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Sample records for minimum size solutions

  1. Estimating minimum polycrystalline aggregate size for macroscopic material homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, M.; Simonovski, I.; Cizelj, L.

    2002-01-01

    During severe accidents the pressure boundary of reactor coolant system can be subjected to extreme loadings, which might cause failure. Reliable estimation of the extreme deformations can be crucial to determine the consequences of severe accidents. Important drawback of classical continuum mechanics is idealization of inhomogenous microstructure of materials. Classical continuum mechanics therefore cannot predict accurately the differences between measured responses of specimens, which are different in size but geometrical similar (size effect). A numerical approach, which models elastic-plastic behavior on mesoscopic level, is proposed to estimate minimum size of polycrystalline aggregate above which it can be considered macroscopically homogeneous. The main idea is to divide continuum into a set of sub-continua. Analysis of macroscopic element is divided into modeling the random grain structure (using Voronoi tessellation and random orientation of crystal lattice) and calculation of strain/stress field. Finite element method is used to obtain numerical solutions of strain and stress fields. The analysis is limited to 2D models.(author)

  2. LDPC Codes with Minimum Distance Proportional to Block Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Jones, Christopher; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes characterized by minimum Hamming distances proportional to block sizes have been demonstrated. Like the codes mentioned in the immediately preceding article, the present codes are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. The previously mentioned codes have low decoding thresholds and reasonably low error floors. However, the minimum Hamming distances of those codes do not grow linearly with code-block sizes. Codes that have this minimum-distance property exhibit very low error floors. Examples of such codes include regular LDPC codes with variable degrees of at least 3. Unfortunately, the decoding thresholds of regular LDPC codes are high. Hence, there is a need for LDPC codes characterized by both low decoding thresholds and, in order to obtain acceptably low error floors, minimum Hamming distances that are proportional to code-block sizes. The present codes were developed to satisfy this need. The minimum Hamming distances of the present codes have been shown, through consideration of ensemble-average weight enumerators, to be proportional to code block sizes. As in the cases of irregular ensembles, the properties of these codes are sensitive to the proportion of degree-2 variable nodes. A code having too few such nodes tends to have an iterative decoding threshold that is far from the capacity threshold. A code having too many such nodes tends not to exhibit a minimum distance that is proportional to block size. Results of computational simulations have shown that the decoding thresholds of codes of the present type are lower than those of regular LDPC codes. Included in the simulations were a few examples from a family of codes characterized by rates ranging from low to high and by thresholds that adhere closely to their respective channel capacity thresholds; the simulation results from these examples showed that the codes in question have low

  3. A minimum-size tokamak concept for conditions near ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1983-01-01

    Based on a combination of Alcator scaling and a recent theory on the Murakami density limit, a minimum-size tokamak concept (Minitor) is proposed. Even if this concept does not aim at alpha particle containment, it has the important goal of reaching plasma core temperatures and Lawson parameter values required for ignition, by ohmic heating alone and under macroscopically stable conditions. The minimized size, and the associated enhancement of the plasma current density, are found to favour high plasma temperatues, average densities, and beta values. The goal of this concept appears to be realizable by relatively modest technical means. (author)

  4. Transverse micro-erosion meter measurements; determining minimum sample size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenhaile, Alan S.; Lakhan, V. Chris

    2011-11-01

    Two transverse micro-erosion meter (TMEM) stations were installed in each of four rock slabs, a slate/shale, basalt, phyllite/schist, and sandstone. One station was sprayed each day with fresh water and the other with a synthetic sea water solution (salt water). To record changes in surface elevation (usually downwearing but with some swelling), 100 measurements (the pilot survey), the maximum for the TMEM used in this study, were made at each station in February 2010, and then at two-monthly intervals until February 2011. The data were normalized using Box-Cox transformations and analyzed to determine the minimum number of measurements needed to obtain station means that fall within a range of confidence limits of the population means, and the means of the pilot survey. The effect on the confidence limits of reducing an already small number of measurements (say 15 or less) is much greater than that of reducing a much larger number of measurements (say more than 50) by the same amount. There was a tendency for the number of measurements, for the same confidence limits, to increase with the rate of downwearing, although it was also dependent on whether the surface was treated with fresh or salt water. About 10 measurements often provided fairly reasonable estimates of rates of surface change but with fairly high percentage confidence intervals in slowly eroding rocks; however, many more measurements were generally needed to derive means within 10% of the population means. The results were tabulated and graphed to provide an indication of the approximate number of measurements required for given confidence limits, and the confidence limits that might be attained for a given number of measurements.

  5. Distribution of droplet sizes for seed solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwah, R.K.; Dixit, N.S.; Venkataramani, N.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    In open cycle MHD power generation, power is generated by passing seeded hot combustion products of a fossil fuel through a magnetic field. Seeding is done with a salt which is readily ionizable, preferably in the form of an aqueous solution, such as potassium carbonate, potassium sulphate, etc. Methods of atomization and the theoretical drop size calculations are presented. Basic parameters necessary for droplet size determination and their measurement are also described. (K.B.)

  6. On the sizes of expander graphs and minimum distances of graph codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Justesen, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    We give lower bounds for the minimum distances of graph codes based on expander graphs. The bounds depend only on the second eigenvalue of the graph and the parameters of the component codes. We also give an upper bound on the size of a degree regular graph with given second eigenvalue....

  7. Minimum Lens Size Supporting the Leaky-Wave Nature of Slit Dipole Antenna at Terahertz Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niamat Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We designed a slit dipole antenna backed by an extended hemispherical silicon lens and investigated the minimum lens size in which the slit dipole antenna works as a leaky-wave antenna. The slit dipole antenna consists of a planar feeding structure, which is a center-fed and open-ended slot line. A slit dipole antenna backed by an extended hemispherical silicon lens is investigated over a frequency range from 0.2 to 0.4 THz with the center frequency at 0.3 THz. The numerical results show that the antenna gain responses exhibited an increased level of sensitivity to the lens size and increased linearly with increasing lens radius. The lens with the radius of 1.2λo is found to be the best possible minimum lens size for a slit dipole antenna on an extended hemispherical silicon lens.

  8. The Minimum Binding Energy and Size of Doubly Muonic D3 Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, M. R.; Faghihi, F.; Mahdavi, M.

    The minimum energy and size of doubly muonic D3 molecule, which two of the electrons are replaced by the much heavier muons, are calculated by the well-known variational method. The calculations show that the system possesses two minimum positions, one at typically muonic distance and the second at the atomic distance. It is shown that at the muonic distance, the effective charge, zeff is 2.9. We assumed a symmetric planar vibrational model between two minima and an oscillation potential energy is approximated in this region.

  9. Minimum bar size for flexure testing of irradiated SiC/SiC composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    This report covers material presented at the IEA/Jupiter Joint International Workshop on SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion structural Applications held in conjunction with ICFRM-8, Sendai, Japan, Oct. 23-24, 1997. The minimum bar size for 4-point flexure testing of SiC/SiC composite recommended by PNNL for irradiation effects studies is 30 x 6 x 2 mm 3 with a span-to-depth ratio of 10/1

  10. Solution for Nonlinear Three-Dimensional Intercept Problem with Minimum Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henzeh Leeghim

    2013-01-01

    a minimum-energy application, which then generates both the desired initial interceptor velocity and the TOF for the minimum-energy transfer. The optimization problem is formulated by using the classical Lagrangian f and g coefficients, which map initial position and velocity vectors to future times, and a universal time variable x. A Newton-Raphson iteration algorithm is introduced for iteratively solving the problem. A generalized problem formulation is introduced for minimizing the TOF as part of the optimization problem. Several examples are presented, and the results are compared with the Hohmann transfer solution approaches. The resulting minimum-energy intercept solution algorithm is expected to be broadly useful as a starting iterative for applications spanning: targeting, rendezvous, interplanetary trajectory design, and so on.

  11. Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated picoplankton in a marine oxygen minimum zone

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesh, Sangita; Parris, Darren J; DeLong, Edward F; Stewart, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) support diverse microbial communities with roles in major elemental cycles. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used amplicon (16S rRNA gene) and shotgun metagenome sequencing to compare microbial communities from large (>1.6 μm) and small (0.2–1.6 μm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox ...

  12. Protograph based LDPC codes with minimum distance linearly growing with block size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Jones, Christopher; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    We propose several LDPC code constructions that simultaneously achieve good threshold and error floor performance. Minimum distance is shown to grow linearly with block size (similar to regular codes of variable degree at least 3) by considering ensemble average weight enumerators. Our constructions are based on projected graph, or protograph, structures that support high-speed decoder implementations. As with irregular ensembles, our constructions are sensitive to the proportion of degree-2 variable nodes. A code with too few such nodes tends to have an iterative decoding threshold that is far from the capacity threshold. A code with too many such nodes tends to not exhibit a minimum distance that grows linearly in block length. In this paper we also show that precoding can be used to lower the threshold of regular LDPC codes. The decoding thresholds of the proposed codes, which have linearly increasing minimum distance in block size, outperform that of regular LDPC codes. Furthermore, a family of low to high rate codes, with thresholds that adhere closely to their respective channel capacity thresholds, is presented. Simulation results for a few example codes show that the proposed codes have low error floors as well as good threshold SNFt performance.

  13. Solution of the problem of the identified minimum for the tri-variate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tified minimum is considered below has zero means, and distinct variances. The solution ... and a non-singular covariance matrix , where ij = ρij σi σj for i ...... (i) through (iv) above, we can use (4.29) to identify a2. 21. , a2. 31. , a2. 12. , a2. 32 uniquely. Now we consider (4.28). In this case, there are two possibilities: (A2. 1, B2.

  14. A minimum wage solution to halving world poverty by 2015: A stakeholder approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Ashta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The UNDP has set Millennium Goals which include the halving of world poverty by 2015. This was translated into reducing by half the number of people living in abject poverty. We examine some existing poverty reduction solutions which are being experimented with, including aid (with central planning with participatory development, property rights, education, microfinance, bottom of the pyramid inclusion, and public sector employment, and find that these have been inadequate to the task, even conjointly. We add a minimum wage based solution.

  15. The Novel Attempt for Finding Minimum Solution in Fuzzy Neutrosophic Relational Geometric Programming (FNRGP with (max,min Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda E. Khalid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article sheds light on the possibility of finding the minimum solution set of neutrosophic relational geometric programming with (max, min composition. This work examines the privacy enjoyed by both neutrosophic logic and geometric programming, and how it affects the minimum solutions.

  16. Prediction of minimum UO2 particle size based on thermal stress initiated fracture model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.

    1976-08-01

    An analytic study was employed to determine the minimum UO 2 particle size that could survive fragmentation induced by thermal stresses in a UO 2 -Na Fuel Coolant Interaction (FCI). A brittle fracture mechanics approach was the basis of the study whereby stress intensity factors K/sub I/ were compared to the fracture toughness K/sub IC/ to determine if the particle could fracture. Solid and liquid UO 2 droplets were considered each with two possible interface contact conditions; perfect wetting by the sodium or a finite heat transfer coefficient. The analysis indicated that particles below the range of 50 microns in radius could survive a UO 2 -Na fuel coolant interaction under the most severe temperature conditions without thermal stress fragmentation. Environmental conditions of the fuel-coolant interaction were varied to determine the effects upon K/sub I/ and possible fragmentation. The underlying assumptions of the analysis were investigated in light of the analytic results. It was concluded that the analytic study seemed to verify the experimental observations as to the range of the minimum particle size due to thermal stress fragmentation by FCI. However the method used when the results are viewed in light of the basic assumptions indicates that the analysis is crude at best, and can be viewed as only a rough order of magnitude analysis. The basic complexities in fracture mechanics make further investigation in this area interesting but not necessarily fruitful for the immediate future

  17. Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated picoplankton in a marine oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Sangita; Parris, Darren J; DeLong, Edward F; Stewart, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) support diverse microbial communities with roles in major elemental cycles. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used amplicon (16S rRNA gene) and shotgun metagenome sequencing to compare microbial communities from large (>1.6 μm) and small (0.2-1.6 μm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community composition compared to depth. Phylogenetic diversity showed contrasting patterns, decreasing towards the anoxic OMZ core in the small size fraction, but exhibiting maximal values at these depths within the larger size fraction. Fraction-specific distributions were evident for key OMZ taxa, including anammox planctomycetes, whose coding sequences were enriched up to threefold in the 0.2-1.6 μm community. Functional gene composition also differed between fractions, with the >1.6 μm community significantly enriched in genes mediating social interactions, including motility, adhesion, cell-to-cell transfer, antibiotic resistance and mobile element activity. Prokaryotic transposase genes were three to six fold more abundant in this fraction, comprising up to 2% of protein-coding sequences, suggesting that particle surfaces may act as hotbeds for transposition-based genome changes in marine microbes. Genes for nitric and nitrous oxide reduction were also more abundant (three to seven fold) in the larger size fraction, suggesting microniche partitioning of key denitrification steps. These results highlight an important role for surface attachment in shaping community metabolic potential and genome content in OMZ microorganisms.

  18. Biomass size-spectra of macrobenthic communities in the oxygen minimum zone off Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Eduardo; Quiñones, Renato; Palma, Maritza; Sellanes, Javier; Gallardo, Víctor A.; Gerdes, Dieter; Rowe, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of macrofaunal secondary production and normalized biomass size-spectra (NBSS) were constructed for macrobenthic communities associated with the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in four areas of the continental margin off Chile. The presence of low oxygen conditions in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) off Chile was shown to have important effects on the size structure and secondary production of the benthic communities living in this ecosystem. The distribution of normalized biomass by size was linear (log 2-log 2 scale) at all stations. The slope of the NBSS ranged from -0.481 to -0.908. There were significant differences between the slopes of the NBS-spectra from the stations located in the OMZ (slope = -0.837) and those located outside the OMZ (slope = -0.463) ( p oxygen conditions (Chile (6.8 g C m -2 y -1) than off northern Chile (2.02 g C m -2 y -1) and off southern Chile (0.83 g C m -2 y -1). A comparison with other studies suggests that secondary production in terms of carbon equivalents was higher than in other upwelling regions.

  19. Passive Rocket Diffuser Theory: A Re-Examination of Minimum Second Throat Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Second-throat diffusers serve to isolate rocket engines from the effects of ambient back pressure during testing without using active control systems. Among the most critical design parameters is the relative area of the diffuser throat to that of the nozzle throat. A smaller second throat is generally desirable because it decreases the stagnation-to-ambient pressure ratio the diffuser requires for nominal operation. There is a limit, however. Below a certain size, the second throat can cause pressure buildup within the diffuser and prevent it from reaching the start condition that protects the nozzle from side-load damage. This paper presents a method for improved estimation of the minimum second throat area which enables diffuser start. The new 3-zone model uses traditional quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow theory to approximate the structure of two distinct diffuser flow fields observed in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and combines them to provide a less-conservative estimate of the second throat size limit. It is unique among second throat sizing methods in that it accounts for all major conical nozzle and second throat diffuser design parameters within its limits of application. The performance of the 3-zone method is compared to the historical normal shock and force balance methods, and verified against a large number of CFD simulations at specific heat ratios of 1.4 and 1.25. Validation is left as future work, and the model is currently intended to function only as a first-order design tool.

  20. Fault Estimation for Fuzzy Delay Systems: A Minimum Norm Least Squares Solution Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Juan; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2017-09-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the problem of fault estimation for a class of Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with state delays. A minimum norm least squares solution (MNLSS) approach is first introduced to establish a fault estimation compensator, which is able to optimize the fault estimator. Compared with most of the existing fault estimation methods, the MNLSS-based fault estimation method can effectively decrease the effect of state errors on the accuracy of fault estimation. Finally, three examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and merits of the proposed method.

  1. Minimum long-term cost solution for remote telecommunication stations on the basis of photovoltaic-based hybrid power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldellis, J.K.; Ninou, I.; Zafirakis, D.

    2011-01-01

    In the case of the telecommunication (T/C) services' expansion to rural and remote areas, the market generally responds with the minimum investments required. Considering the existing situation, cost-effective operation of the T/C infrastructure installed in these regions (i.e. remote T/C stations) becomes critical. However, since in most cases grid-connection is not feasible, the up-to-now electrification solution for remote T/C stations is based on the operation of costly, oil consuming and heavy polluting diesel engines. Instead, the use of photovoltaic (PV)-based hybrid power stations is currently examined, using as a case study a representative remote T/C station of the Greek territory. In this context, the present study is concentrated on the detailed cost-benefit analysis of the proposed solution. More precisely, the main part of the analysis is devoted to develop a complete electricity production cost model, accordingly applied for numerous oil consumption and service period scenarios. Note that in all cases examined, zero load rejections is a prerequisite while minimum long-term cost solutions designated are favorably compared with the diesel-only solution. Finally, a sensitivity analysis, demonstrating the impact of the main economic parameters on the energy production cost of optimum sized PV-diesel hybrid power stations, is also provided. - Research highlights: → Expansion of telecommunication (T/C) in remote areas is vital for their development. → Off-grid T/C stations employed in such areas operate on diesel engines. → The use of PV-diesel-battery hybrid power stations is currently examined. → A detailed long-term electricity production cost model is developed. → Cost-effectiveness of the proposed system is reflected for numerous configurations.

  2. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R 2   >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented. (paper)

  3. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  4. Development of Gis Tool for the Solution of Minimum Spanning Tree Problem using Prim's Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S.; Patra, D.; Shankar, H.; Alok Verma, P.

