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Sample records for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy

  1. Genetics Home Reference: mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens ... JA, Hirano M. Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy and thymidine metabolism: results and hypotheses. Mitochondrion. 2002 Nov;2(1- ...

  2. MITOCHONDRIAL NEUROGASTROINTESTINAL ENCEPHALOMYOPATHY (MNGIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ayatollahi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalo-myopathy (MNGIE is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by thymidine phosphorylase (TP gene mutation. Here we report a patient with MNGIE in whom sensorimotor polyneuropathy was the first presenting symptom and had a fluctuating course. This 26-year-old female patient developed acute-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy from the age of 6 with two relapses later on. In addition, she had gastrointestinal symptoms (diarrhea, recurrent abdominal pain, progressive weight loss and ophthalmoparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed white matter abnormalities, and muscle biopsy showed ragged red fibers. This constellation of clinical and laboratory findings raised the diagnosis of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE. This report highlights the uncommon clinical characteristics of this rare disease.

  3. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halter, Joerg P.; Schuepbach, W. Michael M.; Mandel, Hanna; Casali, Carlo; Orchard, Kim; Collin, Matthew; Valcarcel, David; Rovelli, Attilio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Dotti, Maria T.; Marotta, Giuseppe; Pintos, Guillem; Barba, Pere; Accarino, Anna; Ferra, Christelle; Illa, Isabel; Beguin, Yves; Bakker, Jaap A.; Boelens, Jaap J.; de Coo, Irenaeus F. M.; Fay, Keith; Sue, Carolyn M.; Nachbaur, David; Zoller, Heinz; Sobreira, Claudia; Simoes, Belinda Pinto; Hammans, Simon R.; Savage, David; Marti, Ramon; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Elhasid, Ronit; Gratwohl, Alois; Hirano, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been proposed as treatment for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, a rare fatal autosomal recessive disease due to TYMP mutations that result in thymidine phosphorylase deficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all known

  4. Mitochondrial Neurogastrointestinal Encephalomyopathy Presenting as Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaria, Francesco; De Crescenzo, Franco; Caramadre, Anna Maria; D'Amico, Adele; Diamanti, Antonella; Fattori, Fabiana; Casini, Maria Pia; Vicari, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a rare multisystemic autosomal recessive disorder mainly caused by mutations in the nuclear gene TYMP, encoding thymidine phosphorylase. It generally appears in childhood and is clinically characterized by severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, cachexia, ptosis, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, peripheral neuropathy, and diffuse leukoencephalopathy on brain magnetic resonance imaging. The disease is clinically heterogeneous with the main symptoms being gastrointestinal, with an important weight loss. Symptoms might worsen rapidly, and a timely diagnosis is vital. However, patients report retrospectively their first symptoms before the age of 12 years, but the delay in diagnosis varies from 5 to 10 years. In the present study, we report a case of an adolescent with MNGIE, which was initially, and erroneously, diagnosed as anorexia nervosa. To make a timely and accurate differential diagnosis, we will discuss the clinical differences and similarities between MNGIE and anorexia nervosa and the importance of a multidisciplinary evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential diagnosis of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. First clinical description in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kurbatov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy syndrome (MNGIE is a rare autosomal recessive progressive multisystem disorder. Most of MNGIE is caused by mutations in the gene encoding thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP, locus 22q13. Mitochondrial dysfunction represents multiple deletions and depletion of mtDNA. We present a case of MNGIE with a novel mutation in the position c.1001T>G of TYMP gene, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, decrement of compound muscle action potential following repetitive nerve stimulation on EMG which was not previously described in literature and differential diagnoses MNGIE with other conditions.

  6. Mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations underlie fatal infantile Alpers encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elo, Jenni M; Yadavalli, Srujana S; Euro, Liliya

    2012-01-01

    was impaired. Our results imply that the three FARS2 mutations directly impair aminoacylation function and stability of mtPheRS, leading to a decrease in overall tRNA charging capacity. This study establishes a new genetic cause of infantile mitochondrial Alpers encephalopathy and reports a new mitochondrial...

  7. When should MELAS (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes) be the diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Werneck, Lineu Cesar; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo Soares; Scola, Rosana Herminia

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a rare mitochondrial disorder. Diagnostic criteria for MELAS include typical manifestations of the disease: stroke-like episodes, encephalopathy, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction (laboratorial or histological) and known mitochondrial DNA gene mutations. Clinical features of MELAS are not necessarily uniform in the early stages of the disease, and correlations between clinical manifestations and physiopathology have not been fully elucidated. It is estimated that point mutations in the tRNALeu(UUR) gene of the DNAmt, mainly A3243G, are responsible for more of 80% of MELAS cases. Morphological changes seen upon muscle biopsy in MELAS include a substantive proportion of ragged red fibers (RRF) and the presence of vessels with a strong reaction for succinate dehydrogenase. In this review, we discuss mainly diagnostic criterion, clinical and laboratory manifestations, brain images, histology and molecular findings as well as some differential diagnoses and current treatments.

  8. Computed tomography and angiography in MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasuo, K.; Tamura, S.; Yasumori, K.; Uchino, A.; Masuda, K.; Goda, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Kamikaseda, K.; Wakuta, Y.; Kishi, M.

    1987-01-01

    Among mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes, Pavlakis et al., 1983) is recognized as a distinct syndrome characterized by generalized convulsions and recurrrent stroke-like episodes. The neuroradiological findings of three patients with MELAS are reported here. Retrospective review shows that MELAS should be included in the differential diagnosis of infarct-like lesions of the cerebrum. (orig.)

  9. Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laila Selim

    2013-04-12

    Apr 12, 2013 ... heteroplasmic A3243G mutation was detected in the blood of the patient and his mother. .... mitochondrial defects, such as lactic acidosis or Ragged Red ..... [48] Pulkes T, Eunson L, Patterson V, Siddiqui A, Wood NW, Nelson.

  10. Biallelic Mutations in LIPT2 Cause a Mitochondrial Lipoylation Defect Associated with Severe Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habarou, Florence; Hamel, Yamina; Haack, Tobias B; Feichtinger, René G; Lebigot, Elise; Marquardt, Iris; Busiah, Kanetee; Laroche, Cécile; Madrange, Marine; Grisel, Coraline; Pontoizeau, Clément; Eisermann, Monika; Boutron, Audrey; Chrétien, Dominique; Chadefaux-Vekemans, Bernadette; Barouki, Robert; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Goudin, Nicolas; Boddaert, Nathalie; Nemazanyy, Ivan; Delahodde, Agnès; Kölker, Stefan; Rodenburg, Richard J; Korenke, G Christoph; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Prokisch, Holger; Rotig, Agnes; Ottolenghi, Chris; Mayr, Johannes A; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2017-08-03

    Lipoate serves as a cofactor for the glycine cleavage system (GCS) and four 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases functioning in energy metabolism (α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase [α-KGDHc] and pyruvate dehydrogenase [PDHc]), or amino acid metabolism (branched-chain oxoacid dehydrogenase, 2-oxoadipate dehydrogenase). Mitochondrial lipoate synthesis involves three enzymatic steps catalyzed sequentially by lipoyl(octanoyl) transferase 2 (LIPT2), lipoic acid synthetase (LIAS), and lipoyltransferase 1 (LIPT1). Mutations in LIAS have been associated with nonketotic hyperglycinemia-like early-onset convulsions and encephalopathy combined with a defect in mitochondrial energy metabolism. LIPT1 deficiency spares GCS deficiency and has been associated with a biochemical signature of combined 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase deficiency leading to early death or Leigh-like encephalopathy. We report on the identification of biallelic LIPT2 mutations in three affected individuals from two families with severe neonatal encephalopathy. Brain MRI showed major cortical atrophy with white matter abnormalities and cysts. Plasma glycine was mildly increased. Affected individuals' fibroblasts showed reduced oxygen consumption rates, PDHc, α-KGDHc activities, leucine catabolic flux, and decreased protein lipoylation. A normalization of lipoylation was observed after expression of wild-type LIPT2, arguing for LIPT2 requirement in intramitochondrial lipoate synthesis. Lipoic acid supplementation did not improve clinical condition nor activities of PDHc, α-KGDHc, or leucine metabolism in fibroblasts and was ineffective in yeast deleted for the orthologous LIP2. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment options for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa, Kristin M

    2010-11-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disease caused by the decreased ability of cells to produce sufficient energy in the form of adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Although it is one of the most common maternally inherited mitochondrial disorders, its exact incidence is unknown. Caused most frequently by an A-to-G point mutation at the 3243 position in the mitochondrial DNA, MELAS syndrome has a broad range of clinical manifestations and a highly variable course. The classic neurologic characteristics include encephalopathy, seizures, and stroke-like episodes. In addition to its neurologic manifestations, MELAS syndrome exhibits multisystem effects including cardiac conduction defects, diabetes mellitus, short stature, myopathy, and gastrointestinal disturbances. Unfortunately, no consensus guidelines outlining standard drug regimens exist for this syndrome. Many of the accepted therapies used in treating MELAS syndrome have been identified through a small number of clinical trials or isolated case reports. Currently, the drugs most often used include antioxidants and various vitamins aimed at minimizing the demands on the mitochondria and supporting and maximizing their function. Some of the most frequently prescribed agents include coenzyme Q(10), l-arginine, B vitamins, and levocarnitine. Although articles describing MELAS syndrome are available, few specifically target education for clinical pharmacists. This article will provide pharmacists with a practical resource to enhance their understanding of MELAS syndrome in order to provide safe and effective pharmaceutical care.

  12. Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactate acidosis with stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Igor N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactacidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS represent a multisystemic dysfunction due to various mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Here we report a patient with genetically confirmed MELAS. Case Outline. A patient is presented whose clinical features involved short stature, easy tendency to fatigue, recurrent seizures, progressive cognitive decline, myopathy, sensorineural deafness, diabetes mellitus as well as stroke-like episodes. The major clinical feature of migraine type headache was not present. Neuroimaging studies revealed signs of ischemic infarctions localized in the posterior regions of the brain cortex. Electron microscopy of the skeletal muscle biopsy showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of a large number of mitochondria with paracristal inclusions in the skeletal muscle cells. The diagnosis of MELAS was definitively confirmed by the detection of a specific point mutation A to G at nucleotide position 3243 of mitochondrial DNA. Conclusion. When a relatively young patient without common risk factors for ischemic stroke presents with signs of occipitally localized brain infarctions accompanied with multisystemic dysfunction, MELAS syndrome, it is necessary to conduct investigations in order to diagnose the disease.

  13. Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes: basic concepts, clinical phenotype, and therapeutic management of MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, Douglas M; Kaufmann, Petra

    2008-10-01

    Since the initial description almost 25 years ago, the syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes (MELAS) has been a useful model to study the complex interplay of factors that define mitochondrial disease. This syndrome, most commonly caused by an A-to-G transition mutation at position 3243 of the mitochondrial genome, is typified by characteristic neurological manifestations including seizures, encephalopathy, and strokelike episodes, as well as other frequent secondary manifestations including short stature, cognitive impairment, migraines, depression, cardiomyopathy, cardiac conduction defects, and diabetes mellitus. In this review, we discuss the history, pathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnostic and management strategies of mitochondrial disease in general and of MELAS in particular. We explore features of mitochondrial genetics, including the concepts of heteroplasmy, mitotic segregation, and threshold effect, as a basis for understanding the variability and complicated inheritance patterns seen with this group of diseases. We also describe systemic manifestations of MELAS-associated mutations, including cardiac, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and endothelial abnormalities and pathology, as well as the hypothetical role of derangements to COX enzymatic function in driving the unique pathology and clinical manifestations of MELAS. Although therapeutic options for MELAS and other mitochondrial diseases remain limited, and recent trials have been disappointing, we also consider current and potential therapeutic modalities.

  14. Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) may respond to adjunctive ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steriade, Claude; Andrade, Danielle M; Faghfoury, Hanna; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Tai, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome can present management challenges. Refractory seizures and stroke-like episodes leading to disability are common. We analyzed the clinical, electrophysiologic, and radiologic data of a 22-year-old woman with multiple episodes of generalized and focal status epilepticus and migratory cortical stroke-like lesions who underwent muscle biopsy for mitochondrial genome sequencing. Although initial mitochondrial genetic testing was negative, muscle biopsy demonstrated a mitochondrial DNA disease-causing mutation (m.3260A > G). New antiepileptic medications were added with each episode of focal status epilepticus with only temporary improvement, until a modified ketogenic diet and magnesium were introduced, leading to seizure freedom despite development of a new stroke-like lesion, and subsequent decrease in frequency of stroke-like episodes. We propose a metabolic model in which the ketogenic diet may lead to improvement of the function of respiratory chain complexes. The ketogenic diet may lead to improvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in MELAS, which in turn may promote better seizure control and less frequent stroke-like episodes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Atypical Strokes in a Young African American Male: A Case of Mitochondrial Encephalopathy Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jully M.; Tan, Judy Ann; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Aggarwal, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare but important cause of stroke-like symptoms which can often be missed Thambisetty and Newman 2004. We describe a case of a young male presenting with stroke-like episodes, later diagnosed with MELAS in an attempt to improve the understanding about diagnosing MELAS in the appropriate clinical context. PMID:21789268

  16. Anesthetic Management of Mitochondrial Encephalopathy With Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS Syndrome) in a High-Risk Pregnancy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Josh D; Higgie, Kushlin; Joshi, Mital; Rucker, Joshua; Farzi, Sahar; Siddiqui, Naveed

    2017-07-15

    MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like symptoms) is a rare and complex mitochondrial disorder. We present the in-hospital course of a 36-year-old gravida 2, para 0 with MELAS syndrome and severe preeclampsia, complicated by hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and diabetes. A retained placenta with postpartum hemorrhage required urgent instrumental delivery under spinal anesthesia, transfusion, and intensive care unit admission for pulmonary edema, effusions, and atelectasis. Postpartum endometritis and sepsis also were encountered. This is to our knowledge the first case report of obstetric complications in MELAS syndrome and highlights the salient metabolic sequelae of this syndrome.

  17. [Ubiquinone: metabolism and functions. Ubiquinone deficiency and its implication in mitochondrial encephalopathies. Treatment with ubiquinone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artuch, R; Colomé, C; Vilaseca, M A; Pineda, M; Campistol, J

    Review of ubiquinone-10 metabolism and functions in humans, focusing its implication in the pathogenesis and physiopathology of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. Ubiquinone-10 is an endogenously synthesized lipid with a wide distribution in tissues. Tyrosine and acetil-CoA are involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis. This molecule has several biological functions in cells: it is a movil electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and also acts as antioxidant. Owing to its implication in these functions, ubiquinone deficiency may cause important deletereous effects in tissues. Several authors reported ubiquinone deficient status in some physiological and pathological conditions. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies may be related to a primary or secondary ubiquinone deficient status, or even to an altered function of ubiquinone in the respiratory chain. Moreover, some relevant aspects about ubiquinone therapy in mitochondrial disorders are reported. According to recent reports about ubiquinone implication in several diseases, its determination in different biological samples seems very useful to elucidate the physiopathological mechanisms involved and even the to start a therapy in cases with ubiquinone deficiency.

  18. Diffusion and Perfusion Characteristics of MELAS (Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-Like Episode) in Thirteen Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Eo, Hong; Yoo, So Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Rha, Jung Ho; Shu, Chang Hae

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the diffusion and perfusion characteristics of acute MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode) lesions in a large series to investigate the controversial changes of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) that were reported in prior studies. We analyzed 44 newly appearing lesions during 28 stroke-like episodes in 13 patients with MELAS. We performed a visual assessment of the MR images including the ADC and perfusion maps, comparison of the ADC between the normal and abnormal areas, comparison of % ADC between the 44 MELAS lesions and the 30 acute ischemic infarcts. In addition, the patterns of evolution on follow-up MR images were analyzed. Decreased, increased, and normal ADCs were noted in 16 (36%), 16 (36%), and 12 (27%) lesions, respectively. The mean % ADC was 102 ± 40.9% in the MELAS and 64 ± 17.8% in the acute vascular infarcts (p < 0.001), while perfusion imaging demonstrated hyper-perfusion in six acute MELAS lesions. On follow-up images, resolution, progression, and tissue loss were noted in 10, 4, and 17 lesions, respectively. The cytotoxic edema gradually evolves following an acute stroke-like episode in patients with MELAS, and this may overlap with hyper-perfusion and vasogenic edema. The edematous swelling may be reversible or it may evolve to encephalomalacia, suggesting irreversible damage

  19. Diffusion and Perfusion Characteristics of MELAS (Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-Like Episode) in Thirteen Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Rha, Jung Ho; Eo, Hong; Yoo, So-Young; Shu, Chang Hae

    2011-01-01

    Objective We analyzed the diffusion and perfusion characteristics of acute MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode) lesions in a large series to investigate the controversial changes of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) that were reported in prior studies. Materials and Methods We analyzed 44 newly appearing lesions during 28 stroke-like episodes in 13 patients with MELAS. We performed a visual assessment of the MR images including the ADC and perfusion maps, comparison of the ADC between the normal and abnormal areas, comparison of % ADC between the 44 MELAS lesions and the 30 acute ischemic infarcts. In addition, the patterns of evolution on follow-up MR images were analyzed. Results Decreased, increased, and normal ADCs were noted in 16 (36%), 16 (36%), and 12 (27%) lesions, respectively. The mean % ADC was 102 ± 40.9% in the MELAS and 64 ± 17.8% in the acute vascular infarcts (p MELAS lesions. On follow-up images, resolution, progression, and tissue loss were noted in 10, 4, and 17 lesions, respectively. Conclusion The cytotoxic edema gradually evolves following an acute stroke-like episode in patients with MELAS, and this may overlap with hyper-perfusion and vasogenic edema. The edematous swelling may be reversible or it may evolve to encephalomalacia, suggesting irreversible damage. PMID:21228936

  20. Two siblings with early infantile myoclonic encephalopathy due to mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial glutamate/H+ symporter SLC25A22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Rony; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassah; Halevy, Ayelet; Shuper, Avinoam; Feingold-Zadok, Michal; Behar, Doron M; Straussberg, Rachel

    2014-11-01

    To characterize a new subset of early myoclonic encephalopathy usually associated with metabolic etiologies with a new genetic entity. We describe two siblings with early myoclonic encephalopathy born to consanguineous parents of Arab Muslim origin from Israel. We used homozygosity mapping and candidate gene sequencing to reveal the genetic basis of the myoclonic syndrome. We found a rare missense mutation in the gene encoding one of the two mitochondrial glutamate/H symporters, SLC25A22. The phenotype of early myoclonic encephalopathy was first linked to the same mutation in 2005 in patients of the same ethnicity as our family. Owing to the devastating nature of this encephalopathy, we focus attention on its clinical history, epileptic semiology, distinct electroencephalography features, and genetic basis. We provide the evidence that an integrated diagnostic strategy combining homozygosity mapping with candidate gene sequencing is efficient in consanguineous families with highly heterogeneous autosomal recessive diseases. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Donate Today Enroll in 123 What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary ...

  2. Adult-onset of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome presenting as acute meningoencephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Fu-Chi; Perng, Cherng-Lih; Tso, An-Chen; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Hsu, Chang-Hung

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a rare mitochondrial disorder with a wide range of multisystemic symptoms. Epileptic seizures are common features of both MELAS and meningoencephalitis and are typically treated with anticonvulsants. To provide the reader with a better understanding of MELAS and the adverse effects of valproic acid. A 47-year-old man with a history of diabetes, hearing loss, sinusitis, and otitis media was brought to our emergency department due to acute onset of fever, headache, generalized seizure, and agitation. Because acute meningoencephalitis was suspected, the patient was treated with antibiotics on an empirical basis. The seizure activity was aggravated by valproic acid and abated after its discontinuation. MELAS was suspected and the diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of a nucleotide 3243 A→G mutation in the mitochondrial DNA. Detailed history-taking and systematic review help emergency physicians differentiate MELAS from meningoencephalitis in patients with the common presentation of epileptic seizures. Use of valproic acid to treat epilepsy in patients suspected of having mitochondrial disease should be avoided. Underlying mitochondrial disease should be suspected if seizure activity worsens with valproic acid therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is Important The Connection Between HE and Liver ... Why it’s Important to Treat HE Symptoms of Liver Failure Glossary of terms ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy ...

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is Important The Connection Between HE and Liver ... Why it’s Important to Treat HE Symptoms of Liver Failure Glossary of terms ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy ...

  5. Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy in an STXBP1 Patient with Lactic Acidemia and Normal Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of clinical findings have been associated with mutations in Syntaxin Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1, including multiple forms of epilepsy, nonsyndromic intellectual disability, and movement disorders. STXBP1 mutations have recently been associated with mitochondrial pathology, although it remains unclear if this phenotype is a part of the core feature for this gene disorder. We report a 7-year-old boy who presented for diagnostic evaluation of intractable epilepsy, episodic ataxia, resting tremor, and speech regression following a period of apparently normal early development. Mild lactic acidemia was detected on one occasion at the time of an intercurrent illness. Due to the concern for mitochondrial disease, ophthalmologic evaluation was performed that revealed bilateral midperiphery pigmentary mottling. Optical coherence tomography (OCT testing demonstrated a bilaterally thickened ganglion cell layer in the perifovea. Skeletal muscle biopsy analysis showed no mitochondrial abnormalities or respiratory chain dysfunction. Exome sequencing identified a de novo c.1651C>T (p.R551C mutation in STXBP1. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported in some individuals, our proband had only mild lactic acidemia and no skeletal muscle tissue evidence of mitochondrial disease pathology. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is not an obligate feature of STXBP1 disease.

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... that can be corrected . It may also occur as part of a chronic problem from liver disease ... worse over time. Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ...

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... OVERVIEW Donate Now Join an Event Volunteer Your Time The Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate ... problem from liver disease that gets worse over time. Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy ...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy ( ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy ( ...

  9. Bilirubin encephalopathy

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    Bilirubin encephalopathy is a rare neurological condition that occurs in some newborns with severe jaundice . ... Bilirubin encephalopathy (BE) is caused by very high levels of bilirubin. Bilirubin is a yellow pigment that is created ...

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Now Hepatic Encephalopathy Back Hepatic Encephalopathy is a brain disorder that develops in some individuals with liver ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ...

  11. Measurement of the apparent diffusion coefficient in paediatric mitochondrial encephalopathy cases and a comparison of parenchymal changes associated with the disease using follow-up diffusion coefficient measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uysal, Fatma, E-mail: afatmauysal@gmail.com [Dokuz Eylül University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Izmir (Turkey); Çakmakçı, Handan, E-mail: handan.cakmakci@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylül University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Izmir (Turkey); Yiş, Uluç, E-mail: ulucyis@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylül University, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Izmir (Turkey); Ellidokuz, Hülya, E-mail: hulyaellidokuz@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylül University, Department of Medical Statistics, Izmir (Turkey); Hız, Ayşe Semra, E-mail: aysesemrahiz@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eylül University, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Izmir (Turkey)

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: To reveal the contribution of MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to the diagnosis of mitochondrial encephalopathy (ME) and to evaluate the parenchymal changes associated with this disease in the involved parenchymal areas using the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) parameter. Methods: Ten patients who had undergone MRI and DWI analysis with a pre-diagnosis of neurometabolic disease, and who were subsequently diagnosed with ME in laboratory and/or genetic studies, were included in our study. ADC values were compared with a control group composed of 20 patients of similar age with normal brains. Evaluations involved measurements made in 20 different areas determined on the ADC map. The dominance or contribution of ADC coefficient measurements to the conventional sequences was compared with the controls. Results: In the first examination, an increase in both diffusion and ADC values was detected in six cases and diffusion restriction and a decrease in ADC values in three patients. While an increase in both diffusion and ADC values was demonstrated in four cases, there was diffusion restriction and a decrease in ADC values in three cases in the control examinations. Conclusions: DWI provides information that complements conventional MRI sequences in the diagnosis of ME.

  12. Metabolic encephalopathy and lipid storage myopathy associated with a presumptive mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defect in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa R Biegen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A 1-year-old spayed female Shih Tzu presented for episodic abnormalities of posture and mentation. Neurologic examination was consistent with a bilaterally symmetric multifocal encephalopathy. The dog had a waxing-and-waning hyperlactemia and hypoglycemia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilaterally symmetric cavitated lesions of the caudate nuclei with less severe abnormalities in the cerebellar nuclei. Empirical therapy was unsuccessful and the patient was euthanized. Post-mortem histopathology revealed bilaterally symmetric necrotic lesions of the caudate and cerebellar nuclei and multi-organ lipid accumulation, including a lipid storage myopathy. Malonic aciduria and ketonuria were found on urinary organic acid screen. Plasma acylcarnitine analysis suggested a fatty acid oxidation defect. Fatty acid oxidation disorders are inborn errors of metabolism documented in humans, but poorly described in dogs. Although neurologic signs have been described in humans with this group of diseases, descriptions of advanced imaging and histopathology are severely lacking. This report suggests that abnormalities of fatty acid metabolism may cause severe, bilateral gray matter necrosis and lipid accumulation in multiple organs including the skeletal muscles, liver, and kidneys. Veterinarians should be aware that fatty acid oxidation disorders, although potentially fatal, may be treatable. A timely definitive diagnosis is essential in guiding therapy.

  13. Improvement in symptoms of the syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like symptoms (MELAS) following treatment with sympathomimetic amines--possible implications for improving fecundity in women of advanced reproductive age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potestio, C P; Check, J H; Mitchell-Williams, J

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of sympathomimetic amine therapy on a mitochondrial abnormality known as the mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and stroke-like symptoms syndrome (MELAS syndrome). Dextroamphetamine sulfate 15 mg extended release capsule was prescribed to a woman with a 25 year history of MELAS syndrome refractory to most other therapies. Within one month of therapy the woman noticed considerable improvement in her chronic fatigue, pain, and edema. The MELAS syndrome is thus another condition to add to the list of various chronic refractory disorders that improve considerably after dextroamphetamine therapy. This is the first mitochondrial disorder shown to improve with sympathomimetic amines which could suggest that dextroamphetamine could prove useful in decreasing the risk of aneuploidy in women of advanced reproductive age.

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plan Long-Term Considerations Patient Support Finding Support Services Peer Support Groups Financial Assistance Support for My ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ...

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... to continue to work to my full capacity? Will I be able to drive? Patient Stories Angie M. Caregiver for Brother Charles DiAngelo Hepatic Encephalopathy Jason Dedmon Alcohol-related Cirrhosis ...

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... your body when your liver isn’t working well, it may affect your brain and cause HE. ... it apparent that the liver is not doing well. These could be the symptoms of Hepatic Encephalopathy ( ...

  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... bad. It sends the good things – such as vitamins and nutrients – into your bloodstream for your body ... for Wife Joyce O. Caregiver for Mother Lynette K. Hepatic Encephalopathy Samantha W. Caregiver for Husband Stan ...

  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if ... with continuous treatment, HE can usually be controlled. So it’s important to tell your doctor about any ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... build-up and painful swelling of the legs (edema) and abdomen (ascites) or hepatic encephalopathy. For more ... build up and painful swelling of the legs (edema) and abdomen (ascites) Bruising and bleeding easily Enlarged ...

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... friend, spouse, life partner, parent, sibling or other family member. What is HE? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred ... disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic ...

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2018 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you ... team evaluates the person’s overall physical and mental health, plan to pay for transplant related medical expenses, ...

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... responsible for the daily needs of another person. Caregivers can be a friend, spouse, life partner, parent, sibling or other family member. What is HE? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as ...

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Patient Advisory Council Media Center Careers How You Can Help OVERVIEW Donate Now Join an Event Volunteer ... Hepatic Encephalopathy is a short-term problem that can be corrected . It may also occur as part ...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Hepatic Encephalopathy Back Hepatic ... Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Help ALF Improve This ...

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Related Liver Disease Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Autoimmune Hepatitis Benign Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of ...

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... People ALF Near You Events ALF Blogs Financial Information Policies Advocacy Patient Advisory Council Media Center Careers ... and abdomen (ascites) or hepatic encephalopathy. For more information about cirrhosis of the liver and symptoms, call ...

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering to Your Treatment Plan Long-Term Considerations Patient Support Finding Support Services Peer Support Groups Financial Assistance Support for My Loved Ones Resources Find ...

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... Site Map © COPYRIGHT 2017 AMERICAN LIVER FOUNDATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Your Liver Overview

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  13. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Jaundice In Newborns ... are the common causes of cirrhosis? Hepatitis B & C Alcohol-related Liver Disease Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver ...

  14. No oxygen delivery limitation in hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Albert; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    to choose between cause and effect in three groups of volunteers, including healthy control subjects (HC), patients with cirrhosis of the liver without hepatic encephalopathy (CL), and patients with cirrhosis with acute hepatic encephalopathy. Compared to HC subjects, blood flow and energy metabolism had......Hepatic encephalopathy is a condition of reduced brain functioning in which both blood flow and brain energy metabolism declined. It is not known whether blood flow or metabolism is the primary limiting factor of brain function in this condition. We used calculations of mitochondrial oxygen tension...

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Jaundice ... diseases. What are the common causes of cirrhosis? Hepatitis B & C Alcohol-related Liver Disease Non-alcoholic Fatty ...

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. These toxins build up and can travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic Encephalopathy often ...

  17. Hashimoto's encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a rare not well understood, progressive and relapsing multiform disease, characterized by seizures, movement disorders, subacute cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms and responsiveness to steroid therapy. The disorder is generally associated with thyroid ...... diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb...... and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians.The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism...

  18. Changing phenotypic expression in a patient with a mitochondrial encephalopathy due to 13042G>A de novo mutation--a 5 year follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinwelski, M; Kierdaszuk, B; Dulski, J; Tońska, K; Kodroń, A; Sitek, E J; Bartnik, E; Kamińska, A; Kwieciński, H; Sławek, J

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits of complex I lead to mitochondrial encephalomyopathies associated with various phenotypes. This report aims to present the patient's clinical symptomatology in the context of a very rare 13042G>A de novo mutation and with an emphasis on changing phenotypic expression and pronounced, long-standing response to levetiracetam.

  19. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  20. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  1. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  2. Localized Cerebral Energy Failure in DNA Polymerase Gamma-Associated Encephalopathy Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoulis, Charalampos; Neckelmann, Gesche; Mork, Sverre J.; Engelsen, Bernt E.; Viscomi, Carlo; Moen, Gunnar; Ersland, Lars; Zeviani, Massimo; Bindoff, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial DNA-polymerase gamma cause a wide spectrum of clinical disease ranging from infantile hepato-encephalopathy to juvenile/adult-onset spinocerebellar ataxia and late onset progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Several of these syndromes are associated with an encephalopathy that…

  3. Dopaminergic agonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with an impairment of the dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopaminergic agonists may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with an impairment of the dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopaminergic agonists may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  4. Treatment of Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent the most severe epilepsies, with onset in infancy and childhood and seizures continuing in adulthood in most cases. New genetic causes are being identified at a rapid rate. Treatment is challenging and the overall outcome remains poor. Available targeted treatments, based on the precision medicine approach, are currently few. To provide an overview of the treatment of epileptic encephalopathies with known genetic determinants, including established treatment, anecdotal reports of specific treatment, and potential tailored precision medicine strategies. Genes known to be associated to epileptic encephalopathy were selected. Genes where the association was uncertain or with no reports of details on treatment, were not included. Although some of the genes included are associated with multiple epilepsy phenotypes or other organ involvement, we have mainly focused on the epileptic encephalopathies and their antiepileptic treatments. Most epileptic encephalopathies show genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. The treatment of seizures is difficult in most cases. The available evidence may provide some guidance for treatment: for example, ACTH seems to be effective in controlling infantile spams in a number of genetic epileptic encephalopathies. There are potentially effective tailored precision medicine strategies available for some of the encephalopathies, and therapies with currently unexplained effectiveness in others. Understanding the effect of the mutation is crucial for targeted treatment. There is a broad range of disease mechanisms underlying epileptic encephalopathies, and this makes the application of targeted treatments challenging. However, there is evidence that tailored treatment could significantly improve epilepsy treatment and prognosis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-07

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause neurological death with brain edema and intracranial hypertension. It is assumed that approximately 60%-80% of patients with liver cirrhosis develop hepatic encephalopathy. This review explores the complex mechanisms that lead to hepatic encephalopathy. However, noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is not associated with hepatic diseases and has a completely different etiology. Noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a severe occurrence that is connected with multiple pathogeneses.

  6. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause ne...

  7. Hepatic encephalopathy. Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, Maria Claudia; Bermudez Munoz, Sonia; J Morillo, Anibal

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy occurs in patients with chronic hepatic insufficiency and can produce abnormalities in the central nervous system, which can be observed in MRI studies. Traditionally, these imaging findings include symmetrical hyper intensities in T1-weighted sequences in the basal ganglia (mainly globus pallidus), involving also the substantia nigra, mesencephalic tegmentum, frontal and occipital cortex. These areas appear of normal intensity in T2-weighted imaging sequences. Other entities that can lead to similar findings include manganese intoxication and type-1 neurofibromatosis. Currently, with the advent of MR spectroscopy, abnormalities in patients with clinical and subclinical hepatic encephalopathy have been described. After hepatic transplantation, hyper intensities of the basal ganglia and the MR spectroscopic findings may disappear within 3 months to 1 year, suggesting a functional, more than a structural damage. This article will demonstrate the MR findings of patients with hepatic encephalopathy due to chronic hepatic insufficiency.

  8. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  9. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cycle defects is the X-linked recessive disorder, ornithine ... life, or if the child is fed the compounds that they are unable .... as learning difficulties, drowsiness and avoidance of ... Table 2. Laboratory investigation of suspected metabolic encephalopathy. Laboratory .... Clinical approach to treatable inborn metabolic diseases:.

  10. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, the neuropsychiatric presentation of liver disease, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Reduction of plasma ammonia remains the central therapeutic strategy, but there is a need for newer novel therapies. We discuss current evidence supporting the use of interventions for both the general management of chronic HE and that necessary for more acute and advanced disease.

  11. Encephalopathy and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarria, Laia; Cordoba, Juan

    2013-06-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) candidates experience frequently episodic or persistent hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, these patients can exhibit neurological comorbidities that contribute to cognitive impairment in the pre-transplant period. Assessment of the respective contribution of hepatic encephalopathy or comorbidities in the cognitive manifestations is critical to estimate the neurological benefits of restoring liver function. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy are useful to assess the impact of liver failure or comorbidities. This assessment is critical to decide liver transplant in difficult cases. In the early postoperative period, LT is commonly complicated by a confusional syndrome. The possible role of persisting hepatic encephalopathy in its development has not been clearly established. The origin is usually considered multifactorial and relates to complications following LT, such as infections, rejection, primary liver dysfunction, immunosuppressors, etc.… The diagnosis and treatment is based in the recognition of comorbidities and optimal care of metabolic disturbances. Several studies have demonstrated recovery of cognitive function after LT in patients that have exhibited hepatic encephalopathy. However, some deficits may persist specifically among patients with persistent HE. Other factors present before LT that contribute to a worse neuropsychological outcome after LT are diabetes mellitus and alcohol consumption. Long-term after LT, cognitive function may worsen in relation to vascular risk factors.

  12. GRIN2B encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schuetz, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed for a comprehensive delineation of genetic, functional and phenotypic aspects of GRIN2B encephalopathy and explored potential prospects of personalised medicine. METHODS: Data of 48 individuals with de novo GRIN2B variants were collected from several diagnostic and research c...

  13. Subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger disease)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settanni, F.; Dumont, P.; Casella, C.L.; Pascuzzi, L.; Cecilio, S.; Caldas, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Four patients with variable clinical and tomographic features were diagnosed as having subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (Binswanger disease). This diagnosis was done based on the presence of subacute progression of focal cerebral deficits, presence of hypertension, systemic vascular disease and dementia. The pathogenesis of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy is unknown; possible mechanism include diffuse ischemia and fluid transudation with subsequent gliosis related to subacute hypertensive encephalopathy. (author)

  14. Genetics Home Reference: glycine encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seizures. As they get older, many develop intellectual disability, abnormal movements, and behavioral problems. Other atypical types of glycine encephalopathy appear later in childhood or adulthood ...

  15. Screening of subclinical hepatic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneweg, M; Moerland, W; Quero, J C; Hop, W C; Krabbe, P F; Schalm, S W

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Subclinical hepatic encephalopathy adversely affects daily functioning. The aim of this study was to determine which elements of daily life have predictive value for subclinical hepatic encephalopathy. METHODS: The study was performed in 179 outpatients with liver cirrhosis.

  16. Peripheral neuropathy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial diseases: a single-centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luigetti, M; Sauchelli, D; Primiano, G; Cuccagna, C; Bernardo, D; Lo Monaco, M; Servidei, S

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy in mitochondrial diseases (MDs) may vary from a subclinical finding in a multisystem syndrome to a severe, even isolated, manifestation in some patients. To investigate the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in MDs extensive electrophysiological studies were performed in 109 patients with morphological, biochemical and genetic diagnosis of MD [12 A3243G progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO)/mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), 16 myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF), four mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), 67 PEO with single or multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA, 10 others]. A neuropathy was found in 49 patients (45%). The incidence was very high in MNGIE (100%), MELAS (92%) and MERRF (69%), whilst 28% of PEO patients had evidence of peripheral involvement. The most frequent abnormality was a sensory axonal neuropathy found in 32/49 patients (65%). A sensory-motor axonal neuropathy was instead detected in 16% of the patients and sensory-motor axonal demyelinating neuropathy in 16%. Finally one Leigh patient had a motor axonal neuropathy. It is interesting to note that the great majority had preserved tendon reflexes and no sensory disturbances. In conclusion, peripheral involvement in MD is frequent even if often mild or asymptomatic. The correct identification and characterization of peripheral neuropathy through electrophysiological studies represents another tile in the challenge of MD diagnosis. © 2016 EAN.

  17. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy (PRES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moron E, Fanny E; Diaz Marchan, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinical Syndrome composed of cephalea, alteration in vision and convulsions, usually observed in patients with sudden elevation of arterial pressure. The imagenologic evidence shows reversible vasogenic brain edema without stroke. Its location is predominantly posterior; it affects the cortex and the subcortical white matter of the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes. The treatment with antihypertensive drugs and the removing of immunosupressor medication are generally associated with complete neurological recovery; this is reflected also in the images which return to their basal condition. The untreated hypertension, on the other side, can result in a progressive defect of the autoregulation system of the central nervous system with cerebral hemorrhage, irreversible brain stroke, coma and death

  18. Encephalopathy for prions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colegial, Carlos; Silva, Federico; Perez, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The encephalopathy spongyform for prions are neuro degenerative illness that can be sporadic or transferable, for infectious or hereditary mechanisms. Their investigation has outlined enormous challenges and in the historical journey in search of its cause two doctors have received the Nobel prize of medicine Carleton Gajdusek, for its works in New Guinea where it described the infectious transmission for cannibalistic rites that it took to studies of experimental transmission in chimpanzees and to its theory of the slow virus; later on, Stanley Prusiner developed its experimental works in hamsters, throwing to the neurobiology the prion concept (particles infectious proteinaceous not viral). The paper narrates the history of a patient that died in the San Juan de Dios of Bogota Hospital by cause of this prionic illness and clinical and pathological aspects are discussed

  19. Diabetic encephalopathy: a cerebrovascular disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manschot, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Animal study: The aim was to investigate the role of vascular disturbances in the development of experimental diabetic encephalopathy. We describe the effects of treatment with the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme(ACE)-inhibitor enalapril (treatment aimed at the

  20. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...... therefore been assessed as a potential treatment for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of dopamine agents versus placebo or no intervention for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: Trials were identified through the Cochrane...... hepatic encephalopathy that were published during 1979 to 1982 were included. Three trials assessed levodopa, and two trials assessed bromocriptine. The mean daily dose was 4 grams for levodopa and 15 grams for bromocriptine. The median duration of treatment was 14 days (range seven to 56 days). None...

  1. Mitochondrial Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bulent Kurt; Turgut Topal

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major energy source of cells. Mitochondrial disease occurs due to a defect in mitochondrial energy production. A valuable energy production in mitochondria depend a healthy interconnection between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. A mutation in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA may cause abnormalities in ATP production and single or multiple organ dysfunctions, secondarily. In this review, we summarize mitochondrial physiology, mitochondrial genetics, and clinical expression and ...

  2. MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Rho, Eun Jin

    2002-01-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare syndrom characterized by developmental delay, acrocyanosis, petechiae, chronic diarrhea, and ethylmalonic, lactic, and methylsuccinic aciduria. We report the MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy including previously unreported intracranial hematoma

  3. Sepsis Associated Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neera Chaudhry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE is a common but poorly understood neurological complication of sepsis. It is characterized by diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection elsewhere in the body without overt CNS infection. The pathophysiology of SAE is complex and multifactorial including a number of intertwined mechanisms such as vascular damage, endothelial activation, breakdown of the blood brain barrier, altered brain signaling, brain inflammation, and apoptosis. Clinical presentation of SAE may range from mild symptoms such as malaise and concentration deficits to deep coma. The evaluation of cognitive dysfunction is made difficult by the absence of any specific investigations or biomarkers and the common use of sedation in critically ill patients. SAE thus remains diagnosis of exclusion which can only be made after ruling out other causes of altered mentation in a febrile, critically ill patient by appropriate investigations. In spite of high mortality rate, management of SAE is limited to treatment of the underlying infection and symptomatic treatment for delirium and seizures. It is important to be aware of this condition because SAE may present in early stages of sepsis, even before the diagnostic criteria for sepsis can be met. This review discusses the diagnostic approach to patients with SAE along with its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis.

  4. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  5. An unusual cause of anemia and encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Sharma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors present here an interesting case of recent onset anemia that was associated with an encephalopathy of the unusual cause.Although severe anemia can theoretically result in anemic hypoxia and can then lead to hypoxic encephalopathy, it is not a primary cause of encephalopathy. More frequently anemia can contribute together with other multiple causes of encephalopathy, such as infections, metabolic abnormalities, trauma, hepatic dysfunction, hypertension, toxins.

  6. Recent advances in hepatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMorrow, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy describes the array of neurological alterations that occur during acute liver failure or chronic liver injury. While key players in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, such as increases in brain ammonia, alterations in neurosteroid levels, and neuroinflammation, have been identified, there is still a paucity in our knowledge of the precise pathogenic mechanism. This review gives a brief overview of our understanding of the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and then summarizes the significant recent advances made in clinical and basic research contributing to our understanding, diagnosis, and possible treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted in May 2017 using “hepatic encephalopathy” as a keyword, and selected manuscripts were limited to those research articles published since May 2014. While the authors acknowledge that many significant advances have been made in the understanding of hepatic encephalopathy prior to May 2014, we have limited the scope of this review to the previous three years only. PMID:29026534

  7. CT and MRI findings of cyclosporine-related encephalopathy and hypertensive encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Houjyou, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    We present the MRI and CT findings of one child with cyclosporine-related encephalopathy, and one child with hypertensive encephalopathy following cyclosporine-related encephalopathy. The imaging findings were shown well on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images. Cyclosporine-related encephalopathy was distributed predominantly in the posterior white matter. Hypertensive encephalopathy showed similar changes of CT attenuation, but with wider distribution. These two disorders seem to have the same pathogenesis. (orig.)

