructed to a sonogram and converted to MLC fluence sonogram. The MLC fluence sinogram compared with the planned fluence sinogram. Also point dose measured with cheese phantom and ionization chamber to verify the absolute dose component Results: Planned fluence sinogram and reconstructed MLC fluence sinogram were compared using Gamma metric. MLC positional difference and intensity of the beamlet were used as parameters to evaluate gamma. 3 mm positional difference and 3% beamlet intensity difference were used set for gamma calculation. A total of 26784 non-zero beamlets were included in the analysis out of which 161 beamlets had gamma more than 1. The gamma passing rate found to be 99.4%. Point dose measurements were within 1.3% of the calculated dose. Conclusion: MLC fluence sinogram based delivery quality assurance performed for bilateral breast irradiation. This would be a suitable alternate for large volume targets like bilateral breast, Total body irradiation etc. However conventional method of DQA should be used to validate this method periodically.

  17. Spectral distribution of particle fluence in small field detectors and its implication on small field dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmakhlouf, Hamza; Andreo, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    Correction factors for the relative dosimetry of narrow megavoltage photon beams have recently been determined in several publications. These corrections are required because of the several small-field effects generally thought to be caused by the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium (LCPE) in narrow beams. Correction factors for relative dosimetry are ultimately necessary to account for the fluence perturbation caused by the detector. For most small field detectors the perturbation depends on field size, resulting in large correction factors when the field size is decreased. In this work, electron and photon fluence differential in energy will be calculated within the radiation sensitive volume of a number of small field detectors for 6 MV linear accelerator beams. The calculated electron spectra will be used to determine electron fluence perturbation as a function of field size and its implication on small field dosimetry analyzed. Fluence spectra were calculated with the user code PenEasy, based on the PENELOPE Monte Carlo system. The detectors simulated were one liquid ionization chamber, two air ionization chambers, one diamond detector, and six silicon diodes, all manufactured either by PTW or IBA. The spectra were calculated for broad (10 cm × 10 cm) and narrow (0.5 cm × 0.5 cm) photon beams in order to investigate the field size influence on the fluence spectra and its resulting perturbation. The photon fluence spectra were used to analyze the impact of absorption and generation of photons. These will have a direct influence on the electrons generated in the detector radiation sensitive volume. The electron fluence spectra were used to quantify the perturbation effects and their relation to output correction factors. The photon fluence spectra obtained for all detectors were similar to the spectrum in water except for the shielded silicon diodes. The photon fluence in the latter group was strongly influenced, mostly in the low-energy region, by

  18. Burnup influence on the VVER-1000 reactor vessel neutron fluence evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, I.; Mihaylov, N.; Ilieva, K.; Kirilova, D.; Manolova, M.

    2009-01-01

    The neutron fluence of the vessels of the reactors is determined regularly accordingly the RPV Surveillance Program of the Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 and 6 in order to assess the state of the metal vessel and their radiation damaging. The calculations are carried out by the method of discrete ordinates used in the TORT program for operated reactor cycles. An average reactor spectrum corresponding to fresh U-235 fuel is used as an input neutron source. The impact of the burn up of the fuel on the neutron fluence of VVER-1000 reactor vessel is evaluated. The calculations of isotopic concentrations of U-235 and Pu-239 corresponding to 4 years burn up were performed by the module SAS2H of the code system SCALE 4.4. Since fresh fuel or 4 years burn up fuel assembly are placed in periphery of reactor core the contribution of Pu-239 of first year burn up and of 4 years burn up is taken in consideration. Calculations of neutron fluence were performed with neutron spectrum for fresh fuel, for 1 year and for 4 years burn up fuel. Correction factors for neutron fluence at the inner surface of the reactor vessel, in 1/4 depth of the vessel and in the air behind the vessel were obtained. The correction coefficient could be used when the neutron fluence is assessed so in verification when the measured activity of ex-vessel detectors is compared with calculated ones. (authors)

  19. Burnup influence on the WWER-1000 reactor vessel neutron fluence evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, I.; Mihaylov, N.; Ilieva, K.; Kirilova, D.; Manolova, M.

    2009-01-01

    The neutron fluence of the vessels of the reactors is determined regularly accordingly the RPV Surveillance Program of Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 and 6 in order to assess the state of the metal vessel and their radiation damaging. The calculations are carried out by the method of discrete ordinates used in the TORT program for operated reactor cycles. An average reactor spectrum corresponding to fresh U-235 fuel is used as an input neutron source. The impact of the burn up of the fuel on the neutron fluence of WWER-1000 reactor vessel is evaluated. The calculations of isotopic concentrations of U-235 and Pu-239 corresponding to 4 years burn up were performed by the module SAS2H of the code system SCALE 4.4. Since fresh fuel or 4 years burn up fuel assembly are placed in periphery of reactor core the contribution of Pu-239 of first year burn up and of 4 years burn up is taken in consideration. Calculations of neutron fluence were performed with neutron spectrum for fresh fuel, for 1 year and for 4 years burn up fuel. Correction factors for neutron fluence at the inner surface of the reactor vessel, in ? depth of the vessel and in the air behind the vessel were obtained. The correction coefficient could be used when the neutron fluence is assessed so in verification when the measured activity of ex-vessel detectors is compared with calculated ones. (Authors)

  20. Calculations of electron fluence correction factors using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegbahn, E A; Nilsson, B; Fernandez-Varea, J M; Andreo, P

    2003-01-01

    In electron-beam dosimetry, plastic phantom materials may be used instead of water for the determination of absorbed dose to water. A correction factor φ water plastic is then needed for converting the electron fluence in the plastic phantom to the fluence at an equivalent depth in water. The recommended values for this factor given by AAPM TG-25 (1991 Med. Phys. 18 73-109) and the IAEA protocols TRS-381 (1997) and TRS-398 (2000) disagree, in particular at large depths. Calculations of the electron fluence have been done, using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, in semi-infinite phantoms of water and common plastic materials (PMMA, clear polystyrene, A-150, polyethylene, Plastic water TM and Solid water TM (WT1)). The simulations have been carried out for monoenergetic electron beams of 6, 10 and 20 MeV, as well as for a realistic clinical beam. The simulated fluence correction factors differ from the values in the AAPM and IAEA recommendations by up to 2%, and are in better agreement with factors obtained by Ding et al (1997 Med. Phys. 24 161-76) using EGS4. Our Monte Carlo calculations are also in good accordance with φ water plastic values measured by using an almost perturbation-free ion chamber. The important interdependence between depth- and fluence-scaling corrections for plastic phantoms is discussed. Discrepancies between the measured and the recommended values of φ water plastic may then be explained considering the different depth-scaling rules used

  1. Nitrogen ion induced nitridation of Si(111) surface: Energy and fluence dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Praveen [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); ISOM, Universidad Politecnia de Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Kumar, Mahesh [Physics and Energy Harvesting Group, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Nötzel, R. [ISOM, Universidad Politecnia de Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Shivaprasad, S.M., E-mail: smsprasad@jncasr.ac.in [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2014-06-01

    We present the surface modification of Si(111) into silicon nitride by exposure to energetic N{sub 2}{sup +} ions. In-situ UHV experiments have been performed to optimize the energy and fluence of the N{sub 2}{sup +} ions to form silicon nitride at room temperature (RT) and characterized in-situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We have used N{sub 2}{sup +} ion beams in the energy range of 0.2–5.0 keV of different fluence to induce surface reactions, which lead to the formation of Si{sub x}N{sub y} on the Si(111) surface. The XPS core level spectra of Si(2p) and N(1s) have been deconvoluted into different oxidation states to extract qualitative information, while survey scans have been used for quantifying of the silicon nitride formation, valence band spectra show that as the N{sub 2}{sup +} ion fluence increases, there is an increase in the band gap. The secondary electron emission spectra region of photoemission is used to evaluate the change in the work function during the nitridation process. The results show that surface nitridation initially increases rapidly with ion fluence and then saturates. - Highlights: • A systematic study for the formation of silicon nitride on Si(111). • Investigation of optimal energy and fluence for energetic N{sub 2}{sup +} ions. • Silicon nitride formation at room temperature on Si(111)

  2. Lethality in repair-proficient Escherichia coli after 365nm ultraviolet light irradiation is dependent on fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Reciprocity (total applied fluence produces the same response, regardless of the fluence rate) for the lethal effects caused by 365 and 254 nm ultraviolet light (UV) was studied for repair-proficient and -deficient Escherichia coli strains. In the repair-proficient strain, E. coli WP2 uvr A + recA + , reciprocity after 365 nm UV was only observed at fluence rates of about 750 Wm -2 and above. Below this rate, the cells became increasingly sensitive as the fluence rate was decreased. Similar lack of reciprocity was obtained whether the cells were exposed at 0 or 25 0 C. The double repair-defective mutant, E. coli WP100 uvr A recA, showed complete reciprocity after 365 nm UV over the same range of fluence rates measured for the repair-proficient strain. For 254 nm UV, complete reciprocity occurred in both strains over a range of fluence rates differing by an order of magnitude. (author)

  3. Irradiation induced creep in graphite with respect to the flux effect and the high fluence behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cundy, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    In accelerated irradiation creep tests, performed in the HFR Petten, in a fast neutron flux of about 2x10 4 cm -2 s -1 and at temperatures of 300 and 500 0 C, a fast neutron fluence in excess of 20x10 21 cm -2 (EDN) has been attained so far. As a supplement to this, an analogous creep test was conducted in a fast neutron flux lower by a factor of four which is more typical for the service conditions in a HTR, with a maximum fast fluence of only 4x10 21 cm -2 (EDN). This experiment was aimed at answering the question if, for equal fast fluence, enhanced irradiation creep and Wigner dimensional change would take place in a reduced fast neutron flux. This problem has more generally been addressed to as the ''flux effect'' or the ''equivalent temperature concept''. (orig./IHOE)

  4. Surface damage on polycrystalline β-SiC by xenon ion irradiation at high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillet, J.; Gavarini, S.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Garnier, V.; Peaucelle, C.; Jaurand, X.; Duranti, A.; Bernard, C.; Rapegno, R.; Cardinal, S.; Escobar Sawa, L.; De Echave, T.; Lanfant, B.; Leconte, Y.

    2018-05-01

    Polycrystalline β-silicon carbide (β-SiC) pellets were prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). These were implanted at room temperature with 800 keV xenon at ion fluences of 5.1015 and 1.1017 cm-2. Microstructural modifications were studied by electronic microscopy (TEM and SEM) and xenon profiles were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). A complete amorphization of the implanted area associated with a significant oxidation is observed for the highest fluence. Large xenon bubbles formed in the oxide phase are responsible of surface swelling. No significant gas release has been measured up to 1017 at.cm-2. A model is proposed to explain the different steps of the oxidation process and xenon bubbles formation as a function of ion fluence.

  5. Tissue effects of Ho:YAG laser with varying fluences and pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the effect of varying fluence and pulse width on the ablation rate and consequent thermal damage of the Ho:YAG (2.130 micrometers ) laser. The rate of ablation on fresh bovine knee joint tissues, fibrous cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone in saline was determined after varying the fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and pulse width (150, 250, 450 microsecond(s) ec, FWHM) at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A 400/440 micrometers fiber was used. The ablation rate increased linearly with the fluence. In fibrocartilage, different pulse durations generated significant changes in the ablation rates, but showed minor effects on hyaline cartilage and bone. The heat of ablation for all three tissue types decreased after lengthening the pulse.

  6. Heavy Ion Irradiation Fluence Dependence for Single-Event Upsets in a NAND Flash Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; Wilcox, Edward; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Seidleck, Christina; Label, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the single-event effect (SEE) susceptibility of the Micron 16 nm NAND flash, and found that the single-event upset (SEU) cross section varied inversely with cumulative fluence. We attribute the effect to the variable upset sensitivities of the memory cells. Furthermore, the effect impacts only single cell upsets in general. The rate of multiple-bit upsets remained relatively constant with fluence. The current test standards and procedures assume that SEU follow a Poisson process and do not take into account the variability in the error rate with fluence. Therefore, traditional SEE testing techniques may underestimate the on-orbit event rate for a device with variable upset sensitivity.

  7. Fast reactor fluence dosimetry. Technical progress report, January--November 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of this task are to: (1) develop and demonstrate the use of 10 B and 6 Li helium accumulation fluence monitors (HAFM's) as a reliable and accurate method of measuring reactor neutron fluence; (2) develop and apply an expanded set of HAFM's which will provide fluence responses in different but overlapping neutron energy ranges; (3) identify, through the precise measurement of spectrum-integrated helium production cross sections, those elements which produce significant helium when used individually or as components of advanced alloys in FTR and LMFBR neutron environments, so that their use might be eliminated, minimized, or controlled; (4) use this information to predict, with confidence, the helium production rate for any alloy or material considered for fast reactor use, and (5) maintain a centralized helium measurements laboratory available to the research community, and upgrade the sample throughput capacity to handle FTR dosimetry requirements

  8. Neutron fluence rate and energy spectrum in SPRR-300 reactor thermal column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Haifeng; Dai Junlong

    2006-01-01

    In order to modify the simple one-dimension model, the neutron fluence rate distribution calculated with ANISN code ws checked with that calculated with MCNP code. To modify the error caused by ignoring the neutron landscape orientation leaking, the reflector that can't be modeled in a simple one-dimension model was dealt by extending landscape orientation scale. On this condition the neutron fluence rate distribution and the energy spectrum in the thermal column of SPRR-300 reactor were calculated with one-dimensional code ANISN, and the results of Cd ratio are well accorded with the experimental results. The deviation between them is less than 5% and it isn't above 10% in one or two special positions. It indicates that neutron fluence rate distribution and energy spectrum in the thermal column can be well calculated with one-dimensional code ANISN. (authors)

  9. Upper limits of the photon fluence rate on CT detectors: Case study on a commercial scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Mats, E-mail: mats.persson@mi.physics.kth.se; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-10691 (Sweden); Bujila, Robert; Nowik, Patrik; Andersson, Henrik [Unit of X-ray Physics, Section of Imaging Physics Solna, Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-17176 (Sweden); Kull, Love [Medical Radiation Physics, Sunderby Hospital, Luleå SE-97180 (Sweden); Andersson, Jonas [Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics, Umeå University, Umeå SE-90185 (Sweden)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The highest photon fluence rate that a computed tomography (CT) detector must be able to measure is an important parameter. The authors calculate the maximum transmitted fluence rate in a commercial CT scanner as a function of patient size for standard head, chest, and abdomen protocols. Methods: The authors scanned an anthropomorphic phantom (Kyoto Kagaku PBU-60) with the reference CT protocols provided by AAPM on a GE LightSpeed VCT scanner and noted the tube current applied with the tube current modulation (TCM) system. By rescaling this tube current using published measurements on the tube current modulation of a GE scanner [N. Keat, “CT scanner automatic exposure control systems,” MHRA Evaluation Report 05016, ImPACT, London, UK, 2005], the authors could estimate the tube current that these protocols would have resulted in for other patient sizes. An ECG gated chest protocol was also simulated. Using measured dose rate profiles along the bowtie filters, the authors simulated imaging of anonymized patient images with a range of sizes on a GE VCT scanner and calculated the maximum transmitted fluence rate. In addition, the 99th and the 95th percentiles of the transmitted fluence rate distribution behind the patient are calculated and the effect of omitting projection lines passing just below the skin line is investigated. Results: The highest transmitted fluence rates on the detector for the AAPM reference protocols with centered patients are found for head images and for intermediate-sized chest images, both with a maximum of 3.4 ⋅ 10{sup 8} mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, at 949 mm distance from the source. Miscentering the head by 50 mm downward increases the maximum transmitted fluence rate to 5.7 ⋅ 10{sup 8} mm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. The ECG gated chest protocol gives fluence rates up to 2.3 ⋅ 10{sup 8} − 3.6 ⋅ 10{sup 8} mm{sup −2} s{sup −1} depending on miscentering. Conclusions: The fluence rate on a CT detector reaches 3 ⋅ 10{sup 8

  10. Neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors: a comparison of data sets and interpolation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, C.S.; Killough, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Various segments of the health physics community advocate the use of different sets of neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors as a function of energy and different methods of interpolation between discrete points in those data sets. The major data sets and interpolation methods are used to calculate the spectrum average fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for five spectra associated with the various shielded conditions of the Health Physics Research Reactor. The results obtained by use of the different data sets and interpolation methods are compared and discussed. (author)

  11. Measurement of angular distribution of cosmic-ray muon fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jeng-Wei; Chen, Yen-Fu; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2010-01-01

    In this work a Berkeley Lab cosmic ray detector was used to measure the angular distribution of the cosmic-ray muon fluence rate. Angular response functions of the detector at each measurement orientation were calculated by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, where no energy attenuation was taken into account. Coincidence counting rates were measured at ten orientations with equiangular intervals. The muon angular fluence rate spectrum was unfolded from the measured counting rates associated with the angular response functions using both the MAXED code and the parameter adjusting method.

  12. Fluence inhomogeneities due to a ripple filter induced Moiré effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbæk, Toke Printz; Brons, Stephan; Naumann, Jakob; Ackermann, Benjamin; Horn, Julian; Latzel, Harald; Scheloske, Stefan; Galonska, Michael; Bassler, Niels; Zink, Klemens; Weber, Uli

    2015-02-07

    At particle therapy facilities with pencil beam scanning, the implementation of a ripple filter (RiFi) broadens the Bragg peak, so fewer energy steps from the accelerator are required for a homogeneous dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV). However, sharply focusing the scanned pencil beams at the RiFi plane by ion optical settings can lead to a Moiré effect, causing fluence inhomogeneities at the isocenter. This has been experimentally proven at the Heidelberg Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum (HIT), Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Germany. 150 MeV u(-1) carbon-12 ions are used for irradiation with a 3 mm thick RiFi. The beam is focused in front of and as close to the RiFi plane as possible. The pencil beam width is estimated to be 0.78 mm at a 93 mm distance from the RiFi. Radiographic films are used to obtain the fluence profile 30 mm in front of the isocenter, 930 mm from the RiFi. The Monte Carlo (MC) code SHIELD-HIT12A is used to determine the RiFi-induced inhomogeneities in the fluence distribution at the isocenter for a similar setup, pencil beam widths at the RiFi plane ranging from σχ(RiFi to 1.2 mm and for scanning step sizes ranging from 1.5 to 3.7 mm. The beam application and monitoring system (BAMS) used at HIT is modelled and simulated. When the width of the pencil beams at the RiFi plane is much smaller than the scanning step size, the resulting inhomogeneous fluence distribution at the RiFi plane interfers with the inhomogeneous RiFi mass distribution and fluence inhomogeneity can be observed at the isocenter as large as an 8% deviation from the mean fluence. The inverse of the fluence ripple period at the isocenter is found to be the difference between the inverse of the RiFi period and the inverse of the scanning step size. We have been able to use MC simulations to reproduce the spacing of the ripple stripes seen in films irradiated at HIT. Our findings clearly indicate that pencil beams sharply focused near the RiFi plane result in

  13. Initial stages of the ion beam mixing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traverse, A.; Le Boite, M.G.; Nevot, L.; Pardo, B.; Corno, J.

    1987-01-01

    The grazing x-ray reflectometry technique, performed on irradiated periodic multilayers, was used to study the early stages of the ion beam mixing process. We present our first results, obtained on NiAu samples irradiated with He ions. The experimental fluence dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient is in good agreement with a calculation based on a purely ballistic process

  14. Experimental and Monte Carlo studies of fluence corrections for graphite calorimetry in low- and high-energy clinical proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenço, Ana; Thomas, Russell; Bouchard, Hugo; Kacperek, Andrzej; Vondracek, Vladimir; Royle, Gary; Palmans, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine fluence corrections necessary to convert absorbed dose to graphite, measured by graphite calorimetry, to absorbed dose to water. Fluence corrections were obtained from experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Fluence corrections were calculated to account for the difference in fluence between water and graphite at equivalent depths. Measurements were performed with narrow proton beams. Plane-parallel-plate ionization chambers with a large collecting area compared to the beam diameter were used to intercept the whole beam. High- and low-energy proton beams were provided by a scanning and double scattering delivery system, respectively. A mathematical formalism was established to relate fluence corrections derived from Monte Carlo simulations, using the FLUKA code [A. Ferrari et al., “FLUKA: A multi-particle transport code,” in CERN 2005-10, INFN/TC 05/11, SLAC-R-773 (2005) and T. T. Böhlen et al., “The FLUKA Code: Developments and challenges for high energy and medical applications,” Nucl. Data Sheets 120, 211–214 (2014)], to partial fluence corrections measured experimentally. Results: A good agreement was found between the partial fluence corrections derived by Monte Carlo simulations and those determined experimentally. For a high-energy beam of 180 MeV, the fluence corrections from Monte Carlo simulations were found to increase from 0.99 to 1.04 with depth. In the case of a low-energy beam of 60 MeV, the magnitude of fluence corrections was approximately 0.99 at all depths when calculated in the sensitive area of the chamber used in the experiments. Fluence correction calculations were also performed for a larger area and found to increase from 0.99 at the surface to 1.01 at greater depths. Conclusions: Fluence corrections obtained experimentally are partial fluence corrections because they account for differences in the primary and part of the secondary

  15. Experimental and Monte Carlo studies of fluence corrections for graphite calorimetry in low- and high-energy clinical proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenço, Ana, E-mail: am.lourenco@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Thomas, Russell; Bouchard, Hugo [Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Kacperek, Andrzej [National Eye Proton Therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom); Vondracek, Vladimir [Proton Therapy Center, Budinova 1a, Prague 8 CZ-180 00 (Czech Republic); Royle, Gary [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and Medical Physics Group, EBG MedAustron GmbH, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine fluence corrections necessary to convert absorbed dose to graphite, measured by graphite calorimetry, to absorbed dose to water. Fluence corrections were obtained from experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Fluence corrections were calculated to account for the difference in fluence between water and graphite at equivalent depths. Measurements were performed with narrow proton beams. Plane-parallel-plate ionization chambers with a large collecting area compared to the beam diameter were used to intercept the whole beam. High- and low-energy proton beams were provided by a scanning and double scattering delivery system, respectively. A mathematical formalism was established to relate fluence corrections derived from Monte Carlo simulations, using the FLUKA code [A. Ferrari et al., “FLUKA: A multi-particle transport code,” in CERN 2005-10, INFN/TC 05/11, SLAC-R-773 (2005) and T. T. Böhlen et al., “The FLUKA Code: Developments and challenges for high energy and medical applications,” Nucl. Data Sheets 120, 211–214 (2014)], to partial fluence corrections measured experimentally. Results: A good agreement was found between the partial fluence corrections derived by Monte Carlo simulations and those determined experimentally. For a high-energy beam of 180 MeV, the fluence corrections from Monte Carlo simulations were found to increase from 0.99 to 1.04 with depth. In the case of a low-energy beam of 60 MeV, the magnitude of fluence corrections was approximately 0.99 at all depths when calculated in the sensitive area of the chamber used in the experiments. Fluence correction calculations were also performed for a larger area and found to increase from 0.99 at the surface to 1.01 at greater depths. Conclusions: Fluence corrections obtained experimentally are partial fluence corrections because they account for differences in the primary and part of the secondary

  16. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, B. J.; Miller, D. T.

    2017-01-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  17. Evaluation of the Fluence Conversion Factor for 32P in Sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-18

    When 32S is exposed to neutrons it undergoes a 32S(n,p)32P reaction with a neutron cross section as shown in Figure 1. This reaction may be used to characterize the neutron fluence for neutrons greater than 3 MeV.

  18. Determination of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients by means of artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto B, T. G.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R.; Gallego, E.; Lorente, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper is presented an Artificial Neural Network (Ann) that has been designed, trained and validated to determinate the effective dose e, ambient dose equivalent h(10) and personal dose equivalent hp(10,θ) fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients at different positions, having as only input data 7 count rates obtained with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (Bss) system. A set of 211 neutron spectra and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients published by the International Atomic Energy Agency were used to train and validate the Ann. This set was divided into 2 subsets, one of 181 elements to train the Ann and the remaining 30 to validate it. The Ann was trained using Bss count rates as input data and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients as output data. The network was validated and tested with the set of 30 elements that were not used during the training process. Good results were obtained proving that Ann are a good choice for calculating the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients having as only data the count rates obtained with a Bss. (Author)

  19. International intercomparison of fluence of fast neutrons using 115In(n,γ) activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesiecki, H.; Cosack, M.

    1985-07-01

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has participated in an international intercomparison of fluence measurements of fast neutrons. This was organized under the auspices of the ''Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCEMRI)'', Sect. 3 (Mesures Neutronique). The National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK volunteered to assume responsibility for the experimental realization and final evaluation. This report deals with the measurements performed at the PTB for the neutron fluence intercomparison at neutron energies of Esub(n) = 144 keV and 570 keV which was based on the 115 In(n,γ) 116 Insup(m) reaction. The count rate of a 4πβ-counter which had to be used to determine the activation of the In sample was to be compared with the neutron fluence by which the sample was irradiated. A description of the neutron production, the fluence determination, the 4πβ-counting, and the evaluation of the results will be given. (orig.) [de

  20. Poster - 52: Smoothing constraints in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) fluence map optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGeachy, Philip; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Zinchenko, Yuriy; Khan, Rao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has recently shown dosimetric improvement in comparison to conventional IMRT. That said, the degree of smoothness of resulting fluence maps (FMs) has yet to be investigated and could impact the deliverability of XMRT. This study looks at investigating FM smoothness and imposing smoothing constraint in the fluence map optimization. Methods: Smoothing constraints were modeled in the XMRT algorithm with the sum of positive gradient (SPG) technique. XMRT solutions, with and without SPG constraints, were generated for a clinical prostate scan using standard dosimetric prescriptions, constraints, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement. The smoothness, with and without SPG constraints, was assessed by looking at the absolute and relative maximum SPG scores for each fluence map. Dose volume histograms were utilized when evaluating impact on the dose distribution. Results: Imposing SPG constraints reduced the absolute and relative maximum SPG values by factors of up to 5 and 2, respectively, when compared with their non-SPG constrained counterparts. This leads to a more seamless conversion of FMS to their respective MLC sequences. This improved smoothness resulted in an increase to organ at risk (OAR) dose, however the increase is not clinically significant. Conclusions: For a clinical prostate case, there was a noticeable improvement in the smoothness of the XMRT FMs when SPG constraints were applied with a minor increase in dose to OARs. This increase in OAR dose is not clinically meaningful.

  1. Neutron irradiation effects on intermetallic precipitates in Zircaloy as a function of fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etoh, Y.; Shimada, S.

    1993-01-01

    Intermetallic precipitates in Zircaloy-2 and -4, recrystallized at the α-phase temperature, have been examined using analytical electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated in BWRs up to a fast neutron fluence of 1.4x10 26 n/m 2 (E>1 MeV). Neutron irradiation induces a crystalline-to-amorphous transition, depleting Fe in the amorphous phase of Zr(Fe, Cr) 2 precipitates in the alloys. Amorphization starts from the periphery of the precipitates and all of them are totally amorphized at higher fluences than 1.2x10 26 n/m 2 . The width of the Fe-depleted zone increases in proportion to the 0.45 power of fluence. This result indicates that diffusion of Fe is the rate-controlling process for Fe depletion in Zr(Fe, Cr) 2 precipitates. Dissolution of Zr 2 (Fe, Ni) precipitates in Zircaloy-2 occurs during neutron irradiation. At a high fluence, such as 1.2x10 26 n/m 2 , Zr 2 (Fe, Ni) precipitates are almost completely dissolved into the matrix and the dissolution rate of Fe is faster than that of Ni. (orig.)

  2. Monitoring of the Irradiated Neutron Fluence in the Neutron Transmutation Doping Process of Hanaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Park, Sang-Jun

    2009-08-01

    Neutron transmutation doping (NTD) for silicon is a process of the creation of phosphorus impurities in intrinsic or extrinsic silicon by neutron irradiation to obtain silicon semiconductors with extremely uniform dopant distribution. HANARO has two vertical holes for the NTD, and the irradiation for 5 and 6 inch silicon ingots has been going on at one hole. In order to achieve the accurate neutron fluence corresponding to the target resistivity, the real time neutron flux is monitored by self-powered neutron detectors. After irradiation, the total irradiation fluence is confirmed by measuring the absolute activity of activation detectors. In this work, a neutron fluence monitoring method using zirconium foils with the mass of 10 ~ 50 mg was applied to the NTD process of HANARO. We determined the proportional constant of the relationship between the resistivity of the irradiated silicon and the neutron fluence determined by using zirconium foils. The determined constant for the initially n-type silicon was 3.126 × 1019 n·Ω/cm. It was confirmed that the difference between this empirical value and the theoretical one was only 0.5%. Conclusively, the practical methodology to perform the neutron transmutation doping of silicon was established.

  3. Poster - 52: Smoothing constraints in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) fluence map optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeachy, Philip; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Zinchenko, Yuriy; Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CAN, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CAN, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CAN, Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has recently shown dosimetric improvement in comparison to conventional IMRT. That said, the degree of smoothness of resulting fluence maps (FMs) has yet to be investigated and could impact the deliverability of XMRT. This study looks at investigating FM smoothness and imposing smoothing constraint in the fluence map optimization. Methods: Smoothing constraints were modeled in the XMRT algorithm with the sum of positive gradient (SPG) technique. XMRT solutions, with and without SPG constraints, were generated for a clinical prostate scan using standard dosimetric prescriptions, constraints, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement. The smoothness, with and without SPG constraints, was assessed by looking at the absolute and relative maximum SPG scores for each fluence map. Dose volume histograms were utilized when evaluating impact on the dose distribution. Results: Imposing SPG constraints reduced the absolute and relative maximum SPG values by factors of up to 5 and 2, respectively, when compared with their non-SPG constrained counterparts. This leads to a more seamless conversion of FMS to their respective MLC sequences. This improved smoothness resulted in an increase to organ at risk (OAR) dose, however the increase is not clinically significant. Conclusions: For a clinical prostate case, there was a noticeable improvement in the smoothness of the XMRT FMs when SPG constraints were applied with a minor increase in dose to OARs. This increase in OAR dose is not clinically meaningful.

  4. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, D. T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-06

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  5. Determination of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients by means of artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Rivera P, E.; De Leon M, H. A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal No. 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this paper is presented an Artificial Neural Network (Ann) that has been designed, trained and validated to determinate the effective dose e, ambient dose equivalent h(10) and personal dose equivalent hp(10,{theta}) fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients at different positions, having as only input data 7 count rates obtained with a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (Bss) system. A set of 211 neutron spectra and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients published by the International Atomic Energy Agency were used to train and validate the Ann. This set was divided into 2 subsets, one of 181 elements to train the Ann and the remaining 30 to validate it. The Ann was trained using Bss count rates as input data and the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients as output data. The network was validated and tested with the set of 30 elements that were not used during the training process. Good results were obtained proving that Ann are a good choice for calculating the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients having as only data the count rates obtained with a Bss. (Author)

  6. Low-intensity red and infrared laser effects at high fluences on Escherichia coli cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, L.L.; Campos, V.M.A.; Magalhaes, L.A.G. [Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Biofisica e Biometria; Paoli, F. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Morfologia; Fonseca, A.S., E-mail: adnfonseca@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Fisiologicas

    2015-10-15

    Semiconductor laser devices are readily available and practical radiation sources providing wavelength tenability and high monochromaticity. Low-intensity red and near-infrared lasers are considered safe for use in clinical applications. However, adverse effects can occur via free radical generation, and the biological effects of these lasers from unusually high fluences or high doses have not yet been evaluated. Here, we evaluated the survival, filamentation induction and morphology of Escherichia coli cells deficient in repair of oxidative DNA lesions when exposed to low-intensity red and infrared lasers at unusually high fluences. Cultures of wild-type (AB1157), endonuclease III-deficient (JW1625-1), and endonuclease IV-deficient (JW2146-1) E. coli, in exponential and stationary growth phases, were exposed to red and infrared lasers (0, 250, 500, and 1000 J/cm{sup 2}) to evaluate their survival rates, filamentation phenotype induction and cell morphologies. The results showed that low-intensity red and infrared lasers at high fluences are lethal, induce a filamentation phenotype, and alter the morphology of the E. coli cells. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers have potential to induce adverse effects on cells, whether used at unusually high fluences, or at high doses. Hence, there is a need to reinforce the importance of accurate dosimetry in therapeutic protocols. (author)

  7. Calculation of fluence rate distributions in a pre design clinical facility for BNCT at the LFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, T.T.J.M.; Freudenreich, W.E.

    1995-12-01

    In a previous study [1], it was demonstrated that the creation of a thermal neutron facility for clinical BNCT in the LFR is feasible. Monte Carlo calculations had shown that the neutron fluence rates and gamma dose rates at the detector position of a model representing a first outline of a clinical facility met all requirements that are necessary for clinical BNCT. In order to gain more information about the neutron fluence rates at several positions, a second step is required. Calculations have been performed for the free beam and for a tumour bearing phantom at 5 cm and 10 cm distance from the irradiation window. Due to thermalization and back scattering, the thermal fluence rates in the tumour at 5 and 10 cm distance from the bismuth shield appeared to be approximately twice as high as the thermal fluence rates in the free beam at the corresponding positions of 5 to 6 cm and 10 to 11 cm from the irradiation window. (orig.)

  8. Towards a laser fluence dependent nanostructuring of thin Au films on Si by nanosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffino, F.; Pugliara, A.; Carria, E.; Romano, L.; Bongiorno, C.; Fisicaro, G.; La Magna, A.; Spinella, C.; Grimaldi, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Au nanoclusters are produced by nanosecond laser irradiations of thin Au film on Si. ► The shape, size, and surface density of the Au nanoclusters are tunable by laser fluence. ► The formation dynamic of the Au nanoclusters under nanosecond laser irradiation is analyzed. - Abstract: In this work, we study the nanostructuring effects of nanosecond laser irradiations on 5 nm thick Au film sputter-deposited on Si. After deposition of Au on Si substrate, nanosecond laser irradiations were performed increasing the laser fluence from 750 to 1500 mJ/cm 2 . Several analyses techniques, such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were crossed to study the morphological evolution of the Au film as a function of laser fluence. In particular, the formation of Au nanoparticles was observed. The analyses allowed a quantitative evaluation of the evolution of the nanoparticles size, surface density, and shape as a function of the laser fluence. Therefore, a control the structural properties of the Au nanoparticles is reached, for example, for applications in Si nanowires growth or plasmonics.