    2014-11-01

    minimum spanning tree (MST) of a connected, undirected and weighted network is a tree of that network consisting of all its nodes and the sum of weights of all its edges is minimum among all such possible spanning trees of the same network. In this study, we have developed a new GIS tool using most commonly known rudimentary algorithm called Prim's algorithm to construct the minimum spanning tree of a connected, undirected and weighted road network. This algorithm is based on the weight (adjacency) matrix of a weighted network and helps to solve complex network MST problem easily, efficiently and effectively. The selection of the appropriate algorithm is very essential otherwise it will be very hard to get an optimal result. In case of Road Transportation Network, it is very essential to find the optimal results by considering all the necessary points based on cost factor (time or distance). This paper is based on solving the Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) problem of a road network by finding it's minimum span by considering all the important network junction point. GIS technology is usually used to solve the network related problems like the optimal path problem, travelling salesman problem, vehicle routing problems, location-allocation problems etc. Therefore, in this study we have developed a customized GIS tool using Python script in ArcGIS software for the solution of MST problem for a Road Transportation Network of Dehradun city by considering distance and time as the impedance (cost) factors. It has a number of advantages like the users do not need a greater knowledge of the subject as the tool is user-friendly and that allows to access information varied and adapted the needs of the users. This GIS tool for MST can be applied for a nationwide plan called Prime Minister Gram Sadak Yojana in India to provide optimal all weather road connectivity to unconnected villages (points). This tool is also useful for constructing highways or railways spanning several

  5. What is the optimum minimum segment size used in step and shoot IMRT for prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Sumida, Iori; Koizumi, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    Although the use of small segments in step and shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) provides better dose distribution, extremely small segments decrease treatment accuracy. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum minimum segment size (MSS) in two-step optimization in prostate step and shoot IMRT with regard to both planning quality and dosimetric accuracy. The XiO treatment planning system and Oncor Impression Plus were used. Results showed that the difference in homogeneity index (HI), defined as the ratio of maximum to minimum doses for planning target volume, between the MSS 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm plans, and 2.0 cm plans, was 0.1%, and 9.6%, respectively. With regard to V107 of planning target volume (PTV), the volume receiving 107% of the prescribed dose of the PTV, the difference between MSS 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm was 2%. However, the value of the MSS 2.0 cm or greater plans was more than 2.5-fold that of the MSS 1.0 cm plan. With regard to maximum rectal dose, a significant difference was seen between the MSS 1.5 cm and 2.0 cm plans, whereas no significant difference was seen between the MSS 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm plans. Composite plan verification revealed a greater than 5% dose difference between planned and measured dose in many regions with the MSS 1.0 cm plan, but in only limited regions in the MSS 1.5 cm plan. Our data suggest that the MSS should be determined with regard to both planning quality and dosimetric accuracy. (author)

  6. Investigation on Minimum Film Boiling Point of Highly Heated Vertical Metal Rod in Aqueous Surfactant Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chi Young; Kim, Jae Han [Pukyong Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    In this study, experiments were conducted on the MFB(minimum film boiling) point of highly heated vertical metal rod quenched in aqueous surfactant solution at various temperature conditions. The aqueous Triton X-100 solution(100 wppm) and pure water were used as the liquid pool. Their temperatures ranged from 77 °C to 100 °C. A stainless steel vertical rod of initial center temperature of 500 °C was used as a test specimen. In both liquid pools, as the liquid temperature decreased, the time to reach the MFB point decreased with a parallel increase in the temperature and heat flux of the MFB point. However, over the whole present temperature range, in the aqueous Triton X-100 solution, the time to reach the MFB point was longer, while the temperature and heat flux of the MFB point were reduced when compared with pure water. Based on the present experimental data, this study proposed the empirical correlations to predict the MFB temperature of a high temperature vertical metal rod in pure water and in aqueous Triton X-100 solution.

  7. Minimum cost solution of wind–photovoltaic based stand-alone power systems for remote consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldellis, J.K.; Zafirakis, D.; Kavadias, K.

    2012-01-01

    Renewable energy sources (RES) based stand-alone systems employing either wind or solar power and energy storage comprise a reliable energy alternative, on top of conventional diesel-electric generator sets, commonly used by remote consumers. However, such systems usually imply the need for oversizing and considerable energy storage requirements leading to relatively high costs. On the other hand, hybrid configurations that may exploit both wind and solar potential of a given area may considerably reduce energy storage capacity and improve the economic performance of the system. In this context, an integrated techno-economic methodology for the evaluation of hybrid wind–photovoltaic stand-alone power systems is currently developed, aiming at the designation of optimum configurations for a typical remote consumer, using economic performance criteria. For the problem investigation, the developed evaluation model is applied to four representative areas of the Greek territory with different wind potential characteristics in order to obtain optimum configurations on the basis of minimum initial investment, 10-year and 20-year total cost. According to the results obtained, the proposed solution is favorably compared with all other stand-alone energy alternatives, reflecting the ability of hybrid systems to adjust even in areas where the local RES potential is not necessarily of high quality. - Highlights: ► Wind- and PV-stand alone systems often imply use of extreme battery capacity. ► Hybrid wind–PV systems may reduce energy storage requirements and associated costs. ► An optimization methodology is developed, based on economic performance criteria. ► Methodology is applied to four Greek regions of different wind potential. ► Results obtained reflect the hybrid solution's advantages over other alternatives.

  8. Minimum size limits for yellow perch (Perca flavescens) in western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Wilbur L.; Nepszy, Stephen J.; Scholl, Russell L.

    1980-01-01

    During the 1960's yellow perch (Perca flavescens) of Lake Erie supported a commercial fishery that produced an average annual catch of 23 million pounds, as well as a modest sport fishery. Since 1969, the resource has seriously deteriorated. Commercial landings amounted to only 6 million pounds in 1976, and included proportionally more immature perch than in the 1960's. Moreover, no strong year classes were produced between 1965 and 1975. An interagency technical committee was appointed in 1975 by the Lake Erie Committee of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission to develop an interim management strategy that would provide for greater protection of perch in western Lake Erie, where declines have been the most severe. The committee first determined the age structure, growth and mortality rates, maturation schedule, and length-fecundity relationship for the population, and then applied Ricker-type equilibrium yield models to determine the effects of various minimum length limits on yield, production, average stock weight, potential egg deposition, and the Abrosov spawning frequency indicator (average number of spawning opportunities per female). The committee recommended increasing the minimum length limit of 5.0 inches to at least 8.5 inches. Theoretically, this change would increase the average stock weight by 36% and potential egg deposition by 44%, without significantly decreasing yield. Abrosov's spawning frequency indicator would rise from the existing 0.6 to about 1.2.

  9. Determination of minimum sample size for fault diagnosis of automobile hydraulic brake system using power analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Indira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic brake in automobile engineering is considered to be one of the important components. Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of such a component is very essential for safety of passengers, vehicles and to minimize the unexpected maintenance time. Vibration based machine learning approach for condition monitoring of hydraulic brake system is gaining momentum. Training and testing the classifier are two important activities in the process of feature classification. This study proposes a systematic statistical method called power analysis to find the minimum number of samples required to train the classifier with statistical stability so as to get good classification accuracy. Descriptive statistical features have been used and the more contributing features have been selected by using C4.5 decision tree algorithm. The results of power analysis have also been verified using a decision tree algorithm namely, C4.5.

  10. Size dependent compressibility of nano-ceria: Minimum near 33 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Song, Junhua; Chan, Siu-Wai; Walker, David; Clark, Simon M.; Kalkan, Bora

    2015-01-01

    We report the crystallite-size-dependency of the compressibility of nanoceria under hydrostatic pressure for a wide variety of crystallite diameters and comment on the size-based trends indicating an extremum near 33 nm. Uniform nano-crystals of ceria were synthesized by basic precipitation from cerium (III) nitrate. Size-control was achieved by adjusting mixing time and, for larger particles, a subsequent annealing temperature. The nano-crystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and standard ambient x-ray diffraction (XRD). Compressibility, or its reciprocal, bulk modulus, was measured with high-pressure XRD at LBL-ALS, using helium, neon, or argon as the pressure-transmitting medium for all samples. As crystallite size decreased below 100 nm, the bulk modulus first increased, and then decreased, achieving a maximum near a crystallite diameter of 33 nm. We review earlier work and examine several possible explanations for the peaking of bulk modulus at an intermediate crystallite size

  11. Size dependent compressibility of nano-ceria: Minimum near 33 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbough, Philip P. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Chemistry Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Song, Junhua; Chan, Siu-Wai, E-mail: sc174@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Walker, David [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, New York 10964 (United States); Clark, Simon M. [ARC Center of Excellence for Core to Crust Fluid Systems and Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2019, Australia and The Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee DC, New South Wales 2232 (Australia); Kalkan, Bora [Department of Physics Engineering, Hacettepe University, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-04-20

    We report the crystallite-size-dependency of the compressibility of nanoceria under hydrostatic pressure for a wide variety of crystallite diameters and comment on the size-based trends indicating an extremum near 33 nm. Uniform nano-crystals of ceria were synthesized by basic precipitation from cerium (III) nitrate. Size-control was achieved by adjusting mixing time and, for larger particles, a subsequent annealing temperature. The nano-crystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and standard ambient x-ray diffraction (XRD). Compressibility, or its reciprocal, bulk modulus, was measured with high-pressure XRD at LBL-ALS, using helium, neon, or argon as the pressure-transmitting medium for all samples. As crystallite size decreased below 100 nm, the bulk modulus first increased, and then decreased, achieving a maximum near a crystallite diameter of 33 nm. We review earlier work and examine several possible explanations for the peaking of bulk modulus at an intermediate crystallite size.

  12. Buffer Sizing in Wireless Networks: Challenges, Solutions, and Opportunities

    KAUST Repository

    Showail, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Buffer sizing is an important network configuration parameter that impacts the Quality of Service (QoS) characteristics of data traffic. With falling memory costs and the fallacy that \\'more is better\\', network devices are being overprovisioned with large bu ers. This may increase queueing delays experienced by a packet and subsequently impact stability of core protocols such as TCP. The problem has been studied extensively for wired networks. However, there is little work addressing the unique challenges of wireless environment such as time-varying channel capacity, variable packet inter-service time, and packet aggregation, among others. In this paper we discuss these challenges, classify the current state-of-the-art solutions, discuss their limitations, and provide directions for future research in the area.

  13. Finding the Energy Efficient Curve: Gate Sizing for Minimum Power under Delay Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoni Aizik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A design scenario examined in this paper assumes that a circuit has been designed initially for high speed, and it is redesigned for low power by downsizing of the gates. In recent years, as power consumption has become a dominant issue, new optimizations of circuits are required for saving energy. This is done by trading off some speed in exchange for reduced power. For each feasible speed, an optimization problem is solved in this paper, finding new sizes for the gates such that the circuit satisfies the speed goal while dissipating minimal power. Energy/delay gain (EDG is defined as a metric to quantify the most efficient tradeoff. The EDG of the circuit is evaluated for a range of reduced circuit speeds, and the power-optimal gate sizes are compared with the initial sizes. Most of the energy savings occur at the final stages of the circuits, while the largest relative downsizing occurs in middle stages. Typical tapering factors for power efficient circuits are larger than those for speed-optimal circuits. Signal activity and signal probability affect the optimal gate sizes in the combined optimization of speed and power.

  14. Impact of minimum catch size on the population viability of Strombus gigas (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae) in Quintana Roo, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Joanne R; Mandujano, María del Carmen

    2014-12-01

    The queen conch Strombus gigas represents one of the most important fishery resources of the Caribbean but heavy fishing pressure has led to the depletion of stocks throughout the region, causing the inclusion of this species into CITES Appendix II and IUCN's Red-List. In Mexico, the queen conch is managed through a minimum fishing size of 200 mm shell length and a fishing quota which usually represents 50% of the adult biomass. The objectives of this study were to determine the intrinsic population growth rate of the queen conch population of Xel-Ha, Quintana Roo, Mexico, and to assess the effects of a regulated fishing impact, simulating the extraction of 50% adult biomass on the population density. We used three different minimum size criteria to demonstrate the effects of minimum catch size on the population density and discuss biological implications. Demographic data was obtained through capture-mark-recapture sampling, collecting all animals encountered during three hours, by three divers, at four different sampling sites of the Xel-Ha inlet. The conch population was sampled each month between 2005 and 2006, and bimonthly between 2006 and 2011, tagging a total of 8,292 animals. Shell length and lip thickness were determined for each individual. The average shell length for conch with formed lip in Xel-Ha was 209.39 ± 14.18 mm and the median 210 mm. Half of the sampled conch with lip ranged between 200 mm and 219 mm shell length. Assuming that the presence of the lip is an indicator for sexual maturity, it can be concluded that many animals may form their lip at greater shell lengths than 200 mm and ought to be considered immature. Estimation of relative adult abundance and densities varied greatly depending on the criteria employed for adult classification. When using a minimum fishing size of 200 mm shell length, between 26.2% and up to 54.8% of the population qualified as adults, which represented a simulated fishing impact of almost one third of the

  15. Hedge math: Theoretical limits on minimum stockpile size across nuclear hedging strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, Jarret Marshall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Roesler, Alexander W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    In June 2013, the Department of Defense published a congressionally mandated, unclassified update on the U.S. Nuclear Employment Strategy. Among the many updates in this document are three key ground rules for guiding the sizing of the non-deployed U.S. nuclear stockpile. Furthermore, these ground rules form an important and objective set of criteria against which potential future stockpile hedging strategies can be evaluated.

  16. Resolving the 180-degree ambiguity in vector magnetic field measurements: The 'minimum' energy solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    I present a robust algorithm that resolves the 180-deg ambiguity in measurements of the solar vector magnetic field. The technique simultaneously minimizes both the divergence of the magnetic field and the electric current density using a simulated annealing algorithm. This results in the field orientation with approximately minimum free energy. The technique is well-founded physically and is simple to implement.

  17. Spatial, socio-economic, and ecological implications of incorporating minimum size constraints in marine protected area network design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Kristian; Vaughan, Gregory; Vaz, Sandrine; Smith, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are the cornerstone of most marine conservation strategies, but the effectiveness of each one partly depends on its size and distance to other MPAs in a network. Despite this, current recommendations on ideal MPA size and spacing vary widely, and data are lacking on how these constraints might influence the overall spatial characteristics, socio-economic impacts, and connectivity of the resultant MPA networks. To address this problem, we tested the impact of applying different MPA size constraints in English waters. We used the Marxan spatial prioritization software to identify a network of MPAs that met conservation feature targets, whilst minimizing impacts on fisheries; modified the Marxan outputs with the MinPatch software to ensure each MPA met a minimum size; and used existing data on the dispersal distances of a range of species found in English waters to investigate the likely impacts of such spatial constraints on the region's biodiversity. Increasing MPA size had little effect on total network area or the location of priority areas, but as MPA size increased, fishing opportunity cost to stakeholders increased. In addition, as MPA size increased, the number of closely connected sets of MPAs in networks and the average distance between neighboring MPAs decreased, which consequently increased the proportion of the planning region that was isolated from all MPAs. These results suggest networks containing large MPAs would be more viable for the majority of the region's species that have small dispersal distances, but dispersal between MPA sets and spill-over of individuals into unprotected areas would be reduced. These findings highlight the importance of testing the impact of applying different MPA size constraints because there are clear trade-offs that result from the interaction of size, number, and distribution of MPAs in a network. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. SU-F-T-574: MLC Based SRS Beam Commissioning - Minimum Target Size Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakikhani, R [Florida Cancer Specialists - Largo, Largo, FL (United States); Able, C [Florida Cancer Specialists - New Port Richey, New Port Richey, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a MLC accelerator based SRS program using small fields down to 1 cm × 1 cm and to determine the smallest target size safe for clinical treatment. Methods: Computerized beam scanning was performed in water using a diode detector and a linac-head attached transmission ion chamber to characterize the small field dosimetric aspects of a 6 MV photon beam (Trilogy-Varian Medical Systems, Inc.). The output factors, PDD and profiles of field sizes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 10 cm{sup 2} were measured and utilized to create a new treatment planning system (TPS) model (AAA ver 11021). Static MLC SRS treatment plans were created and delivered to a homogeneous phantom (Cube 20, CIRS, Inc.) for a 1.0 cm and 1.5 cm “PTV” target. A 12 field DMLC plan was created for a 2.1 cm target. Radiochromic film (EBT3, Ashland Inc.) was used to measure the planar dose in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes. A micro ion chamber (0.007 cc) was used to measure the dose at isocenter for each treatment delivery. Results: The new TPS model was validated by using a tolerance criteria of 2% dose and 2 mm distance to agreement. For fields ≤ 3 cm{sup 2}, the max PDD, Profile and OF difference was 0.9%, 2%/2mm and 1.4% respectively. The measured radiochromic film planar dose distributions had gamma scores of 95.3% or higher using a 3%/2mm criteria. Ion chamber measurements for all 3 test plans effectively met our goal of delivering the dose accurately to within 5% when compared to the expected dose reported by the TPS (1 cm plan Δ= −5.2%, 1.5 cm plan Δ= −2.0%, 2 cm plan Δ= 1.5%). Conclusion: End to end testing confirmed that MLC defined SRS for target sizes ≥ 1.0 cm can be safely planned and delivered.