  8. Liver transplant in ethylmalonic encephalopathy: a new treatment for an otherwise fatal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Diodato, Daria; Torre, Giuliano; Picca, Stefano; Pariante, Rosanna; Giuseppe Picardo, Sergio; Di Meo, Ivano; Rizzo, Cristiano; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo; De Ville De Goyet, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a fatal, rapidly progressive mitochondrial disorder caused by ETHE1 mutations, whose peculiar clinical and biochemical features are due to the toxic accumulation of hydrogen sulphide and of its metabolites, including thiosulphate. In mice with ethylmalonic encephalopathy, liver-targeted adeno-associated virus-mediated ETHE1 gene transfer dramatically improved both clinical course and metabolic abnormalities. Reasoning that the same achievement could be accomplished by liver transplantation, we performed living donor-liver transplantation in an infant with ethylmalonic encephalopathy. Unlike the invariably progressive deterioration of the disease, 8 months after liver transplantation, we observed striking neurological improvement with remarkable achievements in psychomotor development, along with dramatic reversion of biochemical abnormalities. These results clearly indicate that liver transplantation is a viable therapeutic option for ETHE1 disease. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Psychopathology and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gama Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Hippocrates that neuropsychiatric illness secondary to liver disease fascinates physicians, but only in the XIX century Marcel Nencki and Ivan Pavlov suggested the relation between high concentrations of ammonia and Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE. The reaction of ammonia and glutamate (origins glutamine, “the Trojan Horse of neurotoxicity of ammonia continues to be the main responsible for the neurologic lesions, recently confirmed by neurochemistry and neuroimagiology studies. Glutamine starts the inflammatory reaction at the central nervous sys- tem but other important actors seem to be manganese and the neurotransmitters systems of GABA and endocanabinoids. Nowadays there are three different etiologic big groups for HE: type A associated with acute liver failure; type B associated with portosystemic bypass; and type C associated with cirrhosis of the liver. The staging of HE is still based on classic West Haven system, but a latent Grade 0 was introduced (the so called minimal HE; remaining the aggra- vating HE from Grade 1 (subtle changes at clinical examination to Grade 4 (coma. In this work a bibliographic review was made on 30 of the most pertinent and recent papers, focusing in psychopathology, physiopathology, etiology and staging of this clinical entity transversal to Psychiatry and Gastroenterology. Alterations are described in vigility and conscience like temporal, spatial and personal disorientation. Attention, concentration and memory are impaired very early, on latent phase and can be accessed through neuropsychological tests. Mood oscillates between euphoric and depressive. Personality changes begin obviously and abruptly or in a subtle and insidious way. There can be changes in perception like visual hallucinations or even of acoustic-verbal. The thought disorders can be of delusional type, paranoid, systematized or not, but also monothematic ala Capgras Syndrome. Speech can be accelerated, slowed down or completely in

  10. Rifaximin in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iadevaia MD

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Maddalena Diana Iadevaia, Anna Del Prete, Claudia Cesaro, Laura Gaeta, Claudio Zulli, Carmelina LoguercioDepartment of Internistica Clinica e Sperimentale, F Magrassi e A Lanzara, Hepatogastroenterology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, ItalyAbstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a challenging complication in patients with advanced liver disease. It can be defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by portosystemic venous shunting, ranging from minimal to overt hepatic encephalopathy or coma. Its pathophysiology is still unclear, although increased levels of ammonia play a key role. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy is currently based on specific tests evaluating the neuropsychiatric state of patients and their quality of life; the severity of hepatic encephalopathy is measured by the West Haven criteria. Treatment of hepatic encephalopathy consists of pharmacological and corrective measures, as well as nutritional interventions. Rifaximin received approval for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in 2010 because of its few side effects and pharmacological benefits. The aim of this work is to review the use and efficacy of rifaximin both in acute and long-term management of hepatic encephalopathy. Treatment of overt hepatic encephalopathy involves management of the acute episode as well as maintenance of remission in those patients who have previously experienced an episode, in order to improve their quality of life. The positive effect of rifaximin in reducing health care costs is also discussed.Keywords: acute hepatic encephalopathy, recurrent hepatic encephalopathy, rifaximin, lactulose, cost, health-related quality of life

  11. Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These episodes were associated with motor weakness on the right side, with difficulties in language and memory and visual disturbance. Neurological examination revealed generalized muscle weakness with mild right sided hemiparesis. The Magnetic Resonance Imaging revealed infarct like lesions in the left occipital ...

  12. Wernicke Encephalopathy after Gastrointestinal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Saygi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We herein describe a child operated for acute abdomen who developed Wernickes encephalopathy (WE secondary to prolonged total parenteral nutrition (TPN that lacked vitamin B1 supplementation. The author concluded that surgeons, child neurologists, pediatricians and radiologists need to be aware of the predisposing factors and symptoms of WE. Clinicians need to keep in mind that ophthalmoplegia, ataxia or altered mental status could be findings of WE. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 627-631

  13. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDY OF SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    OpenAIRE

    J. Meenupriya

    2013-01-01

    Spongiform encephalopathies, categorized as a subclass of neuro-degenerative diseases and commonly known as prion diseases, are a group of progressive conditions that affect the brain and nervous system of many animals, including humans. Prion diseases are common among cannibalistic communities; further research has revealed that the infected or malformed prion protein (named PrPsc) spreads its virulence to the normal, healthy prion protein (named PrPc) when people consume...

  14. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Suvasini; Tripathi, Manjari

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  15. Valproic Acid Induced Hyperammonaemic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanat, S.; Shahbaz, N.; Hassan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To observe clinical and laboratory features of valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic encephalopathy in patients taking valproic acid. Methods: Observational study was conducted at the Neurology Department, Dow University of Health Sciences, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from February 26, 2010 to March 20, 2011. Ten patients on valproic acid therapy of any age group with idiopathic or secondary epilepsy, who presented with encephalopathic symptoms, were registered and followed up during the study. Serum ammonia level, serum valproic acid level, liver function test, cerebrospinal fluid examination, electroencephalogram and brain imaging of all the patients were done. Other causes of encephalopathy were excluded after clinical and appropriate laboratory investigations. Microsoft Excel 2007 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Hyperammonaemia was found in all patients with encephalopathic symptoms. Rise in serum ammonia was independent of dose and serum level of valproic acid. Liver function was also found to be normal in 80% (n=8) of the patients. Valproic acid was withdrawn in all patients. Three (30%) patients improved only after the withdrawal of valproic acid. Six (60%) patients improved after L-Carnitine replacement, one (10%) after sodium benzoate. On followup, serum ammonia had reduced to normal in five (50%) patients and to more than half of the baseline level in two (20%) patients. Three (30%) patients were lost to followup after complete clinical improvement. Conclusion: Within therapeutic dose and serum levels, valproic acid can cause symptomatic hyperammonaemia resulting in encephalopathy. All patients taking valproic acid presenting with encephalopathic symptoms must be monitored for the condition. (author)

  16. A Case of Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes (MELAS) Syndrome with Intracardiac Thrombus [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jung-Chul; Seol, Myung Do; Yoon, Jin Won; Lee, Young Soo; Kim, Dong-Keun; Choi, Yong Hoon; Ahn, Hyo Seong; Cho, Wook Hyun

    2013-03-01

    Myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a multisystem clinical syndrome manifested by mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and recurrent stroke-like episodes. A 27-year-old female with MELAS syndrome presented with cerebral infarction. Echocardiography revealed a thrombus attached to the apex of the hypertrophied left ventricle, with decreased systolic function. The embolism of the intracardiac thrombus might have been the cause of stroke. There should be more consideration given to the increased possibility of intracardiac thrombus formation when a MELAS patient with cardiac involvement is encountered.

  17. Mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase single-nucleotide polymorphisms that lead to defects in refolding but not aminoacylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Rajat; Reynolds, Noah M; Yadavalli, Srujana S

    2011-01-01

    Defects in organellar translation are the underlying cause of a number of mitochondrial diseases, including diabetes, deafness, encephalopathy, and other mitochondrial myopathies. The most common causes of these diseases are mutations in mitochondria-encoded tRNAs. It has recently become apparent...

  18. Mitochondrial myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMauro, Salvatore

    2006-11-01

    Our understanding of mitochondrial diseases (defined restrictively as defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain) is expanding rapidly. In this review, I will give the latest information on disorders affecting predominantly or exclusively skeletal muscle. The most recently described mitochondrial myopathies are due to defects in nuclear DNA, including coenzyme Q10 deficiency and mutations in genes controlling mitochondrial DNA abundance and structure, such as POLG, TK2, and MPV17. Barth syndrome, an X-linked recessive mitochondrial myopathy/cardiopathy, is associated with decreased amount and altered structure of cardiolipin, the main phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane, but a secondary impairment of respiratory chain function is plausible. The role of mutations in protein-coding genes of mitochondrial DNA in causing isolated myopathies has been confirmed. Mutations in tRNA genes of mitochondrial DNA can also cause predominantly myopathic syndromes and--contrary to conventional wisdom--these mutations can be homoplasmic. Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain impair energy production and almost invariably involve skeletal muscle, causing exercise intolerance, cramps, recurrent myoglobinuria, or fixed weakness, which often affects extraocular muscles and results in droopy eyelids (ptosis) and progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

  19. Diagnostic and prognostic factors for acute encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motojima, Yukiko; Nagura, Michiaki; Asano, Yoshitaka; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Takada, Eiko; Sakurai, Yoshio; Moriwaki, Koichi; Tamura, Masanori

    2016-11-01

    Acute encephalopathy has the possibility of sequelae. While early treatment is required to prevent the development of sequelae, differential diagnosis is of the utmost priority. The aim of this study was therefore to identify parameters that can facilitate early diagnosis and prediction of outcome of acute encephalopathy. We reviewed the medical charts of inpatients from 2005 to 2011 and identified 33 patients with febrile status epilepticus. Subjects were classified into an acute encephalopathy group (n = 20) and a febrile convulsion group (n = 13), and the parameters serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), ammonia (NH 3 ), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau protein, and CSF interleukin-6 compared between them. Furthermore, the relationship between each parameter and prognosis was investigated in the encephalopathy group. Significant differences in serum AST, ALT, and LDH were observed between the febrile convulsion and acute encephalopathy group. Moreover, a significant difference in serum LDH was noted between the patients with and without developmental regression at the time of hospital discharge in the encephalopathy group. In particular, CSF tau protein was found to be highly likely to indicate progress, with CSF tau protein >1000 pg/dL associated with poor prognosis leading to developmental regression. Serum AST, ALT and LDH may be related to early diagnosis and prognosis, and should be carefully investigated in patients with encephalopathy. CSF tau protein could also be used as an indicator of poor prognosis in acute encephalopathy. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association

  1. Wernicke's encephalopathy after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yoshiyuki

    2018-05-01

    A 76-year-old woman who had been on hemodialysis for 3 years developed ischemic mitral valve insufficiency, tricuspid insufficiency, and chronic atrial fibrillation, and underwent cardiac surgery. On the 4th postoperative day, she experienced a sudden disturbance of consciousness, aphasia, and limb ataxia. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities. Wernicke's encephalopathy was suspected and the patient was given vitamin B1, whereupon her symptoms gradually improved. On the 42nd postoperative day, she was free of neurological symptoms and discharged.

  2. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman W. El-Hattab

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA while more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA. Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular noncompaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain (ETC complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial tRNAs, rRNAs, ribosomal proteins, and translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  3. MR findings of wernicke encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Goo; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Duk Yull; Song, Chi Sung

    1991-01-01

    Seven patients (33 to 58 years old) with clinical diagnoses of Wernicke encephalopathy were examined with MR on either a 2.0T (5 cases) or a 0.5T scanner (2 cases) using spin-echo pulse sequences. In 2 patients, follow-up MR studies were performed 1 and 5 weeks after thiamine (vitamine B1) treatment. Five patients (4 chronic alcoholics and 1 with hyperemesis gravidarum) showed atrophy of both mamillary bodies, along with patchy lesions around the third ventricle, medial thalami, tectum of the midbrain, and periaqueductal gray matter. Another patient with hyperemesis of gravidrum demonstrated only slightly atrophic mamillary bodies, and the last patient with severe vomiting after gastrojejunostomy showed only diencephaic/mesencephalic lesions with apparently normal mamillary bodies. A follow-up MR showed a decrease in previously-noted diencephalic/-/mesencephalic lesions but no change in the size of the mamillary bodies. Diencephalic/mesencephalic lesions were well seen as a high-signal intensity on proton-and T2-weighted axial images, while atrophy of the mamillary bodies was seen best on T1-weighted sagittal images. MR imaging is very useful in demonstrating the characteristic lesions of Wernicke encephalopathy and in evaluating the result of treatment on follow-up study

  4. Computerized tomography in acute toxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Nobuhiko; Kaneshi, Kunio; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Kurihara, Eiji.

    1983-01-01

    We experienced three cases of acute toxic encephalopathy, including a case of probable Reye syndrome, which had similar and unique CT findings in their acute stage; symmetrical low density area in the thalamus and the dentate nucleus, followed by changes in cerebellar hemispheres and around lateral ventricles. The CT findings, common to probable Reye syndrome and other acute toxic encephalopathy, may suggest the possibility of similar pathogenesis of brain damage in both disorders. The authors propose that present cases are a new subgroup in acute toxic encephalopathy, because of their similar and unique CT features. (author)

  5. A new infectious encephalopathy syndrome, clinically mild encephalopathy associated with excitotoxicity (MEEX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Nozomi; Yoshimaru, Daisuke; Moriyama, Yoko; Yasukawa, Kumi; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi

    2017-09-15

    Acute infectious encephalopathy is often observed in children in East Asia including Japan. More than 40% of the patients remain unclassified into specific syndromes. To investigate the underlying pathomechanisms in those with unclassified encephalopathy, we evaluated brain metabolism by MR spectroscopy. Among seven patients with acute encephalopathy admitted to our hospital from June 2016 to May 2017, three were classified into acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD). The other four showed consciousness disturbance lasting more than three days with no parenchymal lesion visible on MRI, which led to a diagnosis of unclassified encephalopathy. MR spectroscopy in these four patients, however, revealed an increase of glutamine with a normal N-acetyl aspartate level on days 5 to 8, which had normalized by follow-up studies on days 11 to 16. The four patients clinically recovered completely. Among 27 patients with encephalopathy, including the present seven patients, admitted to our hospital from January 2015 to March 2017, seven (26%) were classified into this type, which we propose is a new encephalopathy syndrome, clinically mild encephalopathy associated with excitotoxicity (MEEX). MEEX is the second most common subtype, following AESD (30%). This study suggests that excitotoxicity may be a common underlying pathomechanism of acute infectious encephalopathy, and prompt astrocytic neuroprotection from excitotoxicity may prevent progression of MEEX into AESD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitochondrial Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... noting “soft signs” in unaffected relatives. These include deaf- ness, short stature, migraine headaches and PEO. Muscle ... mitochondrial defects and provide valuable information for family planning. Perhaps most important, knowing the genetic defects that ...

  7. Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increased pressure in the skull, prolonged exposure to toxic elements (including solvents, drugs, radiation, paints, industrial chemicals, and certain metals), chronic progressive trauma, poor nutrition, ...

  8. Fundus Findings in Wernicke Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Serlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency, classically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, confusion, and ataxia. While commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, WE may also occur in the setting of poor nutrition or absorption. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and presented with visual disturbance with bilateral horizontal nystagmus, confusion, and postural imbalance. Fundus examination revealed bilateral optic disc edema with a retinal hemorrhage in the left eye. Metabolic workup demonstrated thiamine deficiency. Her symptoms resolved after thiamine treatment. This case raises the awareness of the possibility of posterior segment findings in WE, which are underreported in WE.

  9. Nonabsorbable disaccharides for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Morgan, Marsha Y

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Nonabsorbable disaccharides (NADs) have been used to treat hepatic encephalopathy (HE) since 1966. However, a Cochrane Review, published in 2004, found insufficient evidence to recommend their use in this context. This updated systematic review evaluates the effects of the NADs...... primary/secondary prevention. Random-effects meta-analyses showed that, compared to placebo/no intervention, NADs had a beneficial effect on HE (relative risk [RR] = 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.53-0.74, number needed to treat [NNT] = 4) and serious liver-related adverse events such as liver...... with minimal HE. Meta-analyses of the prevention randomized controlled trials showed that NADs prevented the development of HE (RR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.33-0.68, NNT = 6), the risk of developing serious liver-related adverse events (RR = 0.48, 95% CI 0.33-0.70, NNT = 6), and reduced mortality (RR = 0.63, 95% CI 0...

  10. Rapidly Progressive Quadriplegia and Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, DonRaphael; McCorquodale, Donald; Peters, Angela; Juster-Switlyk, Kelsey; Smith, Gordon; Ansari, Safdar

    2016-11-01

    A woman aged 77 years was transferred to our neurocritical care unit for evaluation and treatment of rapidly progressive motor weakness and encephalopathy. Examination revealed an ability to follow simple commands only and abnormal movements, including myoclonus, tongue and orofacial dyskinesias, and opsoclonus. Imaging study findings were initially unremarkable, but when repeated, they demonstrated enhancement of the cauda equina nerve roots, trigeminal nerve, and pachymeninges. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed mildly elevated white blood cell count and protein levels. Serial electrodiagnostic testing demonstrated a rapidly progressive diffuse sensory motor axonopathy, and electroencephalogram findings progressed from generalized slowing to bilateral periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. Critical details of her recent history prompted a diagnostic biopsy. Over time, the patient became completely unresponsive with no further abnormal movements and ultimately died. The differential diagnosis, pathological findings, and diagnosis are discussed with a brief review of a well-known yet rare diagnosis.

  11. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy: Atypical Pros and Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurologic diseases that affect several mammalian species including human beings. Four animal TSE agents have been reported: scrapie of sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease (CWD) of deer, elk, and moose; transmissible mink encephalopath...

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Hashimoto's encephalopathy: Report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Shun Chang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Both severe thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism may affect brain function and cause a change in consciousness, as seen with a thyroid storm or myxedema coma. However, encephalopathy may also develop in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases independent of actual thyroid function level, and this is known as Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Although most patients are found to have Hashimoto's thyroiditis, less frequently they have Graves' disease. Clinical manifestations include epilepsy, disturbance of consciousness, cognitive impairment, memory loss, myoclonus, hallucinations, stroke-like episodes, tremor, involuntary movements, language impairment, and gait impairment. Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a relatively rare disease. As a good response can be obtained with corticosteroid therapy, early diagnosis and treatment is very beneficial for patients. Here we report three patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy with typical manifestations of hallucinations that were associated with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, and euthyroid status, respectively. They all showed a dramatic response to methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

  14. Reversible dementia with psychosis: Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Ramon; Lubman, Dan I; Lloyd, John; Tomlinson, E Bruce; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2006-12-01

    A case of presumed Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is presented. The presentation included memory loss, delusions, functional decline and culminated in a generalized seizure. Anti-thyroid antibodies were detected and symptoms resolved with prednisolone. Patients with HE may present with prominent neuropsychiatric symptoms, attract psychiatric diagnoses and present to psychiatric services. Primarily a diagnosis of exclusion, HE should be considered in cases of encephalopathy in which standard investigations are negative.

  15. STXBP1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamberger, Hannah; Nikanorova, Marina; Willemsen, Marjolein H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give a comprehensive overview of the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of STXBP1 encephalopathy (STXBP1-E) by systematically reviewing newly diagnosed and previously reported patients. METHODS: We recruited newly diagnosed patients with STXBP1 mutations through an international networ......, and the degree of ID. Accordingly, we hypothesize that seizure severity and ID present 2 independent dimensions of the STXBP1-E phenotype. STXBP1-E may be conceptualized as a complex neurodevelopmental disorder rather than a primary epileptic encephalopathy....

  16. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  17. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    B. V. Triveni; Salman Mohammed Sheikh; Deepak Shedde

    2014-01-01

    Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) is a clinicopathological syndrome associated with various clinical conditions presenting with headache, encephalopathy, seizure and cortical visual disturbances. Radiological findings in PRES are thought to be due to vasogenic edema predominantly in posterior cerebral hemispheres and are reversible with appropriate management. We present a case of post partum PRES,A 29 year old primigravida of 33 weeks 3 days period of gestation who prese...

  18. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M.; Els, T.

    2001-01-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  19. A whole mitochondrial genome screening in a MELAS patient: A novel mitochondrial tRNAVal mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Kacem, Maha; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Hadj Salem, Ikhlass; Kallel, Nozha; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We report a young Tunisian patient with clinical features of MELAS syndrome. → Reported mitochondrial mutations were absent after a mutational screening of the whole mtDNA. → We described a novel m.1640A>G mutation in the tRNA Val gene which was absent in 150 controls. → Mitochondrial deletions and POLG1 gene mutations were absent. → The m.1640A>G mutation could be associated to MELAS syndrome. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by a wide variety of clinical presentations and a multisystemic organ involvement. In this study, we report a Tunisian girl with clinical features of MELAS syndrome who was negative for the common m.3243A>G mutation, but also for the reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and deletions. Screening of the entire mtDNA genome showed several known mitochondrial variants besides to a novel transition m.1640A>G affecting a wobble adenine in the anticodon stem region of the tRNA Val . This nucleotide was conserved and it was absent in 150 controls suggesting its pathogenicity. In addition, no mutations were found in the nuclear polymerase gamma-1 gene (POLG1). These results suggest further investigation nuclear genes encoding proteins responsible for stability and structural components of the mtDNA or to the oxidative phosphorylation machinery to explain the phenotypic variability in the studied family.

  20. Wernicke's encephalopathy as a complication of gastroparesis after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a common complication of malnutrition, alcohol abuse and gastric outlet obstruction. We describe a patient who developed Wernicke's encephalopathy secondary to gastroparesis, with no significant evidence of malnutrition, alcohol abuse, or gastric outlet obstruction.

  1. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the CDC Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... spongiform encephalopathy) is a progressive neurological disorder of cattle that results from infection by an unusual transmissible ...

  2. Hypertensive encephalopathy in a patient with neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, MWH; Zweens, MJ; Bink, MTE; Odink, RJ

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal hyperthyroidism may give rise to serious cardiovascular complications. A girl with severe thyrotoxicosis in whom hypertensive encephalopathy developed is described. Conclusion Neonatal thyrotoxicosis can give rise to hypertension and may lead to hypertensive encephalopathy.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions FENIB Familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial encephalopathy with neuroserpin inclusion bodies ( FENIB ) is a disorder that causes progressive ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources (8 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Epilepsy and Seizure Disorder in Children Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ... stxbp1 encephalopathy with epilepsy Merck Manual Consumer Version: Seizure Disorders Orphanet: Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy Patient Support and ...

  5. [Human transmissible subacute spongiform encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormont, D

    1994-05-01

    Human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are rare chronic subacute degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) which include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Kuru, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), and Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI). CJD can be either inherited or sporadic. All these diseases are always fatal. Neuropathological features are mainly constituted of neuronal vacuolisation, neuronal death, gliosis with hyperastrocytosis; plaques might be evidenced in kuru and GSS. Neither inflammatory syndrome nor demyelination is detectable. No virus like structure could be identified reproducibly. Human TSE are transmissible to non human primates and rodents. Iatrogenic CJD have been described after tissue grafting (cornea, dura mater), neurosurgery, electrophysiology investigation, and treatment with pituitary derived gonadotrophins and growth hormone. Molecular biochemistry of the CNS investigation revealed that a host encoded protein, the prion protein (PrP), accumulates proportionally to the infectious titer: this abnormality is the only detectable hallmark in TSE. Infectious fractions contain no detectable specific nucleic acid, and are mainly constituted of PrP under an isoform which resists to proteinase K digestion (PrP-res). The PrP gene (PRNP) is located on chromosome 20 in humans. Several mutations of this gene have been described in all inherited TSE (CJD, GSS, and IFF). No treatment is available today. Agents inducing TSE (TSA) are not known: several authors claim that TSA are only constituted of PrP-res; others support the hypothesis of a conventional agent with a specific genetic information.

  6. Encephalopathy caused by lanthanum carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Pilar; Cacharro, Luis Maria; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Rosado, Consolacion; Tabernero, Jose Matias

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is a nonaluminum, noncalcium phosphate-binding agent, which is widely used in patients with end-stage chronic kidney disease. Until now, no significant side-effects have been described for the clinical use of lanthanum carbonate, and there are no available clinical data regarding its tissue stores. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old patient who was admitted with confusional syndrome. The patient received 3750 mg of lanthanum carbonate daily. Examinations were carried out, and the etiology of the encephalopathy of the patient could not be singled out. The lanthanum carbonate levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were high, and the syndrome eased after the drug was removed. The results of our study confirm that, in our case, the lanthanum carbonate did cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although lanthanum carbonate seems a safe drug with minimal absorption, this work reveals the problem derived from the increase of serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, and the possibility that it may cross the BBB. Further research is required on the possible pathologies that increase serum levels of lanthanum carbonate, as well as the risks and side-effects derived from its absorption.

  7. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Saulle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  8. Hashimoto's encephalopathy : epidemiology, pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Ramon; Walterfang, Mark; Velakoulis, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a term used to describe an encephalopathy of presumed autoimmune origin characterised by high titres of antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. In a similar fashion to autoimmune thyroid disease, Hashimoto's encephalopathy is more common in women than in men. It has been reported in paediatric, adult and elderly populations throughout the world. The clinical presentation may involve a relapsing and remitting course and include seizures, stroke-like episodes, cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms and myoclonus. Thyroid function is usually clinically and biochemically normal.Hashimoto's encephalopathy appears to be a rare disorder, but, as it is responsive to treatment with corticosteroids, it must be considered in cases of 'investigation negative encephalopathies'. Diagnosis is made in the first instance by excluding other toxic, metabolic and infectious causes of encephalopathy with neuroimaging and CSF examination. Neuroimaging findings are often not helpful in clarifying the diagnosis. Common differential diagnoses when these conditions are excluded are Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, rapidly progressive dementias, and paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis. In the context of the typical clinical picture, high titres of antithyroid antibodies, in particular antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, are diagnostic. These antibodies, however, can be detected in elevated titres in the healthy general population. Treatment with corticosteroids is almost always successful, although relapse may occur if this treatment is ceased abruptly. Other forms of immunomodulation, such as intravenous immune-globulin and plasma exchange, may also be effective. Despite the link to autoimmune thyroid disease, the aetiology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy is unknown. It is likely that antithyroid antibodies are not pathogenic, but titres can be a marker of treatment response. Pathological findings can suggest an inflammatory process, but features

  9. Branched-chain amino acids for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Koretz, R L; Kjaergard, L L

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  10. Electroencephalography and Brain MRI Patterns in Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabulya, Angela; Lesser, Ronald P; Llinas, Rafael; Kaplan, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Using electroencephalography (EEG) and histology in patients with diffuse encephalopathy, Gloor et al reported that paroxysmal synchronous discharges (PSDs) on EEG required combined cortical gray (CG) and "subcortical" gray (SCG) matter pathology, while polymorphic delta activity (PDA) occurred in patients with white matter pathology. In patients with encephalopathy, we compared EEG findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine if MRI reflected similar pathological EEG correlations. Retrospective case control study of 52 cases with EEG evidence of encephalopathy and 50 controls without evidence of encephalopathy. Review of clinical, EEG and MRI data acquired within 4 days of each other. The most common EEG finding in encephalopathy was background slowing, in 96.1%. We found PSDs in 0% of cases with the combination of CG and SCG abnormalities. Although 13.5% (n=7) had PSDs on EEG; 3 of these had CG and 4 had SCG abnormalities. A total of 73.1% (38/52) had white matter abnormalities-of these 28.9% (11/38) had PDA. PSDs were found with either CG or "SCG" MRI abnormalities and did not require a combination of the two. In agreement with Gloor et al, PDA occurred with white matter MRI abnormalities in the absence of gray matter abnormalities. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2015.

  11. Posterior encephalopathy with vasospasm: MRI and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidauer, S.; Gaa, J.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E.; Sitzer, M.; Hefner, R.

    2003-01-01

    Posterior encephalopathy is characterised by headache, impairment of consciousness, seizures and progressive visual loss. MRI shows bilateral, predominantly posterior, cortical and subcortical lesions with a distribution. Our aim was to analyse the MRI lesion pattern and angiographic findings because the pathophysiology of posterior encephalopathy is incompletely understood. We report three patients with clinical and imaging findings consistent with posterior encephalopathy who underwent serial MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and construction of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and four-vessel digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DWI revealed symmetrical subcortical and cortical parieto-occipital high signal. High and also low ADCs indicated probable vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema. On follow-up there was focal cortical laminar necrosis, while the white-matter lesions resolved almost completely, except in the arterial border zones. DSA revealed diffuse arterial narrowing, slightly more marked in the posterior circulation. These findings suggest that posterior encephalopathy may in some cases be due to diffuse, severe vasospasm affecting especially in the parieto-occipital grey matter, with its higher vulnerability to ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm due to digitoxin intoxication, resulting in posterior encephalopathy, has not yet been described previously. (orig.)

  12. Stimulus induced bursts in severe postanoxic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjepkema-Cloostermans, Marleen C; Wijers, Elisabeth T; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2016-11-01

    To report on a distinct effect of auditory and sensory stimuli on the EEG in comatose patients with severe postanoxic encephalopathy. In two comatose patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with severe postanoxic encephalopathy and burst-suppression EEG, we studied the effect of external stimuli (sound and touch) on the occurrence of bursts. In patient A bursts could be induced by either auditory or sensory stimuli. In patient B bursts could only be induced by touching different facial regions (forehead, nose and chin). When stimuli were presented with relatively long intervals, bursts persistently followed the stimuli, while stimuli with short intervals (encephalopathy can be induced by external stimuli, resulting in stimulus-dependent burst-suppression. Stimulus induced bursts should not be interpreted as prognostic favourable EEG reactivity. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet İbrahim Turan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of death following attempted suicide and accidental exposures. Although clinical presentation depends on the duration and the intensity of exposure, the assessment of the severity of intoxication is difficult. A small percentage of patients who show complete initial recovery may develop delayed neurological deficits. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning is a rare and poor prognosis neurologic disorders and there is no specific treatment. We present a case with early onset of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning with typical cranial imaging findings in a child with atypical history and clinical presentation.

  14. Metronidazole-induced encephalopathy in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Hyeong Cheol; Jeong, Taek Geun; Cho, Young Bum; Yang, Bong Joon; Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Haak Cheoul; Cho, Eun-Young

    2011-06-01

    Encephalopathy is a disorder characterized by altered brain function, which can be attributed to various causes. Encephalopathy associated with metronidazole administration occurs rarely and depends on the cumulative metronidazole dose, and most patients with this condition recover rapidly after discontinuation of therapy. Because metronidazole is metabolized in the liver and can be transported by the cerebrospinal fluid and cross the blood-brain barrier, it may induce encephalopathy even at a low cumulative dose in patients with hepatic dysfunction. We experienced a patient who showed ataxic gait and dysarthric speech after receiving metronidazole for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy that was not controlled by the administration of lactulose. The patient was diagnosed as metronidazole-induced encephalopathy, and stopping drug administration resulted in a complete recovery from encephalopathy. This case shows that caution should be exercised when administering metronidazole because even a low dose can induce encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  15. Diverse Neurological Manifestations of Lead Encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three patients with lead encephalopathy due to industrial poisoning are presented. They all showed a wide spectrum of neurological manifestations, which mimic other neurological presentations. It is emphasised that lead poisoning still occurs in industry, despite efforts at prevention. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 1721 (1974) ...

  16. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Nigerian with Schizophrenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a well-characterized syndrome in alcoholism and malnutrition, little is written of its prevalence or presentation in patients with psychiatric illness. We present a case of a 37-year-old Nigerian male with schizophrenia and malnutrition who presented with delirium and ophthalmoplegia ...

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Some novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases occurred following cerebral anoxia due to accidental strangulation and near-drowning, respectively. The third patient, a child known to have E-β thalassaemia, presented with transient encephalopathy following blood transfusion but involving the anterior brain rather than the posterior part classically described in ...

  18. Wernicke encephalopathy in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallas, Matt; Desai, Jay

    2014-11-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy is caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. It is generally considered to be a disease of adult alcoholics. However, it is known to occur in the pediatric population and in non-alcoholic conditions. We searched PubMed with the key words Wernicke, thiamine, pediatric, children and adolescents and selected publications that were deemed appropriate. The global prevalence rates of hunger, poverty and resultant nutrient deprivation have decreased in the 21st century. However, several scenarios which may predispose to Wernicke encephalopathy may be increasingly prevalent in children and adolescents such as malignancies, intensive care unit stays and surgical procedures for the treatment of obesity. Other predisposing conditions include magnesium deficiency and defects in the SLC19A3 gene causing thiamine transporter-2 deficiency. The classic triad consists of encephalopathy, oculomotor dysfunction and gait ataxia but is not seen in a majority of patients. Treatment should be instituted immediately when the diagnosis is suspected clinically without waiting for laboratory confirmation. Common magnetic resonance findings include symmetric T2 hyperintensities in dorsal medial thalamus, mammillary bodies, periaqueductal gray matter, and tectal plate. Wernicke encephalopathy is a medical emergency. Delay in its recognition and treatment may lead to significant morbidity, irreversible neurological damage or even death. This article aims to raise the awareness of this condition among pediatricians.

  19. Hepatic encephalopathy: experimental studies on the pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. de Knegt (Robert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractAims of this thesis: 1. To study, in rabbits, the suitability of experimental acute liver failure and acute hyperammonemia simulating acute liver failure for the study of hepatic encephalopathy and ammonia toxicity. 2. To study glutamate neurotransmission in rabbits with acute liver

  20. Clinical and experimental aspects of hepatic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Groeneweg (Michael)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractHepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatnc syndrome associated with severe liver disease. Clinical symptoms range from minimal changes in mental state and neuromuscular defects to unresponsive coma. 1-' The syndrome of HE can be divided into three major groups: HE associated with

  1. Hepatic encephalopathy: clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.C.D. van der Rijt (Carin)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is still unsolved. Therapy, therefore, is often insufficient. For the development of effective, new therapies insight into the disease-inducing substrates and the mechanisms of its toxic actions in the central nervous system ·are required. For

  2. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A

    2016-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables. There is ......Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables...... analytical techniques may provide better diagnostic information while the advent of portable wireless headsets may facilitate more widespread use. A large number of other diagnostic tools have been validated for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy including Critical Flicker Frequency......, the Inhibitory Control Test, the Stroop test, the Scan package and the Continuous Reaction Time; each has its pros and cons; strengths and weaknesses; protagonists and detractors. Recent AASLD/EASL Practice Guidelines suggest that the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy should be based on the PHES test...

  3. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Dolstra, C.H.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrPSc was

  4. CT diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiang; Ma Jiwei; Wu Lide

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore CT characteristics of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and to improve the accuracy of CT diagnosis. Methods: 50 cases of neonatal asphyxia in perinatal period diagnosed as hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy by CT was analyzed. Results: The main manifestation of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is cerebral edema and intracranial hemorrhage. Focal or diffuse hypo-dense lesion and hyper-dense area in various location and morphology were seen on CT images. (1) Localized diffuse hypo-dense area in 1 or 2 cerebral lobe were found in 17 cases, and the lesions were localized in frontal lobe (n=6), in frontotemporal lobe (n=5), and in temporo-occipital lobe (n=6). (2) Hypo-density region involving more than three cerebral lobes were found in 18 cases, and abnormalities were found in frontotemporal and parietal lobe (n=8), accompanying with subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=2); in frontal, temporal and occipital lobe (n=6), in which cerebral hemorrhage was complicated (n=1); and in other cerebral lobe (n=4). (3) Diffuse low-density region in all cerebral lobe were found in 15 cases, in which subarachnoid hemorrhage was complicated in 4 cases, and ventricular hemorrhage was found in 2 case. Conclusion: CT imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and has shown its clinical value

  5. The role of neurosteroids in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Dušan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE represents a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by acute or chronic liver failure. Hyperammonemia plays a pivotal role in the development of HE through modulation of neurotransmission, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and energy deficit. Neurosteroids contribute significantly to increased GABAergic tone in HE. Ammonia, in combination with manganese and proinflammatory cytokines, stimulate neurosteroid synthesis by up-regulation of translocator protein, a component of multiprotein complex that stimulate cholesterol transport into astrocytic mitochondria. Cholesterol serves as a substrate for the synthesis of neurosteroids allopregnanolone and tetrahydro-deoxycorticosterone. After release from astrocytes, allopregnanolone and tetrahydro-deoxycorticosterone potentiate GABAergic transmission by positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptor, thus contributing to cognitive deficit and alterations in sleep-wake cycle. Additional potential mechanisms of neurosteroid action in HE include modulation of serotoninergic, cholinergic, glutamatergic, glycinergic, and opioid receptor activities, as well as modulation of gene expression. This review aimed to summarize current knowledge of the role of neurosteroids in the pathogenesis of HE.

  6. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  7. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: ″Wernicke’s Korsakoff″ syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. The term refers to two different syndromes, each representing a different stage of the disease. Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE is an acute syndrome requiring emergent treatment to prevent death and neurologic morbidity. Korsakoff syndrome (KS refers to a chronic neurologic condition that usually occurs as a consequence of WE. It is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum that confusion, ocular signs, and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. Typical brain lesions of wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE are observed at autopsy in 0.4 to 2.8 percent of the general population in the western world and the majority of affected patients are alcoholic. The prevalence of wernicke’s encephalopathy lesions seen on autopsy was 12.5% of alcohol abusers in one report. Among those who with alcohol-related death, it has been reported to be even higher, 29 to 59%. The aim of this study was to report a case of wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old-pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria before that she had hyperemesis gravidarum with weight loss and unresponsive to outpatient and inpatient medical therapy. MRI showed hyperdense lesion around thalamus which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after high dose thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rule out and appropriate treatment of Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal and fetal death.

  8. Autism spectrum disorder and epileptic encephalopathy: common causes, many questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Siddharth; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a particularly severe form of epilepsy, associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, including impaired social-communication and restricted, repetitive behaviors that are the hallmarks of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the genetic landscape of epileptic encephalopathies is growing and demonstrates overlap with genes separately implicated in ASD. However, many questions remain about this connection, including whether epileptiform activity itself contributes to the development of ASD symptomatology. In this review, we compiled a database of genes associated with both epileptic encephalopathy and ASD, limiting our purview to Mendelian disorders not including inborn errors of metabolism, and we focused on the connection between ASD and epileptic encephalopathy rather than epilepsy broadly. Our review has four goals: to (1) discuss the overlapping presentations of ASD and monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (2) examine the impact of the epilepsy itself on neurocognitive features, including ASD, in monogenic epileptic encephalopathies; (3) outline many of the genetic causes responsible for both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy; (4) provide an illustrative example of a final common pathway that may be implicated in both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy. We demonstrate that autistic features are a common association with monogenic epileptic encephalopathies. Certain epileptic encephalopathy syndromes, like infantile spasms, are especially linked to the development of ASD. The connection between seizures themselves and neurobehavioral deficits in these monogenic encephalopathies remains open to debate. Finally, advances in genetics have revealed many genes that overlap in ties to both ASD and epileptic encephalopathy and that play a role in diverse central nervous system processes. Increased attention to the autistic features of monogenic epileptic encephalopathies is warranted for

  9. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C.; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L. M.; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R.; Dijk, Peter H.; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P.; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H.; de Haan, Timo R.

    2016-01-01

    The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson encephalopathy score

  10. Association between Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behroozian, R.; Faramarzpur, M.; Rahimi, E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The knowledge on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) contribution in the pathology of the liver and biliary tract diseases in human is very limited. The aim of this study was to assess the probable association between H. pylori seropositivity and hepatic encephalopathy. Methodology: This is a case control study conducted through three groups, cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy (HE), cirrhotics without HE and healthy controls. All subjects were examined serologically for determination of IgG class antibodies to H. pylori based on ELISA technique. Results: H. pylori seropositivity was present in 88% cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy, 86% cirrhotics without hepatic encephalopathy and 66% healthy controls. Conclusion: According to our results, H. pylori seropositivity rate in cirrhotic patients with or without hepatic encephalopathy was higher than healthy controls. But H. pylori seropositivity rate was not significantly different among cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy and those without it.

  11. Does aetiology of neonatal encephalopathy and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy influence the outcome of treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintyre, Sarah; Badawi, Nadia; Blair, Eve; Nelson, Karin B

    2015-04-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy, a clinical syndrome affecting term-born and late preterm newborn infants, increases the risk of perinatal death and long-term neurological morbidity, especially cerebral palsy. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, a treatment designed for hypoxic or ischaemic injury, associated mortality and morbidity rates have decreased. Unfortunately, only about one in eight neonates (95% confidence interval) who meet eligibility criteria for therapeutic cooling apparently benefit from the treatment. Studies of infants in representative populations indicate that neonatal encephalopathy is a potential result of a variety of antecedents and that asphyxial complications at birth account for only a small percentage of neonatal encephalopathy. In contrast, clinical case series suggest that a large proportion of neonatal encephalopathy is hypoxic or ischaemic, and trials of therapeutic hypothermia are specifically designed to include only infants exposed to hypoxia or ischaemia. This review addresses the differences, definitional and methodological, between infants studied and investigations undertaken, in population studies compared with cooling trials. It raises the question if there may be subgroups of infants with a clinical diagnosis of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in whom the pathobiology of neonatal neurological depression is not fundamentally hypoxic or ischaemic and, therefore, for whom cooling may not be beneficial. In addition, it suggests approaches to future trials of cooling plus adjuvant therapy that may contribute to further improvement of care for these vulnerable neonates. © The Authors. Journal compilation © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  12. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John... encephalopathy (CTE), but the underlying molecular changes remain unclear. Here, biochemical and genetic studies that deepen our understanding of the

  13. Diffusion MR findings in cyclosporin-A induced encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Kubilay; Minareci, Ozenc; Donmez, Fuldem; Tuzun, Umit; Atamer, Tanju

    2004-01-01

    Cyclosporin encephalopathy is a well-known entity, which is clinically characterized by altered mental status, vision problems, focal neurological deficits and seizures. The exact pathophysiology of the cyclosporin encephalopathy has not yet been defined. We report the diffusion-weighted MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings in a case of cyclosporin encephalopathy. The white-matter lesions with reversible restricted diffusion supported the hypothesis of reversible vasospasm induced by the cyclosporin. (orig.)

  14. β-Lapachone attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction in MELAS cybrid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Moon Hee; Kim, Jin Hwan; Seo, Kang-Sik; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Park, Woo Jin

    2014-11-21

    Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study investigated the efficacy of β-lapachone (β-lap), a natural quinone compound, in rescuing mitochondrial dysfunction in MELAS cybrid cells. β-Lap significantly restored energy production and mitochondrial membrane potential as well as normalized the elevated ROS level in MELAS cybrid cells. Additionally, β-lap reduced lactic acidosis and restored glucose uptake in the MELAS cybrid cells. Finally, β-lap activated Sirt1 by increasing the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio, which was accompanied by increased mtDNA content. Two other quinone compounds (idebenone and CoQ10) that have rescued mitochondrial dysfunction in previous studies of MELAS cybrid cells had a minimal effect in the current study. Taken together, these results demonstrated that β-lap may provide a novel therapeutic modality for the treatment of MELAS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Case of hepatic encephalopathy induced by thortrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirato, H.; Kudo, N.; Takita, K. (Nakatori Hospital, Akita (Japan))

    1980-09-01

    A case of hepatic encephalopathy induced by thorotrast injected as a contrast 40 years before was reported. The patient was a 64-year-old man with severe liver dysfunction, and had psychic and neurological symptoms, and hyperammonemia. There was a relationship between ammonium concentration in blood and psychic and neurological symptoms. Electroencephalogram showed three phases waves peculiar to hepatic coma intermittently. Thorotrast in the liver was detected by radiological methods and in vivo measurement of the radioactivity. From the above-mentioned result, this disease was diagnosed as hepatic encephalopathy induced by long-term sedimentation of thorotrast without complication of malignant tumors. Because of the concurrent presence of cerebral infarction, the diagnosis was difficult to make.

  16. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a case of a 64-year-old male with a history of liver failure presenting with altered mental status, initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE by electroencephalogram (EEG. NCSE is a difficult diagnosis to make, given no clear consensus on diagnostic criteria. Especially in the intensive care unit setting of persistent altered mental status with no clear etiology, NCSE must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as the consequences of delayed diagnosis and treatment can be substantial. EEG can be useful in the evaluation of patients with hepatic encephalopathy who have persistently altered levels of consciousness despite optimal medical management. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:372–374.

  17. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    and determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  18. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  19. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Hughes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  20. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy and Meat Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Hester J. T.; Knight, Richard S. G.

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) comprise a wide-ranging group of neurodegenerative diseases found in animals and humans. They have diverse causes and geographical distributions, but have similar pathological features, transmissibility and, are ultimately, fatal. Central to all TSEs is the presence of an abnormal form of a normal host protein, namely the prion protein. Because of their potential transmissibility, these diseases have wide public health ramifications.

  1. A whole mitochondrial genome screening in a MELAS patient: A novel mitochondrial tRNA{sup Val} mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezghani, Najla [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Mnif, Mouna [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Kacem, Maha [Service de Medecine interne, C.H.U. Fattouma Bourguiba de Monastir (Tunisia); Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna, E-mail: emna_mkaouar@mail2world.com [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Hadj Salem, Ikhlass [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia); Kallel, Nozha; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed [Service d' endocrinologie, C.H.U. Habib Bourguiba de Sfax (Tunisia); Fakhfakh, Faiza [Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Universite de Sfax (Tunisia)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} We report a young Tunisian patient with clinical features of MELAS syndrome. {yields} Reported mitochondrial mutations were absent after a mutational screening of the whole mtDNA. {yields} We described a novel m.1640A>G mutation in the tRNA{sup Val} gene which was absent in 150 controls. {yields} Mitochondrial deletions and POLG1 gene mutations were absent. {yields} The m.1640A>G mutation could be associated to MELAS syndrome. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by a wide variety of clinical presentations and a multisystemic organ involvement. In this study, we report a Tunisian girl with clinical features of MELAS syndrome who was negative for the common m.3243A>G mutation, but also for the reported mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and deletions. Screening of the entire mtDNA genome showed several known mitochondrial variants besides to a novel transition m.1640A>G affecting a wobble adenine in the anticodon stem region of the tRNA{sup Val}. This nucleotide was conserved and it was absent in 150 controls suggesting its pathogenicity. In addition, no mutations were found in the nuclear polymerase gamma-1 gene (POLG1). These results suggest further investigation nuclear genes encoding proteins responsible for stability and structural components of the mtDNA or to the oxidative phosphorylation machinery to explain the phenotypic variability in the studied family.

  2. BLOOD BIOMARKERS FOR EVALUATION OF PERINATAL ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Marshall Graham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the liquid brain biopsy. A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment.