  9. High-accuracy fluence determination in ion beams using fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osinga, J.-M.; Akselrod, M.S.; Herrmann, Rochus

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach to use Al2O3:C,Mg-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) and confocal laser scanning microscopy as a semiautomatic tool for fluence measurements in clinical ion beams. The method was found to cover a linear energy transfer (LET) range from at least L∞(Al2O3) = 0...

  10. Ringhals unit 3 and 4 - Fluence determination in a historic and future perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.L. [Primary Systems Inspection and Repair, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Rouden, J. [Material and Analytical Services, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Efsing, P. [Materials Mechanics, Research and Nuclear Development, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The Ringhals site is situated on the Swedish southwest coastline. At the site, there are four operating nuclear power plants. Historically, the Swedish policy has been that the nuclear power plants were to be closed in 2010. The present position is to operate the units until their technical and economic lifetime has run out. The units shall be maintained and invested in to ensure a lifetime of at least 50 years, but the actions taken shall not limit the time to this date. When the initial surveillance capsules were evaluated, it was noted that the material properties of the weld material of unit 3 and 4 showed some deviations from the expected behaviour. Currently there is an extensive project running for re-evaluating the embrittlement situation from a long-term operating perspective. One part of the project is aimed at more accurately determining the fluence levels of the reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The basis for the early evaluations of the dosimeters in the surveillance capsules and the corresponding fluence evaluation had an operating lifetime of 25 years as a target value. Therefore, the accuracy and refinement of the measurement and calculation were taken to be good enough to suit this life span. Looking back at the results from the dosimetry measurements there are a few discrepancies. Some of the dosimeters were disintegrated and some measurements had comparatively large uncertainties. When starting this project there were some re-evaluations done with the old fluence prediction model. For every new run and refinement there appeared new difficulties, and the decision was to start the evaluation from scratch. Then there are two questions remaining regarding the fluence: What is the current fluence level? What will the resulting fluence be after 60 years of operation, when we have up-rated output power of both reactors? This paper aims to describe the view of the fluence evaluation

  11. Development of a simple, low cost, indirect ion beam fluence measurement system for ion implanters, accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, K.; Balaji, S.; Saravanan, K.; Navas, J.; David, C.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2018-02-01

    We developed a simple, low cost user-friendly automated indirect ion beam fluence measurement system for ion irradiation and analysis experiments requiring indirect beam fluence measurements unperturbed by sample conditions like low temperature, high temperature, sample biasing as well as in regular ion implantation experiments in the ion implanters and electrostatic accelerators with continuous beam. The system, which uses simple, low cost, off-the-shelf components/systems and two distinct layers of in-house built softwarenot only eliminates the need for costly data acquisition systems but also overcomes difficulties in using properietry software. The hardware of the system is centered around a personal computer, a PIC16F887 based embedded system, a Faraday cup drive cum monitor circuit, a pair of Faraday Cups and a beam current integrator and the in-house developed software include C based microcontroller firmware and LABVIEW based virtual instrument automation software. The automatic fluence measurement involves two important phases, a current sampling phase lasting over 20-30 seconds during which the ion beam current is continuously measured by intercepting the ion beam and the averaged beam current value is computed. A subsequent charge computation phase lasting 700-900 seconds is executed making the ion beam to irradiate the samples and the incremental fluence received by the sampleis estimated usingthe latest averaged beam current value from the ion beam current sampling phase. The cycle of current sampling-charge computation is repeated till the required fluence is reached. Besides simplicity and cost-effectiveness, other important advantages of the developed system include easy reconfiguration of the system to suit customisation of experiments, scalability, easy debug and maintenance of the hardware/software, ability to work as a standalone system. The system was tested with different set of samples and ion fluences and the results were verified using

  12. SU-E-T-436: Fluence-Based Trajectory Optimization for Non-Coplanar VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, G; Bamber, JC; Bedford, JL [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Evans, PM [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Saran, FH; Mandeville, HC [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a fluence-based trajectory optimization technique for non-coplanar VMAT for brain cancer. Methods: Single-arc non-coplanar VMAT trajectories were determined using a heuristic technique for five patients. Organ at risk (OAR) volume intersected during raytracing was minimized for two cases: absolute volume and the sum of relative volumes weighted by OAR importance. These trajectories and coplanar VMAT formed starting points for the fluence-based optimization method. Iterative least squares optimization was performed on control points 24° apart in gantry rotation. Optimization minimized the root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of PTV dose from the prescription (relative importance 100), maximum dose to the brainstem (10), optic chiasm (5), globes (5) and optic nerves (5), plus mean dose to the lenses (5), hippocampi (3), temporal lobes (2), cochleae (1) and brain excluding other regions of interest (1). Control point couch rotations were varied in steps of up to 10° and accepted if the cost function improved. Final treatment plans were optimized with the same objectives in an in-house planning system and evaluated using a composite metric - the sum of optimization metrics weighted by importance. Results: The composite metric decreased with fluence-based optimization in 14 of the 15 plans. In the remaining case its overall value, and the PTV and OAR components, were unchanged but the balance of OAR sparing differed. PTV RMS deviation was improved in 13 cases and unchanged in two. The OAR component was reduced in 13 plans. In one case the OAR component increased but the composite metric decreased - a 4 Gy increase in OAR metrics was balanced by a reduction in PTV RMS deviation from 2.8% to 2.6%. Conclusion: Fluence-based trajectory optimization improved plan quality as defined by the composite metric. While dose differences were case specific, fluence-based optimization improved both PTV and OAR dosimetry in 80% of cases.

  13. Characterization of saturation of CR-39 detector at high alpha-particle fluence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El Ghazaly

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of saturation in the CR-39 detector reduces and limits its detection dynamic range; nevertheless, this range could be extended using spectroscopic techniques and by measuring the net bulk rate of the saturated CR-39 detector surface. CR-39 detectors were irradiated by 1.5 MeV high alpha-particle fluence varying from 0.06 × 108 to 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2 from Am-241 source; thereafter, they were etched in a 6.25N NaOH solution at a temperature of 70°C for different durations. Net bulk etch rate measurement of the 1.5 MeV alpha-irradiated CR-39 detector surface revealed that rate increases with increasing etching time and reaches its maximum value at the end of the alpha-particle range. It is also correlated with the alpha-particle fluence. The measurements of UV–Visible (UV–Vis absorbance at 500 and 600 nm reveal that the absorbance is linearly correlated with the fluence of alpha particles at the etching times of 2 and 4 hour. For extended etching times of 6, 10, and 14.5 hour, the absorbance is saturated for fluence values of 4.05 × 108, 5.30 × 108, and 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2. These new methods pave the way to extend the dynamic range of polymer-based solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs in measurement of high fluence of heavy ions as well as in radiation dosimetry. Keywords: Alpha Particle, Bulk Etch Rate, CR-39 Detector, Saturated Regime, UV–Vis Spectroscopy

  14. Neutron Fluence And DPA Rate Analysis In Pebble-Bed HTR Reactor Vessel Using MCNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Amir; Suwoto; Rohanda, Anis; Adrial, Hery; Bakhri, Syaiful; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2018-02-01

    In the Pebble-bed HTR reactor, the distance between the core and the reactor vessel is very close and the media inside are carbon and He gas. Neutron moderation capability of graphite material is theoretically lower than that of water-moderated reactors. Thus, it is estimated much more the fast neutrons will reach the reactor vessel. The fast neutron collisions with the atoms in the reactor vessel will result in radiation damage and could be reducing the vessel life. The purpose of this study was to obtain the magnitude of neutron fluence in the Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel. Neutron fluence calculations in the pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel were performed using the MCNP computer program. By determining the tally position, it can be calculated flux, spectrum and neutron fluence in the position of Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel. The calculations results of total neutron flux and fast neutron flux in the reactor vessel of 1.82x108 n/cm2/s and 1.79x108 n/cm2/s respectively. The fast neutron fluence in the reactor vessel is 3.4x1017 n/cm2 for 60 years reactor operation. Radiation damage in stainless steel material caused by high-energy neutrons (> 1.0 MeV) will occur when it has reached the neutron flux level of 1.0x1024 n/cm2. The neutron fluence results show that there is no radiation damage in the Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel, so it is predicted that it will be safe to operate at least for 60 years.

  15. A hybrid source-driven method to compute fast neutron fluence in reactor pressure vessel - 017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren-Tai, Chiang

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid source-driven method is developed to compute fast neutron fluence with neutron energy greater than 1 MeV in nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The method determines neutron flux by solving a steady-state neutron transport equation with hybrid neutron sources composed of peripheral fixed fission neutron sources and interior chain-reacted fission neutron sources. The relative rod-by-rod power distribution of the peripheral assemblies in a nuclear reactor obtained from reactor core depletion calculations and subsequent rod-by-rod power reconstruction is employed as the relative rod-by-rod fixed fission neutron source distribution. All fissionable nuclides other than U-238 (such as U-234, U-235, U-236, Pu-239 etc) are replaced with U-238 to avoid counting the fission contribution twice and to preserve fast neutron attenuation for heavy nuclides in the peripheral assemblies. An example is provided to show the feasibility of the method. Since the interior fuels only have a marginal impact on RPV fluence results due to rapid attenuation of interior fast fission neutrons, a generic set or one of several generic sets of interior fuels can be used as the driver and only the neutron sources in the peripheral assemblies will be changed in subsequent hybrid source-driven fluence calculations. Consequently, this hybrid source-driven method can simplify and reduce cost for fast neutron fluence computations. This newly developed hybrid source-driven method should be a useful and simplified tool for computing fast neutron fluence at selected locations of interest in RPV of contemporary nuclear power reactors. (authors)

  16. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Meyerhof, D.; Vlahovich, S.

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus. (authors)

  17. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Meyerhof, Dorothy; Vlahovich, Slavica

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus.

  18. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources 241 AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  19. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: fflima@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: jasantos@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide, E-mail: santos_neide@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  20. Red light-induced shift of the fluence-response curve for first positive curvature of maize [Zea mays] coleoptiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, E.; Schäfer, E.

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curve for first positive phototropic curvture of dark-grown maize coleoptiles is shifted to ten-fold higher fluences if the coieoptiles are irradiated with red light 2 h prior to the phototropic induction with blue light. Fluence-response curves for this red-induced shift were obtained with unilateral red irradiations 2 h prior to inductive blue pulses of different fluences. They differ significantly depending on whether the red light was given from the same side as or the opposite side to the respective inductive blue pulse, thus demonstrating that the red light effect is a local response of the coleoptile. The fluence-response curves for an inductive blue pulse in the ascending part were compared with those for an inductive blue pulse in the descending part of the fluence-response curve for blue light induced phototropism. They are quite different in threshold of red light sensitivity and shape for irradiations from both the same and the opposite sides. This offers evidence for the hypothesis that at least two different photosystems are involved in phototropism, and that they are modulated differently by a red light preirradiation. All these fluence-response curves indicate that it is possible to increase the response in the coleoptile, if the red light preirradiation is given opposite to the inductive blue pulse. This is supported by blue light fluence-response curves obtained after a weak unilateral red preirradiation. (author)

  1. Absolute measurement and international intercomparison of 0.1-0.8 MeV monoenergetic neutron fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongchang; Lu Hanlin; Rong Chaofan

    1988-01-01

    The methods for absolute measurement of 0.1-18MeV monoenergetic neutron fluence rate are described. Which include proton recoil telescope, semicoducetor telescope, hydrogen filled proportional counter and associated particale method. A long counter used as secondary recent international intercomparison of neutron fluence rate organized by BIPM, and the results were given

  2. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates ATR Cycle 101-B, October 11, 1993--November 27, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>lMeV) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 101-B which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein

  3. Pulsed laser ablation of Germanium under vacuum and hydrogen environments at various fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Hassan [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, Shazia, E-mail: shaziabashir@gcu.edu.pk [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Dawood, Asadullah; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Government College University, Lahore (Pakistan); Mahmood, Arshad [National Institute of Laser and Optronics (NILOP), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-30

    Highlights: • Germanium targets were exposed under vacuum and H{sub 2} environment by nanosecond laser pulses. • The effect of laser fluence and ambient environment has been investigated. • The surface morphology is investigated by SEM analysis. • Raman and FTIR Spectroscopy are performed to reveal structural modification. • Electrical conductivity is probed by four probe method. - Abstract: Laser fluence and ambient environment play a significant role for the formation and development of the micro/nano-structures on the laser irradiated targets. Single crystal (1 0 0) Germanium (Ge) has been ablated under two environments of vacuum (10{sup −3} Torr) and hydrogen (100 Torr) at various fluences ranging from 4.5 J cm{sup −2} to 6 J cm{sup −2}. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser with wavelength of 248 nm, pulse duration of 18 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. Surface morphology has been observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Whereas, structural modification of irradiated targets was explored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrical conductivity of the irradiated Ge is measured by four probe method. SEM analysis exhibits the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS), cones and micro-bumps in both ambient environments (vacuum and hydrogen). The formation as well as development of these structures is strongly dependent upon the laser fluence and environmental conditions. The periodicity of LIPSS or ripples varies from 38 μm to 60 μm in case of vacuum whereas in case of hydrogen environment, the periodicity varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The difference in number of ripples and periodicity as well as in shape and size of cones and bumps in vacuum and hydrogen is explained on the basis of confinement and shielding effect of plasma. FTIR spectroscopy reveals that no new bands are formed for laser ablated Ge under vacuum, whereas C−H stretching vibration band is

  4. Electron fluence correction factors for various materials in clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, M.; Blois, F. de; Podgorsak, E.B.; Seuntjens, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Relative to solid water, electron fluence correction factors at the depth of dose maximum in bone, lung, aluminum, and copper for nominal electron beam energies of 9 MeV and 15 MeV of the Clinac 18 accelerator have been determined experimentally and by Monte Carlo calculation. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure depth doses in these materials. The measured relative dose at d max in the various materials versus that of solid water, when irradiated with the same number of monitor units, has been used to calculate the ratio of electron fluence for the various materials to that of solid water. The beams of the Clinac 18 were fully characterized using the EGS4/BEAM system. EGSnrc with the relativistic spin option turned on was used to optimize the primary electron energy at the exit window, and to calculate depth doses in the five phantom materials using the optimized phase-space data. Normalizing all depth doses to the dose maximum in solid water stopping power ratio corrected, measured depth doses and calculated depth doses differ by less than ±1% at the depth of dose maximum and by less than 4% elsewhere. Monte Carlo calculated ratios of doses in each material to dose in LiF were used to convert the TLD measurements at the dose maximum into dose at the center of the TLD in the phantom material. Fluence perturbation correction factors for a LiF TLD at the depth of dose maximum deduced from these calculations amount to less than 1% for 0.15 mm thick TLDs in low Z materials and are between 1% and 3% for TLDs in Al and Cu phantoms. Electron fluence ratios of the studied materials relative to solid water vary between 0.83±0.01 and 1.55±0.02 for materials varying in density from 0.27 g/cm3 (lung) to 8.96 g/cm3 (Cu). The difference in electron fluence ratios derived from measurements and calculations ranges from -1.6% to +0.2% at 9 MeV and from -1.9% to +0.2% at 15 MeV and is not significant at the 1σ level. Excluding the data for Cu, electron fluence

  5. Synergistic effect of mixed neutron and gamma irradiation in bipolar operational amplifier OP07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Liu, E-mail: liuyan@nint.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an 710024 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wei, Chen; Shanchao, Yang; Xiaoming, Jin [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an 710024 (China); Chaohui, He [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-09-21

    This paper presents the synergistic effects in bipolar operational amplifier OP07. The radiation effects are studied by neutron beam, gamma ray, and mixed neutron/gamma ray environments. The characterateristics of the synergistic effects are studied through comparison of different experiment results. The results show that the bipolar operational amplifier OP07 exhibited significant synergistic effects in the mixed neutron and gamma irradiation. The bipolar transistor is identified as the most radiation sensitive unit of the operational amplifier. In this paper, a series of simulations are performed on bipolar transistors in different radiation environments. In the theoretical simulation, the geometric model and calculations based on the Medici toolkit are built to study the radiation effects in bipolar components. The effect of mixed neutron and gamma irradiation is simulated based on the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of radiation effects in bipolar transistors. The simulated results agree well with the experimental data. The results of the experiments and simulation indicate that the radiation effects in the bipolar devices subjected to mixed neutron and gamma environments is not a simple combination of total ionizing dose (TID) effects and displacement damage. The data suggests that the TID effect could enhance the displacement damage. The synergistic effect should not be neglected in complex radiation environments.

  6. Magnetic collimation and metal foil filtering for electron range and fluence modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaisangittisakul, N.; D'Souza, W.D.; Ma Lijun

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the use of magnetically collimated electron beams together with metal filters for electron fluence and range modulation. A longitudinal magnetic field collimation method was developed to reduce skin dose and to improve the electron beam penumbra. Thin metal foils were used to adjust the energies of magnetically collimated electrons. The effects for different types of foils such as Al, Be, Cu, Pb, and Ti were studied using Monte Carlo calculations. An empirical pencil beam dose calculation model was developed to calculate electron dose distributions under magnetic collimation and foil modulation. An optimization method was developed to produce conformal dose distributions for simulated targets such as a horseshoe-shaped target. Our results show that it is possible to produce an electron depth dose enhancement peak using similar techniques of producing a spread-out Bragg peak. In conclusion, our study demonstrates new aspects of using magnetic collimation and foil filtration for producing fluence and range modulated electron dose distributions

  7. Study on measurement technique contrast of 14 MeV neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Li; Hu Jun; Wen Dezhi

    2005-10-01

    The stability and repetition of the associated-particle method to measure DT neutron fluence was tested. The neutron activation iron method was contrasted with the associated-particle method, the preparatory experiment was done. The neutron fluence measured with associated-particle method was contrasted with neutron activation Al method, the Al activated foil was measured with 4πβ (PC)-γ coincidence standard device. The contrast result's standard deviation of the two method was less than the expand uncertainty of the associated-particle method. Therein, the uncertainty of the associated-particle method is 1.6%, the uncertainty of the activation Al method is 1.8%. (authors)

  8. Pain during photodynamic therapy is associated with protoporphyrin IX fluorescence and fluence rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiegell, S.R.; Skiveren, J.; Philipsen, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence, lesion type, lesion preparation and lesion localization. Methods Twenty-six patients with actinic keratoses (AKs) in different localizations and 34 patients with facial acne vulgaris were treated with methyl aminolaevulinate-PDT. Patients with acne were illuminated using......) patients with acne had a pain score of 6 [interquartile range (IQR) 5-7] compared with 8 (IQR 6-10) when using a fluence rate of 68 mW cm(-2) (P = 0.018). After correcting the pain score for PpIX fluorescence no differences in pain scores were found between first and second acne treatment, locations of AK...... lesions or between the two types of lesions. Conclusions Pain during PDT was correlated with the PpIX fluorescence in the treatment area prior to illumination. Pain was reduced using a lower fluence rate during PDT of acne Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4...

  9. Validation of neutron-transport calculations in benchmark facilities for improved damage-fluence predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.L.; Stallmann, F.W.; Maerker, R.E.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1983-01-01

    An accurate determination of damage fluence accumulated by reactor pressure vessels (RPV) as a function of time is essential in order to evaluate the vessel integrity for both pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients and end-of-life considerations. The desired accuracy for neutron exposure parameters such as displacements per atom or fluence (E > 1 MeV) is of the order of 20 to 30%. However, these types of accuracies can only be obtained realistically by validation of nuclear data and calculational methods in benchmark facilities. The purposes of this paper are to review the needs and requirements for benchmark experiments, to discuss the status of current benchmark experiments, to summarize results and conclusions obtained so far, and to suggest areas where further benchmarking is needed

  10. Photon-Fluence-Weighted let for Radiation Fields Subjected to Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Michiya

    2017-08-01

    In order to estimate the uncertainty of the radiation risk associated with the photon energy in epidemiological studies, photon-fluence-weighted LET values were quantified for photon radiation fields with the target organs and irradiation conditions taken into consideration. The photon fluences giving a unit absorbed dose to the target organ were estimated by using photon energy spectra together with the dose conversion coefficients given in ICRP Publication 116 for the target organs of the colon, bone marrow, stomach, lung, skin and breast with three irradiation geometries. As a result, it was demonstrated that the weighted LET values did not show a clear difference among the photon radiation fields subjected to epidemiological studies, regardless of the target organ and the irradiation geometry.

  11. A new deconvolution approach to robust fluence for intensity modulation under geometrical uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengcheng; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Li, Baosheng; Shu, Huazhong

    2013-09-01

    This work addresses random geometrical uncertainties that are intrinsically observed in radiation therapy by means of a new deconvolution method combining a series expansion and a Butterworth filter. The method efficiently suppresses high-frequency components by discarding the higher order terms of the series expansion and then filtering out deviations on the field edges. An additional approximation is made in order to set the fluence values outside the field to zero in the robust profiles. This method is compared to the deconvolution kernel method for a regular 2D fluence map, a real intensity-modulated radiation therapy field, and a prostate case. The results show that accuracy is improved while fulfilling clinical planning requirements.

  12. A new deconvolution approach to robust fluence for intensity modulation under geometrical uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Pengcheng; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Shu Huazhong; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Li Baosheng

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses random geometrical uncertainties that are intrinsically observed in radiation therapy by means of a new deconvolution method combining a series expansion and a Butterworth filter. The method efficiently suppresses high-frequency components by discarding the higher order terms of the series expansion and then filtering out deviations on the field edges. An additional approximation is made in order to set the fluence values outside the field to zero in the robust profiles. This method is compared to the deconvolution kernel method for a regular 2D fluence map, a real intensity-modulated radiation therapy field, and a prostate case. The results show that accuracy is improved while fulfilling clinical planning requirements. (paper)

  13. Neutron fluence measurement in the cavity of Balakovo nuclear power plant, unit 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorbraak, W.P.; Baard, J.H.; Paardekooper, A.; Nolthenius, H.J.

    1996-12-01

    An international benchmark exercise has been organized by the Russian GOSATOMNADZOR. The aim was to reduce the uncertainty of fluence measurements in Nuclear Power Plants in particular VVER-1000 reactors. The benchmark was set up in the cavity of the Balakovo NPP 3. Eight institutes were involved. This report presents the results obtained by ECN. From this report, it can be concluded that the results of the relative large monitor set (13 different reaction rates with overlapping response regions) point to possible imperfections in the calculated neutron spectra. However the experimental information is not powerful enough to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron fluence rate especially in the energy region between 0.1 and 0.5 MeV below 50 percent. (orig.)

  14. Electrical and optical analyses of low fluence fast neutron damage to JFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, A.; Charles, J.P.; Kerns, S.E.; Kerns, D.V. Jr.; Bardonnie, M. de la; Mialhe, P.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of fast neutron irradiation (30 MeV) on silicon n-channel JFETs are studied. Electrical parameters of the gate-channel junction are analysed at 3 fluences: 4,06*10 10 , 8,12*10 10 and 1,22*10 11 n/cm 2 for a flux of 2,82*10 6 n/s*cm 2 and using a custom software. Electrical parameter changes are attributed to bulk semi-conductor defects. Irradiation effects on passivation overlayers are evacuate using analysis of gate-channel junction electroluminescence. This study shows that even for low neutron fluences (10 11 n/cm 2 ), n-channel JFETs, characterized in direct conducting mode and submitted to neutron radiation, present a decrease in the reverse saturation current associated with recombination. (A.C.)

  15. Fluence to Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients for Evaluation of Accelerator Radiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ralph H.; Zeman, Gary H.

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of a set of conversion functions for the expression of neutron fluence measurements in terms of Effective Dose, E, is described. Four functions in analytical form are presented, covering the neutron energy range from 2.5 10-8 to 10+4 MeV, for the interpretation of fluence measurements in the typical irradiation conditions experienced around high-energy proton accelerators such as the Bevatron. For neutron energies below 200 MeV the analytical functions were modeled after the ISO and ROT conversion coefficients in ICRU 57. For neutron energies above 200 MeV, the analytical function was derived from an analysis of recent published data. Sample calculations using either the analytical expressions or the tabulated conversion coefficients from which the analytical expressions are derived show agreement to better than plus/minus 5%

  16. Effect of laser fluence on surface, structural and mechanical properties of Zr after irradiation in the ambient environment of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelani, M.; Bashir, S.; Khaleeq-ur Rehman, M.; Ahamad, R.; Ul-Haq, F.; Yousaf, D.; Akram, M.; Afzal, N.; Umer Chaudhry, M.; Mahmood, K.; Hayat, A.; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2013-01-01

    The laser irradiation effects on surface, structural and mechanical properties of zirconium (Zr) have been investigated. For this purpose, Zr samples were irradiated with Excimer (KrF) laser (λ = 248 nm, τ = 18 ns, repetition rate ∼ 30 Hz). The irradiation was performed under the ambient environment of oxygen gas at filling pressure of 20 torr by varying laser fluences ranging from 3.8 to 5.1 cm -2 . The surface and structural modification of irradiated targets was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). In order to explore the mechanical properties of irradiated Zr, the tensile testing and Vickers micro hardness testing techniques were employed. SEM analysis reveals the grain growth on the irradiated Zr surfaces for all fluences. However, the largest sized grains are grown for the lowest fluence of 3.8 J/cm 2 . With increasing fluence from 4.3 to 5.1 J cm -2 , the compactness and density of grains increase whereas their size decreases. XRD analysis reveals the appearance of new phases of ZrO 2 and Zr 3 O. The variation in the peak intensity is observed to be anomalous whereas decreasing trend in the crystallite size and residual stresses has been observed with increasing fluence. Micro hardness analysis reveals the increasing trend in surface hardness with increasing fluence. The tensile testing exhibits the increasing trend of yield stress (YS), decreasing trend of percentage elongation and anomalous behaviour of ultimate tensile strength with increasing fluence. (authors)

  17. Epidermal protection with cryogen spray cooling during high fluence pulsed dye laser irradiation: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnell, J W; Nelson, J S; Torres, J H; Anvari, B

    2000-01-01

    Higher laser fluences than currently used in therapy (5-10 J/cm(2)) are expected to result in more effective treatment of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks. However, higher incident fluences increase the risk of epidermal damage caused by absorption of light by melanin. Cryogen spray cooling offers an effective method to reduce epidermal injury during laser irradiation. The objective of this study was to determine whether high laser incident fluences (15-30 J/cm(2)) could be used while still protecting the epidermis in ex vivo human skin samples. Non-PWS skin from a human cadaver was irradiated with a Candela ScleroPlus Laser (lambda = 585 nm; pulse duration = 1.5 msec) by using various incident fluences (8-30 J/cm(2)) without and with cryogen spray cooling (refrigerant R-134a; spurt durations: 40-250 msec). Assessment of epidermal damage was based on histologic analysis. Relatively short spurt durations (40-100 msec) protected the epidermis for laser incident fluences comparable to current therapeutic levels (8-10 J/cm(2)). However, longer spurt durations (100-250 msec) increased the fluence threshold for epidermal damage by a factor of three (up to 30 J/cm(2)) in these ex vivo samples. Results of this ex vivo study show that epidermal protection from high laser incident fluences can be achieved by increasing the cryogen spurt duration immediately before pulsed laser exposure. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Effects of laser focusing and fluence on the analysis of pellets of plant materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustinelli Arantes de Carvalho, Gabriel; Santos, Dario; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; Gomes, Marcos da Silva; Leme, Flavio de Oliveira; Krug, Francisco José

    2012-01-01

    The effects of laser focusing and fluence on LIBS analysis of pellets of plant leaves was evaluated. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (5 ns, 10 Hz, 1064 nm) was used and the emission signals were collected by lenses into an optical fiber coupled to a spectrometer with Echelle optics and ICCD. Data were acquired from the accumulation of 20 laser pulses at 2.0 μs delay and 5.0 μs integration time gate. The emission signal intensities increased with both laser fluence and spot size. Higher sensitivities for Ca, K, Mg, P, Al, B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn determinations were observed for fluences in the range from 25 to 60 J cm −2 . Coefficients of variation of site-to-site measurements were generally lower than 10% (n = 30 sites, 20 laser pulses/site) for a fluence of 50 J cm −2 and 750 μm spot size. For most elements, there is an indication that accuracy is improved with higher fluences. - Highlights: ► Laser focusing and fluence affect the quality of LIBS results. ► Improvements on sensitivity and precision were observed for most analytes. ► Matrix effects can be minimized by choosing the most appropriate fluence.

  19. Biphasic fluence-response curves for phytochrome-mediated kalanchoë seed germination : sensitization by gibberellic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethy, R; Dedonder, A; De Petter, E; Van Wiemeersch, L; Fredericq, H; De Greef, J; Steyaert, H; Stevens, H

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curves for the effect of two red pulses separated by 24 hours on the germination of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. cv Vesuv seeds, incubated on gibberellic acid (GA(3)) are biphasic for suboptimal concentrations. The response in the low fluence range corresponds with a classical red/far-red reversible phytochrome mediated reaction. GA(3) induces an additional response in the very low fluence range, which is also phytochrome mediated. The sensitivity to phytochrome-far-red absorbing form (Pfr), however, is increased about 20,000-fold, so that even far-red fluences become saturating. Both in the very low and low fluence response range, the maximal responses induced by saturating fluences are modulated by the GA(3) concentration. GA(3) having no direct influence on the phytochrome phototransformations, alters the Pfr requirement and determines the responding seed population fraction in the very low and low fluence range. The effet of GA(3) appears to be on the transduction chain of the phytochrome signal.

  20. Calibration of a He accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-03-01

    The helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for a fast reactor dosimetry. The HAFM measurement system was calibrated using He gas and He implanted samples and the measurement accuracy was confirmed to be less than 5%. Based on the preliminary irradiation test in JOYO, the measured He in the {sup 10}B type HAFM agreed well with the calculated values using the JENDL-3.2 library. (author)

  1. On the use of quality factors and fluence to dose rate conversion in human radiation exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhaus, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that various combinations of numbers and factors arrive at estimates of dose and dose effectiveness from values of fluence; but as yet it has not been possible to use biological data with the same degree of precision to estimate the physical data. It would seem that the most reasonable way to use the human data that exist is to apply them as far as possible to the human animal as a whole.

  2. Evaluation of fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for high energy radiations, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Osamu; Uehara, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Nobuaki; Iwai, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shun-ichi.

    1992-09-01

    Computer code system and basic data have been investigated for evaluating fluence to dose equivalent conversion factors for photons and neutrons up to 10 GeV. The present work suggested that the conversion factors would be obtained by incorporating effective quality factors of charged particles into the HERMES (High Energy Radiation Monte Carlo Elaborate System) code system. The effective quality factors for charged particles were calculated on the basis of the Q-L relationships specified in the ICRP Publication-60. (author)

  3. Novel results on fluence dependence and annealing behavior of oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, C; Lozano, M; Campabadal, F; Santander, J; Fonseca, L; Ullán, M; Moreno, A J D

    2002-01-01

    This work presents the latest results on electrical properties degradation of silicon radiation detectors manufactured at the Institut de Microelectronica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM) subjected to proton irradiation at CERN, Switzerland, for high-energy physics (HEP) applications. The evolution of full depletion voltage and leakage current with fluence as well as their annealing behavior with time were studied. The results obtained extend the previous understanding of the role played by technology and oxygenated material in hardening silicon radiation detectors. (15 refs).

  4. Novel results on fluence dependence and annealing behaviour of oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, C; Lozano, M; Campabadal, F; Santander, J; Fonseca, L; Ullán, M; Moreno, A

    2002-01-01

    This work presents the latest results on electrical properties degradation of silicon radiation detectors manufactured at IMB-CNM (Institut de Microelectronica de Barcelona) subjected to proton irradiation at CERN for high energy physics applications. The evolution of full depletion voltage and leakage current with fluence, as well as their annealing behaviour with time, were studied. The results obtained extend the previous understanding of the role played by technology and oxygenated material in hardening silicon radiation detectors. (15 refs).

  5. Dosimetry and fluence calculations on french PWR vessels comparisons between experiments and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimal, J.C.; Bourdet, L.; Guilleret, J.C.; Hedin, F.

    1988-01-01

    Fluence and damage calculations on PWR pressure vessels and irradiation test specimens are presented for two types of reactor: the franco-belgian (reactor CHOOZ) and the french reactors (CPY program). Comparisons with measurements are given for activation foils and fission detectors; most of them are about irradiation test specimen locations; comparisons are made for the Chooz plant on vessel stainless steel samplings and in the reactor pit

  6. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept

  7. Simple dynamic electromagnetic radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Detector monitors gamma dose rate at particular position in a radiation facility where a mixed neutron-gamma environment exists, thus determining reactor power level changes. Device also maps gamma intensity profile across a neutron-gamma beam.

  8. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H p (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm 3 , composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm 2 ). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  9. A Method for Medical Diagnosis Based on Optical Fluence Rate Distribution at Tissue Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Omnia; El-Azab, Jala; Al-Saeed, Tarek A; Hassan, Mahmoud F; Solouma, Nahed H

    2017-09-20

    Optical differentiation is a promising tool in biomedical diagnosis mainly because of its safety. The optical parameters' values of biological tissues differ according to the histopathology of the tissue and hence could be used for differentiation. The optical fluence rate distribution on tissue boundaries depends on the optical parameters. So, providing image displays of such distributions can provide a visual means of biomedical diagnosis. In this work, an experimental setup was implemented to measure the spatially-resolved steady state diffuse reflectance and transmittance of native and coagulated chicken liver and native and boiled breast chicken skin at 635 and 808 nm wavelengths laser irradiation. With the measured values, the optical parameters of the samples were calculated in vitro using a combination of modified Kubelka-Munk model and Bouguer-Beer-Lambert law. The estimated optical parameters values were substituted in the diffusion equation to simulate the fluence rate at the tissue surface using the finite element method. Results were verified with Monte-Carlo simulation. The results obtained showed that the diffuse reflectance curves and fluence rate distribution images can provide discrimination tools between different tissue types and hence can be used for biomedical diagnosis.