  19. Estimating the size of the solution space of metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulet Roberto

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular metabolism is one of the most investigated system of biological interactions. While the topological nature of individual reactions and pathways in the network is quite well understood there is still a lack of comprehension regarding the global functional behavior of the system. In the last few years flux-balance analysis (FBA has been the most successful and widely used technique for studying metabolism at system level. This method strongly relies on the hypothesis that the organism maximizes an objective function. However only under very specific biological conditions (e.g. maximization of biomass for E. coli in reach nutrient medium the cell seems to obey such optimization law. A more refined analysis not assuming extremization remains an elusive task for large metabolic systems due to algorithmic limitations. Results In this work we propose a novel algorithmic strategy that provides an efficient characterization of the whole set of stable fluxes compatible with the metabolic constraints. Using a technique derived from the fields of statistical physics and information theory we designed a message-passing algorithm to estimate the size of the affine space containing all possible steady-state flux distributions of metabolic networks. The algorithm, based on the well known Bethe approximation, can be used to approximately compute the volume of a non full-dimensional convex polytope in high dimensions. We first compare the accuracy of the predictions with an exact algorithm on small random metabolic networks. We also verify that the predictions of the algorithm match closely those of Monte Carlo based methods in the case of the Red Blood Cell metabolic network. Then we test the effect of gene knock-outs on the size of the solution space in the case of E. coli central metabolism. Finally we analyze the statistical properties of the average fluxes of the reactions in the E. coli metabolic network. Conclusion We propose a

  20. Point Counts of Birds in Bottomland Hardwood Forests of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley: Duration, Minimum Sample Size, and Points Versus Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston Paul Smith; Daniel J. Twedt; David A. Wiedenfeld; Paul B. Hamel; Robert P. Ford; Robert J. Cooper

    1993-01-01

    To compare efficacy of point count sampling in bottomland hardwood forests, duration of point count, number of point counts, number of visits to each point during a breeding season, and minimum sample size are examined.

  1. Control of minimum member size in parameter-free structural shape optimization by a medial axis approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Oliver; Steinmann, Paul

    2017-09-01

    We introduce a manufacturing constraint for controlling the minimum member size in structural shape optimization problems, which is for example of interest for components fabricated in a molding process. In a parameter-free approach, whereby the coordinates of the FE boundary nodes are used as design variables, the challenging task is to find a generally valid definition for the thickness of non-parametric geometries in terms of their boundary nodes. Therefore we use the medial axis, which is the union of all points with at least two closest points on the boundary of the domain. Since the effort for the exact computation of the medial axis of geometries given by their FE discretization highly increases with the number of surface elements we use the distance function instead to approximate the medial axis by a cloud of points. The approximation is demonstrated on three 2D examples. Moreover, the formulation of a minimum thickness constraint is applied to a sensitivity-based shape optimization problem of one 2D and one 3D model.

  2. Solute-solvent cavity and bridge functions. I. Varying size of the solute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyalov, I.; Chuev, G.; Georgi, N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present the results of the extensive molecular simulations of solute-solvent cavity and bridge functions. The mixtures of Lennard-Jones solvent with Lennard-Jones solute at infinite dilution are considered for different solute-solvent size ratios—up to 4:1. The Percus-Yevick and hypernetted chain closures deviate substantially from simulation results in the investigated temperature and density ranges. We also find that the behavior of the indirect and cavity correlation functions is non-monotonous within the hard-core region, but the latter can be successfully approximated by mean-field theory if the solute-solvent interaction energy is divided into repulsive and attractive contribution, according to Weeks-Chandler-Andersen theory. Furthermore, in spite of the non-monotonous behavior of logarithm of the cavity function and the indirect correlation function, their difference, i.e., the bridge function remains constant within the hard-core region. Such behavior of the bridge and indirect correlation functions at small distances and for small values of indirect correlation function is well known from the Duh-Haymet plots, where the non-unique relationship results in loops of the bridge function vs. indirect correlation function graphs. We show that the same pathological behavior appears also when distance is small and indirect correlation function is large. We further show that the unique functional behavior of the bridge function can be established when bridge is represented as a function of the renormalized, repulsive indirect correlation function

  3. Minimum requirements for predictive pore-network modeling of solute transport in micromodels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2017-10-01

    Pore-scale models are now an integral part of analyzing fluid dynamics in porous materials (e.g., rocks, soils, fuel cells). Pore network models (PNM) are particularly attractive due to their computational efficiency. However, quantitative predictions with PNM have not always been successful. We focus on single-phase transport of a passive tracer under advection-dominated regimes and compare PNM with high-fidelity direct numerical simulations (DNS) for a range of micromodel heterogeneities. We identify the minimum requirements for predictive PNM of transport. They are: (a) flow-based network extraction, i.e., discretizing the pore space based on the underlying velocity field, (b) a Lagrangian (particle tracking) simulation framework, and (c) accurate transfer of particles from one pore throat to the next. We develop novel network extraction and particle tracking PNM methods that meet these requirements. Moreover, we show that certain established PNM practices in the literature can result in first-order errors in modeling advection-dominated transport. They include: all Eulerian PNMs, networks extracted based on geometric metrics only, and flux-based nodal transfer probabilities. Preliminary results for a 3D sphere pack are also presented. The simulation inputs for this work are made public to serve as a benchmark for the research community.

  4. Calculating solution redox free energies with ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Xiancheng; Hu Hao; Hu Xiangqian; Yang Weitao

    2009-01-01

    A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical minimum free energy path (QM/MM-MFEP) method was developed to calculate the redox free energies of large systems in solution with greatly enhanced efficiency for conformation sampling. The QM/MM-MFEP method describes the thermodynamics of a system on the potential of mean force surface of the solute degrees of freedom. The molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is only carried out with the QM subsystem fixed. It thus avoids 'on-the-fly' QM calculations and thus overcomes the high computational cost in the direct QM/MM MD sampling. In the applications to two metal complexes in aqueous solution, the new QM/MM-MFEP method yielded redox free energies in good agreement with those calculated from the direct QM/MM MD method. Two larger biologically important redox molecules, lumichrome and riboflavin, were further investigated to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. The enhanced efficiency and uncompromised accuracy are especially significant for biochemical systems. The QM/MM-MFEP method thus provides an efficient approach to free energy simulation of complex electron transfer reactions.

  5. Improved Pedagogy for Linear Differential Equations by Reconsidering How We Measure the Size of Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Christopher C.

    2017-01-01

    For over 50 years, the learning of teaching of "a priori" bounds on solutions to linear differential equations has involved a Euclidean approach to measuring the size of a solution. While the Euclidean approach to "a priori" bounds on solutions is somewhat manageable in the learning and teaching of the proofs involving…

  6. The minimum or natural rate of flow and droplet size ejected by Taylor cone–jets: physical symmetries and scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gañán-Calvo, A M; Rebollo-Muñoz, N; Montanero, J M

    2013-01-01

    We aim to establish the scaling laws for both the minimum rate of flow attainable in the steady cone–jet mode of electrospray, and the size of the resulting droplets in that limit. Use is made of a small body of literature on Taylor cone–jets reporting precise measurements of the transported electric current and droplet size as a function of the liquid properties and flow rate. The projection of the data onto an appropriate non-dimensional parameter space maps a region bounded by the minimum rate of flow attainable in the steady state. To explain these experimental results, we propose a theoretical model based on the generalized concept of physical symmetry, stemming from the system time invariance (steadiness). A group of symmetries rising at the cone-to-jet geometrical transition determines the scaling for the minimum flow rate and related variables. If the flow rate is decreased below that minimum value, those symmetries break down, which leads to dripping. We find that the system exhibits two instability mechanisms depending on the nature of the forces arising against the flow: one dominated by viscosity and the other by the liquid polarity. In the former case, full charge relaxation is guaranteed down to the minimum flow rate, while in the latter the instability condition becomes equivalent to the symmetry breakdown by charge relaxation or separation. When cone–jets are formed without artificially imposing a flow rate, a microjet is issued quasi-steadily. The flow rate naturally ejected this way coincides with the minimum flow rate studied here. This natural flow rate determines the minimum droplet size that can be steadily produced by any electrohydrodynamic means for a given set of liquid properties. (paper)

  7. The minimum or natural rate of flow and droplet size ejected by Taylor cone-jets: physical symmetries and scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gañán-Calvo, A. M.; Rebollo-Muñoz, N.; Montanero, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    We aim to establish the scaling laws for both the minimum rate of flow attainable in the steady cone-jet mode of electrospray, and the size of the resulting droplets in that limit. Use is made of a small body of literature on Taylor cone-jets reporting precise measurements of the transported electric current and droplet size as a function of the liquid properties and flow rate. The projection of the data onto an appropriate non-dimensional parameter space maps a region bounded by the minimum rate of flow attainable in the steady state. To explain these experimental results, we propose a theoretical model based on the generalized concept of physical symmetry, stemming from the system time invariance (steadiness). A group of symmetries rising at the cone-to-jet geometrical transition determines the scaling for the minimum flow rate and related variables. If the flow rate is decreased below that minimum value, those symmetries break down, which leads to dripping. We find that the system exhibits two instability mechanisms depending on the nature of the forces arising against the flow: one dominated by viscosity and the other by the liquid polarity. In the former case, full charge relaxation is guaranteed down to the minimum flow rate, while in the latter the instability condition becomes equivalent to the symmetry breakdown by charge relaxation or separation. When cone-jets are formed without artificially imposing a flow rate, a microjet is issued quasi-steadily. The flow rate naturally ejected this way coincides with the minimum flow rate studied here. This natural flow rate determines the minimum droplet size that can be steadily produced by any electrohydrodynamic means for a given set of liquid properties.

  8. Calculation of Appropriate Minimum Size of Isolation Rooms based on Questionnaire Survey of Experts and Analysis on Conditions of Isolation Room Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, An-Na; Song, Hae-Eun; Yang, Young-Kwon; Park, Jin-Chul; Hwang, Jung-Ha

    2017-07-01

    After the outbreak of the MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) epidemic, issues were raised regarding response capabilities of medical institutions, including the lack of isolation rooms at hospitals. Since then, the government of Korea has been revising regulations to enforce medical laws in order to expand the operation of isolation rooms and to strengthen standards regarding their mandatory installation at hospitals. Among general and tertiary hospitals in Korea, a total of 159 are estimated to be required to install isolation rooms to meet minimum standards. For the purpose of contributing to hospital construction plans in the future, this study conducted a questionnaire survey of experts and analysed the environment and devices necessary in isolation rooms, to determine their appropriate minimum size to treat patients. The result of the analysis is as follows: First, isolation rooms at hospitals are required to have a minimum 3,300mm minor axis and a minimum 5,000mm major axis for the isolation room itself, and a minimum 1,800mm minor axis for the antechamber where personal protective equipment is donned and removed. Second, the 15 ㎡-or-larger standard for the floor area of isolation rooms will have to be reviewed and standards for the minimum width of isolation rooms will have to be established.

  9. Modelling size and structure of nanoparticles formed from drying of submicron solution aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A.; Pawar, Amol A.; Venkataraman, Chandra; Mehra, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    Drying of submicron solution aerosols, under controlled conditions, has been explored to prepare nanoparticles for drug delivery applications. A computational model of solution drop evaporation is developed to study the evolution of solute gradients inside the drop and predict the size and shell thickness of precipitating nanoparticles. The model considers evaporation as a two-stage process involving droplet shrinkage and shell growth. It was corroborated that droplet evaporation rate controls the solute distribution within a droplet and the resulting particle structure (solid or shell type). At higher gas temperatures, rapid build-up of solute near drop surface from high evaporation rates results in early attainment of critical supersaturation solubility and a steeper solute gradient, which favours formation of larger, shell-type particles. At lower gas temperatures, formation of smaller, solid nanoparticles is indicated. The computed size and shell thickness are in good agreement with experimentally prepared lipid nanoparticles. This study indicates that solid or shell structure of precipitated nanoparticles is strongly affected by evaporation rate, while initial solute concentration in the precursor solution and atomized droplet size affect shell thickness. For the gas temperatures considered, evaporative cooling leads to droplet temperature below the melting point of the lipid solute. Thus, we conclude that control over nanoparticle size and structure, of thermolabile precursor materials suitable for drug delivery, can be achieved by controlling evaporation rates, through selection of aerosol processing conditions

  10. Modelling size and structure of nanoparticles formed from drying of submicron solution aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, Arpan A.; Pawar, Amol A.; Venkataraman, Chandra; Mehra, Anurag, E-mail: mehra@iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Chemical Engineering (India)

    2015-01-15

    Drying of submicron solution aerosols, under controlled conditions, has been explored to prepare nanoparticles for drug delivery applications. A computational model of solution drop evaporation is developed to study the evolution of solute gradients inside the drop and predict the size and shell thickness of precipitating nanoparticles. The model considers evaporation as a two-stage process involving droplet shrinkage and shell growth. It was corroborated that droplet evaporation rate controls the solute distribution within a droplet and the resulting particle structure (solid or shell type). At higher gas temperatures, rapid build-up of solute near drop surface from high evaporation rates results in early attainment of critical supersaturation solubility and a steeper solute gradient, which favours formation of larger, shell-type particles. At lower gas temperatures, formation of smaller, solid nanoparticles is indicated. The computed size and shell thickness are in good agreement with experimentally prepared lipid nanoparticles. This study indicates that solid or shell structure of precipitated nanoparticles is strongly affected by evaporation rate, while initial solute concentration in the precursor solution and atomized droplet size affect shell thickness. For the gas temperatures considered, evaporative cooling leads to droplet temperature below the melting point of the lipid solute. Thus, we conclude that control over nanoparticle size and structure, of thermolabile precursor materials suitable for drug delivery, can be achieved by controlling evaporation rates, through selection of aerosol processing conditions.

  11. Determination of the minimum size of a statistical representative volume element from a fibre-reinforced composite based on point pattern statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Brøndsted, Povl

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, Trias et al. [1] determined the minimum size of a statistical representative volume element (SRVE) of a unidirectional fibre-reinforced composite primarily based on numerical analyses of the stress/strain field. In continuation of this, the present study determines the minimu...... size of an SRVE based on a statistical analysis on the spatial statistics of the fibre packing patterns found in genuine laminates, and those generated numerically using a microstructure generator. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Scrum of scrums solution for large size teams using scrum methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Qurashi, Saja Al; Qureshi, M. Rizwan Jameel

    2014-01-01

    Scrum is a structured framework to support complex product development. However, Scrum methodology faces a challenge of managing large teams. To address this challenge, in this paper we propose a solution called Scrum of Scrums. In Scrum of Scrums, we divide the Scrum team into teams of the right size, and then organize them hierarchically into a Scrum of Scrums. The main goals of the proposed solution are to optimize communication between teams in Scrum of Scrums; to make the system work aft...

  13. Effect of grain size on corrosion of nanocrystalline copper in NaOH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Wei; Xu Yimin; Wang Qiming; Shi Peizhen; Yan Mi

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Coppers display an active-passive-transpassive behaviour with duplex passive film. → Grain size variation has little effect on the overall corrosion behaviour of Cu. → Little effect on corrosion may be due to duplex passivation in NaOH solution. → Bulk nanocrystalline Cu show bamboo-like flake corrosion structure. - Abstract: Effect of grain size on corrosion of bulk nanocrystalline copper was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization measurements in 0.1 M NaOH solution. Bulk nanocrystalline copper was prepared by inert gas condensation and in situ warm compress (IGCWC) method. The grain sizes of all bulk nanocrystalline samples were determined to be 48, 68 and 92 nm using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that bulk coppers displayed an active-passive-transpassive behaviour with duplex passive films. From polycrystalline to nanocrystalline, grain size variation showed little effect on the overall corrosion resistance of copper samples.

  14. (I Can’t Get No) Saturation: A Simulation and Guidelines for Minimum Sample Sizes in Qualitative Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijnsoever, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the sample size in qualitative research that is required to reach theoretical saturation. I conceptualize a population as consisting of sub-populations that contain different types of information sources that hold a number of codes. Theoretical saturation is reached after all the

  15. Evolution of genome size and chromosome number in the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea (Lentibulariaceae), with a new estimate of the minimum genome size in angiosperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Andreas; Michael, Todd P.; Rivadavia, Fernando; Sousa, Aretuza; Wang, Wenqin; Temsch, Eva M.; Greilhuber, Johann; Müller, Kai F.; Heubl, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Some species of Genlisea possess ultrasmall nuclear genomes, the smallest known among angiosperms, and some have been found to have chromosomes of diminutive size, which may explain why chromosome numbers and karyotypes are not known for the majority of species of the genus. However, other members of the genus do not possess ultrasmall genomes, nor do most taxa studied in related genera of the family or order. This study therefore examined the evolution of genome sizes and chromosome numbers in Genlisea in a phylogenetic context. The correlations of genome size with chromosome number and size, with the phylogeny of the group and with growth forms and habitats were also examined. Methods Nuclear genome sizes were measured from cultivated plant material for a comprehensive sampling of taxa, including nearly half of all species of Genlisea and representing all major lineages. Flow cytometric measurements were conducted in parallel in two laboratories in order to compare the consistency of different methods and controls. Chromosome counts were performed for the majority of taxa, comparing different staining techniques for the ultrasmall chromosomes. Key Results Genome sizes of 15 taxa of Genlisea are presented and interpreted in a phylogenetic context. A high degree of congruence was found between genome size distribution and the major phylogenetic lineages. Ultrasmall genomes with 1C values of sections of the genus. The smallest known plant genomes were not found in G. margaretae, as previously reported, but in G. tuberosa (1C ≈ 61 Mbp) and some strains of G. aurea (1C ≈ 64 Mbp). Conclusions Genlisea is an ideal candidate model organism for the understanding of genome reduction as the genus includes species with both relatively large (∼1700 Mbp) and ultrasmall (∼61 Mbp) genomes. This comparative, phylogeny-based analysis of genome sizes and karyotypes in Genlisea provides essential data for selection of suitable species for comparative

  16. Minimum critical values of uranyl and plutonium nitrate solutions calculated by various routes of the french criticality codes system CRISTAL using the new isopiestic nitrate density law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, Jacques; Rouyer, Veronique; Leclaire, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides for various cases of 235 U enrichment or Pu isotopic vectors, and different reflectors, new minimum critical values of uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate solutions (H + =0) obtained by the standard IRSN calculation route and the new isopiestic density laws. Comparisons are also made with other more accurate routes showing that the standard one's results are most often conservative and usable for criticality safety assessments. (author)

  17. Meta-Heuristics for Dynamic Lot Sizing: a review and comparison of solution approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F. Jans (Raf); Z. Degraeve (Zeger)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractProofs from complexity theory as well as computational experiments indicate that most lot sizing problems are hard to solve. Because these problems are so difficult, various solution techniques have been proposed to solve them. In the past decade, meta-heuristics such as tabu search,

  18. Improved pedagogy for linear differential equations by reconsidering how we measure the size of solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Christopher C.