  3. Inflammatory Macrophages Promotes Development of Diabetic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beiyun; Miao, Ya; Zhao, Zhe; Zhong, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes and Alzheimer's disease are often associated with each other, whereas the relationship between two diseases is ill-defined. Although hyperglycemia during diabetes is a major cause of encephalopathy, diabetes may also cause chronic inflammatory complications including peripheral neuropathy. Hence the role and the characteristics of inflammatory macrophages in the development of diabetic encephalopathy need to be clarified. Diabetes were induced in mice by i.p. injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Two weeks after STZ injection and confirmation of development of diabetes, inflammatory macrophages were eliminated by i.p. injection of 20µg saporin-conjugated antibody against a macrophage surface marker CD11b (saporin-CD11b) twice per week, while a STZ-treated group received injection of rat IgG of same frequency as a control. The effects of macrophage depletion on brain degradation markers, brain malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase, superoxidase anion-positive cells and nitric oxide (NO) were measured. Saporin-CD11b significantly reduced inflammatory macrophages in brain, without affecting mouse blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose responses and beta cell mass. However, reduced brain macrophages significantly inhibited the STZ-induced decreases in brain MDA, catalase and superoxidase anion-positive cells, and the STZ-induced decreases in brain NO. Inflammatory macrophages may promote development of diabetic encephalopathy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Origin and implications of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, H

    1996-04-01

    All spongiform encephalopathies in animals, including humans, are slow developing infectious diseases. The current working theory links the origin of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to the feeding of cattle with meat and bone meal prepared from scrapie-infected sheep remains. Recycling of cattle meat and bones (MBM) essentially resulted in the selection of a single strain from the "wild type", a mixture of 20 strains. The BSE agent is easily transmitted through ingestion, with some evidence of vertical transmission. Paradoxically, cattle have selected a major new strain which appears to be more virulent than an unselected strain found in scrapie sheep. The same strain of BSE agent is implicated in the occurrence of spongiform encephalopathy in domestic cats, tiger, and some exotic species of ruminants in zoos. The properties of BSE and its spread into cattle are still disputed. Since our understanding of the disease and its transmissibility in humans must await observations that will be made over some years to come, it is important to keep a reasonable perspective and ensure that any speculative comment is consistent with fact. In risk assessment in such circumstances, it is tempting give too much credence to persuasive parallels when direct relevant information is not available. On the other hand, it would also not be wise to assume that the disease will die by itself and will have no effect on humans.

  5. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy characterized by parallel use of the continuous reaction time and portosystemic encephalopathy tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Vilstrup, H

    2015-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a frequent complication to liver cirrhosis that causes poor quality of life, a great burden to caregivers, and can be treated. For diagnosis and grading the international guidelines recommend the use of psychometric tests of different modalities (computer...... based vs. paper and pencil). To compare results of the Continuous Reaction time (CRT) and the Portosystemic Encephalopathy (PSE) tests in a large unselected cohort of cirrhosis patients without clinically detectable brain impairment and to clinically characterize the patients according to their test...

  6. The metabolomic profile of umbilical cord blood in neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Walsh

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE in newborns can cause significant long-term neurological disability. The insult is a complex injury characterised by energy failure and disruption of cellular homeostasis, leading to mitochondrial damage. The importance of individual metabolic pathways, and their interaction in the disease process is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to describe and quantify the metabolomic profile of umbilical cord blood samples in a carefully defined population of full-term infants with HIE.The injury severity was defined using both the modified Sarnat score and continuous multichannel electroencephalogram. Using these classification systems, our population was divided into those with confirmed HIE (n = 31, asphyxiated infants without encephalopathy (n = 40 and matched controls (n = 71. All had umbilical cord blood drawn and biobanked at -80 °C within 3 hours of delivery. A combined direct injection and LC-MS/MS assay (AbsolutIDQ p180 kit, Biocrates Life Sciences AG, Innsbruck, Austria was used for the metabolomic analyses of the samples. Targeted metabolomic analysis showed a significant alteration between study groups in 29 metabolites from 3 distinct classes (Amino Acids, Acylcarnitines, and Glycerophospholipids. 9 of these metabolites were only significantly altered between neonates with Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy and matched controls, while 14 were significantly altered in both study groups. Multivariate Discriminant Analysis models developed showed clear multifactorial metabolite associations with both asphyxia and HIE. A logistic regression model using 5 metabolites clearly delineates severity of asphyxia and classifies HIE infants with AUC = 0.92. These data describe wide-spread disruption to not only energy pathways, but also nitrogen and lipid metabolism in both asphyxia and HIE.This study shows that a multi-platform targeted approach to metabolomic analyses using accurately phenotyped and

  7. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders.

  8. Probiotics for people with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Rohan; McGee, Richard G; Riordan, Stephen M; Webster, Angela C

    2017-02-23

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a disorder of brain function as a result of liver failure or portosystemic shunt or both. Both hepatic encephalopathy (clinically overt) and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (not clinically overt) significantly impair patient's quality of life and daily functioning, and represent a significant burden on healthcare resources. Probiotics are live micro-organisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, may confer a health benefit on the host. To determine the beneficial and harmful effects of probiotics in any dosage, compared with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment for people with any grade of acute or chronic hepatic encephalopathy. This review did not consider the primary prophylaxis of hepatic encephalopathy. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, conference proceedings, reference lists of included trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform until June 2016. We included randomised clinical trials that compared probiotics in any dosage with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment in people with hepatic encephalopathy. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We conducted random-effects model meta-analysis due to obvious heterogeneity of participants and interventions. We defined a P value of 0.05 or less as significant. We expressed dichotomous outcomes as risk ratio (RR) and continuous outcomes as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 21 trials with 1420 participants, of these, 14 were new trials. Fourteen trials compared a probiotic with placebo or no treatment, and seven trials compared a probiotic with lactulose. The trials used a variety of probiotics; the most commonly used group of probiotic was VSL#3, a proprietary name for a group of eight probiotics. Duration of administration

  9. Normalization of the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To construct normal values for the tests of the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) and evaluate the prevalence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) among Turkish patients with liver cirrhosis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-five healthy subjects and sixty patients with liver ...

  10. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...... antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy, but the results are conflicting....

  11. Radiographical findings in patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwir, Saleh; Hal, Hassan; Veith, Joshua; Schreibman, Ian; Kadry, Zakiyah; Riley, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication encountered in patients with liver cirrhosis. Hepatic encephalopathy is not reflected in the current liver transplant allocation system. Correlation was sought between hepatic encephalopathy with findings detected on radiographic imaging studies and the patient's clinical profile. A retrospective analysis was conducted of patients with cirrhosis, who presented for liver transplant evaluation in 2009 and 2010. Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, ejection fraction less than 60% and who had a TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting) procedure or who did not complete the evaluation were excluded. Statistical analysis was performed and variables found to be significant on univariate analysis (P encephalopathy group (n = 58) and a control group (n = 59). Univariate analysis found that a smaller portal vein diameter, smaller liver antero-posterior diameter, liver nodularity and use of diuretics or centrally acting medications showed significant correlation with hepatic encephalopathy. This association was confirmed for smaller portal vein, use of diuretics and centrally acting medications in the multivariate analysis. A decrease in portal vein diameter was associated with increased risk of encephalopathy. Identifying patients with smaller portal vein diameter may warrant screening for encephalopathy by more advanced psychometric testing, and more aggressive control of constipation and other factors that may precipitate encephalopathy. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited.

  12. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of transmissible mink encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful transmission of Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy (TME) to cattle supports the bovine hypothesis to the still controversial origin of TME outbreaks. Human and primate susceptibility to classical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (c-BSE) and the transmissibility of L-type BSE to macaques as...

  13. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  14. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: We identified trials through...

  15. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2017-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. Objectives: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. Search methods: We identified trials through...

  16. Early Recognition of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Through FDDNP PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    characteristic distribution is felt to be the cardinal pathologic feature of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. This project will examine whether FDDNP PET...chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Pathological series have indicated that a characteristic feature of CTE is accumulation of tau protein in the...3. Accomplishments: Major goals: Upon receiving approval from the Human Research Protection Office, enrollment of participants began in March , 2015

  17. Safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of rifaximin for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Krag, Aleksander; Gluud, Lise L

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a complex disease entity ranging from mild cognitive dysfunction to deep coma. Traditionally, treatment has focused on a reduction of ammonia through a reduced production, absorption, or clearance. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic, which reduces the production of ...... and safety of long-term treatment with rifaximin and evaluate effects of combination therapy with lactulose and branched-chain amino acids for patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy is a complex disease entity ranging from mild cognitive dysfunction to deep coma. Traditionally, treatment has focused on a reduction of ammonia through a reduced production, absorption, or clearance. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic, which reduces the production...... of ammonia by gut bacteria and, to some extent, other toxic derivatives from the gut. Clinical trials show that these effects improve episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. A large randomized trial found that rifaximin prevents recurrent episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. Most patients were treated...

  18. Reversible cortical blindness in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kanti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and often fatal manifestation of chronic liver disease. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is believed to be multifactorial including impaired blood-brain barrier function, imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in cortex, accumulation of various toxic and false neurotransmitters, and lack of nutrients like oxygen and glucose. Signs and symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy varies and commonly ranges from personality changes, disturbed consciousness, sleep pattern alternation, intellectual deterioration, speech disturbances, asterixis to frank coma and even death. Reversible or transient cortical blindness is rare manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy. It may even precede the phase of altered consciousness in such patients. Very few similar cases have been reported worldwide. Hence, we would like to report a case of transient cortical blindness in a patient of hepatic encephalopathy.

  19. Some aspects of morphogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tumanskiy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the literary data and conducted large-scale research it was ascertained that diabetes mellitus raises the risk of cerebral stroke in 2-6 times, the risk of transitional ischemic attacks in 3 times in comparison with the same risk in the general population [3]. Diabetic encephalopathy in its pure form can be found in 80.7% of patients with diabetes mellitus of the 1st type, its development is caused mainly by ineffective metabolic control of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow [4]. Mixed encephalopathy is prevailed among patients with diabetes mellitus of the 2nd type; lacunar heart attack is more often developed among this category of patients [5], multiple focus of ischemic affection of white substance – leukoaraiosis regarded as the areas of increased level of water, gliosis, and demyelination of white substance is often registered [6]. Pathogeny of diabetic encephalopathy hasn’t been studied properly. It is known that it is a multifactor effect in the development of which the main role is led by the vascular dysfunction with the reduction of blood supply and ischemia of brain tissue, as well as direct toxic influence of hyperglycemia and disorder of trophism of nerve tissue [7]. Microangiopathy and macroangiopathy acquire the special meaning in encephalopathy development among patients with diabetes mellitus. The evidence of microangiopathy and macroangiopathy is identified by the disease course and prognosis. On the ultrastructural level the changes of vessel microcircular movement are registered on the 1st month of the experimental alloxan diabetes. During electronic microscopy the thickening of basal membrane of capillaries as well as their dissection is observed. In micro vessels such phenomena as precipitation of lipoproteids, raising of the synthesis of collagen (the second type, dystrophic changes of endotheliocytes, and lowering of micropinocytosis can be found [11,12,13,14]. As the severity of diabetes mellitus

  20. Hepatic encephalopathy: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaminathan M

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mirashini Swaminathan,1 Mark Alexander Ellul,2 Timothy JS Cross1 1Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, 2Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of liver dysfunction, including acute liver failure and liver cirrhosis. HE presents as a spectrum of neuropsychiatric symptoms ranging from subtle fluctuating cognitive impairment to coma. It is a significant contributor of morbidity in patients with liver disease. HE is observed in acute liver failure, liver bypass procedures, for example, shunt surgery and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and cirrhosis. These are classified as Type A, B and C HE, respectively. HE can also be classified according to whether its presence is overt or covert. The pathogenesis is linked with ammonia and glutamine production, and treatment is based on mechanisms to reduce the formation and/or removal of these compounds. There is no specific diagnostic test for HE, and diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion, excluding other causes and use of clinical tests that may support its diagnosis. Many tests are used in trials and experimentally, but have not yet gained universal acceptance. This review focuses on the definitions, pathogenesis and treatment of HE. Consideration will be given to existing treatment, including avoidance of precipitating factors and novel therapies such as prebiotics, probiotics, antibiotics, laxatives, branched-chain amino acids, shunt embolization and the importance of considering liver transplant in appropriate cases. Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, pathogenesis, treatment, lactulose, rifaximin, probiotics, covert hepatic encephalopathy

  1. Memantine, a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist improves hyperammonemia-induced encephalopathy and acute hepatic encephalopathy in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogels, B. A.; Maas, M. A.; Daalhuisen, J.; Quack, G.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor overactivity in two different experimental rat models of encephalopathy: subacute encephalopathy caused by severe hyperammonemia in portacaval-shunted rats (AI-PCS rats) and acute hepatic

  2. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, Mad Cow Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Bruckner

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Mad Cow Disease or BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy became a household name internationally and also in South Africa. International hysteria resulted following reports of a possible link between a disease diagnosed in cattle in Britain and a variant of the disease diagnosed in humans after the presumed ingestion or contact with meat from infected cattle. The European Union instituted a ban on the importation of beef from the United Kingdom during March 1996 that had a severe effect on the beef industry in the UK and also resulted in a world wide consumer resistance against beef consumption.

  3. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis...... and treatment is important for the reversibility of the condition. In this case report we emphasize the importance of blood pressure control in a post-partum woman, who had a rather complicated pregnancy. The symptoms of PRES were not recognized immediately because of failure to use and acknowledge a blood...

  4. Biomarkers of multiorgan injury in neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Saima; Molloy, Eleanor J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major contributor to neurodevelopmental deficits including cerebral palsy in term and near-term infants. The long-term neurodevelopmental outcome is difficult to predict with certainty in first few days of life. Multiorgan involvement is common but not part of the diagnostic criteria for NE. The most frequently involved organs are the heart, liver, kidneys and hematological system. Cerebral and organ involvement is associated with the release of organ specific biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. These biomarkers may have a role in the assessment of the severity of asphyxia and long-term outcome in neonates with NE.

  5. Advances in ammonia metabolism and hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeters, P.B.; Wilson, J.H.P.; Meijer, A.J.; Holm, E.

    1988-01-01

    There are four main 'parts' within the book: the first is devoted to peripheral and hepatic ammonia metabolism, the urea cycle, acid base status and its regulation; part two addresses animal models in liver failure, GABA-ergic neurotransmission and its relevance in hepatic failure; a third part concerns neurochemistry including brain ammonia metabolism, serotonin metabolism and energy status, in vivo evaluated with modern techniques like infusion of compounds labeled with stable or radioactive isotopes and with NMR, while the last section provides a description of the determination of ammonia and the treatment of encephalopathy with established but also with experimental techniques. refs.; figs.; tabs

  6. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    and treatment is important for the reversibility of the condition. In this case report we emphasize the importance of blood pressure control in a post-partum woman, who had a rather complicated pregnancy. The symptoms of PRES were not recognized immediately because of failure to use and acknowledge a blood......Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis...

  7. [Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder; Bülow, Hans Henrik

    2015-11-23

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis and treatment is important for the reversibility of the condition. In this case report we emphasize the importance of blood pressure control in a post-partum woman, who had a rather complicated pregnancy. The symptoms of PRES were not recognized immediately because of failure to use and acknowledge a blood pressure test.

  8. Cardiovascular dysfunction in infants with neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, Katey

    2012-04-01

    Severe perinatal asphyxia with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy occurs in approximately 1-2\\/1000 live births and is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated neurological disabilities in children. Multiorgan dysfunction commonly occurs as part of the asphyxial episode, with cardiovascular dysfunction occurring in up to a third of infants. This narrative paper attempts to review the literature on the importance of early recognition of cardiac dysfunction using echocardiography and biomarkers such as troponin and brain type natriuretic peptide. These tools may allow accurate assessment of cardiac dysfunction and guide therapy to improve outcome.

  9. [Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) toxic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signaté, A; Olindo, S; Chausson, N; Cassinoto, C; Edimo Nana, M; Saint Vil, M; Cabre, P; Smadja, D

    2009-03-01

    Ingestion of star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) can induce severe intoxication in subjects with chronic renal failure. Oxalate plays a key role in the neurotoxicity of star fruit. We report the cases of two patients with unknown chronic renal insufficiency who developed severe encephalopathy after ingestion of star fruit. The two patients developed intractable hiccups, vomiting, impaired consciousness and status epilepticus. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging showed cortical and thalamic hyperintense lesions related to epileptic status. They improved after being submitted to continuous hemofiltration which constitutes the most effective treatment during the acute phase.

  10. Electrocardiography as an early cardiac screening test in children with mitochondrial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Baik

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate myocardial conductivity to understand cardiac involvement in patients with mitochondrial disease. Methods : We performed retrospective study on fifty-seven nonspecific mitochondrial encephalopathy patients with no clinical cardiac manifestations. The patients were diagnosed with mitochondrial respiratory chain complex defects through biochemical enzyme assays of muscle tissue. We performed standard 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG on all patients. Results : ECG abnormalities were observed in 30 patients (52.6%. Prolongation of the QTc interval (&gt;440 ms was seen in 19 patients (33.3%, widening of the corrected QRS interval in 15 (26.3%, and bundle branch block in four (7.0%. Atrioventricular block, premature atrial contraction and premature ventricular contraction were seen in two patients each (3.5% and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in one patient (1.8%. Conclusion : Given this finding, we recommend active screening with ECG in patients with mitochondrial disease even in patients without obvious cardiac manifestation.

  11. Prions and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

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    Juntes Polona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are a unique group of neurodegenerative diseases of animals and humans, which always have a fatal outcome and are transmissible among animals of the same or different species. Scope and Approach. The aim of this work is to review some recent data about animal TSEs, with the emphasis on their causative agents and zoonotic potential, and to discuss why the surveillance and control measures over animal TSEs should remain in force. Key Findings and Conclusions. We still have incomplete knowledge of prions and prion diseases. Scrapie has been present for a very long time and controlled with varied success. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE emerged unnoticed, and spread within a few years to epidemic proportions, entailing enormous economic consequences and public concerns. Currently, the classical BSE epidemic is under control, but atypical cases do, and probably will, persist in bovine populations. The Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD of the cervids has been spreading in North America and has recently been detected in Europe. Preventive measures for the control of classical BSE remain in force, including the feed ban and removal of specified risk materials. However, active BSE surveillance has considerably decreased. In the absence of such preventive and control measures, atypical BSE cases in healthy slaughtered bovines might persist in the human food chain, and BSE prions might resurface. Moreover, other prion strains might emerge and spread undetected if the appropriate preventive and surveillance measures were to cease, leaving behind inestimable consequences.

  12. Probiotics in management of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Barjesh Chander; Singh, Jatinderpal

    2016-12-01

    Gut microflora leads to production of ammonia and endotoxins which play important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). There is relationship between HE and absorption of nitrogenous substances from the intestines. Probiotics play a role in treatment of HE by causing alterations in gut flora by decreasing the counts of pathogen bacteria, intestinal mucosal acidification, decrease in production and absorption of ammonia, alterations in permeability of gut, decreased endotoxin levels and changes in production of short chain fatty acids. Role of gut microbiota using prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics have been evaluated in the management of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), overt HE and prevention of HE. Many studies have shown efficacy of probiotics in reduction of blood ammonia levels, treatment of MHE and prevention of HE. However these trials have problems like inclusion of small number of patients, short treatment durations, variability in HE/MHE related outcomes utilized and high bias risk, errors of systematic and random types. Systematic reviews also have shown different results with one systematic review showing clinical benefits whereas another concluded that probiotics do not have any role in treatment of MHE or HE. Also practical questions on optimal dose, ideal combination of organisms, and duration of treatment and persistence of benefits on long term follow-up are still to be clarified. At present, there are no recommendations for use of probiotics in patients with HE.

  13. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy: An Underrecognized Clinicoradiologic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiujuan; Wu, Wei; Pan, Wei; Wu, Limin; Liu, Kangding; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE) is a rare but distinctive type of acute encephalopathy with global distribution. Occurrence of ANE is usually preceded by a virus-associated febrile illness and ensued by rapid deterioration. However, the causal relationship between viral infections and ANE and the exact pathogenesis of ANE remain unclear; both environmental and host factors might be involved. Most cases of ANE are sporadic and nonrecurrent, namely, isolated or sporadic ANE; however, few cases are recurrent and with familial episodes. The recurrent and familial forms of ANE were found to be incompletely autosomal-dominant. Further the missense mutations in the gene encoding the nuclear pore protein Ran Binding Protein 2 (RANBP2) were identified. Although the clinical course and the prognosis of ANE are diverse, the hallmark of neuroradiologic manifestation of ANE is multifocal symmetric brain lesions which are demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The treatment of ANE is still under investigation. We summarize the up-to-date knowledge on ANE, with emphasis on prompt diagnosis and better treatment of this rare but fatal disease. PMID:25873770

  14. Septic encephalopathy and septic encephalitis‬‬.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Simone C; Eiffert, Helmut; Brück, Wolfgang; Nau, Roland

    2017-02-01

    During the last two decades, septic encephalopathy (SE) was recognized as a clinically relevant problem with a high prevalence in patients at admission and during their hospital stay. SE is a condition associated with increased mortality and morbidity such as long-term cognitive impairment. Areas covered: This review illustrates the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and encephalitis involving blood-brain-barrier dysfunction and neuroinflammation caused by endothelial and microglial activation by endogenous or pathogen-derived compounds, hypoxia by impaired microvascular regulation and septic shock as well as imbalance of neurotransmitters. The continuum between septic-embolic and septic-metastatic encephalitis and SE is underlined by histological findings. The options of technical examinations and biomarkers to diagnose SE are discussed together with established therapeutic options as well as current experimental approaches. Expert commentary: An outlook for clinicians is provided including promising diagnostic approaches by means of new imaging techniques. Clinical trials with drugs already established for other indications such as statins, erythropoietin and minocycline are warranted in the future.

  15. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover VPB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vijay PB Grover, Joshua M Tognarelli, Nicolas Massie, Mary ME Crossey, Nicola A Cook, Simon D Taylor-Robinson Liver Unit, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that "those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief". He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, cirrhosis, ammonia, pathology, treatment, rifaximin, lactulose

  16. Anatomy of the late radiation encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Reuck, J; vander Eecken, H

    1975-01-01

    The clinico-pathological data and the topography of the lesions were determined in 13 cases of late radiation encephalopathy. In one case the arterial vascularisation was studied by the translucidation technique after filling of the blood vessels with a colloidal barium sulphate solution. The radiation lesions consisted of areas of focal necrosis and of diffuse demyelination and necrosis of the deep cerebral structures and the brain stem. Demyelination was predominantly present in cases of late appearance of the neurological symptoms while necrosis was found in cases with a short latency period. The cerebral cortex and the arcuate fibres were always the most preserved structures. The topography of the focal lesions in the cerebral hemispheres and in the brain stem corresponded well to the vascular supply areas of the deep perforating arteries, while the diffuse lesions always had a predominant distribution in the periventricular arterial end- and border-zones. These observations were also confirmed by a post mortem angiographic study. The present report argues once more for a vascular aetiology as cause of the late radiation encephalopathy.

  17. The Frequency and Severity of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abnormalities in Infants with Mild Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian H; Neil, Jeffrey; Morey, JoAnn; Yang, Edward; Silvera, Michelle V; Inder, Terrie E; Ortinau, Cynthia

    2017-08-01

    To assess and contrast the incidence and severity of abnormalities on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia. This retrospective cohort studied infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia at a single tertiary neonatal intensive care unit between 2013 and 2015. Two neuroradiologists masked to the clinical condition evaluated brain MRIs for cerebral injury after therapeutic hypothermia using the Barkovich classification system. Additional abnormalities not included in this classification system were also noted. The rate, pattern, and severity of abnormalities/injury were compared across the grades of neonatal encephalopathy. Eighty-nine infants received therapeutic hypothermia and met study criteria, 48 with mild neonatal encephalopathy, 35 with moderate neonatal encephalopathy, and 6 with severe neonatal encephalopathy. Forty-eight infants (54%) had an abnormality on MRI. There was no difference in the rate of overall MRI abnormalities by grade of neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 54%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 54%, and severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P= .89). Basal ganglia/thalamic injury was more common in those with severe neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 4%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 9%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 34%; P = .03). In contrast, watershed injury did not differ between neonatal encephalopathy grades (mild neonatal encephalopathy 36%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 32%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P = .3). Mild neonatal encephalopathy is commonly associated with MRI abnormalities after therapeutic hypothermia. The grade of neonatal encephalopathy during the first hours of life may not discriminate adequately between infants with and without cerebral injury noted on MRI after therapeutic hypothermia

  18. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice. A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians’ awareness of its possible onset. PMID:27399058

  19. Current concepts in the assessment and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cash, W J

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined as a metabolically induced, potentially reversible, functional disturbance of the brain that may occur in acute or chronic liver disease. Standardized nomenclature has been proposed but a standardized approach to the treatment, particularly of persistent, episodic and recurrent encephalopathy associated with liver cirrhosis has not been proposed. This review focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of HE in patients with cirrhosis. The pathogenesis and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in fulminant hepatic failure is quite different and is reviewed elsewhere.

  20. Portal hemodynamics in chronic portal-systemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi, Motohide; Igarashi, Masahiko; Hino, Shinichi; Takayasu, Kenichi; Goto, Nobuaki; Musha, Hirotaka; Ohnishi, Kunihiko; Okuda, Kunio

    1985-01-01

    A portal hemodynamic study was made in 7 consecutive patients with chronic portal-systemic encephalopathy by percutaneous transhepatic catheterization of the portal vein and injecting contrast medium into the superior mesenteric vein or by superior mesenteric arterial portography in comparison with patients without encephalopathy studied by percutaneous catheterization of these veins. It is suggested that chronic portal-systemic encephalopathy is a result of a large collateral route shunting a large proportion of the superior mesenteric venous blood into systemic circulation, and that development of such collaterals precludes formation of large esophageal varices. (Auth.)

  1. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavige G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%, electrolyte imbalances (80% and shock (40%. Five (33.3% patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%. Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3% of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  2. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David O; Robbins, Clifford A; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. However, the study of CTE remains in its infancy. This review focuses on research from the Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) at Boston University. This study reviews the formation of the CSTE, major CSTE publications and current ongoing research projects at the CSTE. The neuropathology of CTE has been well-described. Current research focuses on: methods of diagnosing the disease during life (including the development of biomarkers), examination of CTE risk factors (including genetic susceptibility and head impact exposure variables); description of the clinical presentation of CTE; development of research diagnostic criteria for Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome; and assessment of mechanism and pathogenesis. Current research at the BU CSTE is aimed at increasing understanding of the long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts and attempting to begin to answer several of the unanswered questions regarding CTE.

  3. Reversible infantile mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczonadi, Veronika; Bansagi, Boglarka; Horvath, Rita

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are usually severe and progressive conditions; however, there are rare forms that show remarkable spontaneous recoveries. Two homoplasmic mitochondrial tRNA mutations (m.14674T>C/G in mt-tRNA(Glu)) have been reported to cause severe infantile mitochondrial myopathy in the first months of life. If these patients survive the first year of life by extensive life-sustaining measures they usually recover and develop normally. Another mitochondrial disease due to deficiency of the 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate methyltransferase (TRMU) causes severe liver failure in infancy, but similar to the reversible mitochondrial myopathy, within the first year of life these infants may also recover completely. Partial recovery has been noted in some other rare forms of mitochondrial disease due to deficiency of mitochondrial tRNA synthetases and mitochondrial tRNA modifying enzymes. Here we summarize the clinical presentation of these unique reversible mitochondrial diseases and discuss potential molecular mechanisms behind the reversibility. Understanding these mechanisms may provide the key to treatments of potential broader relevance in mitochondrial disease, where for the majority of the patients no effective treatment is currently available.

  4. A Case of Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjit Tarafdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-years-old man on phenytoin, levetiracetam, and sodium valproate presented with acute confusion. Routine investigations including serum valproate and phenytoin concentration were normal. His serum ammonia concentration was raised. His valproate was held and 2 days later he recovered with concordant normalisation of serum ammonia concentration. Urea acid cycle disorder was ruled out, and a diagnosis of valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE was made. Asymptomatic hyperammonemia occurs in 15–50% of valproate-treated patients, and while the true incidence of VHE is not known, it is a recognized complication of sodium valproate treatment. VHE typically presents acutely with impaired consciousness, lethargy, and vomiting. Valproate concentrations may be in the therapeutic range, and liver function tests are typically “normal.” Treatment for VHE consists of ceasing valproate and providing supportive care. Some have advocated carnitine replacement.

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

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    Kostić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by the following symptoms: seizures, impaired consciousness and/or vision, vomiting, nausea, and focal neurological signs. Diagnostic imaging includes examination by magnetic resonance (MR and computed tomography (CT, where brain edema is visualized bi-laterally and symmetrically, predominantly posteriorly, parietally, and occipitally. Case report. We presented a 73-year-old patient with the years-long medical history of hipertension and renal insufficiency, who developed PRES with the symptomatology of the rear cranium. CT and MR verified changes in the white matter involving all lobes on both sides of the brain. After a two-week treatment (antihypertensive, hypolipemic and rehydration therapy clinical improvement with no complications occurred, with complete resolution of changes in the white matter observed on CT and MR. Conclusion. PRES is a reversible syndrome in which the symptoms withdraw after several days to several weeks if early diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started without delay.

  6. Transcranial electrostimulation in patients with alcoholic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barylnik Yu.B.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TES was used for treating patients with alcoholic encephalopathy against the background of the basic treatment, which includes nootropics, normotimics, soporifics, over-all strengthening therapy and other devices. The course of treatment consisted of 10 daily procedures lasting for 30 minutes. The TES influence was evaluated according to the clinical state, the neurologic status, including EEG (electroencephalogram, the psychometric scales were also used for evaluating the manifestation of depression, anxiety and working memory in comparison with appropriate indices in the control group of patients, who were being treated by the traditional method. TES led to normalization of health state, neurologic status and vegetative innervation, the reduction in pathologic inclination, which corresponded to general improvement of the state of patients, EEG indices and psychometric scales

  7. Myoclonic encephalopathy after exposure to trichloroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Pere; Nogué, Santiago; Vilchez, Daniel; Salvadó, Elisa; Casal, Amparo; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2008-12-01

    Trichloroethylene is a widely-used industrial solvent that is absorbed through the digestive or respiratory tracts or cutaneously. It has a selective tropism for the cardiovascular and central nervous systems and may cause death due to cardiac arrest or neurological sequelae. We present the case of a 25-yr-old women who was exposed to trichloroethylene in the workplace for 18 months and who developed a disabling myoclonic encephalopathy. Non-toxicological causes were excluded. Although the exposure ceased, the disease progressed with thalamic and cerebellar involvement. The patient, who had only a partial response to symptomatic treatment, suffered severe limitations in the activities of daily living and was registered as permanently disabled due to a work-related disability.

  8. Cooling for newborns with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Susan E; Berg, Marie; Hunt, Rod; Tarnow-Mordi, William O; Inder, Terrie E; Davis, Peter G

    2013-01-31

    Newborn animal studies and pilot studies in humans suggest that mild hypothermia following peripartum hypoxia-ischaemia in newborn infants may reduce neurological sequelae without adverse effects. To determine the effect of therapeutic hypothermia in encephalopathic asphyxiated newborn infants on mortality, long-term neurodevelopmental disability and clinically important side effects. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group as outlined in The Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 2007). Randomised controlled trials evaluating therapeutic hypothermia in term and late preterm newborns with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy were identified by searching the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2007, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2007), previous reviews including cross-references, abstracts, conferences, symposia proceedings, expert informants and journal handsearching. We updated this search in May 2012. We included randomised controlled trials comparing the use of therapeutic hypothermia with standard care in encephalopathic term or late preterm infants with evidence of peripartum asphyxia and without recognisable major congenital anomalies. The primary outcome measure was death or long-term major neurodevelopmental disability. Other outcomes included adverse effects of cooling and 'early' indicators of neurodevelopmental outcome. Four review authors independently selected, assessed the quality of and extracted data from the included studies. Study authors were contacted for further information. Meta-analyses were performed using risk ratios (RR) and risk differences (RD) for dichotomous data, and weighted mean difference for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 11 randomised controlled trials in this updated review, comprising 1505 term and late preterm infants with moderate/severe encephalopathy and evidence of intrapartum asphyxia

  9. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-01-01

    A primed continuous infusion of [ 15 N, 1- 13 C]leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet [0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)]. An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO 2 enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy

  10. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus disguising as hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yong Min; Lee, Sung Wook; Han, Sang Young; Baek, Yang Hyun; Ahn, Ji Hye; Choi, Won Jong; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Yoon, Byeol A

    2015-04-28

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus has become an important issue in modern neurology and epileptology. This is based on difficulty in definitively elucidating the condition and its various clinical phenomena and on our inadequate insight into the intrinsic pathophysiological processes. Despite nonconvulsive status epilepticus being a situation that requires immediate treatment, this disorder may not be appreciated as the cause of mental status impairment. Although the pathophysiology of nonconvulsive status epilepticus remains unknown, this disorder is thought to lead to neuronal damage, so its identification and treatment are important. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. We report a case of a 52-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting an altered mental status. He was initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus by electroencephalogram.

  11. Hypertension as the trigger for posterior reversible encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RESEARCH. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neuro ..... rise of blood pressure instead of the sustained levels of hypertension in these patients. .... high prevalence and more extensive imaging findings. Am J Kidney ...

  12. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  13. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome-associated Encephalopathy Successfully Treated with Corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Takashi; Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-11-01

    The encephalopathy that occurs in association with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which is caused by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli), has a high mortality rate and patients sometimes present sequelae. We herein describe the case of a 20-year-old woman who developed encephalopathy during the convalescent stage of HUS caused by E.coli O26. Hyperintense lesions were detected in the pons, basal ganglia, and cortex on diffusion-weighted brain MRI. From the onset of HUS encephalopathy, we treated the patient with methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse therapy alone. Her condition improved, and she did not present sequelae. Our study shows that corticosteroids appear to be effective for the treatment of some patients with HUS encephalopathy.

  14. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Maternal or neonatal infection: association with neonatal encephalopathy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenster, Meike; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Ruel, Theodore; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Tam, Emily W; Partridge, John Colin; Barkovich, Anthony James; Ferriero, Donna M; Glass, Hannah C

    2014-07-01

    Perinatal infection may potentiate brain injury among children born preterm. The objective of this study was to examine whether maternal and/or neonatal infection are associated with adverse outcomes among term neonates with encephalopathy. This study is a cohort study of 258 term newborns with encephalopathy whose clinical records were examined for signs of maternal infection (chorioamnionitis) and infant infection (sepsis). Multivariate regression was used to assess associations between infection, pattern, and severity of injury on neonatal magnetic resonance imaging, as well as neurodevelopment at 30 mo (neuromotor examination, or Bayley Scales of Infant Development, second edition mental development index encephalopathy, chorioamnionitis was associated with a lower risk of brain injury and adverse outcomes, whereas signs of neonatal sepsis carried an elevated risk. The etiology of encephalopathy and timing of infection and its associated inflammatory response may influence whether infection potentiates or mitigates injury in term newborns.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: MECP2-related severe neonatal encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Stroke: Encephalopathy Information Page National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Microcephaly Information Page Educational Resources (8 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Seizures Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 1 (EIEE1) is a seizure disorder characterized by a type of seizure known as ... 2 links) Health Topic: Developmental Disabilities Health Topic: Epilepsy Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  18. Cerebral CT appearances of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wenlong; Wu Aiqin; Xu Chongyong; Ying Binyu; Hong Ruizhen

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the cerebral CT appearances of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine and improve the recognition on this disease. Methods: Four cases of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine were collected and their cerebral CT appearances were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Cerebral CT appearances in acute phase (within 8 days): (1) cerebral edema in different degree. CT abnormalities consisted of cortical hypodensities and complete loss of gray-white matter differentiation. The CT value were in 11-13 HU, and to be watery density in serious case, (2) subarachnoid hemorrhage. It demonstrated the signs of poisoning hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in chronic phase. Conclusion: The cerebral CT appearances of toxic encephalopathy of tetramine had some character in acute phase and it can predict the serious degree of intoxication, but there was no characteristic findings in chronic phase

  19. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Our Setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Zubair, U. B.; Mumtaz, H.; Yousaf, M. A.; Muhammad, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the clinical presentation and neuroimaging abnormalities in a series of patients diagnosed as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome at Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Study Design: Case series study. Place and Duration: Study was carried out at Military Hospital Rawalpindi form December 01st, 2011 to May 31st, 2012. Patients and Methods: Study included all the cases of the Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) admitted in the wards and intensive care unit (ITC). Neuroimaging was done and all the studies were reviewed by independent neuroradiologist. Different clinical and laboratory variables were also studied and correlated with neuroimaging. Follow up ws done to look for the prognosis. Results: Of the seven patients labelled as PRES two were male and five were female. Two patients were over 50 years of age, out of them one was male and one was female. One patient had end stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN), one had eclampsia, one had pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and one had just uncontrolled HTN. Peak spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in 5 cases was 210 mm of Hg, four of which had seizures. Rest two had spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) of 160 out of which one developed seizures. Total out of 7, 5 experienced seizures and altered conscious state, rest two only had confusion. One patient had papilloedema. Follow up was done after 06 weeks, 02 patients died, 05 remained alive and symptoms of PRES had vanished. Conclusion: PRES is a neurological emergency, presents with a variety of symptoms and has a specific neuroimaging pattern. Early recognition and prompt treatment result in a good neurological outcome. (author)

  20. Neuroimmunomodulators in neuroborreliosis and Lyme encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Elizabeth A; Pacheco-Quinto, Javier; Herdt, Aimee R; Halperin, John J

    2018-01-11

    Lyme encephalopathy, characterized by non-specific neurobehavioral symptoms including mild cognitive difficulties, may occur in patients with systemic Lyme disease and is often mistakenly attributed to CNS infection. Identical symptoms occur in innumerable other inflammatory states and may reflect the effect of systemic immune mediators on the CNS. Multiplex immunoassays were used to characterize the inflammatory profile in serum and CSF from Lyme and non-Lyme patients with a range of symptoms to determine if there are specific markers of active CNS infection (neuroborreliosis), or systemic inflammatory mediators associated with neurobehavioral syndromes. CSF CXCL13 was elevated dramatically in confirmed neuroborreliosis (n=8) and to a lesser extent in possible neuroborreliosis (n=11) and other neuroinflammatory conditions (n=44). Patients with Lyme (n=63) or non-Lyme (n=8) encephalopathy had normal CSF findings, but had elevated serum levels of IL-7, TSLP, IL-17A, IL-17F, and MIP-1α/CCL3. CSF CXCL13 is a sensitive and specific marker of neuroborreliosis in individuals with Borrelia-specific intrathecal antibody (ITAb) production. However, CXCL13 does not distinguish individuals strongly suspected of having neuroborreliosis, but lacking confirmatory ITAb, from those with other neuroinflammatory conditions. Patients with mild cognitive symptoms occurring during acute Lyme disease, and/or following appropriate treatment, have normal CSF but elevated serum levels of T-helper 17 markers and T-cell growth factors. These markers are also elevated in non-Lyme disease patients experiencing similar symptoms. Our results support that in the absence of CSF abnormalities, neurobehavioral symptoms are associated with systemic inflammation, not CNS infection or inflammation, and are not specific to Lyme disease. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Contrast-induced encephalopathy following cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Roberto; Simon, Neil; Markus, Romesh; Muller, David Wm; Kathir, Krishna

    2017-08-01

    To describe the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of contrast-induced encephalopathy (CIE) following cardiac catheterization. CIE is an acute, reversible neurological disturbance directly attributable to the intra-arterial administration of iodinated contrast medium. The PubMed database was searched and all cases in the literature were retrieved and reviewed. 52 reports of CIE following cardiac catheterization were found. Encephalopathy, motor and sensory disturbances, vision disturbance, opthalmoplegia, aphasia, and seizures have been reported. Transient cortical blindness is the most commonly reported neurological syndrome, occurring in approximately 50% of cases. The putative mechanism involves disruption of the blood brain barrier and direct neuronal injury. Contrast-induced transient vasoconstriction has also been implicated. Symptoms typically appear within minutes to hours of contrast administration and resolve entirely within 24-48 hr. Risk factors may include hypertension, diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, the administration of large volumes of iodinated contrast, percutaneous coronary intervention or selective angiography of internal mammary grafts, and previous adverse reaction to iodinated contrast. Characteristic findings on cerebral imaging include cortical and sub-cortical contrast enhancement on computed tomography (CT). Imaging findings in CIE may mimic subarachnoid hemorrhage or cerebral ischemia; the Hounsfield scale on CT and the apparent diffusion coefficient on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are useful imaging tools in distinguishing these entities. In some cases, brain imaging is normal. Prognosis is excellent with supportive management alone. CIE tends to recur, although re-challenge with iodinated contrast without adverse effects has been documented. CIE is an important clinical entity to consider in the differential diagnosis of stroke following cardiac catheterization. Given that prognosis is

  2. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  3. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boby Varkey Maramattom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urea cycle disorders (UCD are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual. [1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain.

  4. Hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sook Ja; Choi, Yun Sun; Shin, Chung Ho; Cho, Sung Bum; Cho, Jae Min; Kim, Hyun Sook; Han, Tae Il; Yoon, Yong Kyu

    2001-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES) is a sudden-onset symptom complex that involves multisystem failure and includes encephalopathy, shock, coma, convulsions, prerenal azotemia, hepatic dysfunction, and bleeding coagulopathy and progressive thrombocytopenia in previously healthy infants and children. Its radiologic findings have rarely been reported, and it has not been described in Korea. We present a case of clinically diagnosed HSES, and include the CT and MRI findings

  5. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  6. Frequency of helicobacter pylori antibodies in porto-systemic encephalopathy,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethar, G.H.; Ahmed, R.; Afsar, S.; Zuberi, B.F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of Helicobacter pylori antibodies in patients presenting with porto-systemic encephalopathy due to liver disease. Patients and Methods: During the study period, seventy-six patients of porto-systemic encephalopathy due to liver diseases was selected. These subjects were evaluated for hepatic encephalopathy grade, modified Child-Pugh classification and were managed according to the standard practices. These patients were evaluated for Helicobacter (H. pylori) antibody status by ELlSA (Abbott Laboratories) method. Results: Out of 76 patients studied and tested for H. pylori antibodies, 48(63.2%) were males and 28(36.8%) were females with age ranging between 17 and 85 years. Out of 76 patients who presented with porto-systemic encephalopathy, 59(77.6%) had a positive H. pylori antibody test. Thirty-five of these were males and 24 were females. A significant number of patients who presented with higher grade of encephalopathy were H. pylori antibody positive (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, frequency of H. pylori antibodies was significantly high in patients of porto-systematic encephalopathy. (author)

  7. Current state of knowledge of hepatic encephalopathy (part IV): Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy by liver support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Tarek

    2017-04-01

    Hepatic Encephalopathy is a devastating complication of End-Stage Liver Disease. In its severe grades it requires extra intervention beyond the standard medical approaches. In this article were view the role of liver support systems in managing hepatic encephalopthy.

  8. Environmental Subconcussive Injury, Axonal Injury, and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. Morley

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain injury occurs in two phases: the initial injury itself and a secondary cascade of precise immune-based neurochemical events. The secondary phase is typically functional in nature and characterized by delayed axonal injury with more axonal disconnections occurring than in the initial phase. Axonal injury occurs across the spectrum of disease severity, with subconcussive injury, especially when repetitive, now considered capable of producing significant neurological damage consistent with axonal injury seen in clinically evident concussion, despite no observable symptoms. This review is the first to introduce the concept of environmental subconcussive injury (ESCI and sets out how secondary brain damage from ESCI once past the juncture of microglial activation appears to follow the same neuron-damaging pathway as secondary brain damage from conventional brain injury. The immune response associated with ESCI is strikingly similar to that mounted after conventional concussion. Specifically, microglial activation is followed closely by glutamate and calcium flux, excitotoxicity, reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (RNS generation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial dysfunction and energy crisis. ESCI damage also occurs in two phases, with the primary damage coming from microbiome injury (due to microbiome-altering events and secondary damage (axonal injury from progressive secondary neurochemical events. The concept of ESCI and the underlying mechanisms have profound implications for the understanding of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE etiology because it has previously been suggested that repetitive axonal injury may be the primary CTE pathogenesis in susceptible individuals and it is best correlated with lifetime brain trauma load. Taken together, it appears that susceptibility to brain injury and downstream neurodegenerative diseases, such as CTE, can be conceptualized as a continuum of brain resilience. At one end

  9. Performance of the hepatic encephalopathy scoring algorithm in a clinical trial of patients with cirrhosis and severe hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassanein, T.; Blei, A.T.; Perry, W.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The grading of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is based on a combination of indicators that reflect the state of consciousness, intellectual function, changes in behavior, and neuromuscular alterations seen in patients with liver failure. METHODS: We modified the traditional West Haven...... criteria (WHC) to provide an objective assessment of the cognitive parameters to complement the subjective clinical ratings for the performance of extracorporeal albumin dialysis (ECAD) using a molecular adsorption recirculating system in patients with cirrhosis and severe (grade III / IV) encephalopathy...

  10. Mitochondrial morphology and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic and are able to interchange their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and a fragmented disconnected arrangement by the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. Changes in mitochondrial morphology are regulated by the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins 1 and 2, and optic atrophy 1) and the mitochondrial fission proteins (dynamin-related peptide 1 and mitochondrial fission protein 1) and have been implicated in a...