  10. Fast Radio Bursts’ Recipes for the Distributions of Dispersion Measures, Flux Densities, and Fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niino, Yuu

    2018-05-01

    We investigate how the statistical properties of dispersion measure (DM) and apparent flux density/fluence of (nonrepeating) fast radio bursts (FRBs) are determined by unknown cosmic rate density history [ρ FRB(z)] and luminosity function (LF) of the transient events. We predict the distributions of DMs, flux densities, and fluences of FRBs taking account of the variation of the receiver efficiency within its beam, using analytical models of ρ FRB(z) and LF. Comparing the predictions with the observations, we show that the cumulative distribution of apparent fluences suggests that FRBs originate at cosmological distances and ρ FRB increases with redshift resembling the cosmic star formation history (CSFH). We also show that an LF model with a bright-end cutoff at log10 L ν (erg s‑1 Hz‑1) ∼ 34 are favored to reproduce the observed DM distribution if ρ FRB(z) ∝ CSFH, although the statistical significance of the constraints obtained with the current size of the observed sample is not high. Finally, we find that the correlation between DM and flux density of FRBs is potentially a powerful tool to distinguish whether FRBs are at cosmological distances or in the local universe more robustly with future observations.

  11. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin; Yue, Yong; Zhang, Jinjin; Yu, Miao; Li, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm 2 , 495 mJ/cm 2 , and 637 mJ/cm 2 , the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, and the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications

  12. Effects of laser fluence on the structural properties of pulsed laser deposited ruthenium thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wai-Keat; Wong, Hin-Yong; Chan, Kah-Yoong; Tou, Teck-Yong [Multimedia University, Centre for Advanced Devices and Systems (CADS), Faculty of Engineering, Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Yong, Thian-Khok [Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Yap, Seong-Shan [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Institute of Physics, Trondheim (Norway)

    2010-08-15

    Ruthenium (Ru) has received great interest in recent years for applications in microelectronics. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) enables the growth of Ru thin films at low temperatures. In this paper, we report for the first time the characterization of pulsed laser deposited Ru thin films. The deposition processes were carried out at room temperature in vacuum environment for different durations with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 355-nm laser wavelength, employing various laser fluences ranging from 2 J/cm{sup 2} to 8 J/cm{sup 2}. The effect of the laser fluence on the structural properties of the deposited Ru films was investigated using surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ru droplets, some spherical in shape and some flattened into round discs were found on the deposited Ru. The droplets were correlated to ripple formations on the target during the laser-induced ejection from the target. In addition, crystalline Ru with orientations of (100), (101), and (002) was observed in the XRD spectra and their intensities were found to increase with increasing laser fluence and film thickness. Grain sizes ranging from 20 nm to 35 nm were deduced using the Scherrer formula. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) show that the composition of the plume and the deposited Ru film was of high purity. (orig.)

  13. Effects of laser fluence on the structural properties of pulsed laser deposited ruthenium thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wai-Keat; Wong, Hin-Yong; Chan, Kah-Yoong; Tou, Teck-Yong; Yong, Thian-Khok; Yap, Seong-Shan

    2010-01-01

    Ruthenium (Ru) has received great interest in recent years for applications in microelectronics. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) enables the growth of Ru thin films at low temperatures. In this paper, we report for the first time the characterization of pulsed laser deposited Ru thin films. The deposition processes were carried out at room temperature in vacuum environment for different durations with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser of 355-nm laser wavelength, employing various laser fluences ranging from 2 J/cm 2 to 8 J/cm 2 . The effect of the laser fluence on the structural properties of the deposited Ru films was investigated using surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Ru droplets, some spherical in shape and some flattened into round discs were found on the deposited Ru. The droplets were correlated to ripple formations on the target during the laser-induced ejection from the target. In addition, crystalline Ru with orientations of (100), (101), and (002) was observed in the XRD spectra and their intensities were found to increase with increasing laser fluence and film thickness. Grain sizes ranging from 20 nm to 35 nm were deduced using the Scherrer formula. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) show that the composition of the plume and the deposited Ru film was of high purity. (orig.)

  14. Effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on transport properties of thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Leonard, K. J.

    2017-07-01

    Thermoelectric materials were subjected to high fluence neutron irradiation in order to understand the effect of radiation damage on transport properties. This study is relevant to the NASA Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program in which thermoelectric elements are exposed to radiation over a long period of time in space missions. Selected n-type and p-type bismuth telluride materials were irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a neutron fluence of 1.3 × 1018 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The increase in the Seebeck coefficient in the n-type material was partially off-set by an increase in electrical resistivity, making the power factor higher at lower temperatures. For the p-type materials, although the Seebeck coefficient was not affected by irradiation, electrical resistivity decreased slightly. The figure of merit, zT, showed a clear drop in the 300-400 K range for the p-type material and an increase for the n-type material. Considering that the p-type and n-type materials are connected in series in a module, the overall irradiation damages at the device level were limited. These results, at neutron fluences exceeding a typical space mission, are significant to ensure that the radiation damage to thermoelectrics does not affect the performance of RTGs.

  15. High-energy and high-fluence proton irradiation effects in silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Taylor, S.J.; Yang, M.; Matsuda, S.; Kawasaki, O.; Hisamatsu, T.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined proton irradiation damage in high-energy (1 endash 10 MeV) and high-fluence (approx-gt 10 13 cm -2 ) Si n + -p-p + structure space solar cells. Radiation testing has revealed an anomalous increase in short-circuit current I sc followed by an abrupt decrease and cell failure, induced by high-fluence proton irradiation. We propose a model to explain these phenomena by expressing the change in carrier concentration p of the base region as a function of the proton fluence in addition to the well-known model where the short-circuit current is decreased by minority-carrier lifetime reduction after irradiation. The reduction in carrier concentration due to majority-carrier trapping by radiation-induced defects has two effects. First, broadening of the depletion layer increases both the generation endash recombination current and also the contribution of the photocurrent generated in this region to the total photocurrent. Second, the resistivity of the base layer is increased, resulting in the abrupt decrease in the short circuit current and failure of the solar cells. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. Robust fluence map optimization via alternating direction method of multipliers with empirical parameter optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Hao

    2016-01-01

    For the treatment planning during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), beam fluence maps can be first optimized via fluence map optimization (FMO) under the given dose prescriptions and constraints to conformally deliver the radiation dose to the targets while sparing the organs-at-risk, and then segmented into deliverable MLC apertures via leaf or arc sequencing algorithms. This work is to develop an efficient algorithm for FMO based on alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Here we consider FMO with the least-square cost function and non-negative fluence constraints, and its solution algorithm is based on ADMM, which is efficient and simple-to-implement. In addition, an empirical method for optimizing the ADMM parameter is developed to improve the robustness of the ADMM algorithm. The ADMM based FMO solver was benchmarked with the quadratic programming method based on the interior-point (IP) method using the CORT dataset. The comparison results suggested the ADMM solver had a similar plan quality with slightly smaller total objective function value than IP. A simple-to-implement ADMM based FMO solver with empirical parameter optimization is proposed for IMRT or VMAT. (paper)

  17. Investigation of the drastic change in the sputter rate of polymers at low ion fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zekonyte, J.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Faupel, F.

    2005-01-01

    The polymer sputter rate dependence on ion fluence and ion chemistry (Ar, N 2 , O 2 ) at 1 keV energy was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) which allowed to do real time etch rate measurements and to study kinetics of sputtering. The obtained sputter rates differed drastically from polymer to polymer showing, that the chemical structure of polymer is an important factor in the polymer etch yield. A decrease in the sputter rate was observed up to ion fluence of 5 x 10 14 -5 x 10 15 cm -2 (depending on the polymer type and ion chemistry) followed by the saturation in the rate at prolonged ion bombardment. Polymer removal was accompanied by the formation of degradation products, cross-linking or branching, modification of the surface chemical structure, which was studied in situ using XPS. The dependence of the surface glass transition temperature, T gs on the ion fluence was studied using the method based on the embedding of metallic nanoparticles. The correlation between chemical yield data and ablation rate is discussed

  18. Very low-energy and low-fluence ion beam bombardment of naked plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norarat, R.; Semsang, N.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    Ion beam bombardment of biological organisms has been recently applied to mutation breeding of both agricultural and horticultural plants. In order to explore relevant mechanisms, this study employed low-energy ion beams to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The study aimed at simulation of the final stage of the process of the ion beam bombardment of real cells to check whether and how very low-energy and low-fluence of ions can induce mutation. Argon and nitrogen ions at 5 keV and 2.5 keV respectively bombarded naked plasmid DNA pGFP to very low-fluences, an order of 10 13 ions/cm 2 . Subsequently, DNA states were analyzed using electrophoresis. Results provided evidences that the very low-energy and low-fluence ion bombardment indeed altered the DNA structure from supercoil to short linear fragments through multiple double strand breaks and thus induced mutation, which was confirmed by transfer of the bombarded DNA into bacteria Escherichia coli and subsequent expression of the marker gene.

  19. Development of the processing software package for RPV neutron fluence determination methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, S.; Kirilova, K.; Ilieva, K.

    2001-01-01

    According to the INRNE methodology the neutron transport calculation is carried out by two steps. At the first step reactor core eigenvalue calculation is performed. This calculation is used for determination of the fixed source for the next step calculation of neutron transport from the reactor core to the RPV. Both calculation steps are performed by state of the art and tested codes. The interface software package DOSRC developed at INRNE is used as a link between these two calculations. The package transforms reactor core calculation results to neutron source input data in format appropriate for the neutron transport codes (DORT, TORT and ASYNT) based on the discrete ordinates method. These codes are applied for calculation of the RPV neutron flux and its responses - induced activity, radiation damage, neutron fluence etc. Fore more precise estimation of the neutron fluence, the INRNE methodology has been supplemented by the next improvements: - implementation of more advanced codes (PYTHIA/DERAB) for neutron-physics parameter calculations; - more detailed neutron source presentation; - verification of neutron fluence by statistically treated experimental data. (author)

  20. A Method for Medical Diagnosis Based on Optical Fluence Rate Distribution at Tissue Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omnia Hamdy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Optical differentiation is a promising tool in biomedical diagnosis mainly because of its safety. The optical parameters’ values of biological tissues differ according to the histopathology of the tissue and hence could be used for differentiation. The optical fluence rate distribution on tissue boundaries depends on the optical parameters. So, providing image displays of such distributions can provide a visual means of biomedical diagnosis. In this work, an experimental setup was implemented to measure the spatially-resolved steady state diffuse reflectance and transmittance of native and coagulated chicken liver and native and boiled breast chicken skin at 635 and 808 nm wavelengths laser irradiation. With the measured values, the optical parameters of the samples were calculated in vitro using a combination of modified Kubelka-Munk model and Bouguer-Beer-Lambert law. The estimated optical parameters values were substituted in the diffusion equation to simulate the fluence rate at the tissue surface using the finite element method. Results were verified with Monte-Carlo simulation. The results obtained showed that the diffuse reflectance curves and fluence rate distribution images can provide discrimination tools between different tissue types and hence can be used for biomedical diagnosis.

  1. Vessel fluence evaluation for SMART using DLC-23 and DLC-185 data libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyo Youn; Cho, Byung Oh; Joo, Han Gyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    In this report, it was performed the vessel fluence evaluation for SMART using nuclear cross-section libraries of DLC-23/CASK and DLC-185/BUGLE-96 and it was compared with the results. It was shown that the maximum neutron fluences for the inner surface of SMART vessel, which has 60 years lifetime and 90% capacity factor, resulted from using DLC-23/CASK and DLC-185/BUGLE-96 are 2.88x10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2} and 1.98 x10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. It is concluded that the fast neutron fluence at the reactor pressure vessel of SMART is far less than 1.0x10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} which is specified by the requirement of 10 CFR 50.61 and the SMART has the preservation of reactor vessel integrity throughout the reactor lifetime. Also, it was shown that the result using DLC-23/CASK has conservatism of about 30% comparing with the result using DLC-185/BUGLE-96. 15 refs., 7 figs., 13 tabs. (Author)

  2. Fluence-compensated down-scattered neutron imaging using the neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, D. T., E-mail: casey21@llnl.gov; Munro, D. H.; Grim, G. P.; Landen, O. L.; Spears, B. K.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Field, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Volegov, P. L.; Merrill, F. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility is used to observe the primary ∼14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV) from the assembled shell. Due to the strong spatial dependence of the primary neutron fluence through the dense shell, the down-scattered image is convolved with the primary-neutron fluence much like a backlighter profile. Using a characteristic scattering angle assumption, we estimate the primary neutron fluence and compensate the down-scattered image, which reveals information about asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without invoking complicated models.

  3. Time-resolved and integrated angular distributions of plume ions from silver at low and medium laser fluence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Laser impact on metals in the UV regime results in a significant number of ablated plume ions even at moderate fluence (0.7–2.4 J/cm2). The ablated particles are largely neutrals at the lowest fluence, but the fraction of ions increases strongly with fluence. The ion flow in different directions...... from a silver target irradiated by a laser beam at a wavelength of 355 nm in vacuum was measured with a hemispherical array of Langmuir probes. The time-of-flight spectra in all directions, as well as the total angular yield were determined. The angular distribution peaks strongly in forward direction...

  4. Statistical Analysis of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculation Benchmark Data Using Multiple Regression Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carew, John F.; Finch, Stephen J.; Lois, Lambros

    2003-01-01

    The calculated >1-MeV pressure vessel fluence is used to determine the fracture toughness and integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. It is therefore of the utmost importance to ensure that the fluence prediction is accurate and unbiased. In practice, this assurance is provided by comparing the predictions of the calculational methodology with an extensive set of accurate benchmarks. A benchmarking database is used to provide an estimate of the overall average measurement-to-calculation (M/C) bias in the calculations ( ). This average is used as an ad-hoc multiplicative adjustment to the calculations to correct for the observed calculational bias. However, this average only provides a well-defined and valid adjustment of the fluence if the M/C data are homogeneous; i.e., the data are statistically independent and there is no correlation between subsets of M/C data.Typically, the identification of correlations between the errors in the database M/C values is difficult because the correlation is of the same magnitude as the random errors in the M/C data and varies substantially over the database. In this paper, an evaluation of a reactor dosimetry benchmark database is performed to determine the statistical validity of the adjustment to the calculated pressure vessel fluence. Physical mechanisms that could potentially introduce a correlation between the subsets of M/C ratios are identified and included in a multiple regression analysis of the M/C data. Rigorous statistical criteria are used to evaluate the homogeneity of the M/C data and determine the validity of the adjustment.For the database evaluated, the M/C data are found to be strongly correlated with dosimeter response threshold energy and dosimeter location (e.g., cavity versus in-vessel). It is shown that because of the inhomogeneity in the M/C data, for this database, the benchmark data do not provide a valid basis for adjusting the pressure vessel fluence.The statistical criteria and methods employed in

  5. Sci-Thur AM: Planning - 04: Evaluation of the fluence complexity, solution quality, and run efficiency produced by five fluence parameterizations implemented in PARETO multiobjective radiotherapy treatment planning software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, H; Fiege, J; McCurdy, B; Potrebko, P; Cull, A

    2012-07-01

    PARETO (Pareto-Aware Radiotherapy Evolutionary Treatment Optimization) is a novel multiobjective treatment planning system that performs beam orientation and fluence optimization simultaneously using an advanced evolutionary algorithm. In order to reduce the number of parameters involved in this enormous search space, we present several methods for modeling the beam fluence. The parameterizations are compared using innovative tools that evaluate fluence complexity, solution quality, and run efficiency. A PARETO run is performed using the basic weight (BW), linear gradient (LG), cosine transform (CT), beam group (BG), and isodose-projection (IP) methods for applying fluence modulation over the projection of the Planning Target Volume in the beam's-eye-view plane. The solutions of each run are non-dominated with respect to other trial solutions encountered during the run. However, to compare the solution quality of independent runs, each run competes against every other run in a round robin fashion. Score is assigned based on the fraction of solutions that survive when a tournament selection operator is applied to the solutions of the two competitors. To compare fluence complexity, a modulation index, fractal dimension, and image gradient entropy are calculated for the fluence maps of each optimal plan. We have found that the LG method results in superior solution quality for a spine phantom, lung patient, and cauda equina patient. The BG method produces solutions with the highest degree of fluence complexity. Most methods result in comparable run times. The LG method produces superior solution quality using a moderate degree of fluence modulation. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Epoxy-paint stripping using TEA CO2 laser: Determination of threshold fluence and the process parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhargava, P.; Biswas, A. K.; Sahu, Shasikiran; Mandloi, V.; Ittoop, M. O.; Khattak, B. Q.; Tiwari, M. K.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that the threshold fluence for laser paint stripping can be accurately estimated from the heat of gasification and the absorption coefficient of the epoxy-paint. The threshold fluence determined experimentally by stripping of the epoxy-paint on a substrate using a TEA CO2 laser matches closely with the calculated value. The calculated threshold fluence and the measured absorption coefficient of the paint allowed us to determine the epoxy paint thickness that would be removed per pulse at a given laser fluence even without experimental trials. This was used to predict the optimum scan speed required to strip the epoxy-paint of a given thickness using a high average power TEA CO2 laser. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) studies were also carried out on laser paint-stripped concrete substrate to show high efficacy of this modality.

  7. New approach for absolute fluence distribution calculations in Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation in turbid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böcklin, Christoph; Baumann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2014-01-01

    A novel way to attain three dimensional fluence rate maps from Monte-Carlo simulations of photon propagation is presented in this work. The propagation of light in a turbid medium is described by the radiative transfer equation and formulated in terms of radiance. For many applications, particularly in biomedical optics, the fluence rate is a more useful quantity and directly derived from the radiance by integrating over all directions. Contrary to the usual way which calculates the fluence rate from absorbed photon power, the fluence rate in this work is directly calculated from the photon packet trajectory. The voxel based algorithm works in arbitrary geometries and material distributions. It is shown that the new algorithm is more efficient and also works in materials with a low or even zero absorption coefficient. The capabilities of the new algorithm are demonstrated on a curved layered structure, where a non-scattering, non-absorbing layer is sandwiched between two highly scattering layers

  8. Fluence correction factors for graphite calorimetry in a low-energy clinical proton beam: I. Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, H; Al-Sulaiti, L; Andreo, P; Shipley, D; Lühr, A; Bassler, N; Martinkovič, J; Dobrovodský, J; Rossomme, S; Thomas, R A S; Kacperek, A

    2013-05-21

    The conversion of absorbed dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to absorbed dose-to-water in a water phantom is performed by water to graphite stopping power ratios. If, however, the charged particle fluence is not equal at equivalent depths in graphite and water, a fluence correction factor, kfl, is required as well. This is particularly relevant to the derivation of absorbed dose-to-water, the quantity of interest in radiotherapy, from a measurement of absorbed dose-to-graphite obtained with a graphite calorimeter. In this work, fluence correction factors for the conversion from dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to dose-to-water in a water phantom for 60 MeV mono-energetic protons were calculated using an analytical model and five different Monte Carlo codes (Geant4, FLUKA, MCNPX, SHIELD-HIT and McPTRAN.MEDIA). In general the fluence correction factors are found to be close to unity and the analytical and Monte Carlo codes give consistent values when considering the differences in secondary particle transport. When considering only protons the fluence correction factors are unity at the surface and increase with depth by 0.5% to 1.5% depending on the code. When the fluence of all charged particles is considered, the fluence correction factor is about 0.5% lower than unity at shallow depths predominantly due to the contributions from alpha particles and increases to values above unity near the Bragg peak. Fluence correction factors directly derived from the fluence distributions differential in energy at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9964 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.2%. Fluence correction factors derived from a ratio of calculated doses at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9947 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.3%. These results are of direct relevance to graphite calorimetry in low-energy protons but given that the fluence

  9. WE-AB-209-10: Optimizing the Delivery of Sequential Fluence Maps for Efficient VMAT Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, D [Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge, MA (United States); Balvert, M [Tilburg University, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an optimization model and solution approach for computing MLC leaf trajectories and dose rates for high quality matching of a set of optimized fluence maps to be delivered sequentially around a patient in a VMAT treatment. Methods: We formulate the fluence map matching problem as a nonlinear optimization problem where time is discretized but dose rates and leaf positions are continuous variables. For a given allotted time, which is allocated across the fluence maps based on the complexity of each fluence map, the optimization problem searches for the best leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the original fluence maps are closely recreated. Constraints include maximum leaf speed, maximum dose rate, and leaf collision avoidance, as well as the constraint that the ending leaf positions for one map are the starting leaf positions for the next map. The resulting model is non-convex but smooth, and therefore we solve it by local searches from a variety of starting positions. We improve solution time by a custom decomposition approach which allows us to decouple the rows of the fluence maps and solve each leaf pair individually. This decomposition also makes the problem easily parallelized. Results: We demonstrate method on a prostate case and a head-and-neck case and show that one can recreate fluence maps to high degree of fidelity in modest total delivery time (minutes). Conclusion: We present a VMAT sequencing method that reproduces optimal fluence maps by searching over a vast number of possible leaf trajectories. By varying the total allotted time given, this approach is the first of its kind to allow users to produce VMAT solutions that span the range of wide-field coarse VMAT deliveries to narrow-field high-MU sliding window-like approaches.

  10. Sneutrino mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Y.

    1997-10-01

    In supersymmetric models with nonvanishing Majorana neutrino masses, the sneutrino and antisneutrino mix. The conditions under which this mixing is experimentally observable are studied, and mass-splitting of the sneutrino mass eigenstates and sneutrino oscillation phenomena are analyzed

  11. Dependence of wavelength of Xe ion-induced rippled structures on the fluence in the medium ion energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanisch, Antje; Grenzer, Joerg [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany); Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich [Institute of Physics, University of Siegen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Ion-beam eroded self-organized nanostructures on semiconductors offer new ways for the fabrication of high density memory and optoelectronic devices. It is known that wavelength and amplitude of noble gas ion-induced rippled structures tune with the ion energy and the fluence depending on the energy range, ion type and substrate. The linear theory by Makeev predicts a linear dependence of the ion energy on the wavelength for low temperatures. For Ar{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +} it was observed by different groups that the wavelength grows with increasing fluence after being constant up to an onset fluence and before saturation. In this coarsening regime power-law or exponential behavior of the wavelength with the fluence was monitored. So far, investigations for Xe ions on silicon surfaces mainly concentrated on energies below 1 keV. We found a linear dependence of both the ion energy and the fluence on the wavelength and amplitude of rippled structures over a wide range of the Xe{sup +} ion energy between 5 and 70 keV. Moreover, we estimated the ratio of wavelength to amplitude to be constant meaning a shape stability when a threshold fluence of 2.10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} was exceeded.

  12. A new method for the determination of unknown neutron fluence for 14.0 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Fariha [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)]. E-mail: fariha@pinstech.org.pk; Khan, Ehsan U. [Department of Physics, CIIT, Islamabad (Pakistan); Qureshi, Imtinan [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Husaini, Syed N. [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmad, Waqar [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rajput, Usman [Physics Reasearch Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Raza, Qaiser [Applied Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2006-11-15

    Measuring the correct neutron fluence in various energy intervals in and around the neutron sources is important for the purpose of personnel and environmental neutron dosimetry. In this paper, we present a new method for the measurement of the fluence of mono-energetic neutrons having the energy of 14.0 MeV. The samples exposed to neutrons from the 14.0 MeV neutron generator at PINSTECH with various fluence values ranging from 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 10} n cm{sup -2} were etched for 10 min in 6 N NaOH at 70.0{+-}1.0 {sup o}C and the transmittance of UV radiation was measured using a spectrophotometer. This procedure was repeated 20 times after etching the same sample each time for increasing time intervals till the stage when transmittance reached the constant minimum value. An exponential decay of the transmittance has been observed with respect to the increasing etching time interval in each of the samples exposed to various neutron fluence. Further, it has also been observed that there is a linear relationship between the transmittance decay constant and neutron fluence. Hence, the linear graph can be used as a calibration for measuring the unknown fluence of 14.0 MeV neutrons.

  13. Flux effect on neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels irradiated to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, N.; Dohi, K.; Nishida, K.; Nomoto, A.; Iwasaki, M.; Tsuno, S.; Akiyama, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ohta, T.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is of great concern for the long term operation of light water reactors. In particular, the embrittlement of the RPV steels of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) at very high fluences beyond 6*10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, needs to be understood in more depth because materials irradiated in material test reactors (MTRs) to such high fluences show larger shifts than predicted by current embrittlement correlation equations available worldwide. The primary difference between the irradiation conditions of MTRs and surveillance capsules is the neutron flux. The neutron flux of MTR is typically more than one order of magnitude higher than that of surveillance capsule, but it is not necessarily clear if this difference in neutron flux causes difference in mechanical properties of RPV. In this paper, we perform direct comparison, in terms of mechanical property and microstructure, between the materials irradiated in surveillance capsules and MTRs to clarify the effect of flux at very high fluences and fluxes. We irradiate the archive materials of some of the commercial reactors in Japan in the MTR, LVR-15, of NRI Rez, Czech Republic. Charpy impact test results of the MTR-irradiated materials are compared with the data from surveillance tests. The comparison of the results of microstructural analyses by means of atom probe tomography is also described to demonstrate the similarity / differences in surveillance and MTR-irradiated materials in terms of solute atom behavior. It appears that high Cu material irradiated in a MTR presents larger shifts than those of surveillance data, while low Cu materials present similar embrittlement. The microstructural changes caused by MTR irradiation and surveillance irradiation are clearly different

  14. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygoryev, Dmytro [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Gauny, Stacey [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kronenberg, Amy [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Turker, Mitchell S., E-mail: turkerm@ohsu.edu [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Densely ionizing forms of space radiation induce mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence. • Large interstitial deletions and discontinuous LOH patterns are radiation signature mutations. • Space radiation mutagenesis suggests a cancer risk from deep space travel. - Abstract: High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing {sup 48}Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm), {sup 56}Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV, LET = 0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3–5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest.

  15. Textural feature calculated from segmental fluences as a modulation index for VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Yeon; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Jung-In; Kim, Hyoungnyoun; Kim, Il Han; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2015-12-01

    Textural features calculated from various segmental fluences of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were optimized to enhance its performance to predict plan delivery accuracy. Twenty prostate and twenty head and neck VMAT plans were selected retrospectively. Fluences were generated for each VMAT plan by summations of segments at sequential groups of control points. The numbers of summed segments were 5, 10, 20, 45, 90, 178 and 356. For each fluence, we investigated 6 textural features: angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation and entropy (particular displacement distances, d = 1, 5 and 10). Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (rs) were calculated between each textural feature and several different measures of VMAT delivery accuracy. The values of rs of contrast (d = 10) with 10 segments to both global and local gamma passing rates with 2%/2 mm were 0.666 (p <0.001) and 0.573 (p <0.001), respectively. It showed rs values of -0.895 (p <0.001) and 0.727 (p <0.001) to multi-leaf collimator positional errors and gantry angle errors during delivery, respectively. The number of statistically significant rs values (p <0.05) to the changes in dose-volumetric parameters during delivery was 14 among a total of 35 tested parameters. Contrast (d = 10) with 10 segments showed higher correlations to the VMAT delivery accuracy than did the conventional modulation indices. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fast neutron fluence calculations as support for a BWR pressure vessel and internals surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, Marco A.; Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Xolocostli-Munguia, J. Vicente; Gomez-Torres, Armando M.

    2010-01-01

    Materials surveillance programs are required to detect and prevent degradation of safety-related structures and components of a nuclear power reactor. In this work, following the directions in the Regulatory Guide 1.190, a calculational methodology is implemented as additional support for a reactor pressure vessel and internals surveillance program for a BWR. The choice of the neutronic methods employed was based on the premise of being able of performing all the expected future survey calculations in relatively short times, but without compromising accuracy. First, a geometrical model of a typical BWR was developed, from the core to the primary containment, including jet pumps and all other structures. The methodology uses the Synthesis Method to compute the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution. In the methodology, the code CORE-MASTER-PRESTO is used as the three-dimensional core simulator; SCALE is used to generate the fine-group flux spectra of the components of the model and also used to generate a 47 energy-groups job cross section library, collapsed from the 199-fine-group master library VITAMIN-B6; ORIGEN2 was used to compute the isotopic densities of uranium and plutonium; and, finally, DORT was used to calculate the two-dimensional and one-dimensional neutron flux distributions required to compute the synthesized three-dimensional neutron flux. Then, the calculation of fast neutron fluence was performed using the effective full power time periods through six operational fuel cycles of two BWR Units and until the 13th cycle for Unit 1. The results showed a maximum relative difference between the calculated-by-synthesis fast neutron fluxes and fluences and those measured by Fe, Cu and Ni dosimeters less than 7%. The dosimeters were originally located adjacent to the pressure vessel wall, as part of the surveillance program. Results from the computations of peak fast fluence on pressure vessel wall and specific weld locations on the core shroud are

  17. Estimation of saturation activities for activation experiments in CHARM and CSBF using Fluence Conversion Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Guerin, Helene Chloe; Iliopoulou, Elpida; CERN. Geneva. HSE Department

    2017-01-01

    As summer student at CERN, I have been working in the Radiation Protection group for 10 weeks. I worked with the \\textsc{Fluka} Monte Carlo simulation code, using Fluence Conversion Coefficients method to perform simulations to estimate the saturation activities for activation experiments in the \\textsc{CSBF} and the \\textsc{Charm} facility in the East Experimental Area. The provided results will be used to plan a Monte Carlo benchmark in the \\textsc{CSBF} during a beam period at the end of August 2017.

  18. Fast neutron fluence evaluation of the smart reactor pressure vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.Y.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, H.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Zee, S.Q.

    2007-01-01

    In Korea, the design of an advanced integral reactor system called SMART has been developed by KAERI to supply energy for seawater desalination as well as an electricity generation. A fast neutron fluence distribution at the SMART reactor pressure vessel was evaluated to confirm the integrity of the vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code. The GEOSHIELD code was developed by KAERI in order to prepare an input list including a geometry modeling of the DORT code and to process results from the DORT code output list. Results by a GEOSHIELD code processing and by a manual processing of the DORT show a good agreement. (author)

  19. The FLUKA study of the secondary particles fluence in the AD-Antiproton Decelerator target area

    CERN Document Server

    Calviani, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo FLUKA simulations [1, 2] carried out to investigate the secondary particles fluence emerging from the antiproton production target and their spatial distribution in the AD target area. The detailed quantitative analysis has been performed for different positions along the magnet dog-leg as well as after the main collimator. These results allow tuning the position of the new beam current transformers (BCT) in the target area, in order to have a precise pulse-by-pulse evaluation of the intensity of negative particles injected in the AD-ring before the deceleration phase.

  20. Variability in fluence and spectrum of high-energy photon bursts produced by lightning leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Celestin , Sebastien; Xu , Wei; Pasko , Victor P.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we model the production and acceleration of thermal runaway electrons during negative corona flash stages of stepping lightning leaders and the corresponding terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) or negative cloud-to-ground (−CG) lightning-produced X-ray bursts in a unified fashion. We show how the source photon spectrum and fluence depend on the potential drop formed in the lightning leader tip region during corona flash and how the X-ray burst spectrum ...

  1. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650 0 C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys

  2. Realization of fluence field modulated CT on a clinical TomoTherapy megavoltage CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P; Hermus, James; Geurts, Mark; Smilowitz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The multi-leaf collimator (MLC) assembly present on TomoTherapy (Accuray, Madison WI) radiation therapy (RT) and mega voltage CT machines is well suited to perform fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT). In addition, there is a demand in the RT environment for FFMCT imaging techniques, specifically volume of interest (VOI) imaging.A clinical TomoTherapy machine was programmed to perform VOI. Four different size ROIs were placed at varying distances from isocenter. Projections intersecting the VOI received ‘full dose’ while those not intersecting the VOI received 30% of the dose (i.e. the incident fluence for non VOI projections was 30% of the incident fluence for projections intersecting the VOI). Additional scans without fluence field modulation were acquired at ‘full’ and 30% dose. The noise (pixel standard deviation) and mean CT number were measured inside the VOI region and compared between the three scans. Dose maps were generated using a dedicated TomoTherapy treatment planning dose calculator.The VOI-FFMCT technique produced an image noise 1.05, 1.00, 1.03, and 1.05 times higher than the ‘full dose’ scan for ROI sizes of 10 cm, 13 cm, 10 cm, and 6 cm respectively within the VOI region. The VOI-FFMCT technique required a total imaging dose equal to 0.61, 0.69, 0.60, and 0.50 times the ‘full dose’ acquisition dose for ROI sizes of 10 cm, 13 cm, 10 cm, and 6 cm respectively within the VOI region.Noise levels can be almost unchanged within clinically relevant VOIs sizes for RT applications while the integral imaging dose to the patient can be decreased, and/or the image quality in RT can be dramatically increased with no change in dose relative to non-FFMCT RT imaging. The ability to shift dose away from regions unimportant for clinical evaluation in order to improve image quality or reduce imaging dose has been demonstrated. This paper demonstrates that FFMCT can be performed using the MLC on a clinical TomoTherapy machine for the

  3. Magnesium aluminate planar waveguides fabricated by C-ion implantation with different energies and fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hong-Lian; Yu, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Lian; Wang, Tie-Jun; Qiao, Mei; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xue-Lin, E-mail: xuelinwang@sdu.edu.cn

    2015-11-01

    We report on MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} planar waveguides produced using different energies and fluences of C-ion implantation at room temperature. Based on the prism coupling method and end-face coupling measurements, light could propagate in the C-ion-implanted samples. The Raman spectra results indicate that the MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal lattice was damaged during the multi-energy C implantation process, whereas the absorption spectra were hardly affected by the C-ion implantation in the visible and infrared bands.