    2017-11-01

    For over 50 years, the learning of teaching of a priori bounds on solutions to linear differential equations has involved a Euclidean approach to measuring the size of a solution. While the Euclidean approach to a priori bounds on solutions is somewhat manageable in the learning and teaching of the proofs involving second-order, linear problems with constant co-efficients, we believe it is not pedagogically optimal. Moreover, the Euclidean method becomes pedagogically unwieldy in the proofs involving higher-order cases. The purpose of this work is to propose a simpler pedagogical approach to establish a priori bounds on solutions by considering a different way of measuring the size of a solution to linear problems, which we refer to as the Uber size. The Uber form enables a simplification of pedagogy from the literature and the ideas are accessible to learners who have an understanding of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and the exponential function, both usually seen in a first course in calculus. We believe that this work will be of mathematical and pedagogical interest to those who are learning and teaching in the area of differential equations or in any of the numerous disciplines where linear differential equations are used.

  19. Restricting minimum size of DGs to confirm correct operation of fast directional protection switches in their simultaneous allocation with DGs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorkhosh, Seyed Salman; Samet, Haidar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Simultaneous allocation of DGs and fast directional protection switches (FPDSs) is made. • A protection constraint is proposed which restricts the allowable size of DGs. • The proposed constraint ensures the correct operation of upstream installed FDPS in all conditions. - Abstract: This paper presents simultaneous allocation of distributed generations (DGs) and fast directional protection switches (FDPSs) to decrease energy losses and enhance reliability of the network. The main contribution of the paper is restricting the allowable size of DGs to ensure the correct operation of upstream installed FDPS in all conditions. The paper introduces a method based on genetic algorithm to solve the optimization problem. Finally, to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method some simulations considering a 33 bus test network are performed. The optimization problem with and without applying protection constraint is solved. Customer’s load is modeled by a three level yearly load. Time value of money and load growth rate are also considered. To assess the importance of the proposed protection constraint, fault studies after adding DGs and FDPSs to a 33 bus test network are performed. Results confirm the importance of the proposed protection constraint

  20. High-efficiency space-based software radio architectures & algorithms (a minimum size, weight, and power TeraOps processor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, Mark Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baker, Zachary K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stettler, Matthew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pigue, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmierer, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Power, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Paul S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos has recently completed the latest in a series of Reconfigurable Software Radios, which incorporates several key innovations in both hardware design and algorithms. Due to our focus on satellite applications, each design must extract the best size, weight, and power performance possible from the ensemble of Commodity Off-the-Shelf (COTS) parts available at the time of design. In this case we have achieved 1 TeraOps/second signal processing on a 1920 Megabit/second datastream, while using only 53 Watts mains power, 5.5 kg, and 3 liters. This processing capability enables very advanced algorithms such as our wideband RF compression scheme to operate remotely, allowing network bandwidth constrained applications to deliver previously unattainable performance.

  1. Size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Maroto-Centeno, José Alberto [Departamento de Física, Escuela Politécnica Superior de Linares, Universidad de Jaén, 23700 Linares, Jaén (Spain); Adroher-Benítez, Irene [Grupo de Física de Fluidos y Biocoloides, Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-05-28

    In this work, the size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks has been studied through Monte Carlo simulations. Two models that provide user-friendly expressions to predict the partition coefficient have been tested over a wide range of volume fractions: Ogston's model (especially devised for fibrous media) and the pore model. The effects of crosslinking and bond stiffness have also been analyzed. Our results suggest that the fiber model can acceptably account for size-exclusion effects in crosslinked gels. Its predictions are good for large solutes if the fiber diameter is assumed to be the effective monomer diameter. For solutes sizes comparable to the monomer dimensions, a smaller fiber diameter must be used. Regarding the pore model, the partition coefficient is poorly predicted when the pore diameter is estimated as the distance between adjacent crosslinker molecules. On the other hand, our results prove that the pore sizes obtained from the pore model by fitting partitioning data of swollen gels are overestimated.

  2. Size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Maroto-Centeno, José Alberto; Adroher-Benítez, Irene

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks has been studied through Monte Carlo simulations. Two models that provide user-friendly expressions to predict the partition coefficient have been tested over a wide range of volume fractions: Ogston's model (especially devised for fibrous media) and the pore model. The effects of crosslinking and bond stiffness have also been analyzed. Our results suggest that the fiber model can acceptably account for size-exclusion effects in crosslinked gels. Its predictions are good for large solutes if the fiber diameter is assumed to be the effective monomer diameter. For solutes sizes comparable to the monomer dimensions, a smaller fiber diameter must be used. Regarding the pore model, the partition coefficient is poorly predicted when the pore diameter is estimated as the distance between adjacent crosslinker molecules. On the other hand, our results prove that the pore sizes obtained from the pore model by fitting partitioning data of swollen gels are overestimated

  3. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A; Isborn, Christine M

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  4. Association of radionuclides with different molecular size fractions in soil solution: implications for plant uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Shaw, S.; Salbu, B.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using hollow fibre ultrafiltration to determine the molecular size distribution of radionuclides in soil solution was investigated. The physical and chemical composition of soil plays a vital role in determining radionuclide uptake by plant roots. Soil solution samples were extracted from loam, peat and sand soils that had been artificially contaminated with 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 Pu and 241 Am six years previously as part of a five-year lysimeter study on radionuclide uptake to crops. Ultrafiltration of soil solution was performed using hollow fibre cartridges with a nominal molecular weight cut off of 3 and 10 kD. The association of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 Pu and 241 Am with different molecular size fractions of the soil solution is discussed in terms of radionuclide bioavailability to cabbage grown in the same three soils. 137 Cs and 90 Sr were present in low molecular weight forms and as such were mobile in soil and potentially available for uptake by the cabbage. In contrast, a large proportion (61-87%) of the 239 Pu and 241 Am were associated with colloidal and high molecular weight material and therefore less available for uptake by plant roots. The contribution from low molecular weight species of 239 Pu and 241 Am to the total activity in soil solution decreased in the order loam ≥ peat ≥ sand. Association of radionuclides with low molecular weight species of less than 3 kD did not, however, automatically imply availability to plants. (author)

  5. Grain size effect in corrosion behavior of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni coatings in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liping; Zhang Junyan; Gao Yan; Xue Qunji; Hu Litian; Xu Tao

    2006-01-01

    Effects of grain size reduction on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of nanocrystalline Ni produced by pulse electrodeposition were characterized using potentiodynamic polarization testing and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to confirm the electrochemical measurements and the suggested mechanisms. The corrosion resistance of Ni coatings in alkaline solutions considerably increased as the grain size decreased from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline. The higher corrosion resistance of NC Ni may be due to the more rapid formation of continuous Ni(OH) 2 passive films compared with coarse-grained Ni coatings

  6. Continuum electrostatics for ionic solutions with non-uniform ionic sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bo

    2009-01-01

    This work concerns electrostatic properties of an ionic solution with multiple ionic species of possibly different ionic sizes. Such properties are described by the minimization of an electrostatic free-energy functional of ionic concentrations. Bounds are obtained for ionic concentrations with low electrostatic free energies. Such bounds are used to show that there exists a unique set of equilibrium ionic concentrations that minimizes the free-energy functional. The equilibrium ionic concentrations are found to depend sorely on the equilibrium electrostatic potential, resembling the classical Boltzmann distributions that relate the equilibrium ionic concentrations to the equilibrium electrostatic potential. Unless all the ionic and solvent molecular sizes are assumed to be the same, explicit formulae of such dependence are, however, not available in general. It is nevertheless proved that in equilibrium the ionic charge density is a decreasing function of the electrostatic potential. This determines a variational principle with a convex functional for the electrostatic potential

  7. Spatio-temporal droplet size statistics in developing spray of starchy solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2015-07-01

    In the given research, the spray jet breakup of a modified starch solution was studied as a function of jet injection time and nozzle orifice diameter. The starch-urea-borax solution was prepared and tested with three axisymmetric full cone nozzles at service temperature of 80°C and the injection pressure of 5 bar. It is worth mentioning that no jet breakup was seen below these temperature and pressure values. The imaging studies on the time based spray evolution revealed monotonic increase in both; spray cone angle and tip penetration with an increase in injection time form 0-300 mm. Hereinafter, both parameters exhibited constants value over injection time. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) measurements of the droplet size revealed significant decrease in the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) along the spray centerline. However, a steady decrease in SMD was seen towards the spray boundary. For fixed injection time of 300 ms, the overall SMD was decreased from 112 to 71 µm at 60 mm downstream, from 102 to 64 µm at 100 mm downstream and from 85 to 61 µm at 140 mm downstream with an increase in orifice diameter from 1.19 to 1.59 mm.

  8. The effect of backroom size on retail product availability – operational and technological solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Milićević

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Amid the conditions of increasingly fierce competition, retailers are doing their best to meet the demands of their customers as efficiently as possible. Through the ever-growing level of product availability they raise the quality of service, which is positively reflected not only on the growth in sales, but also customer satisfaction. In the opposite case, the out-ofstock problem emerges, affecting not only customers, but also retailers and their suppliers. Bearing in mind, that the causes of the given problem occur most frequently in the last metres of the supply chain, in this paper we investigated the effect of backroom size on product availability, depending on the retail format. For this purpose, we used moderated regression analysis on the sample of 80 fast moving consumer goods in retail stores located on the territory of the Republic of Serbia. The obtained results pointed to opposite movements in the smallest and the largest format. Whereas in superettes the out-of-stock level lowers with the increase in the backroom size, it tends to drop in hypermarkets. Therefore, we pointed to some in-store problems that cause product stock-outs in different store formats. In addition to indicating the potential causes of analyzed relations, this paper also presents certain operational and technological solutions related to their mitigation.

  9. Size, shape, and diffusivity of a single Debye-Hückel polyelectrolyte chain in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysa, W. Chamath; Dünweg, B.; Prakash, J. Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained bead-spring chain model, with Debye-Hückel electrostatic interactions between the beads, are used to determine the root-mean-square end-to-end vector, the radius of gyration, and various shape functions (defined in terms of eigenvalues of the radius of gyration tensor) of a weakly charged polyelectrolyte chain in solution, in the limit of low polymer concentration. The long-time diffusivity is calculated from the mean square displacement of the centre of mass of the chain, with hydrodynamic interactions taken into account through the incorporation of the Rotne-Prager-Yamakawa tensor. Simulation results are interpreted in the light of the Odjik, Skolnick, Fixman, Khokhlov, and Khachaturian blob scaling theory (Everaers et al., Eur. Phys. J. E 8, 3 (2002)) which predicts that all solution properties are determined by just two scaling variables—the number of electrostatic blobs X and the reduced Debye screening length, Y. We identify three broad regimes, the ideal chain regime at small values of Y, the blob-pole regime at large values of Y, and the crossover regime at intermediate values of Y, within which the mean size, shape, and diffusivity exhibit characteristic behaviours. In particular, when simulation results are recast in terms of blob scaling variables, universal behaviour independent of the choice of bead-spring chain parameters, and the number of blobs X, is observed in the ideal chain regime and in much of the crossover regime, while the existence of logarithmic corrections to scaling in the blob-pole regime leads to non-universal behaviour.