  11. Topiramate increases the risk of valproic acid-induced encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young; Kim, Dong Wook; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Moon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sang Kun

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic encephalopathy is a rare but serious complication of valproic acid (VPA) therapy that usually presents with impaired consciousness or increased seizure frequency. Although it has been suggested that topiramate (TPM) increases the risk of VPA-induced encephalopathy, the additional risk in patients receiving TPM therapy has not been evaluated. We reviewed all adult patients who took VPA between January 2005 and February 2009 at the Seoul National University Hospital and identified patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy based on clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) data. Information on sex, age, serum ammonia level, serum VPA level, liver function test, and EEG was collected from patient registry and medical data. We enrolled 8,372 patients who received VPA therapy and 1,236 patients who received VPA/TPM combination therapy. We identified 11 patients with VPA-induced encephalopathy (0.13%), 7 of whom received a combination therapy of VPA and TPM. The odds ratio of VPA-induced encephalopathy with TPM over that without TPM was 10.16. There were no significant differences in sex distribution, number of antiepileptic agents, ammonia level, VPA serum level, underlying diseases, dosage of VPA, duration of VPA treatment, treatment of encephalopathy, and outcomes between the two groups. Our study showed that the prevalence of VPA-induced encephalopathy is approximately 0.1% among patients treated with VPA and that the risk of this condition, although still low, can increase by approximately 10 times in the presence of TPM therapy. Based on these results, we suggest that TPM should be carefully used in patients receiving VPA treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  12. The Thompson Encephalopathy Score and Short-Term Outcomes in Asphyxiated Newborns Treated With Therapeutic Hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, Patricia; Jansen-van der Weide, Martine C; Groenendaal, Floris; Onland, Wes; van Straaten, Henrika L M; Zonnenberg, Inge; Vermeulen, Jeroen R.; Dijk, Peter H; Dudink, Jeroen; Rijken, Monique; van Heijst, Arno; Dijkman, Koen P; Cools, Filip; Zecic, Alexandra; van Kaam, Anton H; de Haan, Timo R

    BACKGROUND: The Thompson encephalopathy score is a clinical score to assess newborns suffering from perinatal asphyxia. Previous studies revealed a high sensitivity and specificity of the Thompson encephalopathy score for adverse outcomes (death or severe disability). Because the Thompson

  13. Genetics Home Reference: SCN8A-related epilepsy with encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources (6 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Epilepsy and Seizure Disorder in Children Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ... related epilepsy with encephalopathy Merck Manual Consumer Version: Seizure Disorders Orphanet: Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy Patient Support and ...

  14. Mitochondrial shaping cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Henriques, Mafalda; Langer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A broad range of cellular processes are regulated by proteolytic events. Proteolysis has now also been established to control mitochondrial morphology which results from the balanced action of fusion and fission. Two out of three known core components of the mitochondrial fusion machinery are under proteolytic control. The GTPase Fzo1 in the outer membrane of mitochondria is degraded along two independent proteolytic pathways. One controls mitochondrial fusion in vegetatively growing cells, the other one acts upon mating factor-induced cell cycle arrest. Fusion also depends on proteolytic processing of the GTPase Mgm1 by the rhomboid protease Pcp1 in the inner membrane of mitochondria. Functional links of AAA proteases or other proteolytic components to mitochondrial dynamics are just emerging. This review summarises the current understanding of regulatory roles of proteolytic processes for mitochondrial plasticity.

  15. Hyperemesis gravidarum complicated by Wernicke encephalopathy

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    Mehmet Güney

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is a potentially fatal but reversible medical emergency. WE usually remains unrecognized in obstetric patients. Aim of the present study is to report a rare case of hyperemesis gravidarum that is complicated by WE. CASE: A 29 years-old, gravida 2, para 1 woman was admitted to Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Süleyman Demirel University in 2007 with an one week history of convulsions and confusion. The patient had nausea and vomiting accompanied by weight loss of 8 kg since she was pregnant. Symptoms of nausea and vomiting became severe in the last weeks. The patient had ataxia, nystagmus, confusion and general muscle weakness. Laboratory examinations were normal, except potassium levels (2.4 mmol/l and ketonuria. There was no diagnosed lesion in the radiological examinations. The patient was diagnosed as WE, and she had replacement therapy with potassium and thiamine for 7 seven days. The patient responded well and was discharged. CONCLUSION: Hyperemesis gravidarum may cause WE which can be diagnosed clinically. Thiamine should be supplemented to pregnant women with prolonged vomiting to prevent development of WE.

  16. Neuroinflammation in hepatic encephalopathy: mechanistic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V; Norenberg, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major neurological complication of severe liver disease that presents in acute and chronic forms. While elevated brain ammonia level is known to be a major etiological factor in this disorder, recent studies have shown a significant role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic HE. This review summarizes the involvement of ammonia in the activation of microglia, as well as the means by which ammonia triggers inflammatory responses in these cells. Additionally, the role of ammonia in stimulating inflammatory events in brain endothelial cells (ECs), likely through the activation of the toll-like receptor-4 and the associated production of cytokines, as well as the stimulation of various inflammatory factors in ECs and in astrocytes, are discussed. This review also summarizes the inflammatory mechanisms by which activation of ECs and microglia impact on astrocytes leading to their dysfunction, ultimately contributing to astrocyte swelling/brain edema in acute HE. The role of microglial activation and its contribution to the progression of neurobehavioral abnormalities in chronic HE are also briefly presented. We posit that a better understanding of the inflammatory events associated with acute and chronic HE will uncover novel therapeutic targets useful in the treatment of patients afflicted with HE.

  17. Prognostic Assessment in Patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita García-Martínez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of liver failure that is associated with poor prognosis. However, the prognosis is not uniform and depends on the underlying liver disease. Acute liver failure is an uncommon cause of HE that carries bad prognosis but is potentially reversible. There are several prognostic systems that have been specifically developed for selecting patients for liver transplantation. In patients with cirrhosis the prognosis of the episode of HE is usually dictated by the underlying precipitating factor. Acute-on-chronic liver failure is the most severe form of decompensation of cirrhosis, the prognosis depends on the number of associated organ failures. Patients with cirrhosis that have experienced an episode of HE should be considered candidates for liver transplant. The selection depends on the underlying liver function assessed by the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD index. There is a subgroup that exhibits low MELD and recurrent HE, usually due to the coexistence of large portosystemic shunts. The recurrence of HE is more common in patients that develop progressive deterioration of liver function and hyponatremia. The bouts of HE may cause sequels that have been shown to persist after liver transplant.

  18. Resveratrol in Patients with Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Giulia Malaguarnera

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy (MHE is characterized by an impairment of social interaction, emotional behavior, sleep disorders, physical and mental symptoms, and diminished Quality of Life (QoL. The aim of our study is evaluating the potential liver health promoting a perspective of Resveratrol (RV activities and evaluate whether RV treatment may improve health related quality of life (HRQL and reduce depression and anxiety in patients with MHE. Methods: We evaluated depression using the Beck Depression Inventory test, anxiety with State-trait anxiety inventory test, quality of life through SF-36 test, and ammonia serum levels in 70 MHE patients that were randomized into two groups. Results: In the comparison between RV group and placebo group we observed a decrease in Back Depression Inventory (BDI (p < 0.001, in State-trait anxiety inventory (STAI (p < 0.001, and improve in physical function (p < 0.001, in role physical (p < 0.05, in body pain (p < 0.05, in general health (p < 0.001, in vitality (p < 0.05, and in social function (p < 0.001. Conclusions: Resveratrol showed efficacy in the treatment of depression, anxiety, and ammonia serum levels, and improved the quality of life Of MHE patients.

  19. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keulen, L J M; Vromans, M E W; Dolstra, C H; Bossers, A; van Zijderveld, F G

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrP(Sc) was detected after 6 months in the tonsil and the ileal Peyer's patches. At 9 months postinfection, PrP(Sc) accumulation involved all gut-associated lymphoid tissues and lymph nodes as well as the spleen. At this time point, PrP(Sc) accumulation in the peripheral neural tissues was first seen in the enteric nervous system of the caudal jejunum and ileum and in the coeliac-mesenteric ganglion. In the central nervous system, PrP(Sc) was first detected in the dorsal motor nucleus of the nervus Vagus in the medulla oblongata and in the intermediolateral column in the spinal cord segments T7-L1. At subsequent time points, PrP(Sc) was seen to spread within the lymphoid system to also involve all non-gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In the enteric nervous system, further spread of PrP(Sc) involved the neural plexi along the entire gastrointestinal tract and in the CNS the complete neuraxis. These findings indicate a spread of the BSE agent in sheep from the enteric nervous system through parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves to the medulla oblongata and the spinal cord.

  20. The Neuropathology of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Kiernan, Patrick T.; Alvarez, Victor E.

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE. PMID:25904048

  1. The mechanisms and treatment of asphyxial encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido eWassink

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute post-asphyxial encephalopathy occurring around the time of birth remains a major cause of death and disability. The recent seminal insight that allows active neuroprotective treatment is that even after profound asphyxia (the primary phase, many brain cells show initial recovery from the insult during a short latent phase, typically lasting approximately 6 h, only to die hours to days later after a secondary deterioration characterized by seizures, cytotoxic edema, and progressive failure of cerebral oxidative metabolism. Although many of these secondary processes are potentially injurious, they appear to be primarily epiphenomena of the ‘execution’ phase of cell death. Animal and human studies designed around this conceptual framework have shown that moderate cerebral hypothermia initiated as early as possible but before the onset of secondary deterioration, and continued for a sufficient duration to allow the secondary deterioration to resolve, has been associated with potent, long-lasting neuroprotection. Recent clinical trials show that while therapeutic hypothermia significantly reduces morbidity and mortality, many babies still die or survive with disabilities. The challenge for the future is to find ways of improving the effectiveness of treatment. In this review, we will dissect the known mechanisms of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in relation to the known effects of hypothermic neuroprotection.

  2. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmela Tartaglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The aim of this perspective is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  3. Painless thyroiditis complicating with hypercalcemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewjitcharoen, Yotsapon; Lumlertgul, Nuttha

    2012-01-01

    Severe hypercalcemia has rarely been reported in patients with hyperthyroidism. Although the pathogenesis is not clear; it is believed to be due to activation of osteoclasts resulting in excessive bone resorption. To recognize the unusual cause of hypercalcemia from painless thyroiditis, which could manifest with transient hyperthyroidism in the early stage. A 70-year-old woman presented with watery diarrhea, nausea and vomiting and significant weight loss for two months. Initially, she was misdiagnosed as having Graves'disease from her clinical presentation and thyroid function tests. Oral propylthiouracil was given to treat hyperthyroidism. However two weeks after discharge, she developed altered consciousness due to severe hypercalcemia. After combined treatment of hypercalcemia and severe hyperthyroidism, her symptoms resolved quickly. Later on, her thyroid function tests switched to subclinical hypothyroid at two months after initial presentation. No concurrent pathological conditions could be found to explain the other causes of hypercalcemia. Therefore, painless thyroiditis complicated with severe hypercalcemia was subsequently diagnosed based on her clinical course. Hypercalcemic encephalopathy is an uncommon manifestation of hyperthyroidism that should be kept in mind in patients who demonstrated clinical pictures of hyperthyroidism and alteration of consciousness. Moreover the present case emphasizes the consideration of painless thyroiditis as a differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism because anti-thyroid medications were not indicated in this condition.

  4. Pathogenetic aspects of alcoholic encephalopathy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shchetinin S.G.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is considered to be the most common exogenous toxins, causing encephalopathy. The defeat of almost all parts of the nervous system should be assigned to the special features of ethanol. Neurophysiological mechanisms of development of substance dependence are based in the stem and limbic structures of the brain that are involved in ensuring the regulation of emotional state, mood, motivation sphere, psychophysical tone of human behavior in general and its adaptation to the environment. Stress or disruption of the normal functioning of these structures can lead to the formation of abstinence syndrome, affective disorders in remission and craving for alcohol. Dopaminergic and opioid (endorphin system play an important role in the genesis of various mental and motor disorders. In some way alcohol dependence can be regarded as an endorfinodefitsitnoe disease with a pathogenetic point of view. Activating of opioidereal system by trans-cranial electrical stimulation promotes the restoration of disturbed emotional, cognitive and autonomic functions, reduces craving for alcohol and in that way increases the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatment

  5. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal bu...

  6. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy with magentic resonance imaging; With special reference to portal system encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Etsuo; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Kadota, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Makoto; Kuriyama, Keiko; Kuroda, Chikazumi (Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance (MR) images were examined in 16 patients with liver cirrhosis. The findings of MR imaging were correlated with portal-systemic collateral vessel shown on angiograms. In 9 of 16 patients, basal ganglia was hyperintense compared with white matter on T1-weighted images. These 9 patients had portal-systemic collateral vessel 10 mm or more in diameter that was suppied by superior mesenteric vein (SMV), and 4 of the 9 patients had portal-systemic encephalopathy on angiograms. In the remaining 7 patients, no hyperintense lesions were seen in basal ganglia relative to white matter on T1-weighted images; angiography revealed that 2 patients had portal-systemic collateral vessel that was supplied by SMV but was 5 mm or less in diameter, 3 had bood supplies from splenic vein, and 2 had no collateral vessel. There was no change in signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In conclusion, a large portal-systemic collateral vessel supplied by SMV may be shown as a high intensity lesion in basal ganglia, thus making it possible to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy even if there was no psychoneurologic symptoms or signs. (N.K.).

  7. Seeing more clearly through the fog of encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Peter W; Sutter, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute confusional states (often referred to as encephalopathy or delirium) pose diagnostic and management challenges for treating physicians. Encephalopathy is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and the diagnosis rests on clinical grounds but may also be supported by the finding of electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence for diffuse cerebral dysfunction. The myriad cerebral transmitter and metabolic disruptions are generated by systemic organ system failures, principal among which are those of the liver, kidneys, lungs, heart, and endocrine system, along with the effects of exogenous toxins and medications. In most cases, several of these organ failures together contribute to the confusional state, frequently in the context of a diffuse cerebral atrophy that affects the aging brain. This special issue of the Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology is dedicated to exploring the electrophysiology of these conditions. It reviews the pathophysiology, psychiatric manifestations, clinical and imaging correlations of the many causes and types of encephalopathy. A literature review of the EEG abnormalities in the various types of encephalopathy provides an overview that ranges from paraneoplastic causes, through organ system failures, postcardiorespiratory arrest, to postoperative delirium. The issue is supplemented by tables of relevant clinical correlations, graphs, Venn diagrams, and the use of mathematical modeling used to explain how defects in the neuronal interplay might generate the EEG patterns seen in encephalopathy. We hope that this assembly will act as a springboard for further discussion and investigation into the EEG underpinnings, clinical correlations, diagnosis. and prognostication of these common and morbid disturbances of brain function.

  8. Recent advances in hepatic encephalopathy [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Liere

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy describes the array of neurological alterations that occur during acute liver failure or chronic liver injury. While key players in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, such as increases in brain ammonia, alterations in neurosteroid levels, and neuroinflammation, have been identified, there is still a paucity in our knowledge of the precise pathogenic mechanism. This review gives a brief overview of our understanding of the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and then summarizes the significant recent advances made in clinical and basic research contributing to our understanding, diagnosis, and possible treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted in May 2017 using “hepatic encephalopathy” as a keyword, and selected manuscripts were limited to those research articles published since May 2014. While the authors acknowledge that many significant advances have been made in the understanding of hepatic encephalopathy prior to May 2014, we have limited the scope of this review to the previous three years only.

  9. The relationship between plasma free fatty acids and experimentally induced hepatic encephalopathy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J. J.; Bosman, D. K.; Jörning, G. G.; de Haan, J. G.; Maas, M. A.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy in the rat have been investigated in order to study the postulated relationship between plasma free fatty acids concentration (C6 - C22:0) and the degree of hepatic encephalopathy. As a model of chronic hepatic encephalopathy, porta caval shunted

  10. 77 FR 29914 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy. This action will allow interested... importation of live bovines and products derived from bovines with regard to bovine spongiform encephalopathy...

  11. A Critical Case of Wernicke's Encephalopathy Induced by Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Ju Kang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a reversible but potentially critical disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Most patients complain of symptoms such as ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and confusion. Heavy alcohol drinking is commonly associated with the disease, but other clinical conditions also can provoke it. In pregnant women, hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to the depletion of body thiamine due to poor oral intake and a high metabolic demand. We report a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum in a 36-year-old female at 20 weeks of pregnancy, who visited our hospital because of shock with vaginal bleeding. This case suggests that although the initial presentation may include atypical symptoms (e.g., shock or bleeding, Wernicke’s encephalopathy should be considered, and thiamine replacement should be performed in pregnant women with neurologic symptoms and poor oral intake.

  12. Colectomy for porto-systemic encephalopathy: is it still topical?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rym Ennaifer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common long term complication of porto-systemic shunt. We report herein the case of a 59-year-old man with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis treated successfully 9 years earlier with distal splenorenal shunt for uncontrolled variceal bleeding. In the last year, he developed a severe and persistent hepatic encephalopathy secondary to the shunt, which was resistant to medical therapy. As liver transplantation was not available and obliteration of the shunt was hazardous, we performed subtotal colectomy in order to reduce ammonia production. This therapeutic option proved successful, as the grade of encephalopathy decreased and the patient improved. Our experience indicates that colonic exclusion should be considered as an option in the management of HE refractory to medical treatment in highly selected patients when liver transplantation is not available or even as a bridge given the long waiting time on lists.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnan, L.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.; Berlot, G.

    1998-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an uncommon disorder caused by a thiamine deficiency which is clinically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and disturbances of consciousness, each finding being variably present. The disease is caused by malnutrition or malabsorption, and is often associated with prolonged alcohol intake, neoplasm and extensive inflammatory processes of the digestive tract and parenteral hyperalimentation-induced gastrointestinal mucosal atrophy. Clinical diagnosis can be elusive and MRI may be the only imaging technique able to detect the cerebral lesions, whose type and distribution are characteristic of the Wernicke's encephalopathy, whereas CT is positive only in exceptional cases. We report a case of a 56-year-old woman who developed a Wernicke's encephalopathy 1 month after a colonic resection with signal intensity changes located in the mammillary bodies and in the medial thalamic nuclei. (orig.)

  14. Research progress of BOLD-functional MRI of hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Zhang Longjiang; Lu Guangming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE), characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from behavior abnormality, conscious disorder and even coma, is a consequence of liver dysfunction in both acute and chronic hepatic diseases. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to a subgroup of cirrhotic patients without clinical overt hepatic encephalopathy symptoms hut with abnormalities in neuro -cognitive functions. HE/MHE can have a far-reaching impact on quality of life and prognosis. The exact neuropathology mechanism was still unclear. Recently, functional MRI (fMRI) has been increasingly applied for investigating the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of HE. This paper will review the fMRI research applied on uncovering the neuropathology mechanism of HE. (authors)

  15. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clinical picture and diagnostics of this disorder, including the peculiar anomalies on EEG. The especial attention is given to approaches to the treatment of epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikeswaves activity during sleep. Efficacy of valproates, corticosteroid hormones and antiepileptic drugs of other groups is considered. The author represents own experience of treatment this disorder with corticosteroids, scheme of therapy and assessment of efficacy.

  16. Clinical and radiological features of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qiu LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the diagnosis and treatment of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. Methods  The clinical and imaging data of 3 cases of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy were summarized and analyzed for the purpose of improving the acumen in diagnosis and treatment. Results All the 3 patients showed relatively mild clinical symptoms, and they were misdiagnosed in different degrees during the treatment, but their clinical symptoms were improved by rapid and effective antihypertensive therapy. Cerebral CT and MRI scans revealed extensive abnormal signals in brain stem, with or without supratentorial lesions and brain stem hemorrhage. The lesions as revealed by imaging were improved significantly after treatment. Conclusions Clinical-radiographic dissociation is the classic feature of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. The clinical symptoms and lesions as shown by imaging could be improved after active treatment. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.03

  17. Acute Infantile Encephalopathy Predominantly Affecting The Frontal Lobes (AIEF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raha, Sarbani; Udani, Vrajesh

    2012-12-01

    Acute Infantile Encephalopathy Predominantly Affecting the Frontal Lobes (AIEF) is a relatively recent described entity. This article includes case reports of two patients who had bifrontal involvement during acute febrile encephalopathy. Case 1 describes a 1-y-old boy who presented with hyperpyrexia and dialeptic seizures. Imaging revealed significant bilateral frontal lobe involvement while serology proved presence of Influenza B infection. Over a period of one wk, he recovered with significant cognitive decline and perseveratory behavior. Another 6-y-old boy presented with language and behavioral problems suggestive of frontal dysfunction after recovering from prolonged impairment of consciousness following a convulsive status epilepticus. Bilateral superior frontal lesions with gyral swelling was evident on neuroimaging. These cases are among the very few cases of AIEF described in recent literature and the article also reviews this unique subtype of acute encephalopathy.

  18. Progress in Diagnosing Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like Episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Xin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: MELAS involves multiple systems with variable clinical symptoms and recurrent episodes. The prognosis of MELAS patients depends on timely diagnosis. Therefore, overall diagnosis of MELAS should be based on the maternal inheritance family history, clinical manifestation, and findings from serial MRI, muscle biopsy, and genetics.

  19. Potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, Romain; de Montmollin, Etienne; Poujade, Julien; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Souweine, Bertrand; Darmon, Michael; Mariotte, Eric; Argaud, Laurent; Barbier, François; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Marcotte, Guillaume; Dumenil, Anne-Sylvie; Jamali, Samir; Lacave, Guillaume; Ruckly, Stéphane; Mourvillier, Bruno; Timsit, Jean-François

    2017-08-01

    Identifying modifiable factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy may help improve patient care and outcomes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective multicenter database. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) was defined by a score on the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) sepsis at ICU admission, of whom 1341 (53%) had sepsis-associated encephalopathy. After adjusting for baseline characteristics, site of infection, and type of admission, the following factors remained independently associated with sepsis-associated encephalopathy: acute renal failure [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-1.67], hypoglycemia 10 mmol/l (aOR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.09-1.72), hypercapnia >45 mmHg (aOR = 1.91, 95% CI 1.53-2.38), hypernatremia >145 mmol/l (aOR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.48-3.57), and S. aureus (aOR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.05-2.25). Sepsis-associated encephalopathy was associated with higher mortality, higher use of ICU resources, and longer hospital stay. After adjusting for age, comorbidities, year of admission, and non-neurological SOFA score, even mild alteration of mental status (i.e., a score on the GCS of 13-14) remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% CI 1.09-1.76). Acute renal failure and common metabolic disturbances represent potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy. However, a true causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. Our study confirms the prognostic significance of mild alteration of mental status in patients with sepsis.

  20. Risk factors and outcome of Shigella encephalopathy in Bangladeshi children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Afroze

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although, Shigella encephalopathy, a serious extra-intestinal complication of shigellosis, significantly increases the risks of death, data are very limited on predicting factors particularly related to electrolyte profiles in children below five years of age with Shigella encephalopathy. Our objective was to determine the clinical as well as laboratory predicting factors and outcome of children with Shigella encephalopathy.In this unmatched case-control design, children aged 2-59 months having a positive stool culture for Shigella and who had their serum electrolytes been done from July 2012 to June 2015 were studied. Children with Shigella encephalopathy, defined as having abnormal mentation, constituted the cases, and those without encephalopathy constituted the controls. During the study period, we identified a total of 541 children less than five years of age, who had Shigella in their stool culture. Only 139 children fulfilled the study criteria and among them 69 were cases and 70 were controls. The cases more often had fatal outcome compared to the controls (7% vs. 0%, P = 0.02. In logistic regression analysis, the cases were independently associated with shorter duration (1.2 ± 0.4 days of diarrhea prior to admission, dehydrating diarrhea, sepsis and hyponatremia (p<0.05 for all. Among 139 Shigella isolates, S. flexneri (88/139, 63% and S. sonnei(34/139, 24% were the dominant species. S. dysenteriae was not isolated throughout the study period. S.sonnei was more frequently isolated from the cases (24/69, 35% than the controls (10/70, 14%, whereas the isolation of S. flexneri was comparable between the groups (40/69, 58% vs 48/70, 69%. A total of 94 (67.6% isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, 84 (60.4% to ciprofloxacin, 66/138 (48% to ampicillin, 5 (3.5% to ceftriaxone, 17 (12.2% to mecillinum and 35 (25% to azithromycin.The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the children with Shigella encephalopathy

  1. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae-Ick; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, Soung-Kyeong; Kim, Beum-Saeng; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Yang, Dong-Won

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in which diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the paraventricular area of the third ventricles and medial thalami. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping showed isointensity in the aforementioned areas. Diffusion-weighted MR images may provide evidence of vasogenic edema associated with thiamine deficiency, proven in the histopathology of experimental animals. In addition, diffusion-weighted MRI has many advantages over T2 or FLARE-weighted brain MRI in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in Wernicke's encephalopathy

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    DARA, Naghi; SAYYARI, Ali-Akbar; IMANZADEH, Farid

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Dara N, Sayyari AA, Imanzadeh F. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1):1-11.ObjectiveAs acute liver failure (ALF) and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy.Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complic...

  3. Brain gamma-aminobutyric acid deficiency in dialysis encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, V P; Perry, T L; Price, J D; Reeve, C E; Godolphin, W J; Kish, S J

    1985-02-01

    We measured levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the CSF and in the autopsied brain of patients with dialysis encephalopathy. GABA concentrations were low in the CSF of three of five living patients. Mean GABA content was reduced by 30 to 50% in five brain regions (frontal, occipital, and cerebellar cortex, caudate nucleus, and medial dorsal thalamus) in five fatal cases. GABA content was normal in brain regions where GABA is characteristically reduced in Huntington's disease. Choline acetyltransferase activity was diminished (by 25 to 35%) in cerebral cortex of the dialysis encephalopathy patients.

  4. Chloroquine inhibits autophagy and deteriorates the mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in hypoxic rat neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Hao, Lei; Guo, Yan-Yan; Yang, Guang-Lu; Mei, Hua; Li, Xiao-Hua; Zhai, Qiong-Xiang

    2018-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction (MD) and apoptosis in the neurons are associated with neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) encephalopathy (HIE). The present study was to explore the influence of autophagy on the induction of MD and apoptosis in the neurons in a neonatal HIE rats and in hypoxia-treated neurons in vitro. Ten-day-old HI rat pups were sacrificed for brain pathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. The induction of autophagy, apoptosis and MD were also determined in the neurons under hypoxia, with or without autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) treatment. HI treatment caused atrophy and apoptosis of neurons, with a significantly increased levels of apoptosis- and autophagy-associated proteins, such as cleaved caspase 3 and the B subunit of autophagy-related microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-B). in vitro experiments demonstrated that the hypoxia induced autophagy in neurons, as was inhibited by CQ. The hypoxia-induced cytochrome c release, cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 9 were aggravated by CQ. Moreover, there were higher levels of reactive oxygen species, more mitochondrial superoxide and less mitochondrial membrane potential in the CQ-treated neurons under hypoxia than in the neurons singularly under hypoxia. Apoptosis and autophagy were induced in HI neonatal rat neurons, autophagy inhibition deteriorates the hypoxia-induced neuron MD and apoptosis. It implies a neuroprotection of autophagy in the hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Administration of autophagy inducer agents might be promising in HIE treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. MRI findings in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy resulting from decompensated chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureka, Jyoti; Jakkani, Ravi Kanth; Panwar, Sanuj

    2012-06-01

    Hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a type of metabolic encephalopathy with diversified etiology. Hyperammonemia is the end result of several metabolic disorders such as congenital deficiencies of urea cycle enzymes, hepatic encephalopathy, Reye's syndrome and other toxic encephalopathies. Non-specific clinical presentation poses a great challenge in early diagnosis of this entity. Irrespective of the underlying etiology, hyperammonemia causes a distinctive pattern of brain parenchymal injury. The cingulate gyrus and insular cortex are more vulnerable to this type of toxic insult. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings in combination with laboratory parameters can help to differentiate this entity from other metabolic encephalopathy and thus aiding in early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Evaluation and Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay; Saab, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a spectrum of neurocognitive manifestations often seen in patients with liver injury or rarely in patients with portosystemic shunting without liver injury. It can be divided into minimal (covert) hepatic encephalopathy and overt hepatic encephalopathy, depending on the severity. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy have compromised clinical outcomes, decreased quality of life, and increased healthcare utilization, often resulting in a heavy financial and personal burden on caregivers. The diagnosis remains largely clinical, with the exclusion of possible other causes for the altered mental status. Current treatment strategies include nonabsorbable disaccharides and antibiotics. This review will focus on the diagnosis, management and clinical impact of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:27377741

  7. Epilepsy and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P. Saneto DO, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. In a large cohort of children and adolescents with mitochondrial disease (n = 180, over 48% of patients developed seizures. The majority (68% of patients were younger than 3 years and medically intractable (90%. The electroencephalographic pattern of multiregional epileptiform discharges over the left and right hemisphere with background slowing occurred in 62%. The epilepsy syndrome, infantile spasms, was seen in 17%. Polymerase γ mutations were the most common genetic etiology of seizures, representing Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (14%. The severity of disease in those patients with epilepsy was significant, as 13% of patients experienced early death. Simply the loss of energy production cannot explain the development of seizures or all patients with mitochondrial dysfunction would have epilepsy. Until the various aspects of mitochondrial physiology that are involved in proper brain development are understood, epilepsy and its treatment will remain unsatisfactory.

  8. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  9. [Leigh's encephalopathy (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy). Documentation of its evolution through neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J A; González-Ferrer, S; Martínez, C; Prieto-Carrasquero, M; Delgado, W; Mora La Cruz, E

    1996-09-01

    A 30 months-old boy developed bilateral nistagmus, tremor, gait disturbance, hypotonia and disartria. The diagnose of Leigh encephalopathy was suggested on the basis of clinical, neuroimaging and laboratory findings. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at an early stage revealed bilateral and symmetric lesions in the putamen, appearing as hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images. Twelve months later a relatively large hypertense area in the posterior brainstem was observed. At this stage, the patient exhibited marked deterioration, dystonic manifestations, rigidity and respiratory disturbances. He died 6 months later for respiratory arrest during bronconeumonic infection. We believe MRI is a valuable means to allow assessment of the evolution of the disease.

  10. Rare and unusual ... or are they? Less commonly diagnosed encephalopathies associated with systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Allison L; Lewis, Steven L

    2009-04-01

    Encephalopathy due to hepatic or renal failure, electrolyte disturbances, or the administration of benzodiazepines and narcotics is commonly encountered, well reviewed in the literature, and, therefore, not usually missed. This article focuses on encephalopathies that were previously well described but may be overlooked by modern clinicians, as well as those that are still taught in the classroom but seldom thought of in practice. Due to the presumed relative rarity of these cases and emphasis on the well-memorized "classic" clinical presentations, these often treatable, and perhaps not so rare, encephalopathies due to systemic medical illness may go undiagnosed and untreated. Pancreatic encephalopathy, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and pellagra encephalopathy are reviewed in detail; cefepime and ifosfamide encephalopathies are discussed as examples of specific medication-induced encephalopathies. Septic encephalopathy, central pontine myelinolysis, and fat embolism syndrome are briefly reviewed. The encephalopathies reviewed have the potential for devastating neurological consequences if recognition and, therefore, treatment are delayed. Clinical improvement for many of these syndromes depends on prompt intervention. This article highlights some representative examples of less-commonly diagnosed metabolic and toxic encephalopathies.

  11. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  12. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  13. Mitochondrial signaling in health and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orrenius, Sten; Packer, Lester; Cadenas, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    .... The text covers themes essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial activity, including electron transport and energy production, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics, mitochondrial signaling...

  14. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke′s encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushree Sangita Behura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Wernicke′s encephalopathy (WE is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1 deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion, oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia. Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning, which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs ( global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings, the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases.Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but

  15. Celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Nadia M; Bracken, Julia M; Chandratre, Sonal R

    2014-12-01

    Celiac crisis is a life-threatening presentation of celiac disease which is described in the context of classic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of diarrhea, leading to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Neurologic manifestations are atypical symptoms of celiac crisis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no published report on seizure or encephalopathy as the presenting manifestation of celiac crisis. We describe a 2-year-old boy presenting with acute status epilepticus and lethargy. Prior to presentation, he had mild abdominal distention and intermittent diarrhea. Laboratory analysis revealed hyponatremia, anemia, hypocalcemia, transaminitis, and hyperglycemia. Electroencephalography revealed severe diffuse encephalopathy, and complete infectious work-up was negative. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal; however, repeat imaging showed osmotic demyelination syndrome. Given the history of GI symptoms and hyperglycemia, celiac serology was obtained revealing elevated tissue transglutaminase, and a diagnosis was confirmed by Marsh 3c lesions in the duodenum. He significantly improved with steroid therapy in addition to adequate nutrition, fluids, and initiation of a gluten-free diet. We report herein on the first case of celiac crisis presenting with status epilepticus and encephalopathy in the absence of profound GI symptoms. Our case suggests that celiac crisis should be considered in the differential of seizures and encephalopathy in children.

  16. [Subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures in an alcoholic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, R; Otto, F G

    2000-09-01

    We introduce a case of a 66 year-old male with chronic alcoholism who suffered from confusion, Wernicke-aphasia and epileptic seizures. Several EEG revealed periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. The patient's case resembles the symptoms of a subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures which can occur in alcoholics.

  17. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  18. Antithyroperoxidase Antibodies in Encephalopathy : Diagnostic Marker or Incidental Finding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, B.; Van Santen, H. M.; Niermeijer, J. M.; Schonenberg-Meinema, D.; Van Trotsenburg, A. S P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute encephalopathy who are thoroughly examined for an underlying diagnosis and in whom infectious, metabolic, and malignant causes are excluded can form a true diagnostic dilemma. If antithyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO abs) are present, the diagnosis steroid responsive

  19. About pathognomonic images: an infrequent case of acute encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Grasso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The occurrence of acute encephalopathy is a dramatic clinical dilemma when usual diagnostic techniques (blood tests, cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid analysis show no abnormalities. CLINICAL CASE We describe a case of a 73 years old man admitted in our Internal Medicine Unit for acute diarrhoea with vomiting and fever who developed a prolonged gastrointestinal dysmotility syndrome with poor nutritional intake. Although a parenteral support was provided, he developed acute encephalopathy followed by hypotension and lactic acidosis without evidence of renal and hepatic disease or glycemic alterations. Likewise, no cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid alterations were found. Conversely, cerebral MRI showed marked and diffuse DP-2 and FLAIR hyperintensity of the mesencephalic tectal plate, of the periaqueductal area, and of the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the median thalamic area. These MRI descriptions were considered pathognomonic of Wernicke encephalopathy. Thus, the immediate use of ev thiamine was followed by a prompt and complete recovery of neurological, hemodinamic and metabolic conditions. CONCLUSIONS Non-alcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy is a rare and dramatic clinical event with high mortality. In this context, brain MRI is the best diagnostic tool providing a typical picture.

  20. A case of chronic Wernicke's encephalopathy: A neuropsychological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W.; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE). She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After 5 days without treatment, she was

  1. GRIN1 Mutations in Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Yokohama City University and other medical centers in Israel and Japan reported mutations on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors subunit GRIN1 (GluN1 identified in patients with nonsyndromic intellectual disability and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy.

  2. Coenzyme Q-responsive Leigh's encephalopathy in two sisters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maldergem, L. van; Trijbels, J.M.F.; Mauro, S. Di; Sindelar, P.J.; Musumeci, O.; Janssen, A.J.M.; Delberghe, X.; Martin, J.J.; Gillerot, Y.

    2002-01-01

    A 31-year-old woman had encephalopathy, growth retardation, infantilism, ataxia, deafness, lactic acidosis, and increased signals of caudate and putamen on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Muscle biochemistry showed succinate:cytochrome c oxidoreductase (complex II-III) deficiency. Both clinical

  3. STXBP1 encephalopathy: A neurodevelopmental disorder including epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamberger, H.; Nikanorova, M.; Willemsen, M.H.; Accorsi, P.; Angriman, M.; Baier, H.; Benkel-Herrenbrueck, I.; Benoit, V.; Budetta, M.; Caliebe, A.; Cantalupo, G.; Capovilla, G.; Casara, G.; Courage, C.; Deprez, M.; Destree, A.; Dilena, R.; Erasmus, C.E.; Fannemel, M.; Fjaer, R.; Giordano, L.; Helbig, K.L.; Heyne, H.O.; Klepper, J.; Kluger, G.J.; Lederer, D.; Lodi, M.; Maier, O.; Merkenschlager, A.; Michelberger, N.; Minetti, C.; Muhle, H.; Phalin, J.; Ramsey, K.; Romeo, A.; Schallner, J.; Schanze, I.; Shinawi, M.; Sleegers, K.; Sterbova, K.; Syrbe, S.; Traverso, M.; Tzschach, A.; Uldall, P.; Coster, R. van; Verhelst, H.; Viri, M.; Winter, S.; Wolff, M.; Zenker, M.; Zoccante, L.; Jonghe, P. De; Helbig, I.; Striano, P.; Lemke, J.R.; Moller, R.S.; Weckhuysen, S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give a comprehensive overview of the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of STXBP1 encephalopathy (STXBP1-E) by systematically reviewing newly diagnosed and previously reported patients. METHODS: We recruited newly diagnosed patients with STXBP1 mutations through an international network

  4. Update on the Therapeutic Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Linda Skibsted; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common and devastating complication to chronic liver disease. In this paper, we summarize the latest research and evidence of both conventional and up-coming treatments. RECENT FINDINGS: Meta-analyses report beneficial effects of lactulose...

  5. In vitro adsorption of possible aetiological factors of hepatic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chamuleau, R. A.; Schoemaker, L. P.; Smit, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    Four different adsorbents (activated charcoal, XAD-4, a strong base anion and a strong acid cation-exchange resin) were tested in vitro for their capacity to remove substances that may be important in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Separate columns packed with one of these adsorbents

  6. Case Report: Hypertensive encephalopathy with CT confirmation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertensive encephalopathy (HE) is a clinical syndrome that occurs infrequently in children and is often underdiagnosed. We review four patients with HE and describe their clinical presentation and radiological findings on computed tomography (CT). Our cases demonstrate typical features on CT and correlate clinically ...

  7. Hypothermia therapy for newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato S

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia reduces cerebral injury and improves the neurological outcome secondary to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. It has been indicated for asphyxiated full-term or near-term newborn infants with clinical signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). A search was performed for articles on therapeutic hypothermia in newborns with perinatal asphyxia in PubMed; the authors chose those considered most significant. There are two therapeutic hypothermia methods: selective head cooling and total body cooling. The target body temperature is 34.5 °C for selective head cooling and 33.5 °C for total body cooling. Temperatures lower than 32 °C are less neuroprotective, and temperatures below 30 °C are very dangerous, with severe complications. Therapeutic hypothermia must start within the first 6h after birth, as studies have shown that this represents the therapeutic window for the hypoxic-ischemic event. Therapy must be maintained for 72 h, with very strict control of the newborn's body temperature. It has been shown that therapeutic hypothermia is effective in reducing neurologic impairment, especially in full-term or near-term newborns with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Therapeutic hypothermia is a neuroprotective technique indicated for newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Advanced neuroimaging techniques for the term newborn with encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Vann; Poskitt, Kenneth John; Miller, Steven Paul

    2009-03-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period and of long-term neurodevelopmental disability in survivors. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques now play a major role in the clinical care of newborns with encephalopathy and in research addressing this important condition. From conventional magnetic resonance imaging, typical patterns of injury have been defined in neonatal encephalopathy. When applied in contemporary cohorts of newborns with encephalopathy, the patterns of brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging distinguish risk factors, clinical presentation, and risk of abnormal outcome. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion tensor imaging provide novel perspectives on neonatal brain metabolism, microstructure, and connectivity. With the application of these imaging tools, it is increasingly apparent that brain injury commonly occurs at or near the time of birth and evolves over the first weeks of life. These observations have complemented findings from trials of emerging strategies of brain protection, such as hypothermia. Application of these advanced magnetic resonance techniques may enable the earliest possible identification of newborns at risk of neurodevelopmental impairment, thereby ensuring appropriate follow-up with rehabilitation and psychoeducational resources.

  9. HHV-6 symptoms in central nervous system. Encephalitis and encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinari, Satoshi; Hamano, Shinichiro

    2007-01-01

    Described is the present knowledge of central nervous symptoms, mainly encephalitis and encephalopathy, caused by the primary infection of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) in the pediatric field. Discovery of HHV-6 is in 1986, the virus, normally latent, has a high nervous affinity, and most infants are infected until the age of 3 years. Encephalitis and encephalopathy caused by the primary infection can be derived from direct viral invasion in nervous system or secondary like that through angitis. Most of early clinical symptoms are febrile convulsion. Imaging of the head by MRI particularly with diffusion weighted imaging and by cerebral blood flow SPECT with 123 I-infetamine (IMP) is important for classification of encephalitis and encephalopathy by HHV-6: Four types of them are defined according to the area of lesion observed in abnormal images, the basal nuclei-diencephalon-brainstem, frontal lobe-dominant one, cerebral hemisphere and diffusive one. Further reviewed are the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis together with other HHV-6 related problems like infection in neonate, temporal lobe epilepsy and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. Current topics are related with activation of latent HHV-6. Despite numerous findings, many remain to be elucidated in acute encephalitis and encephalopathy which are most important in pediatrics. (R.T.)

  10. Laboratory examinations of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Denmark during 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    The aim of this report is to give detailed information on the diagnostic examination on trans-missible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) performed in Denmark during 2016. The present annual report is the 21st on this topic published by the National Veterinary Institute, Technical University...

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DARA, Naghi; SAYYARI, Ali-Akbar; IMANZADEH, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Objective As acute liver failure (ALF) and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy. Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complication typically occurs in patients with severe comorbidities and needs multidisciplinary evaluation and care. Hepatic encephalopathy should be considered in any patient with acute liver failure and cirrhosis who presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations, decrease level of consciousness (coma), change of personality, intellectual and behavioral deterioration, speech and motor dysfunction. Every cirrhotic patient may be at risk; potential precipitating factors should be addressed in regular clinic visits. The encephalopathy of liver disease may be prominent, or can be present in subtle forms, such as decline of school performance, emotional outbursts, or depression. “Subtle form” of hepatic encephalopathy may not be obvious on clinical examination, but can be detected by neurophysiologic and neuropsychiatric testing. PMID:24665321

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a adult female

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    occipital regions. Atypical imaging finding of contrast enhancement of lesion can occur, but is less common. A 20‑year‑old primiparous lady presented with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ...

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a adult female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typical imaging findings characteristically involve the white matter bilaterally in the parieto-occipital regions. Atypical imaging finding of contrast enhancement of lesion can occur, but is less common. A 20-year-old primiparous lady presented with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, ...

  14. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to suture line breakdown after bladder operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogerd, W; Zoetmulder, F A; Moffie, D

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with a severe encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in absence of liver dysfunction, attributed to urine absorption into the systemic circulation due to suture line breakdown after bladder dome resection. At autopsy characteristic Alzheimer type II astrocytes were found in the basal ganglia.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: acute necrotizing encephalopathy type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... encephalopathy type 1 typically appears in infancy or early childhood, although some people do not develop the condition ... status and number of prior infections, may also influence risk. Related ... it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What are the different ways in which a ...

  16. Pathophysiological aspects of acute hepatic encephalopathy in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutz, N.E.P.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to elucidate the pathogenesis of acute hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In order to study acute HE, plasma and brain concentrations were measured of ammonia, aminoacids, lactate and polyamines as well as brain energy rich phosphates. In addition new techniques of brain research were developed and applied. 277 refs.; 29 figs.; 18 tabs

  17. Metformin inhibits glutaminase activity and protects against hepatic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ampuero

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. METHODS: Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment. Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. RESULTS: Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82: 4.9% (2/41 in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41 in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p=0.002. In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2-108.8; p=0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.2; p=0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5-71.6; p=0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8-163.4; p=0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin inhibits glutaminase

  18. Increased accumulation of N-isopropyl-p-(123I)-iodoamphetamine in two cases with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, K.; Ono, S.; Fukunaga, M.; Morita, R.; Yasuda, T.; Higashi, Y.; Terao, A.

    1989-01-01

    We present two cases with mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS), which showed both increased and decreased accumulation of N-isopropyl-p-( 123 I)-iodoamphetamine ( 123 I-IMP) in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The increased accumulation of the tracer occurred before low density appeared on conventional computed tomography, suggesting that 123 I-IMP SPECT may be useful in pathophysiological study of MELAS. (orig.)