  4. A new Recoil Proton Telescope for energy and fluence measurement of fast neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebreton, Lena; Bachaalany, Mario [IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons), Cadarache Bat.159, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Husson, Daniel; Higueret, Stephane [IPHC / RaMsEs (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien / Radioprotection et Mesures Environnementales), 23 rue du loess - BP28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High Energy Neutron metrology Applications), is being developed at the IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons) and aims at characterizing energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a Recoil Proton Telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5 to 20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50{sub m} thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for the proton tracking and a 3 mm thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. This first prototype used CMOS sensors called MIMOSTAR, initially developed for heavy ion physics. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of ten compared with conventional designs. The first prototype has already been done and was a successful study giving the results it offered in terms of energy and fluence measurements. For mono energetic beams going from 5 to 19 MeV, the telescope offered an energy resolution between 5 and 11% and fluence difference going from 5 to 7% compared to other home standards. A second and final prototype of the detector is being designed. It will hold upgraded CMOS sensors called FastPixN. These CMOS sensors are supposed to run 400 times faster than the older version and therefore give the telescope the ability to support neutron flux in the order of 107 to 108cm{sup 2}:s{sup 1}. The first prototypes results showed that a 50 m pixel size is enough for a precise scattering angle reconstruction. Simulations using MCNPX and GEANT4 are already in place for further improvements. A DeltaE diode will replace the third CMOS sensor and will be installed right before the silicon diode for a better recoil proton selection. The final prototype with

  5. Measurement of low neutron-fluences using electrochemically etched PC and PET track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, G.; Dajko, G.; Turek, K.; Spurny, F.

    1979-01-01

    Systematic investigations have been carried out to study different properties of electrochemically etched (ECE) polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) foils. The dependence of the density of background discharge spots on surface-thickness removal, electrical field strength and frequency of voltage is given. The effect of these parameters on the neutron sensitivity of polycarbonate and polyethylene-terephthalate foils irradiated at right angles to 14.7 MeV, 241 Am-Be and 252 Cf neutrons is also studied. With knowledge of the background and sensitivity data, the etching and electrical parameters are optimized for low neutron-fluence measurements. (author)

  6. Sputtering and mixing of supported nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiménez-Sáez, J.C.; Pérez-Martín, A.M.C.; Jiménez-Rodríguez, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Sputtering and mixing of Co nanoparticles supported in Cu(0 0 1) under 1-keV argon bombardment are studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. Particles of different initial size have been considered. The cluster height decreases exponentially with increasing fluence. In nanoparticles, sputtering yield is significantly enhanced compared to bulk. In fact, the value of this magnitude depends on the cluster height. A theoretical model for sputtering is introduced with acceptable results compared to those obtained by simulation. Discrepancies happen mainly for very small particles. Mixing rate at the interface is quantified; and besides, the influence of border effects for clusters of different initial size is assessed. Mixing rate and border length–surface area ratio for the initial interface show a proportionality relation. The phenomenon of ion-induced burrowing of metallic nanoparticles is analysed

  7. Effects of high thermal and high fast fluences on the mechanical properties of type 6061 aluminum in the HFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Tichler, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is an epithermal, externally moderated (by D 2 O) facility designed to produce neutron beams for research. Type 6061 T-6 aluminum was used for the beam tubes, pressure vessel, fuel cladding, and most other components in the high flux area. The HFBR has operated since 1965. The epithermal, external moderation of the HFBR means that materials irradiated in different areas of the facility receive widely different flux spectra. Thus, specimens from a control rod drive follower tube (CRDF) have received 1.5 /times/ 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and 3.2 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal fluence, while those from a vertical thimble flow shroud received 1.9 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.0 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal. These numbers correspond to fast to thermal fluence ratios ranging from 0.05 to 1.9. Irradiations are occurring at approximately 333/degree/K. The data indicate that the increase in tensile strength and decrease in ductility result primarily from the thermal fluence, i.e., the transmutation of aluminum to silicon. These effects appear to be saturating at fluences above approximately 1.8 /times/ 10 23 n/cm 2 thermal at values of 90,000 psi (6700 Kg/mm 2 ) and 9%, respectively. The specimens receiving the highest fluence ratios appear to have less increase in tensile strength and less decrease in ductility than specimens with a lower fast to thermal fluence ratio and the same thermal fluence, suggesting a possible beneficial effect of the high energy neutrons in preventing formation of silicon crystallites. 7 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Microbial UV fluence-response assessment using a novel UV-LED collimated beam system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Colleen; Sain, Amanda; Shatalov, Max; Ducoste, Joel

    2011-02-01

    A research study has been performed to determine the ultraviolet (UV) fluence-response of several target non-pathogenic microorganisms to UV light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) by performing collimated beam tests. UV-LEDs do not contain toxic mercury, offer design flexibility due to their small size, and have a longer operational life than mercury lamps. Comsol Multiphysics was utilized to create an optimal UV-LED collimated beam design based on number and spacing of UV-LEDs and distance of the sample from the light source while minimizing the overall cost. The optimized UV-LED collimated beam apparatus and a low-pressure mercury lamp collimated beam apparatus were used to determine the UV fluence-response of three surrogate microorganisms (Escherichia coli, MS-2, T7) to 255 nm UV-LEDs, 275 nm UV-LEDs, and 254 nm low-pressure mercury lamps. Irradiation by low-pressure mercury lamps produced greater E. coli and MS-2 inactivation than 255 nm and 275 nm UV-LEDs and similar T7 inactivation to irradiation by 275 nm UV-LEDs. The 275 nm UV-LEDs produced more efficient T7 and E. coli inactivation than 255 nm UV-LEDs while both 255 nm and 275 nm UV-LEDs produced comparable microbial inactivation for MS-2. Differences may have been caused by a departure from the time-dose reciprocity law due to microbial repair mechanisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Laser cleaning of parchment: structural, thermal and biochemical studies into the effect of wavelength and fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Craig J.; Vest, Marie; Cooper, Martin; Wess, Tim J.

    2004-01-01

    Laser cleaning of parchment is a novel technique that has the potential to provide contactless, chemical-free cleaning of historically important documents. However, the effect of laser cleaning on the collagenous structure of parchment is still poorly understood, as is the effect of the wavelength or the energy density (fluence level) used to clean parchment. In this study, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), shrinkage temperature (Ts) measurements by the micro hot table technique and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of parchment samples after laser cleaning reveal the effect of cleaning to the structural, thermal and molecular characteristics of parchment, respectively. The effect of cleaning at infrared (1064 nm), green (532 nm) and ultraviolet (266 nm) wavelengths at a range of fluence levels is investigated. SAXS is used to investigate the removal of dirt from parchment. Laser cleaning at IR or green wavelengths appears not to alter the collagen diffraction pattern from SAXS, the shrinkage activity or shrinkage temperature from Ts measurements or the molecular integrity of parchment as shown by SDS-PAGE. However, parchments cleaned at the ultraviolet wavelength display structural damage and a reduction in hydrothermal stability and molecular integrity

  10. Probabilistic model for fluences and peak fluxes of solar energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nymmik, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The model is intended for calculating the probability for solar energetic particles (SEP), i.e., protons and Z=2-28 ions, to have an effect on hardware and on biological and other objects in the space. The model describes the probability for the ≥10 MeV/nucleon SEP fluences and peak fluxes to occur in the near-Earth space beyond the Earth magnetosphere under varying solar activity. The physical prerequisites of the model are as follows. The occurrence of SEP is a probabilistic process. The mean SEP occurrence frequency is a power-law function of solar activity (sunspot number). The SEP size (taken to be the ≥30 MeV proton fluence size) distribution is a power-law function within a 10 5 -10 11 proton/cm 2 range. The SEP event particle energy spectra are described by a common function whose parameters are distributed log-normally. The SEP mean composition is energy-dependent and suffers fluctuations described by log-normal functions in separate events

  11. Thickness optimization of various moderator materials for maximization of thermal neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhang, Prosenjit; Verma, Rishi; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    Plasma focus device is widely being used as pulsed neutron source for variety of applications. Measurements of neutron yield by largely preferred Helium-3 proportional counter and Silver activation counter are mainly sensitive to thermal neutrons and are typically used with a neutron moderator. Thermalization of neutron is based on scattering reaction and hydrogenous materials are the best thermalizing medium. The efficiency of aforementioned neutron detectors is considerably affected by physical and geometrical properties of thermalizing medium i.e. moderator material, its thickness and shape. In view of the same, simulations have been performed to explore the effective utilization of Polyethylene, Perspex and Light water as moderating mediums for cylindrical and spherical geometry. In this study, estimated thermal fluence value up to 0.5 eV has been considered as the benchmark factor for comparing efficient thermalization by specific material, its thickness and shape. In either of the shapes being cylindrical or spherical, use of Polyethylene as moderating medium has resulted in minimum optimum thickness along with highest thermal fluence. (author)

  12. Time changes of vertical profile of neutron fluence rate in LVR-15 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Stehno, J.; Erben, O.; Lahodova, Z.; Marek, M.

    2003-01-01

    The LVR-15 reactor is a light water research type reactor, which is situated, in Nuclear Research Institute, Rez near Prague. The reactor is used as a multipurpose facility. For some experiments and material productions, e.g. for homogeneity of silicon resistance in production of radiation doped silicon, the time changes of vertical profile of neutron fluence rate are particularly important. The assembly used for silicon irradiation has two self-powered neutron detectors installed in a vertical irradiation channel in LVR-15 reactor. Vertical profile of thermal neutron fluence rate was automatically scanned during reactor operation. The results of measurements made in 2002 and 2003 with these detectors are presented. A set of vertical profile measurements was made during two 21-days reactor cycles. During the cycle the vertical profile slightly changes both in the position of its maximum and in the shape. The time dependences of the position of profile maximum and the profile width at half maximum during the cycle are given. (author)

  13. Laser Fluence Recognition Using Computationally Intelligent Pulsed Photoacoustics Within the Trace Gases Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, M.; Ćojbašić, Ž.; Rabasović, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.; Todorović, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the possibilities of computational intelligence applications for trace gas monitoring are discussed. For this, pulsed infrared photoacoustics is used to investigate SF6-Ar mixtures in a multiphoton regime, assisted by artificial neural networks. Feedforward multilayer perceptron networks are applied in order to recognize both the spatial characteristics of the laser beam and the values of laser fluence Φ from the given photoacoustic signal and prevent changes. Neural networks are trained in an offline batch training regime to simultaneously estimate four parameters from theoretical or experimental photoacoustic signals: the laser beam spatial profile R(r), vibrational-to-translational relaxation time τ _{V-T} , distance from the laser beam to the absorption molecules in the photoacoustic cell r* and laser fluence Φ . The results presented in this paper show that neural networks can estimate an unknown laser beam spatial profile and the parameters of photoacoustic signals in real time and with high precision. Real-time operation, high accuracy and the possibility of application for higher intensities of radiation for a wide range of laser fluencies are factors that classify the computational intelligence approach as efficient and powerful for the in situ measurement of atmospheric pollutants.

  14. Performance of core modifications to reduce the reactor pressure vessel fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiehlmann, H.D.; Lisdat, R.; Sommer, D.

    1997-01-01

    It's often discussed that nuclear power plants (NPP) are designed for an operation of 40 years equivalent to 32 full power years (FPY) assuming a load factor of 0.8. Such fixed plant life times are subjects of US operating licenses but not, as in most other countries, in the Federal Republic of Germany. Here the operating licenses are issued for an indefinite period. However, the German utilities are continuously upgrading their plants to attain a safety level that meets all current requirements. These upgrading measures also include the replacement of bigger components like e.g. the steam generator. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV), however, has a special status. Unlike most other components of a NPP which most likely will be exchanged during its service life a replacement or annealing treatment of the RPV certainly require more efforts to be economically justified. Thus the embrittlement of the RPV has an essential impact on the life time of a NPP. The end-of-life (EOL) RPV material toughness in essential depends on the steel quality and the accumulated neutron fluence. For a given NPP the reduction of the neutron flux at the inner surface of the RPV is the only way to limit its embrittlement. The resulting modifications for the core loadings in combination with the insertion of additional core components like steel elements are described and the impact on core performance and RPV fluence considered. (UK)

  15. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, G.J.; Smith, G.W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4--12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate ∼.05 V/rad responsivity with ≥1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or ''peaks'' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10 5 to 10 7 n/cm 2 range indicate smearing over ∼1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels

  16. Lifetime Neutron Fluence Analysis of the Ringhals Unit 1 Boiling Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a neutron fluence assessment considering the entire commercial operating history (35 cycles or ∼ 25 effective full power years of the Ringhals Unit 1 reactor pressure vessel beltline region. In this assessment, neutron (E >1.0 MeV fluence and iron atom displacement distributions were calculated on the moderator tank and reactor pressure vessel structures. To validate those calculations, five in-vessel surveillance chain dosimetry sets were evaluated as well as material samples taken from the upper core grid and wide range neutron monitor tubes to act as a form of retrospective dosimetry. During the analysis, it was recognized that delays in characterizing the retrospective dosimetry samples reduced the amount of reactions available to be counted and complicated the material composition determination. However, the comparisons between the surveillance chain dosimetry measurements (M and calculated (C results show similar and consistent results with the linear average M/C ratio of 1.13 which is in good agreement with the resultant least squares best estimate (BE/C ratios of 1.10 for both neutron (E >1.0 MeV flux and iron atom displacement rate.

  17. EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION ON THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF ALLOY 690 AT LOW NEUTRON FLUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOO SEOG RYU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Alloy 690 has been selected as a steam generator tubing material for SMART owing to a near immunity to primary water stress corrosion cracking. The steam generators of SMART are faced with a neutron flux due to the integrated arrangement inside a reactor vessel, and thus it is important to know the irradiation effects of the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690. Alloy 690 was irradiated at HANARO to fluences of (0.7−28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV at 250°C, and its thermal conductivity was measured using the laser-flash equipment in the IMEF. The thermal conductivity of Alloy 690 was dependent on temperature, and it was a good fit to the Smith-Palmer equation, which modified the Wiedemann-Franz law. The irradiation at 250°C did not degrade the thermal conductivity of Alloy 690, and even showed a small increase (1% at fluences of (0.7∼28 × 1019n/cm2 (E>0.1MeV.

  18. Plasma instability control toward high fluence, high energy x-ray continuum source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Patrick; Kirkwood, Robert; Wilks, Scott; Blue, Brent

    2017-10-01

    X-ray source development at Omega and NIF seeks to produce powerful radiation with high conversion efficiency for material effects studies in extreme fluence environments. While current K-shell emission sources can achieve tens of kJ on NIF up to 22 keV, the conversion efficiency drops rapidly for higher Z K-alpha energies. Pulsed power devices are efficient generators of MeV bremsstrahlung x-rays but are unable to produce lower energy photons in isolation, and so a capability gap exists for high fluence x-rays in the 30 - 100 keV range. A continuum source under development utilizes instabilities like Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) to generate plasma waves that accelerate electrons into high-Z converter walls. Optimizing instabilities using existing knowledge on their elimination will allow sufficiently hot and high yield electron distributions to create a superior bremsstrahlung x-ray source. An Omega experiment has been performed to investigate the optimization of SRS and high energy x-rays using Au hohlraums with parylene inner lining and foam fills, producing 10× greater x-ray yield at 50 keV than conventional direct drive experiments on the facility. Experiment and simulation details on this campaign will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DoE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Novel low fluence combination laser treatment of solar lentigines in type III Asian skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Wei Cheng Anthony Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate a novel low fluence combination laser technique [Erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Erb:YAG and neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG] to effectively treat solar lentigines in type III Asian skin in a single session. Design: A prospective study. Setting: A Singapore-based clinic. Participants: Five patients (all females were enrolled into the study. The ages ranged 35-60 years; all patients had Fitzpatrick skin type III. Measurements: Photographs were taken at baseline and at 1-month follow-up. These were reviewed by two independent physicians who were blinded to the study. Changes in pigment severity were assessed by a 5-point scale (1: Aggravation of pigment, 2: No change, 3: 25-50% improvement, 4: 51-75% improvement, and 5: 76-100% improvement. Results: All patients received a single treatment session. At 1-month follow-up, a reduction in pigment was observed in all patients. Both physicians′ reports were independently agreeable. All patients scored 5, having >90% improvement in pigment severity. No hypopigmentation, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH, or recurrence was seen. Conclusion: Low fluence combination laser is effective and safe for clearance of solar lentigines in type III Asian skin.

  20. Analysis of radiation damage to Si solar cells under high-fluence electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Taylor, S.J.; Yang, Ming-Ju; Matsuda, Sumio; Kawasaki, Osamu; Hisamatsu, Tadashi.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation testing of Si n + -p-p + space solar cells has revealed an anomalous increase in short-circuit current I sc , followed by an abrupt decrease and cell failure, induced by high-fluence (>10 16 cm -2 ) electron irradiation. A model which can be used to explain these phenomena by expressing the change in majority-carrier concentration p of the base region as a function of the electron fluence has been proposed in addition to the well-known model in which I sc is decreased due to minority-carrier lifetime reduction with irradiation. The reduction in p due to majority-carrier trapping by radiation-induced defects has two effects; one is broadening of the depletion layer which contributes to the increase in the generated photocurrent and that in the recombination-generation current in the depletion layer, and the second is an increase in the resistivity of the base layer resulting in an abrupt decrease of I sc and failure of the solar cells. (author)

  1. Dosimetric And Fluence Measurements At Hadron Facilities For LHC Radiation Damage Studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E

    2001-01-01

    Dosimetry plays an essential role in experiments assessing radiation damage and hardness for the components of detectors to be operated at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics), Geneva, Switzerland. Dosimetry is used both for calibration of the radiation fields and estimate of fluences and doses during the irradiation tests. The LHC environment will result in a complex radiation field composed of hadrons (mainly neutrons, pions and protons) and photons, each having an energy spectrum ranging from a few keV to several hundreds of MeV or several GeV, even. In this thesis, are exposed the results of measurements of particle fluences and doses at different hadron irradiation facilities: SARA, πE1-PSI and ZT7PS used for testing the radiation hardness of materials and equipment to be used in the future experiments at LHC. These measurements are applied to the evaluation of radiation damage inflicted to various semiconductors (such as silicon) and electronics ...

  2. Calculation of neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors for extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.D.; Harty, R.; McDonald, J.C.; Tanner, J.E.

    1993-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a standard for the performance testing of personnel extremity dosimeters for the US Department of Energy. Part of this effort requires the calculation of neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors for finger and wrist extremities. This study focuses on conversion factors for two types of extremity models: namely the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom (as specified in the draft standard for performance testing of extremity dosimeters) and more realistic extremity models composed of tissue-and-bone. Calculations for each type of model are based on both bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf sources. The results are then tabulated and compared with whole-body conversion factors. More appropriate energy-averaged quality factors for the extremity models have also been computed from the neutron fluence in 50 equally spaced energy bins with energies from 2.53 x 10 -8 to 15 MeV. Tabulated results show that conversion factors for both types of extremity phantom are 15 to 30% lower than the corresponcung whole-body phantom conversion factors for 252 Cf neutron sources. This difference in extremity and whole-body conversion factors is attributable to the proportionally smaller amount of back-scattering that occurs in the extremity phantoms compared with whole-body phantoms

  3. Neutron fluence determination for operation effectiveness assessment and prediction of WWER pressure vessel lifetime at the Kozloduy NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolov, T; Ilieva, K; Belousov, S; Petrova, T; Antonov, S; Ivanov, K; Prodanova, R; Penev, I; Taskaev, E [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika; Ivanov, I; Tsokov, P; Nelov, N; Lilkov, B; Tsocheva, V; Monev, M; Velichkov, V; Kharalampieva, Ts [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    Embrittlement processes in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) metal have been investigated by neutron dosimetry. A software package for fluence calculations has been developed and used for evaluation of the accumulated neutron fluence, the critical temperature of radiation embrittlement and the RPV lifetime. A digital reactivity meter DR-8 has been introduced for continuous neutron fluence monitoring. Estimates of the neutron fluence and the radiation state of all 6 units of the Kozloduy NPP are presented. The Unit 4 RPV is in the best state regarding metal embrittlement, while the Units 2 and 3 can be safely operated up to the end of their design lifetime only using dummy cassettes. The neutron fluence accumulation in the Unit 1 RPV is quite big and can not be reduced with annealing. Activity measurements of the Unit 1 internal wall shavings are made after the 14-th cycle which show a good agreement with calculated values (1.10{sup 5} Bq/g). The critical embrittlement temperature of the Units 1 - 4 is estimated as a function of the working cycles. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Effects of vegetation, a clay cap and environmental variables on 222Rn fluence rate from reclaimed U mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.C.; Fraley, L. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    We measured 222 Rn fluence rate and several environmental variables on two plots with U mill tailings buried beneath 30 cm of overburden and 20 cm of topsoil. An additional 30 cm of clay covered the tailings on one plot and each plot was subdivided into bare soil and vegetated subplots. We used linear correlation, two-way ANOVA and stepwise multiple regression to analyze the effects of the plot characteristics and the environmental variables on 222 Rn fluence rate. The most important effect on 222 Rn fluence rates from these plots was the combination of a clay cap and a vegetated surface. The mean annual fluence rate from the plot having both of these characteristics (520 +/- 370 mBq m-2 s-1) was over three times that of the vegetated plot without a clay cap (170 +/- 130 mBq m-2 s-1) and 18 times that of the bare plot with a clay cap (29 +/- 13 mBq m-2 s-1). The interaction effect may have been due to the growth of roots in the moist clay and active transport of dissolved 222 Rn to the surface in water. This speculation is supported by the observation that on vegetated plots with a clay cap, moisture in the clay enhanced the fluence rate

  5. Charpy impact test results of ferritic alloys at a fluence of 6 x 1022n/cm2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Charpy impact tests on specimens in the AD-2 reconstitution experiment were completed. One hundred ten specimens made of HT-9 base metal, 9Cr-1Mo base metal and 9Cr-1Mo weldment at various heat treatment conditions were tested in temperature range from -73 0 C to 260 0 C. The specimens were irradiated from 390 0 C to 550 0 C and the fluence of the specimens reached 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . This is the first time that the transition behavior of ferritic alloys at high fluence was obtained. This is also the first time that comprehensive results on the irradiated 9Cr-1Mo weldment are available. The test results show a small additional shift in transition temperature for HT-9 base metal irradiated at 390 0 C and 450 0 C as the fluence was raised to 6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . At higher irradiation temperatures, however, the shift in transition temperature is less conclusive. Further reduction in USE was observed at higher fluence for all the irradiation temperatures. There is no apparent fluence effect for 9Cr-1Mo base metal at all the irradiation temperatures studied. Contrary to the previous finding on HT-9 base metal and weldment, the 9Cr-1Mo weldment shows a higher transition temperature ( + 60 0 C) and a higher USE ( + 100%) as compared to the 9Cr-1MO base metal for the same irradiation conditions. 6 references, 7 figures, 7 tables

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program BWR High-Fluence Material Project: Assessment of the Role of High-Fluence on the Efficiency of HWC Mitigation on SCC Crack Growth Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastien Teysseyre

    2014-04-01

    As nuclear power plants age, the increasing neutron fluence experienced by stainless steels components affects the materials resistance to stress corrosion cracking and fracture toughness. The purpose of this report is to identify any new issues that are expected to rise as boiling water reactor power plants reach the end of their initial life and to propose a path forward to study such issues. It has been identified that the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report summarizes the data available to support this hypothesis and describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. This program plan includes acquisition of irradiated materials, generation of material via irradiation in a test reactor, and description of the test plan. This plan offers three approaches, each with an estimated timetable and budget.

  7. Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection...

  8. Creation of an atlas of filter positions for fluence field modulated CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P., E-mail: TSzczykutowicz@uwhealth.org [Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Hermus, James [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1550 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) and volume of interest (VOI) CT imaging applications require adjustment of the profile of the x-ray fluence incident on a patient as a function of view angle. Since current FFMCT prototypes can theoretically take on an infinite number of configurations, measuring a calibration data set for all possible positions would not be feasible. The present work details a methodology for calculating an atlas of configurations that will span all likely body regions, patient sizes, patient positioning, and imaging modes. The hypothesis is that there exists a finite number of unique modulator configurations that effectively span the infinite number of possible fluence profiles with minimal loss in performance. Methods: CT images of a head, shoulder, thorax, abdominal, wrist, and leg anatomical slices were dilated and contracted to model small, medium, and large sized patients. Additionally, the images were positioned from iso-center by three different amounts. The modulator configurations required to compensate for each image were computed assuming a FFMCT prototype, digital beam attenuator, (DBA), was set to equalize the detector exposure. Each atlas configuration should be different from the other atlas configurations. The degree of difference was quantified using the sum of the absolute differences in filter thickness between configurations. Using this metric, a set of unique wedge configurations for which no two configurations have a metric value smaller than some threshold can be constructed. Differences in the total number of incident photons between the unconstrained filters and the atlas were studied as a function of the number of atlas positions for each anatomical site and size/off-centering combination. Results: By varying the threshold used in creating the atlas, it was found that roughly 322 atlas positions provided an incident number of photons within 20% of using 19 440 unique filters (the number of atlas entries

  9. Compaction in optical fibres and fibre Bragg gratings under nuclear reactor high neutron and gamma fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, L.; Cheymol, G. [CEA, French Nuclear Energy Commission, Nuclear Energy Division, DPC/SEARS/LISL Bat 467 CEA Saclay 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Gusarov, A. [SCK.CEN - Belgian Nuclear Research center, Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S. [Universite de Saint-Etienne, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS5516, 18, rue du Pr. Lauras, F-42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of the development by CEA and SCK.CEN of a Fabry Perot Sensor (FPS) able to measure dimensional changes in Material Testing Reactor (MTR), the first goal of the SAKE 1 (Smirnof extention - Additional Key-tests on Elongation of glass fibres) irradiation was to measure the linear compaction of single mode fibres under high fast neutron fluence. Indeed, the compaction of the fibre which forms one side of the Fabry Perot cavity, may in particular cause a noticeable measurement error. An accurate quantification of this effect is then required to predict the radiation-induced drift and optimize the sensor design. To achieve this, an innovative approach was used. Approximately seventy uncoated fibre tips (length: 30 to 50 mm) have been prepared from several different fibre samples and were installed in the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). After 22 days of irradiation a total fast (E > 1 MeV) fluence of 3 to 5x10{sup 19} n{sub fast}/cm{sup 2}, depending on the sample location, was accumulated. The temperature during irradiation was 291 deg. C, which is not far from the condition of the intended FPS use. A precise measurement of each fibre tip length was made before the irradiation and compared to the post irradiation measurement highlighting a decrease of the fibres' length corresponding to about 0.25% of linear compaction. The amplitude of the changes is independent of the capsule, which could mean that the compaction effect saturates even at the lowest considered fluence. In the prospect of performing distributed temperature measurement in MTR, several fibre Bragg gratings written using a femtosecond laser have been also irradiated. All the gratings were written in radiation hardened fibres, and underwent an additional treatment with a procedure enhancing their resistance to ionizing radiations. A special mounting made it possible to test the reflection and the transmission of the gratings on fibre samples cut down to 30 to 50 mm. The comparison

  10. Creation of an atlas of filter positions for fluence field modulated CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczykutowicz, Timothy P.; Hermus, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) and volume of interest (VOI) CT imaging applications require adjustment of the profile of the x-ray fluence incident on a patient as a function of view angle. Since current FFMCT prototypes can theoretically take on an infinite number of configurations, measuring a calibration data set for all possible positions would not be feasible. The present work details a methodology for calculating an atlas of configurations that will span all likely body regions, patient sizes, patient positioning, and imaging modes. The hypothesis is that there exists a finite number of unique modulator configurations that effectively span the infinite number of possible fluence profiles with minimal loss in performance. Methods: CT images of a head, shoulder, thorax, abdominal, wrist, and leg anatomical slices were dilated and contracted to model small, medium, and large sized patients. Additionally, the images were positioned from iso-center by three different amounts. The modulator configurations required to compensate for each image were computed assuming a FFMCT prototype, digital beam attenuator, (DBA), was set to equalize the detector exposure. Each atlas configuration should be different from the other atlas configurations. The degree of difference was quantified using the sum of the absolute differences in filter thickness between configurations. Using this metric, a set of unique wedge configurations for which no two configurations have a metric value smaller than some threshold can be constructed. Differences in the total number of incident photons between the unconstrained filters and the atlas were studied as a function of the number of atlas positions for each anatomical site and size/off-centering combination. Results: By varying the threshold used in creating the atlas, it was found that roughly 322 atlas positions provided an incident number of photons within 20% of using 19 440 unique filters (the number of atlas entries

  11. Application of fluence field modulation to proton computed tomography for proton therapy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedes, G; De Angelis, L; Rit, S; Hansen, D; Belka, C; Bashkirov, V; Johnson, R P; Coutrakon, G; Schubert, K E; Schulte, R W; Parodi, K; Landry, G

    2017-07-12

    This simulation study presents the application of fluence field modulated computed tomography, initially developed for x-ray CT, to proton computed tomography (pCT). By using pencil beam (PB) scanning, fluence modulated pCT (FMpCT) may achieve variable image quality in a pCT image and imaging dose reduction. Three virtual phantoms, a uniform cylinder and two patients, were studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an ideal list-mode pCT scanner. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected for high image quality and only PBs intercepting them preserved full fluence (FF). Image quality was investigated in terms of accuracy (mean) and noise (standard deviation) of the reconstructed proton relative stopping power compared to reference values. Dose calculation accuracy on FMpCT images was evaluated in terms of dose volume histograms (DVH), range difference (RD) for beam-eye-view (BEV) dose profiles and gamma evaluation. Pseudo FMpCT scans were created from broad beam experimental data acquired with a list-mode pCT prototype. FMpCT noise in ROIs was equivalent to FF images and accuracy better than  -1.3%(-0.7%) by using 1% of FF for the cylinder (patients). Integral imaging dose reduction of 37% and 56% was achieved for the two patients for that level of modulation. Corresponding DVHs from proton dose calculation on FMpCT images agreed to those from reference images and 96% of BEV profiles had RD below 2 mm, compared to only 1% for uniform 1% of FF. Gamma pass rates (2%, 2 mm) were 98% for FMpCT while for uniform 1% of FF they were as low as 59%. Applying FMpCT to preliminary experimental data showed that low noise levels and accuracy could be preserved in a ROI, down to 30% modulation. We have shown, using both virtual and experimental pCT scans, that FMpCT is potentially feasible and may allow a means of imaging dose reduction for a pCT scanner operating in PB scanning mode. This may be of particular importance to proton therapy given the low integral dose found

  12. Expected neutrino fluence from short Gamma-Ray Burst 170817A and off-axis angle constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, D.; Heinze, J.; Winter, W.

    2018-05-01

    We compute the expected neutrino fluence from SGRB 170817A, associated with the gravitational wave event GW 170817, directly based on Fermi observations in two scenarios: structured jet and off-axis (observed) top-hat jet. While the expected neutrino fluence for the structured jet case is very small, large off-axis angles imply high radiation densities in the jet, which can enhance the neutrino production efficiency. In the most optimistic allowed scenario, the neutrino fluence can reach only 10-4 of the sensitivity of the neutrino telescopes. We furthermore demonstrate that the fact that gamma-rays can escape limits the baryonic loading (energy in protons versus photons) and the off-axis angle for the internal shock scenario. In particular, for a baryonic loading of 10, the off-axis angle is more strongly constrained by the baryonic loading than by the time delay between the gravitational wave event and the onset of the gamma-ray emission.

  13. ArF laser surface modification of polyethersulfone film: Effect of laser fluence in improving surface biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazokian, H.; Jelvani, S.; Mollabashi, M.; Barzin, J.; Azizabadi Farahani, G.

    2011-01-01

    ArF laser treatment of polyethersulfone (PES) films was performed to improve biocompatibility of surfaces. For this purpose, the threshold fluence for laser ablation of PES was obtained from experimental measurements and then samples were irradiated at 2 separate ranges of fluences, i.e. below and above the ablation threshold. In order to investigate the physico-chemical changes, the modified surfaces were characterized by attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectroscopy and contact-angle measurements. The biocompatibility of the treated samples in comparison to those untreated was examined in vitro using a platelet adhesion test. The number of adhered platelets was obtained using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) method. For surfaces irradiated below the ablation threshold, a high reduction in the number of the adhered platelets was observed; while this number increased in samples treated at the fluence above the ablation threshold. The change in platelet adhesion was attributed to the change in chemistry and roughness of the irradiated surfaces.

  14. Pulsed laser ablation of silicon with low laser fluence in a low-pressure of ammonia ambient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Cheow-Keong; Tohara, Makoto; Enomoto, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Katsumi

    2004-01-01

    Silicon was ablated by 532 nm wavelength of Nd:YAG laser in ammonia gas ambient. The influence of laser fluence and gas ambient pressures between 1.33x10 1 to 1.33x10 -5 Pa on the deposited compound was studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results indicate that the deposited compound is composed of nonstoichiometric silicon nitride (SiN x , x=0-0.84). It has been shown that the composition of nitrogen to silicon is sensitive to the laser fluence; it increases with decreasing laser fluence. However, the ammonia gas ambient in these low pressures range had no influence on the composition of the deposited compound. The reaction of the ablated silicon with low-pressure ambient ammonia is proposed to be occurred on the substrate

  15. The TL fluence response to heavy charged particles using the track interaction model and track structure information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Avila, O.

    2002-01-01

    The extended track interaction model, ETIM, has recently been proposed to explain the TLD-100 fluence response of peak 5 to heavy ions. This model includes the track structure information through the use of the luminescent-centre occupation probability obtained from radial dose distributions produced by the ions as they travel through the dosemeter. In this work an implementation of ETIM using Monte Carlo techniques is presented. The simulation was applied to calculate the response of peak 5 of both sensitised and normal TLD-100 crystals to 2.6 and 6.8 MeV 4 He ions. The simulation shows that the TL-fluence response has a strong dependence on ion energy, in disagreement with experimental observations. In spite of this, good agreement between the simulated TL-fluence response calculated for the 6.8 MeV 4 He radial distributions and the experimental data for the two energies was achieved. (author)

  16. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, rΘ, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  17. Fluence measurement at the neutron time of flight experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Christina; Jericha, Erwin

    At the neutron time of flight facility n_TOF at CERN a new spallation target was installed in 2008. In 2008 and 2009 the commissioning of the new target took place. During the summer 2009 a fission chamber of the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Braunschweig was used for the neutron fluence measurement. The evaluation of the data recorded with this detector is the primary topic of this thesis. Additionally a neutron transmission experiment with air has been performed at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities (ATI). The experiment was implemented to clarify a question about the scattering cross section of molecular gas which could not be answered clearly via the literature. This problem came up during the evaluations for n_TOF.