  10. Overview of progress in European medium sized tokamaks towards an integrated plasma-edge/wall solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H.; Eich, T.; Beurskens, M.; Coda, S.; Hakola, A.; Martin, P.; Adamek, J.; Agostini, M.; Aguiam, D.; Ahn, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Akers, R.; Albanese, R.; Aledda, R.; Alessi, E.; Allan, S.; Alves, D.; Ambrosino, R.; Amicucci, L.; Anand, H.; Anastassiou, G.; Andrèbe, Y.; Angioni, C.; Apruzzese, G.; Ariola, M.; Arnichand, H.; Arter, W.; Baciero, A.; Barnes, M.; Barrera, L.; Behn, R.; Bencze, A.; Bernardo, J.; Bernert, M.; Bettini, P.; Bilková, P.; Bin, W.; Birkenmeier, G.; Bizarro, J. P. S.; Blanchard, P.; Blanken, T.; Bluteau, M.; Bobkov, V.; Bogar, O.; Böhm, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Bottereau, C.; Bouquey, F.; Bourdelle, C.; Brémond, S.; Brezinsek, S.; Brida, D.; Brochard, F.; Buchanan, J.; Bufferand, H.; Buratti, P.; Cahyna, P.; Calabrò, G.; Camenen, Y.; Caniello, R.; Cannas, B.; Canton, A.; Cardinali, A.; Carnevale, D.; Carr, M.; Carralero, D.; Carvalho, P.; Casali, L.; Castaldo, C.; Castejón, F.; Castro, R.; Causa, F.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavedon, M.; Cecconello, M.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Cesario, R.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Chapman, S.; Chernyshova, M.; Choi, D.; Cianfarani, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Citrin, J.; Clairet, F.; Classen, I.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Colas, L.; Conway, G.; Corre, Y.; Costea, S.; Crisanti, F.; Cruz, N.; Cseh, G.; Czarnecka, A.; D'Arcangelo, O.; De Angeli, M.; De Masi, G.; De Temmerman, G.; De Tommasi, G.; Decker, J.; Delogu, R. S.; Dendy, R.; Denner, P.; Di Troia, C.; Dimitrova, M.; D'Inca, R.; Dorić, V.; Douai, D.; Drenik, A.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunne, M.; Duval, B. P.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Erdös, B.; Esposito, B.; Fable, E.; Faitsch, M.; Fanni, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Felici, F.; Ferreira, J.; Février, O.; Ficker, O.; Fietz, S.; Figini, L.; Figueiredo, A.; Fil, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fitzgerald, M.; Fontana, M.; Ford, O.; Frassinetti, L.; Fridström, R.; Frigione, D.; Fuchert, G.; Fuchs, C.; Furno Palumbo, M.; Futatani, S.; Gabellieri, L.; Gałązka, K.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Galeani, S.; Gallart, D.; Gallo, A.; Galperti, C.; Gao, Y.; Garavaglia, S.; Garcia, J.; Garcia-Carrasco, A.; Garcia-Lopez, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Gardarein, J.-L.; Garzotti, L.; Gaspar, J.; Gauthier, E.; Geelen, P.; Geiger, B.; Ghendrih, P.; Ghezzi, F.; Giacomelli, L.; Giannone, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Giroud, C.; Gleason González, C.; Gobbin, M.; Goodman, T. P.; Gorini, G.; Gospodarczyk, M.; Granucci, G.; Gruber, M.; Gude, A.; Guimarais, L.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hacek, P.; Hacquin, S.; Hall, S.; Ham, C.; Happel, T.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Hauer, V.; Havlickova, E.; Hellsten, T.; Helou, W.; Henderson, S.; Hennequin, P.; Heyn, M.; Hnat, B.; Hölzl, M.; Hogeweij, D.; Honoré, C.; Hopf, C.; Horáček, J.; Hornung, G.; Horváth, L.; Huang, Z.; Huber, A.; Igitkhanov, J.; Igochine, V.; Imrisek, M.; Innocente, P.; Ionita-Schrittwieser, C.; Isliker, H.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Jacquet, P.; Jakubowski, M.; Jardin, A.; Jaulmes, F.; Jenko, F.; Jensen, T.; Jeppe Miki Busk, O.; Jessen, M.; Joffrin, E.; Jones, O.; Jonsson, T.; Kallenbach, A.; Kallinikos, N.; Kálvin, S.; Kappatou, A.; Karhunen, J.; Karpushov, A.; Kasilov, S.; Kasprowicz, G.; Kendl, A.; Kernbichler, W.; Kim, D.; Kirk, A.; Kjer, S.; Klimek, I.; Kocsis, G.; Kogut, D.; Komm, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Koslowski, H. R.; Koubiti, M.; Kovacic, J.; Kovarik, K.; Krawczyk, N.; Krbec, J.; Krieger, K.; Krivska, A.; Kube, R.; Kudlacek, O.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Labit, B.; Laggner, F. M.; Laguardia, L.; Lahtinen, A.; Lalousis, P.; Lang, P.; Lauber, P.; Lazányi, N.; Lazaros, A.; Le, H. B.; Lebschy, A.; Leddy, J.; Lefévre, L.; Lehnen, M.; Leipold, F.; Lessig, A.; Leyland, M.; Li, L.; Liang, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Loarer, T.; Loarte, A.; Loewenhoff, T.; Lomanowski, B.; Loschiavo, V. P.; Lunt, T.; Lupelli, I.; Lux, H.; Lyssoivan, A.; Madsen, J.; Maget, P.; Maggi, C.; Maggiora, R.; Magnussen, M. L.; Mailloux, J.; Maljaars, B.; Malygin, A.; Mantica, P.; Mantsinen, M.; Maraschek, M.; Marchand, B.; Marconato, N.; Marini, C.; Marinucci, M.; Markovic, T.; Marocco, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, Y.; Solis, J. R. Martin; Martitsch, A.; Mastrostefano, S.; Mattei, M.; Matthews, G.; Mavridis, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Mazon, D.; McCarthy, P.; McAdams, R.; McArdle, G.; McCarthy, P.; McClements, K.; McDermott, R.; McMillan, B.; Meisl, G.; Merle, A.; Meyer, O.; Milanesio, D.; Militello, F.; Miron, I. G.; Mitosinkova, K.; Mlynar, J.; Mlynek, A.; Molina, D.; Molina, P.; Monakhov, I.; Morales, J.; Moreau, D.; Morel, P.; Moret, J.-M.; Moro, A.; Moulton, D.; Müller, H. W.; Nabais, F.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Nemes-Czopf, A.; Nespoli, F.; Neu, R.; Nielsen, A. H.; Nielsen, S. K.; Nikolaeva, V.; Nimb, S.; Nocente, M.; Nouailletas, R.; Nowak, S.; Oberkofler, M.; Oberparleiter, M.; Ochoukov, R.; Odstrčil, T.; Olsen, J.; Omotani, J.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Orain, F.; Osterman, N.; Paccagnella, R.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Panjan, M.; Papp, G.; Papřok, R.; Parail, V.; Parra, F. I.; Pau, A.; Pautasso, G.; Pehkonen, S.-P.; Pereira, A.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Peterka, M.; Petersson, P.; Petrzilka, V.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Pironti, A.; Pisano, F.; Pisokas, T.; Pitts, R.; Ploumistakis, I.; Plyusnin, V.; Pokol, G.; Poljak, D.; Pölöskei, P.; Popovic, Z.; Pór, G.; Porte, L.; Potzel, S.; Predebon, I.; Preynas, M.; Primc, G.; Pucella, G.; Puiatti, M. E.; Pütterich, T.; Rack, M.; Ramogida, G.; Rapson, C.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Rasmussen, J.; Rattá, G. A.; Ratynskaia, S.; Ravera, G.; Réfy, D.; Reich, M.; Reimerdes, H.; Reimold, F.; Reinke, M.; Reiser, D.; Resnik, M.; Reux, C.; Ripamonti, D.; Rittich, D.; Riva, G.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Rohde, V.; Rosato, J.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Sabot, R.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Salewski, M.; Salmi, A.; Samaddar, D.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Santos, J.; Sauter, O.; Scannell, R.; Scheffer, M.; Schneider, M.; Schneider, B.; Schneider, P.; Schneller, M.; Schrittwieser, R.; Schubert, M.; Schweinzer, J.; Seidl, J.; Sertoli, M.; Šesnić, S.; Shabbir, A.; Shalpegin, A.; Shanahan, B.; Sharapov, S.; Sheikh, U.; Sias, G.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Silva, A.; Silva Fuglister, M.; Simpson, J.; Snicker, A.; Sommariva, C.; Sozzi, C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spizzo, G.; Spolaore, M.; Stange, T.; Stejner Pedersen, M.; Stepanov, I.; Stober, J.; Strand, P.; Šušnjara, A.; Suttrop, W.; Szepesi, T.; Tál, B.; Tala, T.; Tamain, P.; Tardini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Teplukhina, A.; Terranova, D.; Testa, D.; Theiler, C.; Thornton, A.; Tolias, P.; Tophøj, L.; Treutterer, W.; Trevisan, G. L.; Tripsky, M.; Tsironis, C.; Tsui, C.; Tudisco, O.; Uccello, A.; Urban, J.; Valisa, M.; Vallejos, P.; Valovic, M.; Van den Brand, H.; Vanovac, B.; Varoutis, S.; Vartanian, S.; Vega, J.; Verdoolaege, G.; Verhaegh, K.; Vermare, L.; Vianello, N.; Vicente, J.; Viezzer, E.; Vignitchouk, L.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Villone, F.; Viola, B.; Vlahos, L.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Vondráček, P.; Vu, N. M. T.; Wagner, D.; Walkden, N.; Wang, N.; Wauters, T.; Weiland, M.; Weinzettl, V.; Westerhof, E.; Wiesenberger, M.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wischmeier, M.; Wodniak, I.; Wolfrum, E.; Yadykin, D.; Zagórski, R.; Zammuto, I.; Zanca, P.; Zaplotnik, R.; Zestanakis, P.; Zhang, W.; Zoletnik, S.; Zuin, M.; ASDEX Upgrade, the; MAST; TCV Teams

    2017-10-01

    Integrating the plasma core performance with an edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) that leads to tolerable heat and particle loads on the wall is a major challenge. The new European medium size tokamak task force (EU-MST) coordinates research on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), MAST and TCV. This multi-machine approach within EU-MST, covering a wide parameter range, is instrumental to progress in the field, as ITER and DEMO core/pedestal and SOL parameters are not achievable simultaneously in present day devices. A two prong approach is adopted. On the one hand, scenarios with tolerable transient heat and particle loads, including active edge localised mode (ELM) control are developed. On the other hand, divertor solutions including advanced magnetic configurations are studied. Considerable progress has been made on both approaches, in particular in the fields of: ELM control with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP), small ELM regimes, detachment onset and control, as well as filamentary scrape-off-layer transport. For example full ELM suppression has now been achieved on AUG at low collisionality with n  =  2 RMP maintaining good confinement {{H}\\text{H≤ft(98,\\text{y}2\\right)}}≈ 0.95 . Advances have been made with respect to detachment onset and control. Studies in advanced divertor configurations (Snowflake, Super-X and X-point target divertor) shed new light on SOL physics. Cross field filamentary transport has been characterised in a wide parameter regime on AUG, MAST and TCV progressing the theoretical and experimental understanding crucial for predicting first wall loads in ITER and DEMO. Conditions in the SOL also play a crucial role for ELM stability and access to small ELM regimes. In the future we will refer to the author list of the paper as the EUROfusion MST1 Team.

  11. Gas-solute dispersivity ratio in granular porous media as related to particle size distribution and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Straface, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of solute dispersion in porous media is generally much more time consuming than gas dispersion measurements performed under equivalent conditions. Significant time savings may therefore, be achieved if solute dispersion coefficients can be estimated based on measured gas dispersion...... data. This paper evaluates the possibility for estimating solute dispersion based on gas dispersion measurements. Breakthrough measurements were carried out at different fluid velocities (covering the same range in Reynolds number), using O2 and NaCl as gas and solute tracers, respectively. Three...... different, granular porous materials were used: (1) crushed granite (very angular particles), (2) gravel (particles of intermediate roundness) and (3) Leca® (almost spherical particles). For each material, 21 different particle size fractions were used. Gas and solute dispersion coefficients were determined...

  12. Estimation of minimum sample size for identification of the most important features: a case study providing a qualitative B2B sales data set

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Bohanec; Mirjana Kljajić Borštnar; Marko Robnik-Šikonja

    2017-01-01

    An important task in machine learning is to reduce data set dimensionality, which in turn contributes to reducing computational load and data collection costs, while improving human understanding and interpretation of models. We introduce an operational guideline for determining the minimum number of instances sufficient to identify correct ranks of features with the highest impact. We conduct tests based on qualitative B2B sales forecasting data. The results show that a relatively small inst...

  13. Waste sizing solution as co-substrate for anaerobic decolourisation of textile dyeing wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, I.; Santos, dos A.B.; Spanjers, H.

    2005-01-01

    Dyeing wastewaters and residual size are textile factory waste streams that can be treated anaerobically. For successful anaerobic treatment of dyeing effluents, a co-substrate has to be added because of their low concentration of easily biodegradable compounds. Starch-based size contains easily

  14. Estimation of minimum sample size for identification of the most important features: a case study providing a qualitative B2B sales data set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Bohanec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An important task in machine learning is to reduce data set dimensionality, which in turn contributes to reducing computational load and data collection costs, while improving human understanding and interpretation of models. We introduce an operational guideline for determining the minimum number of instances sufficient to identify correct ranks of features with the highest impact. We conduct tests based on qualitative B2B sales forecasting data. The results show that a relatively small instance subset is sufficient for identifying the most important features when rank is not important.

  15. Stable solutions of a scalar conservation law for particle-size segregation in dense granular avalanches

    OpenAIRE

    Shearer, M.; Gray, J. M N T; Thornton, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Dense, dry granular avalanches are very efficient at sorting the larger particles towards the free surface of the flow, and finer grains towards the base, through the combined processes of kinetic sieving and squeeze expulsion. This generates an inversely graded particle-size distribution, which is fundamental to a variety of pattern formation mechanisms, as well as subtle size-mobility feedback effects, leading to the formation of coarse-grained lateral levees that create channels in geophys...

  16. Tuning the crystal morphology and size of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 in aqueous solution by surfactants

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Yichang

    2011-01-01

    Herein we report a facile synthesis method using surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a capping agent for controlling the crystal size and morphology of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) crystals in aqueous systems. The particle sizes can be precisely adjusted from ca. 100 nm to 4 μm, and the morphology can be changed from truncated cubic to rhombic dodecahedron. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Influence of solvent polarization and non-uniform ion size on electrostatic properties between charged surfaces in an electrolyte solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jun-Sik

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study electrostatic properties between two similar or oppositely charged surfaces immersed in an electrolyte solution by using the mean-field approach accounting for solvent polarization and non-uniform size effects. Applying a free energy formalism accounting for unequal ion sizes and orientational ordering of water dipoles, we derive coupled and self-consistent equations to calculate electrostatic properties between charged surfaces. Electrostatic properties for similarly charged surfaces depend on the counterion size but not on the coion size. Moreover, electrostatic potential and osmotic pressure between similarly charged surfaces are found to be increased with increasing counterion size. On the other hand, the corresponding ones between oppositely charged surfaces are related to both sizes of positive and negative ions. For oppositely charged surfaces, the electrostatic potential, number density of solvent molecules, and relative permittivity of an electrolyte having unequal ion sizes are not symmetric about the centerline between the charged surfaces. For either case, the consideration of solvent polarization results in a decrease in the electrostatic potential and the osmotic pressure compared to the case without the effect.

  18. Hydrophilic luminescent silicon nanoparticles in steric colloidal solutions: their size, agglomeration and toxicity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šimáková, Petra; Cibulka, Ondřej; Fučíková, Anna; Kalbáčová, M.H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 12 (2017), s. 1-4, č. článku 1700195. ISSN 1862-6351 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) DAAD-16-18 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanocrystals * colloidal solutions * steric stabilization * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics

  19. Solution-Processable Ultrathin Size- and Shape-Controlled Colloidal Cu2-xS Nanosheets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stam, Ward; Akkerman, Quinten A.; Ke, Xiaoxing; van Huis, Marijn A.; Bals, Sara; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2015-01-01

    Ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets (NSs) possess extraordinary properties that are attractive for both fundamental studies and technological devices. Solution-based bottom-up methods are emerging as promising routes to produce free-standing NSs, but the synthesis of colloidal NSs with

  20. Determination of the lateral size and thickness of solution-processed graphene flakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Shang; Bin-Tay, Wei; Aslam, Zabeada; Westwood, A. V. K.; Brydson, R.

    2017-09-01

    We present a method to determine the lateral size distribution of solution…processed graphene via direct image analysis techniques. Initially transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were correlated and used to provide a reliable benchmark. A rapid, automated OM method was then developed to obtain the distribution from thousands of flakes, avoiding statistical uncertainties and providing high accuracy. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was further employed to develop an in-situ method to derive the number particle size distribution (PSD) for a dispersion, with a deviation lower than 22% in the sub-micron regime. Methods for determining flake thickness are also discussed.

  1. Colloidal solutions of luminescent porous silicon clusters with different cluster sizes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herynková, Kateřina; Podkorytov, E.; Šlechta, Miroslav; Cibulka, Ondřej; Leitner, J.; Pelant, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2014), 1-5 ISSN 1931-7573 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystalline silicon * porous silicon * cluster size * luminescent markers Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.524, year: 2012