  19. SCN8A encephalopathy: Research progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisler, Miriam H; Helman, Guy; Hammer, Michael F; Fureman, Brandy E; Gaillard, William D; Goldin, Alan L; Hirose, Shinichi; Ishii, Atsushi; Kroner, Barbara L; Lossin, Christoph; Mefford, Heather C; Parent, Jack M; Patel, Manoj; Schreiber, John; Stewart, Randall; Whittemore, Vicky; Wilcox, Karen; Wagnon, Jacy L; Pearl, Phillip L; Vanderver, Adeline; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2016-07-01

    On April 21, 2015, the first SCN8A Encephalopathy Research Group convened in Washington, DC, to assess current research into clinical and pathogenic features of the disorder and prepare an agenda for future research collaborations. The group comprised clinical and basic scientists and representatives of patient advocacy groups. SCN8A encephalopathy is a rare disorder caused by de novo missense mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN8A, which encodes the neuronal sodium channel Nav 1.6. Since the initial description in 2012, approximately 140 affected individuals have been reported in publications or by SCN8A family groups. As a result, an understanding of the severe impact of SCN8A mutations is beginning to emerge. Defining a genetic epilepsy syndrome goes beyond identification of molecular etiology. Topics discussed at this meeting included (1) comparison between mutations of SCN8A and the SCN1A mutations in Dravet syndrome, (2) biophysical properties of the Nav 1.6 channel, (3) electrophysiologic effects of patient mutations on channel properties, (4) cell and animal models of SCN8A encephalopathy, (5) drug screening strategies, (6) the phenotypic spectrum of SCN8A encephalopathy, and (7) efforts to develop a bioregistry. A panel discussion of gaps in bioregistry, biobanking, and clinical outcomes data was followed by a planning session for improved integration of clinical and basic science research. Although SCN8A encephalopathy was identified only recently, there has been rapid progress in functional analysis and phenotypic classification. The focus is now shifting from identification of the underlying molecular cause to the development of strategies for drug screening and prioritized patient care. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Aline Haas; Costa, Ana Beatriz; Engel, Jéssica Della Giustina; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza

    2018-01-01

    Obesity leads to various changes in the body. Among them, the existing inflammatory process may lead to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, in turn, can trigger mitochondrial changes, which is called mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, excess nutrients supply (as it commonly is the case with obesity) can overwhelm the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, causing a mitochondrial dysfunction, and lead to a higher ROS formation. This increase in ROS production by the respiratory chain may also cause oxidative stress, which may exacerbate the inflammatory process in obesity. All these intracellular changes can lead to cellular apoptosis. These processes have been described in obesity as occurring mainly in peripheral tissues. However, some studies have already shown that obesity is also associated with changes in the central nervous system (CNS), with alterations in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and in cerebral structures such as hypothalamus and hippocampus. In this sense, this review presents a general view about mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity, including related alterations, such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis, and focusing on the whole organism, covering alterations in peripheral tissues, BBB, and CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Multifunctional Mitochondrial AAA Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Steven E

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria perform numerous functions necessary for the survival of eukaryotic cells. These activities are coordinated by a diverse complement of proteins encoded in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that must be properly organized and maintained. Misregulation of mitochondrial proteostasis impairs organellar function and can result in the development of severe human diseases. ATP-driven AAA+ proteins play crucial roles in preserving mitochondrial activity by removing and remodeling protein molecules in accordance with the needs of the cell. Two mitochondrial AAA proteases, i-AAA and m-AAA, are anchored to either face of the mitochondrial inner membrane, where they engage and process an array of substrates to impact protein biogenesis, quality control, and the regulation of key metabolic pathways. The functionality of these proteases is extended through multiple substrate-dependent modes of action, including complete degradation, partial processing, or dislocation from the membrane without proteolysis. This review discusses recent advances made toward elucidating the mechanisms of substrate recognition, handling, and degradation that allow these versatile proteases to control diverse activities in this multifunctional organelle.

  2. MRI and CT appearances in metabolic encephalopathies due to systemic diseases in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathla, G.; Hegde, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    The term encephalopathy refers to a clinical scenario of diffuse brain dysfunction, commonly due to a systemic, metabolic, or toxic derangement. Often the clinical evaluation is unsatisfactory in this scenario and imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, assessment of treatment response, and prognostication of the disorder. Hence, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging features of some relatively frequently acquired metabolic encephalopathies encountered in the hospital setting. This study reviews the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a number of metabolic encephalopathies that occur as part of systemic diseases in adults. The following conditions are covered in this review: hypoglycaemic encephalopathy, hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy, non-ketotic hyperglycaemia, hepatic encephalopathy, uraemic encephalopathy, hyperammonaemic encephalopathy, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. MRI is the imaging method of choice in evaluating these conditions. Due to their high metabolic activity, bilateral basal ganglia changes are evident in the majority of cases. Concurrent imaging abnormalities in other parts of the central nervous system often provide useful diagnostic information about the likely underlying cause of the encephalopathy. Besides this, abnormal signal intensity and diffusion restriction patterns on MRI and MR spectroscopy features may provide important clues as to the diagnosis and guide further management. Frequently, the diagnosis is not straightforward and typical imaging features require correlation with clinical and laboratory data for accurate assessment

  3. A Novel 3670-Base Pair Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Resulting in Multi-systemic Manifestations in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ming Liu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA deletion is a rare occurrence that results in defects to oxidative phosphorylation. The common clinical presentations of mtDNA deletion vary but include mitochondrial myopathy, Pearson syndrome, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Here, we report the case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with progressive deterioration of his clinical status (which included hypoglycemia, short stature, sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa, and chronic gastrointestinal dysmotility that progressed to acute deterioration with pancreatitis, Fanconi syndrome, lactic acidosis, and acute encephalopathy. Following treatment, the patient was stabilized and his neurological condition improved. Through a combination of histological examinations and biochemical and molecular analyses, mitochondrial disease was confirmed. A novel 3670-base pair deletion (deletion of mtDNA nt 7,628-11,297 was identified in the muscle tissue. A direct repeat of CTACT at the breakpoints was also detected.

  4. MELAS syndrome associated with a new mitochondrial tRNA-Val gene mutation (m.1616A>G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Yuka; Tanaka, Yuji; Satomi, Kazuo

    2017-09-11

    We describe the case of a 40-year-old-man with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, with cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure. He had a mitochondrial transfer RNA (tRNA) mutation (m.1616A>G) of the (tRNA-Val) gene, and it was not found in MELAS syndrome ever before. The presence of this newly observed tRNA-Val mutation (m.1616A>G) may induce multiple respiratory chain enzyme deficiencies and contribute to MELAS syndrome symptoms that are associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. We report that the pathognomonic symptom in MELAS syndrome caused by this newly observed mtDNA mutation may be rapid progression of cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Ultrastructural examination of skin biopsies may assist in diagnosing mitochondrial cytopathy when muscle biopsies yield negative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, John L; Warren, Christine B; Prayson, Richard A

    2017-08-01

    Ultrastructural evaluation of skin biopsies has been utilized for diagnosis of mitochondrial disease. This study investigates how frequently skin biopsies reveal mitochondrial abnormalities, correlates skin and muscle biopsy findings, and describes clinical diagnoses rendered following the evaluation. A retrospective review of surgical pathology reports from 1990 to 2015 identified skin biopsies examined by electron microscopy for suspected metabolic disease. A total of 630 biopsies were included from 615 patients. Of these patients, 178 also underwent a muscle biopsy. Of the 630 skin biopsies, 75 (12%) showed ultrastructural abnormalities and 34 (5%) specifically showed mitochondrial abnormalities including increased size (n=27), reduced or abnormal cristae (n=23), dense matrices (n=20), and increased number (n=8). Additional findings included lysosomal abnormalities (n=13), lipid accumulation (n=2) or glycogen accumulation (n=1). Of the 34 patients with mitochondrial abnormalities on skin biopsy, 20 also had muscle biopsies performed and nine showed abnormalities suggestive of a mitochondrial disorder including absent cytochrome oxidase staining (n=2), increased subsarcolemmal NADH, SDH, or cytochrome oxidase staining (n=1), or ultrastructural findings including large mitochondrial size (n=5), abnormal mitochondrial structure (n=5), and increased mitochondrial number (n=4). The most common presenting symptoms were intellectual disability (n=13), seizures (n=12), encephalopathy (n=9), and gastrointestinal disturbances (n=9). At last known follow-up, 12 patients had a definitive diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder. One patient each had Complex I deficiency, Complex III deficiency, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Our results suggest that skin biopsy sometimes yields diagnostic clues suggestive of a mitochondrial cytopathy in cases with a negative muscle biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Treatment of Hyponatremic Encephalopathy in the Critically Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achinger, Steven G; Ayus, Juan Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Hyponatremic encephalopathy, symptomatic cerebral edema due to a low osmolar state, is a medical emergency and often encountered in the ICU setting. This article provides a critical appraisal and review of the literature on identification of high-risk patients and the treatment of this life-threatening disorder. Online search of the PubMed database and manual review of articles involving risk factors for hyponatremic encephalopathy and treatment of hyponatremic encephalopathy in critical illness. Hyponatremic encephalopathy is a frequently encountered problem in the ICU. Prompt recognition of hyponatremic encephalopathy and early treatment with hypertonic saline are critical for successful outcomes. Manifestations are varied, depending on the extent of CNS's adaptation to the hypoosmolar state. The absolute change in serum sodium alone is a poor predictor of clinical symptoms. However, certain patient specific risks factors are predictive of a poor outcome and are important to identify. Gender (premenopausal and postmenopausal females), age (prepubertal children), and the presence of hypoxia are the three main clinical risk factors and are more predictive of poor outcomes than the rate of development of hyponatremia or the absolute decrease in the serum sodium. In patients with hyponatremic encephalopathy exhibiting neurologic manifestations, a bolus of 100 mL of 3% saline, given over 10 minutes, should be promptly administered. The goal of this initial bolus is to quickly treat cerebral edema. If signs persist, the bolus should be repeated in order to achieve clinical remission. However, the total change in serum sodium should not exceed 5 mEq/L in the initial 1-2 hours and 15-20 mEq/L in the first 48 hours of treatment. It has recently been demonstrated in a prospective fashion that 500 mL of 3% saline at an infusion rate of 100 mL per hour can be given safely. It is critical to recognize the early signs of cerebral edema (nausea, vomiting, and headache

  7. Radiolabeled Cu-ATSM as a novel indicator of overreduced intracellular state due to mitochondrial dysfunction: studies with mitochondrial DNA-less ρ0 cells and cybrids carrying MELAS mitochondrial DNA mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yukie; Yoneda, Makoto; Ikawa, Masamichi; Furukawa, Takako; Kiyono, Yasushi; Mori, Tetsuya; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Saga, Tsuneo; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Radiolabeled Cu-diacetyl-bis (N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazone) ( ⁎ Cu-ATSM), including 60/62/64 Cu-ATSM, is a potential imaging agent of hypoxic tumors for positron emission tomography (PET). We have reported that ⁎ Cu-ATSM is trapped in tumor cells under intracellular overreduced states, e.g., hypoxia. Here we evaluated ⁎ Cu-ATSM as an indicator of intracellular overreduced states in mitochondrial disorders using cell lines with mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: Mitochondrial DNA-less ρ 0 206 cells; the parental 143B human osteosarcoma cells; the cybrids carrying mutated mitochondria from a patient of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) (2SD); and that carrying wild-type one (2SA) were used. Cells were treated under normoxia or hypoxia, and 64 Cu-ATSM uptake was examined to compare it with levels of biological reductant NADH and NADPH. Results: ρ 0 206 cells showed higher 64 Cu-ATSM uptake than control 143B cells under normoxia, whereas 64 Cu-ATSM uptake was not significantly increased under hypoxia in ρ 0 206 cells. Additionally, 64 Cu-ATSM uptake showed correlate change to the NADH and NADPH levels, but not oxygenic conditions. 2SD cells showed increased 64 Cu-ATSM uptake under normoxia as compared with the control 2SA, and 64 Cu-ATSM uptake followed NADH and NADPH levels, but not oxygenic conditions. Conclusions: 64 Cu-ATSM accumulated in cells with overreduced states due to mitochondrial dysfunction, even under normoxia. We recently reported that 62 Cu-ATSM-PET can visualize stroke-like episodes maintaining oxygen supply in MELAS patients. Taken together, our data indicate that ⁎ Cu-ATSM uptake reflects overreduced intracellular states, despite oxygenic conditions; thus, ⁎ Cu-ATSM would be a promising marker of intracellular overreduced states for disorders with mitochondrial dysfunction, such as MELAS, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Clinical manifestations and treatment response of steroid in pediatric Hashimoto encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Seo, Dae Won; Lee, Munhyang

    2014-07-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy is a steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with elevated titers of antithyroid antibodies. Clinical symptoms are characterized by behavioral and cognitive changes, speech disturbance, seizures, myoclonus, psychosis, hallucination, involuntary movements, cerebellar signs, and coma. The standard treatment is the use of corticosteroids along with the treatment of any concurrent dysthyroidism. Other options are immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. We described symptoms and outcomes on 3 teenage girls with Hashimoto encephalopathy. Presenting symptoms were seizure or altered mental status. One patient took levothyroxine due to hypothyroidism before presentation of Hashimoto encephalopathy. After confirmation of elevated antithyroid antibodies, all patients were treated with steroids. One patient needed plasmapheresis because of the lack of response to steroids and immunoglobulins. Hashimoto encephalopathy should be considered in any patient presenting with acute or subacute unexplained encephalopathy and seizures. Even though the use of steroids is the first line of treatment, plasmapheresis can rescue steroid-resistant patients. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Flumazenil versus placebo or no intervention for people with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goh, Ee Teng; Andersen, Mette L.; Morgan, Marsha Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of cirrhosis which results in poor brain functioning. The spectrum of changes associated with hepatic encephalopathy ranges from the clinically 'indiscernible' or minimal hepatic encephalopathy to the clinically 'obvious' or overt hepatic...... encephalopathy. Flumazenil is a synthetic benzodiazepine antagonist with high affinity for the central benzodiazepine recognition site. Flumazenil may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy through an indirect negative allosteric modulatory effect on gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor function. The previous...... version of this review, which included 13 randomised clinical trials, found no effect of flumazenil on all-cause mortality, based on an analysis of 10 randomised clinical trials, but found a beneficial effect on hepatic encephalopathy, based on an analysis of eight randomised clinical trials. Objectives...

  10. Mitochondrial Dynamics: Coupling Mitochondrial Fitness with Healthy Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, David; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in mitochondrial function and the accumulation of abnormal mitochondria. However, the precise mechanisms by which aging promotes these mitochondrial alterations and the role of the latter in aging are still not fully understood. Mitochondrial dynamics is a key process regulating mitochondrial function and quality. Altered expression of some mitochondrial dynamics proteins has been recently associated with aging and with age-related alterations in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mice, and humans. Here, we review the link between alterations in mitochondrial dynamics, aging, and age-related impairment. We propose that the dysregulation of mitochondrial dynamics leads to age-induced accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria and contributes to alterations linked to aging, such as diabetes and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Anni, H.; Dráber, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2013), s. 216-227 ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gliomas * mitochondrial dysfunction * microtubule proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2013

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction in epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Kunz, W.S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 35-40 ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR GA309/08/0292 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epilepsy * mitochondrial dysfunction * neurodegeneration Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.025, year: 2012

  13. Brain hypothermia therapy for childhood acute encephalopathy based on clinical evidence

    OpenAIRE

    IMATAKA, GEORGE; ARISAKA, OSAMU

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have reported on the effectiveness of brain hypothermia therapy in childhood acute encephalopathy, additional studies in this field are necessary. In this review, we discussed brain hypothermia therapy methods for two clinical conditions for which sufficient evidences are currently available in the literature. The first condition is known as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and occurs in newborns and the second condition is acute encephalopathy which occurs in adults ...

  14. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  15. Mutations of PTPN23 in developmental and epileptic encephalopathy

    KAUST Repository

    Sowada, Nadine

    2017-10-31

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with poor prognosis. Recent discoveries have greatly expanded the repertoire of genes that are mutated in epileptic encephalopathies and DEE, often in a de novo fashion, but in many patients, the disease remains molecularly uncharacterized. Here, we describe a new form of DEE in patients with likely deleterious biallelic variants in PTPN23. The phenotype is characterized by early onset drug-resistant epilepsy, severe and global developmental delay, microcephaly, and sometimes premature death. PTPN23 encodes a tyrosine phosphatase with strong brain expression, and its knockout in mouse is embryonically lethal. Structural modeling supports a deleterious effect of the identified alleles. Our data suggest that PTPN23 mutations cause a rare severe form of autosomal-recessive DEE in humans, a finding that requires confirmation.

  16. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after neurosurgery: A literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán Paz, S; Moreno Casanova, I; Benatar-Haserfaty, J

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical-radiological characterized by decreased level of consciousness, seizures, and visual disturbances, as well as radiologically ras brain edema, predominantly in parieto-occipital white matter regions. There are many situations that can trigger the disorder, including the administration of immunosuppressants, chemotherapy agents, hypertensive disorders, and sepsis. The case is described of a patient diagnosed with stage IV prostate adenocarcinoma, receiving chemotherapy, andundergoing a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after surgery for resection of brain metastasis. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. A case of hepatic encephalopathy induced by trotrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hideo; Kudo, Norishige; Takita, Kyoji

    1980-01-01

    A case of hepatic encephalopathy induced by thorotrast injected as a contrast 40 years before was reported. The patient was a 64-year-old man with severe liver dysfunction, and had psychic and neurological symptoms, and hyperammonemia. There was a relationship between ammonium concentration in blood and psychic and neurological symptoms. Electroencephalogram showed three phases waves peculiar to hepatic coma intermittently. Throtrast in the liver was detected by radiological methods and in vivo measurement of the radioactivity. From the above-mentioned result, this disease was diagnosed as hepatic encephalopathy induced by long-term sedimentation of thorotrast without complication of malignant tumors. Because of the concurrent presence of cerebral infarction, the diagnosis was difficult to make. (Tsunoda, M.)

  18. [Bio-ecological control of chronic liver disease and encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengmark, S; Di Cocco, P; Clemente, K; Corona, L; Angelico, R; Manzia, T; Famulari, A; Pisani, F; Orlando, G

    2011-08-01

    Minimal encephalopathy was originally associated with chronic liver disease but is increasingly associated with most other chronic diseases and particularly with diabetes and also chronic disorders in other organs: kidneys, lungs, thyroid and with obesity. It is increasingly with dramatically increased and more or less permanent increase in systemic inflammation, most likely a result of Western lifestyle. Frequent physical exercise and intake of foods rich in vitamins, antioxidants, fibres, lactic acid bacteria etc in combination with reduction in intake of refined and processed foods is known to reduce systemic inflammation and prevent chronic diseases. Some lactic acid bacteria, especially Lb paracasei, lb plantarum and pediococcus pentosaceus have proven effective to reduce inflammation and eliminate encephalopathy. Significant reduction in blood ammonia levels and endotoxin levels were reported in parallel to improvement of liver disease. Subsequent studies with other lactic acid bacteria seem to demonstrate suppression of inflammation and one study also provides evidence of clinical improvement.

  19. Concentric structure of thalamic lesions in acute necrotizing encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, M.; Nakano, I.; Hayashi, M.; Kuwashima, M.; Yoshida, K.; Nakai, Y.; Itoh, M.; Takashima, S.

    2002-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANE) is characterized by multiple, symmetrical brain lesions affecting the bilateral thalami, putamina and cerebral white matter, which often show a concentric structure on CT and MRI. To reveal the pathological substrate of this finding, comparison was made between CT and necropsy findings of three fatal cases of ANE. Cranial CT demonstrated a concentric structure of the thalamocerebral lesions in one patient who died 3.5 days after the onset of encephalopathy, but not in the other two patients who died within 30 h. Neuropathological examination of postmortem brains revealed laminar changes of vascular and parenchymal pathology in all the cases. Excessive permeability of blood vessels and resultant vasogenic edema became more prominent with increasing depth from the cerebral surface. The deep portion of the lesions showed severe perivascular hemorrhage, accounting for the central high density on the CT images of one patient. (orig.)

  20. Encephalopathy Associated with Influenza B in a Healthy Young Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Masaki; Okada, Satoshi; Terashima, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with a fever, convulsions, and loss of consciousness at our hospital. The patient had a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 12. Influenza B virus infection was diagnosed using the rapid test kit, and an eight-fold increase in the serum levels of anti-influenza B virus antibody was confirmed using the complement fixation test. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multifocal high-signal lesions, and an electroencephalogram showed diffuse slowing of the background activity, indicating acute encephalopathy. After treatment with peramivir and methylprednisolone for 3 days, the patient was discharged without any neurological impairment. This was a case of influenza B infection associated with acute encephalopathy in a healthy young man.

  1. Severe valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy successfully managed with peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amandeep; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2014-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used drug for epilepsy, psychiatric disorders and migraine and is frequently used in neurosurgical intensive care units. Though most of its side-effects are mild and transient, certain idiosyncratic side-effects have been attributed to VPA. Valproate induced hyperammonemia (VIH) is one such side-effect. VIH can produce symptoms of encephalopathy known as valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE). VIH and VHE usually respond to withdrawal of VPA. However, in some cases VHE can be unresponsive to supportive measures and severe enough to be life-threatening. In such cases, dialysis can be used to rapidly reverse hyperammonemia and VHE and can prove to be a lifesaving measure. We report such a case of VIH and life-threatening VHE in a postoperative neurosurgical patient that was managed successfully with peritoneal dialysis.

  2. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    leila pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Wernicke’s Korsakoff syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. Confusion and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. The aim of this study was report of a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case report: A 28-years-old pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria. MRI showed hyperdense lesion which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rull out Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal death.

  3. Hepatic encephalopathy associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas (Lama glama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillitteri, C A; Craig, L E

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy has been listed as a differential for llamas displaying neurologic signs, but it has not been histopathologically described. This report details the neurologic histopathologic findings associated with 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis with concurrent neurologic signs and compares them to 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis in the absence of neurologic signs and 3 cases without hepatic lipidosis. Brain from all 3 llamas displaying neurologic signs contained Alzheimer type II cells, which were not detected in either subset of llamas without neurologic signs. Astrocytic immunohistochemical staining intensity for glial fibrillary acid protein was decreased in llamas with neurologic signs as compared to 2 of 3 llamas with hepatic lipidosis and without neurologic signs and to 2 of 3 llamas without hepatic lipidosis. Immunohistochemical staining for S100 did not vary between groups. These findings suggest that hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas.

  4. Acute febrile encephalopathy in adults from Northwest India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute onset fever with altered mentation is a common problem encountered by the physician practicing in tropical countries. Central nervous system (CNS infections are the most common cause resulting in fever with altered mentation in children. Aim : In this study, we have tried to analyze the cause of encephalopathy following short febrile illness in adults presenting to a tertiary care center in Northwestern part of India. Setting and Design : A prospective observational study carried out in a tertiary care center in the Northwestern India over a period of 1 year. Material and Methods : A total of 127 patients with fever of less than 2 weeks duration along with alteration in mentation were studied prospectively over a period of 12 months. The demographic variables were recorded in detail. In addition to routine investigations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, noncontrast- and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, along with magnetic resonance imaging were performed in all the subjects. Statistical Analysis : The results were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The values were expressed as mean with standard deviation for contiguous variable as percentage for the others. Results and Conclusion : Out of these, 70% had primary CNS infection as the etiology. A total of 33% patients had meningitis, 29.9% had evidence of meningoencephalitis, and 12.7% were diagnosed as sepsis-associated encephalopathy. These were followed by cerebral malaria, leptospirosis, and brain abscess as the cause of febrile encephalopathy in adults. Among the noninfectious causes, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cortical venous thrombosis, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome were documented in 2.36% each. In 11% of the patients, the final diagnosis could not be made in spite of the extensive investigations. Our study demonstrates that acute febrile encephalopathy in adults is a heterogeneous syndrome with primary CNS infections being the commonest

  5. Approach to Clinical Syndrome of Jaundice and Encephalopathy in Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Anil C.; Garg, Hitendra K.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India. Most common etiology here is viral hepatitis (hepatitis E > hepatitis B> hepatitis A). Apart from ALF, one may also come across subacute hepatic failure (SAHF) as well as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) due to viral hepatitis. Interestingly, a host of other conditions can mimic ALF because clinical presentation in these conditions can be dominated by jaundice and encephalopathy. Malarial hepatopathy is possibly the best-known condition out of these and is not an uncommon manifestation of severe malaria. A similar presentation can also be seen in other common infections in tropics such as dengue fever, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, amoebic liver abscesses, tuberculosis and other bacterial and fungal infections with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related disease. In many of these conditions, liver failure may not be underlying pathophysiology. Some pregnancy related liver diseases could also present with jaundice and encephalopathy. This review summarizes the commonly seen presentations in tropical country like India, where jaundice and encephalopathy dominate the clinical picture. PMID:26041951

  6. Pheochromocytoma: a rare cause of childhood hypertensive encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftab, S.; Yasmeen, T.; Hamid, M.H.; Sarwar, M.; Sipra, H.; Sheikh, A.; Haider, N.; Hanif, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are rare neuroendocrine tumours of chromaffin tissues. They are catecholamine secreting tumours which cause severe hypertension and other systemic disturbances. Of all the causes of childhood hypertension, pheochromocytoma constitutes less than 1%. We report the case of a 12 years old child who presented with hypertensive encephalopathy, confirmed histologically to be secondary to pheochromocytoma, and cured with meticulous critical care and surgical resection. (author)

  7. An Unusual Case of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Zemple

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old pregnant female with no significant past medical history presented with acute onset headache and nausea as well as tonic-clonic seizures, then rapidly decompensated into a coma with complete absence of brainstem reflexes. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP syndrome and subsequent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES with brainstem involvement. Emergent delivery and blood pressure control resulted in rapid and complete neurologic recovery.

  8. Studying neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy with conventional MRI, MRS, and DWI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoyi; Wu, Wulin; Chineah, Ashley; Liu, Fan; Liao, Weihua; Hou, Bob L.; Zhang, Ping

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy. We collected conventional MRI in 24 neonates with neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy. We performed 1 H-MRS and DWI sequences to nine of the 24 patients and seven age-matched healthy control subjects. Multiple-voxel 1 H-MRS data were acquired using PRESS pulse sequence with TE=135 ms and TR=1500 ms. The spectroscopic regions of interest were the bilateral basal ganglia and thalamus with a 1.0 mL spatial resolution. The data from DWI were collected by using a single shot-spin echo-echo planar imaging sequence with TR/TE: 2900/98, and imaging regions were also focused on the bilateral basal ganglia and thalamus. Nineteen of the 24 patients had abnormal T 1 -weighted image hyperintensity in the globus pallidus, but these lesions appeared as normal T 2 -weighted image intensity in the same region. Ten of the 24 patients had T 1 -weighted image high signal intensity in the subthalamic nucleus and appeared as normal intensity in the region for the T 2 -weighted images. The peak area ratios of NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were significantly decreased (t-test, P 1 H-MRS are important complementary tools in the diagnosis of neonatal bilirubin encephalopathy. The study provides important information for applying these MR modalities to evaluate neonates with bilirubin encephalopathy. (orig.)

  9. Determination of lactic acid level in systemic liquids in children with progressive encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszał, Elzbieta; Wojaczyńska-Stanek, Katarzyna; Pietruszewski, Jerzy; Emich-Widera, Ewa; Bielińska-Bujniewicz, Eugenia

    2002-03-01

    This article reports the results of research into the activities of lactic acid concentrations in the body fluids of children with progressive encephalopathies (PE) in comparison to patients with non-progressive encephalopathies (NPE) and those with non-progressive encephalopathies with concomitant epilepsy (NPEE). The study was designed to determine whether there is difference between the serum and CSF lactic acid concentrations in children with progressive encephalopathies (PE), static (non-progressive) encephalopathies (NPE) and non progressive encephalopathies with concomitant epilepsy (NPEE), and whether the clinical status correlates with the concentration of these biochemical markers in children with PE. The assessment involved 138 children of both sexes, whose age ranged between 8 months and 15 years, diagnosed and treated in the Neurology Department at the Pediatric Clinic of the Silesian Medical Academy in Katowice between 1995 and 1997. Lactate concentrations were determined in serum and cerebro-spinal fluid and analyzed statistically. The findings showed higher serum and CSF concentrations in children with PE than in patients who manifested non-progressive forms of encephalopathy. The degree of clinical symptom aggravation in PE children was likewise analyzed and compared to the values of lactate concentrations in body fluids; however, no correlation was found between these parameters. Children with progressive encephalopathies present higher lactate concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid than patients with static (non-progressive) encephalopathy.

  10. Research progress of BOLD-fMRI in minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhiming; Zhao Jiannong

    2013-01-01

    The minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the early stage of hepatic encephalopathy. It has few apparent clinical symptoms and specific manifestations, and is difficult to diagnose. In the recent years, BOLD-fMRI has been used to study hepatic encephalopathy gradually. Through detection of the brain neuron activities in different states, it can not only locate the abnormal activity of brain functional areas, but also can find the changes of brain functional connectivity. BOLD- fMRI combining with other MR technologies can explore the pathology and pathogenesis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy from micro to macro and from structure to function. (authors)

  11. The ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ville, Dorothée; Chiron, Catherine; Laschet, Jacques; Dulac, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Hormonal therapy or ketogenic diet often permits overcoming the challenging periods of many epileptic encephalopathies (West and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes and encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep), but relapse affects over 20% of patients. We report here a monocenter pilot series of 42 consecutive patients in whom we combined oral steroids with the ketogenic diet for corticosteroid-resistant or -dependent epileptic encephalopathy. We retrospectively evaluated the effect on seizure frequency, interictal spike activity, neuropsychological course, and steroid treatment course. Twenty-three patients had West syndrome (WS), 13 had encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in slow sleep (CSWS), and six others had miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. All patients succeeded to reach 0.8 to 1.6g/l ketone bodies in the urine following the usual KD regimen. For at least 6 months, 14/42 responded to the addition of the ketogenic diet: 4/23 with WS, 8/13 with CSWS, and 2/6 with miscellaneous epileptic encephalopathies. The addition of the KD allowed withdrawing steroids in all responders. Among them, 10/15 had been patients with steroid-dependent epileptic encephalopathy and 4/27 patients with steroid-resistant epileptic encephalopathy. Therefore, the ketogenic diet can be used successfully in combination with corticosteroids for epileptic encephalopathies. Patients presenting with steroid-dependent CSWS seem to be the best candidates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeted resequencing in epileptic encephalopathies identifies de novo mutations in CHD2 and SYNGAP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; Heavin, Sinéad B; Yendle, Simone C

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of epilepsies with poor prognosis, of which the majority are of unknown etiology. We perform targeted massively parallel resequencing of 19 known and 46 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in 500 affected individuals (cases) to identify...... CHD2 and SYNGAP1 mutations are new causes of epileptic encephalopathies, accounting for 1.2% and 1% of cases, respectively. We also expand the phenotypic spectra explained by SCN1A, SCN2A and SCN8A mutations. To our knowledge, this is the largest cohort of cases with epileptic encephalopathies...

  13. Current trends in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae, Brendan M McGuireDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common reversible neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with chronic and acute liver dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality. Although a clear pathogenesis is yet to be determined, elevated ammonia in the serum and central nervous system are the mainstay for pathogenesis and treatment. Management includes early diagnosis and prompt treatment of precipitating factors (infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, electrolyte disturbances, hepatocellular carcinoma, dehydration, hypotension, and use of benzodiazepines, psychoactive drugs, and/or alcohol. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of lactulose and lactitol enemas in the treatment of acute hepatic encephalopathy. Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated the efficacy of oral lactulose and lactitol with the goal of two to three soft bowel movements a day for the treatment of chronic HE. However, lactulose and lactitol have significant gastrointestinal side effects. For patients unable to tolerate lactulose or lactitol or who still have persistent chronic HE with lactulose or lactitol, neomycin, metronidazole and rifaximin are second-line agents. More recent data supports the benefits of rifaximin used solely and as an additional agent with fewer side effects than neomycin or metronidazole. Newer therapies being investigated in humans with clinical promise include nitazoxanide, the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS, L-ornithine phenylacetate, sodium benzoate, and/or sodium phenylacetate and Kremezin® (AST-120.Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, liver dysfunction, lactulose, lactitol

  14. Pure methotrexate encephalopathy presenting with seizures: CT and MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Kelkar, P.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Ramelli, G. [Department of Pediatrics, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    1998-02-01

    With the advent of chemotherapy, mortality rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have decreased, but complications in the central nervous system have appeared. These include direct involvement of the brain itself and the development of chemotherapy-related encephalopathy as a delayed reaction. In most reported cases, this encephalopathy is believed to be due to necrotising angiitis arising from the combination of chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the cases of four children with ALL who had been treated with high-dose intravenous and intrathecal chemotherapy but no radiation therapy, and who were admitted to hospital because of seizures. CT of the brain revealed the presence of diffuse periventricular white matter hypodensities in all cases and subcortical hyperdense foci in three cases. MRI showed diffuse hyperintense white matter lesions on T2-weighted images in all four patients; hypointense changes were observed on susceptibility-sensitive FLASH sequences in the hyperdense foci seen on CT as well as changes that were hyperintense on T1-weighted images. It was, therefore, concluded that the lesions corresponded to a leukoencephalopathy with calcific deposits. These findings are of a pure form of methotrexate encephalopathy causing seizures. (orig.) With 2 figs., 17 refs.

  15. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in children : CT findings related to prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Min; Il, Yim Byung; Kim, Ok Hwa; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Suh, Jung Ho

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate prognosis-related CT findings in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. For the purpose of prognosis, 28 children with a clinical history and CT findings suggestive of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) were restrospectively reviewed. The diagnostic criteria for HIE, as seen on CT scanning, were as follows : 1, ventricular collapse;2, effacement of cortical sulci;3, prominent enhancement of cortical vessels;4, poor differentiation of gray and white matter;5, reversal sign;6, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern;7, high density on tentorial edge, as seen on precontrast scans;and 8, low density in thalamus, brain stem and basal ganglia. On the basis of clinical outcome, we divided the patients into three groups, as follows:group I(good prognosis);group II(neurologic sequelae), and group III(vegetative state or expire), and among these, compared CT findings. There were thirteen patients in group I, six in group II, and nine in group III. Ventricular collapse, effacement of cortical sulci, and prominent enhancement of cortical vessels were noted in all groups, whereas poor differentiation of gray and white matter, reversal sign, obliteration of perimesencephalic cistern, high density on tentorial edge, on precontrast scan, and low density in brain stem and basal ganglia were observed only in groups II and III. CT findings showed distinct differences between groups in whom prognosis was good, and in whom it was poor. An awareness of poor prognostic CT findings may be clinically helpful in the evaluation of patients with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

  16. Guillain-Barre syndrome with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj F Banakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinicoradiologic entity commonly associated with eclampsia, septicemia, chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Concurrent occurrence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS with PRES is a rare entity. Dysautonomia is a proposed mechanism for such occurrence. Here we present a non-diabetic, non-hypertensive 63-year-old male patient, who came with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis, developing generalized seizures, altered sensorium and raised blood pressure on fifth day of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of brain showed altered signal intensities involving the parieto-occipital areas suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed albuminocytological dissociation, nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating type of polyneuropathy. The patient was treated with antihypertensives and antiepileptics. After resolution of the encephalopathy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg was given. The patient recovered gradually over few months. Our case concludes GBS as independent risk factor, for PRES may be secondary to dysautonomia and physicians should be aware of such rare coexistence so that early treatment can be done to reduce the mortality and morbidity.

  17. Ammonia levels and the severity of hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, M.O.; Khokhar, N.; Shafqat, F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between ammonia levels with the severity of HE in patients coming to the tertiary care hospital with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Study Design: Descriptive, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, from January 2011 to February 2012. Methodology: A total of 135 patients with liver cirrhosis and HE had serum ammonia levels measured on admission. The diagnosis of HE was based on clinical criteria, and its severity was graded according to the West Haven Criteria for grading of mental status. Ammonia levels were correlated with the severity of HE using Spearman rank correlation. Results: Out of 20 patients with normal ammonia levels, 13 (65%) were in HE I-II, 6 (30%) were in grade-III, while 1 (5%) patient was in grade-IV HE. Out of 45 patients with mild hyperammonemia, 27 (60%) were in grade I-II, 12 (26%) were in grade-III and 6 (13%) were in grade-IV HE. Out of 34 patients with moderate hyperammonemia, 9 (26%) were in grade I-II, 18 (53%) were in grade-III, and 7 (20%) were in grade-IV HE. Out of 36 patients with severe hyperammonemia, 31 (86%) patients were in grade-IV HE (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Ammonia levels correlated with the severity of hepatic encephalopathy. Greater the ammonia level, severe is the grade of hepatic encephalopathy. (author)

  18. Pure methotrexate encephalopathy presenting with seizures: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Kelkar, P.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G.; Ramelli, G.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of chemotherapy, mortality rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have decreased, but complications in the central nervous system have appeared. These include direct involvement of the brain itself and the development of chemotherapy-related encephalopathy as a delayed reaction. In most reported cases, this encephalopathy is believed to be due to necrotising angiitis arising from the combination of chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the cases of four children with ALL who had been treated with high-dose intravenous and intrathecal chemotherapy but no radiation therapy, and who were admitted to hospital because of seizures. CT of the brain revealed the presence of diffuse periventricular white matter hypodensities in all cases and subcortical hyperdense foci in three cases. MRI showed diffuse hyperintense white matter lesions on T2-weighted images in all four patients; hypointense changes were observed on susceptibility-sensitive FLASH sequences in the hyperdense foci seen on CT as well as changes that were hyperintense on T1-weighted images. It was, therefore, concluded that the lesions corresponded to a leukoencephalopathy with calcific deposits. These findings are of a pure form of methotrexate encephalopathy causing seizures. (orig.)

  19. Cerebral circulation and prognosis of the patients with hypoxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogami, Kenichiro; Fujii, Masami; Kashiwagi, Shiro; Sadamitsu Daikai; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Recent progress in cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques improved the survival rate of patients with acute cardiopulmonary disturbances. However, severe cerebral complications remained frequently in patients who survived the acute stage. Early prediction of cerebral prognosis is important to optimize the management of these patients. We examined the relations between radiological findings (Xe-CT and MRI) and cerebral prognosis. Patients included in this study were selected from all patients with hypoxic encephalopathy admitted to our hospital. There were 11 men and 10 women. Causes of hypoxic encephalopathy were heart disease (11 cases), suffocation (4 cases), CO intoxication (2 cases), asthma (1 case), pneumothorax (1 case), anaphyraxy shock (1 case) and electric shock (1 case). Xe-CT and MRI were carried out 3 weeks after the onset. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) of the patients was measured at rest and 15 minutes after intravenous administration of acetazolamide (1 g). The prognosis was evaluated 3 months after the onset in accordance with Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Low hemispheric CBF (30 ml/100 g/min), poor reactivity of acetazolamide challenge test (10 ml/100 g/min), presence of hyperintensity areas in the basal ganglia in T1 weighted images (T1WI) and T2 weighted images (T2WI) are the factors associated with poor outcome in hypoxic encephalopathy. (author)

  20. Management and investigation of neonatal encephalopathy: 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinello, Kathryn; Hart, Anthony R; Yap, Sufin; Mitra, Subhabrata

    2017-01-01

    This review discusses an approach to determining the cause of neonatal encephalopathy, as well as current evidence on resuscitation and subsequent management of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). Encephalopathy in neonates can be due to varied aetiologies in addition to hypoxic-ischaemia. A combination of careful history, examination and the judicious use of investigations can help determine the cause. Over the last 7 years, infants with moderate to severe HIE have benefited from the introduction of routine therapeutic hypothermia; the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome is 7 (95% CI 5 to 10). More recent research has focused on optimal resuscitation practices for babies with cardiorespiratory depression, such as delayed cord clamping after establishment of ventilation and resuscitation in air. Around a quarter of infants with asystole at 10 min after birth who are subsequently cooled have normal outcomes, suggesting that individualised decision making on stopping resuscitation is needed, based on access to intensive treatment unit and early cooling. The full benefit of cooling appears to have been exploited in our current treatment protocols of 72 hours at 33.5°C; deeper and longer cooling showed adverse outcome. The challenge over the next 5–10 years will be to assess which adjunct therapies are safe and optimise hypothermic brain protection in phase I and phase II trials. Optimal care may require tailoring treatments according to gender, genetic risk, injury severity and inflammatory status. PMID:28389438

  1. L-ornithine-L-aspartate infusion efficacy in hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of L-ornithine-L-aspartate in treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. Cirrhotic patients with hyperammonemia and overt hepatic encephalopathy were enrolled. Eighty patients were randomized to two treatment groups, L-ornithine-L-aspartate (20g/d) or placebo, both dissolved in 250mL of 5% dextrose water and infused intravenously for four hours a day for five consecutive days with 0.5 g/kg dietary protein intake at the end of daily treatment period. Outcome variables were postprandial blood ammonia and mental state grade. Adverse reactions and mortality were also determined. Both treatment groups were comparable regarding age, gender, etiology of cirrhosis, Child-Pugh class, mental state grade and blood ammonia at baseline. Although, improvement occurred in both groups, there was a greater improvement in L-ornithine-L-aspartate group with regard to both variables. Four patients in the placebo group and 2 in L-ornithine-L-aspartate group died. L-ornithine-L-aspartate infusions were found to be effective in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy. (author)

  2. A Rare Case of Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Accompanying Late Postpartum Eclampsia or Hypertensive Encephalopathy-A Clinical Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuntala PN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES refers to a clinic-radiologic diagnosis. Clinically it is characterized by non specific symptoms such as headache, confusion, visual disturbances and seizures. The radiological findings in PRES are thought to be due to vasogenic oedema, predominantly in the posterior cerebral hemispheres, and are reversible with appropriate management. We report a case of reversible encephalopathy diagnosed by MRI scan occurring in atypical areas like the caudate and lentiform nuclei of the brain following an uneventful lower segment caesarean section in a normotensive patient, who was successfully treated with antihypertensives, anticonvulsants and supportive treatment. The differential diagnosis of convulsions in the post-partum period is discussed.

  3. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF POSTERIOR REVERSIBLE ENCEPHALOPATHY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwaprem Raj

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES is a neurotoxic state that occurs secondary to the inability of posterior circulation to autoregulate. The clinical spectrum and the underlying pathophysiology are still poorly defined. No conclusive evidence has been put forward regarding the relationship between clinical conditions and specific imaging findings of severity or location of oedema. PURPOSE To assess the role of computed tomography in evaluation of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS 55 patients referred to the Department of Radio-Diagnosis, with a history of neurological abnormalities, including altered mental function, visual loss, stupor with a predisposing history favouring PRES and followed up for a period of 10 – 30 days. RESULTS 21 patients (38.2% were females. 32 patients (58.1% were in the age group between 21 to 30 years. Predisposing condition; 16 (29.1% presented with pre-eclampsia, 12 (21.8% with post-partum status in altered sensorium, 9 (16.4% with seizures, 7 (12.7% with hypertension, 6 (10.9% with visual disturbances, 4 (7.3% with eclampsia and 1 (1.8% with uraemia. 20 cases (36.4% showed findings suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome on initial computed tomography examination. 35 cases showed no initial radiological evidence suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Of the 20 cases which showed computed tomographic evidence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, recovery was noted in 5 cases (9.1%. Persistence of findings detected on first CT was noted in 13 patients (23.6%. Regional predominance of the lesions was as follows. Frontal lobe (39%, Parietal lobe (32%, Temporal lobe (15% and occipital lobe (15%. CONCLUSION Varied clinical manifestations are associated with anatomical findings recognisable by neuro-imaging as PRES. Prompt imaging is necessary for the recognition of the condition and appropriate

  4. How to diagnose and manage hepatic encephalopathy: A consensus statement on roles and responsibilities beyond the liver specialist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shawcross, D.L. (Debbie L.); Dunk, A.A. (Arthur A.); Jalan, R. (Rajiv); Kircheis, G. (Gerald); R.J. de Knegt (Robert); W. Laleman (Wim); Ramage, J.K. (John K.); H. Wedemeyer (Heiner); Morgan, I.E.J. (Ian E.J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction Hepatic encephalopathy is defined as brain dysfunction caused by liver insufficiency and/or portosystemic shunting. Symptoms include nonspecific cognitive impairment, personality changes and changes in consciousness. Overt (symptomatic) hepatic encephalopathy is a common

  5. Mitochondrial disease and endocrine dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jasmine; Rahman, Joyeeta; Achermann, John C; Dattani, Mehul T; Rahman, Shamima

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria are critical organelles for endocrine health; steroid hormone biosynthesis occurs in these organelles and they provide energy in the form of ATP for hormone production and trafficking. Mitochondrial diseases are multisystem disorders that feature defective oxidative phosphorylation, and are characterized by enormous clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity. To date, mitochondrial diseases have been found to result from >250 monogenic defects encoded across two genomes: the nuclear genome and the ancient circular mitochondrial genome located within mitochondria themselves. Endocrine dysfunction is often observed in genetic mitochondrial diseases and reflects decreased intracellular production or extracellular secretion of hormones. Diabetes mellitus is the most frequently described endocrine disturbance in patients with inherited mitochondrial diseases, but other endocrine manifestations in these patients can include growth hormone deficiency, hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, hypoparathyroidism and thyroid disease. Although mitochondrial endocrine dysfunction frequently occurs in the context of multisystem disease, some mitochondrial disorders are characterized by isolated endocrine involvement. Furthermore, additional monogenic mitochondrial endocrine diseases are anticipated to be revealed by the application of genome-wide next-generation sequencing approaches in the future. Understanding the mitochondrial basis of endocrine disturbance is key to developing innovative therapies for patients with mitochondrial diseases.