  18. Ultrahigh precision nonlinear reflectivity measurement system for saturable absorber mirrors with self-referenced fluence characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsila, Lasse; Härkönen, Antti; Hyyti, Janne; Guina, Mircea; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of nonlinear optical reflectivity of saturable absorber devices is discussed. A setup is described that enables absolute accuracy of reflectivity measurements better than 0.3%. A repeatability within 0.02% is shown for saturable absorbers with few-percent modulation depth. The setup incorporates an in situ knife-edge characterization of beam diameters, making absolute reflectivity estimations and determination of saturation fluences significantly more reliable. Additionally, several measures are discussed to substantially improve the reliability of the reflectivity measurements. At its core, the scheme exploits the limits of state-of-the-art digital lock-in technology but also greatly benefits from a fiber-based master-oscillator power-amplifier source, the use of an integrating sphere, and simultaneous comparison with a linear reflectivity standard.

  19. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of builtup, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  20. Improvement of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Kenta, E-mail: murakami@tokai.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo, E-mail: iwai@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, 2-2-2 Iida-Nishi, Yamagata, Yamagata-shi 990-9585 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Sekimura, Naoto, E-mail: sekimura@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    This paper reports the modification of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo (HIT). The HIT facility was severely damaged during the 2011 earthquake, which occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. A damaged 1.0 MV tandem Cockcroft-Walton accelerator was replaced with a 1.7 MV accelerator, which was formerly used in another campus of the university. A decision was made to maintain dual-beam irradiation capability by repairing the 3.75 MV single-ended Van de Graaff accelerator and reconstructing the related beamlines. A new beamline was connected with a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) to perform in-situ TEM observation under ion irradiation.

  1. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, G.J.; Smith, G.W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (16-MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate ∼0.5 V/rad responsivity with ≥1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or ''peaks'' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10 5 to 10 7 n/cm 2 range indicate smearing over ∼1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels. 9 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Experiments for neutron fluence assessment on WWER-440 and WWER-1000 pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilieva, K; Apostolov, T; Penev, I; Trifonov, A; Taskaev, E; Belousov, S; Antonov, S; Petrova, T; Stoeva, L [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika; Boyadzhiev, Z; Nelov, N; Tsocheva, V; Andreeva, I; Lilkov, B; Velichkov, V; Monev, M [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    The activity of shavings sampled out from the expected maximum embrittlement location (weld 4) on the inner pressure vessel wall of the Kozloduy-1 Unit after the 14-th cycle has been measured. The experiment was carried out along the INEI channel using Fe and Cu string and foil detectors. The axial neutron flux distribution at the Unit 3 after the cycle 11 has been measured and compared to the calculated values. The calculations of the expected activities have been carried out taking into account the local power distribution. A comparison between measured and calculated values using ACTIVAT code is made. It shows a discrepancy of about 20%. It is recommended to carry out ex-vessel neutron fluence measurements using a rack device with activation detectors in order to verify the calculation results. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Neutron flux uncertainty and covariances for spectrum adjustment and estimation of WWER-1000 pressure vessel fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Bertram

    2000-01-01

    Results of estimation of the covariance matrix of the neutron spectrum in the WWER-1000 reactor cavity and pressure vessel positions are presented. Two-dimensional calculations with the discrete ordinates transport code DORT in r-theta and r-z-geometry used to determine the neutron group spectrum covariances including gross-correlations between interesting positions. The new Russian ABBN-93 data set and CONSYST code used to supply all transport calculations with group neutron data. All possible sources of uncertainties namely caused by the neutron gross sections, fission sources, geometrical dimensions and material densities considered, whereas the uncertainty of the calculation method was considered negligible in view of the available precision of Monte Carlo simulation used for more precise evaluation of the neutron fluence. (Authors)

  4. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of built-up, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  5. Tritium release kinetics in lithium orthosilicate ceramic pebbles irradiated with low thermal-neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Chengjian; Gao, Xiaoling; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kawasaki, Kiyotaka; Uchimura, Hiromichi; Toda, Kensuke; Kang, Chunmei; Chen, Xiaojun; Wang, Heyi; Peng, Shuming; Wang, Xiaolin; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Tritium release kinetics in lithium orthosilicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ) ceramic pebbles irradiated with low thermal-neutron fluence was studied by out-of-pile annealing experiments. It was found that the tritium produced in Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles was mainly released as tritiated water vapor (HTO). The apparent desorption activation energy of tritium on the pebble surface was consistent with the diffusion activation energy of tritium in the crystal grains, indicating that tritium release was mainly controlled by diffusion process. The diffusion coefficients of tritium in the crystal grains at temperatures ranging from 450 K to 600 K were obtained by isothermal annealing tests, and the Arrhenius relation was determined to be D = 1 × 10 −7.0 exp (−40.3 × 10 3 /RT) cm 2 s −1

  6. Tritium release kinetics in lithium orthosilicate ceramic pebbles irradiated with low thermal-neutron fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Chengjian; Gao, Xiaoling [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Box 919-214, Mian Yang 621900 (China); Kobayashi, Makoto; Kawasaki, Kiyotaka; Uchimura, Hiromichi; Toda, Kensuke [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Box 919-1, Mian Yang 621900 (China); Kang, Chunmei; Chen, Xiaojun; Wang, Heyi; Peng, Shuming [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Box 919-214, Mian Yang 621900 (China); Wang, Xiaolin, E-mail: xlwang@caep.ac.cn [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Box 919-1, Mian Yang 621900 (China); Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji [Radiochemistry Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Tritium release kinetics in lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) ceramic pebbles irradiated with low thermal-neutron fluence was studied by out-of-pile annealing experiments. It was found that the tritium produced in Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles was mainly released as tritiated water vapor (HTO). The apparent desorption activation energy of tritium on the pebble surface was consistent with the diffusion activation energy of tritium in the crystal grains, indicating that tritium release was mainly controlled by diffusion process. The diffusion coefficients of tritium in the crystal grains at temperatures ranging from 450 K to 600 K were obtained by isothermal annealing tests, and the Arrhenius relation was determined to be D = 1 × 10{sup −7.0} exp (−40.3 × 10{sup 3}/RT) cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}.

  7. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, ATR Cycle 102-A, 11/28/93 thru 1/16/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1994-02-01

    This report contains the thermal (2,200 m/s) and fast (E > 1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 102-A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations and proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution. All ''H'' holder monitoring wires for this cycle are 54 inches long. All ''SR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 55 inches long. This length allows measurement of the full core region and makes the first count elevation 24.73 inches above core midplane. Due to the safety rod problems in the west lobe, ''BR'' holders were used in the W-1, 2, 3, and 4 positions. All ''BR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 56.25 inches long. The distance from the end of the wires to the first count position was 4.25 inches for all wires counted from this cycle

  8. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates ATR Cycle 99-A, November 23, 1992--January 23, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1993-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>me) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 99-A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power ReactorPrograms (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations and proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution. All ''H'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 54 inches long. All ''SR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 55 inches long. This length allows measurement of the full core region and makes the first count elevation 24.73 inches above core midplane. Due to the safety rod problems in the west lobe, ''BR'' holders were used in the W-1, 2, 3, and 4 positions. All ''BR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 56.25 inches long. The distance from the end of the wires to the first count position was 4.25 inches for all wires counted from this cycle

  9. High Neutron Fluence Survivability Testing of Advanced Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Klemer, Daniel; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.

    2004-01-01

    The motivation for the reported research was to support NASA space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. The purpose of the high-neutron fluence testing was to demonstrate the survivability of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in a fission reactor environment. 520 FBGs were installed in the Ford reactor at the University of Michigan. The reactor was operated for 1012 effective full power hours resulting in a maximum neutron fluence of approximately 5x1019 n/cm2, and a maximum gamma dose of 2x103 MGy gamma. This work is significant in that, to the knowledge of the authors, the exposure levels obtained are approximately 1000 times higher than for any previously published experiment. Four different fiber compositions were evaluated. An 87% survival rate was observed for fiber Bragg gratings located at the fuel centerline. Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR), originally developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, can be used to interrogate several thousand low-reflectivity FBG strain and/or temperature sensors along a single optical fiber. A key advantage of the OFDR sensor technology for space nuclear power is the extremely low mass of the sensor, which consists of only a silica fiber 125μm in diameter. The sensors produced using this technology will fill applications in nuclear power for current reactor plants, emerging Generation-IV reactors, and for space nuclear power. The reported research was conducted by Luna Innovations and was funded through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center

  10. Development and applications of energy-specific fluence monitor for field monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnakumar, D.N., E-mail: nkkumar@igcar.gov.i [Radiological Safety Division, Radiological Safety and Environmental Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Somayaji, K.M.; Venkatesan, R.; Meenakshisundaram, V. [Radiological Safety Division, Radiological Safety and Environmental Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-07-15

    A portable energy-specific fluence monitor is developed for field monitoring as well as to serve as stand-alone data acquisition system to measure dose rate due to routine releases at various locations in and around Nuclear Power Reactors. The data from an array of such monitors deployed over a region of interest would help in evolving a methodology to arrive at the source term evaluation in the event of a postulated nuclear incident. The other method that exists for this purpose is by conducting tracer experiments using known release of a gas like SF{sub 6} into the atmosphere and monitoring their concentrations downwind. The above instrument enables one to use the routine release of {sup 41}Ar as a tracer gas. The Argon fluence monitor houses a CsI(Tl) detector and associated miniature electronics modules for conditioning the signal from the detector. Data logging and in-situ archival of the data are controlled by a powerful web enabled communication controller preloaded with Microsoft Windows Compact Edition (WIN CE). The application software is developed in Visual Basic.NET under Compact Framework and deployed in the module. The paper gives an outline of the design aspects of the instrument, associated electronics and calibration of the instrument, including the preliminary results obtained using the instrument. The utility of the system is established by carrying out field survey around Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), consisting of two Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR), by mapping the {sup 41}Ar plume. Additional features such as enhancing the monitor capability with embedded GPS along with real-time linking using wireless networking techniques are also being incorporated.

  11. The role of DNA-protein interaction in the UV damage of T7 bacteriophage at high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fekete, A.; Ronto, G.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of higher fluences (0.5-10 kJm -2 ) and that of phage protein coat on the UV (lambda = 254 nm) damage of T7 DNA were studied by UV difference spectroscopy. Beside the pyrimidine dimers and adducts produced also in isolated DNA in the case of intact phages and fluences exceeding 0.5 kJ m -2 other photoproducts, probably DNA-protein cross-links were identified as well. Phages deprived of their protein coat by a thermal treatment show similar UV damage to that of isolated DNA. (author)

  12. RAMA Methodology for the Calculation of Neutron Fluence; Metodologia RAMA para el Calculo de la Fluencia Neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villescas, G.; Corchon, F.

    2013-07-01

    he neutron fluence plays an important role in the study of the structural integrity of the reactor vessel after a certain time of neutron irradiation. The NRC defined in the Regulatory Guide 1.190, the way must be estimated neutron fluence, including uncertainty analysis of the validation process (creep uncertainty is ? 20%). TRANSWARE Enterprises Inc. developed a methodology for calculating the neutron flux, 1,190 based guide, known as RAMA. Uncertainty values obtained with this methodology, for about 18 vessels, are less than 10%.

  13. Resveratrol Prevents High Fluence Red Light-Emitting Diode Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Photoinhibition of Human Skin Fibroblast Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mamalis

    Full Text Available Skin fibrosis is a significant medical problem that leads to a functional, aesthetic, and psychosocial impact on quality-of-life. Light-emitting diode-generated 633-nm red light (LED-RL is part of the visible light spectrum that is not known to cause DNA damage and is considered a safe, non-invasive, inexpensive, and portable potential alternative to ultraviolet phototherapy that may change the treatment paradigm of fibrotic skin disease.The goal of our study was to investigate the how reactive oxygen species (ROS free radicals generated by high fluence LED-RL inhibit the migration of skin fibroblasts, the main cell type involved in skin fibrosis. Fibroblast migration speed is increased in skin fibrosis, and we studied cellular migration speed of cultured human skin fibroblasts as a surrogate measure of high fluence LED-RL effect on fibroblast function. To ascertain the inhibitory role of LED-RL generated ROS on migration speed, we hypothesized that resveratrol, a potent antioxidant, could prevent the photoinhibitory effects of high fluence LED-RL on fibroblast migration speed.High fluence LED-RL generated ROS were measured by flow cytometry analysis using dihydrorhodamine (DHR. For purposes of comparison, we assessed the effects of ROS generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on fibroblast migration speed and the ability of resveratrol, a well known antioxidant, to prevent LED-RL and H2O2 generated ROS-associated changes in fibroblast migration speed. To determine whether resveratrol could prevent the high fluence LED-RL ROS-mediated photoinhibition of human skin fibroblast migration, treated cells were incubated with resveratrol at concentrations of 0.0001% and 0.001% for 24 hours, irradiated with high fluences LED-RL of 480, 640, and 800 J/cm2.High fluence LED-RL increases intracellular fibroblast ROS and decreases fibroblast migration speed. LED-RL at 480, 640 and 800 J/cm2 increased ROS levels to 132.8%, 151.0%, and 158.4% relative to matched

  14. Fluence correction factors for graphite calorimetry in a low-energy clinical proton beam: I. Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmans, Hugo; Al-Sulaiti, L; Andreo, P

    2013-01-01

    , is required as well. This is particularly relevant to the derivation of absorbed dose-to-water, the quantity of interest in radiotherapy, from a measurement of absorbed dose-to-graphite obtained with a graphite calorimeter. In this work, fluence correction factors for the conversion from dose...

  15. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 158B/159A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walker, Billy Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 158B/159A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  16. Effects of laser fluence and liquid media on preparation of small Ag nanoparticles by laser ablation in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Caroline Gomes; Pereira, Rafael Santiago Floriani; Andritschky, Martin; Lopes, Augusto Luís Barros; Grilo, João Paulo de Freitas; Nascimento, Rubens Maribondo do; Silva, Filipe Samuel

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to assess a method for preparation of small and highly stable Ag nanoparticles by nanosecond laser ablation in liquid. Effect of liquid medium and laser fluence on the size, morphology and structure of produced nanoparticles has been studied experimentally. Pulses of a Nd:YAG laser of 1064 nm wavelength at 35 ns pulse width at different fluences were employed to irradiate the silver target in different environments (water, ethanol and acetone). The UV-Visible absorption spectra of nanoparticles exhibit surface plasmon resonance absorption peak in the UV region. STEM and TEM micrographs were used to evaluate the size and shape of nanoparticles. The stability of silver colloids in terms of oxidation at different liquid media was analyzed by SAED patterns. The results showed that characteristics of Ag nanoparticles and their production rate were strongly influenced by varying laser fluence and liquid medium. Particles from 2 to 80 nm of diameter were produced using different conditions and no oxidation was found in ethanol and acetone media. This work puts in evidence a promising approach to produce small nanoparticles by using high laser fluence energy.

  17. Evolution of arsenic in high fluence plasma immersion ion implanted silicon : Behavior of the as-implanted surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanath, V.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Vanzetti, L.; Koh, A. L.; Steinhauser, G.; Pepponi, G.; Bersani, M.; Meirer, F.; Foad, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    High fluence (>1015 ions/cm2) low-energy (3 + on (1 0 0) silicon was investigated, with the focus on stability and retention of the dopant. At this dose, a thin (∼3 nm) amorphous layer forms at the surface, which contains about 45% arsenic (As) in a silicon and oxygen matrix. The presence of silicon

  18. DOUBLE-EXPONENTIAL FITTING FUNCTION FOR EVALUATION OF COSMIC-RAY-INDUCED NEUTRON FLUENCE RATE IN ARBITRARY LOCATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huailiang; Yang, Yigang; Wang, Qibiao; Tuo, Xianguo; Julian Henderson, Mark; Courtois, Jérémie

    2017-12-01

    The fluence rate of cosmic-ray-induced neutrons (CRINs) varies with many environmental factors. While many current simulation and experimental studies have focused mainly on the altitude variation, the specific rule that the CRINs vary with geomagnetic cutoff rigidity (which is related to latitude and longitude) was not well considered. In this article, a double-exponential fitting function F=(A1e-A2CR+A3)eB1Al, is proposed to evaluate the CRINs' fluence rate varying with geomagnetic cutoff rigidity and altitude. The fitting R2 can have a value up to 0.9954, and, moreover, the CRINs' fluence rate in an arbitrary location (latitude, longitude and altitude) can be easily evaluated by the proposed function. The field measurements of the CRINs' fluence rate and H*(10) rate in Mt. Emei and Mt. Bowa were carried out using a FHT-762 and LB 6411 neutron prober, respectively, and the evaluation results show that the fitting function agrees well with the measurement results. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Transperineal in vivo fluence-rate dosimetry in the canine prostate during SnET2-mediated PDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilge, Lothar; Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie; Douplik, Alexander; Selman, Steven H; Keck, Rick W; Szkudlarek, Maria; Pestka, Maciej; Jankun, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    Advances in photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment for prostate cancer can be achieved either by improving selectivity of the photosensitizer towards prostate gland tissue or improving the dosimetry by means of individualized treatment planning using currently available photosensitizers. The latter approach requires the ability to measure, among other parameters, the fluence rate at different positions within the prostate and the ability to derive the tissue optical properties. Here fibre optic probes are presented capable of measuring the fluence rate throughout large tissue volumes and a method to derive the tissue optical properties for different volumes of the prostate. The responsivity of the sensors is sufficient to detect a fluence rate of 0.1 mW cm -2 . The effective attenuation coefficient in the canine prostate at 660 nm is higher at the capsule (2.15 ± 0.19 cm -1 ) than in proximity of the urethra (1.84 ± 0.36 cm -1 ). Significant spatial and temporal intra- and inter-canine variability in the tissue optical properties was noted, highlighting the need for individualized monitoring of the fluence rate for improved dosimetry

  20. Determination of photon fluence spectra from a 60Co therapy unit based on PENELOPE and MCNP simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, Andreas; Hranitzky, Christian; Stadtmann, Hannes; Maringer, Franz Josef

    2011-01-01

    Photon fluence spectra of the Seibersdorf Labor/BEV Picker 60 Co therapy unit were calculated using two generally recognised Monte Carlo codes, PENELOPE-2006 and MCNP5. The complexity of the simulation model was increased in three steps (from a pure source capsule and a simplified model using rotational symmetry to a realistic model of the facility). Photon fluence spectra of both codes generally agree within their statistical standard uncertainties for the case of identical geometry set-up and particle transport parameter settings. Resulting total fluence values were about 0.3% higher for MCNP as compared to PENELOPE. The verification of the simulated photon fluence spectra was based upon depth-dose measurements in water performed with a PTW 31003 ionisation chamber and a thick-walled chamber type CC01. The depth-dose curve calculated with PENELOPE agreed with the curve obtained from measurements within 0.4% across the available depth region in the 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm water phantom. The comparison of measured and simulated beam quality indices (TPR 20,10 ) revealed deviations of less than 0.2%.

  1. Rapid-relocation model for describing high-fluence retention of rare gases implanted in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, K.

    2009-09-01

    It has been known for a long time that the maximum areal density of inert gases that can be retained in solids after ion implantation is significantly lower than expected if sputter erosion were the only limiting factor. The difference can be explained in terms of the idea that the trapped gas atoms migrate towards the surface in a series of detrapping-trapping events so that reemission takes place well before the receding surface has advanced to the original depth of implantation. Here it is shown that the fluence dependent shift and shape of implantation profiles, previously determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), can be reproduced surprisingly well by extending a simple retention model originally developed to account only for the effect of surface recession by sputtering ('sputter approximation'). The additional migration of inert gas atoms is formally included by introducing an effective shift parameter Yeff as the sum of the sputtering yield Y and a relocation efficiency Ψrel. The approach is discussed in detail for 145 keV Xe + implanted in Si at normal incidence. Yeff was found to increase with increasing fluence, to arrive at a maximum equivalent to about twice the sputtering yield. At the surface one needs to account for Xe depletion and the limited depth resolution of RBS. The (high-fluence) effect of implanted Xe on the range distributions is discussed on the basis of SRIM calculations for different definitions of the mean target density, including the case of volume expansion (swelling). To identify a 'range shortening' effect, the implanted gas atoms must be excluded from the definition of the depth scale. The impact-energy dependence of the relocation efficiency was derived from measured stationary Xe concentrations. Above some characteristic energy (˜20 keV for Ar, ˜200 keV for Xe), Y exceeds Ψrel. With decreasing energy, however, Ψrel increases rapidly. Below 2-3 keV more than 90% of the reemission of Ar and Xe is estimated

  2. Penalized likelihood fluence optimization with evolutionary components for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydush, Alan H.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Das, Shiva K.

    2004-01-01

    A novel iterative penalized likelihood algorithm with evolutionary components for the optimization of beamlet fluences for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is presented. This algorithm is designed to be flexible in terms of the objective function and automatically escalates dose, as long as the objective function increases and all constraints are met. For this study, the objective function employed was the product of target equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and fraction of target tissue within set homogeneity constraints. The likelihood component of the algorithm iteratively attempts to minimize the mean squared error between a homogeneous dose prescription and the actual target dose distribution. The updated beamlet fluences are then adjusted via a quadratic penalty function that is based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints of the organs at risk. The evolutionary components were included to prevent the algorithm from converging to a local maximum. The algorithm was applied to a prostate cancer dataset, with especially difficult DVH constraints on bladder, rectum, and femoral heads. Dose distributions were generated for manually selected sets of three-, four-, five-, and seven-field treatment plans. Additionally, a global search was performed to find the optimal orientations for an axial three-beam plan. The results from this optimal orientation set were compared to results for manually selected orientation (gantry angle) sets of 3- (0 deg., 90 deg., 270 deg. ), 4- (0 deg., 90 deg., 180 deg., 270 deg. ), 5- (0 deg., 50 deg., 130 deg., 230 deg., 310 deg.), and 7- (0 deg., 40 deg., 90 deg., 140 deg., 230 deg., 270 deg., 320 deg. ) field axial treatment plans. For all the plans generated, all DVH constraints were met and average optimization computation time was approximately 30 seconds. For the manually selected orientations, the algorithm was successful in providing a relatively homogeneous target dose distribution, while simultaneously satisfying

  3. Test of Fibre Bragg Gratings samples under High Fast Neutrons Fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheymol, G.; Remy, L.; Gusarov, A.; Kinet, D.; Mégret, P.; Laffont, G.; Blanchet, T.; Morana, A.; Marin, E.; Girard, S.

    2018-01-01

    Optical fibre sensors (OFS) are worthy of interest for measurements in nuclear reactor thanks to their unique features, particularly compact size and remote multi-point sensing for some of them. But besides non negligible constraints associated with the high temperature environment of the experiments of interest, it is well known that the performances of OFS can be severely affected by high level of radiations. The Radiation Induced Attenuation (RIA) in the fibre is probably most known effect, which can be to some extent circumvented by using rad hard fibres to limit the dynamic loss. However, when the fast neutron fluence reaches 1018 to 1019 n/cm2, the density and index variations associated to structural changes may deteriorate drastically the performances of OFS even if they are based on rad hard fibres, by causing direct errors in the measurements of temperature and/or strain changes. The aim of the present study is to access the effect of nuclear radiations on the Fabry Perot (FP) and of Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors through the comparison of measurements made on these OFS - or part of them - before and after irradiation [1]. In the context of development of OFS for high irradiation environment and especially for Material Testing Reactors (MTRs), Sake 2 experiment consists in an irradiation campaign at high level of gamma and neutron fluxes conducted on samples of fibre optics - bare or functionalised with FBG. The irradiation was performed at two levels of fast neutron fluence: 1 and 3.1019 n/cm2 (E>1MeV), at 250°± 25°C, in the SCK•CEN BR2 reactor (Mol Belgium). An irradiation capsule was designed to allow irradiation at the specified temperature without active control. The neutron fluence was measured with activation dosimeters and the results were compared with MCPN computations. Investigation of bare samples gives information on the density changes, while for the FBGs both density and refractive index perturbation are involved. Some results for

  4. SIFT: A method to verify the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Sandra C.; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Boer, Hans C.J. de

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy patients are increasingly treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and high tumor doses. As part of our quality control program to ensure accurate dose delivery, a new method was investigated that enables the verification of the IMRT fluence delivered during patient treatment using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), irrespective of changes in patient geometry. Methods and materials: Each IMRT treatment field is split into a static field and a modulated field, which are delivered in sequence. Images are acquired for both fields using an EPID. The portal dose image obtained for the static field is used to determine changes in patient geometry between the planning CT scan and the time of treatment delivery. With knowledge of these changes, the delivered IMRT fluence can be verified using the portal dose image of the modulated field. This method, called split IMRT field technique (SIFT), was validated first for several phantom geometries, followed by clinical implementation for a number of patients treated with IMRT. Results: The split IMRT field technique allows for an accurate verification of the delivered IMRT fluence (generally within 1% [standard deviation]), even if large interfraction changes in patient geometry occur. For interfraction radiological path length changes of 10 cm, deliberately introduced errors in the delivered fluence could still be detected to within 1% accuracy. Application of SIFT requires only a minor increase in treatment time relative to the standard IMRT delivery. Conclusions: A new technique to verify the delivered IMRT fluence from EPID images, which is independent of changes in the patient geometry, has been developed. SIFT has been clinically implemented for daily verification of IMRT treatment delivery

  5. Efficacy of intense pulsed light therapy in the treatment of facial acne vulgaris: Comparison of two different fluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika V Patidar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne vulgaris is the most common disease of the skin affecting adolescents and young adults causing psychological distress. The combination of antibiotic resistance, adverse effects of topical and systemic anti acne medications and desire for high tech approaches have all led to new enthusiasm for light based acne treatment. Intense pulse light (IPL therapy has three modes of action in acne vulgaris i.e., photochemical, photo thermal and photo immunological. Aims: (1 to study efficacy of IPL therapy in facial acne vulgaris. (2 To compare two fluences - one normal and other subnormal on right and left side of face respectively. Methods: (Including settings and design and statistical analysis used. Total 45 patients in age group 16 to 28 years with inflammatory facial acne vulgaris were included in prospective study. Baseline data for each patient was recorded. All patients were given 4 sittings of IPL at 2 weeks interval and were followed for 2 months every 2 weeks. Fluence used was 35J/cm2 on right and 20J/cm2 on left side. Percentage reduction in lesion count was calculated at each sitting and follow up and graded as mild (0-25%, moderate (26-50%, good (51-75% and excellent (76-100%. Side effects were noted. The results were analysed using Mann-Whitney Test. Results: On right side, excellent results were achieved in 10(22%, good in 22(49% and moderate in 13(29% patients. On left side excellent were results achieved in 7(15%, good in 19(42% and moderate in 16(43% patients. There was no statically significant difference noted in efficacy of two fluences used in treatment of facial acne vulgaris. Conclusions: IPL is a effective and safe option for inflammatory acne vulgaris with minimal reversible side effects. Subnormal fluence is as effective as normal fluence in Indian skin.

  6. Investigation into the optimum beam shape and fluence for selective ablation of dental calculus at lambda = 400 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenly, Joshua E; Seka, Wolf; Rechmann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is shown to selectively ablate dental calculus. The optimal transverse shape of the laser beam, including its variability under water-cooling, is determined for selective ablation of dental calculus. Intensity profiles under various water-cooling conditions were optically observed. The 400-nm laser was coupled into a multimode optical fiber using an f = 2.5-cm lens and light-shaping diffuser. Water-cooling was supplied coaxially around the fiber. Five human tooth samples (four with calculus and one pristine) were irradiated perpendicular to the tooth surface while the tooth was moved back and forth at 0.3 mm/second, varying between 20 and 180 iterations. The teeth were imaged before and after irradiation using light microscopy with a flashing blue light-emitting diode (LED). An environmental scanning electron microscope imaged each tooth after irradiation. High-order super-Gaussian intensity profiles are observed at the output of a fiber coiled around a 4-in. diameter drum. Super-Gaussian beams have a more-homogenous fluence distribution than Gaussian beams and have a higher energy efficiency for selective ablation. Coaxial water-cooling does not noticeably distort the intensity distribution within 1 mm from the optical fiber. In contrast, lasers focused to a Gaussian cross section (Calculus is preferentially ablated at high fluences (> or =2 J/cm(2)); below this fluence, stalling occurs because of photo-bleaching of the calculus. Healthy dental hard tissue is not removed at fluences calculus with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser. Fluences over 2 J/cm(2) are required to remove calculus efficiently since photo-bleaching stalls calculus removal below that value.

  7. Task-Driven Optimization of Fluence Field and Regularization for Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction in Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Grace J; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Stayman, J Webster

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a joint optimization of dynamic fluence field modulation (FFM) and regularization in quadratic penalized-likelihood reconstruction that maximizes a task-based imaging performance metric. We adopted a task-driven imaging framework for prospective designs of the imaging parameters. A maxi-min objective function was adopted to maximize the minimum detectability index ( ) throughout the image. The optimization algorithm alternates between FFM (represented by low-dimensional basis functions) and local regularization (including the regularization strength and directional penalty weights). The task-driven approach was compared with three FFM strategies commonly proposed for FBP reconstruction (as well as a task-driven TCM strategy) for a discrimination task in an abdomen phantom. The task-driven FFM assigned more fluence to less attenuating anteroposterior views and yielded approximately constant fluence behind the object. The optimal regularization was almost uniform throughout image. Furthermore, the task-driven FFM strategy redistribute fluence across detector elements in order to prescribe more fluence to the more attenuating central region of the phantom. Compared with all strategies, the task-driven FFM strategy not only improved minimum by at least 17.8%, but yielded higher over a large area inside the object. The optimal FFM was highly dependent on the amount of regularization, indicating the importance of a joint optimization. Sample reconstructions of simulated data generally support the performance estimates based on computed . The improvements in detectability show the potential of the task-driven imaging framework to improve imaging performance at a fixed dose, or, equivalently, to provide a similar level of performance at reduced dose.

  8. Epitaxial silicon detectors for particle tracking-Radiation tolerance at extreme hadron fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, Gunnar; Dolenc, Irena; Fretwurst, Eckhart; Hoenniger, Frank; Kramberger, Gregor; Moll, Michael; Nossarzewska, Elsbieta; Pintilie, Ioana; Roeder, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Diodes processed on n-type epitaxial silicon with a thickness of 25, 50 and 75 μm had been irradiated with reactor neutrons and high-energy protons (24 GeV/c) up to integrated fluences of Φ eq =10 16 cm -2 . Systematic experiments on radiation-induced damage effects revealed the following results: in contrast to standard and oxygen-enriched float zone (FZ) silicon devices no space charge sign inversion was observed after irradiation. It is shown that the radiation-generated concentration of deep acceptors, dominating the behavior of n-type FZ diodes, is compensated by creation of shallow donors. Thus a positive space charge is maintained throughout the irradiation up to the highest fluence and even during prolonged elevated-temperature annealing cycles. Defect analysis studies using thermally stimulated current measurements attribute the effect to a damage-induced shallow donor at E C -0.23 eV. It is argued that, as in the case of thermal donors, oxygen dimers, out diffusing from the Cz substrate during the diode processing, are responsible precursers. Results from extensive annealing experiments at elevated temperatures are verified by comparison with prolonged room-temperature annealing. These results showed that in contrast to FZ detectors, which always have to be cooled, room-temperature storage during beam off periods of future elementary particle physics experiments would even be beneficial for n-type epi-silicon detectors. A dedicated experiment at CERN-PS had successfully proven this expectation. It was verified, that in such a scenario the depletion voltage for the epi-detector could always be kept at a moderate level throughout the full S-LHC operation (foreseen upgrade of the large hadron collider). Practically no difference with respect to FZ-silicon devices was found in the damage-induced bulk generation current. The charge trapping measured with 90 Sr electrons (mip's) is also almost identical to what was expected. A charge collection efficiency of

  9. Epitaxial silicon detectors for particle tracking-Radiation tolerance at extreme hadron fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, Gunnar [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany)]. E-mail: gunnar.lindstroem@desy.de; Dolenc, Irena [Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, 100 (Slovenia); Fretwurst, Eckhart [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany); Hoenniger, Frank [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany); Kramberger, Gregor [Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, 100 (Slovenia); Moll, Michael [CERN, Geneva, 1211 (Switzerland); Nossarzewska, Elsbieta [ITME, Institute for Electronocs Materials Technology, Warsaw, 01919 (Poland); Pintilie, Ioana [National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest, 077125 (Romania); Roeder, Ralf [CiS Institute for Microsensors gGmbH, Erfurt, 99099 (Germany)

    2006-11-30

    Diodes processed on n-type epitaxial silicon with a thickness of 25, 50 and 75 {mu}m had been irradiated with reactor neutrons and high-energy protons (24 GeV/c) up to integrated fluences of {phi} {sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. Systematic experiments on radiation-induced damage effects revealed the following results: in contrast to standard and oxygen-enriched float zone (FZ) silicon devices no space charge sign inversion was observed after irradiation. It is shown that the radiation-generated concentration of deep acceptors, dominating the behavior of n-type FZ diodes, is compensated by creation of shallow donors. Thus a positive space charge is maintained throughout the irradiation up to the highest fluence and even during prolonged elevated-temperature annealing cycles. Defect analysis studies using thermally stimulated current measurements attribute the effect to a damage-induced shallow donor at E {sub C}-0.23 eV. It is argued that, as in the case of thermal donors, oxygen dimers, out diffusing from the Cz substrate during the diode processing, are responsible precursers. Results from extensive annealing experiments at elevated temperatures are verified by comparison with prolonged room-temperature annealing. These results showed that in contrast to FZ detectors, which always have to be cooled, room-temperature storage during beam off periods of future elementary particle physics experiments would even be beneficial for n-type epi-silicon detectors. A dedicated experiment at CERN-PS had successfully proven this expectation. It was verified, that in such a scenario the depletion voltage for the epi-detector could always be kept at a moderate level throughout the full S-LHC operation (foreseen upgrade of the large hadron collider). Practically no difference with respect to FZ-silicon devices was found in the damage-induced bulk generation current. The charge trapping measured with {sup 90}Sr electrons (mip's) is also almost identical to what was expected

  10. Mixed parentage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang Appel, Helene; Singla, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increase in cross border intimate relationships and children of mixed parentage, there is little mention or scholarship about them in the area of childhood and migrancy in the Nordic countries. The international literature implies historical pathologisation, contestation and current...... of identity formation in the . They position themselves as having an “in-between” identity or “ just Danes” in their every day lives among friends, family, and during leisure activities. Thus a new paradigm is evolving away- from the pathologisation of mixed children, simplified one-sided categories...