  2. Overview of progress in European medium sized tokamaks towards an integrated plasma-edge/wall solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, H.; Eich, T.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Coda, S.; Hakola, A.; Martin, P.; Adamek, J.; Agostini, M.; Aguiam, D.; Ahn, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Akers, R.; Albanese, R.; Aledda, R.; Alessi, E.; Allan, S.; Alves, D.; Ambrosino, R.; Amicucci, L.; Anand, H.; Anastassiou, G.; Andrèbe, Y.; Angioni, C.; Apruzzese, G.; Ariola, M.; Arnichand, H.; Arter, W.; Baciero, A.; Barnes, M.; Barrera, L.; Behn, R.; Bencze, A.; Bernardo, J.; Bernert, M.; Bettini, P.; Bilková, P.; Bin, W.; Birkenmeier, G.; Bizarro, J. P.S.; Blanchard, P.; Blanken, T.; Bluteau, M.; Bobkov, V.; Bogar, O.; Böhm, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Bottereau, C.; Bouquey, F.; Bourdelle, C.; Brémond, S.; Brezinsek, S.; Brida, D.; Brochard, F.; Buchanan, J.; Bufferand, H.; Buratti, P.; Cahyna, P.; Calabrò, G.; Camenen, Y.; Caniello, R.; Cannas, B.; Canton, A.; Cardinali, A.; Carnevale, D.; Carr, M.; Carralero, D.; Carvalho, P.; Casali, L.; Castaldo, C.; Castejón, F.; Castro, R.; Causa, F.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavedon, M.; Cecconello, M.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Cesario, R.; Challis, C.D.; Chapman, I.T.; Chapman, S.; Chernyshova, M.; Choi, D.; Cianfarani, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Citrin, J.; Clairet, F.; Classen, I.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Colas, L.; Conway, G.; Corre, Y.; Costea, S.; Crisanti, F.; Cruz, N.; Cseh, G.; Czarnecka, A.; D'Arcangelo, O.; De Angeli, M.; De Masi, G.; De Temmerman, G.; De Tommasi, G.; Decker, J.; Delogu, R. S.; Dendy, R.; Denner, P.; Di Troia, C.; Dimitrova, M.; D'Inca, R.; Dorić, V.; Douai, D.; Drenik, A.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Dunne, M.; Duval, B. P.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Erdös, B.; Esposito, B.; Fable, E.; Faitsch, M.; Fanni, A.; Fedorczak, N.; Felici, F.; Ferreira, J.; Février, O.; Ficker, O.; Fietz, S.; Figini, L.; Figueiredo, A.; Fil, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fitzgerald, M.; Fontana, M.; Ford, O.; Frassinetti, L.; Fridström, R.; Frigione, D.; Fuchert, G.; Fuchs, C.; Furno Palumbo, M.; Futatani, S.; Gabellieri, L.; Gałazka, K.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Galeani, S.; Gallart, D.; Gallo, A.; Galperti, C.; Gao, Y.; Garavaglia, S.; Garcia, J.; Garcia-Carrasco, A.; Garcia-Lopez, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Gardarein, J. L.; Garzotti, L.; Gaspar, J.; Gauthier, E.; Geelen, P.; Geiger, B.; Ghendrih, P.; Ghezzi, F.; Giacomelli, L.; Giannone, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Giroud, C.; Gleason González, C.; Gobbin, M.; Goodman, T. P.; Gorini, G.; Gospodarczyk, M.; Granucci, G.; Gruber, M.; Gude, A.; Guimarais, L.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hacek, P.; Hacquin, S.; Hall, S.; Ham, C.; Happel, T.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Hauer, V.; Havlickova, E.; Hellsten, T.; Helou, W.; Henderson, S.; Hennequin, P.; Heyn, M.; Hnat, B.; Hölzl, M.; Hogeweij, D.; Honoré, C.; Hopf, C.; Horáček, J.; Hornung, G.; Horváth, L.; Huang, Z.; Huber, A.; Igitkhanov, J.; Igochine, V.; Imrisek, M.; Innocente, P.; Ionita-Schrittwieser, C.; Isliker, H.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Jacquet, P.; Jakubowski, M.; Jardin, A.; Jaulmes, F.; Jenko, F.; Jensen, T.; Jeppe Miki Busk, O.; Jessen, M.; Joffrin, E.; Jones, O.; Jonsson, T.; Kallenbach, A.; Kallinikos, N.; Kálvin, S.; Kappatou, A.; Karhunen, J.; Karpushov, A.; Kasilov, S.; Kasprowicz, G.; Kendl, A.; Kernbichler, W.; Kim, D.; Kirk, A.; Kjer, S.; Klimek, I.; Kocsis, G.; Kogut, D.; Komm, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Koslowski, H. R.; Koubiti, M.; Kovacic, J.; Kovarik, K.; Krawczyk, N.; Krbec, J.; Krieger, K.; Krivska, A.; Kube, R.; Kudlacek, O.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Labit, B.; Laggner, F. M.; Laguardia, L.; Lahtinen, A.; Lalousis, P.; Lang, P.; Lauber, P.; Lazányi, N.; Lazaros, A.; Le, H.B.; Lebschy, A.; Leddy, J.; Lefévre, L.; Lehnen, M.; Leipold, F.; Lessig, A.; Leyland, M.; Li, L.; Liang, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Liu, Y.Q.; Loarer, T.; Loarte, A.; Loewenhoff, T.; Lomanowski, B.; Loschiavo, V. P.; Lunt, T.; Lupelli, I.; Lux, H.; Lyssoivan, A.; Madsen, J.; Maget, P.; Maggi, C.; Maggiora, R.; Magnussen, M. L.; Mailloux, J.; Maljaars, B.; Malygin, A.; Mantica, P.; Mantsinen, M.; Maraschek, M.; Marchand, B.; Marconato, N.; Marini, C.; Marinucci, M.; Markovic, T.; Marocco, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, Y.; Martin Solis, J. R.; Martitsch, A.; Mastrostefano, S.; Mattei, M.; Matthews, G.; Mavridis, M.; Mayoral, M. L.; Mazon, D.; McCarthy, P.; McAdams, R.; McArdle, G.; McCarthy, P.; McClements, K.; McDermott, R.; McMillan, B.; Meisl, G.; Merle, A.; Meyer, O.; Milanesio, D.; Militello, F.; Miron, I. G.; Mitosinkova, K.; Mlynar, J.; Mlynek, A.; Molina, D.; Molina, P.; Monakhov, I.; Morales, J.; Moreau, D.; Morel, P.; Moret, J. M.; Moro, A.; Moulton, D.; Müller, H. W.; Nabais, F.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Nemes-Czopf, A.; Nespoli, F.; Neu, R.; Nielsen, A. H.; Nielsen, S. K.; Nikolaeva, V.; Nimb, S.; Nocente, M.; Nouailletas, R.; Nowak, S.; Oberkofler, M.; Oberparleiter, M.; Ochoukov, R.; Odstrčil, T.; Olsen, J.; Omotani, J.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Orain, F.; Osterman, N.; Paccagnella, R.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Panjan, M.; Papp, G.; Papřok, R.; Parail, V.; Parra, F. I.; Pau, A.; Pautasso, G.; Pehkonen, S. P.; Pereira, A.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Peterka, M.; Petersson, P.; Petrzilka, V.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, C.; Pironti, A.; Pisano, F.; Pisokas, T.; Pitts, R.; Ploumistakis, I.; Plyusnin, V.; Pokol, G.; Poljak, D.; Pölöskei, P.; Popovic, Z.; Pór, G.; Porte, L.; Potzel, S.; Predebon, I.; Preynas, M.; Primc, G.; Pucella, G.; Puiatti, M. E.; Pütterich, T.; Rack, M.; Ramogida, G.; Rapson, C.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Rasmussen, J.; Rattá, G. A.; Ratynskaia, S.; Ravera, G.; Réfy, D.; Reich, M.; Reimerdes, H.; Reimold, F.; Reinke, M.; Reiser, D.; Resnik, M.; Reux, C.; Ripamonti, D.; Rittich, D.; Riva, G.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M.; Rohde, V.; Rosato, J.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Sabot, R.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Salewski, M.; Salmi, A.; Samaddar, D.; Sanchis-Sanchez, L.; Santos, J.; Sauter, O.; Scannell, R.; Scheffer, M.; Schneider, M.; Schneider, B.; Schneider, P.; Schneller, M.; Schrittwieser, R.; Schubert, M.; Schweinzer, J.; Seidl, J.; Sertoli, M.; Šesnić, S.; Shabbir, A.; Shalpegin, A.; Shanahan, B.; Sharapov, S.; Sheikh, U.; Sias, G.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Silva, A.; Silva Fuglister, M.; Simpson, J.; Snicker, A.; Sommariva, C.; Sozzi, C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spizzo, G.; Spolaore, M.; Stange, T.; Stejner Pedersen, M.; Stepanov, I.; Stober, J.; Strand, P.; Šušnjara, A.; Suttrop, W.; Szepesi, T.; Tál, B.; Tala, T.; Tamain, P.; Tardini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Teplukhina, A.; Terranova, D.; Testa, D.; Theiler, C.; Thornton, A.; Tolias, P.; Tophj, L.; Treutterer, W.; Trevisan, G. L.; Tripsky, M.; Tsironis, C.; Tsui, C.; Tudisco, O.; Uccello, A.; Urban, J.; Valisa, M.; Vallejos, P.; Valovic, M.; Van Den Brand, H.; Vanovac, B.; Varoutis, S.; Vartanian, S.; Vega, J.; Verdoolaege, G.; Verhaegh, K.; Vermare, L.; Vianello, N.; Vicente, J.; Viezzer, E.; Vignitchouk, L.; Vijvers, W.A.J.; Villone, F.; Viola, B.; Vlahos, L.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Vondráček, P.; Vu, N. M.T.; Wagner, D.; Walkden, N.; Wang, N.; Wauters, T.; Weiland, M.; Weinzettl, V.; Westerhof, E.; Wiesenberger, M.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wischmeier, M.; Wodniak, I.; Wolfrum, E.; Yadykin, D.; Zagórski, R.; Zammuto, I.; Zanca, P.; Zaplotnik, R.; Zestanakis, P.; Zhang, W.; Zoletnik, S.; Zuin, M.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating the plasma core performance with an edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) that leads to tolerable heat and particle loads on the wall is a major challenge. The new European medium size tokamak task force (EU-MST) coordinates research on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), MAST and TCV. This multi-machine

  3. Overview of progress in European medium sized tokamaks towards an integrated plasma-edge/wall solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, H.; Eich, T.; Beurskens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating the plasma core performance with an edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) that leads to tolerable heat and particle loads on the wall is a major challenge. The new European medium size tokamak task force (EU-MST) coordinates research on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), MAST and TCV. This multi-machine ...

  4. Influence of Number Size, Problem Structure and Response Mode on Children's Solutions of Multiplication Word Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Corte, E.; And Others

    One important finding from recent research on multiplication word problems is that children's performances are strongly affected by the nature of the multiplier (whether it is an integer, decimal larger than 1 or a decimal smaller than 1). On the other hand, the size of the multiplicand has little or no effect on problem difficulty. The aim of the…

  5. Regulation of Small and Medium-Sized Business Development in Russia: Problems and Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Yuryevna Bogachkova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors prove that despite the active state policy carried out since the second half of the 2000s and aimed at supporting small and medium-sized business in the Russian Federation, the current level of development of this economic sector is insufficient. The present paper characterizes the modern structure of small and medium-sized business. The authors show that the main problems hindering its growth are conditioned by low market demand, large tax deductions, numerous administrative barriers, lack of funding and state support. On the basis of the official data of Russian Federal State Statistics Service on theresults of annual surveys of entrepreneurs, the authors revealed the factors that prevented innovation situation in the country have stable negative impact on MSB, while the impact of such factors as imperfect legal and regulatory framework, investment risks, low profitability and inadequate state of technological infrastructure is relatively nonsignificant. The authors describe systemwide and resource measures of state regulation of small and medium-sized business. The system-wide measures include preferential access to production facilities and equipment, special tax regimes, administrative control. The measures of resource support to entrepreneurs consist in subsidizing the lease payments and interest rates on loans for the modernization of production; grant support, the establishment of microfinance organizations and guarantee funds, the development of business support infrastructure. The authors describe the forms of these measures implementation in 2013 and the main directions of improving the state regulation of small and medium-sized business, including the reduction of tax burden and facilitation of taxation procedures, the reduction of administrative barriers and ensuring access of small and medium-sized enterprises to government orders and technological infrastructure.

  6. Pupil size stability of the cubic phase mask solution for presbyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguer, Citlalli; Acosta, Eva; Arines, Justo

    2018-01-01

    Presbyopia correction involves different types of studies such as lens design, clinical study, and the development of objective metrics, such as the visual Strehl ratio. Different contact lens designs have been proposed for presbyopia correction, but performance depends on pupil diameter. We will analyze the potential use of a nonsymmetrical element, a cubic phase mask (CPM) solution, to develop a contact or intraocular lens whose performance is nearly insensitive to changes in pupil diameter. We will show the through focus optical transfer function of the proposed element for different pupil diameters ranging from 3 to 7 mm. Additionally, we will show the images obtained through computation and experiment for a group of eye charts with different visual acuities. Our results show that a CPM shaped as 7.07 μm*(Z33-Z3-3)-0.9 μm Z20 is a good solution for a range of clear vision with a visual acuity of at least 0.1 logMar from 0.4 to 6 m for pupil diameters in the 3- to 7-mm range. Our results appear to be a good starting point for further development and study of this kind of CPM solution for presbyopia.

  7. CFD simulation of a vertical axis wind turbine operating at a moderate tip speed ratio: guidelines for minimum domain size and azimuthal increment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaeiha, A.; Kalkman, I.; Blocken, B.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the performance of a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation requires a domain size that is large enough to minimize the effects of blockage and uncertainties in the boundary conditions on the results. It also requires the

  8. Effect of Molecular Size of Solutes on Their Partial Molar Volumes in Supercritical n-Pentane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The densities of n-pentane, methane-n-pentane, propane-n-pentane, n-heptane-n-pentane, and n-decane-n-pentane binary mixtures were determined at 476.5K in the pressure range from 2 to 5 MPa. The partial molar volumes of the solutes in n-pentane were calculated using the density data. It was found that the partial molar volumes of methane and propane are positive , while those of n-heptane and n-decane are negative.

  9. Not seeing the forest for the trees: size of the minimum spanning trees (MSTs) forest and branch significance in MST-based phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Andreia Sofia; Monteiro, Pedro T; Carriço, João A; Ramirez, Mário; Francisco, Alexandre P

    2015-01-01

    Trees, including minimum spanning trees (MSTs), are commonly used in phylogenetic studies. But, for the research community, it may be unclear that the presented tree is just a hypothesis, chosen from among many possible alternatives. In this scenario, it is important to quantify our confidence in both the trees and the branches/edges included in such trees. In this paper, we address this problem for MSTs by introducing a new edge betweenness metric for undirected and weighted graphs. This spanning edge betweenness metric is defined as the fraction of equivalent MSTs where a given edge is present. The metric provides a per edge statistic that is similar to that of the bootstrap approach frequently used in phylogenetics to support the grouping of taxa. We provide methods for the exact computation of this metric based on the well known Kirchhoff's matrix tree theorem. Moreover, we implement and make available a module for the PHYLOViZ software and evaluate the proposed metric concerning both effectiveness and computational performance. Analysis of trees generated using multilocus sequence typing data (MLST) and the goeBURST algorithm revealed that the space of possible MSTs in real data sets is extremely large. Selection of the edge to be represented using bootstrap could lead to unreliable results since alternative edges are present in the same fraction of equivalent MSTs. The choice of the MST to be presented, results from criteria implemented in the algorithm that must be based in biologically plausible models.

  10. Overview of progress in European medium sized tokamaks towards an integrated plasma-edge/wall solution

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, H.; Eich, T.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Coda, S.; Hakola, A.; Martin, P.; Adamek, J.; Agostini, M.; Aguiam, D.; Ahn, J.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Akers, R.; Albanese, R.; Aledda, R.; Alessi, E.

    2017-01-01

    Integrating the plasma core performance with an edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) that leads to tolerable heat and particle loads on the wall is a major challenge. The new European medium size tokamak task force (EU-MST) coordinates research on ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), MAST and TCV. This multi-machine approach within EU-MST, covering a wide parameter range, is instrumental to progress in the field, as ITER and DEMO core/pedestal and SOL parameters are not achievable simultaneously in present day de...

  11. Software-Defined Solutions for Managing Energy Use in Small to Medium Sized Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peffer, Therese [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Council on International Education Exchange (CIEE), Portland, ME (United States); Blumstein, Carl [Council on International Education Exchange (CIEE), Portland, ME (United States); Culler, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS); Modera, Mark [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC); Meier, Alan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-10

    The Project uses state-of-the-art computer science to extend the benefits of Building Automation Systems (BAS) typically found in large buildings (>100,000 square foot) to medium-sized commercial buildings (<50,000 sq ft). The BAS developed in this project, termed OpenBAS, uses an open-source and open software architecture platform, user interface, and plug-and-play control devices to facilitate adoption of energy efficiency strategies in the commercial building sector throughout the United States. At the heart of this “turn key” BAS is the platform with three types of controllers—thermostat, lighting controller, and general controller—that are easily “discovered” by the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. The user interface showcases the platform and provides the control system set-up, system status display and means of automatically mapping the control points in the system.

  12. The exact solution and the finite-size behaviour of the Osp(1vertical stroke 2)-invariant spin chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    We have solved exactly the Osp(1vertical stroke 2) spin chain by the Bethe ansatz approach. Our solution is based on an equivalence between the Osp(1vertical stroke 2) chain and a certain special limit of the Izergin-Korepin vertex model. The completeness of the Bethe ansatz equations is discussed for a system with four sites and the appearance of special string structures is noted. The Bethe ansatz presents an important phase factor which distinguishes the even and odd sectors of the theory. The finite-size properties are governed by a conformal field theory with central charge c=1. (orig.)

  13. An exact solution to the extended Hubbard model in 2D for finite size system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harir, S.; Bennai, M.; Boughaleb, Y.

    2008-08-01

    An exact analytical diagonalization is used to solve the two-dimensional extended Hubbard model (EHM) for a system with finite size. We have considered an EHM including on-site and off-site interactions with interaction energies U and V, respectively, for a square lattice containing 4×4 sites at one-eighth filling with periodic boundary conditions, recently treated by Kovacs and Gulacsi (2006 Phil. Mag. 86 2073). Taking into account the symmetric properties of this square lattice and using a translation linear operator, we have constructed a r-space basis only with 85 state-vectors which describe all possible distributions for four electrons in the 4×4 square lattice. The diagonalization of the 85×85 matrix energy allows us to study the local properties of the above system as a function of the on-site and off-site interactions energies, where we have shown that the off-site interaction encourages the existence of the double occupancies at the first excited state and induces a supplementary conductivity of the system.

  14. Synthesis of nano-sized hydroxyapatite powders through solution combustion route under different reaction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samir Kumar; Roy, Sujit Kumar; Kundu, Biswanath; Datta, Someswar; Basu, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite, Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 (HAp) was synthesized by combustion in the aqueous system containing calcium nitrate-diammonium hydrogen orthophosphate with urea and glycine as fuels. These ceramics are important materials for biomedical applications. Thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis were employed to understand the nature of synthesis process during combustion. Effects of different process parameters namely, nature of fuel (urea and glycine), fuel to oxidizer ratio (0.6-4.0) and initial furnace temperature (300-700 o C) on the combustion behavior as well as physical properties of as-formed powders were investigated. A series of combustion reactions were carried out to optimize the reaction parameters for synthesis of nano-sized HAp powders. The combustion temperature (T f ) for the oxidant and fuels were calculated to be 896 deg. C and 1035 deg. C for the stoichiometric system of urea and glycine respectively. The stoichiometric glycine-calcium nitrate produced higher flame temperature (both calculated and measured) and powder with lower specific surface area (8.75 m 2 /g) compared to the stoichiometric urea-calcium nitrate system (10.50 m 2 /g). Fuel excess combustion in both glycine and urea produced powders with higher surface area. Nanocrystalline HAp powder could be synthesized in situ with a large span of fuel to oxidizer ratio (φ) in case of urea system (0.8 < φ < 4) and (0.6 < φ < 1.5) for the glycine system. Calcium hydroxyapatite particles having diameters ranging between 20 nm and 120 nm could be successfully synthesized through optimized process variable.

  15. Digesta retention patterns of solute and different-sized particles in camelids compared with ruminants and other foregut fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Marie T; Runge, Ullrich; Ortmann, Sylvia; Lang, Richard A; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Schwarm, Angela; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2015-07-01

    The mean retention times (MRT) of solute or particles in the gastrointestinal tract and the forestomach (FS) are crucial determinants of digestive physiology in herbivores. Besides ruminants, camelids are the only herbivores that have evolved rumination as an obligatory physiological process consisting of repeated mastication of large food particles, which requires a particle sorting mechanism in the FS. Differences between camelids and ruminants have hardly been investigated so far. In this study we measured MRTs of solute and differently sized particles (2, 10, and 20 mm) and the ratio of large-to-small particle MRT, i.e. the selectivity factors (SF(10/2mm), SF(20/2mm), SF(20/10mm)), in three camelid species: alpacas (Vicugna pacos), llamas (Llama glama), and Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus). The camelid data were compared with literature data from ruminants and non-ruminant foregut fermenters (NRFF). Camelids and ruminants both had higher SF(10/2mm)FS than NRFF, suggesting convergence in the function of the FS sorting mechanism in contrast to NRFF, in which such a sorting mechanism is absent. The SF(20/10mm)FS did not differ between ruminants and camelids, indicating that there is a particle size threshold of about 1 cm in both suborders above which particle retention is not increased. Camelids did not differ from ruminants in MRT(2mm)FS, MRTsoluteFS, and the ratio MRT(2mm)FS/MRTsoluteFS, but they were more similar to 'cattle-' than to 'moose-type' ruminants. Camelids had higher SF(10/2mm)FS and higher SF(20/2mm)FS than ruminants, indicating a potentially slower particle sorting in camelids than in ruminants, with larger particles being retained longer in relation to small particles.