  6. Mitochondrial nucleoid interacting proteins support mitochondrial protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J; Cooper, H M; Reyes, A; Di Re, M; Sembongi, H; Litwin, T R; Gao, J; Neuman, K C; Fearnley, I M; Spinazzola, A; Walker, J E; Holt, I J

    2012-07-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes and translation factors co-purify with mitochondrial nucleoids of human cells, based on affinity protein purification of tagged mitochondrial DNA binding proteins. Among the most frequently identified proteins were ATAD3 and prohibitin, which have been identified previously as nucleoid components, using a variety of methods. Both proteins are demonstrated to be required for mitochondrial protein synthesis in human cultured cells, and the major binding partner of ATAD3 is the mitochondrial ribosome. Altered ATAD3 expression also perturbs mtDNA maintenance and replication. These findings suggest an intimate association between nucleoids and the machinery of protein synthesis in mitochondria. ATAD3 and prohibitin are tightly associated with the mitochondrial membranes and so we propose that they support nucleic acid complexes at the inner membrane of the mitochondrion.

  7. The mitochondrial uncoupling proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ledesma, Amalia; de Lacoba, Mario García; Rial, Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    The uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are transporters, present in the mitochondrial inner membrane, that mediate a regulated discharge of the proton gradient that is generated by the respiratory chain. This energy-dissipatory mechanism can serve functions such as thermogenesis, maintenance of the redox balance, or reduction in the production of reactive oxygen species. Some UCP homologs may not act as true uncouplers, however, and their activity has yet to be defined. The UCPs are integral membrane...

  8. MITOCHONDRIAL BKCa CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique eBalderas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in a glioma cell line 15 years ago, mitochondrial BKCa channel (mitoBKCa has been studied in brain cells and cardiomyocytes sharing general biophysical properties such as high K+ conductance (~300 pS, voltage-dependency and Ca2+-sensitivity. Main advances in deciphering the molecular composition of mitoBKCa have included establishing that it is encoded by the Kcnma1 gene, that a C-terminal splice insert confers mitoBKCa ability to be targeted to cardiac mitochondria, and evidence for its potential coassembly with β subunits. Notoriously, β1 subunit directly interacts with cytochrome c oxidase and mitoBKCa can be modulated by substrates of the respiratory chain. mitoBKCa channel has a central role in protecting the heart from ischemia, where pharmacological activation of the channel impacts the generation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial Ca2+ preventing cell death likely by impeding uncontrolled opening of the mitochondrial transition pore. Supporting this view, inhibition of mitoBKCa with Iberiotoxin, enhances cytochrome c release from glioma mitochondria. Many tantalizing questions remain. Some of them are: how is mitoBKCa coupled to the respiratory chain? Does mitoBKCa play non-conduction roles in mitochondria physiology? Which are the functional partners of mitoBKCa? What are the roles of mitoBKCa in other cell types? Answers to these questions are essential to define the impact of mitoBKCa channel in mitochondria biology and disease.

  9. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  10. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the prediction of the neurodevelopmental outcome of acute bilirubin encephalopathy in newborns

    OpenAIRE

    TATLI, Mustafa Mansur

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in the diagnosis of acute bilirubin encephalopathy, but the relationship between MRI findings and neurodevelopmental outcome in newborns with acute bilirubin encephalopathy remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between acute bilirubin encephalopathy, MRI findings, and neurodevelopmental outcome. Materials and Methods: The study included 13 infants with acute bilirubin encephalopathy. MRI was performed ...

  11. Hypothyroidism-induced Reversible Encephalopathy as a Cause of Aggravation of Parkinsonism and Myoclonus in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehm, Gwanhee; Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Beomseok

    2017-01-01

    Myoclonus and encephalopathy are unusual in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We describe the case of a 59-year-old male with PD who developed myoclonus and encephalopathy. Underlying hypothyroidism was revealed after admission and treated with levothyroxine. Myoclonus and encephalopathy were completely resolved following thyroid hormone replacement. Hypothyroidism can cause reversible myoclonus and encephalopathy along with unusual aggravation of parkinsonism symptoms in patients with PD.

  12. Mitochondrial functionality in female reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Gąsior

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In most animal species female germ cells are the source of mitochondrial genome for the whole body of individuals. As a source of mitochondrial DNA for future generations the mitochondria in the female germ line undergo dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes. In addition to maintaining the intact template of mitochondrial genome from one generation to another, mitochondrial role in oocytes is much more complex and pleiotropic. The quality of mitochondria determines the ability of meiotic divisions, fertilization ability, and activation after fertilization or sustaining development of a new embryo. The presence of normal number of functional mitochondria is also crucial for proper implantation and pregnancy maintaining. This article addresses issues of mitochondrial role and function in mammalian oocyte and presents new approaches in studies of mitochondrial function in female germ cells.

  13. Molecular basis for mitochondrial signaling

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent advances in the study of structure, function, and regulation of metabolite, protein and ion translocating channels, and transporters in mitochondria. A wide array of cutting-edge methods are covered, ranging from electrophysiology and cell biology to bioinformatics, as well as structural, systems, and computational biology. At last, the molecular identity of two important channels in the mitochondrial inner membrane, the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore have been established. After years of work on the physiology and structure of VDAC channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane, there have been multiple discoveries on VDAC permeation and regulation by cytosolic proteins. Recent breakthroughs in structural studies of the mitochondrial cholesterol translocator reveal a set of novel unexpected features and provide essential clues for defining therapeutic strategies. Molecular Basis for Mitochondrial Signaling covers these and many more re...

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy-integration of canonical traumatic brain injury secondary injury mechanisms with tau pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R; Hall, Edward D

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a new neurodegenerative tauopathy labeled Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), has been identified that is believed to be primarily a sequela of repeated mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), often referred to as concussion, that occurs in athletes participating in contact sports (e.g. boxing, American football, Australian football, rugby, soccer, ice hockey) or in military combatants, especially after blast-induced injuries. Since the identification of CTE, and its neuropathological finding of deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, mechanistic attention has been on lumping the disorder together with various other non-traumatic neurodegenerative tauopathies. Indeed, brains from suspected CTE cases that have come to autopsy have been confirmed to have deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau in locations that make its anatomical distribution distinct for other tauopathies. The fact that these individuals experienced repetitive TBI episodes during their athletic or military careers suggests that the secondary injury mechanisms that have been extensively characterized in acute TBI preclinical models, and in TBI patients, including glutamate excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, free radical-induced oxidative damage and neuroinflammation, may contribute to the brain damage associated with CTE. Thus, the current review begins with an in depth analysis of what is known about the tau protein and its functions and dysfunctions followed by a discussion of the major TBI secondary injury mechanisms, and how the latter have been shown to contribute to tau pathology. The value of this review is that it might lead to improved neuroprotective strategies for either prophylactically attenuating the development of CTE or slowing its progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adult onset urea cycle disorder in a patient with presumed hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiq, Muslim; Holt, Andrew F; Safdar, Kamran; Weber, Frederick; Ravinuthala, Ravi; Jonas, Mark E; Neff, Guy W

    2008-02-01

    Deficiency of any of the 5 enzymes in the urea cycle results in the accumulation of ammonia, leading to encephalopathy; which if untreated, can be lethal and produce devastating neurologic sequelae in long-term survivors. We hereby present an interesting case that presented with hyperammonemia and encephalopathy; later found to have an urea cycle defect.

  16. Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Human Herpesvirus-6-Associated Acute Encephalopathy/Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Tanuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of acute encephalopathy associated with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 infection, we measured the levels of oxidative stress markers 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG and hexanoyl-lysine adduct (HEL, tau protein, and cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF obtained from patients with HHV-6-associated acute encephalopathy (HHV-6 encephalopathy (n=16 and complex febrile seizures associated with HHV-6 (HHV-6 complex FS (n=10. We also examined changes in CSF-8OHdG and CSF-HEL levels in patients with HHV-6 encephalopathy before and after treatment with edaravone, a free radical scavenger. CSF-8-OHdG levels in HHV-6 encephalopathy and HHV-6 complex FS were significantly higher than in control subjects. In contrast, CSF-HEL levels showed no significant difference between groups. The levels of total tau protein in HHV-6 encephalopathy were significantly higher than in control subjects. In six patients with HHV-6 infection (5 encephalopathy and 1 febrile seizure, the CSF-8-OHdG levels of five patients decreased after edaravone treatment. Our results suggest that oxidative DNA damage is involved in acute encephalopathy associated with HHV-6 infection.

  17. Systemic hypothermia after neonatal encephalopathy: outcomes of neo.nEURO.network RCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simbruner, Georg; Mittal, Rashmi A; Rohlmann, Friederike

    2010-01-01

    Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods.......Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods....

  18. Intrapartum fever and chorioamnionitis as risks for encephalopathy in term newborns: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Heidi K; Li, Christopher I; Loch, Christian M; Koepsell, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between diagnoses of isolated intrapartum fever or chorioamnionitis and the risk of encephalopathy in term newborns. We conducted a population-based, case-control study in Washington State using 1994 to 2002 linked data from the Washington State Birth Registry and the Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System (CHARS). We identified 1060 singleton, term newborns (602 males, 458 females) with International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9) diagnoses consistent with encephalopathy, and 5330 unaffected control newborns (2756 males, 2574 females). Intrapartum fever was defined by a diagnosis of intrapartum temperature of >38 degrees C in the birth registry or CHARS databases. Chorioamnionitis was defined using ICD-9 diagnoses recorded in CHARS. We identified 2.2 cases of encephalopathy per 1000 births. Isolated intrapartum fever was associated with a 3.1-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3-4.2) increased risk of newborn encephalopathy. Chorioamnionitis was associated with a 5.4-fold (95% CI 3.6-7.8) increased risk of encephalopathy. We found that isolated intrapartum fever and chorioamnionitis were independently associated with an increased risk of encephalopathy in term infants. Our data also indicate that there is a spectrum of risk for encephalopathy in term infants exposed to intrapartum fever. Infants born to women with signs of chorioamnionitis other than isolated intrapartum fever may be at higher risk of encephalopathy than those exposed only to isolated intrapartum fever.

  19. Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics in treatment for hepatic encephalopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, G.P.A.; Severijnen, R.S.V.M.; Timmerman, H.

    2005-01-01

    In order to reduce ammonia production by urease-positive bacteria Solga recently hypothesised (S.F. Solga, Probiotics can treat hepatic encephalopathy, Medical Hypotheses 2003; 61: 307-13), that probiotics are new therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and that they may replace antibiotics

  20. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  1. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies cover a diverse group of disorders in which ragged red and COX-negative fibers are common findings on muscle morphology. In contrast, muscle degeneration and regeneration, typically found in muscular dystrophies, are not considered characteristic features of mitochondrial...... myopathies. We investigated regeneration in muscle biopsies from 61 genetically well-defined patients affected by mitochondrial myopathy. Our results show that the perturbed energy metabolism in mitochondrial myopathies causes ongoing muscle regeneration in a majority of patients, and some were even affected...

  2. [Changes in serotonin and noradrenaline in hepatic encephalopathy as a result of liver failure in rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-ning; Song, Yu-na; Chen, Fu; Luo, Mei-lan

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the changes in serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) in hepatic encephalopathy as a result of acute and chronic liver failure in rat. One hundred and ten Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into groups of normal control (n=20), experimental group of acute liver failure (ALF) encephalopathy (n=45), and experimental group of chronic liver failure (CLF) encephalopathy (n=45). Two dosages of thioacetamide (TAA) of 500 mg/kg were gavaged with an interval of 24 hours to reproduce ALF model. To reproduce CLF model rats were fed with 0.03% TAA in drinking water for 10 weeks, and 50% of TAA dosage was added or withheld according to the change in weekly body weight measurement. Animals were sacrificed and venous blood specimens were obtained after successful replication of model, and 5-HT, NA, ammonia, parameters of liver function were determined, and liver and brain were studied pathologically. The experiment showed that the liver functions of rats in groups ALF encephalopathy and CLF encephalopathy deteriorated seriously, changes in alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin (TBIL), albumen (ALB), ALB/globulin (A/G), and blood ammonia were observed(Pliver and brain pathologies were identical to those of ALF and CLF encephalopathy. The values of 5-HT were increased in groups ALF encephalopathy and CLF encephalopathy [(16.06+/-1.08) micromol/L and (15.32+/-1.48) micromol/L] compared with the normal group [(2.75+/-0.26) micromol/L, both Pencephalopathy [(94.0+/-2.13) pmol/L vs.(121.2+/-14.8) pmol/L,Pencephalopathy and CLF encephalopathy. The content of NA decreases remarkably in CLF encephalopathy.

  3. Risk factor for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, T.K.; Farooqui, R.; Khan, U.; Farooqui, R.

    2008-01-01

    To determine underlying risk factors in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. All neonates (153) with the diagnosis of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) were included in the study. Controls (187) were selected from admissions on the same day. Possible risk factors such as maternal age, parity, antenatal monitoring, place of delivery, prolonged second stage of labour, type of delivery, type of attendant at delivery and the gestational age were noted and compared. Sixty one (39.9%) mothers of asphyxiated babies reported no antenatal visits compared to 24.1% in the control group (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.2; p=0.002). Only 6.5% of cases were born in government hospitals (teaching and district) in comparison to 20.9% of controls (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.9-7.6; p=0.001). In 28.1% of cases, mothers had history of prolonged 2nd stage of labour in comparison to 5.9% of controls (OR 6.3, 95% CI 3.3-11.9; p<0.001). Fifty five cases (35.9%) were delivered by unskilled birth attendants compared to 28 (14.9%) controls (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9-5.3; p<0.001). No significant difference was found in maternal age, maternal parity, gestational age and the mode of delivery between the two groups. Delivery by unskilled birth attendant, prolonged second stage of labour, birth in a non-government hospital setup and absence of antenatal care were significant risk factors for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in neonates. Improvement in antenatal and intrapartum care may be helpful in decreasing the frequency of this problem. (author)

  4. Study of MRI characteristics of newborn bilirubin encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wulin; Wang Xiaoyi; Liao Weihua; Liu Fan; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore routine magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of newborn bilirubin encephalopathy (NBE). Methods: MRI features and clinical data of 17 patients with Newborn bilirubin encephalopathy were retrospectively analyzed, globus pallidus (GP)and subthalamic signal intensity was evaluated. The increase of GP signal intensity and serum total bilirubin peak value were analyzed using pearson correlation analysis. Serum total bilirubin peak value between patients with high signal in the subthalamic nuclei on T 1 WI and patients without high signal in the subthalamic nuclei were compared statistically. Results: The main MRI presentation in the NBE group was abnormally increased signal intensity in the GP on T 1 WI, which was not apparent on T 2 WI. One patient showed abnormal high signal intensity in the posteromedial part of GP. Nine patients had high signal in the subthalamic nuclei on T 1 WI and normal signal on T 2 WI. Four patients showed high signal in the brainstem with sparing of dorsal pontine. The increase in value of GP signal intensity was 249.0-423.8 in 12 patients and their serum total bilirubin peak values were 366.0-983.3 μmol/L. A positive correlation was found between increase of GP signal intensity and serum total bilirubin peak value. The serum total bilirubin level of abnormal subthalamic group and normal subthalamic group were 660.7±192.4 μmol/L and 513.3±107.51 μmol/L respectively. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (t=1.914, P>0.05). Conclusion: The routine MRI has some characteristics and is useful in the diagnosis of newborn bilirubin encephalopathy. (authors)

  5. Prognostic factors for acute encephalopathy with bright tree appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Junji; Nabatame, Shin; Nakano, Sayaka; Iwatani, Yoshiko; Kitai, Yukihiro; Tominaga, Koji; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Okinaga, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Nagai, Toshisaburo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    To determine the prognostic factors for encephalopathy with bright tree appearance (BTA) in the acute phase through retrospective case evaluation. We recruited 10 children with encephalopathy who presented with BTA and classified them into 2 groups. Six patients with evident regression and severe psychomotor developmental delay after encephalopathy were included in the severe group, while the remaining 4 patients with mild mental retardation were included in the mild group. We retrospectively analyzed their clinical symptoms, laboratory data, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings. Patients in the severe group developed subsequent complications such as epilepsy and severe motor impairment. Univariate analysis revealed that higher maximum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (p=0.055) were a weak predictor of poor outcome. Maximum creatinine levels were significantly higher (p<0.05) and minimal platelet counts were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the severe group than in the mild group. Acute renal failure was not observed in any patient throughout the study. MRS of the BTA lesion during the BTA period showed elevated lactate levels in 5 children in the severe group and 1 child in the mild group. MRI performed during the chronic phase revealed severe brain atrophy in all patients in the severe group. Higher creatinine and LDH levels and lower platelet counts in the acute phase correlated with poor prognosis. Increased lactate levels in the BTA lesion during the BTA period on MRS may predict severe physical and mental disability. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomarkers of brain injury in neonatal encephalopathy treated with hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, An N; Chang, Taeun; Kadom, Nadja; Tsuchida, Tammy; Scafidi, Joseph; Glass, Penny; McCarter, Robert; Baumgart, Stephen; Vezina, Gilbert; Nelson, Karin B

    2012-09-01

    To determine if early serum S100B and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels are associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in newborns with encephalopathy. Patients who received therapeutic whole-body hypothermia were prospectively enrolled in this observational study. Serum specimens were collected at 0, 12, 24, and 72 hours of cooling. S100B and NSE levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in surviving infants at 7-10 days of life. Standardized neurologic examination was performed by a child neurologist at 14 days of life. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between S100B and NSE levels and unfavorable outcome (death or severe magnetic resonance imaging injury/significant neurologic deficit). Cutoff values were determined by receiver operating curve analysis. Newborns with moderate to severe encephalopathy were enrolled (n = 75). Median pH at presentation was 6.9 (range, 6.5-7.35), and median Apgar scores of 1 at 1 minute, 3 at 5 minutes, and 5 at 10 minutes. NSE and S100B levels were higher in patients with unfavorable outcomes across all time points. These results remained statistically significant after controlling for covariables, including encephalopathy grade at presentation, Apgar score at 5 minutes of life, initial pH, and clinical seizures. Elevated serum S100B and NSE levels measured during hypothermia were associated with neuroradiographic and clinical evidence of brain injury in encephalopathic newborns. These brain-specific proteins may be useful immediate biomarkers of cerebral injury severity. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-wide association analysis identifies a mutation in the thiamine transporter 2 (SLC19A3 gene associated with Alaskan Husky encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Vernau

    Full Text Available Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy (AHE has been previously proposed as a mitochondrial encephalopathy based on neuropathological similarities with human Leigh Syndrome (LS. We studied 11 Alaskan Husky dogs with AHE, but found no abnormalities in respiratory chain enzyme activities in muscle and liver, or mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes that cause LS in people. A genome wide association study was performed using eight of the affected dogs and 20 related but unaffected control AHs using the Illumina canine HD array. SLC19A3 was identified as a positional candidate gene. This gene controls the uptake of thiamine in the CNS via expression of the thiamine transporter protein THTR2. Dogs have two copies of this gene located within the candidate interval (SLC19A3.2 - 43.36-43.38 Mb and SLC19A3.1 - 43.411-43.419 Mb on chromosome 25. Expression analysis in a normal dog revealed that one of the paralogs, SLC19A3.1, was expressed in the brain and spinal cord while the other was not. Subsequent exon sequencing of SLC19A3.1 revealed a 4bp insertion and SNP in the second exon that is predicted to result in a functional protein truncation of 279 amino acids (c.624 insTTGC, c.625 C>A. All dogs with AHE were homozygous for this mutation, 15/41 healthy AH control dogs were heterozygous carriers while 26/41 normal healthy AH dogs were wild type. Furthermore, this mutation was not detected in another 187 dogs of different breeds. These results suggest that this mutation in SLC19A3.1, encoding a thiamine transporter protein, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of AHE.

  8. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    of Denmark (DTU-VET). The report is made to fulfil the demands given by the EU Commission (Regulation No 999/2001 of the European Parliament and the Council of 22. May 2001) and the Office Inter-national des Epizooties (OIE) (Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Ani-mals, 5th edition 2008......, Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  9. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    of Denmark (DTU-VET). The report is made to fulfil the demands given by the EU Commission (Regulation No 999/2001 of the European Parliament and the Council of 22. May 2001) and the Office Inter-national des Epizooties (OIE) (Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals, 5th edition 2008......, Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  10. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    of Denmark (DTU-VET). The report is made to fulfil the demands given by the EU Commission (Regulation No 999/2001 of the European Parliament and the Council of 22. May 2001) and the Office Inter-national des Epizooties (OIE) (Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Ani-mals, 5th edition 2008......, Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  11. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo; Marchesini, Giulio; Borre, Mette; Aagaard, Niels Kristian; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2017-05-18

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a brain dysfunction with neurological and psychiatric changes associated with liver insufficiency or portal-systemic shunting. The severity ranges from minor symptoms to coma. A Cochrane systematic review including 11 randomised clinical trials on branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. We identified trials through manual and electronic searches in The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded and Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science, and LILACS (May 2017). We included randomised clinical trials, irrespective of the bias control, language, or publication status. The authors independently extracted data based on published reports and collected data from the primary investigators. We changed our primary outcomes in this update of the review to include mortality (all cause), hepatic encephalopathy (number of people without improved manifestations of hepatic encephalopathy), and adverse events. The analyses included random-effects and fixed-effect meta-analyses. We performed subgroup, sensitivity, regression, and trial sequential analyses to evaluate sources of heterogeneity (including intervention, and participant and trial characteristics), bias (using The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group method), small-study effects, and the robustness of the results after adjusting for sparse data and multiplicity. We graded the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We found 16 randomised clinical trials including 827 participants with hepatic encephalopathy classed as overt (12 trials) or minimal (four trials). Eight trials assessed oral BCAA supplements and seven trials assessed intravenous

  12. Subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures in alcoholism (SESA): case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, F G; Kozian, R

    2001-10-01

    The case of a 66-year-old patient is reported in view of the rarity of his condition: a case of subacute encephalopathy with seizures in alcoholics (SESA syndrome), described first in 1981 by Niedermeyer, et al. Wernicke-type aphasia, epileptic seizures (generalized tonic-clonic) and PLEDs EEG pattern dominated the neurological picture, in addition to hepatomegaly and rhabdomyolysis. This condition differs from all other known CNS complications in chronic alcoholism and is withdrawal-independent. It is prognostically favorable as far as the syndrome as such is concerned.

  13. Atypical presentation of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinico-neuroradiological entity, first described in 1996. It is commonly associated with systemic hypertension, intake of immunosuppressant drugs, sepsis and eclampsia and preeclampsia. Headache, alteration in consciousness, visual disturbances and seizures are common manifestations of PRES. Signs of pyramidal tract involvement and motor dysfunction are uncommon clinical findings. However, clinical presentation is not diagnostic. On neuroimaging, lesions are characteristically found in parieto occipital region of the brain due to vasogenic edema. We report two cases of PRES with atypical clinical presentation-one which was suggestive of neurocysticercosis and the other in which agitation and opisthotonic posture were predominant features.

  14. A Less Known Stroke Mimic: Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keneilwe Malomo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinico-neuro-radiological diagnosis, which can complicate a wide range of conditions. Clinical features include generalised and/or focal neurological deficits. These features are also present in neurovascular disorders, such as stroke. Currently, emphasis in the management of hyperacute stroke is thrombolysis, and it is important to bear in mind stroke mimics as a possible cause of clinical features. The Authors present the case of a 66-year-old man, who presented with acute focal neurological deficit. His brain imaging and history were consistent with PRES.

  15. Moyamoya disease in a child with previous acute necrotizing encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taik-Kun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Jung Hyuck; Kim, Baek Hyun; Chung, Hwan Hoon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan Hospital, 516 Kojan-Dong, Ansan City, Kyungki-Do 425-020 (Korea); Eun, Baik-Lin [Department of Pediatrics, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-09-01

    A previously healthy 24-day-old boy presented with a 2-day history of fever and had a convulsion on the day of admission. MRI showed abnormal signal in the thalami, caudate nuclei and central white matter. Acute necrotising encephalopathy was diagnosed, other causes having been excluded after biochemical and haematological analysis of blood, urine and CSF. He recovered, but with spastic quadriparesis. At the age of 28 months, he suffered sudden deterioration of consciousness and motor weakness of his right limbs. MRI was consistent with an acute cerebrovascular accident. Angiography showed bilateral middle cerebral artery stenosis or frank occlusion with numerous lenticulostriate collateral vessels consistent with moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  16. Oxidative metabolism of astrocytes is not reduced in hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Peter; Mouridsen, Kim; Hansen, Mikkel B

    2014-01-01

    In patients with impaired liver function and hepatic encephalopathy (HE), consistent elevations of blood ammonia concentration suggest a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HE. Ammonia and acetate are metabolized in brain both primarily in astrocytes. Here, we used dynamic [(11)C]acetate PET...... of the brain to measure the contribution of astrocytes to the previously observed reduction of brain oxidative metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis and HE, compared to patients with cirrhosis without HE, and to healthy subjects. We used a new kinetic model to estimate uptake from blood to astrocytes...

  17. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Presenting as Stroke Mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Frick

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 33-year-old male with end stage renal disease presenting to the emergency department (ED with headache, dizziness, and unilateral weakness. Initial concern was for ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES. The patient was treated appropriately and made a full neurologic recovery. PRES is an under-recognized diagnosis in the ED. As a stroke mimic, PRES can lead the clinician on an incorrect diagnostic pathway with potential for iatrogenic harm.

  18. Cattle traceability system in Japan for bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Sugiura

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available To promote consumer confidence in the safety of beef and to ensure the proper implementation of eradication measures against bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, the Cattle Traceability Law was approved by the Diet in June 2003 and a cattle traceability system has been in operation in Japan since December 2003. The system enables tracing the cohort and offspring animals of a BSE case within 24 h of its detection. The traceability database system also provides distributors, restaurants and consumers with information on the cattle from which the beef that they sell, serve and consume originate.

  19. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in sports: a historical and narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gary

    2018-01-01

    My objectives are to review: 1) a brief history of sport-related concussion (SRC) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), 2) the evolution of CTE in American professional football, 3) the data regarding SRC/CTE as they relate to depression and suicide, 4) the data on the neurocognitive effects of subconcussion/repetitive head trauma (with emphases on heading the ball in soccer and early exposure to football), 5) the evidence related to SRC and neurodegenerative diseases, 6) the published studies of CTE, 7) the NINDS neuropathological criteria for CTE, 8) public beliefs about SRC/CTE, and 9) the scientific questions regarding CTE.

  20. Cardiac abnormalities in diabetic patients with mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR)Gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Shiotani, Hideyuki

    1999-01-01

    An A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA is known to be a pathogenic factor for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes and cardiomyopathy. This mutation causes dysfunction of the central nervous system in MELAS. Because the heart, as well as the brain and nervous system, is highly dependent on the energy produced by mitochondrial oxidation, these tissues are more vulnerable to mitochondrial defects. Cardiac abnormalities were assessed in 10 diabetic patients associated with this mutation using echocardiography and 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, and compared with 19 diabetic patients without the mutation. Duration of diabetes, therapy, control of blood glucose and diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, were not different between the 2 groups. Diabetic patients with the mutation had a significantly thicker interventricular septum (16.8±3.7 vs 11.0±1.6 mm, p 0.05). In conclusion, left ventricular hypertrophy with or without abnormal wall motion and severely reduced MIBG uptake may be characteristic in diabetic patients with a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA Leu(UUR) gene. (author)

  1. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  2. Understanding mitochondrial myopathies: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhimanyu S. Ahuja

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are small, energy-producing structures vital to the energy needs of the body. Genetic mutations cause mitochondria to fail to produce the energy needed by cells and organs which can cause severe disease and death. These genetic mutations are likely to be in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, or possibly in the nuclear DNA (nDNA. The goal of this review is to assess the current understanding of mitochondrial diseases. This review focuses on the pathology, causes, risk factors, symptoms, prevalence data, symptomatic treatments, and new research aimed at possible preventions and/or treatments of mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial myopathies are mitochondrial diseases that cause prominent muscular symptoms such as muscle weakness and usually present with a multitude of symptoms and can affect virtually all organ systems. There is no cure for these diseases as of today. Treatment is generally supportive and emphasizes symptom management. Mitochondrial diseases occur infrequently and hence research funding levels tend to be low in comparison with more common diseases. On the positive side, quite a few genetic defects responsible for mitochondrial diseases have been identified, which are in turn being used to investigate potential treatments. Speech therapy, physical therapy, and respiratory therapy have been used in mitochondrial diseases with variable results. These therapies are not curative and at best help with maintaining a patient’s current abilities to move and function.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis

  4. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Keane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that has increasingly been linked with mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of the electron transport chain. This inhibition leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of cellular energy levels, which can consequently cause cellular damage and death mediated by oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. A number of genes that have been shown to have links with inherited forms of PD encode mitochondrial proteins or proteins implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the central involvement of mitochondria in PD. This involvement is corroborated by reports that environmental toxins that inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been shown to be associated with PD. This paper aims to illustrate the considerable body of evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction with neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of PD patients and to highlight the important need for further research in this area.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA repair and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandavilli, Bhaskar S.; Santos, Janine H.; Van Houten, Bennett

    2002-11-30

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain plays an important role in energy production in aerobic organisms and is also a significant source of reactive oxygen species that damage DNA, RNA and proteins in the cell. Oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA is implicated in various degenerative diseases, cancer and aging. The importance of mitochondrial ROS in age-related degenerative diseases is further strengthened by studies using animal models, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and yeast. Research in the last several years shows that mitochondrial DNA is more susceptible to various carcinogens and ROS when compared to nuclear DNA. DNA damage in mammalian mitochondria is repaired by base excision repair (BER). Studies have shown that mitochondria contain all the enzymes required for BER. Mitochondrial DNA damage, if not repaired, leads to disruption of electron transport chain and production of more ROS. This vicious cycle of ROS production and mtDNA damage ultimately leads to energy depletion in the cell and apoptosis.

  6. Endocrine disorders in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andrew M; Walker, Mark; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2013-10-15

    Endocrine dysfunction in mitochondrial disease is commonplace, but predominantly restricted to disease of the endocrine pancreas resulting in diabetes mellitus. Other endocrine manifestations occur, but are relatively rare by comparison. In mitochondrial disease, neuromuscular symptoms often dominate the clinical phenotype, but it is of paramount importance to appreciate the multi-system nature of the disease, of which endocrine dysfunction may be a part. The numerous phenotypes attributable to pathogenic mutations in both the mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA creates a complex and heterogeneous catalogue of disease which can be difficult to navigate for novices and experts alike. In this article we provide an overview of the endocrine disorders associated with mitochondrial disease, the way in which the underlying mitochondrial disorder influences the clinical presentation, and how these factors influence subsequent management. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of 80 Term Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Katar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to review the etiology, clinical - laboratory features and mortality rate of term 80 neonates with perinatal asphyxia admitted to our neonatal unit between January 2005-April 2006. The sex distribution was 24 (%30 female and 56 (% 70 male. The mean gestational age was 38.6±1.3 weeks and weight 3156±561 gram. Of the patients % 46.25 were delivered with a cesarean section and % 53.75 with spontaneous vaginal delivery. The etiologic factors for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were % 31.25 force delivery, meconium aspiration, and % 66.25 preeclampsia, eclampsia and diabetic mother’s infant. The distribution of patients according to HIE statging system (Sarnat&Sarnat were as follows: 33 patients (% 41.25 in stage 1, 20 (% 25 in stage 2 and 27 (% 33.75 in stage 3. Seizures were observed in % 33.75 of patients. The mean duration of hospital stay was 10.6±7.7 days for the surviving patients and 4.2±3.4 days for patients who died. Except from central nervous system, liver and kidney were the most involved organs.Perinatal asphyxia remains to be leading cause of neonatal mortality. Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a common newborn problem and cause important mortality and morbidity where low-social –cultural –education conditions with in regions.

  8. Clinical and Imaging Findings in Childhood Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUNGOR, Serdal; KILIC, Betul; TABEL, Yilmaz; SELIMOGLU, Ayse; OZGEN, Unsal; YILMAZ, Sezai

    2018-01-01

    Objective Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by typical radiologic findings in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. The symptoms include headache, nausea, vomiting, visual disturbances, focal neurologic deficits, and seizures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological features of PRES in children and to emphasize the recognition of atypical features. Materials & Methods We retrospectively examined 23 children with PRES from Mar 2010-Apr 2015 in Inonu University Turgut Ozal Medical Center in Turkey. We compared the clinical features and cranial MRI findings between underlying diseases of PRES. Results The most common precipitating factors were hypertension (78.2%) and medications, namely immunosuppressive and antineoplastic agents (60.8%). Manifestations included mental changes (100%), seizures (95.6%), headache (60.8%), and visual disturbances (21.7%) of mean 3.6 (range 1-10) days' duration. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral occipital lesions in all patients, associated in 82.6% with less typical distribution of lesions in frontal, temporal or parietal lobes, cerebellum, corpus callosum, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Frontal involvement was predominant, observed in 56.5% of patients. Clinical recovery was followed by radiologic resolution in all patients. Conclusion PRES is often unsuspected by the clinician, thus radiologists may be the first to suggest this diagnosis on an MRI obtained for seizures or encephalopathy. Atypical MRI finding is seen quite often. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are required to avoid a devastating outcome. PMID:29379559

  9. A case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Uk Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of tacrolimus-induced encephalopathy after successful kidney transplantation. An 11-year-old girl presented with sudden onset of neurologic symptoms, hypertension, and psychiatric symptoms, with normal kidney function, after kidney transplantation. The symptoms improved after cessation of tacrolimus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed acute infarction of the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory in the right frontal lobe. Three days later, she had normal mental function and maintained normal blood pressure with left hemiparesis. Follow-up MRI was performed on D19, showing new infarct lesions at both cerebral hemispheres. Ten days later, MRI showed further improvement, but brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT showed mild reduction of uptake in both the anterior cingulate gyrus and the left thalamus. One month after onset of symptoms, angiography showed complete resolution of stenosis. However, presenting as a mild fine motor disability of both hands and mild dysarthria, what had been atrophy at both centrum semiovale at 4 months now showed progression to encephalomalacia. There are two points of interest in this case. First, encephalopathy occurred after administration of tacrolimus and improved after discontinuation of the drug. Second, the development of right-side hemiplegia could not be explained by conventional MRI; but through diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT of white matter tract, visualization was possible.

  10. Subacute Noninfective Inflammatory Encephalopathy: Our Experience and Diagnostic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Viswanathan, Lakshminarayanapuram Gopal; Sindhu, Dodmalur Malikarjuna; Pai, Anupama Ramakanth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Immune dysregulation associated encephalopathies present with significant psychiatric manifestations and only a few soft neurological and general systemic features. They are generally resistant to treatment with psychiatric medications. Generalized orthostatic myoclonus and faciobrachial dystonic seizures are mistaken as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Patients and Methods: Forty-two patients seen during 2010–2015 and diagnosed as noninfective encephalopathy were analyzed. Those patients with infective causes and those who had significant features of systemic manifestations of vasculitis and other disorders of central nervous system were excluded from the study. They were investigated with cerebrospinal fluid imaging, electroencephalogram (EEG), and antibody profile. Results: More than 70% patients had psychiatric manifestation as presenting features and reported to psychiatrist. Three patients had paraneoplastic and others N-methyl-D-aspartate, voltage-gated potassium channel, thyroid peroxidase, antinuclear antibody related, and few were due to unknown antibody. Conclusion: Serious diagnostic errors are common and early diagnosis is based on high degree suspicion in patients presenting with new-onset refractory psychosis. Soft neurological features should be looked for and EEG serves as a very sensitive tool in establishing organicity. PMID:28515556

  11. Hepatic encephalopathy: cause and possible management with botanicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Suyash; Tripathi, Yamini B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a brain functional disorder, characterized by neuropsychiatric abnormalities with liver failure. High blood ammonia, causing glutamate neurotoxicity is the basic cause, finally leading to low-grade cerebral edema. Its manifestation is more likely in patients of sepsis, oxidative stress, generalized inflammation, gut mal-functioning, amoebiaesis, viral hepatitis, nervous imbalance, etc. Thus, the therapeutic goals primarily include the maintenance of proper blood supply and prevention of hypoxic condition in liver, along with management of factors responsible for high blood ammonia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and high GI- serotonin. The drugs in clinical practice include lactulose, sodium benzoate, flumazenil and rifaximin, supplementation of zinc, branched chain amino acids (BCAA), l-ornithine-l aspartate, antioxidants and iNOS inhibitors. However, herbal formulations would be of great importance as it shows multi-targeted action because it possesses a natural cocktail of secondary metabolites. It can collectively act as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, prebiotic, hepatoprotective and neuron-protective agents. We have briefly outlined some of these plants and also recent patents useful in the management of hepatic encephalopathy.

  12. Diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy with magentic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Etsuo; Narumi, Yoshifumi; Kadota, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Makoto; Kuriyama, Keiko; Kuroda, Chikazumi

    1993-01-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance (MR) images were examined in 16 patients with liver cirrhosis. The findings of MR imaging were correlated with portal-systemic collateral vessel shown on angiograms. In 9 of 16 patients, basal ganglia was hyperintense compared with white matter on T1-weighted images. These 9 patients had portal-systemic collateral vessel 10 mm or more in diameter that was suppied by superior mesenteric vein (SMV), and 4 of the 9 patients had portal-systemic encephalopathy on angiograms. In the remaining 7 patients, no hyperintense lesions were seen in basal ganglia relative to white matter on T1-weighted images; angiography revealed that 2 patients had portal-systemic collateral vessel that was supplied by SMV but was 5 mm or less in diameter, 3 had bood supplies from splenic vein, and 2 had no collateral vessel. There was no change in signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In conclusion, a large portal-systemic collateral vessel supplied by SMV may be shown as a high intensity lesion in basal ganglia, thus making it possible to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy even if there was no psychoneurologic symptoms or signs. (N.K.)

  13. Hepatic encephalopathy: Ever closer to its big bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Pablo A; Marcotegui, Ariel R; Orbea, Lisandro; Skerl, Juan; Perazzo, Juan Carlos

    2016-11-14

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder that commonly complicates the course of patients with liver disease. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized hundreds of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is the earliest form of HE and is estimated to affect more that 75% of patients with liver cirrhosis. It is characterized by cognitive impairment predominantly attention, reactiveness and integrative function with very subtle clinical manifestations. The development of MHE is associated with worsen in driving skills, daily activities and the increase of overall mortality. Skeletal muscle has the ability to shift from ammonia producer to ammonia detoxifying organ. Due to its large size, becomes the main ammonia detoxifying organ in case of chronic liver failure and muscular glutamine-synthase becomes important due to the failing liver and brain metabolic activity. Gut is the major glutamine consumer and ammonia producer organ in the body. Hepatocellular dysfunction due to liver disease, results in an impaired clearance of ammonium and in its inter-organ trafficking. Intestinal bacteria, can also represent an extra source of ammonia production and in cirrhosis, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and symbiosis can be observed. In the study of HE, to get close to MHE is to get closer to its big bang; and from here, to travel less transited roads such as skeletal muscle and intestine, is to go even closer. The aim of this editorial is to expose this road for further and deeper work.

  14. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chou Chiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia (TH is a recommended regimen for newborn infants who are at or near term with evolving moderate-to-severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. The Task Force of the Taiwan Child Neurology Society and the Taiwan Society of Neonatology held a joint meeting in 2015 to establish recommendations for using TH on newborn patients with HIE. Based on current evidence and experts' experiences, this review article summarizes the key points and recommendations regarding TH for newborns with HIE, including: (1 selection criteria for TH; (2 choices of method and equipment for TH; (3 TH prior to and during transport; (4 methods for temperature maintenance, monitoring, and rewarming; (5 systemic care of patients during TH, including the care of respiratory and cardiovascular systems, management of fluids, electrolytes, and nutrition, as well as sedation and drug metabolism; (6 monitoring and management of seizures; (7 neuroimaging, prognostic factors, and outcomes; and (8 adjuvant therapy for TH. Key Words: hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, neonate, patient care, perinatal asphyxia, therapeutic hypothermia

  15. Development of a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yigang; Tang Yamei; Liu Jun; Sun Ying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy. Methods: A total of 40 rats were subjected to local γ-irradiation to the brain with the dosage of 7 Gy/d for 6 consecutive days. The amount of food intake, hairs and skin of irradiated field, body weight, general activities, CNS symptoms and signs were examined and recorded after irradiation. On day 3, 7, 14 and 30, the brain tissue was removed to observe histopathologic changes. Results: During the first two days after irradiation, the irradiated rats were agitated, and the amount of food intake decreased from day 2 onwards. No serious skin reaction to irradiation was observed. Survived rats had normal activities without any abnormal nervous signs. Histopathologic changes showed slight neuronal degeneration, smaller cell body, red-colored cytoplasm, disappearance of Nissl body, vacuolation, typical cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and nuclear divergence. On the 14th and 30th days, hypochromatism, loose and reticular necrotic foci were found in some samples. Conclusion: The murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy is useful and practical in radiobiological studies

  16. MR imaging for diagnostic evaluation of encephalopathy in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Manohar M; Soares-Fernandes, João P; Whyte, Hilary; Raybaud, Charles

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is used with increasing frequency to evaluate the neonatal brain because it can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information that is needed for optimal treatment and appropriate counseling. Special care must be taken in preparing encephalopathic neonates for an MR study, transporting them from the intensive care unit, monitoring their vital signs, and optimizing MR sequences and protocols. Moreover, to accurately interpret the findings, specific knowledge is needed about the normal MR imaging appearances of the physiologic processes of myelination, cell migration, and sulcation, as well as patterns of injury, in the neonatal brain at various stages of gestational development. Hypoxic-ischemic injury, the most common cause of neonatal encephalopathy, has characteristic appearances that depend on the severity and duration of the insult as well as the stage of brain development. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MR spectroscopy depict abnormalities earlier than do conventional MR imaging sequences. However, diffusion-weighted imaging, if performed in the first 24 hours after the insult, might lead to underestimation of the extent of injury. When the MR findings are atypical, the differential diagnosis of neonatal encephalopathy also should include congenital and metabolic disorders and infectious diseases. Despite recent advances in the MR imaging-based characterization of these conditions, the clinical history must be borne in mind to achieve an accurate diagnosis.

  17. White matter injury in term newborns with neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Amanda M; Chau, Vann; Poskitt, Kenneth J; Sargent, Michael A; Lupton, Brian A; Hill, Alan; Roland, Elke; Miller, Steven P

    2009-01-01

    White matter injury (WMI) is the characteristic pattern of brain injury detected on magnetic resonance imaging in the premature newborn. Focal noncystic WMI is increasingly recognized in populations of term newborns. The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of focal noncystic WMI in a cohort of 48 term newborns with encephalopathy studied with magnetic resonance imaging at 72 +/- 12 h of life, and to identify clinical risk factors for this pattern of injury. Eleven newborns (23%; 95% CI 11-35) were found to have WMI (four minimal, three moderate, and four severe). In 10 of the 11 newborns, the WMI was associated with restricted diffusion on apparent diffusion coefficient maps. An increasing severity of WMI was associated with lower gestational age at birth (p = 0.05), but not lower birth weight. Newborns with WMI had milder encephalopathy and fewer clinical seizures relative to other newborns in the cohort. Other brain injuries were seen in three of the 11 newborns: basal nuclei predominant pattern of injury in one and cortical strokes in two. These findings suggest that WMI in the term newborn is acquired near birth and that the state of brain maturation is an important determinant of this pattern of brain injury.

  18. Is Encephalopathy a Mechanism to Renew Sulfate in Autism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Lentz-Marino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes two claims: (1 autism can be characterized as a chronic low-grade encephalopathy, associated with excess exposure to nitric oxide, ammonia and glutamate in the central nervous system, which leads to hippocampal pathologies and resulting cognitive impairment, and (2, encephalitis is provoked by a systemic deficiency in sulfate, but associated seizures and fever support sulfate restoration. We argue that impaired synthesis of cholesterol sulfate in the skin and red blood cells, catalyzed by sunlight and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, creates a state of colloidal instability in the blood manifested as a low zeta potential and increased interfacial stress. Encephalitis, while life-threatening, can result in partial renewal of sulfate supply, promoting neuronal survival. Research is cited showing how taurine may not only help protect neurons from hypochlorite exposure, but also provide a source for sulfate renewal. Several environmental factors can synergistically promote the encephalopathy of autism, including the herbicide, glyphosate, aluminum, mercury, lead, nutritional deficiencies in thiamine and zinc, and yeast overgrowth due to excess dietary sugar. Given these facts, dietary and lifestyle changes, including increased sulfur ingestion, organic whole foods, increased sun exposure, and avoidance of toxins such as aluminum, mercury, and lead, may help to alleviate symptoms or, in some instances, to prevent autism altogether.