  11. Effect of hydrogen on mechanical fluence during storage in dry; Efecto del hidrogeno en la fluencia mecanica durante el almacenamiento en seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2011-07-01

    One of the challenges in the field of the mechanical fluence modeling is to include the effect of hydrogen as an additional hardening factor associated with reactor irradiation. For this it is necessary to identify the weight of each variable in the factor hardening of the classical laws of mechanics fluence.

  12. Fast-mixed spectrum reactor interim report initial feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.J.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of an initial four-month feasibility study of the Fast-Mixed Spectrum Reactor (FMSR). Reactor physics, fuel cycle, and thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed on a reference design. These results when coupled to a fuel and materials evaluation performed in cooperation with the Argonne National Laboratory indicate that the FMSR is feasible provided the fuels, cladding, and subassembly ducts can survive a peak fuel burnup of 15 to 20 atom percent heavy metal and peak fluences of 8 x 10 23 (nvt > 0.1 MeV). The results of this short study have also provided a basis for exploring alternative designs requiring significantly lower peak burnup and fluences for their operation

  13. Estimation of fast neutron fluence in steel specimens type Laguna Verde in TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L.; Aguilar H, F.

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of this work is to obtain the fluence of fast neutrons recorded within four specimens of carbon steel, similar to the material having the vessels of the BWR reactors of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde when subjected to neutron flux in a experimental facility of the TRIGA Mark III reactor, calculating an irradiation time to age the material so accelerated. For the calculation of the neutron flux in the specimens was used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. In an initial stage, three sheets of natural molybdenum and molybdenum trioxide (MoO 3 ) were incorporated into a model developed of the TRIGA reactor operating at 1 M Wth, to calculate the resulting activity by setting a certain time of irradiation. The results obtained were compared with experimentally measured activities in these same materials to validate the calculated neutron flux in the model used. Subsequently, the fast neutron flux received by the steel specimens to incorporate them in the experimental facility E-16 of the reactor core model operating at nominal maximum power in steady-state was calculated, already from these calculations the irradiation time required was obtained for values of the neutron flux in the range of 10 18 n/cm 2 , which is estimated for the case of Laguna Verde after 32 years of effective operation at maximum power. (Author)

  14. Helium behaviour in UO{sub 2} through low fluence ion implantation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, P., E-mail: philippe.garcia@cea.fr [CEA – DEN/DEC, Bât. 352, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Gilabert, E. [Centre d’Et' udes Nucleáires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, Le Haut Vigneau, 33175 Gradignan (France); Martin, G.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C. [CEA – DEN/DEC, Bât. 352, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Sauvage, T.; Desgardin, P.; Barthe, M.-F. [CNRS-CEMHTI, UPR3079, 45071 Orleáns (France)

    2014-05-01

    In this work we focus on experiments involving implantation of 500 keV {sup 3}He ions in sintered polycrystalline material. Samples are implanted at low fluences (∼2 ×10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) and subsequently isothermally annealed in a highly sensitive thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) device PIAGARA (Plateforme Interdisciplinaire pour l’Analyse des GAz Rares en Aquitaine). The helium fluencies studied are two to three orders of magnitude lower than previous Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) experiments carried out on identical samples implanted at identical energies. The fractional release of helium obtained in the TDS experiments is interpreted using a three-dimensional axisymmetric diffusion model which enables results to be quantitatively compared to previous NRA data. The analysis shows that helium behaviour is qualitatively independent of ion fluency over three orders of magnitude: helium diffusion appears to be strongly inhibited below 1273 K within the centre of the grains presumably as a result of helium bubble precipitation. The scenario involving diffusion at grain boundaries and in regions adjacent to them observed at higher fluencies is quantitatively confirmed at much lower doses. The main difference lies in the average width of the region in which uninhibited diffusion occurs.

  15. Retention of nanocrystalline WN{sub x} layers exposed to high-fluence deuterium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassallo, E., E-mail: vassallo@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Caniello, R., E-mail: caniello@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Angella, G., E-mail: angella@ieni.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, D., E-mail: david.dellasega@polimi.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, 20156 Milano (Italy); Granucci, G., E-mail: granucci@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Mellera, V., E-mail: mellera@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Minelli, D., E-mail: minelli@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Pedroni, M., E-mail: pedroni@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Ricci, D., E-mail: ricci@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “ P. Caldirola ”, 20125 Milano (Italy); Rigato, V., E-mail: valentino.rigato@lnl.infn.it [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, 35020 Padova (Italy); and others

    2015-11-15

    For high-power plasma operation regimes in tokamak fusion devices the power load onto W divertor plates must be kept below acceptable limits for materials. N{sub 2} gas is likely to be used to reduce the power load. However, because of erosion phenomena, WN{sub x} compounds will be produced in the divertor and tritium retention is issue of concern. We report recent experiments using the GYM linear plasma device that examined D retention in WN{sub x} compounds exposed to D plasma at divertor relevant fluence (∼10{sup 24} m{sup −2}). It is shown that WN{sub x} compounds with different nitrogen concentration have very similar D retention, lower than the case of the tungsten without nitrogen and in any case lower than the acceptable limit for operation in ITER. - Highlights: • Nitrogen in the process of tungsten redeposition in tokamak plays a very important role for fuel retention. • Incorporation of nitrogen in tungsten decreases the D retention. • WN{sub x} compounds showed a level of D retention lower than the acceptable limit for tritium (T) operation in ITER.

  16. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R. G.; Morgan, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 400 °C and 28 dpa (1.7 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 465 °C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided (˜15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  17. Ultra High Fluence Radiation Monitoring Technology for the Future Circular Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gorine, Georgi; Mandic, Igor; Jazbec, Anže; Snoj, Luka; Capeans, Mar; Moll, Michael; Bouvet, Didier; Ravotti, Federico; Sallese, Jean-Michel

    2018-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) is foreseen as the next generation ~100 km long synchrotron to be built in the Geneva area starting 2050. This machine is expected to reach an energy level of 100 TeV generating unprecedented radiation levels >100 times higher than in today`s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Current Radiation Monitoring system, like the RADMONs employed in the LHC, will not be capable to function and withstand this harsh environment. The development of a new Ultra High Fluence and Dose Radiation Sensor is a key element to allow irradiation tests of FCC equipment and, at a later stage, to monitor radiation levels in the FCC itself. In this paper, we present an innovative dosimetry solution based on thin layers of metals, which resistivity is shown to increase significantly due to the accumulated displacement damage. After describing the fabrication techniques used to manufacture these Radiation Dependent Resistors (RDR), we show and discuss the results of the irradiation experiments carried out ...

  18. Influence of the number of energy groups on the accuracy of neutron fluence calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.U.; Konheiser, J.

    1999-01-01

    The question how many groups are necessary to obtain all needed integral quantities for the neutron load of pressure vessels and detector positions outside the vessel with sufficient accuracy is of general interest. Until now, there are no systematic investigations on this question. In principle 3-dimensional consideration is required for such neutron load calculations. Therefore, an estimation of the needed number of groups can be of interest to minimize calculation time. One general problem is the P L -approximation of the angular distributions for the transfers between different groups. For elastic scattering this P L -approximation becomes poorer with increasing number of groups. As deterministic methods generally use the P L -approximation they cannot be used for investigations of the errors caused by the group approximation. We have investigated this problem applying group Monte-Carlo but nearly exact representation of this elastic slowing down without P L -approximation. The calculations were directed to assess the neutron fluence of a Russian WWER-1000 reactor. For that a simplified geometrical model of this reactor type has been used. (orig.)

  19. A novel linear programming approach to fluence map optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeijn, H Edwin; Ahuja, Ravindra K; Dempsey, James F; Kumar, Arvind; Li, Jonathan G

    2003-01-01

    We present a novel linear programming (LP) based approach for efficiently solving the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence-map optimization (FMO) problem to global optimality. Our model overcomes the apparent limitations of a linear-programming approach by approximating any convex objective function by a piecewise linear convex function. This approach allows us to retain the flexibility offered by general convex objective functions, while allowing us to formulate the FMO problem as a LP problem. In addition, a novel type of partial-volume constraint that bounds the tail averages of the differential dose-volume histograms of structures is imposed while retaining linearity as an alternative approach to improve dose homogeneity in the target volumes, and to attempt to spare as many critical structures as possible. The goal of this work is to develop a very rapid global optimization approach that finds high quality dose distributions. Implementation of this model has demonstrated excellent results. We found globally optimal solutions for eight 7-beam head-and-neck cases in less than 3 min of computational time on a single processor personal computer without the use of partial-volume constraints. Adding such constraints increased the running times by a factor of 2-3, but improved the sparing of critical structures. All cases demonstrated excellent target coverage (>95%), target homogeneity (<10% overdosing and <7% underdosing) and organ sparing using at least one of the two models

  20. Controlling the stainless steel surface wettability by nanosecond direct laser texturing at high fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorčič, P.; Šetina-Batič, B.; Hočevar, M.

    2017-12-01

    This work investigates the influence of the direct laser texturing at high fluences (DLT-HF) on surface morphology, chemistry, and wettability. We use a Nd:YAG laser ( λ = 1064 nm) with pulse duration of 95 ns to process stainless steel surface. The surface morphology and chemistry after the texturing is examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), while the surface wettability is evaluated by measuring the static contact angle. Immediately after the texturing, the surface is superhydrophilic in a saturated Wenzel regime. However, this state is not stable and the superhydrophilic-to-superhydrophobic transition happens if the sample is kept in atmospheric air for 30 days. After this period, the laser-textured stainless steel surface expresses lotus-leaf-like behavior. By using a high-speed camera at 10,000 fps, we measured that the water droplet completely rebound from this superhydrophobic surface after the contact time of 12 ms.

  1. High-fluence hyperthermal ion irradiation of gallium nitride surfaces at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finzel, A.; Gerlach, J.W., E-mail: juergen.gerlach@iom-leipzig.de; Lorbeer, J.; Frost, F.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Irradiation of gallium nitride films with hyperthermal nitrogen ions. • Surface roughening at elevated sample temperatures was observed. • No thermal decomposition of gallium nitride films during irradiation. • Asymmetric surface diffusion processes cause local roughening. - Abstract: Wurtzitic GaN films deposited on 6H-SiC(0001) substrates by ion-beam assisted molecular-beam epitaxy were irradiated with hyperthermal nitrogen ions with different fluences at different substrate temperatures. In situ observations with reflection high energy electron diffraction showed that during the irradiation process the surface structure of the GaN films changed from two dimensional to three dimensional at elevated temperatures, but not at room temperature. Atomic force microscopy revealed an enhancement of nanometric holes and canyons upon the ion irradiation at higher temperatures. The roughness of the irradiated and heated GaN films was clearly increased by the ion irradiation in accordance with x-ray reflectivity measurements. A sole thermal decomposition of the films at the chosen temperatures could be excluded. The results are discussed taking into account temperature dependent sputtering and surface uphill adatom diffusion as a function of temperature.

  2. Assessment of the effects of neutron fluence on Swedish nuclear pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.

    1980-11-01

    Nuclear pressure vessels are subject to neutron irradiation during service causing embrittlement. This is one important factor in the overall problem of reactor vessel integrity. At present the irradiation effects are mainly assessed by the Charpy V-notch test. Two measures of embrittlement are defined: the increase of the ductile/brittle transition temperature and the decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The object of the present work is to assess these changes for the Swedish nuclear pressure vessels. On the basis of data from irradiations carried out in other countries and Swedish surveillance programmes, the expected end of life embrittlement is estimated for Swedish vessels. The results show that the embrittlement of most reactor vessels is expected to be quite small. Oskarshamn 1 and PWR-vessels, however, will probably show moderate changes, the former due to the higher copper content, and the latter due to the high end of life fluences. Some of the vessel materials which exhibit marginal properties in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by the Charpy V-notch impact test, are identified. It is recommended that fracture mechanics analyses be applied in these cases. (author)

  3. Short-wavelength ablation of polymers in the high-fluence regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberatore, Chiara; Juha, Libor; Vyšín, Ludek; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Mann, Klaus; Müller, Matthias; Pina, Ladislav; Rocca, Jorge J

    2014-01-01

    Short-wavelength ablation of poly(1,4-phenylene ether-ether-sulfone) (PPEES) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was investigated using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) radiation from plasma-based sources. The initial experiment was performed with a 10 Hz desktop capillary-discharge XUV laser lasing at 46.9 nm. The XUV laser beam was focused onto the sample by a spherical mirror coated with a Si/Sc multilayer. The same materials were irradiated with 13.5 nm radiation emitted by plasmas produced by focusing an optical laser beam onto a xenon gas-puff target. A Schwarzschild focusing optics coated with a Mo/Si multilayer was installed at the source to achieve energy densities exceeding 0.1 J cm −2 in the tight focus. The existing experimental system at the Laser Laboratorium Göttingen was upgraded by implementing a 1.2 J driving laser. An increase of the SXR fluence was secured by improving the alignment technique. (paper)

  4. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650 0 C and to a maximum fluence of 17.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400 0 C to 14.0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6 C, Mo 2 C, Chi, Laves, M 23 C 6 , α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation

  5. Fluence-based and microdosimetric event-based methods for radiation protection in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, S.B.

    2002-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has recently published a report (Report no.137) that discusses various aspects of the concepts used in radiation protection and the difficulties in measuring the radiation environment in spacecraft for the estimation of radiation risk to space travelers. Two novel dosimetric methodologies, fluence-based and microdosimetric event-based methods, are discussed and evaluated, along with the more conventional quality factor/linear energy transfer (LET) method. It was concluded that for the present, any reason to switch to a new methodology is not compelling. It is suggested that because of certain drawbacks in the presently-used conventional method, these alternative methodologies should be kept in mind. As new data become available and dosimetric techniques become more refined, the question should be revisited and that in the future, significant improvement might be realized. In addition, such concepts as equivalent dose and organ dose equivalent are discussed and various problems regarding the measurement/estimation of these quantities are presented. (author)

  6. Substrate and coating defect planarization strategies for high-laser-fluence multilayer mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolz, Christopher J.; Wolfe, Justin E.; Mirkarimi, Paul B.; Folta, James A.; Adams, John J.; Menor, Marlon G.; Teslich, Nick E.; Soufli, Regina; Menoni, Carmen S.; Patel, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Planarizing or smoothing over nodular defects in multilayer mirrors can be accomplished by a discrete deposit-and-etch process that exploits the angle-dependent etching rate of optical materials. Typically, nodular defects limit the fluence on mirrors irradiated at 1064 nm with 10 ns pulse lengths due to geometrically- and interference-induced light intensification. Planarized hafina/silica multilayer mirrors have demonstrated > 125 J/cm 2 laser resistance for single-shot testing and 50 J/cm 2 for multi-shot testing for nodular defects originating on the substrate surface. Two planarization methods were explored: thick planarization layers on the substrate surface and planarized silica layers throughout the multilayer in which only the silica layers that are below one half of the incoming electric field value are etched. This paper also describes the impact of planarized defects that are buried within the multilayer structure compared to planarized substrate particulate defects. - Highlights: • Defect planarization significantly improves multilayer mirror laser resistance • Substrate and coating defects have both been effectively planarized • Single and multishot laser resistance improvement was demonstrated

  7. Electrical characterization of 10B doped diamond irradiated with low thermal neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, M.L.; Reed, M.J.; Jagannadham, K.; Verghese, K.; Bedair, S.M.; El-Masry, N.; Butler, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    A sample of 10 B isotope doped diamond was neutron irradiated to a thermal fluence of 1.3x10 19 neutron cm -2 . The diamond sample was cooled continuously during irradiation in a nuclear reactor. 7 Li is formed by nuclear transmutation reaction from 10 B. Characterization for electrical conductance in the temperature range of 160 K 10 B doped sample and the 10 B doped and irradiated sample. The unirradiated diamond sample showed p-type conductance at higher temperature (T>200 K) and p-type surface conductance at lower temperature (T 7 Li that is formed by nuclear transmutation reaction from 10 B atoms. Also, compensation of n-type carriers from 7 Li by p-type carriers from 10 B is used to interpret the conductance above 400 K. A low concentration of radiation induced defects, absence of defect complexes, and the low activation energy of n-type 7 Li are thought responsible for the observed variation of conductance in the irradiated diamond. The present results illustrate that neutron transmutation from 10 B doped diamond is a useful method to achieve n-type conductivity in diamond

  8. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 {1}/{4}Cr-1Mo , H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650°C and to a maximum fluence of 1.76 × 10 23 n/cm 2 (E >0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400°C to 1.40 × 10 23 n/cm 2. A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6C, Mo 2C, Chi, Laves, M 23C 6, α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation.

  9. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear...... as possible operational moves....

  10. Lateral Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    negative (right panel c) and the kinetic energy dissipation is larger than that expected from meterological forcing alone (right panel a). This is...10.1002/grl.50919. Shcherbina, A. et al., 2014, The LatMix Summer Campaign: Submesoscale Stirring in the Upper Ocean., Bull. American Meterological

  11. Development of instrumentation and technological procedures for industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Final project report, October 2001 - September 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmera, B.; Posta, S.; Jansky, B.

    2004-01-01

    The project consisted of the following stages (Stage symbol; Stage name; Stage output; Fields of application): E01; Neutron detection and spectrometry using doped scintillators; A spectrometry system for fast neutron measurements in low neutron intensity fields; Fuel storage facilities, analysis of samples contaminated by uranium and transuranium elements, university teaching. E02; Neutron and gamma spectrometry in mixed neutron/gamma fields; A system for the spectrometry of mixed neutron/gamma fields; Neutron and gamma spectrometry in working environment, radiation protection of military equipment, metrology in neutron/gamma fields, university teaching. E03; Neutron detection methods based on fission fragment track counting; A system for neutron fluence determination based on fission fragment track counting; Storage cask monitoring, radiation protection, university teaching. E04; Calibration methods for gamma scanning of fuel assemblies; A calibration system for fuel pin inspection via gamma distribution measurement; Nuclear fuel burnup assessment, BUC technology implementation, spent fuel processing. E05; Optimization of the neutron capture therapy method at the LVR-15 reactor; Treatment of selected tumorous and non-tumorous diseases; Radiotherapy - novel therapy methods in oncology, novel methods of non-tumorous disease therapy, operation of the irradiation facilities of the LVR-15 reactor with simultaneous neutron capture therapy procedures. Details of each of the stages are given. (P.A.)

  12. Dependence of fluence errors in dynamic IMRT on leaf-positional errors varying with time and leaf number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Kung, Jong H.; Jiang, Steve B.; Chin, Lee

    2003-01-01

    In d-MLC based IMRT, leaves move along a trajectory that lies within a user-defined tolerance (TOL) about the ideal trajectory specified in a d-MLC sequence file. The MLC controller measures leaf positions multiple times per second and corrects them if they deviate from ideal positions by a value greater than TOL. The magnitude of leaf-positional errors resulting from finite mechanical precision depends on the performance of the MLC motors executing leaf motions and is generally larger if leaves are forced to move at higher speeds. The maximum value of leaf-positional errors can be limited by decreasing TOL. However, due to the inherent time delay in the MLC controller, this may not happen at all times. Furthermore, decreasing the leaf tolerance results in a larger number of beam hold-offs, which, in turn leads, to a longer delivery time and, paradoxically, to higher chances of leaf-positional errors (≤TOL). On the other end, the magnitude of leaf-positional errors depends on the complexity of the fluence map to be delivered. Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to determine the actual distribution of leaf-positional errors either by the imaging of moving MLC apertures with a digital imager or by analysis of a MLC log file saved by a MLC controller. This leads next to an important question: What is the relation between the distribution of leaf-positional errors and fluence errors. In this work, we introduce an analytical method to determine this relation in dynamic IMRT delivery. We model MLC errors as Random-Leaf Positional (RLP) errors described by a truncated normal distribution defined by two characteristic parameters: a standard deviation σ and a cut-off value Δx 0 (Δx 0 ∼TOL). We quantify fluence errors for two cases: (i) Δx 0 >>σ (unrestricted normal distribution) and (ii) Δx 0 0 --limited normal distribution). We show that an average fluence error of an IMRT field is proportional to (i) σ/ALPO and (ii) Δx 0 /ALPO, respectively, where

  13. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, ATR Cycle 100-BC, April 23, 1993--May 13, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.D.; Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 100-BC which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations and proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution. All open-quotes Hclose quotes holder monitor wires for this cycle are 54 inches long. All open-quotes SRclose quotes holder monitor wires for this cycle are 55 inches long. This length allows measurement of the full core region and makes the first count elevation 24.73 inches above core midplane. Due to the safety rod problems in the west lobe, open-quotes BRclose quotes holders were used in the W-1, 2, 3, and 4 positions. All open-quotes BRclose quotes holder monitor wires for this cycle are 56.25 inches long. The distance from the end of the wires to the first count position was 4.25 inches for all wires counted from this cycle. The results from the measurements in the W-1, 2, 3, 4 monitor positions indicate that the safety rod followers were rotated to a different azimuthal orientation relative to the normal orientation. The results indicate that the rotation was counterclockwise from their normal orientation. This is the same condition observed starting with Cycle 99-B

  14. Research Laboratory of Mixed Radiation Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    determined as a product H = D·Q of the absorbed dose, D, and radiation quality factor, Q, both determined by the recombination chamber. The chambers can be used for determination of dose equivalents of any external radiation, therefore also in neutron and neutron-gamma fields. REFERENCE NEUTRON FIELDS Standard neutron fields, traceable to primary standard laboratory (NPL, Great Britain) were established at the Institute of Atomic Energy almost ten years ago. The fields are formed by calibrated sources of 252 Cf and 241 Am-Be. Additionally, spherical filters made of iron or paraffin can be used for modification of the neutron spectrum and gamma component of absorbed dose. The fields are used mostly for research work but they also serve as only one in Poland facility suitable for calibration of neutron dose meters used in radiation protection. Maintenance of the fields includes some periodic measurements of the dosimetric parameters, improvements of the measuring methods and international intercomparisons. RESEARCH ON INTERNAL DOSIMETRY - Two research projects were carried out in 2001-evaluation of the data on intake of radiocesium after the Chernobyl accident and research on calibration of thyroid counter with regard to depth of thyroid gland. The second of the projects can be applied not only for radiation protection but also for improvement of measurements of iodine uptake in thyroid after diagnostic administration of 131 I. (author)

  15. Parity mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelberger, E.G.

    1975-01-01

    The field of parity mixing in light nuclei bears upon one of the exciting and active problems of physics--the nature of the fundamental weak interaction. It is also a subject where polarization techniques play a very important role. Weak interaction theory is first reviewed to motivate the parity mixing experiments. Two very attractive systems are discussed where the nuclear physics is so beautifully simple that the experimental observation of tiny effects directly measures parity violating (PV) nuclear matrix elements which are quite sensitive to the form of the basic weak interaction. Since the measurement of very small analyzing powers and polarizations may be of general interest to this conference, some discussion is devoted to experimental techniques

  16. Neutron fluence in a 18 MeV Electron Accelerator for Therapy; Fluencia de neutrones en un Acelerador de Electrones de 18 MeV para terapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L C [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Direccion de Innovacion Tecnologica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    An investigation was made on the theoretical fundamentals for the determination of the neutron fluence in a linear electron accelerator for radiotherapy applications and the limit values of leakage neutron radiation established by guidelines and standards in radiation protection for these type of accelerators. This investigation includes the following parts: a) Exhaustive bibliographical review on the topics mentioned above, in order to combine and to update the necessary basic information to facilitate the understanding of this subject; b) Analysis of the accelerator operation and identification of its main components, specially in the accelerator head; c) Study of different types of targets and its materials for the Bremsstrahlung production which is based on the electron initial energy, the thickness of the target, and its angular distribution and energy, which influences in the neutron generation by means of the photonuclear and electro disintegration reactions; d) Analysis of the neutron yield based on the target type and its thickness, the energy of electrons and photons; e) Analysis of the neutron energy spectra generated in the accelerator head, inside and outside the treatment room; f) Study of the dosimetry fundamentals for neutron and photon mixed fields, the dosimeter selection criteria and standards applied for these applications, specially the Panasonic U D-809 thermoluminescent dosemeter and C R-39 nuclear track dosimeter; g) Theoretical calculation of the neutron yield using a simplified geometric model for the accelerator head with spherical cell, which considers the target, primary collimator, flattener filter, movable collimators and the head shielding as the main components for radiation production. The cases with W and Pb shielding for closed movable collimators and an irradiation field of 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} were analyzed and, h) Experimental evaluation of the leakage neutron radiation from the patient and head planes, observing that the

  17. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations at Fluences of Less Than One HZE Particle per Cell Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high energy and charge (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells where irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with O (77 keV/ (long-s)m), Si (99 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (175 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (195 keV/ (long-s)m) or Fe (240 keV/ (long-s)m) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Non-linear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and non-linear dose response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblast irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by non-linear models motivated by a non-targeted effect (NTE). Best fits for the dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a NTE model for O and a linear response model fit best for Si and Fe particles. Additional evidence for NTE were found in low dose experiments measuring gamma-H2AX foci, a marker of double strand breaks (DSB), and split-dose experiments with human fibroblasts. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  18. Molecular pathways in the bystander response of cells exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have examined biological effects in cell populations exposed to very low mean doses of alpha radiation by which only a small fraction of the cells are actually traversed by an alpha particle. We showed earlier that an enhanced frequency of sister chromatid exchanges and HPRT mutations occur in the non-irradiated, 'bystander' cells. The frequency of mutations induced by a single alpha particle traversing the nucleus of a cell was increased nearly fivefold at the lowest fluence studied, a result of mutations occurring in bystander cells. This was associated with a similar increase in the induction of micronuclei, indicating the induction of DNA damage in bystander cells. In order to gain information concerning molecular pathways, we studied changes in gene expression in bystander cells in confluent cultures of human diploid fibroblasts or mouse embryo-derived fibroblasts (MEFs) by western analysis and in-situ immunofluorescence. The expression levels of p53, p21 Waf1 and p34 cdc2 were significantly modulated in bystander cells. The upregulation of p53 and p21 Waf1 did not occur in cultures irradiated at low density, and was markedly reduced in the presence of the gap junction inhibitor lindane. The importance of gap-junction mediated intercellular communication was confirmed in connexin-43 knockout MEFs. Western blot analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that the bystander response is suppressed by incubation with superoxide dismutase as well as an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, and is associated with the induction of NFKB, suggesting the effect is mediated by oxidative stress. The stress-activated protein kinase p38 and its downstream effector ATF2 are also induced in bystander cells independent of oxidative stress. These results will be discussed in terms of whether activation of the p53 damage response pathway is the direct result of signaling from irradiated cells, or rather is a consequence of DNA induced damage in the bystander

  19. Phytochrome controls achene germination in Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae by very low fluence response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Amaral-Baroli

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Achene without ornament of the tegument were light insensitive with germination under all tested light conditions. Achene with verrucose ornament of the tegument presented low germination under darkness and high germination under light conditions. By pre-incubation at 36° C for remotion of pre-existing Pfr and by comparison of results of counting of dark germinating achenes at the end of experiment and daily under dim green safe light (0.001mumol m-2 s-1 nm-1 we concluded that germination was controlled by phytochrome through very low fluence response.Aquênios sem ornamento do tegumento são insensíveis à luz com ocorrência de germinação sob todas as condições de luz testadas. Aquênios com ornamento verrucoso do tegumento apresentou baixa germinação sob escuro e alta germinação sob luz. A pré-incubação a 36° C para a remoção de Fve pré-existente e pela comparação dos resultados de contagem no final do experimento de aquênios que germinam no escuro e diárias sob luz verde de segurança (0.001mimol m-2s-1nm-1 concluimos que a germinação de Bidens pilosa é controlada pelo fitocromo através da resposta de fluência baixa.

  20. Approaches for accounting and prediction of fast neutron fluence on WWER pressure vessels and results of validation of calculational procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodkin, P.G.; Khrennikov, N.N.; Ryabinin, Yu.A.; Adeev, V.A.

    2015-01-01

    A description is given of the universal procedure for calculation of fast neutron fluence (FNF) on WWER vessels. Approbation of the calculation procedure was carried out by comparing the calculation results for this procedure and measurements on the outer surface of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 vessels. In addition, an estimation of the uncertainty of the settlement procedure was made in accordance with the requirements of regulatory documents. The developed procedure is applied at Kola NPP for independent fast neutron fluence estimates on the WWER-440 reactor vessels when planning core loads taking into account the introduction of new fuels. The results of the pilot operation of the procedure for calculating FNF at the Kola NPP were taken into account when improving the procedure and its application to the calculations of FNF on the WWER-1000 vessels [ru

  1. Structural and electronic characterization of 355 nm laser-crystallized silicon: Interplay of film thickness and laser fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semler, Matthew R.; Swenson, Orven F.; Hoey, Justin M.; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Gette, Cody R.; Hobbie, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the laser crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films as a function of laser fluence and film thickness. Silicon films grown through plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were subjected to a Q-switched, diode-pumped solid-state laser operating at 355 nm. The crystallinity, morphology, and optical and electronic properties of the films are characterized through transmission and reflectance spectroscopy, resistivity measurements, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and optical and scanning-electron microscopy. Our results reveal a unique surface morphology that strongly couples to the electronic characteristics of the films, with a minimum laser fluence at which the film properties are optimized. A simple scaling model is used to relate film morphology to conductivity in the laser-processed films

  2. Standard Test Method for Application and Analysis of Helium Accumulation Fluence Monitors for Reactor Vessel Surveillance, E706 (IIIC)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the concept and use of helium accumulation for neutron fluence dosimetry for reactor vessel surveillance. Although this test method is directed toward applications in vessel surveillance, the concepts and techniques are equally applicable to the general field of neutron dosimetry. The various applications of this test method for reactor vessel surveillance are as follows: 1.1.1 Helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) capsules, 1.1.2 Unencapsulated, or cadmium or gadolinium covered, radiometric monitors (RM) and HAFM wires for helium analysis, 1.1.3 Charpy test block samples for helium accumulation, and 1.1.4 Reactor vessel (RV) wall samples for helium accumulation. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  3. The refractive index distributions of KTP crystal waveguides formed with He-ions at high fluences and low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Jiao-Jian; Lu, Fei; Ming, Xian-Bing; Ma, Yu-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The 300 keV He + ions have been implanted into z-cut KTP crystals with fluences of 4 × 10 16 , 6 × 10 16 , 8 × 10 16 and 10 × 10 16 ions/cm 2 . The Rutherford back scattering spectrometry (RBS)/channelling spectra of KTP crystals and the dark-mode spectrum have been measured. According to the multiple scattering formulae of Feldman and Rodgers, the damage profiles of z-cut KTP crystals have been calculated and extracted. The relations between the damage ratio, fluence and the ion-implanted depth have been established. The refractive index profiles over depth have been calculated, which are very close to the real distribution in waveguide

  4. BPW34 Commercial p-i-n Diodes for High-Level 1-MeV Neutron Equivalent Fluence Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Ravotti, F; Moll, M; Saigne, F

    2008-01-01

    The BPW34 p-i-n diode was characterized at CERN in view of its utilization as radiation monitor at the LHC to cover the broad 1-MeV neutron equivalent fluence (Phieq) range expected for the LHC machine and experiments during operation. Electrical measurements for both forward and reverse bias were used to characterize the device and to understand its behavior under irradiation. When the device is powered forward, a sensitivity to fast hadrons for Phieq > 2 times1012 cm-2 has been observed. With increasing particle fluences the forward I- V characteristics of the diode shifts towards higher voltages. At Phieq > 3times1013 cm-2, the forward characteristic starts to bend back assuming a thyristor-like behavior. An explanation for this phenomenon is given in this article. Finally, detailed radiation-response curves for the forward bias-operation and annealing studies of the diode's forward voltage are presented for proton, neutron and gamma irradiation.

  5. Classical dynamics simulation of the fluence dependence of sputtering properties for the 2 keV Cu → Cu(1 0 0) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karolewski, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Classical dynamics simulations of sputtering have been carried out for 2 keV Cu projectiles incident on a Cu(1 0 0) crystallite target, in order to study the effects of projectile fluence on sputtering properties. Five projectiles are delivered into a 400 Ang 2 region of a Cu crystallite target at 5 ps intervals, giving a maximum fluence of 1.25 x 10 14 cm -2 in the primary impact zone. The altitudinal angle (φ) of the projectiles was 30 deg. (measured with respect to the surface), and the azimuthal (phi) direction of incidence was parallel to the surface atomic rows. The sputter yield is found not to depend sensitively on fluence. Over the fluence range investigated, the predicted standard deviation of the sputter yield is only 5% of the mean value of 11.7. Resputtered projectiles contribute less than 2% of the total sputter yield. With increasing fluence, the angular distribution of sputtered atoms tends to become less anisotropic. For example, the intensity modulations in the azimuthal angular distribution are reduced. This effect is due to the increasing contribution from atoms that are sputtered from defective structural environments. However, sputtered atom energy distributions and emission statistics show little dependence on fluence. The information depth of sputtered atoms increases rapidly with fluence, from 0.11 monolayers (ML) initially, to 1.2 ML after sputtering 0.25 ML from the primary impact zone

  6. Full-fluence tests of experimental thermosetting fuel rods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The irradiation performance of injected thermosetting fuel rods is compared to that of standard pitch-temperature gas-cooled reactor requirements. The primary objective of the experiments reported here was to obtain additional irradiation data at higher fluences for resin-based rods with intermediate binder char contents within the 15 to 30 wt% ''window of acceptability'' that had been previously established. 12 refs

  7. Effect of He+ fluence on surface morphology and ion-irradiation induced defect evolution in 7075 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kai; Ma, Qian; Wan, Hao; Yang, Bin; Ge, Junjie; Zhang, Lingyu; Si, Naichao

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of microstructure for 7075 aluminum alloys with 50 Kev helium ions irradiation were studied by using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fluences of 1 × 1015, 1 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ions cm-2 were selected, and irradiation experiments were conducted at room temperatures. The transmission process of He+ ions was simulated by using SRIM software, including distribution of ion ranges, energy losses and atomic displacements. Experimental results show that irradiated pits and micro-cracks were observed on irradiation sample surface, and the size of constituent particles (not including Mg2Si) decreased with the increasing dose. The x-ray diffraction results of the pair of peaks is better resolved in irradiated samples might indicate that the stressed structure consequence due to crystal defects (vacancies and interstitials) after He+ implantation. TEM observation indicated that the density of MgZn2 phase was significantly reduced after helium ion irradiation which is harmful to strength. Besides, the development of compressive stress produced a large amount of dislocation defects in the 1015 ions cm-2 sample. Moreover, higher fluence irradiation produced more dislocations in sample. At fluence of 1016 ions cm-2, dislocation wall formed by dislocation slip and aggregation in the interior of grains, leading to the refinement of these grains. As fluence increased to 1017 ions cm-2, dislocation loops were observed in pinned dislocation. Moreover, dislocation as effective defect sink, irradiation-induced vacancy defects aggregated to these sinks, and resulted in the formation of helium bubbles in dislocation.