  16. Software-as-a-Service and Cloud Computing, a solution for small and medium-sized companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajenaru, A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Small and medium-sized companies are an important part of today’s world economy, for their ability to offer new jobs but also for their capacity of innovation. At the same time, they are in a constant struggle with larger companies that take advantage of their negotiating power to impose their way of doing business to the SMEs. In an ICT enabled world, most large companies being intense ICT users, the lag of ICT adoption in SMEs may create a strong barrier between SMEs and large companies, promoting an over growing digital divide, the SMEs being in danger of being left out in some economic sectors. This paper aims at finding a possible solution in the Software-as-a-Service and Cloud Computing model, a rather new solution, yet more and more sought off by SMEs but also larger companies, especially considering the global financial and economic crisis, as well as evaluating the European Union’s main views and policies regarding the SAAS – Cloud model.

  17. Minimum spanning trees and random resistor networks in d dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, N

    2005-09-01

    We consider minimum-cost spanning trees, both in lattice and Euclidean models, in d dimensions. For the cost of the optimum tree in a box of size L , we show that there is a correction of order L(theta) , where theta or =1 . The arguments all rely on the close relation of Kruskal's greedy algorithm for the minimum spanning tree, percolation, and (for some arguments) random resistor networks. The scaling of the entropy and free energy at small nonzero T , and hence of the number of near-optimal solutions, is also discussed. We suggest that the Steiner tree problem is in the same universality class as the minimum spanning tree in all dimensions, as is the traveling salesman problem in two dimensions. Hence all will have the same value of theta=-3/4 in two dimensions.

  18. DISSOLVED ORGANIC-MATTER, CADMIUM, COPPER AND ZINC IN PIG SLURRY-SIZE AND SOIL SOLUTION-SIZE EXCLUSION CHROMATOGRAPHY FRACTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DELCASTILHO, P; DALENBERG, JW; BRUNT, K; BRUINS, AP

    1993-01-01

    Sephadex size exclusion chromatography was used to prepare molecular size fractions from liquid pig slurry, before and after aerobic interaction with a loamy-sand soil. In the liquid fractions organic matter was characterized and some components were identified. The distribution of zinc and copper

  19. A general solution for optimal egg size during external fertilization, extended scope for intermediate optimal egg size and the introduction of Don Ottavio 'tango'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Honkoop, PJC; Drent, J; van der Meer, J

    2004-01-01

    Egg sizes of marine invertebrates vary greatly, both within and between species. Among the proposed causes of this are a trade-off between egg size, egg number and survival probability of offspring, and a selection pressure exerted by sperm limitation during external fertilization. Although larger

  20. Statistical process control charts for attribute data involving very large sample sizes: a review of problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed A; Panesar, Jagdeep S; Laney, David B; Wilson, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The use of statistical process control (SPC) charts in healthcare is increasing. The primary purpose of SPC is to distinguish between common-cause variation which is attributable to the underlying process, and special-cause variation which is extrinsic to the underlying process. This is important because improvement under common-cause variation requires action on the process, whereas special-cause variation merits an investigation to first find the cause. Nonetheless, when dealing with attribute or count data (eg, number of emergency admissions) involving very large sample sizes, traditional SPC charts often produce tight control limits with most of the data points appearing outside the control limits. This can give a false impression of common and special-cause variation, and potentially misguide the user into taking the wrong actions. Given the growing availability of large datasets from routinely collected databases in healthcare, there is a need to present a review of this problem (which arises because traditional attribute charts only consider within-subgroup variation) and its solutions (which consider within and between-subgroup variation), which involve the use of the well-established measurements chart and the more recently developed attribute charts based on Laney's innovative approach. We close by making some suggestions for practice.

  1. Determining minimum lubrication film for machine parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1978-01-01

    Formula predicts minimum film thickness required for fully-flooded ball bearings, gears, and cams. Formula is result of study to determine complete theoretical solution of isothermal elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication of fully-flooded elliptical contacts.

  2. Quantitative Research on the Minimum Wage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert S.

    1975-01-01

    The article reviews recent research examining the impact of minimum wage requirements on the size and distribution of teenage employment and earnings. The studies measure income distribution, employment levels and effect on unemployment. (MW)

  3. Comparison of layer grain size analysis with pipette and sieve analysis: a solution for the underestimation of the clay fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konert, M.; Vandenberghe, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Classically, the grain size of soil and sediment samples is determined by the sieve method for the coarse fractions and by the pipette method, based on the 'Stokes' sedimentation rates, for the fine fractions. Results from the two methods are compared with results from laser diffraction size

  4. Corrosion behaviour of nanometre sized cerium oxide and titanium oxide incorporated aluminium in NaCl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, P. Muhamed; Edwin, Leela

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion resistant aluminium incorporated with nano oxides of cerium and titanium. ► 0.2% nano CeO 2 and 0.05% nano TiO 2 showed increased corrosion resistance. ► Nano TiO 2 concentration influenced the optimum performance of the material. ► Comparison of Micro and nano CeO 2 and TiO 2 aluminium showed the latter is best. - Abstract: The study highlights the development of an aluminium matrix composite by incorporating mixture of nanometre sized cerium oxide and titanium oxide in pure aluminium and its corrosion resistance in marine environment. The mixed nanometre sized oxides incorporated aluminium exhibited improved microstructure and excellent corrosion resistance. Corrosion resistance depends on the concentration of nanometre sized titanium oxide. Electrochemical characteristics improved several folds in nanometre sized mixed oxides incorporated aluminium than micrometre sized oxides incorporated aluminium.

  5. Stability of silver nanoparticles (nAg) in aqueous solution: the role of particle size and water ionic strength

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Radebe, N

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available biota which can arise from the particulates, dissolved species or both forms. However, there is limited and contradicting information on how the nanoparticle and aqueous solution characteristics influence nanoparticle stability and toxicity. This study...

  6. Minimum Wages and Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, Gary S.; Kanbur, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Textbook analysis tells us that in a competitive labor market, the introduction of a minimum wage above the competitive equilibrium wage will cause unemployment. This paper makes two contributions to the basic theory of the minimum wage. First, we analyze the effects of a higher minimum wage in terms of poverty rather than in terms of unemployment. Second, we extend the standard textbook model to allow for incomesharing between the employed and the unemployed. We find that there are situation...

  7. Effects of grain size on high temperature creep of fine grained, solution and dispersion hardened V-1.6Y-8W-0.8TiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuno, T. [Ehime Univerisity, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kurishita, H., E-mail: kurishi@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nagasaka, T.; Nishimura, A.; Muroga, T. [Fusion Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Oroshi-cho 322-6, Tok, Gifu 292 (Japan); Sakamoto, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Nakai, K. [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Ehime Univerisity, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Matsuo, S.; Arakawa, H. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    Creep resistance is the major concern of vanadium and its alloys for fusion reactor structural applications. In order to elucidate the effects of grain size on the creep behavior of solution and dispersion strengthened vanadium alloys, V-1.6Y-8W-0.8TiC specimens with fine grain sizes from 0.58 to 1.45 {mu}m were prepared by mechanical alloying and HIP without any plastic working and tested at 1073 K and 250 MPa in vacuum. It is shown that the creep resistance of V-1.6Y-8W-0.8TiC depends strongly on grain size and increases with increasing grain size: The creep life for the grain size of 1.45 {mu}m is almost one order longer than that of 0.58 {mu}m, and about two orders longer than that of V-4Cr-4Ti (NIFS-Heat 2) although the grain size of V-4Cr-4Ti is as large as 17.8 {mu}m. The observed creep behavior is discussed in terms of grain size effects on dislocation glide and grain boundary sliding.

  8. Probing the Interplay of Size, Shape, and Solution Environment in Macromolecular Diffusion Using a Simple Refraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankidy, Bijith D.; Coutinho, Cecil A.; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of polymers is a critical parameter in biomedicine, catalysis, chemical separations, nanotechnology, and other industrial applications. Here, measurement of macromolecular diffusion in solutions is described using a visually instructive, undergraduate-level optical refraction experiment based on Weiner's method. To…

  9. Study of band gap and determination of size of PbS quantum dots synthesized by colloidal solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Ghamsari

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available   PbS semiconductor non-crystals have been synthesized in order to study the modification of their electronic structures and optical properties in relation to their size. The synthesis has been carried out by using the techniques of colloidal chemistry. Strong quantum confinement behavior has been observed based on the analysis of optical spectra of these particles. The average particle size approximated by x-ray line width and hyperbolic band model calculation. Heterogeneous broadening of optical spectrum is studied finally.

  10. Analytical solutions to sampling effects in drop size distribution measurements during stationary rainfall: Estimation of bulk rainfall variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijlenhoet, R.; Porrà, J.M.; Sempere Torres, D.; Creutin, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    A stochastic model of the microstructure of rainfall is used to derive explicit expressions for the magnitude of the sampling fluctuations in rainfall properties estimated from raindrop size measurements in stationary rainfall. The model is a marked point process, in which the points represent the

  11. Size control and supporting of palladium nanoparticles made by laser ablation in saline solution as a facile route to heterogeneous catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzun, Galina; Nakamura, Junji; Zhang, Xiaorui; Barcikowski, Stephan; Wagener, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We studied laser-generated, size-controlled palladium nanoparticles in saline solution. • Palladium nanoparticles were electrostatically stabilized by anions. • Photo- and electrocatalyst are prepared by supporting Pd nanoparticles to TiO 2 and graphene. • Particle size does not change during supporting process, while 18 wt% load has been achieved. • Palladium nanoparticles and graphene undergo a redox-reaction during adsorption. - Abstract: In the literature many investigations on colloidal stability and size control of gold nanoparticles are shown but less for ligand-free palladium nanoparticles, which can be promising materials in various applications. Palladium nanoparticles are perspective materials for a manifold of energy application like photo- and electrocatalysis or hydrogen storage. For this purpose, size-controlled nanoparticles with clean surfaces and facile immobilization on catalyst supports are wanted. Laser ablation in saline solution yields ligand-free, charged colloidal palladium nanoparticles that are supported by titania and graphene nanosheets as model systems for photo- and electrocatalysis, respectively. By adjusting the ionic strength during laser ablation in liquid, it is possible to control stability and particle size without compromising subsequent nanoparticle adsorption of supporting materials. A quantitative deposition of nearly 100% yield with up to 18 wt% nanoparticle load was achieved. The average size of the laser-generated nanoparticles remains the same after immobilization on a support material, in contrast to other preparation methods of catalysts. The characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a redox reaction between the immobilized nanoparticles and the graphene support

  12. Minimum critical mass systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1987-01-01

    An analysis is presented of thermal systems with minimum critical mass, based on the use of materials with optimum neutron moderating and reflecting properties. The optimum fissile material distributions in the systems are obtained by calculations with standard computer codes, extended with a routine for flat fuel importance search. It is shown that in the minimum critical mass configuration a considerable part of the fuel is positioned in the reflector region. For 239 Pu a minimum critical mass of 87 g is found, which is the lowest value reported hitherto. (author)

  13. Exact solution for the inhomogeneous Dicke model in the canonical ensemble: Thermodynamical limit and finite-size corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogosov, W.V., E-mail: walter.pogosov@gmail.com [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electrodynamics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Shapiro, D.S. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); V.A. Kotel' nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bork, L.V. [N.L. Dukhov All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Onishchenko, A.I. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-15

    We consider an exactly solvable inhomogeneous Dicke model which describes an interaction between a disordered ensemble of two-level systems with single mode boson field. The existing method for evaluation of Richardson–Gaudin equations in the thermodynamical limit is extended to the case of Bethe equations in Dicke model. Using this extension, we present expressions both for the ground state and lowest excited states energies as well as leading-order finite-size corrections to these quantities for an arbitrary distribution of individual spin energies. We then evaluate these quantities for an equally-spaced distribution (constant density of states). In particular, we study evolution of the spectral gap and other related quantities. We also reveal regions on the phase diagram, where finite-size corrections are of particular importance.

  14. Investigation of Removal Efficiency of Nano Sized Alumina for Removal of Acid Red 18 from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Dehghani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Acid Red 18 dye was one of the Azo colors that are used in textile and dyeing industries. These dyes are often toxic and carcinogenic to humans and the environment as pollution. This study was conducted with the aim of investigating on nano alumina efficiency for removal of Acid Red 18 dye from aqueous solutions. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in the laboratory scales and effect of The initial concentration of dye (25 to 100 mg/l, pH solution (3, 7, 11, nano alumina concentration (0.1, 0.4, 1, 1.5 g/l and contact time in range 5 to 240 min on dye removal efficiency were evaluated. Also kinetic and isotherm models of adsorption process were evaluated. Results: The high removal efficiency was observed in pH=3, contact time=60 min and Adsorbent concentration of 0.4 g/L. The rate of color removal were 63/24, 50/84 and 20 percent respectively at pH of 3, 7 and 11 for the initial dye concentration of 25 mg/l and 0.4 g/l mass absorbent that showing with increasing pH removal efficiency is reduced. the studied dye absorption isotherm was fitted Langmuir model (R2=0.994 which was 83.33 mg/g for maximum adsorption. The results from kinetic studies showed that removal of the studied dye was best described by pseudo-second order kinetic model (r2=0.999. Conclusion: The present study shows nano alumina powder is promising adsorbent for removal of Acid Red 18 from aqueous solution.

  15. THE EVALUATION OF THE EFFICIENCY OF ENERGY-SAVING SOLUTIONS IMPLEMENTED IN MIDIUM-SIZED SHOPPING CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Szymczak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A six-year time perspective allows for a relative assessment of the amendment of building law regulations on widespread energy saving solutions. The response of the energy efficiency class is included in the energy performance certificate of a building. What does the confrontation with reality look like? For the user of the facility, the main measure is obviously the price in case of energy saving and the cost of ownership. So how to determine for potential user the optimum that will achieve the required level of energy efficiency with low cost of living? Is the changed building law regulations help in developing the “golden mean”?

  16. Minimum entropy production principle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maes, C.; Netočný, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 7 (2013), s. 9664-9677 ISSN 1941-6016 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : MINEP Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Minimum_entropy_production_principle

  17. Shape- and size-controlled synthesis of nanometre ZnO from a simple solution route at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, H L; Qian, X F; Gong, Q; Du, W M; Ma, X D; Zhu, Z K

    2006-01-01

    Single crystalline ZnO nanorods with a diameter of about 5 nm were synthesized without the presence of any surfactants in ethanol solvent at room temperature. Nanodots and nanorods with different size and shape could be observed by TEM via simply altering NaOH concentration and reaction time. The polar ZnO nanorod growth mechanism was discussed by the 'Ostwald ripening' mechanism. Optical absorption and photoluminescence properties of ZnO nanorods have been characterized. The UV absorption spectrum revealed a clear blue-shift with a single absorption peak centred at 350 nm

  18. Analytical inversions in remote sensing of particle size distributions. IV - Comparison of Fymat and Box-McKellar solutions in the anomalous diffraction approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fymat, A. L.; Smith, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown that the inverse analytical solutions, provided separately by Fymat and Box-McKellar, for reconstructing particle size distributions from remote spectral transmission measurements under the anomalous diffraction approximation can be derived using a cosine and a sine transform, respectively. Sufficient conditions of validity of the two formulas are established. Their comparison shows that the former solution is preferable to the latter in that it requires less a priori information (knowledge of the particle number density is not needed) and has wider applicability. For gamma-type distributions, and either a real or a complex refractive index, explicit expressions are provided for retrieving the distribution parameters; such expressions are, interestingly, proportional to the geometric area of the polydispersion.

  19. Size-dependent magnetic and structural properties of CoCrFeO4 nano-powder prepared by solution self-combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijo, A. K.; Dutta, Dimple P.

    2018-04-01

    The study reports the tuning of magnetic and structural properties of nano-sized CoCrFeO4 via post-annealing treatment. CoCrFeO4 nano-powder has been prepared by solution self-combustion method. The structural and magnetic properties have been studied over a range of annealing temperatures (300-900 °C). The formation of the phase pure CoCrFeO4 spinel has been confirmed from powder XRD analysis. The crystallite size is observed to increase with an increase in annealing temperature. On annealing, the value of magnetic parameters-remanence, coercivity and saturation magnetization have enhanced. All the samples exhibit irreversibility at low-temperature measurements.

  20. A microcantilever investigation of size effect, solid-solution strengthening and second-phase strengthening for prism slip in alpha-Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Jicheng, E-mail: jicheng.gong@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Microcantilevers of various sizes were machined using a focused ion beam from commercially pure (CP) Ti, Ti-6Al and Ti-6Al-4V, and tested in bending using a nanoindentor in order to study the size effect, solution strengthening and second-phase strengthening in {alpha}-Ti. Slip on the prismatic system was activated by selecting the crystal orientation of {alpha}-phase in the cantilevers. The critical resolved shear stresses (CRSSs) were determined via an inverse process of fitting a crystal plasticity finite element model to the experimental load-displacement data. Cantilevers had an equilateral triangular cross-section and cantilevers with widths w of 10, 5, 2 and 1 {mu}m were tested. For each material the increase in CRSS {tau} with reducing cantilever width w is represented well by the expression {tau}={tau}{sub 0}+A/w , where {tau}{sub 0} is the CRSS for an infinite sample and A is a constant. Such a variation of CRSS with beam size is well accounted for by the increased back stress generated by dislocations piling up at the neutral axis. The CRSS values extrapolated to infinite sample size are 86 MPa for the CP-Ti, 308 MPa for the Ti-6Al and 444 MPa for the slip in the Ti-6Al-4V.