  19. CT and MR manifestations of acute methyl alcohol toxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiaofen; Yang Bo; Ye Gengxin; Zhang Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the CT and MR manifestations of methyl alcohol toxic encephalopathy and to improve the diagnosing value of CT and MRI. Methods: 40 patients with methyl alcohol intoxication were collected in this study, in which CT scan was performed on 40 cases and MRI on 4 cases. All CT and MRI radiological data of brain were retrospectively studied. Results: 13 of 40 cases showed abnormal findings on brain CT and MRI. The most common manifestation (6/13, 46%)was hypodensity in frontal parietal white matter and external capsule-putamen on CT, which showed long or short T1 and long T2 on MR. Hemorrhage in right putamen was found only in 1 patient (1/13,7%). CT showed low density inbilateral external capsule in 4 cases (4/13,31%), in which MR showed long or short T1 and long T2. Low density lesions in subcortical white matter of bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, cingulate gyms and insular lobes were found in 2 patients (2/13,15%). The more severe clinic manifestation, the more obvious brain lesion CT and MRI showed. Conclusion: Brain CT and MR manifestations have great diagnostic value of acute methyl alcohol toxic encephalopathy. MRI was more sensitive and better than CT in finding early brain damage caused by methanol intoxication. (authors)

  20. Genetic epileptic encephalopathies: is all written into the DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Pasquale; de Jonghe, Peter; Zara, Federico

    2013-11-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy is a condition in which epileptic activity, clinical or subclinical, is thought to be responsible for any disturbance of cognition, behavior, or motor control. However, experimental evidence supporting this clinical observation are still poor and the causal relationship between pharmacoresistant seizures and cognitive outcome is controversial. In the past two decades, genetic studies shed new light onto complex mechanisms underlying different severe epileptic conditions associated with intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities, thereby providing important clues on the relationship between seizures and cognitive outcome. Dravet syndrome is a childhood disorder associated with loss-of-function mutations in SCN1A and is characterized by frequent seizures and severe cognitive impairment, thus well illustrating the concept of epileptic encephalopathy. However, it is difficult to determine the causative role of the underlying sodium channel dysfunction and that of the consequent seizures in influencing cognitive outcome in these children. It is also difficult to demonstrate whether a recognizable profile of cognitive impairment or a definite behavioral phenotype exists. Data from the laboratory and the clinics may provide greater insight into the degree to which epileptic activity may contribute to cognitive impairment in individual syndromes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome mimicking herpes simplex encephalitis on imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieraerts, Christopher; Demaerel, Philippe; Van Damme, Philip; Wilms, Guido

    2013-01-01

    We present a case in which mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes syndrome mimicked the clinical and radiological signs of herpes simplex encephalitis. In a patient with subacute encephalopathy, on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, lesions were present in both temporal lobes extending to both insular regions with sparing of the lentiform nuclei and in both posterior straight and cingulate gyri. Final diagnosis of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes syndrome was based on biochemical investigations on cerebrospinal fluid, electromyogram, muscle biopsy, and genetic analysis. On diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion restriction was present in some parts of the lesions but not throughout the entire lesions. We suggest that this could be an important sign in the differential diagnosis with herpes simplex encephalitis.

  2. MELAS syndrome associated with both A3243G-tRNALeu mutation and multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharoni, Sharon; Traves, Teres A; Melamed, Eldad; Cohen, Sarit; Silver, Esther Leshinsky

    2010-09-15

    The syndrome of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episode (MELAS) is characterized clinically by recurrent focal neurological deficits, epilepsy, and short stature. The phenotypic spectrum is extremely diverse, with multisystemic organ involvement leading to isolated diabetes, deafness, renal tubulopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and retinitis pigmentosa. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is associated with an AG transmission mutation (A3243G) in the tRNALeu gene of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We describe a woman with a unique combination of the MELAS A3243G mutation and multiple mtDNA deletions with normal POLG sequence. The patient presented with diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness, short stature, and mental disorientation. All her three children died in early adolescence. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [A study on the expression of anti-mitochondrial antibody in the brain of patients with MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Kun; Yao, Sheng; Wang, Hai-Yan; Piao, Yue-Shan; Lu, De-Hong; Yuan, Yun

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the pathological changes and pathogenesis of the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis stroke-like episodes) by using the method of immunohistochemical staining in the brain biopsy specimens with anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA). We performed immunohistochemical staining in 3 confirmed MELAS patients' paraffin-imbued brain biopsy specimens. Small vessel proliferation and the uneven thickness of the wall were found in the 3 MELAS patients. A lot of brown deposits was shown in the wall of small vessels and also noted in neurons. The main pathological change in the MELAS brain biopsy immunohistochemical staining with AMA was the small vessel proliferation, indicating that abnormal mitochondria accumulated in the vascular smooth muscle, endothelial cell and neurons of the lesion sites. This finding was consistent with the electron microscopic discovery and valuable for the diagnosis of MELAS.

  4. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Qin, Lilan; Reiter, Russel J.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT) is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s). Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs). Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria. PMID:27999288

  5. Need for early diagnosis of mental and mobility changes in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnia, Jan W; Oudman, Erik; Bresser, Esmay L; Gerridzen, Ineke J; van de Wiel, Albert; Beuman, Carla; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2014-12-01

    Korsakoff syndrome is a chronic form of amnesia resulting from thiamine deficiency. The syndrome can develop from unrecognized or undertreated Wernicke encephalopathy. The intra-individual course of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome has not been studied extensively, nor has the temporal progression of gait disturbances and other symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy. Here we present the detailed history of a patient whose acute symptoms of Wernicke encephalopathy were far from stable. We follow his mobility changes and the shifts in his mental status from global confusion and impaired consciousness to more selective cognitive deficits. His Wernicke encephalopathy was missed and left untreated, being labeled as "probable" Korsakoff syndrome. Patients with a history of self-neglect and alcohol abuse, at risk of or suffering with Wernicke encephalopathy, should receive immediate and adequate vitamin replacement. Self-neglecting alcoholics who are bedridden may have severe illness and probably active Wernicke encephalopathy. In these patients, mobility changes, delirium, or impaired consciousness can be an expression of Wernicke encephalopathy, and should be treated to prevent further damage from the neurologic complications of thiamine deficiency.

  6. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure: Clinical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-07-01

    Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice.A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1.To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians' awareness of its possible onset.

  7. Malnutrition-induced Wernicke's encephalopathy following a water-only fasting diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheon, Deborah A

    2015-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a critical condition of neurological dysfunction resulting from a deficiency in thiamine. Chronic alcoholism is recognized as the most common cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy, but other causes, including fasting/starvation and malnutrition, have been documented within the scientific literature. These causes may not be readily recognized by healthcare professionals and may lead to Wernicke's encephalopathy being overlooked as a diagnosis when a nonalcoholic patient presents with classic signs and symptoms of the disorder. A narrative review of thiamine and its relationship to the development, diagnosis, and treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy is presented based on a review of evidence-based guidelines and published research. To heighten awareness of the development of Wernicke's encephalopathy in fasted/starved and malnourished patients and to contribute to the scientific body of knowledge for the identification and management of Wernicke's encephalopathy in these patients, the clinical course and treatment of an adult woman who developed Wernicke's encephalopathy following a 40-day water-only fasting diet is outlined. Clinical suspicion was required to identify the patient's condition and initiate immediate intervention through parenteral thiamine administration. Oral thiamine supplementation of 100 to 800 mg per day for 6 months was required to aid recovery. The patient's clinical course and response to treatment illustrate the necessity for clinical awareness and suspicion of Wernicke's encephalopathy among healthcare professionals, timely and adequate parenteral thiamine administration, and oral thiamine supplementation at therapeutic doses to correct the nutrient deficiency, halt the progression of Wernicke's encephalopathy, and promote recovery. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy after fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy: A case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Seiichiro; Kadowaki, Shigenori; Komori, Azusa; Sugiyama, Keiji; Narita, Yukiya; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Ura, Takashi; Ando, Masashi; Sato, Yozo; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Ishihara, Makoto; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Tajika, Masahiro; Muro, Kei

    2017-06-01

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy induced by fluoropyrimidines (FPs) is a rare complication. Its pathophysiology remains unclear, especially given the currently used regimens, including intermediate-doses of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or oral FP agents. We aimed to characterize the clinical manifestations in cancer patients who developed hyperammonemic encephalopathy after receiving FP-based chemotherapy.We retrospectively reviewed 1786 patients with gastrointestinal or primary-unknown cancer who received FP-based regimens between 2007 and 2012. Eleven patients (0.6%) developed acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. The incidence according to the administered anticancer drugs were as follows: 5-FU (8 of 1176, 0.7%), S-1 (1 of 679, 0.1%), capecitabine (2 of 225, 0.9%), and tegafur-uracil (UFT) (0 of 39, 0%). Ten patients (90.9%) had at least 1 aggravating factor, including infection, dehydration, constipation, renal dysfunction, and muscle loss. All the 10 patients met the definition of sarcopenia. Median time to the onset of hyperammonemic encephalopathy in the cycle was 3 days (range: 2-21). Three patients (27.3%) developed encephalopathy during the first cycle of the regimen and the remaining 8 patients during the second or more cycles. Seven patients (63.6%) had received at least 1 other FP-containing regimen before without episodes of encephalopathy.All patients recovered soon after immediate discontinuation of chemotherapy and supportive therapies, such as hydration, infusion of branched-chain amino acids, and oral lactulose intake, with a median time to recovery of 2 days (range: encephalopathy due to S-1 monotherapy, received modified FOLFOX-6 therapy without encephalopathy later.FP-associated acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is extremely rare, but a possible event at any time and even during the administration of oral FP agents. Particular attention is warranted when giving FP-based therapy for patients with aggravating factors, such as sarcopenia. This

  9. Uremic Encephalopathy with Atypical Magnetic Resonance Features on Diffusion-Weighted Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Eu Gene; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See Sung

    2012-01-01

    Uremic encephalopathy is a well-known disease with typical MR findings including bilateral vasogenic or cytotoxic edema at the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Involvement of the basal ganglia has been very rarely reported, typically occurring in uremic-diabetic patients. We recently treated a patient who had non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with an atypical lesion distribution involving the supratentorial white matter, without cortical or basal ganglia involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with atypical MR findings.

  10. Uremic Encephalopathy with Atypical Magnetic Resonance Features on Diffusion-Weighted Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eu Gene; Jeon, Se Jeong; Choi, See Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine and Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Uremic encephalopathy is a well-known disease with typical MR findings including bilateral vasogenic or cytotoxic edema at the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia. Involvement of the basal ganglia has been very rarely reported, typically occurring in uremic-diabetic patients. We recently treated a patient who had non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with an atypical lesion distribution involving the supratentorial white matter, without cortical or basal ganglia involvement. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of non-diabetic uremic encephalopathy with atypical MR findings.

  11. Severe posterior reversible encephalopathy in pheochromocytoma: Importance of susceptibility-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serter, Asil; Alkan, Alpay; Aralasmak, Ayse; Kocakoc, Ercan [Dept. of Radiology, Bezmialem Vakif University School of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkmenistan)

    2013-10-15

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare cause of hypertension in children. Hypertension is one of the common reasons of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Intracerebral hemorrhage is a serious and unexpected complication of hypertensive encephalopathy due to pheochromocytoma, and very rarely seen in the childhood. Intracerebral hemorrhages should be searched if there are hypertensive reversible signal changes on the brain. Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) is a more sensitive method than conventional MRI when demonstrating cerebral microhemorrhagic foci. This is the first report of SWI findings on intracerebral hemorrhages in basal ganglia, brain stem and periventricular white matter due to hypertensive encephalopathy in a child with pheochromocytoma.

  12. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  13. Defective mitochondrial rRNA methyltransferase MRM2 causes MELAS-like clinical syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garone, Caterina; D'Souza, Aaron R; Dallabona, Cristina; Lodi, Tiziana; Rebelo-Guiomar, Pedro; Rorbach, Joanna; Donati, Maria Alice; Procopio, Elena; Montomoli, Martino; Guerrini, Renzo; Zeviani, Massimo; Calvo, Sarah E; Mootha, Vamsi K; DiMauro, Salvatore; Ferrero, Ileana; Minczuk, Michal

    2017-11-01

    Defects in nuclear-encoded proteins of the mitochondrial translation machinery cause early-onset and tissue-specific deficiency of one or more OXPHOS complexes. Here, we report a 7-year-old Italian boy with childhood-onset rapidly progressive encephalomyopathy and stroke-like episodes. Multiple OXPHOS defects and decreased mtDNA copy number (40%) were detected in muscle homogenate. Clinical features combined with low level of plasma citrulline were highly suggestive of mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, however, the common m.3243 A > G mutation was excluded. Targeted exome sequencing of genes encoding the mitochondrial proteome identified a damaging mutation, c.567 G > A, affecting a highly conserved amino acid residue (p.Gly189Arg) of the MRM2 protein. MRM2 has never before been linked to a human disease and encodes an enzyme responsible for 2'-O-methyl modification at position U1369 in the human mitochondrial 16S rRNA. We generated a knockout yeast model for the orthologous gene that showed a defect in respiration and the reduction of the 2'-O-methyl modification at the equivalent position (U2791) in the yeast mitochondrial 21S rRNA. Complementation with the mrm2 allele carrying the equivalent yeast mutation failed to rescue the respiratory phenotype, which was instead completely rescued by expressing the wild-type allele. Our findings establish that defective MRM2 causes a MELAS-like phenotype, and suggests the genetic screening of the MRM2 gene in patients with a m.3243 A > G negative MELAS-like presentation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. The potato tuber mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper

    We are testing the hypothesis that oxidized peptides are released from stressed mitochondria and contribute to retrograde signalling (Møller IM & Sweetlove LJ 2010 Trends Plant Sci 15, 370-374). However, there is a large gap between the number of experimentally verified mitochondrial proteins (~450......) and in silico-predicted mitochondrial proteins (2000-3000). Thus, before starting to look for oxidized peptides, we wanted to expand the current compendium of plant mitochondrial proteins while obtaining what could be termed the "baseline proteome" from our model organelle, the potato tuber mitochondrion. Its...

  15. Newborns Referred for Therapeutic Hypothermia: Association between Initial Degree of Encephalopathy and Severity of Brain Injury (What About the Newborns with Mild Encephalopathy on Admission?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne-Loranger, Maude; Sheppard, Megan; Ali, Nabeel; Saint-Martin, Christine; Wintermark, Pia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the severity of brain injury and/or mortality in a cohort of newborns referred for therapeutic hypothermia, in relation to the degree of encephalopathy on admission, and to especially look at the ones with initial mild encephalopathy. Term newborns with perinatal depression referred to our neonatal intensive care unit for possible hypothermia treatment from 2008 to 2012 were enrolled prospectively. The modified Sarnat score on admission was correlated with severity of brain injury on brain imaging and/or autopsy. A total of 215 newborns were referred for possible cooling. Sixty percent (128/215) were cooled. Most of the not-cooled newborns with an available brain magnetic resonance imaging (85% = 50/59) had an initial mild encephalopathy, and 40% (20/50) developed brain injury. Some cooled newborns had an initial mild encephalopathy (12% = 13/108); only 31% (4/13) developed brain injury. Our results demonstrated that several newborns with an initial mild encephalopathy developed subsequent brain injury, especially when they were not cooled. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy and spatial analysis of the feed industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathilde; Abrial, David; Jarrige, Nathalie; Rican, Stéphane; Garrido, Myriam; Calavas, Didier; Ducrot, Christian

    2007-06-01

    In France, despite the ban of meat-and-bone meal (MBM) in cattle feed, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) was detected in hundreds of cattle born after the ban. To study the role of MBM, animal fat, and dicalcium phosphate on the risk for BSE after the feed ban, we conducted a spatial analysis of the feed industry. We used data from 629 BSE cases as well as data on use of each byproduct and market area of the feed factories. We mapped risk for BSE in 951 areas supplied by the same factories and connection with use of byproducts. A disease map of BSE with covariates was built with the hierarchical Bayesian modeling methods, based on Poisson distribution with spatial smoothing. Only use of MBM was spatially linked to risk for BSE, which highlights cross-contamination as the most probable source of infection after the feed ban.

  17. Bruxism Associated with Anoxic Encephalopathy: Successful Treatment with Baclofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruce Janati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bruxism is a movement disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth. Etiology of bruxism can be divided into three groups: psychosocial factors, peripheral factors, and pathophysiological factors. Methods. The clinical investigation was conducted at King Khaled Hospital in Hail, Saudi Arabia, in 2012. Results. A 16-year-old Saudi female was brought to the hospital in a comatose state and with generalized convulsive seizures secondary to acute anoxic encephalopathy. In the third week of hospitalization, while still in a state of akinetic mutism, she developed incessant bruxism which responded favorably to a GABA receptor agonist (baclofen. Conclusion. Our data support the hypothesis that bruxism emanates from imbalance or dysregulation of the neurotransmitter system. Larger scale studies will be needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  18. CT perfusion imaging in the management of posterior reversible encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, S.O.; McKinney, A.; Teksam, M.; Liu, H.; Truwit, C.L.

    2004-01-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a renal transplant presented with hypertension and seizures. CT and MRI demonstrated typical bilateral parietal, occipital and posterior frontal cortical and subcortical edema, thought to represent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The cause was presumed to be hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy was started, lowering of the blood pressure in the range of 110-120 mmHg systolic. However, stable xenon (Xe) CT perfusion imaging revealed ischemia within the left parietal occipital region. The antihypertensive was adjusted which increased both the systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 31 mm Hg. The patient was re-imaged with Xe CT and was found to have resolution of the ischemic changes within the left parietal occipital region. In this report, we present a case in which stable Xe CT was used to monitor the degree of cerebral perfusion and guide titration of antihypertensive therapy. Such brain perfusion monitoring may have helped to prevent infarction of our patient. (orig.)

  19. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: An atypical postpartum complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashish Paul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is presented by headache, altered mental status, blurring of vision, vomiting and seizure in conjunction with radiological finding of posterior cerebral white matter edema. Data suggest that most cases occur in young middle-aged with marked female preponderance, hypertension being the most common cause. In this case, it was diagnosed in a normotensive patient in the postnatal period that underwent cesarean section. The initial symptoms had misled toward a diagnosis of postdural puncture headache. Symptomatic treatment was started immediately in the ICU. This is an interesting case as the patient was a normotensive one without any other contributory factors and there was unanticipated delay in diagnosing the case until the time we could get a magnetic resonance imaging report.

  20. Compare Of the West Syndrome with Other Syndromes in the Epileptic Encephalopathy - Kosovo Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Zeka

    2017-11-01

    CONCLUSION: WS is a frequent disease of the encephalopathies with the epileptogenic framework. The resistance in anticonvulsive therapy is huge, and psychomotoric retardation follows a big percentage of children with this syndrome.

  1. De novo mutations in synaptic transmission genes including DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p...... = 8.2 × 10(-4)), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have...... analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the "classical" epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1...

  2. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, Moniek S. E.; Schmand, Ben; Wekking, Ellie M.; Hageman, Gerard; Deelman, Betto G.

    2003-01-01

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  3. Suboptimal performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MSE; Schmand, B; Wekking, EM; Hageman, G; Deelman, BG

    Suboptimal performance during neuropsychological testing can seriously complicate assessment in behavioral neurotoxicology. We present data on the prevalence of suboptimal performance in a group of Dutch patients with suspected chronic toxic encephalopathy (CTE) after long-term occupational exposure

  4. Prognostic Value of Cytochrome C and Cytokines in Acute Viral Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Serum cytochrome c and cytokines were evaluated as prognostic predictors in 29 children (ages 9 mos to 9 yrs 11 mos with viral acute encephalopathies and multiple organ failure at Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Japan.

  5. Wernicke’s encephalopathy associated with liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajesh; Garg, Vipul

    2017-07-31

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a rare neurological disorder caused by thiamine deficiency, characterised by ocular motor dysfunction, ataxia and impairment in consciousness. It predominantly affects brain regions with a high metabolic rate such as mammillary bodies, medial thalamic nuclei, the tectal region and the cerebellum. Although chronic alcoholism is the most common cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy, various other conditions not related to alcohol consumption such as bariatric surgery, acute pancreatitis, hyperemesis gravidarum, prolonged fasting and gastrointestinal surgery have been implicated in its aetiology. We report the case of a patient who underwent surgery for liver abscess and subsequently developed Wernicke's encephalopathy; he showed a positive response to thiamine supplementation. This is the first report describing liver abscess as the cause of Wernicke's encephalopathy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in eleven countries: Diagnostic pattern across time, 1993-2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Pedro-Cuesta (Jesús); M. Glatzel (Markus); J. Almazán (Javier); K. Stoeck (Katharina); V. Mellina (Vittorio); M. Puopolo (Maria); M. Pocchiari (Maurizio); I. Zerr (Inga); H.A. Kretszchmar (Hans); J-P. Brandel (Jean-Philippe); N. Delasnerie-Laupretre (Nicole); A. Alperovitch (Annick); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); P. Sanchez-Juan (Pascual); S.J. Collins (Steven); V. Lewis (Victoria); G.H. Jansen (Gerard); M.B. Coulthart (Michael); E. Gelpi (Ellen); H. Budka (Herbert); E. Mitrová (Eva)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The objective of this study was to describe the diagnostic panorama of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies across 11 countries. Methods: From data collected for surveillance purposes, we describe annual proportions of deaths due to different human transmissible

  7. Bronchiolitis-associated encephalopathy in critically-ill infants: an underestimated complication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Roberto; Chiappe, Stefano; Porcella, Annalisa; Rosatelli, Daniela; Fanos, Vassilios

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the bronchiolitis-associated encephalopathy in critically ill infants. The records of infants with severe bronchiolitis admitted to our intensive care unit between 1991 and 2003 were reviewed. Subjects with underlying neurological disorders were excluded. Encephalopathy was defined as occurrence of seizures or at least two nonconvulsive neurologic manifestations. A semistructured telephone interview investigated long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. Twenty-one infants (11 newborns) were enrolled. All patients required oxygen supplementation and 14 required mechanical ventilation. Encephalopathy occurred in 10 infants, six of whom developed seizures. Encephalopathic infants frequently (six of nine) showed transient EEG abnormalities, and occasionally (one of nine) cranial ultrasound abnormalities. A positive respiratory syncytial virus test was found in five of nine encephalopathic infants. One encephalopathic patient died, while 20 infants clinically normalised before discharge and showed a good neurodevelopmental outcome. Acute encephalopathy was frequently observed in our patients with severe bronchiolitis. Long-term prognosis of encephalopathic infants was good.

  8. Effect of Neonatal Seizures on Cognitive Outcome of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The independent effect of clinical neonatal seizures and their treatment on longterm neurodevelopmental outcome in 77 term newborns at risk for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE was determined in a study at University of California San Francisco.

  9. Dextromethorphan in the treatment of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizures in infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Hsuan Chien

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy with suppression-burst in electroencephalography (EEG can evolve into a few types of epileptic syndromes. We present here an unusual case of early myoclonic encephalopathy that evolved into migrating partial seizures in infancy. A female neonate initially had erratic myoclonus movements, hiccups, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG that was compatible with early myoclonic encephalopathy. The seizures were controlled with dextromethorphan (20 mg/kg, and a suppression-burst pattern in EEG was reverted to relatively normal background activity. However, at 72 days of age, alternating focal tonic seizures, compatible with migrating partial seizures in infancy, were demonstrated by the 24-hour EEG recording. The seizures responded poorly to dextromethorphan. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of early myoclonic encephalopathy evolving into migrating partial seizure in infancy. Whether it represents another age-dependent epilepsy evolution needs more clinical observation.

  10. Long-term cognitive and behavioral consequences of neonatal encephalopathy following perinatal asphyxia: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Handel, M.; Swaab, H.; de Vries, L.S.; Jongmans, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258268743

    2007-01-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) following perinatal asphyxia (PA) is considered an important cause of later neurodevelopmental impairment in infants born at term. This review discusses long-term consequences for general cognitive functioning, educational achievement, neuropsychological functioning and

  11. Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) induced by oxcarbazepine in idiopathic focal epilepsy in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlidis, Elena; Rubboli, Guido; Nikanorova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Encephalopathy with status epilepticus during sleep (ESES) is an age-related disorder characterized by neuropsychological regression, epilepsy and a typical EEG pattern of continuous epileptiform activity (> 85%) during NREM sleep. Cases of worsening or induction of ESES with phenytoin...

  12. Mitochondrial contribution to lipofuscin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette König

    2017-04-01

    Moreover, we observed that Lon protease downregulation is linked to a higher lipofuscinogenesis whereas the application of the mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant mitoTEMPO is able to prevent the accumulation of this protein aggregate.

  13. Severe Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy Requiring Dialysis Aggravated by Prolonged Fasting and Intermittent High Fat Load in a Ramadan Fasting Month in a Patient with CPTII Homozygous Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phowthongkum, P; Ittiwut, C; Shotelersuk, V

    2017-11-21

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPTII) deficiency is a mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorder that can present antenatally as congenital brain malformations, or postnatally with lethal neonatal, severe infantile, or the most common adult myopathic forms. No case of severe hyperammonemia without liver dysfunction has been reported. We described a 23-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with seizures and was found to have markedly elevation of serum ammonia. Continuous renal replacement therapy was initiated with successfully decreased ammonia to a safety level. He had a prolonged history of epilepsies and encephalopathic attacks that was associated with high ammonia level. Molecular diagnosis revealed a homozygous mutation in CPTII. The plasma acylcarnitine profile was consistent with the diagnosis. Failure to produce acetyl-CoA, the precursor of urea cycle from fatty acid in prolonged fasting state in Ramadan month, worsening mitochondrial functions from circulating long chain fatty acid and valproate toxicities were believed to contribute to this critical metabolic decompensation. Fatty acid oxidation disorders should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hyperammonemia even without liver dysfunction. To our knowledge, this is the first case of CPTII deficiency presented with severe hyperammonemic encephalopathy required dialysis after prolonged religious related fasting.

  14. Hypertensive Encephalopathy: Isolated Pons Involvement Mimicking Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamanagatti, S.; Subramanian, S. [India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2006-09-15

    MRI of the brain was performed, and it demonstrated an isolated high signal on the T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences that involved only the central pons with sparing the periphery. There was no restricted diffusion on diffusion weighted imaging. The differential diagnosis included posterior reversible syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis; however, the blood sodium on admission was normal. The pathogenesis of HE is that the auto-regulatory mechanisms that control the cerebral blood flow are exceeded, resulting in hyper-perfusion. The consequent over-distension of the cerebral vessels, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and ultimately, the extravasation of fluid into the interstitium all cause vasogenic edema. In most cases, the changes of hypertensive encephalopathy represent reversible vasogenic edema, which can be seen on T2-weighted images, and restricted diffusion is not seen on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Hypertensive encephalopathy that manifests as a reversible increased signal isolated to the pons on T2-weighted images is extremely uncommon. The differential diagnosis for such pontine T2 hyperintensity includes pontine glioma, ischemic and radiation changes (generally irreversible conditions), as well as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and rhomb-encephalitis. In CPM electrolyte imbalances provide a clue for the diagnosis, where as for glioma, there will be an expansion and mass effect. In conclusion, clinical recognition of brainstem HE may be difficult. The features of a lack of correlation between the severity of the radiological abnormality and the clinical status, combined with the rapid resolution following antihypertensive treatment, should suggest the diagnosis. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with the imaging abnormalities of this life

  15. Hypertensive Encephalopathy: Isolated Pons Involvement Mimicking Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamanagatti, S.; Subramanian, S.

    2006-01-01

    MRI of the brain was performed, and it demonstrated an isolated high signal on the T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences that involved only the central pons with sparing the periphery. There was no restricted diffusion on diffusion weighted imaging. The differential diagnosis included posterior reversible syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis; however, the blood sodium on admission was normal. The pathogenesis of HE is that the auto-regulatory mechanisms that control the cerebral blood flow are exceeded, resulting in hyper-perfusion. The consequent over-distension of the cerebral vessels, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and ultimately, the extravasation of fluid into the interstitium all cause vasogenic edema. In most cases, the changes of hypertensive encephalopathy represent reversible vasogenic edema, which can be seen on T2-weighted images, and restricted diffusion is not seen on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Hypertensive encephalopathy that manifests as a reversible increased signal isolated to the pons on T2-weighted images is extremely uncommon. The differential diagnosis for such pontine T2 hyperintensity includes pontine glioma, ischemic and radiation changes (generally irreversible conditions), as well as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and rhomb-encephalitis. In CPM electrolyte imbalances provide a clue for the diagnosis, where as for glioma, there will be an expansion and mass effect. In conclusion, clinical recognition of brainstem HE may be difficult. The features of a lack of correlation between the severity of the radiological abnormality and the clinical status, combined with the rapid resolution following antihypertensive treatment, should suggest the diagnosis. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with the imaging abnormalities of this life

  16. Encefalopatías espongiformes transmisibles Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Delgado-Hachmeister

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Las encefalopatías espongiformes transmisibles (EET han cobrado gran importancia en los últimos años. Principalmente por el surgimiento de la encefalopatía espongiforme del bovino (EEB y la nueva variante de la ermedad de Creutzfeldt-Jakob (nvECJ, esta última probablemente adquirida por la ingesta de carne de bovino contaminada. Hasta la fecha se ha informado de 109 casos de la nvECJ en el humano y la gran mayoría de los casos ha ocurrido en el Reino Unido. No se sabe la magnitud real que podrán tener las EET en el humano, sin embargo algunos piensan que nos encontramos en el principio de una pandemia de la nvECJ. En el presente artículo se discuten varios aspectos de las EET y métodos para la prevención de la transmisión de estas enfermedades, tanto en rumiantes como en el humano.Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE are a group of diseases which have received a lot of attention in recent years. The interest on these diseases has been stimulated by the appearance of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE and the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (nvCJD; the latter is likely to be acquired by ingesting contaminated beef. Until now 109 cases of nvCJD have been reported, most of them occurring in the United Kingdom. Some experts think that this is the beginning of a nvCJD pandemic. Deep knowledge of the mechanisms of transmission of TSE is needed to prevent the emergence of a TSE pandemic in humans.We address various aspects of TSE and discuss prevention methods of TSE in ruminants and humans.

  17. Mitochondrial PKA mediates sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Rashel; Breitbart, Haim

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of ATP to power sperm motility. Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins has been proposed as a major regulatory mechanism for mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sperm motility was measured by a computer-assisted analyzer, protein detection by western blotting, membrane potential by tetramethylrhodamine, cellular ATP by luciferase assay and localization of PKA by immuno-electron microscopy. Bicarbonate is essential for the creation of mitochondrial electro-chemical gradient, ATP synthesis and sperm motility. Bicarbonate stimulates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of two 60kDa proteins identified as Tektin and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase. This phosphorylation was inhibited by respiration inhibition and phosphorylation could be restored by glucose in the presence of bicarbonate. However, this effect of glucose cannot be seen when the mitochondrial ATP/ADP exchanger was inhibited indicating that glycolytic-produced ATP is transported into the mitochondria and allows PKA-dependent protein phosphorylation inside the mitochondria. Bicarbonate activates mitochondrial soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) which catalyzes cAMP production leading to the activation of mitochondrial PKA. Glucose can overcome the lack of ATP in the absence of bicarbonate but it cannot affect the mitochondrial sAC/PKA system, therefore the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the 60kDa proteins does not occur in the absence of bicarbonate. Production of CO2 in Krebs cycle, which is converted to bicarbonate is essential for sAC/PKA activation leading to mitochondrial membrane potential creation and ATP synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP

  20. The potato tuber mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper Foged; Chen, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are called the powerhouses of the cell. To better understand the role of mitochondria in maintaining and regulating metabolism in storage tissues, highly purified mitochondria were isolated from dormant potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum 'Folva') and their proteome investigated. Proteins...... manner using normalized spectral counts including as many as 5-fold more "extreme" proteins (low mass, high isoelectric point, hydrophobic) than previous mitochondrial proteome studies. We estimate that this compendium of proteins represents a high coverage of the potato tuber mitochondrial proteome...

  1. Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy after Bee Sting and Treatment with Zolpidem: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Demir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, a metabolic encephalopathy, develops as a result of cessation or reduction of oxygen and blood flow to the brain. The clinical picture may vary in severity from minimal neurologic deficits to coma. In living patients, permanent neuropsychological sequelae can develop. Herein, we present a case of HIE that occured after anaphylactic reaction due to bee sting, which was treatedm with zolpidem.

  2. More than meets the eye: infant presenting with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Kuntal; Agarwal, Rajkumar

    2018-04-05

    We report a newborn infant who presented with poor Apgar scores and umbilical artery acidosis leading to the diagnosis of hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. During the course of the infant's hospitalisation, subsequent workup revealed an underlying genetic cause that masqueraded as hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood after exanthema subitum outside Japan or Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, L.; Lanferman, H.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Jacobi, G.; Zanella, F. [Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie, Klinikum der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood (ANE) is an uncommon disease which predominantly affects infants and young children living in Japan and Taiwan. A multifocal encephalopathy with symmetrical lesions in the thalamus, tegmentum of the brain stem, cerebral periventricular white matter and cerebellar medulla is characteristic. We present the imaging features in a 4-year-old Japanese boy who had been living in Germany for 2{sup 1}/{sub 2} years before presentation. (orig.)

  4. Recurrent occurrences of CDKL5 mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Kimura, Nobusuke; Mogami, Yukiko; Usui, Daisuke; Takayama, Rumiko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) is recognized as one of the genes responsible for epileptic encephalopathy. We identified CDKL5 mutations in five Japanese patients (one male and four female) with epileptic encephalopathy. Although all mutations were of de novo origin, they were located in the same positions as previously reported pathogenic mutations. These recurrent occurrences of de novo mutations in the same loci may indicate hot spots of nucleotide alteration.

  5. OUTCOMES in CHILDHOOD FOLLOWING THERAPEUTIC HYPOTHERMIA for NEONATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC ENCEPHALOPATHY (HIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Girija; Pappas, Athina; Shankaran, Seetha

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we review the childhood outcomes of neonates with birth depression and/or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The outcomes of these children prior to the era of hypothermia for neuroprotection will first be summarized, followed by discussion of results from randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. The predictors of outcome in childhood following neonatal HIE using clinical and imaging biomarkers following hypothermia therapy will be described. PMID:27863707

  6. Outcomes in childhood following therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Girija; Pappas, Athina; Shankaran, Seetha

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we review the childhood outcomes of neonates with birth depression and/or hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The outcomes of these children prior to the era of hypothermia for neuroprotection will first be summarized, followed by discussion of results from randomized controlled trials of therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The predictors of outcome in childhood following neonatal HIE using clinical and imaging biomarkers following hypothermia therapy will be described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Early Prediction and Outcome of Septic Encephalopathy in Acute Stroke Patients With Nosocomial Coma

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Dao-Ming; Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background Septic encephalopathy (SE) is the most common acute encephalopathy in ICU; however, little attention has been focused on risk of SE in the course of acute stroke. Our aim is to investigate the early prediction and outcome of SE in stroke patients with nosocomial coma (NC). Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in an ICU of the tertiary teaching hospital in China from January 2006 to December 2009. Ninety-four acute stroke patients with NC were grouped according to with...

  8. The thalamus in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatic encephalopathy: A volumetric MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Ran; Zhang, Jiuquan; You, Zhonglan; Wei, Luqing; Fan, Yi; Cui, Jinguo; Wang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: The thalamus is a major relay and filter station in the central neural system. Some previous studies have suggested that the thalamus maybe implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The aim of our study was to investigate changing thalamic volumes in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatic encephalopathy. Methods: Neuropsychological tests and structural MR scanning were performed on 24 cirrhotic patients, 23 cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy, 24 cirrhotic patients during their first episode of overt hepatic encephalopathy, and 33 healthy controls. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed to detect gray matter morphological changes. The thalamus and whole brain volume were extrapolated. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of thalamic volumes was used to discriminate patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy from those with hepatic cirrhosis. Results: Thalamic volume increased in a stepwise manner in patients with progressively worse stages of hepatic encephalopathy compared to healthy subjects. Additionally, a comparison of gray matter morphometry between patients with Child–Pugh grades A, B, or C and controls revealed a progression in thalamic volumes in parallel with the degree of liver failure. Moreover, thalamic volume was significantly correlated with the number connection test A time and digit-symbol test score in cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (r = 0.659, P = 0.001; r = −0.577, P = 0.004; respectively). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.827 (P = 0.001). Conclusions: A significantly increased thalamic volume may be provide an objective imaging measure for predicting seizures due to minimal hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients

  9. The thalamus in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatic encephalopathy: A volumetric MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Ran, E-mail: taoran1648@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Department of Radiology, Bethune International Peace Hospital of People' s Liberty Army, Shijiazhuang 050082, Hebei Province (China); Zhang, Jiuquan, E-mail: jiuquanzhang@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); You, Zhonglan, E-mail: you_zhonglan@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Wei, Luqing, E-mail: weiluqing@foxmail.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Fan, Yi, E-mail: fanyi1978@yahoo.cn [Department of Infectious Diseases, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Cui, Jinguo, E-mail: cuijinguo2005@163.com [Department of Radiology, Bethune International Peace Hospital of People' s Liberty Army, Shijiazhuang 050082, Hebei Province (China); Wang, Jian, E-mail: wangjian_811@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Background and aims: The thalamus is a major relay and filter station in the central neural system. Some previous studies have suggested that the thalamus maybe implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The aim of our study was to investigate changing thalamic volumes in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatic encephalopathy. Methods: Neuropsychological tests and structural MR scanning were performed on 24 cirrhotic patients, 23 cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy, 24 cirrhotic patients during their first episode of overt hepatic encephalopathy, and 33 healthy controls. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed to detect gray matter morphological changes. The thalamus and whole brain volume were extrapolated. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of thalamic volumes was used to discriminate patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy from those with hepatic cirrhosis. Results: Thalamic volume increased in a stepwise manner in patients with progressively worse stages of hepatic encephalopathy compared to healthy subjects. Additionally, a comparison of gray matter morphometry between patients with Child–Pugh grades A, B, or C and controls revealed a progression in thalamic volumes in parallel with the degree of liver failure. Moreover, thalamic volume was significantly correlated with the number connection test A time and digit-symbol test score in cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (r = 0.659, P = 0.001; r = −0.577, P = 0.004; respectively). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.827 (P = 0.001). Conclusions: A significantly increased thalamic volume may be provide an objective imaging measure for predicting seizures due to minimal hepatic encephalopathy in cirrhotic patients.

  10. Reversible encephalopathy syndrome: report of 12 cases with follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greco Crasto, S.; Sardo, P.; Davini, O.; Rizzo, L.; De Lucchi, R.

    2004-01-01

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological features of reversible encephalopathy syndrome and follow-up results in 12 patients. This syndrome seems to be the result of an acute encephalopathy showing with brain edema mainly in the white matter (vasogenic edema). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images are useful to distinguish this entity from acute ischemia. Early recognition and treatment often lead to complete neurological recovery. If unrecognized, the patient's condition can progress to central nervous system failure. (orig.)

  11. Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood after exanthema subitum outside Japan or Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porto, L.; Lanferman, H.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Jacobi, G.; Zanella, F.

    1999-01-01

    Acute necrotising encephalopathy of childhood (ANE) is an uncommon disease which predominantly affects infants and young children living in Japan and Taiwan. A multifocal encephalopathy with symmetrical lesions in the thalamus, tegmentum of the brain stem, cerebral periventricular white matter and cerebellar medulla is characteristic. We present the imaging features in a 4-year-old Japanese boy who had been living in Germany for 2 1 / 2 years before presentation. (orig.)

  12. Prodominant hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy with supratentorial involvement: Case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hee; Park, Sung Tae; Lim, Hyun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Tae; Cha, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brainstem and cerebellar edema are uncommon in association with typical supratentorial changes. We experienced three cases of atypical hypertensive encephalopathy involving brainstem and cerebellum as well as cerebral white matter, which showed characteristic alternating linear bright and low signals in the pons, the so-called 'stripe sign'. We report these cases here with a brief literature review.

  13. Neonatal encephalopathy and socioeconomic status: population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Heidi K; Loch, Christian M; Li, Christopher I

    2007-07-01

    To investigate the association between maternal socioeconomic status and the risk of encephalopathy in full-term newborns. Population-based case-control study. Washington State births from 1994 through 2002 recorded in the linked Washington State Birth Registry and Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System. Cases (n = 1060) were singleton full-term newborns with Comprehensive Hospital Abstract Reporting System International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnoses of seizures, birth asphyxia, central nervous system dysfunction, or cerebral irritability. Control cases (n = 5330) were singleton full-term newborns selected from the same database. Main Exposures Socioeconomic status was defined by median income of the census tract of the mother's residence, number of years of maternal educational achievement, or maternal insurance status. Odds ratios estimating the risk of encephalopathy associated with disadvantaged socioeconomic status were calculated in 3 separate analyses using multivariate adjusted logistic regression. Newborns of mothers living in neighborhoods in which residents have a low median income were at increased risk of encephalopathy compared with newborns in neighborhoods in which residents have a median income more than 3 times the poverty level (adjusted odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-2.3). There was also a trend for increasing risk of encephalopathy associated with decreasing neighborhood income (PNewborns of mothers with less than 12 years of educational achievement had a higher risk of encephalopathy compared with newborns of mothers with more than 16 years of educational achievement (adjusted odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.3). Newborns of mothers receiving public insurance also had a higher risk of encephalopathy compared with newborns of mothers who have commercial insurance (adjusted odds ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-1.7). Disadvantaged socioeconomic status was independently

  14. Heat stress presenting with encephalopathy and MRI findings of diffuse cerebral injury and hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Waldo R; Varghese, Shaun; Savitz, Sean; Wu, Tzu Ching

    2013-06-17

    Heat stress results in multiorgan failure and CNS injury. There a few case reports in the literature on the neurological consequences of heat stress. We describe a patient with heat stress presenting with encephalopathy and bilateral cerebral, cerebellar, and thalamic lesions and intraventricular hemorrhage on MRI. Heat stress should be in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with encephalopathy and elevated serum inflammatory markers especially if the history suggests a preceding episode of hyperthermia.

  15. A mitochondrially targeted compound delays aging in yeast through a mechanism linking mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism to mitochondrial redox biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Burstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study revealed a mechanism of delaying aging in yeast by a natural compound which specifically impacts mitochondrial redox processes. In this mechanism, exogenously added lithocholic bile acid enters yeast cells, accumulates mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and elicits an age-related remodeling of phospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes. Such remodeling of mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics progresses with the chronological age of a yeast cell and ultimately causes significant changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome. These changes in the composition of membrane phospholipids alter mitochondrial abundance and morphology, thereby triggering changes in the age-related chronology of such longevity-defining redox processes as mitochondrial respiration, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, the preservation of cellular homeostasis of mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species, and the coupling of electron transport to ATP synthesis.

  16. Melatonin and human mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Sharafati-Chaleshtori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the main causative factors in a wide variety of complications such as neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, aging process, and septic shock. Decrease in respiratory complex activity, increase in free radical production, increase in mitochondrial synthase activity, increase in nitric oxide production, and impair in electron transport system and/or mitochondrial permeability are considered as the main factors responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction. Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone, is selectively taken up by mitochondria and acts as a powerful antioxidant, regulating the mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin increases the permeability of membranes and is the stimulator of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and catalase. It also acts as an inhibitor of lipoxygenase. Melatonin can cause resistance to oxidation damage by fixing the microsomal membranes. Melatonin has been shown to retard aging and inhibit neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia/reperfusion, septic shock, diabetes, cancer, and other complications related to oxidative stress. The purpose of the current study, other than introducing melatonin, was to present the recent findings on clinical effects in diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunction including diabetes, cancer, gastrointestinal diseases, and diseases related to brain function.

  17. Mitochondrial Metabolism in Aging Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism is the underlying basis for the increased sensitivity in the aged heart to stress. The aged heart exhibits impaired metabolic flexibility, with a decreased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and enhanced dependence on glucose metabolism. Aging impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with a greater role played by the mitochondria located between the myofibrils, the interfibrillar mitochondria. With aging, there is a decrease in activity of complexes III and IV, which account for the decrease in respiration. Furthermore, aging decreases mitochondrial content among the myofibrils. The end result is that in the interfibrillar area there is an approximate 50% decrease in mitochondrial function, affecting all substrates. The defective mitochondria persist in the aged heart, leading to enhanced oxidant production and oxidative injury and the activation of oxidant signaling for cell death. Aging defects in mitochondria represent new therapeutic targets, whether by manipulation of the mitochondrial proteome, modulation of electron transport, activation of biogenesis or mitophagy, or the regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion. These mechanisms provide new ways to attenuate cardiac disease in elders by preemptive treatment of age-related defects, in contrast to the treatment of disease-induced dysfunction. PMID:27174952

  18. Influenza-associated Encephalitis/Encephalopathy Identified by the Australian Childhood Encephalitis Study 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Philip N; Dale, Russell C; Blyth, Christopher C; Macartney, Kristine; Crawford, Nigel W; Marshall, Helen; Clark, Julia E; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Webster, Richard I; Cheng, Allen C; Booy, Robert; Jones, Cheryl A

    2017-11-01

    Influenza-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy (IAE) is an important cause of acute encephalitis syndrome in children. IAE includes a series of clinicoradiologic syndromes or acute encephalopathy syndromes that have been infrequently reported outside East Asia. We aimed to describe cases of IAE identified by the Australian Childhood Encephalitis study. Children ≤ 14 years of age with suspected encephalitis were prospectively identified in 5 hospitals in Australia. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, imaging, and outcome at discharge data were reviewed by an expert panel and cases were categorized by using predetermined case definitions. We extracted cases associated with laboratory identification of influenza virus for this analysis; among these cases, specific IAE syndromes were identified where clinical and radiologic features were consistent with descriptions in the published literature. We identified 13 cases of IAE during 3 southern hemisphere influenza seasons at 5 tertiary children's hospitals in Australia; 8 children with specific acute encephalopathy syndromes including: acute necrotizing encephalopathy, acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late diffusion restriction, mild encephalopathy with reversible splenial lesion, and hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome. Use of influenza-specific antiviral therapy and prior influenza vaccination were infrequent. In contrast, death or significant neurologic morbidity occurred in 7 of the 13 children (54%). The conditions comprising IAE are heterogeneous with varied clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging changes, and outcomes. Overall, outcome of IAE is poor emphasizing the need for optimized prevention, early recognition, and empiric management.