  8. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy; Divergencia da fluencia de fontes de Cs-137 usadas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas- LCR-DBB (UERJ). R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524- Pav. HLC, sala 136 terreo- CEP 20.550- 013. Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  9. Study of titania nanorod films deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation as a function of laser fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, A. P.; Belviso, M. R.; Catalano, M.; Cesaria, M.; Cozzoli, P. D.; Luches, A.; Manera, M. G.; Martino, M.; Rella, R.; Taurino, A.

    2011-11-01

    Chemically synthesized brookite titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorods with average diameter and length dimensions of 3-4 nm and 35-50 nm, respectively, were deposited by the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation technique. A toluene nanorod solution was frozen at the liquid-nitrogen temperature and irradiated with a KrF excimer laser ( λ=248 nm, τ=20 ns) at the repetition rate of 10 Hz, at different fluences (25 to 350 mJ/cm2). The deposited films were structurally characterized by high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopy. single-crystal Si wafers and carbon-coated Cu grids were used as substrates. Structural analyses evidenced the occurrence of brookite-phase crystalline nanospheres coexisting with individually distinguishable TiO2 nanorods in the films deposited at fluences varying from 50 to 350 mJ/cm2. Nanostructured TiO2 films comprising only nanorods were deposited by lowering the laser fluence to 25 mJ/cm2. The observed shape and phase transitions of the nanorods are discussed taking into account the laser-induced heating effects, reduced melting temperature and size-dependent thermodynamic stability of nanoscale TiO2.

  10. Fluence-rate effects on irradiation embrittlement and composition and temperature effects on annealing/reirradiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Hiser, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Recent MEA investigation on the effect of neutron fluence rate on radiation-induced embrittlement accrual and the contributions of metallurgical variables to postirradiation annealing and re-irradiation behavior are reviewed. Studies of fluence-rate effects involved experiments in the UBR test reactor and separately, radiation sensitivity determinations for the decommissioned Gundremmingen (KRB-A) vessel material. Annealing-reirradiation studies employed 399 0 C and 454 0 C heat treatments. Material composition is shown to play a major role in postirradiation annealing recovery. Results illustrate effects of variable copper and variable nickel contents on recoveray of steel plate having low phosphorus levels. Composition effects on recovery were also observed for prototypic welds depicting high/low copper and high/low nickel contents and three flux types. The welds, in addition, indicate major differences in re-irradiation sensitivity. The UBR investigations revealed a significant difference in fluence rate sensitivity between the ASTM A 302-B reference plate and a submerged-arc (S/A) Linde 80 weld. Studies of the Gundremmingen reactor vessel, representing a joint USA-FRG-UK undertaking revealed an anomaly in strong vs. weak test orientation radiation sensitivity. (orig./HP)

  11. Standard Test Method for Determining Thermal Neutron Reaction Rates and Thermal Neutron Fluence Rates by Radioactivation Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this test method is to define a general procedure for determining an unknown thermal-neutron fluence rate by neutron activation techniques. It is not practicable to describe completely a technique applicable to the large number of experimental situations that require the measurement of a thermal-neutron fluence rate. Therefore, this method is presented so that the user may adapt to his particular situation the fundamental procedures of the following techniques. 1.1.1 Radiometric counting technique using pure cobalt, pure gold, pure indium, cobalt-aluminum, alloy, gold-aluminum alloy, or indium-aluminum alloy. 1.1.2 Standard comparison technique using pure gold, or gold-aluminum alloy, and 1.1.3 Secondary standard comparison techniques using pure indium, indium-aluminum alloy, pure dysprosium, or dysprosium-aluminum alloy. 1.2 The techniques presented are limited to measurements at room temperatures. However, special problems when making thermal-neutron fluence rate measurements in high-...

  12. Role of laser fluence in protein synthesis of cultured DRG neurons following low-level laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liqin; Qiu, Caimin; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Yixiu; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-11-01

    Low-level lasers have been used to relieve pain in clinical for many years. But the mechanism is not fully clear. In animal models, nitric oxide (NO) has been reported involving in the transmission and modulation of nociceptive signals. So the objective of this study was to establish whether low-level laser with different fluence could stimulate the production of nitric oxide synthese (NOS), which produces NO in cultured primary dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG neurons). The primary DRG neurons were isolated from healthy Sprague Dawley rats (8-12 weeks of age) and spread on 35 mm culture dishes specially used for confocal microscopy. 24 hours after spreading, cells were irradiated with 658 nm laser for two consecutive days at the energy density of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mJ·cm-2 respectively. Control groups were not exposed to the laser, but were kept under the same conditions as the irradiated ones. The synthesis of NOS after laser irradiation was detected by immunofluorescence assay, and the changes of NOS were evaluated using confocal microscopy and Image J software. The results showed that all the laser fluence could promote the production of NOS in DRG neurons, especially the 60 mJ·cm-2 . These results demonstrated that low-level laser irradiation could modify protein synthesis in a dose- or fluence- dependent manner, and indicated that low-level laser irradiation might achieve the analgesic effect through modulation of NO production.

  13. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Fornacelli, Cristina [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Gomoiu, Ioana [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Lognoli, David [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Mohanu, Dan [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} to 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  14. Naphthalene degradation in seawater by UV irradiation: The effects of fluence rate, salinity, temperature and initial concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Liang; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Baiyu; Zheng, Jisi; Liu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The removal of naphthalene follows first order kinetics in seawater. • Irradiance and temperature are the most influential factors. • An increase in irradiance can linearly promote photodegradation. • High salinity suppresses the photodegradation of naphthalene. - Abstract: A large amount of oil pollution at sea is produced by the operational discharge of oily wastewater. The removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from such sources using UV irradiation has become attractive, yet the photolysis mechanism in seawater has remained unclear. This study examines the photodegradation kinetics of naphthalene in natural seawater through a full factorial design of experiments (DOE). The effects of fluence rate, salinity, temperature and initial concentration are investigated. Results show that fluence rate, temperature and the interaction between temperature and initial concentration are the most influential factors. An increase in fluence rate can linearly promote the photodegradation process. Salinity increasingly impedes the removal of naphthalene because of the existence of free-radical scavengers and photon competitors. The results will help understand the photolysis mechanism of PAHs and develop more effective methods for treating oily seawater generated from offshore industries

  15. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm2 to 1 mJ/cm2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  16. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm 2 to 1 mJ/cm 2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  17. Investigation on neutron/gamma discrimination phenomena in plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    This PhD topic was born from misunderstandings and incomplete knowledge of the mechanism and relative effectiveness of neutron and gamma-ray (n/γ) discrimination between plastic scintillators compared to liquid scintillators. The shape of the light pulse these materials generate following interaction with an ionizing particle (predominantly recoil protons in the case of neutrons and electrons in the case of gamma-rays) is different in time in a way that depends on the detected particle (nature and energy). It is this fact that enables separation (PSD). The behavior in liquid scintillators has been extensively studied experimentally for practical applications. Only recently has it been shown that a weak separation can also be achieved using specially prepared plastics. The study of this system presents an open field and the understanding of both liquids and plastics with respect to their PSD properties is far from complete. This work is dedicated to exploring the fundamental photophysical phenomena at play in the generation of luminescence emission, following the interaction of ionizing radiation with organic scintillators. For this purpose, firstly a detailed literature review of the state-of-the-art has been conducted extending from 1960 to the present day. Secondly a complete characterization of the main scintillating materials has been conducted to define their fluorescence properties and the characteristics of their scintillation under irradiation. Thirdly a proton beam has been used to simulate recoil protons to quantify under controlled laboratory conditions their specific energy deposition in a plastic scintillator with PSD properties. The fourth part of this thesis is devoted to the study of PSD efficiency of scintillators as a function of their molecular structure. This investigation has led to a plastic scintillator prepared in our laboratory with good PSD properties and a patent submission. Finally, photophysical experiments were performed using a femtosecond laser to simulate, purely optically, neutron/matter interactions giving rise to delayed fluorescence. This technique was chosen so as to examine the fundamental energy transfers involved. Overall this work led to an improved understanding and greater insight about the correlation between the chemical structure of organic scintillating materials and their n/γ discrimination properties. This will guide both applications and future materials development. (author) [fr

  18. A novel dual mode neutron-gamma imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Gerling, Mark; Brennan, James S.; Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Mrowka, Stanley; Marleau, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Scatter Camera (NSC) can image fission sources and determine their energy spectra at distances of tens of meters and through significant thicknesses of intervening materials in relatively short times (1). We recently completed a 32 element scatter camera and will present recent advances made with this instrument. A novel capability for the scatter camera is dual mode imaging. In normal neutron imaging mode we identify and image neutron events using pulse shape discrimination (PSD) and time of flight in liquid scintillator. Similarly gamma rays are identified from Compton scatter in the front and rear planes for our segmented detector. Rather than reject these events, we show it is possible to construct a gamma-ray image by running the analysis in a 'Compton mode'. Instead of calculating the scattering angle by the kinematics of elastic scatters as is appropriate for neutron events, it can be found by the kinematics of Compton scatters. Our scatter camera has not been optimized as a Compton gamma-ray imager but is found to work reasonably. We studied imaging performance using a Cs137 source. We find that we are able to image the gamma source with reasonable fidelity. We are able to determine gamma energy after some reasonable assumptions. We will detail the various algorithms we have developed for gamma image reconstruction. We will outline areas for improvement, include additional results and compare neutron and gamma mode imaging.

  19. Study of combinations of TL/OSL single dosimeters for mixed high/low ionization density radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oster, L.; Druzhyna, S.; Orion, I.; Horowitz, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss and compare the potential application of combined OSL/TL measurements using 6 LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-600 is enriched of isotope 6 Li which has a high cross-section for the reaction with slow neutrons) or 7 LiF:Mg,Ti ( TLD-700 is enriched of 7 Li isotope) and TLD-100 (natural isotopic composition) detectors. The OSL/TL duel readout of LiF:Mg,Ti as an ionization density discriminator avoids some of the difficulties inherent to the various types of discrimination mixed-field passive dosimeters, and in addition has several advantages. The preferential excitation of OSL compared to TL following high ionization density (HID) alpha irradiation, naturally explained via the identification of OSL with the “two-hit” F 2 or F 3 center, whereas the major component of composite TL glow peak 5 is believed to arise from a ''one-hit'' complex defect. This evidence allows near-total discrimination between HID radiation and low-ionization density (LID) radiation. Beta and alpha particle irradiations were carried out with 90 Sr/ 90 Y (∼500 keV average energy) and 241 Am sources (4.7 MeV) respectively and neutron irradiations were carried out at the PTB (Germany) (E n = 5 MeV) and RARAF (Columbia University, USA) (E n = 6 MeV) accelerator facilities. The highest values of the FOM obtained was ∼30 for neutron/gamma discrimination and ∼110 for alpha/gamma discrimination using OSL/TL – peak 5 measurements in TLD-700. -- Highlights: ► The increased response of OSL compared to TL following HID irradiation is observed. ► This evidence is explained via the identification of OSL with the ''two-hit'' F2 centers. ► The potential application of combined OSL/TL in discrimination dosimetry is discussed. ► The values of FOM were 110 for alpha/gamma and 30 for neutron/gamma discrimination

  20. Absolute measurement of thermal neutron fluence and its application for fission track dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzawa, Yoshihiro; Honda, Teruyuki; Nozaki, Tetsuya.

    1988-01-01

    The absolute measurements of thermal neutron fluence for fission track dating have been developed after the proceeding results of Honda et al. (1987). The 2,200 m/sec activation cross section of 197 Au (98.8 barn) is corrected to 87.4 barn (σa) by the three factors of the neutron temperature, Maxwellian distribution of thermal neutrons and non 1/v correction factor for the above absolute measurement. The calibrated factor (B th ) of standard glasses (SRM613, SRM962a, CN-1 and CN-2) and zeta-a (ζa) values for fission track dating are determined on the basis of these experimental results. The values of B th , (7.47 ± 0.29) x 10 9 for SRM613, (7.43 ± 0.34) x 10 9 for SRM962a, (2.50 ± 0.06) x 10 9 for CN-1 and (2.74 ± 0.06) x 10 9 for CN-2 closely agree with those reported previously by Honda et al. (1987). Further, the ζa values of 392.3 ± 16.5 for SRM962a and SRM613, 131.4 ± 3.1 for CN-1 and 144.1 ± 3.3 for CN-2 calculated from B th , effective thermal neutron fission cross-section σf (497.4 barn), isotopic abundance ratio 235 U/ 239 U, I (7.2527 x 10 -3 ) and spontaneous fission decay constant of 238 U, λ f (6.85 x 10 -17 a -7 ) show close agreement with ζ b values (392.5 ± 10.0, 131.6 ± 3.3, 140.1 ± 3.5) derived from the absolute age of Fish Canyon Tuff (27.9 ± 0.7 Ma) respectively. The fission track dating of zircons separated from Oligocene-Miocene tuff distributed in Eastern Hokkaido have been carried out by the external detector method using ζ a . The obtained ages are 28.6 ± 0.7 Ma (1 - 2) and 23.3 ± 0.7 Ma (3 - 2). These results agree well with the geologic age supported from Ashoro Fossil Fauna, K-Ar ages of volcanic rocks and stratigraphy in this area. (author)

  1. Calculation of neutron fluence in the region of the pressure vessel for the history of different reactors by using the Monte-Carlo-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barz, H.U.; Bertram, W.

    1992-01-01

    Embrittlement of pressure vessel material caused by neutron irradiation is a very important problem for VVER-440 reactors. For the estimation of the fracture risk highly reliable neutron fluence values are necessary. For this reason a special theoretical determination of space dependent neutron fluences has been performed mainly on the basis of Monte-Carlo calculations. The described method allows the accurate calculation of neutron fluences near the pressure vessel in the height of the core region for all reactor histories and loading cycles in an efficient manner. To illustrate the accuracy of the suggested method a comparison with experimental results was done. The calculated neutron fluence values can be used for planning the loading schemes of each reactor according to the safety requirements against brittle fracture. (orig.)

  2. Contribution to time resolved X-ray fluence and differential spectra measurement method improvement in 5-200 KeV range. Application to pulsed emission sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vie, M.

    1983-09-01

    Two types of sensors have been developed to measure locally the time-resolved fluence and differential energetic spectrum of pulsed X-ray in the energy range 5 to 200 keV. Rise time of these sensors is very short (10 ns) in order to permit time-resolved measurements. Fluence sensors have been developed by putting filters in front of detector in order to make sensor response independent of X-ray energy and proportional to X-ray fluence. The energetic differential spectrum was calculated by way of a method similar to the ROSS method but using filters separated within a pair defining adjacent spectral width. A detailed analysis of uncertainties affecting calculated fluence and spectrum has been done [fr

  3. A new expression for determination of fluences from a spherical moderator neutron source for the calibration of spherical neutron measuring devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshnoodi, M.; Sohrabi, M.

    1997-01-01

    A new expression modifying the inverse square law for determination of neutron fluences from spherical moderator neutron sources is reported. The formalism is based on the neutron fluence at a point outside the moderator as the summation of fluxes of two groups of neutrons: direct neutrons from the central region of the moderator, and moderated neutrons which, to a first approximation, are scattered from the outermost layers of the spherical moderator. The expression has been further developed for spherical neutron measuring devices with an appropriate geometry factor which corrects the reading of the device for non-uniform irradiation of the detector. The combination of the new fluence function and those of the air and room scattered components introduce a calibration model. The fluence relationship obtained for moderated sources may conveniently be used for calculating the more rapid change of neutron dose at close distances than that which is based on the inverse square dependence. (author)

  4. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement and comparisons with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.; Kolibal, J.G.

    1985-10-01

    Realistic calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement have been carried out with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models. Comparisons with measurements show that the results are well within the experimental uncertainties

  5. Gain and time resolution of 45 μm thin Low Gain Avalanche Detectors before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1015 neq/cm2

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, J; Cavallaro, E; Chytka, L; Davis, P.M; Flores, D; Förster, F; Grinstein, S; Hidalgo, S; Komarek, T; Kramberger, G; Mandić, I; Merlos, A; Nozka, L; Pellegrini, G; Quirion, D; Sykora, T; Physics

    2018-01-01

    The gain showed the expected decrease at a fixed voltage for a lower initial implantation dose, as well as for a higher fluence due to effective acceptor removal in the multiplication layer. Time resolutions below 30 ps were obtained at the highest applied voltages for both implantation doses before irradiation. Also after an intermediate fluence of 3 × 1014 neq/cm2, similar values were measured since a higher applicable reverse bias voltage could recover most of the pre-irradiation gain...

  6. Experimental time resolved measurement of fluence and energy spectra of photons emitted by a pulsed X-ray generator in the range 5-300 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vie, M.; Baboulet, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed: - A sensor to measure locally X ray fluence rate amplitude and variation versus time during X ray pulses, - A spectrometer based on ROSS method to measure absolute X ray spectrum versus time during X ray pulses. This metrology is used to characterise single shot X ray pulsed sources emitting photons in the range of 5 to 300 keV. Fluence domain is between 10 -9 and 5 10 -4 J. cm -2 with a few nanoseconds time resolution [fr

  7. Analysis of stationary fluence by minimization of a functional in tension and velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loula, A.F.D.; Guerreiro, J.N.C.; Toledo, E.M.

    1989-11-01

    New mixed finite element formulations for plane elasticity problems are presented with no limitation in the choice of conforming finite element spaces. Adding least square residual form of the governing equations to the classical Galerkin formulation the original saddle point problem is transformed into a minimization problem. Stability analysis, error estimates and numerical results are presented, confirming the error estimates and the good performance of this new formulation. (author) [pt

  8. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K; Hansen, D; Rit, S; Belka, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  9. Polarization and fluence effects in femtosecond laser induced micro/nano structures on stainless steel with antireflection property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caizhen; Ye, Yayun; Jia, Baoshen; Li, Yuan; Ding, Renjie; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Yuxin; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, micro/nano structures on stainless steel were prepared in single spot irradiation mode and scan mode by using femtosecond laser technique. The influence of polarization and fluence on the formation of micro/nano structures were explored. Surface morphology, microstructure, roughness and composition of prepared samples were characterized. The antireflection property and wettability of laser treated samples were also tested and compared with that of original stainless steel.Results showed that the laser-induced spot consists of two distinct regions due to the Gaussian beam profile: a core region of moth-eye-like structure and a peripheral region of nanoparticles-covered laser-induced periodic surface structure (NC-LIPSS). The proportion of the core region and dimension of micro/nano structure increase with increasing laser fluence. Polarization can be used to tune the direction of NC-LIPSS. Atomic ratios of Cr and Mn increase and atomic ratio of Ni decreases after laser irradiation. Oxygen is not detected on laser irradiated samples, indicating that oxidation reactions are not significant during the interaction process between femtosecond laser and 304 stainless steel. These are good for the application of stainless steel as its physical properties would not change or even enhanced. The overlaps between two laser scan lines significantly influence the surface roughness and should be controlled carefully during the preparation process. The laser irradiated surface has a better antireflection property in comparison with that of original stainless steel, which may due to the scattering and absorption of micro/nano structures. Contact angle of micro/nano structured stainless steel decreases with the increase of laser fluence. The hydrophilic property can be explained by Wenzel's model. The interference between the surface plasmon wave and the incident light wave leads to the formation of NC-LIPSS.

  10. Neutron Fluence Evaluation of Reactor Internal Structure Using 3D Transport Calculation Code, RAPTOR-M3G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeng, YoungJae; Lim, MiJoung; Kim, KyungSik; Cho, YoungKi; Yoo, ChoonSung; Kim, ByoungChul

    2015-01-01

    Age-related degradation mechanisms are including the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking(IASCC), void swelling, stress relaxation, fatigue, and etc. A lot of Baffle Former Bolts(BFBs) was installed at the former plate ends between baffle and barrel structure. These would undergo severe experiences, which are high temperature and pressure, bypass water flow and neutron exposure and have some radioactive limitation in inspecting their integrity. The objectives of this paper is to evaluate fast neutron fluence(n/cm 2 , E>1.0MeV) for PWR internals using 3D transport calculation code, RAPTOR-M3G, and to figure out a strategy to manage the effects of aging in PWR internals. One of age-related degradation mechanisms, IASCC, which is affected by fast neutron exposure rate, has been currently issued for PWR internals and has 2 x 10 21 (n/cm 2 ) of the threshold value by MRP-175. Because a lot of BFBs was installed around the internal components, closer inspections are required. As part of an aging management for Kori unit 2, 3D transport calculation code, RAPTOR-M3G, was applied for determining fast neutron fluence at baffle, barrel and former plates regions. As a result, the fast neutron fluence exceeds the screening or threshold values of IASCC in all of baffle, barrel and former plate region. And the most significant region is the baffle because it is located closest to the core. In addition, some regions including former plate tend to be more damaged because of less moderate ability than water. In conclusion, Ice's has been progressed for PWR internals of Kori unit 2. Several regions of internal components were damaged by fast neutron exposure and increase in size as time goes by

  11. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Hansen, D [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Jutland (Denmark); Rit, S [University Lyon, Lyon, Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes (France); Belka, C [LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  12. Response of Ni/4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes to alpha-particle irradiation at different fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omotoso, E., E-mail: ezekiel.omotoso@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Departments of Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife 220005 (Nigeria); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Diale, M.; Ngoepe, P.N.M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been carried out on 1.9×10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC at room temperature using 5.4 MeV alpha-particle irradiation over a fluence ranges from 2.6×10{sup 10} to 9.2×10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}. Current–voltage (I–V), capacitance–voltage (C–V) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been carried out to study the change in characteristics of the devices and free carrier removal rate due to alpha-particle irradiation, respectively. As radiation fluence increases, the ideality factors increased from 1.20 to 1.85 but the Schottky barrier height (SBH{sub I–V}) decreased from 1.47 to 1.34 eV. Free carrier concentration, N{sub d} decreased with increasing fluence from 1.7×10{sup 16} to 1.1×10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} at approximately 0.70 μm depth. The reduction in N{sub d} shows that defects were induced during the irradiation and have effect on compensating the free carrier. The free carrier removal rate was estimated to be 6480±70 cm{sup −1}. Alpha-particle irradiation introduced two electron traps (E{sub 0.39} and E{sub 0.62}), with activation energies of 0.39±0.03 eV and 0.62±0.08 eV, respectively. The E{sub 0.39} as attribute related to silicon or carbon vacancy, while the E{sub 0.62} has the attribute of Z{sub 1}/Z{sub 2}.

  13. Rapid method of calculating the fluence and spectrum of neutrons from a critical assembly and the resulting dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessis, J.

    1977-01-01

    The proposed calculation method is unsophisticated but rapid. The first part (computer code CRITIC), which is based on the Fermi age equation, evaluates the number of neutrons per fission emitted from a moderated critical assembly and their energy spectrum. The second part (computer code NARCISSE), which uses the current albedo for concrete, evaluates the product of neutron reflection on the walls and calculates the fluence resulting at any point in the room and its energy distribution by 21 groups. The results obtained are shown to compare satisfactorily with those obtained through the use of a Monte Carlo program

  14. Hypopigmentation Induced by Frequent Low-Fluence, Large-Spot-Size QS Nd:YAG Laser Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yisheng; Lee, Siong See Joyce; Goh, Chee Leok

    2015-12-01

    The Q-switched 1064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG) laser is increasingly used for nonablative skin rejuvenation or "laser toning" for melasma. Multiple and frequent low-fluence, large-spot-size treatments are used to achieve laser toning, and these treatments are associated with the development of macular hypopigmentation as a complication. We present a case series of three patients who developed guttate hypomelanotic macules on the face after receiving laser toning treatment with QS 1064-nm Nd:YAG.

  15. Combination therapy of low-fluence photodynamic therapy and intravitreal ranibizumab for choroidal neovascular membrane in choroidal osteoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney J Morris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroidal osteoma is an unusual form of intraocular calcification seen in otherwise healthy eyes. It is a benign idiopathic osseous tumor of the choroid, typically seen in young females. Choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM is a complication seen in one-third of these patients and carries a poor visual outcome. We report a case of a 25-year-old hyperthyroid female with choroidal osteoma and subfoveal CNVM in her left eye which was successfully treated using low-fluence photodynamic therapy (PDT with verteporfin followed by a single injection of intravitreal ranibizumab.

  16. Radiation clusters formation and evolution in FCC metals at low-temperature neutron irradiation up to small damage fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Shcherbakov, E.N.; Asiptsov, O.I.; Skryabin, L.A.; Portnykh, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of transmission electron microscopy and precision size measurements are used to study the formation of radiation-induced clusters in FCC metals (Ni, Pt, austenitic steels EhI-844, ChS-68) irradiated with fast neutron (E>0.1 MeV) fluences from 7 x 10 21 up to 3.5 x 10 22 m -2 at a temperature of 310 K. Using statistical thermodynamic methods the process of radiation clusters formation and evolution is described quantitatively. The change in the concentration of point defects under irradiation as well as size variations of irradiated specimens on annealing are calculated [ru

  17. Potential high fluence response of pressure vessel internals constructed from austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Harrod, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the in-core components in pressurized water reactors are constructed of austenitic stainless steels. The potential behavior of these components can be predicted using data on similar steels irradiated at much higher displacement rates in liquid-metal reactors or water-cooled mixed-spectrum reactors. Consideration of the differences between the pressurized water environment and that of the other reactors leads to the conclusion that significant amounts of void swelling, irradiation creep, and embrittlement will occur in some components, and that the level of damage per atomic displacement may be larger in the pressurized water environment

  18. Determination of neutron fluence and radiation brittleness temperature of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 pressure vessels in Kozloduy NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, K.; Apostolov, T.; Belousov, S.; Petrova, T.; Antonov, S.; Ivanov, K.; Prodanova, R.

    1993-01-01

    In Units 1-4 of Kozloduy NPP (WWER-440/230), the weld 4 of RPV undergoes the most severe irradiation embrittlement. Neither witness-samples, nor detectors are designed for these reactors. Transport calculations of fast neutron fluence on WWER-440 RPV and ex-vessel measurements by threshold activation detectors are the primary means for adequate assessment of metal state and for prognosis concerning the reactor life span. In WWER-1000 reactors (Units 5-6) the maximum neutron fluence occurs on the weld 3. The systematical observation of metal state is performed through witness-samples and threshold activation detectors ( 54 Fe (n,p), 63 Cu (n,α), 93 Nb (n,n')) placed above the reactor top edge and at the first vessel ring level. There are big differences in energy spectrum and integral neutron flux falling onto the weld 3, the RPV base metal and the staff detectors. This requires additional neutron measurements in the air gap between the RPV and the thermal insulation. (author)

  19. Radiation annealing mechanisms of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels dependent on irradiation temperature and neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachur, D.

    1982-01-01

    Heat treatment after irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steels showed annealing of irradiation embrittlement. Depending on the irradiation temperature, the embrittlement started to anneal at about 220 0 C and was completely annealed at 500 0 C with 4 h of annealing time. The annealing behavior was normally measured in terms of the Vickers hardness increase produced by irradiation relative to the initial hardness as a function of the annealing temperature. Annealing results of other mechanical properties correspond to hardness results. During annealing, various recovery mechanisms occur in different temperature ranges. These are characterized by activation energies from 1.5 to 2.1 eV. The individual mechanisms were determined by the different time dependencies at various temperatures. The relative contributions of the mechanisms showed a neutron fluence dependence, with the lower activation energy mechanisms being predominant at low fluence and vice versa. In the temperature range where partial annealing of a mechanism took place during irradiation, an increase in activation energy was observed. Trend curves for the increase in transition temperature with irradiation, for the relative increase of Vickers hardness and yield strength, and for the relative decrease of Charpy-V upper shelf energy are interpreted by the behavior of different mechanisms

  20. The effect of high-resolution fluences by couch shift between arcs on the VMAT plan quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung In; Park, So Yeon; Choi, Chang Heon; Park, Jong Min [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Various studies have demonstrated the dosimetric advantages of multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) with fine leaf widths for both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), which can generate high resolution fluences. However, a practical disadvantage of MLCs with fine leaf widths is a limited field length in the longitudinal direction. This is because the numbers of leaves and motors are limited due to spatial constraints within the treatment head. We propose an alternative way to generate high resolution fluences of a VMAT plan without MLCs with fine leaf widths for the treatment of large H and N target volumes. With the Millennium 120 MLC with inner leaf widths of 5 mm, we simulate 2.5 mm inner leaf widths by a 2.5 mm shift of the patient couch in the longitudinal direction between arcs. In this way, we acquire not only the improved dosimetric effects of the MLCs with fine leaf widths, but also the full coverage of the H and N target volumes. The HAS plan was better than the others in terms of normal tissue sparing and plan efficiency.

  1. Calculus of the fluence and the absorbed dose by the different head tissues before photons of distinct energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin V, C.; Rivera M, T.; Vega C, H. R.; Azorin N, J.

    2009-10-01

    Two models were used, in the first one the head was built with the scalp that includes the skin and the adipose tissue, the skull, the brain and the tumor, it is modeled as a sphere of 1 cm of radius that be places in the center of the head pattern. The spherical models of the scalp, the skull and the brain were built respectively with spheres of 8.5, 8 and 7 cm of radius. The tumor was irradiated with an unidirectional beam of photons, the calculated cases were photons of 6 0Co and monoenergetic photons beams of 6, 8, 10 and 15 MeV. For each case be calculated the total photons fluence to 5, 10 and 15 cm in air and to 20.5 cm that is the interface between the air and head. This calculus included values of photons fluence halfway the scalp, halfway the skull, halfway the brain and in the tumor center. Also is calculated the total absorbed dose by the scalp, the skull, the brain and the tumor. (author)

  2. Effect of fluence and ambient environment on the surface and structural modification of femtosecond laser irradiated Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umm-i-Kalsoom; Ali, Nisar; Husinsky, Wolfgang; Nathala, Chandra S R; Bashir, Shazia; Shahid Rafique, M; Makarov, Sergey V; Begum, Narjis

    2016-01-01

    Under certain conditions, ultrafast pulsed laser interaction with matter leads to the formation of self-organized conical as well as periodic surface structures (commonly reffered to as, laser induced periodic surface structures, LIPSS). The purpose of the present investigations is to explore the effect of fsec laser fluence and ambient environments (Vacuum and O 2 ) on the formation of LIPSS and conical structures on the Ti surface. The surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The ablation threshold with single and multiple (N = 100) shots and the existence of an incubation effect was demonstrated by SEM investigations for both the vacuum and the O 2 environment. The phase analysis and chemical composition of the exposed targets were performed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. SEM investigations reveal the formation of LIPSS (nano and micro). FFT d-spacing calculations illustrate the dependence of periodicity on the fluence and ambient environment. The periodicity of nano-scale LIPSS is higher in the case of irradiation under vacuum conditions as compared to O 2 . Furthermore, the O 2 environment reduces the ablation threshold. XRD data reveal that for the O 2 environment, new phases (oxides of Ti) are formed. EDS analysis exhibits that after irradiation under vacuum conditions, the percentage of impurity element (Al) is reduced. The irradiation in the O 2 environment results in 15% atomic diffusion of oxygen. (paper)

  3. Using fluence separation to account for energy spectra dependence in computing dosimetric a-Si EPID images for IMRT fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weidong; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    This study develops a method to improve the dosimetric accuracy of computed images for an amorphous silicon flat-panel imager. Radially dependent kernels derived from Monte Carlo simulations are convolved with the treatment-planning system's energy fluence. Multileaf collimator (MLC) beam hardening is accounted for by having separate kernels for open and blocked portions of MLC fields. Field-size-dependent output factors are used to account for the field-size dependence of scatter within the imager. Gamma analysis was used to evaluate open and sliding window test fields and intensity modulated patient fields. For each tested field, at least 99.6% of the points had γ<1 with a 3%, 3-mm criteria. With a 2%, 2-mm criteria, between 81% and 100% of points had γ<1. Patient intensity modulated test fields had 94%-100% of the points with γ<1 with a 2%, 2-mm criteria for all six fields tested. This study demonstrates that including the dependencies of kernel and fluence on radius and beam hardening in the convolution improves its accuracy compared with the use of radial and beam-hardening independent kernels; it also demonstrates that the resultant accuracy of the convolution method is sufficient for pretreatment, intensity modulated patient field verification

  4. Influence of laser fluence in ArF-excimer laser assisted crystallisation of a-SiGe:H films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiussi, S.; Lopez, E.; Serra, J.; Gonzalez, P.; Serra, C.; Leon, B.; Fabbri, F.; Fornarini, L.; Martelli, S.