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with neonatal encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellhaas, Renée A; Ng, Chee M; Dillon, Christina H; Barks, John D E; Bhatt-Mehta, Varsha

    2013-02-01

    Phenobarbital is the first-line treatment for neonatal seizures. Many neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are treated with therapeutic hypothermia, and about 40% have clinical seizures. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital in infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy who undergo therapeutic hypothermia. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on phenobarbital pharmacokinetics, taking into account maturational changes. Level 3 neonatal ICU. Infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and suspected seizures, all treated with phenobarbital. Some of these infants also received treatment with therapeutic hypothermia. None. A retrospective cohort study of 39 infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with phenobarbital (20 were treated with therapeutic hypothermia and 19 were not). Data on phenobarbital plasma concentrations were collected in 39 subjects with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with or without therapeutic hypothermia. Using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, population pharmacokinetics of phenobarbital were developed with a total of 164 plasma concentrations. A one-compartment model best described the pharmacokinetics. The clearance of phenobarbital was linearly related to body weight and matured with increasing age with a maturation half-life of 22.1 days. Therapeutic hypothermia did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of phenobarbital. Therapeutic hypothermia does not influence the clearance of phenobarbital after accounting for weight and age. Standard phenobarbital dosing is appropriate for the initial treatment of seizures in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  20. Efficacy of Rifaximin in Prevention of Recurrence of Hepatic Encephalopathy in Patients with Cirrhosis of Liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, B.; Zaidi, Y. A.; Alam, A.; Anjum, H. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of Rifaximin in prevention of repeated episodes of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with liver cirrhosis as compared to placebo. Study Design: Triple-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Shaikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore, from October 2012 to April 2013. Methodology: Patients in remission from recurrent hepatic encephalopathy resulting from cirrhosis were randomly assigned to receive either Rifaximin, at a dose of 550 mg twice daily (63 patients), or placebo (63 patients.) Patients were requested to take the drug orally twice daily for 6 months or until they developed a breakthrough episode of hepatic encephalopathy. Results: Mean age of patients in treatment and control group was 40.21 A +- 2.33 years and 42.87 A +- 4.54 years respectively. The most common etiology of cirrhosis was hepatitis C followed by hepatitis B. Patients who remained free of hepatic encephalopathy during study period were 40 out of 63 patients in control group and 35 patients out of 63 patients (p = 0.56). Most of the patients who developed breakthrough hepatic encephalopathy had a MELD score range of 21-25 in both groups. The number of deaths and adverse events was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Over a 6-month period, treatment with Rifaximin failed to maintain remission from hepatic encephalopathy more effectively than placebo in the studied group. (author)

  1. Evaluation of Cardiac Mitochondrial Function by a Nuclear Imaging Technique using Technetium-99m-MIBI Uptake Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in energy production for the cell. The proper function of a myocardial cell largely depends on the functional capacity of the mitochondria. Therefore it is necessary to establish a novel and reliable method for a non-invasive assessment of mitochondrial function and metabolism in humans. Although originally designed for evaluating myocardial perfusion, 99m Tc-MIBI can be also used to evaluate cardiac mitochondrial function. In a clinical study on ischemic heart disease, reverse redistribution of 99m Tc-MIBI was evident after direct percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. The presence of increased washout of 99m Tc-MIBI was associated with the infarct-related artery and preserved left ventricular function. In non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, an increased washout rate of 99m Tc-MIBI, which correlated inversely with left ventricular ejection fraction, was observed in patients with congestive heart failure. Increased 99m Tc-MIBI washout was also observed in mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) and in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac mitochondrial function could be greatly beneficial in monitoring possible cardiotoxic drug use and in the evaluation of cardiac damage in clinical medicine

  2. A Mitochondrial Disorder in a Middle Age Iranian Patient: Report of a Rare Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasi, Mostafa; Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Mehrpour, Masoud; Haghi-Ashtiani, Bahram; Haji Akhondi, Fahimeh; Nilipour, Yalda; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) can involve multiple systems and cause stroke-like episodes and status epilepticus. Case Presentation: A 48-year-old female with history of early fatigability, migraine-type headaches, and bilateral sensory-neural hearing loss presented 3 episodes of serial seizures. On admission she was affected by Wernicke aphasia and, then, right hemiparesis. Investigations showed elevated arterial lactate and ragged red fibers on muscle biopsy. Conclusion: Though more commonly diagnosed during childhood, some cases of adult-onset MELAS syndrome are reported. This syndrome should be considered in patients with stroke-like events in adults without cerebrovascular risk factors and difficult-to-treat seizures. PMID:29158884

  3. Synthesis of (2-[{sup 11}C]Methoxy)rotenone, a marker of mitochondrial complex I activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charalambous, A; Mangner, T J; Kilbourn, M R

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that defects in the function of the complexes of the electron transport chain might be involved in the pathology of neurological diseases such as mitochondrial encephalopathies, Parkinson's Huntington's and Alzheimer's disease. Rotenone is a potent reversible competitive inhibitor of complex I (NADH-CoQ reductase). To study the possible involvement of complex I in such diseases, we synthesized (2-[{sup 11}C]methoxy)rotenone by [{sup 11}C]alkylation of 2-O-desmethyl rotenone methyl enol ether followed by hydrolysis of the enol ether to the ketone using aqueous trifluoroacetic acid. (2-[{sup 11}C]Methoxy)rotenone was purified by high pressure liquid chromatography (silica gel) and was obtained in 7-10% yields decay corrected to end of bombardment in synthesis times typically shorter than 48 min. Radiochemical purities were over 95% and specific activities averaged 1000 Ci/mmol at end of synthesis.

  4. Bilateral Occipital Lobe Hemorrhages Presenting as Denial of Blindness in Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome- A Rare Combination of Anton Syndrome and Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godasi, Raja; Rupareliya, Chintan; Bollu, Pradeep C

    2017-10-04

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) or reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy (RPL) is an acute neurological syndrome characterized by the development of radiological abnormalities on brain imaging along with clinical manifestations, such as a headache, seizures, encephalopathy, etc. We report the case of a middle-aged male who presented to the emergency department after he woke up with complete blindness and was found to have hemorrhagic PRES. Intracranial hemorrhages were seen in around 15% of patients who presented with this condition. In this article, we review the different types of hemorrhages seen in the setting of PRES and their associations.

  5. Mitochondrial Nucleoid: Shield and Switch of the Mitochondrial Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria preserve very complex and distinctively unique machinery to maintain and express the content of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Similar to chromosomes, mtDNA is packaged into discrete mtDNA-protein complexes referred to as a nucleoid. In addition to its role as a mtDNA shield, over 50 nucleoid-associated proteins play roles in mtDNA maintenance and gene expression through either temporary or permanent association with mtDNA or other nucleoid-associated proteins. The number of mtDNA(s) contained within a single nucleoid is a fundamental question but remains a somewhat controversial issue. Disturbance in nucleoid components and mutations in mtDNA were identified as significant in various diseases, including carcinogenesis. Significant interest in the nucleoid structure and its regulation has been stimulated in relation to mitochondrial diseases, which encompass diseases in multicellular organisms and are associated with accumulation of numerous mutations in mtDNA. In this review, mitochondrial nucleoid structure, nucleoid-associated proteins, and their regulatory roles in mitochondrial metabolism are briefly addressed to provide an overview of the emerging research field involving mitochondrial biology. PMID:28680532

  6. How to diagnose and manage hepatic encephalopathy: a consensus statement on roles and responsibilities beyond the liver specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawcross, Debbie L; Dunk, Arthur A; Jalan, Rajiv; Kircheis, Gerald; de Knegt, Robert J; Laleman, Wim; Ramage, John K; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Morgan, Ian E J

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is defined as brain dysfunction caused by liver insufficiency and/or portosystemic shunting. Symptoms include nonspecific cognitive impairment, personality changes and changes in consciousness. Overt (symptomatic) hepatic encephalopathy is a common complication of cirrhosis that is associated with a poor prognosis. Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present to healthcare providers who do not have primary responsibility for management of patients with cirrhosis. Therefore, we developed a series of 'consensus points' to provide some guidance on management. Using a modified 'Delphi' process, consensus statements were developed that summarize our recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Points on which full consensus could not be reached are also discussed. Our recommendations emphasize the role of all healthcare providers in the identification of cognitive impairment in patients with cirrhosis and provide guidance on steps that might be considered to make a diagnosis of overt hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, treatment recommendations are summarized. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy can have a significant impact on patients; however, in most circumstances identification and management of minimal hepatic encephalopathy remains the responsibility of specialists in liver diseases. Our opinion statements aim to define the roles and responsibilities of all healthcare providers who at times care for patients with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. We suggest that these recommendations be considered further by colleagues in other disciplines and hope that future guidelines consider the management of patients with cirrhosis and with a 'suspicion' of cognitive impairment through to a formal diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  7. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  8. Modern view on hepatic encephalopathy: basic terms and concepts of pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Shulyatnikova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The problem of acute and chronic forms of hepatic encephalopathy (HE is not clearly identified among modern problems of hepatology and neuroscience in Ukraine. Despite the significant contribution to the development of lethal complications in patients with liver pathology and long history of the study of this issue, there is still no unified opinion on the links of HE pathogenesis. The aim of this review is to conduct a comprehensive analysis of current data on the spreading and mechanisms of development of HE. HE is a complex of potentially reversible neurocognitive disorders in patients with chronic or acute hepatic failure (ALF. HE is more often a complication of liver cirrhosis and is the second most frequent cause of hospitalization of such patients after ascites. When decompensating liver failure in acute or chronic hepatic pathology in patients severe forms of HE develop, accompanied by a progressive increase in intracranial pressure and the development of coma, which often ends lethal due to poor corrigibility of intracranial hypertension while maintaining hepatogenic neurointoxication. HE is considered as the end result of the accumulation of a number of neurotoxic substances in the brain, among which are ammonia, mercaptans, short chain fatty acids, false neurotransmitters, gamma-aminobutyric acid, manganese. The most popular among the reasons for the development of HE is the neurotoxic theory of ammonia. Ammonia is subjected to detoxification in the liver, turning into urea, a smaller fraction with the participation of glutamine synthetase is used in the synthesis of glutamine in muscles, liver and astrocytes of brain. In case of hepatic dysfunction and/or portosystemic shunting, the concentration of ammonia in blood increases up to 10 times and the main load for its detoxification is shifted to myocytes and astroglia. In ALF glutamine overload of astrocytes occurs with a change in intracellular osmolarity and subsequent

  9. Mitochondrial quality control pathways as determinants of metabolic health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Held, Ntsiki M.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is key for maintaining cellular health, while mitochondrial failure is associated with various pathologies, including inherited metabolic disorders and age-related diseases. In order to maintain mitochondrial quality, several pathways of mitochondrial quality control have

  10. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmeira, Carlos M.; Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-01-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes

  11. Prospects for therapeutic mitochondrial transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollihue, Jenna L; Rabchevsky, Alexander G

    2017-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in a multitude of diseases and pathological conditions- the organelles that are essential for life can also be major players in contributing to cell death and disease. Because mitochondria are so well established in our existence, being present in all cell types except for red blood cells and having the responsibility of providing most of our energy needs for survival, then dysfunctional mitochondria can elicit devastating cellular pathologies that can be widespread across the entire organism. As such, the field of "mitochondrial medicine" is emerging in which disease states are being targeted therapeutically at the level of the mitochondrion, including specific antioxidants, bioenergetic substrate additions, and membrane uncoupling agents. New and compelling research investigating novel techniques for mitochondrial transplantation to replace damaged or dysfunctional mitochondria with exogenous healthy mitochondria has shown promising results, including tissue sparing accompanied by increased energy production and decreased oxidative damage. Various experimental techniques have been attempted and each has been challenged to accomplish successful transplantation. The purpose of this review is to present the history of mitochondrial transplantation, the different techniques used for both in vitro and in vivo delivery, along with caveats and pitfalls that have been discovered along the way. Results from such pioneering studies are promising and could be the next big wave of "mitochondrial medicine" once technical hurdles are overcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Resveratrol induces mitochondrial biogenesis in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszar, Anna; Labinskyy, Nazar; Pinto, John T; Ballabh, Praveen; Zhang, Hanrui; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Pearson, Kevin; de Cabo, Rafael; Pacher, Pal; Zhang, Cuihua; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2009-07-01

    Pathways that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis are potential therapeutic targets for the amelioration of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Resveratrol was shown to impact mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle and the liver, but its role in mitochondrial biogenesis in endothelial cells remains poorly defined. The present study determined whether resveratrol induces mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured human coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). In CAECs resveratrol increased mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA content, upregulated protein expression of electron transport chain constituents, and induced mitochondrial biogenesis factors (proliferator-activated receptor-coactivator-1alpha, nuclear respiratory factor-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A). Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) was induced, and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) was upregulated in a SIRT1-dependent manner. Knockdown of SIRT1 (small interfering RNA) or inhibition of NO synthesis prevented resveratrol-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. In aortas of type 2 diabetic (db/db) mice impaired mitochondrial biogenesis was normalized by chronic resveratrol treatment, showing the in vivo relevance of our findings. Resveratrol increases mitochondrial content in endothelial cells via activating SIRT1. We propose that SIRT1, via a pathway that involves the upregulation of eNOS, induces mitochondrial biogenesis. Resveratrol induced mitochondrial biogenesis in the aortas of type 2 diabetic mice, suggesting the potential for new treatment approaches targeting endothelial mitochondria in metabolic diseases.

  13. Nationwide survey of rotavirus-associated encephalopathy and sudden unexpected death in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Ohashi, Masahiro; Ihira, Masaru; Hashimoto, Shuji; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2014-08-01

    Rotavirus can cause severe complications such as encephalopathy/encephalitis and sudden unexpected death. The incidence of rotavirus-associated encephalopathy/encephalitis or sudden unexpected death remains unknown. To clarify the clinical features of rotavirus-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy and sudden unexpected death, we conducted a nationwide survey in Japan. A two-part questionnaire was designed to determine the number of the cases and the clinical features of severe cases of rotavirus infection, including encephalitis/encephalopathy and sudden unexpected death, between 2009 and 2011. Of the 1365 questionnaires sent to hospitals, 963 (70.5%) were returned and eligible for analysis. We determined 58 cases of rotavirus-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy and 7 cases of sudden unexpected death. These patients were diagnosed with rotavirus infection by immunochromatography. Although 36/58 (62.1%) encephalitis/encephalopathy patients had no sequelae, 15/58 (25.9%) patients had neurological sequelae, and 7/58 (12.1%) patients had fatal outcomes. Pleocytosis was observed in 9/40 (22.5%) patients and cerebrospinal fluid protein levels were elevated in only 4/40 (10%) patients. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (>500 IU/L) or acidemia (pHdeath were 44.0 and 4.9 cases in Japan, respectively. Elevated LDH (>500 IU/L) or acidemia (pH<7.15) were related to a poor prognosis of the encephalitis/encephalopathy. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression and role of neuroglobin in rats with sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Na; Ai, Yu-Hang; Gong, Hua; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Li; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Yao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    To determine the role of neuroglobin in the pathology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and ascertain if neuroglobin has any protective effects against sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Randomized laboratory animal study. Research university animal laboratory. Two hundred and forty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received cecal puncture and ligation (or sham) surgery to induce sepsis, then broken up into groups based on whether or not the rat developed sepsis-associated encephalopathy as determined by electroencephalograph and evoked potential recordings. The rats were then left untreated to examine the effect of sepsis-associated encephalopathy on neuroglobin, treated with a neuroglobin antisense nucleotide to block gene expression, or given hemin, a neuroglobin inducer. Following sepsis induction, diagnosis, and treatment, the brains were analyzed for both gross and ultrastructural morphology. Also, neuronal neuroglobin immunoreactivity and apoptosis (via terminal uridine nucleotide end-labeling) were examined. Blood serum levels were then analyzed for neuroglobin, superoxide dismutase, and malondialdehyde levels. We determined that sepsis-associated encephalopathy induces damage evident when examining both gross and ultrastructural morphology, as well as induces neuronal neuroglobin expression. Also, blockade of neuroglobin expression via antisense treatment will exacerbate these pathological effects, while increasing neuroglobin levels via hemin will ameliorate them. Blood analysis found that levels of superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde mirrored the level of pathology found in the brain, while plasma neuroglobin levels reflected the amount of neuronal neuroglobin immunoreactivity. We conclude that neuroglobin is involved in the pathogenesis of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and has neuroprotective effects. We also determined that hemin has protective effects against sepsis-associated encephalopathy as well, most probably due to its effect on

  15. The clinical outcome and neuroimaging of acute encephalopathy after status epilepticus in Dravet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Ye, Jintang; Zeng, Qi; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Xiaoling; Liu, Aijie; Yang, Zhixian; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiru; Zhang, Yuehua

    2018-06-01

    To analyze the clinical outcome and neuroimaging over a long duration follow-up in the currently largest series of acute encephalopathy after status epilepticus in patients with Dravet syndrome. Clinical and neuroimaging data of patients with Dravet syndrome with a history of acute encephalopathy (coma >24h) after status epilepticus from February 2005 to December 2016 at Peking University First Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-five patients (15 males, 20 females) with a history of acute encephalopathy were enrolled from a total of 624 patients with Dravet syndrome (5.6%). The median onset age of acute encephalopathy was 3 years 1 month. The duration of status epilepticus varied between 40 minutes to 12 hours. Thirty-four patients had a high fever when status epilepticus occurred, and only one had a normal temperature. Coma lasted from 2 to 20 days. Twelve patients died and 23 survived with massive neurological regression. The median follow-up time was 2 years 1 month. Neuroimaging of 20 out of 23 survivors during the recovery phase showed diverse degrees of cortical atrophy with or without subcortical lesions. Acute encephalopathy after status epilepticus is more prone to occur in patients with Dravet syndrome who had a high fever. The mortality rate is high in severe cases. Survivors are left with severe neurological sequelae but often with either no seizure or low seizure frequency. Acute encephalopathy is more prone to occur in patients with Dravet syndrome with a high fever. The mortality rate is high for acute encephalopathy after status epilepticus in patients with Dravet syndrome. Survivors have neurological sequelae. © 2018 The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press.

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in fatty acid oxidation disorders: insights from human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajner, Moacir; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez

    2015-11-20

    Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) plays a pivotal role in maintaining body energy homoeostasis mainly during catabolic states. Oxidation of fatty acids requires approximately 25 proteins. Inherited defects of FAO have been identified in the majority of these proteins and constitute an important group of inborn errors of metabolism. Affected patients usually present with severe hepatopathy, cardiomyopathy and skeletal myopathy, whereas some patients may suffer acute and/or progressive encephalopathy whose pathogenesis is poorly known. In recent years growing evidence has emerged indicating that energy deficiency/disruption of mitochondrial homoeostasis is involved in the pathophysiology of some fatty acid oxidation defects (FAOD), although the exact underlying mechanisms are not yet established. Characteristic fatty acids and carnitine derivatives are found at high concentrations in these patients and more markedly during episodes of metabolic decompensation that are associated with worsening of clinical symptoms. Therefore, it is conceivable that these compounds may be toxic. We will briefly summarize the current knowledge obtained from patients and genetic mouse models with these disorders indicating that disruption of mitochondrial energy, redox and calcium homoeostasis is involved in the pathophysiology of the tissue damage in the more common FAOD, including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiencies. We will also provide evidence that the fatty acids and derivatives that accumulate in these diseases disrupt mitochondrial homoeostasis. The elucidation of the toxic mechanisms of these compounds may offer new perspectives for potential novel adjuvant therapeutic strategies in selected disorders of this group. © 2016 Authors.

  17. Episodic weakness due to mitochondrial DNA MT-ATP6/8 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auré, Karine; Dubourg, Odile; Jardel, Claude; Clarysse, Lucie; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Laforêt, Pascal; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Petiot, Philippe; Gervais-Bernard, Hélène; Vial, Christophe; Bedat-Millet, Anne-Laure; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Vandier, Christophe; Fontaine, Bertrand; Lombès, Anne

    2013-11-19

    To report that homoplasmic deleterious mutations in the mitochondrial DNA MT-ATP6/8 genes may be responsible for acute episodes of limb weakness mimicking periodic paralysis due to channelopathies and dramatically responding to acetazolamide. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing and restriction PCR, oxidative phosphorylation functional assays, reactive oxygen species metabolism, and patch-clamp technique in cultured skin fibroblasts. Occurrence of a typical MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) syndrome in a single member of a large pedigree with episodic weakness associated with a later-onset distal motor neuropathy led to the disclosure of 2 deleterious mitochondrial DNA mutations. The MT-ATP6 m.9185T>C p.Leu220Pro mutation, previously associated with Leigh syndrome, was present in all family members, while the MT-TL1 m.3271T>C mutation, a known cause of MELAS syndrome, was observed in the sole patient with MELAS presentation. Significant defect of complexes V and I as well as oxidative stress were observed in both primary fibroblasts and cybrid cells with 100% m.9185T>C mutation. Permanent plasma membrane depolarization and altered permeability to K(+) in fibroblasts provided a link with the paralysis episodes. Screening of 9 patients, based on their clinical phenotype, identified 4 patients with similar deleterious MT-ATP6 mutations (twice m.9185T>C and once m.9176T>C or m.8893T>C). A fifth patient presented with an original potentially deleterious MT-ATP8 mutation (m.8403T>C). All mutations were associated with almost-normal complex V activity but significant oxidative stress and permanent plasma membrane depolarization. Homoplasmic mutations in the MT-ATP6/8 genes may cause episodic weakness responding to acetazolamide treatment.

  18. Mitochondrial glutamate carriers from Drosophila melanogaster: biochemical, evolutionary and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetti, Paola; Cappello, Anna Rita; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Carrisi, Chiara; Martello, Emanuela; Caggese, Corrado; Dolce, Vincenza; Capobianco, Loredana

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial carriers are members of a family of transport proteins that mediate solute transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Two isoforms of the glutamate carriers, GC1 and GC2 (encoded by the SLC25A22 and SLC25A18 genes, respectively), have been identified in humans. Two independent mutations in SLC25A22 are associated with severe epileptic encephalopathy. In the present study we show that two genes (CG18347 and CG12201) phylogenetically related to the human GC encoding genes are present in the D. melanogaster genome. We have functionally characterized the proteins encoded by CG18347 and CG12201, designated as DmGC1p and DmGC2p respectively, by overexpression in Escherichia coli and reconstitution into liposomes. Their transport properties demonstrate that DmGC1p and DmGC2p both catalyze the transport of glutamate across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Computational approaches have been used in order to highlight residues of DmGC1p and DmGC2p involved in substrate binding. Furthermore, gene expression analysis during development and in various adult tissues reveals that CG18347 is ubiquitously expressed in all examined D. melanogaster tissues, while the expression of CG12201 is strongly testis-biased. Finally, we identified mitochondrial glutamate carrier orthologs in 49 eukaryotic species in order to attempt the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the glutamate carrier function. Comparison of the exon/intron structure and other key features of the analyzed orthologs suggests that eukaryotic glutamate carrier genes descend from an intron-rich ancestral gene already present in the common ancestor of lineages that diverged as early as bilateria and radiata. © 2013.

  19. Mitochondrial role in cell aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Fleming, J.; Economos, A. C.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental studies on the mitochondria of insect and mammalian cells are examined with a view to an analysis of intrinsic mitochondrial senescence, and its relation to the age-related changes in other cell organelles. The fine structural and biochemical data support the concept that the mitochondria of fixed postmitotic cells may be the site of intrinsic aging because of the attack by free radicals and lipid peroxides originating in the organelles as a by-product of oxygen reduction during respiration. Although the cells have numerous mechanisms for counteracting lipid peroxidation injury, there is a slippage in the antioxidant protection. Intrinsic mitochondrial aging could thus be considered as a specific manifestation of oxygen toxicity. It is proposed that free radical injury renders an increasing number of the mitochondria unable to divide, probably because of damage to the lipids of the inner membrane and to mitochondrial DNA.

  20. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  1. Genetics of mitochondrial dysfunction and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demain, L A M; Conway, G S; Newman, W G

    2017-02-01

    Increasingly, mitochondria are being recognized as having an important role in fertility. Indeed in assisted reproductive technologies mitochondrial function is a key indicator of sperm and oocyte quality. Here, we review the literature regarding mitochondrial genetics and infertility. In many multisystem disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction death occurs prior to sexual maturity, or the clinical features are so severe that infertility may be underreported. Interestingly, many of the genes linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and infertility have roles in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA or in mitochondrial translation. Studies on populations with genetically uncharacterized infertility have highlighted an association with mitochondrial DNA deletions, whether this is causative or indicative of poor functioning mitochondria requires further examination. Studies on the impact of mitochondrial DNA variants present conflicting data but highlight POLG as a particularly interesting candidate gene for both male and female infertility. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  3. Common effects of lithium and valproate on mitochondrial functions: protection against methamphetamine-induced mitochondrial damage

    OpenAIRE

    Bachmann, Rosilla F.; Wang, Yun; Yuan, Peixiong; Zhou, Rulun; Li, Xiaoxia; Alesci, Salvatore; Du, Jing; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the progression of a variety of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Thus, enhancing mitochondrial function could potentially help ameliorate the impairments of neural plasticity and cellular resilience associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. A series of studies was undertaken to investigate the effects of mood stabilizers on mitochondrial function, and against mitochondrially media...

  4. Mitochondrial quality control in cardiac diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Campos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis is a hallmark of cardiac diseases. Therefore, maintenance of mitochondrial integrity through different surveillance mechanisms is critical for cardiomyocyte survival. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings on the central role of mitochondrial quality control processes including regulation of mitochondrial redox balance, aldehyde metabolism, proteostasis, dynamics and clearance in cardiac diseases, highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets.

  5. Mitochondrial fusion through membrane automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Konstantinos; Andronikos, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that malfunctions in mitochondrial processes can be blamed for diseases. However, the mechanism behind these operations is yet not sufficiently clear. In this work we present a novel approach to describe a biomolecular model for mitochondrial fusion using notions from the membrane computing. We use a case study defined in BioAmbient calculus and we show how to translate it in terms of a P automata variant. We combine brane calculi with (mem)brane automata to produce a new scheme capable of describing simple, realistic models. We propose the further use of similar methods and the test of other biomolecular models with the same behaviour.

  6. Surgical disconnection of patent paraumbilical vein in refractory hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Bando, Koichi; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Kakinuma, Daisuke; Kanda, Tomohiro; Akimaru, Koho; Tajiri, Takashi

    2008-06-01

    Refractory hepatic encephalopathy (HE) frequently develops in patients with cirrhosis and portal-systemic shunt. Recently, patients with refractory HE associated with portal-systemic shunt have been treated with interventional radiology. We describe a promising new treatment for portal-systemic shunt, ligation of the patent paraumbilical vein (PUV) after partial splenic embolization, in patients with refractory HE. Four patients with cirrhosis (3 women and 1 man; mean age, 56 years) and refractory HE due to a patent PUV were studied. Patency of the PUV had recurred in 1 patient after primary occlusion by interventional radiological procedures. The Child-Pugh class was B in 2 patients and C in 2. Before the present treatment, all patients had been hospitalized at least 3 times because of recurrent HE. Partial splenic embolization was performed in all patients to decrease portal venous pressure before surgery. Surgical ligation of the patent PUV was performed under epidural anesthesia. The patent PUV was carefully skeletonized and doubly ligated. Esophageal varices were evaluated with upper gastrointestinal endoscopy before and after surgery. The mean follow-up duration was 15.8 months. After ligation, there were no clinically significant complications. Esophageal varices were unchanged. The serum ammonia level was higher before surgery (162.3 +/- 56.4 mug/dL, mean +/- SD) than after surgery (41.8 +/- 20.2 mug/dL; p=0.0299). No patient had symptoms of HE. Ligation of the patent PUV is an effective treatment for patients with refractory HE.

  7. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric Wernicke encephalopathy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuccoli, Giulio; Siddiqui, Nasir; Bailey, Ariel; Bartoletti, Stefano C.

    2010-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disease resulting from dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. WE is characterized by changes in consciousness, ocular dysfunction, and ataxia. Neuroradiologic findings usually show symmetric signal intensity alterations in the mammillary bodies, medial thalami, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area. Selective involvement of the cranial nerve nuclei, cerebellum, red nuclei, dentate nuclei, fornix, splenium, cerebral cortex, and basal ganglia characterize nonalcoholic WE patients. Furthermore, symmetric basal ganglia alterations with involvement of the putamen have only been observed in children. The incidence of WE is underestimated in both adult and pediatric patients. Interestingly, the frequency of WE in children appears to be similar to that observed in adults. The prognosis of the disease largely depends on the time from diagnosis to thiamine supplementation. The aim of this pediatric literature review is to provide an update on neuroradiologic findings in children affected by WE in an effort to determine pertinent clinical and imaging findings that can improve the detection and early identification of the disease. A thorough knowledge of the MRI findings of WE will assist in arriving at an early diagnosis, thereby reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in children. (orig.)

  8. Central-Variant Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome with Albuminocytologic Dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Woo; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2018-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a disorder of reversible vasogenic brain edema which mainly involves the parieto-occipital lobes in various clinical settings. The main mechanism is known to be cerebral autoregulation failure and endothelial dysfunction leading to the disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We report the case of a 47-year-old woman with PRES which involved the brain stem and thalami, sparing the cerebral hemispheres. She was admitted to the emergency room because of acute-onset confusion. Her initial blood pressure was 270/220 mm Hg. Routine blood lab tests showed pleocytosis, hyperglycemia, and azotemia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a lesion of vasogenic edema involving nearly the whole area of pons, the left side of the midbrain, and the bilateral medial thalami. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination revealed an increased level of protein with normal white blood cell count. With conservative care, the patient markedly recovered 3 days after symptom onset, and a follow-up MRI confirmed complete resolution of the vasogenic edema. This case suggests that PRES can rarely involve the "central zone" only, sparing the cerebral hemispheres, which may be confused with other neurological diseases. Besides, the CSF albuminocytologic dissociation may suggest the disruption of the blood-brain barrier in patients with PRES.

  9. Central-Variant Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome with Albuminocytologic Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Woo Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a disorder of reversible vasogenic brain edema which mainly involves the parieto-occipital lobes in various clinical settings. The main mechanism is known to be cerebral autoregulation failure and endothelial dysfunction leading to the disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We report the case of a 47-year-old woman with PRES which involved the brain stem and thalami, sparing the cerebral hemispheres. She was admitted to the emergency room because of acute-onset confusion. Her initial blood pressure was 270/220 mm Hg. Routine blood lab tests showed pleocytosis, hyperglycemia, and azotemia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a lesion of vasogenic edema involving nearly the whole area of pons, the left side of the midbrain, and the bilateral medial thalami. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination revealed an increased level of protein with normal white blood cell count. With conservative care, the patient markedly recovered 3 days after symptom onset, and a follow-up MRI confirmed complete resolution of the vasogenic edema. This case suggests that PRES can rarely involve the “central zone” only, sparing the cerebral hemispheres, which may be confused with other neurological diseases. Besides, the CSF albuminocytologic dissociation may suggest the disruption of the blood-brain barrier in patients with PRES.

  10. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric Wernicke encephalopathy: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuccoli, Giulio [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Siddiqui, Nasir; Bailey, Ariel; Bartoletti, Stefano C. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is an acute neurological disease resulting from dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. WE is characterized by changes in consciousness, ocular dysfunction, and ataxia. Neuroradiologic findings usually show symmetric signal intensity alterations in the mammillary bodies, medial thalami, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area. Selective involvement of the cranial nerve nuclei, cerebellum, red nuclei, dentate nuclei, fornix, splenium, cerebral cortex, and basal ganglia characterize nonalcoholic WE patients. Furthermore, symmetric basal ganglia alterations with involvement of the putamen have only been observed in children. The incidence of WE is underestimated in both adult and pediatric patients. Interestingly, the frequency of WE in children appears to be similar to that observed in adults. The prognosis of the disease largely depends on the time from diagnosis to thiamine supplementation. The aim of this pediatric literature review is to provide an update on neuroradiologic findings in children affected by WE in an effort to determine pertinent clinical and imaging findings that can improve the detection and early identification of the disease. A thorough knowledge of the MRI findings of WE will assist in arriving at an early diagnosis, thereby reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease in children. (orig.)

  11. MRI findings of Wernicke encephalopathy revisited due to hunger strike

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unlu, Ercument [Department of Radiology, Trakya University School of Medicine, Mimar Sinan m, Muammer Aksoy c, Yorulmaz apt, No 50, D-1 22030 Edirne (Turkey)]. E-mail: drercument@yahoo.com; Cakir, Bilge [Department of Radiology, Trakya University School of Medicine, Mimar Sinan m, Muammer Aksoy c, Yorulmaz apt, No 50, D-1 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Asil, Talip [Department of Neurology, Trakya University School of Medicine, Edirne (Turkey)

    2006-01-15

    Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among a group of patients who presented with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) due to the neurological complications of a long-term hunger strike (HS). Methods: MRI studies also including the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of six male patients with WE aged from 25 to 38 years (mean age 31 years) were evaluated. Results: In all subjects, T2-weighted sequences, FLAIR and DWI revealed a signal hyperintensity within the posteromedial thalami and surrounding the third ventricle. In particular, on coronal images, the hyperintense areas around the third ventricle showed a suggestive 'double wing' configuration. We observed an increased signal on proton-density and T2-weighted images in the mamillary bodies of three patients. Four patients demonstrated additional hyperintensities within the periaqueductal region and/or the tectal plate. At least one lesion area in five of six patients demonstrated contrast enhancement. Conclusion: The consistent imaging findings of our study suggest that MRI is a reliable means of diagnosing WE. Acute WE is sometimes underdiagnosed, yet early diagnosis and treatment of WE is crucial in order to avoid persistent brain damage. MRI, including postcontrast T1-weighted imaging, DWI beneath standardized T2-weighted imaging, and FLAIR sequences may prove to be a valuable adjunct to clinical diagnosis and to provide additional information in acute and/or subacute WE.

  12. [Case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome caused by Fisher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Katsunori; Ando, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Osamu

    2018-01-26

    This report presents a case of a 71-year-old woman with Fisher syndrome who had posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) before the initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment. She had symptoms of common cold 2 weeks before the onset of PRES. On the day of the onset, she began to stagger while walking. On day 2, she developed hypertension, vision impairment, and limb weakness and was admitted to the hospital. On day 3, she was provided steroid pulse therapy. On day 4, she developed convulsions and right imperfection single paralysis and was transferred to the our hospital. During the transfer, the patient was conscious. Her blood pressure was high at 198/107 mmHg. She had mild weakness in her limbs and face, light perception in both eyes, dilation of both pupils, total external ophthalmoplegia, no tendon reflexes, and limb and trunk ataxia. We diagnosed PRES because of the high signal intensities observed on T 2 -weighted MRI on both sides of the parietal and occipital lobes. We also diagnosed Fisher syndrome because of a positive anti-GQ1b immunoglobulin G antibody test and albuminocytologic dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid. PRES showed prompt improvement with antihypertensive therapy, whereas Fisher syndrome slowly improved over a course of 2 months. This case is the first report of PRES without IVIg suggesting that Fisher syndrome induces hypertension and causes PRES.

  13. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Suicide: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hal S. Wortzel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a global health concern, and the recent literature reports that a single mild TBI can result in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. It has been suggested that CTE may lead to death by suicide, raising important prevention, treatment, and policy implications. Thus, we conducted a systematic review of the medical literature to answer the key question: What is the existing evidence in support of a relationship between CTE and suicide? Systematic searches of CTE and suicide yielded 85 unique abstracts. Seven articles were identified for full text review. Only two case series met inclusion criteria and included autopsies from 17 unique cases, 5 of whom died by suicide. Neither studies used blinding, control cases, or systematic data collection regarding TBI exposure and/or medical/neuropsychiatric history. The identified CTE literature revealed divergent opinions regarding neuropathological elements of CTE and heterogeneity regarding clinical manifestations. Overall quality of evidence regarding a relationship between CTE and suicide was rated as very low using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group (GRADE criteria. Further studies of higher quality and methodological rigor are needed to determine the existence and nature of any relationship between CTE and suicide.

  14. Stem Cell Therapy for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel eGonzales-Portillo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatments for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE have been limited. The aim of this paper is to offer translational research guidance on stem cell therapy for neonatal HIE by examining clinically relevant animal models, practical stem cell sources, safety and efficacy of endpoint assays, as well as a general understanding of modes of action of this cellular therapy. In order to do so, we discuss the clinical manifestations of HIE, highlighting its overlapping pathologies with stroke providing insights on the potential of cell therapy, currently investigated in stroke, for HIE. To this end, we draw guidance from recommendations outlined in Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm for Stroke or STEPS, which have been recently modified to Baby STEPS to cater for the neonatal symptoms of HIE. These guidelines recognized that neonatal HIE exhibits distinct disease symptoms from adult stroke in need of an innovative translational approach that facilitates the entry of cell therapy in the clinic. Finally, new information about recent clinical trials, and insights into combination therapy are provided with the vision that stem cell therapy may benefit from available treatments, such as hypothermia, already being tested in children diagnosed with HIE.

  15. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Patients who Underwent Cardiovascular Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, Ana Maria; Bueno Melo, Juliana; Acosta Puentes, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (pres) is not well understood. This entity has been reported in relation to multiple clinical conditions. It has been proposed that the vertebrobasilar circulation is more sensitive to injuries sustained by the central nervous system. Consequently, the main radiologic manifestations of this condition occur in the pareto-occipital regions. As its name implies, pres has a reversible nature. Once the noxious factors are withdrawn, both the vasogenic edema in affected areas, as well as neurological symptoms tends to resolve, whereas if the situation persists the lesions may progress to parenchymal ischemia. Cerebral computed tomography (CT) in pres may show hypodense areas in the affected white matter. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is used to better characterize the abnormal regions. This modality is capable of displaying an increased signal intensity in these areas on T2-weighted FLAIR sequences that is less apparent on diffusion-weighted images. In order to confirm this diagnosis, a follow up imaging study either with CT or MR can be performed approximately four weeks after the onset of symptoms. Nevertheless, an exact consensus with respect to the follow-up period has not been reached. The supporting findings for this diagnosis include resolution of the affected white matter and clinical remission without neurological sequelae. We hereby report three proven cases of pres in patients of different age groups that had undergone major cardiovascular surgery with extracorporeal circulation, a common factor that was thought to have been the precursor to this condition in these individuals.

  16. Laser Correction of Delayed Posthypoxic Encephalopathies (Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study whether posthypoxic brain dysfunctions may be corrected by low-intensity laser irradiation an hour after hypovolemic hypotension at late postresuscitation stages (following 30 days. Material and methods. Experiments were carried out on high-anxious male albino rats weighing 280—300 g. The study model was one-hour hypovolemic hypotension (blood pressure 40 mm Hg, followed by blood reinfusion. The integrative brain function was evaluated from the indices of the rat orientative-trying behavior in the elevated cross labyrinth test. The depressive component of the rats’ behavior was examined in the forced swimming test. Plasma norepinephrine levels were measured. Laser irradiation was performed 30 days after blood reinfusion. Results. Laser irradiation used at late postresuscitation stages leads to the normalization of plasma norepinephrine levels, the reduction of anxiety in the rats, and their improved orientative-trying behavior. Conclusion. The positive impact of laser irradiation on the rat orientative-trying behavior is associated with its anxiolytic effect, in which the recovery of autonomic homeostasis plays a considerable role. Key words: blood loss, postresuscitative period, behavior, laser, posthypoxic encephalopathy, norepinephrine.

  17. Progressive necrotic encephalopathy following tacrolimus therapy for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridon, Paolo; Ragonese, Paolo; Di Benedetto, Norma; Grasso, Giovanni; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; D'Amelio, Marco; Savettieri, Giovanni

    2009-12-01

    Previously described neurologic damage induced by immunosuppressive treatments includes transient or reversible central nervous system involvement. We describe a 57-year-old man who underwent liver transplantation and was started on immunosuppressive therapy with tacrolimus (FK506). Six months later, he started complaining of a progressive motor and sensory impairment of the left side, together with cognitive impairment. Brain MRI showed an enlarging lesion of the white matter with peripheral contrast enhancement. PET study indicated severe hypometabolism in the right hemisphere and spectroscopic MRI showed a peak of choline and relative reduction of other metabolites. Findings of CSF examinations and cultures, serology, and molecular techniques were normal. Tacrolimus treatment was stopped. A cerebral biopsy of the lesion showed a sub acute necrotizing process. In the following months, cognitive status of the patient tended to improve although he remained hemiplegic, while serial MRI confirmed the tendency to the recovery of the lesion that was still present 1 year after. The present observation describes a progressive encephalopathy associated with immune suppression with an unusual feature and permanent brain damage.

  18. MRI findings of Wernicke encephalopathy revisited due to hunger strike

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, Ercument; Cakir, Bilge; Asil, Talip

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among a group of patients who presented with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) due to the neurological complications of a long-term hunger strike (HS). Methods: MRI studies also including the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of six male patients with WE aged from 25 to 38 years (mean age 31 years) were evaluated. Results: In all subjects, T2-weighted sequences, FLAIR and DWI revealed a signal hyperintensity within the posteromedial thalami and surrounding the third ventricle. In particular, on coronal images, the hyperintense areas around the third ventricle showed a suggestive 'double wing' configuration. We observed an increased signal on proton-density and T2-weighted images in the mamillary bodies of three patients. Four patients demonstrated additional hyperintensities within the periaqueductal region and/or the tectal plate. At least one lesion area in five of six patients demonstrated contrast enhancement. Conclusion: The consistent imaging findings of our study suggest that MRI is a reliable means of diagnosing WE. Acute WE is sometimes underdiagnosed, yet early diagnosis and treatment of WE is crucial in order to avoid persistent brain damage. MRI, including postcontrast T1-weighted imaging, DWI beneath standardized T2-weighted imaging, and FLAIR sequences may prove to be a valuable adjunct to clinical diagnosis and to provide additional information in acute and/or subacute WE

  19. The research of melatonin in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Bin; Feng Xing; Qian Zhihong; Shi Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the function of melatonin in the pathogenesis and the prognosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and provide the pathophysiology basis for therapying HIE with melatonin. Methods: The level of plasma melatonin of twenty normal term infants and twenty modest HIE and twenty middle-severity HIE in their acute phase and recovery phase were assayed respectively with radioimmunoassay (RIA). Then compare the difference of the melatonin level among these neonates. Results: (1) For modest HIE, the melatonin level was higher than that in the normal in the acute phase and there was no difference to the normal in the recovery phase. (2) There was no difference between the melatonin level in middle-severity HIE in the acute phase and that in the normal, but in the recovery phase it was higher than that in the normal. (3) For modest HIE, the melatonin level in acute phase was higher than that in the recovery phase, but for middle-severity HIE, it was adverse. (4) In the acute phase, the level in modest HIE was higher than that in the middle-severity HIE, but on the contrary in the recovery phase. Conclusion: Melatonin have protection action on HIE. The prognosis of modest HIE neonates with rising melatonin level in the acute phase is better than that with lower melatonin level of middle-severity HIE. (authors)

  20. Sudden onset unexplained encephalopathy in infants: think of cannabis intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Eran; Rekhtman, David; Berkun, Yackov; Wexler, Isaiah

    2016-03-01

    The use of cannabis as both a therapeutic agent and recreational drug is common, and its availability is increasing as a result of legalization in many countries. Among older children, the manifestations of cannabis intoxication are numerous and include both neurological and systemic manifestations that are frequently non-specific. There have been only a few reports detailing cannabis intoxication in infants and toddlers. We describe three infants who presented to the emergency department with encephalopathic signs without prominent systemic manifestations. During the initial interview of caregivers, no history of exposure to neurotoxic agents was obtained. All three patients were subsequently diagnosed with cannabis intoxication based on urine toxic screens for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The infants recovered with supportive care that included fluids and monitoring. The non-specific symptomatology of cannabis intoxication in infants together with the wide differential for unexplained acute onset encephalopathy may delay diagnosis and lead to inappropriate procedures and interventions such as antimicrobial treatments and imaging studies. Healthcare personnel of emergency rooms, urgent care centers, and general clinics should be aware of the potential risk of cannabis ingestion in young infants. A thorough medical history and toxic screen are warranted in all infants with unexplained decreased sensorium.