    2003-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (poly-SiGe) coatings are drawing increasing attention as active layers in solar cells, bolometers and various microelectronic devices. As a consequence, alternative low-cost production techniques, capable to produce such alloys with uniform and controlled grain size, become more and more attractive. Excimer laser assisted crystallisation, already assessed in thin film transistor production, has proved to be a valuable 'low-thermal budget' technique for the crystallisation of amorphous silicon. Main advantages are the high process quality and reproducibility as well as the possibility of tailoring the grain size in both, small selected regions and large areas. The feasibility of this technique for producing poly-SiGe films has been studied irradiating hydrogenated amorphous SiGe films with spatially uniform ArF-laser pulses of different fluences. Surface morphology, structure and chemical composition have been extensively characterised, demonstrating the need of using a 'step-by-step' process and a careful adjustment of both, total number of shots and laser fluence at each 'step' in order to diminish segregation effects and severe damages of the film surface and of segregation effects

  5. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: a review of current work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledney, G D; Madonna, G S; Elliott, T B; Moore, M M; Jackson, W E

    1991-10-01

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, we developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60[Co sources. Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections. Combined therapy with S-TDCM and ceftriaxone for K. pneumoniae infections in mice exposed to a mixed radiation field or to gamma rays was more effective than single-agent therapy. In all irradiated-wounded mice, single therapy of acquired infections with an antibiotic or S-TDCM did not increase survival. Survival of irradiated-wounded mice after topical application of gentamicin sulfate cream suggested that bacteria colonizing the wound disseminated systemically in untreated irradiated mice, resulting in death from sepsis. In lethal models of acquired infections in irradiated-wounded mice, significant increases in survival were achieved when systemic treatments with S-TDCM or gentamicin were combined with topical treatments of gentamicin cream. Therapies for sepsis in all mice exposed to a mixed field were less effective than in mice exposed to gamma rays. Nonetheless, the data show a principle by which successful therapy may be provided to individuals receiving tissue trauma in conjunction with

  6. Effect of spot size and fluence on Q-switched alexandrite laser treatment for pigmentation in Asians: a randomized, double-blinded, split-face comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Chen; Chen, Chih-Kang

    2012-10-01

    Q-switched laser treatment for pigment disorders commonly leads to postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) in Asians. To evaluate the effect of spot size and fluence on Q-switched alexandrite laser (QSAL) treatment for pigmentation in Asians. Ten patients with freckles, 18 with lentigines, and 8 with acquired bilateral nevus of Ota-like macules (ABNOM) received 1 session of QSAL treatment for a 3-mm spot on one cheek and a 4-mm spot on the other cheek. The lowest fluences to achieve a visible biologic effect were chosen. The patients with freckles experienced the highest improvement rate (83-84%), followed by those with lentigines (52%) and ABNOM (35%). Similar efficacy was observed for both cheeks (p > 0.05). PIH developed in 10% (1/10), 44% (8/18), and 75% (6/8) of the patients with freckles, lentigines, and ABNOM, respectively. The severity of PIH was lower in the 4-mm spot with a lower fluence than in the 3-mm spot with a higher fluence in patients with lentigines (p = 0.03), but not in those with freckles or ABNOM. Using a larger spot to achieve the same biologic effect at a lower fluence is associated with equal efficacy and less-severe PIH in patients with lentigines.

  7. Fluence measurements applied to 5-20 MeV/amu ion beam dosimetry by simultaneous use of a total-absorption calorimeter and a Faraday cup

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, T; Takizawa, H; Tachibana, H; Tanaka, R

    1998-01-01

    A Faraday cup was fabricated for measuring the beam current of a few tens MeV/amu ion beams of the TIARA AVF cyclotron. It has been applied as a beam monitor for studying the characteristics of film dosimeters that are well-established for high doses of sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-rays and 1 to 10 MeV electrons. A total absorption calorimeter designed to measure energy fluence has also been tested for estimating the uncertainty in fluence measurement of 5-20 MeV/amu ion beams, by simultaneous use of the calorimeter and the Faraday cup in a broad uniform fluence field. The estimated fluence was evaluated on the basis of nominal particle energy values derived from the cyclotron acceleration parameters. The average ratio of the measured fluence values to the estimated values is 1.024, and the average precision is within +-2% at a 68% confidence level, for most of the ion beams with a range of kinetic energy per nucleon, 5-20 MeV/amu, at an integrated charge above 5 nC/cm sup 2.

  8. On the influence of atomic mixing on the evolution of ion-implantation profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras-Marti, A.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.; Peon-Fernandez, J.; Rodriguez-Vidal, M.

    1982-01-01

    Various processes contributing to the evolution of high-fluence implantation profiles in solids are considered within a general scheme. In particular the influence of atomic mixing is analysed. A Green function is derived which contains all the information on the instantaneous profile. In the Gaussian approximation, simple expressions for parameters which describe the ion-induced relocation effects on the depth profile are found. The contributions of recoil and cascade mixing are discussed. The relative significance of diffusive and collisional processes on the profiles can also be assessed. (author)

  9. Analysis of influence of fast neutron fluence irradiated to Beryllium element of The RSG-GAS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Kuntjoro

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of influence fast neutron fluence irradiated to the RSG-GAS beryllium reflector have been done. Methods of analysis was carried out by measuring fluxes neutron in beryllium element and block position that function as reflector.The calculation done for determination it is there any influence of neutron as long as beryllium in the core. Besides that, visualization done to make sure it there is any deformation at beryllium as effect of irradiation. Fluxes and fluences of beryllium element measurement result in 200 kW reactor power are 2.30E+07 n/cm 2 .sec and 4.19E+17 n/cm 2 in position E-2, 3.70E+07 n/cm 2 s and 6.74E+17 n/cm 2 in position J-8, 2.19E+12 n/cm 2 s and 3.99E+22 n/cm 2 in position. Measurement results in the position B-3 are 2.12E+12 n/cm 2 s and 3.86E+22 n/cm 2 in position G-10 respectively. Other result are fluxes and fluence in beryllium block, those are 5,02E+07 n/cm 2 s and 9,15E+17 n/cm 2 in position (5-6), and 2,32E+07 n/cm 2 s and 4,23E+17 n/cm 2 in position (C-D). Deformation (L/L) results for beryllium element are 1,12E-08 in position E-2, 1,84E-08 in position J-8, 1,60E-03 in position B-3, and 1,55E-03 in position G-10. In beryllium block deformation results are 2,52E-08 in position (5-6) and 1,13E-08 in position (C-D). Those results are shown unseen deformation in beryllium element and beryllium block and demonstrably by visual observation in reactor hot cell. (author)

  10. Fluence map optimization (FMO) with dose–volume constraints in IMRT using the geometric distance sorting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Yihua; Li Cunhua; Ren Haozheng; Zhang Yong; Min Zhifang

    2012-01-01

    A new heuristic algorithm based on the so-called geometric distance sorting technique is proposed for solving the fluence map optimization with dose–volume constraints which is one of the most essential tasks for inverse planning in IMRT. The framework of the proposed method is basically an iterative process which begins with a simple linear constrained quadratic optimization model without considering any dose–volume constraints, and then the dose constraints for the voxels violating the dose–volume constraints are gradually added into the quadratic optimization model step by step until all the dose–volume constraints are satisfied. In each iteration step, an interior point method is adopted to solve each new linear constrained quadratic programming. For choosing the proper candidate voxels for the current dose constraint adding, a so-called geometric distance defined in the transformed standard quadratic form of the fluence map optimization model was used to guide the selection of the voxels. The new geometric distance sorting technique can mostly reduce the unexpected increase of the objective function value caused inevitably by the constraint adding. It can be regarded as an upgrading to the traditional dose sorting technique. The geometry explanation for the proposed method is also given and a proposition is proved to support our heuristic idea. In addition, a smart constraint adding/deleting strategy is designed to ensure a stable iteration convergence. The new algorithm is tested on four cases including head–neck, a prostate, a lung and an oropharyngeal, and compared with the algorithm based on the traditional dose sorting technique. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is more suitable for guiding the selection of new constraints than the traditional dose sorting method, especially for the cases whose target regions are in non-convex shapes. It is a more efficient optimization technique to some extent for choosing constraints than

  11. Fluence map optimization (FMO) with dose-volume constraints in IMRT using the geometric distance sorting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yihua; Li, Cunhua; Ren, Haozheng; Zhang, Yong; Min, Zhifang

    2012-10-21

    A new heuristic algorithm based on the so-called geometric distance sorting technique is proposed for solving the fluence map optimization with dose-volume constraints which is one of the most essential tasks for inverse planning in IMRT. The framework of the proposed method is basically an iterative process which begins with a simple linear constrained quadratic optimization model without considering any dose-volume constraints, and then the dose constraints for the voxels violating the dose-volume constraints are gradually added into the quadratic optimization model step by step until all the dose-volume constraints are satisfied. In each iteration step, an interior point method is adopted to solve each new linear constrained quadratic programming. For choosing the proper candidate voxels for the current dose constraint adding, a so-called geometric distance defined in the transformed standard quadratic form of the fluence map optimization model was used to guide the selection of the voxels. The new geometric distance sorting technique can mostly reduce the unexpected increase of the objective function value caused inevitably by the constraint adding. It can be regarded as an upgrading to the traditional dose sorting technique. The geometry explanation for the proposed method is also given and a proposition is proved to support our heuristic idea. In addition, a smart constraint adding/deleting strategy is designed to ensure a stable iteration convergence. The new algorithm is tested on four cases including head-neck, a prostate, a lung and an oropharyngeal, and compared with the algorithm based on the traditional dose sorting technique. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is more suitable for guiding the selection of new constraints than the traditional dose sorting method, especially for the cases whose target regions are in non-convex shapes. It is a more efficient optimization technique to some extent for choosing constraints than the dose

  12. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed connective tissue disease Overview Mixed connective tissue disease has signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders — primarily lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease ...

  13. Fluid mixing III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnby, N.

    1988-01-01

    Covering all aspects of mixing, this work presents research and developments in industrial applications, flow patterns and mixture analysis, mixing of solids into liquids, and mixing of gases into liquids

  14. Thin TaC layer produced by ion mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barna, Árpád; Kotis, László; Pécz, Béla

    2012-01-01

    in strongly asymmetric ion mixing; the carbon was readily transported to the Ta layer, while the reverse process was much weaker. Because of the asymmetrical transport the C/TaC interface remained sharp independently from the applied fluence. The carbon transported to the Ta layer formed Ta......Ion-beam mixing in C/Ta layered systems was investigated. C 8nm/Ta 12nm and C 20nm/Ta 19nm/C 20nm layer systems were irradiated by Ga+ ions of energy in the range of 2–30keV. In case of the 8nm and 20nm thick C cover layers applying 5–8keV and 20–30keV Ga+ ion energy, respectively resulted...

  15. Mixed plastics recycling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hegberg, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of mixed plastics recycling technology. In addition, it characterizes mixed plastics wastes and describes collection methods, costs, and markets for reprocessed plastics products.

  16. High fluence deposition of polyethylene glycol films at 1064 nm by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Kingshott, P.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has been applied for deposition of thin polyethylene glycol (PEG) films with infrared laser light at 1064 nm. We have irradiated frozen targets (of 1 wt.% PEG dissolved in water) and measured the deposition rate in situ with a quartz crystal 2...... microbalance. The laser fluence needed to produce PEG films turned out to be unexpectedly high with a threshold of 9 J/cm(2) and the deposition rate was much lower than that with laser light at 355 nm. Results from matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI......-TOF-MS) analysis demonstrate that the chemistry, molecular weight and polydispersity of the PEG films were identical to the starting material. Studies of the film surface with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicate that the Si-substrate is covered by a relatively homogenous PEG film with few bare spots. (c...

  17. Determination of the fluence profile in three dimension for the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera A, E.; Urena N, F.; Delfin L, A.; Garcia M, T.

    2006-01-01

    In this work the results of the dosimetric properties of the lithium carbonate are presented (detecting), before the thermal neutrons. The process consists on irradiating samples of lithium carbonate in the installation of the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark III reactor, with a controlled period and with time intervals of 20 hours of irradiation. It is necessary to mention that the detectors were placed in different internal positions of the thermal column. With the purpose of being used these results for future studies, like it is the fluence profile in the thermal column. To use the BNCT technique (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). Which is a binary technique that requires the simultaneous presence of a neutron flux with appropriate energy and a neutron captor (10B), those which interacting to attack to the tumor cells without producing significant damage to the tissues when both agents are separated. (Author)

  18. Determination of the Neutron Fluence, the Beam Characteristics and the Backgrounds at the CERN-PS TOF Facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Leal, L C; Kitis, G; Guber, K H; Quaranta, A; Koehler, P E

    2002-01-01

    In the scope of our programme we propose to start in July 2000 with measurements on elements of well known cross sections, in order to check the reliability of the whole experimental installation at the CERN-TOF facility. These initial exploratory measurements will provide the key-parameters required for the further experimentation at the CERN-TOF neutron beam. The neutron fluence and energy resolution will be determined as a function of the neutron kinetic energy by reproducing standard capture and fission cross sections. The measurements of capture cross sections on elements with specific cross section features will allow to us to disentangle the different components of backgrounds and estimate their level in the experimental area. The time-energy calibration will be determined and monitored with a set of monoenergetic filters as well as by the measurements of elements with resonance-dominated cross sections. Finally, in this initial phase the behaviour of several detectors scheduled in successive measureme...

  19. Specific heat of Nb3Sn and V2Zr compounds irradiated with high fluences fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar'kin, A.E.; Mirmel'shtejn, A.V.; Arkhipov, V.E.; Goshchitskij, B.N.

    1987-01-01

    Specific heat of Nb 3 Sn (structure A15) and V 2 Zr (C15) specimens irradiated with high fluences of bast neutrons has been measured. It is shown that in these compounds the temperature reduction of superconducting transition T c under neutron irradiation is accompanied with high decrease of N(E F ). Phonon spectrum of the irradiated V 2 Zr (amorphous phase) on the whole is harder, than at an initial state, for irradiated Nb 3 Sn state (disordered crystalline structure) phonon spectrum is differ weakly from initial one. General regularities of parameter change of electron and phonon subsystems for A15 compounds investigated here and earlier (V 3 Si, Mo 3 Si, Mo 3 Ge) have been analysed

  20. Circuit designs for measuring reactor period, peak power, and pulse fluence on TRIGA and other pulse reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.D.; Thome, F.V.; Williams, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Inexpensive circuits for use in evaluating reactor pulse prompt period, peak power, and pulse fluence (NVT) are presented. In addition to low cost, these circuits are easily assembled and calibrated and operate with a high degree of accuracy. The positive period measuring system has been used in evaluating reactivity additions as small as 5 cents (with an accuracy of ±0.1 cents) and as large as $4.50 (accuracy ±2 cents). Reactor peak power is measured digitally with a system accuracy of ±0.04% of a 10 Volt input (±4 mV). The NVT circuit measures over a 2-1/2 decade range, has 3 place resolution and an accuracy of better than 1%. (author)

  1. Plume splitting and oscillatory behavior in transient plasmas generated by high-fluence laser ablation in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focsa, C.; Gurlui, S.; Nica, P.; Agop, M.; Ziskind, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present a short overview of studies performed in our research groups over the last decade on the characterization of transient plasma plumes generated by laser ablation in various temporal regimes, from nanosecond to femtosecond. New results are also presented along with this overview, both being placed in the context of similar studies performed by other investigators. Optical (fast gate intensified CCD camera imaging and space- and time-resolved emission spectroscopy) and electrical (mainly Langmuir probe) methods have been applied to experimentally explore the dynamics of the plasma plume and its constituents. Peculiar effects as plume splitting and sharpening or oscillations onset have been evidenced in vacuum at high laser fluence. New theoretical approaches have been developed to account for the experimental observations.

  2. Nucleation of point defects in low-fluence ion-implanted GaAs and GaP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesch, W.; Wendler, E.; Gaertner, K.

    1992-01-01

    The defect production due to low-fluence medium-mass ion implantation into GaAs and GaP at room temperature is investigated. In the parameter region analysed weakly damaged layers are created containing point defects and point defects complexes. Temperature dependent channeling measurements show different structures of the damage produced in the two materials. The depth profiles of the near-edge optical absorption coefficient K sufficiently correspond to the profiles of the primarily produced vacancy concentration N vac . The absorption coefficient K(N vac ) determined from the depth profiles of the two magnitudes shows a square root dependence for GaAs, whereas for GaP a linear dependence is found. The differences observed are discussed in the frame of different nucleation mechanisms. (orig.)

  3. Combined Bulk and Surface Radiation Damage Effects at Very High Fluences in Silicon Detectors: Measurements and TCAD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Moscatelli, F; Morozzi, A; Mendicino, R; Dalla Betta, G F; Bilei, G M

    2016-01-01

    In this work we propose a new combined TCAD radiation damage modelling scheme, featuring both bulk and surface radiation damage effects, for the analysis of silicon detectors aimed at the High Luminosity LHC. In particular, a surface damage model has been developed by introducing the relevant parameters (NOX, NIT) extracted from experimental measurements carried out on p-type substrate test structures after gamma irradiations at doses in the range 10-500 Mrad(Si). An extended bulk model, by considering impact ionization and deep-level cross-sections variation, was included as well. The model has been validated through the comparison of the simulation findings with experimental measurements carried out at very high fluences (2×1016 1 MeV equivalent n/cm2) thus fostering the application of this TCAD approach for the design and optimization of the new generation of silicon detectors to be used in future HEP experiments.

  4. Does the fluence map editing in electronic tissue compensator improve dose homogeneity in bilateral field plan of head and neck patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinhikar Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of fluence map editing in electronic tissue compensator (ETC on the dose homogeneity for head and neck cancer patients. Treatment planning using 6-MV X-rays and bilateral field arrangement employing ETC was carried out on the computed tomography (CT datasets of 20 patients with head and neck cancer. All the patients were planned in Varian Eclipse three-dimensional treatment planning system (3DTPS with dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC. The treatment plans, with and without fluence editing, was compared and the effect of pre-editing and post-editing the fluence maps in the treatment field was evaluated. The skin dose was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs and was compared with the skin dose estimated by TPS. The mean percentage volume of the tissue receiving at least 107% of the prescription dose was 5.4 (range 1.5-10; SD 2.4. Post-editing fluence map showed that the mean percentage volume of the tissue receiving at least 107% of the prescription dose was 0.47 (range 0.1-0.9; SD 0.3. The mean skin dose measured with TLD was found to be 74% (range 71-80% of the prescribed dose while the TPS showed the mean skin dose as 85% (range 80-90%. The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 11%. Fluence map editing thus proved to be a potential tool for improving dose homogeneity in head and neck cancer patients planned with ETC, thus reducing the hot spots in the treatment region as well. The treatment with ETC is feasible with DMLC and does not take any additional time for setup or delivery. The method used to edit the fluence maps is simple and time efficient. Manual control over a plan is essential to create the best treatment plan possible.

  5. Bonding structure and mechanical properties of B-C-N thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition at different laser fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.B.; Xiao, J.L.; Shen, Q.; Zhang, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Boron carbon nitride (B-C-N) thin films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition under different laser fluences changing from 1.0 to 3.0 J/cm"2. The influence of laser fluence on microstructure, bonding structure, and mechanical properties of the films was studied, so as to explore the possibility of improving their mechanical properties by controlling bonding structure. The bonding structure identified by FT-IR and XPS indicated the coexistence of B-N, B-C, N-C and N=C bonds in the films, suggesting the formation of a ternary B-C-N hybridization. There is a clear evolution of bonding structure in the B-C-N films with the increasing of laser fluence. The variation of the mechanical properties as a function of laser fluence was also in accordance with the evolution of B-C and sp"3 N-C bonds whereas contrary to that of sp"2 B-N and N=C bonds. The hardness and modulus reached the maximum value of 33.7 GPa and 256 GPa, respectively, at a laser fluence of 3.0 J/cm"2, where the B-C-N thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition possessed the highest intensity of B-C and N-C bonds and the lowest fraction of B-N and N=C bonds. - Highlights: • Improvement of mechanical property by controlling bonding structure is explored. • A clear evolution of bonding structure with the increasing of laser fluence • Variation of property is in accordance with the evolution of B−C and N−C bonds.

  6. Color matters--material ejection and ion yields in UV-MALDI mass spectrometry as a function of laser wavelength and laser fluence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltwisch, Jens; Jaskolla, Thorsten W; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The success of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) as a widely employed analytical tool in the biomolecular sciences builds strongly on an effective laser-material interaction that is resulting in a soft co-desorption and ionization of matrix and imbedded biomolecules. To obtain a maximized ion yield for the analyte(s) of interest, in general both wavelength and fluence need to be tuned to match the specific optical absorption profile of the used matrix. However, commonly only lasers with fixed emission wavelengths of either 337 or 355 nm are used for MALDI-MS. Here, we employed a wavelength-tunable dye laser and recorded both the neutral material ejection and the MS ion data in a wide wavelength and fluence range between 280 and 377.5 nm. α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA), 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA), α-cyano-2,4-difluorocinnamic acid (DiFCCA), and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) were investigated as matrices, and several peptides as analytes. Recording of the material ejection was achieved by adopting a photoacoustic approach. Relative ion yields were derived by division of photoacoustic and ion signals. In this way, distinct wavelength/fluence regions can be identified for which maximum ion yields were obtained. For the tested matrices, optimal results were achieved for wavelengths corresponding to areas of high optical absorption of the respective matrix and at fluences about a factor of 2-3 above the matrix- and wavelength-dependent ion detection threshold fluences. The material ejection as probed by the photoacoustic method is excellently fitted by the quasithermal model, while a sigmoidal function allows for an empirical description of the ion signal-fluence relationship.

  7. Reliable detection of fluence anomalies in EPID-based IMRT pretreatment quality assurance using pixel intensity deviations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, J. J.; Gardner, J. K.; Wang, S.; Siebers, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This work uses repeat images of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields to quantify fluence anomalies (i.e., delivery errors) that can be reliably detected in electronic portal images used for IMRT pretreatment quality assurance. Methods: Repeat images of 11 clinical IMRT fields are acquired on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at energies of 6 MV and 18 MV. Acquired images are corrected for output variations and registered to minimize the impact of linear accelerator and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) positioning deviations. Detection studies are performed in which rectangular anomalies of various sizes are inserted into the images. The performance of detection strategies based on pixel intensity deviations (PIDs) and gamma indices is evaluated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Residual differences between registered images are due to interfraction positional deviations of jaws and multileaf collimator leaves, plus imager noise. Positional deviations produce large intensity differences that degrade anomaly detection. Gradient effects are suppressed in PIDs using gradient scaling. Background noise is suppressed using median filtering. In the majority of images, PID-based detection strategies can reliably detect fluence anomalies of ≥5% in ∼1 mm 2 areas and ≥2% in ∼20 mm 2 areas. Conclusions: The ability to detect small dose differences (≤2%) depends strongly on the level of background noise. This in turn depends on the accuracy of image registration, the quality of the reference image, and field properties. The longer term aim of this work is to develop accurate and reliable methods of detecting IMRT delivery errors and variations. The ability to resolve small anomalies will allow the accuracy of advanced treatment techniques, such as image guided, adaptive, and arc therapies, to be quantified.

  8. Mixing ratio sensor of alcohol mixed fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Shigeru; Matsubara, Yoshihiro

    1987-08-07

    In order to improve combustion efficiency of an internal combustion engine using gasoline-alcohol mixed fuel and to reduce harmful substance in its exhaust gas, it is necessary to control strictly the air-fuel ratio to be supplied and the ignition timing and change the condition of control depending upon the mixing ratio of the mixed fuel. In order to detect the mixing ratio of the mixed fuel, the above mixing ratio has so far been detected by casting a ray of light to the mixed fuel and utilizing a change of critical angle associated with the change of the composition of the fluid of the mixed fuel. However, in case when a light emitting diode is used for the light source above, two kinds of sensors are further needed. Concerning the two kinds of sensors above, this invention offers a mixing ratio sensor for the alcohol mixed fuel which can abolish a temperature sensor to detect the environmental temperature by making a single compensatory light receiving element deal with the compensation of the amount of light emission of the light emitting element due to the temperature change and the compensation of the critical angle caused by the temperature change. (6 figs)

  9. Evidos: optimisation of individual monitoring in mixed neutron/photon fields at workplaces of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Reginatto, M.; Schuhmacher, H.; Lacoste, V.; Muller, M.; Boschung, M.; Fiechtner, A.; Coeck, M.; Vanhavere, F.; Curzio, G.; D'errico, F.; Kyllonen, J.E.; Lindborg, L.; Molinos, C.; Tanner, R.; Derdau, D.; Lahaye, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Within its 5. Framework Programme, the EC is funding the project EVIDOS ('Evaluation of Individual Dosimetry in Mixed Neutron and Photon Radiation Fields'). The aim of this project is the optimisation of individual monitoring at workplaces of the nuclear fuel cycle with special regard to neutrons. Various dosemeters for mixed field application - passive and new electronic devices - are tested in selected workplace fields in nuclear installations in Europe. The fields are characterised using a series of spectrometers that provide the energy distribution of neutron fluence (Bonner spheres) and newly developed devices that provide the energy and directional distribution of the neutron fluence. Results from the first measurement campaign, carried out in simulated workplace fields (IRSN, Cadarache. France), and those of a second measurement campaign, carried out at workplaces at a boiling water reactor and at a storage cask with used fuel elements (Kernkraftwerk Kriimmel, Germany), are described. (authors)

  10. Continuous mixing of solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raouf, M.S.

    1963-01-01

    The most important literature on theoretical aspects of mixing solids was reviewed.

    Only when the mixed materials showed no segregation it was possible to analyse the mixing process quantitatively. In this case the mixture could be described by the 'χ' Square test. Longitudinal mixing could be

  11. European mixed forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bravo-Oviedo, Andres; Pretzsch, Hans; Ammer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Aim of study: We aim at (i) developing a reference definition of mixed forests in order to harmonize comparative research in mixed forests and (ii) review the research perspectives in mixed forests. Area of study: The definition is developed in Europe but can be tested worldwide. Material...... and Methods: Review of existent definitions of mixed forests based and literature review encompassing dynamics, management and economic valuation of mixed forests. Main results: A mixed forest is defined as a forest unit, excluding linear formations, where at least two tree species coexist at any...... density in mixed forests, (iii) conversion of monocultures to mixed-species forest and (iv) economic valuation of ecosystem services provided by mixed forests. Research highlights: The definition is considered a high-level one which encompasses previous attempts to define mixed forests. Current fields...

  12. Atomic mixing of metallic bilayers Ni/Ti irradiated with high energy heavy ions; Etude du melange ionique de bicouches metalliques Ni/Ti irradiees avec des ions lourds de haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguay, R

    1994-09-26

    We have studied the ionic mixing of Nl(105 angstrom) bilayers irradiated, at 80 and 300 K. with GeV heavy ions. In this energy range, the energy transfer from the incident ions to the target occurs mainly through electronic excitations. We have shown that this energy transfer induces a strong ionic mixing at the Nl/Ti interface. The thickness of the mixed interlayer increases with the fluence. At low fluences (10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}), the Nl/Ti interface is rough ; at higher fluences (10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) a homogeneous mixed interlayer appears ; and at even higher fluences (some 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) a preferential diffusion of Ni into Ti is clearly seen. The characterization techniques used are: (1) electrical resistivity measurements which allow to follow in situ the damage kinetic. (II) neutron and X-ray reflectometry. (III) elaboration of transverse cuts on which was performed energy loss spectroscopy. (II) and (III) allow the determination of the concentration profiles of the different species present in the sample. (IV) transmission electron microscopy on the transverse cuts which gives a direct image of the different layers. (author). 11 refs., 103 figs., 23 tabs., 2 appends.

  13. Structure and morphologies of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquid: Effects of temperature and energy fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillén, G. García; Palma, M.I. Mendivil [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455 (Mexico); Krishnan, B. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455 (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León – Centro de Innovación, Investigación y Desarrollo de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Apodaca, Nuevo León 66600 (Mexico); Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Roy, T.K. Das [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León 66455 (Mexico); and others

    2015-07-15

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a zinc metal target at different water temperatures (room temperature, 50, 70 and 90 °C). Ablation was carried out using 532 nm output from a pulsed (10 ns, 10 Hz) Nd:YAG laser at three different laser fluence. Analysis of the morphology, crystalline phase, elemental composition, optical and luminescent properties were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. TEM analysis showed that a change in temperature resulted in ZnO and Zn(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles with different sizes and morphologies. XPS results confirmed the compositions and chemical states of these nanoparticles. These zinc nanomaterials showed emission in the ultraviolet (UV) and blue regions. The results of this work demonstrated that by varying the liquid medium temperature, the structure, composition, morphology and optical properties of the nanomaterials could be modified during pulsed laser ablation in liquid. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Zinc nanomaterial colloids were synthesized by PLAL. • Effects of laser fluence and the distilled water temperature were analyzed. • The final structure varied with the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • The morphology was dependent on the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • Zinc nanocolloids showed emission in the UV and blue region.

  14. Size properties of colloidal nanoparticles produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation and studying the effects of liquid medium and laser fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Fattahi, Behzad

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Colloidal aluminum- and titanium-based nanoparticles fabricated by laser ablation. • Various liquid environments and laser fluences were applied as variable parameters. • Physical characteristics of liquid medium influence ablation process and nanoparticle formation. • Size properties of prepared nanoparticles depend on liquid medium and laser fluence. • Ablation of both metals in ethanol results in nanoparticles with smaller size. - Abstract: In this paper, pulsed laser ablation method was used for synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles of aluminum and titanium targets in distilled water, ethanol, and acetone as liquid environments. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) absorption spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for characterization of produced nanoparticles. Using image processing technique and analyzing the SEM images, nanoparticles’ mean size and size distribution were achieved. The results show that liquid medium has strong effect on size properties of produced nanoparticles. From the results, it was found that ablation of both metal targets in ethanol medium leads to formation of smaller size nanoparticles with narrower size distributions. The influence of laser fluence was also investigated. According to the results, higher laser fluence produces larger mean size nanoparticles with broader size distribution

  15. Fluence dependence of the ultraviolet-light-induced accumulation of chalcone synthase mRNA and effects of blue and far-red light in cultured parsley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, B.; Hahlbrock, K.; Schäfer, E.

    1986-01-01

    The fluence dependence of the time course of accumulation of chalcone synthase mRNA in ultraviolet (UV)-light-irradiated cell suspension cultures of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) and the additional effects of blue and far-red light have been investigated. Variations of the UV fluence had no detectable influence on the initial rate of increase in mRNA amount or translational activity, nor on the preceding lag period of approximately 3 h, but strongly influenced the duration of the transient increase. The effects were the same whether the fluence rate or the time of irradiation was varied to obtain a given fluence. Blue-light pretreatment of the cells resulted in increased amounts of mRNA and abolished the apparent lag period. This effect remained cryptic without the subsequent UV-light treatment. Irradiation with long-wavelength far-red light following UV-light pulses shortened the duration of the mRNA accumulation period. This effect was not altered by a preceding blue-light treatment. Thus, three photoreceptors, a UV-B receptor, a blue-light receptor and phytochrome, participate in the regulation of chalcone synthase mRNA accumulation in this system

  16. Structure and morphologies of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquid: Effects of temperature and energy fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillén, G. García; Palma, M.I. Mendivil; Krishnan, B.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Roy, T.K. Das

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a zinc metal target at different water temperatures (room temperature, 50, 70 and 90 °C). Ablation was carried out using 532 nm output from a pulsed (10 ns, 10 Hz) Nd:YAG laser at three different laser fluence. Analysis of the morphology, crystalline phase, elemental composition, optical and luminescent properties were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. TEM analysis showed that a change in temperature resulted in ZnO and Zn(OH) 2 nanoparticles with different sizes and morphologies. XPS results confirmed the compositions and chemical states of these nanoparticles. These zinc nanomaterials showed emission in the ultraviolet (UV) and blue regions. The results of this work demonstrated that by varying the liquid medium temperature, the structure, composition, morphology and optical properties of the nanomaterials could be modified during pulsed laser ablation in liquid. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Zinc nanomaterial colloids were synthesized by PLAL. • Effects of laser fluence and the distilled water temperature were analyzed. • The final structure varied with the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • The morphology was dependent on the distilled water temperature and laser fluence. • Zinc nanocolloids showed emission in the UV and blue region

  17. Quantitative assessment of growing hair counts, thickness and colour during and after treatments with a low-fluence, home-device laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Petersen, D; Barbet-Pfeilsticker, M; Beerwerth, F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At-home laser and intense pulsed-light hair removal continues to grow in popularity and availability. A relatively limited body of evidence is available on the course of hair growth during and after low-fluence laser usage. OBJECTIVES: To assess growing hair counts, thickness and colo...

  18. Size properties of colloidal nanoparticles produced by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation and studying the effects of liquid medium and laser fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: mahdm@iust.ac.ir; Fattahi, Behzad

    2015-02-28

    Highlights: • Colloidal aluminum- and titanium-based nanoparticles fabricated by laser ablation. • Various liquid environments and laser fluences were applied as variable parameters. • Physical characteristics of liquid medium influence ablation process and nanoparticle formation. • Size properties of prepared nanoparticles depend on liquid medium and laser fluence. • Ablation of both metals in ethanol results in nanoparticles with smaller size. - Abstract: In this paper, pulsed laser ablation method was used for synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles of aluminum and titanium targets in distilled water, ethanol, and acetone as liquid environments. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) absorption spectrophotometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for characterization of produced nanoparticles. Using image processing technique and analyzing the SEM images, nanoparticles’ mean size and size distribution were achieved. The results show that liquid medium has strong effect on size properties of produced nanoparticles. From the results, it was found that ablation of both metal targets in ethanol medium leads to formation of smaller size nanoparticles with narrower size distributions. The influence of laser fluence was also investigated. According to the results, higher laser fluence produces larger mean size nanoparticles with broader size distribution.

  19. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla [Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (DCCI) - University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage - National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage - National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A set of a secco model samples was prepared using white lead and four different organic binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). • The samples were irradiated with low-fluence UV laser pulses (0.1–1 mJ/cm{sup 2}). • The effects of laser irradiation were analysed by using different techniques. • The analysis did not point out changes due to low-fluence laser irradiation. • High fluence (88 mJ/cm{sup 2}) laser radiation instead yielded a chromatic change ascribed to the inorganic component. - Abstract: Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2}–1 mJ/cm{sup 2} on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after

  20. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Galeotti, Monica; Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A set of a secco model samples was prepared using white lead and four different organic binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). • The samples were irradiated with low-fluence UV laser pulses (0.1–1 mJ/cm 2 ). • The effects of laser irradiation were analysed by using different techniques. • The analysis did not point out changes due to low-fluence laser irradiation. • High fluence (88 mJ/cm 2 ) laser radiation instead yielded a chromatic change ascribed to the inorganic component. - Abstract: Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm 2 –1 mJ/cm 2 on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm 2 and 1 mJ/cm 2 and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after irradiation in the proposed