  1. Effects of aging on PuO{sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O particle size in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C.H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Between 1944 and 1989, 54.5 metric tons of the United States' weapons-grade plutonium and an additional 12.9 metric tons of fuels-grade plutonium were produced in and separated from irradiated uranium metal fuel at the Hanford Site. Acidic high-activity wastes containing around 600 kg of plutonium were made alkaline and discharged to underground storage tanks from separations, isolation, and recycle processes to yield average plutonium concentration of about 0.003 g/L (or {proportional_to} 0.0002 wt. %) in the {proportional_to} 200 million liter tank waste volume. The plutonium is largely associated with low-solubility metal hydroxide/oxide sludges where its low concentration and intimate mixture with neutron-absorbing elements (e.g., iron) are credited in nuclear criticality safety. However, concerns have been expressed that plutonium, in the form of hydrated plutonium oxide, PuO{sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O, could undergo sufficient crystal growth through dissolution and reprecipitation in the alkaline tank waste to potentially become separable from neutron absorbing constituents by settling or sedimentation. Thermodynamic considerations and laboratory studies of systems chemically analogous to tank waste show that the plutonium, precipitated in the alkaline tank waste by neutralization from acid solution, probably entered as 2-5-nm PuO{sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O, crystallite particles that, because of the low concentration of the neutral Pu(IV) dissolved species and opposition from radiolytic processes, grow from that point at exceedingly slow rates. (orig.)

  2. The Effect of File Size and Type and Irrigation Solutions on the Accuracy of Electronic Apex Locators: An In Vitro Study on Canine Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeczek, Maciej; Kosior, Piotr; Piesiak-Pańczyszyn, Dagmara; Dudek, Krzysztof; Chrószcz, Aleksander; Czajczyńska-Waszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kowalczyk-Zając, Małgorzata; Gabren-Syller, Aleksandra; Kirstein, Karol; Skalec, Aleksandra; Bryła, Ewelina; Dobrzyński, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the root canal during endodontic treatment have a significant influence on the course of the therapeutic process as well as on its final result in both human and veterinary medicine. The apical constriction should be the termination point for the preparation and filling of the root canal. This research was conducted with the use of a Septodont kit consisting of a small chamber filled with the examined solution in which a healthy second incisor was placed. The step back method was applied for the root canal preparation and master apical file of 30 was used. The working length was 22 mm. The examination was conducted with the use of steel as well as nickel titanium hand instruments. Different irrigation solutions and two types of apex locators were used. Measurements of the working length of the root canal showed dependence on the size of the instrument. Examinations carried out in various environments showed that analogical measurements were obtained only for sodium hypochlorite solutions. In other environments the measured sections were shortened. Comparative examinations with the use of steel instruments demonstrated insignificant measurement differences. Compared to these results, the measurements in nickel titanium group were characterized by more considerable deviations.

  3. The Effect of File Size and Type and Irrigation Solutions on the Accuracy of Electronic Apex Locators: An In Vitro Study on Canine Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Janeczek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the root canal during endodontic treatment have a significant influence on the course of the therapeutic process as well as on its final result in both human and veterinary medicine. The apical constriction should be the termination point for the preparation and filling of the root canal. This research was conducted with the use of a Septodont kit consisting of a small chamber filled with the examined solution in which a healthy second incisor was placed. The step back method was applied for the root canal preparation and master apical file of 30 was used. The working length was 22 mm. The examination was conducted with the use of steel as well as nickel titanium hand instruments. Different irrigation solutions and two types of apex locators were used. Measurements of the working length of the root canal showed dependence on the size of the instrument. Examinations carried out in various environments showed that analogical measurements were obtained only for sodium hypochlorite solutions. In other environments the measured sections were shortened. Comparative examinations with the use of steel instruments demonstrated insignificant measurement differences. Compared to these results, the measurements in nickel titanium group were characterized by more considerable deviations.

  4. An Analytic Solution to the Computation of Power and Sample Size for Genetic Association Studies under a Pleiotropic Mode of Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Derek; Londono, Douglas; Patel, Payal; Kim, Wonkuk; Finch, Stephen J; Heiman, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Our motivation here is to calculate the power of 3 statistical tests used when there are genetic traits that operate under a pleiotropic mode of inheritance and when qualitative phenotypes are defined by use of thresholds for the multiple quantitative phenotypes. Specifically, we formulate a multivariate function that provides the probability that an individual has a vector of specific quantitative trait values conditional on having a risk locus genotype, and we apply thresholds to define qualitative phenotypes (affected, unaffected) and compute penetrances and conditional genotype frequencies based on the multivariate function. We extend the analytic power and minimum-sample-size-necessary (MSSN) formulas for 2 categorical data-based tests (genotype, linear trend test [LTT]) of genetic association to the pleiotropic model. We further compare the MSSN of the genotype test and the LTT with that of a multivariate ANOVA (Pillai). We approximate the MSSN for statistics by linear models using a factorial design and ANOVA. With ANOVA decomposition, we determine which factors most significantly change the power/MSSN for all statistics. Finally, we determine which test statistics have the smallest MSSN. In this work, MSSN calculations are for 2 traits (bivariate distributions) only (for illustrative purposes). We note that the calculations may be extended to address any number of traits. Our key findings are that the genotype test usually has lower MSSN requirements than the LTT. More inclusive thresholds (top/bottom 25% vs. top/bottom 10%) have higher sample size requirements. The Pillai test has a much larger MSSN than both the genotype test and the LTT, as a result of sample selection. With these formulas, researchers can specify how many subjects they must collect to localize genes for pleiotropic phenotypes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The effects of aging time on the size, morphology, oriented attachment and magnetic behavior of hematite nanocrystals synthesized by forced hydrolysis of FeIII solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, C.; Barriga-Castro, E.D.; Mendoza-Reséndez, R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: Three-dimensional (3-D) nanoarchitectures composed of self-organized hematite nanocrystals were successfully prepared by thermally induced hydrolysis of iron (III) solutions in the presence of urea and without additional stabilizers. The size, morphology and microstructure of these nanocrystal aggregates were investigated as a function of aging time using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The evolution of the microstructural parameters, including crystallite size, root mean square strain and lattice parameters, was analyzed by the Rietveld method using the MAUD software program and adopting the size–strain–shape Popa model. In addition, vibrating-sample magnetometry measurements were carried out to examine the magnetic behavior of the nanoarchitectures. These studies suggested that the formation mechanism of the observed nanoarchitectures consisted of several self-organization processes linked in hierarchical levels. The nanocrystals within these nanoarchitectures grew in size by Ostwald ripening and subsequent grain growth when they were aged at 98 °C in tightly capped tubes for an aging time that varied from 2 h up to 45 days. The crystal morphology evolved favoring a rhombohedral shape until intergrowth between the densely packed nanocrystals occurred. Consequently, the morphology of the nanoarchitectures, their effective magnetic anisotropy, the occurrence of the Morin transition and the exchange bias effect were also strongly dependent on the aging time

  6. Addressing the minimum fleet problem in on-demand urban mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazifeh, M M; Santi, P; Resta, G; Strogatz, S H; Ratti, C

    2018-05-01

    Information and communication technologies have opened the way to new solutions for urban mobility that provide better ways to match individuals with on-demand vehicles. However, a fundamental unsolved problem is how best to size and operate a fleet of vehicles, given a certain demand for personal mobility. Previous studies 1-5 either do not provide a scalable solution or require changes in human attitudes towards mobility. Here we provide a network-based solution to the following 'minimum fleet problem', given a collection of trips (specified by origin, destination and start time), of how to determine the minimum number of vehicles needed to serve all the trips without incurring any delay to the passengers. By introducing the notion of a 'vehicle-sharing network', we present an optimal computationally efficient solution to the problem, as well as a nearly optimal solution amenable to real-time implementation. We test both solutions on a dataset of 150 million taxi trips taken in the city of New York over one year 6 . The real-time implementation of the method with near-optimal service levels allows a 30 per cent reduction in fleet size compared to current taxi operation. Although constraints on driver availability and the existence of abnormal trip demands may lead to a relatively larger optimal value for the fleet size than that predicted here, the fleet size remains robust for a wide range of variations in historical trip demand. These predicted reductions in fleet size follow directly from a reorganization of taxi dispatching that could be implemented with a simple urban app; they do not assume ride sharing 7-9 , nor require changes to regulations, business models, or human attitudes towards mobility to become effective. Our results could become even more relevant in the years ahead as fleets of networked, self-driving cars become commonplace 10-14 .

  7. The Effect of Micro/Nano-metrics Size on the Interaction of Jordanian Aluminosilicate Raw Materials with High pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabsheh, Islam; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador

    2014-05-01

    Environmental preservation has become a driving force behind the search for new sustainable and environmentally friendly composites to replace conventional concrete produced from ordinary Portland cement (OPC). Current researches concentrate on developing building products (geopolymers) through geopolymerization. The goal is to produce low cost construction materials for green housing. Geopolymerization is the process of polymerizing minerals with high silica and alumina at low temperature by the use of alkali solutions. Dissolution is the most important process for supplying the high initial Al and Si concentrations to produce the gel phase that is responsible for geopolymerization. This study has been focused on the influence of different micrometric particle sizes of three Jordanian raw materials on their dissolution behavior in sodium hydroxide solution. The samples are kaolinite, volcanic tuff and silica sand. The dissolution properties of each material, alone and mixed with the other two materials were studied in different concentrations (5 and 10 M) using (NaOH) at 25ºC, and shaking time for 24 and 168 h. To better understand the dissolution process, the alkaline solution was renewed after the desired time in order to know if the Al-Si raw material is completely dissolved or not. Different analytical techniques were used to characterize raw materials physically, mineralogically, chemically and thermally. All processed samples either centrifuged solutions or solid residues were fully characterized. The leached concentrations of Al and Si were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP). X-ray Diffraction Technique (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used to evaluate the solid residue characterization compared with the original ones. The three aluminosilicate raw materials have indicated variable degrees of solubility under highly alkaline conditions. The method for the size reduction of the used raw

  8. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  9. MINIMUM AREAS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING FACILITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Public Instruction, Harrisburg.

    MINIMUM AREA SPACE REQUIREMENTS IN SQUARE FOOTAGE FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING FACILITIES ARE PRESENTED, INCLUDING FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTIONAL USE, GENERAL USE, AND SERVICE USE. LIBRARY, CAFETERIA, KITCHEN, STORAGE, AND MULTIPURPOSE ROOMS SHOULD BE SIZED FOR THE PROJECTED ENROLLMENT OF THE BUILDING IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROJECTION UNDER THE…

  10. Refinement of the deletion in 8q22.2-q22.3: the minimum deletion size at 8q22.3 related to intellectual disability and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-ichi; Ida, Kazumi; Naruto, Takuya; Iai, Mizue; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Kuechler et al. [2011] reported five patients with interstitial deletions in 8q22.2-q22.3 who had intellectual disability, epilepsy, and dysmorphic features. We report on a new patient with the smallest overlapping de novo deletion in 8q22.3 and refined the phenotype. The proposita was an 8-year-old girl, who developed seizures at 10 months, and her epileptic seizure became severe and difficult to control with antiepileptic drugs. She also exhibited developmental delay and walked alone at 24 months. She was referred to us for evaluation for developmental delay and epilepsy at the age of 8 years. She had intellectual disability (IQ 37 at 7 years) and autistic behavior, and spoke two word sentences at 8 years. She had mild dysmorphic features, including telecanthus and thick vermilion of the lips. Array comparative genomic hybridization detected a 1.36 Mb deletion in 8q22.3 that encompassed RRM2B and NCALD, which encode the small subunit of p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase and neurocalcin delta in the neuronal calcium sensor family of calcium-binding proteins, respectively. The minimum overlapping region between the present and previously reported patients is considered to be a critical region for the phenotype of the deletion in 8q22.3. We suggest that the deletion in 8q22.3 may represent a clinically recognizable condition, which is characterized by intellectual disability and epilepsy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A comparison of six software packages for evaluation of solid lung nodules using semi-automated volumetry: What is the minimum increase in size to detect growth in repeated CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoop, Bartjan de; Gietema, Hester; Prokop, Mathias; Ginneken, Bram van; Zanen, Pieter; Groenewegen, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    We compared interexamination variability of CT lung nodule volumetry with six currently available semi-automated software packages to determine the minimum change needed to detect the growth of solid lung nodules. We had ethics committee approval. To simulate a follow-up examination with zero growth, we performed two low-dose unenhanced CT scans in 20 patients referred for pulmonary metastases. Between examinations, patients got off and on the table. Volumes of all pulmonary nodules were determined on both examinations using six nodule evaluation software packages. Variability (upper limit of the 95% confidence interval of the Bland-Altman plot) was calculated for nodules for which segmentation was visually rated as adequate. We evaluated 214 nodules (mean diameter 10.9 mm, range 3.3 mm-30.0 mm). Software packages provided adequate segmentation in 71% to 86% of nodules (p < 0.001). In case of adequate segmentation, variability in volumetry between scans ranged from 16.4% to 22.3% for the various software packages. Variability with five to six software packages was significantly less for nodules ≥8 mm in diameter (range 12.9%-17.1%) than for nodules <8 mm (range 18.5%-25.6%). Segmented volumes of each package were compared to each of the other packages. Systematic volume differences were detected in 11/15 comparisons. This hampers comparison of nodule volumes between software packages. (orig.)

  12. Minimum Error Entropy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Marques de Sá, Joaquim P; Santos, Jorge M F; Alexandre, Luís A

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the minimum error entropy (MEE) concept applied to data classification machines. Theoretical results on the inner workings of the MEE concept, in its application to solving a variety of classification problems, are presented in the wider realm of risk functionals. Researchers and practitioners also find in the book a detailed presentation of practical data classifiers using MEE. These include multi‐layer perceptrons, recurrent neural networks, complexvalued neural networks, modular neural networks, and decision trees. A clustering algorithm using a MEE‐like concept is also presented. Examples, tests, evaluation experiments and comparison with similar machines using classic approaches, complement the descriptions.

  13. Do Minimum Wages Fight Poverty?

    OpenAIRE

    David Neumark; William Wascher

    1997-01-01

    The primary goal of a national minimum wage floor is to raise the incomes of poor or near-poor families with members in the work force. However, estimates of employment effects of minimum wages tell us little about whether minimum wages are can achieve this goal; even if the disemployment effects of minimum wages are modest, minimum wage increases could result in net income losses for poor families. We present evidence on the effects of minimum wages on family incomes from matched March CPS s...

  14. Employment effects of minimum wages

    OpenAIRE

    Neumark, David

    2014-01-01

    The potential benefits of higher minimum wages come from the higher wages for affected workers, some of whom are in low-income families. The potential downside is that a higher minimum wage may discourage employers from using the low-wage, low-skill workers that minimum wages are intended to help. Research findings are not unanimous, but evidence from many countries suggests that minimum wages reduce the jobs available to low-skill workers.

  15. Suggested benchmarks for shape optimization for minimum stress concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pauli

    2008-01-01

    Shape optimization for minimum stress concentration is vital, important, and difficult. New formulations and numerical procedures imply the need for good benchmarks. The available analytical shape solutions rely on assumptions that are seldom satisfied, so here, we suggest alternative benchmarks...

  16. 75 FR 6151 - Minimum Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... capital and reserve requirements to be issued by order or regulation with respect to a product or activity... minimum capital requirements. Section 1362(a) establishes a minimum capital level for the Enterprises... entities required under this section.\\6\\ \\3\\ The Bank Act's current minimum capital requirements apply to...

  17. Effect of the borax mass and pre-spray medium temperature on droplet size and velocity vector distributions of intermittently sprayed starchy solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2015-02-07

    Spray coating technology has demonstrated great potential in the slow release fertilizers industry. The better understanding of the key spray parameters benefits both the environment and low cost coating processes. The use of starch based materials to coat the slow release fertilizers is a new development. However, the hydraulic spray jet breakup of the non-Newtonian starchy solutions is a complex phenomenon and very little known. The aim of this research was to study the axial and radial distributions of the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and velocity vectors in pulsing spray patterns of native and modified tapioca starch solutions. To meet the objective, high speed imaging and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques were employed to characterize the four compositions of the starch-urea-borax complex namely S0, S1, S2 and S3. The unheated solutions exhibited very high viscosities ranging from 2035 to 3030 cP. No jet breakup was seen at any stage of the nozzle operation at an injection pressure of 1-5 bar. However, at 80 °C temperature and 5 bar pressure, the viscosity was reduced to 455 to 638 cP and dense spray patterns emerged from the nozzle obscuring the PDA signals. The axial size distribution revealed a significant decrease in SMD along the spray centreline. The smallest axial SMD (51 to 79 μm) was noticed in S0 spray followed by S1, S2 and S3. Unlikely, the radial SMD in S0 spray did not vary significantly at any stage of the spray injection. This trend was attributed to the continuous growth of the surface wave instabilities on the native starch sheet. However, SMD obtained with S1, S2 and S3 varied appreciably along the radial direction. The mean velocity vector profiles followed the non-Gaussian distribution. The constant vector distributions were seen in the near nozzle regions, where the spray was in the phase of development. In far regions, the velocity vectors were poly-dispersed and a series of ups and downs were seen in the respective radial

  18. ''Reduced'' magnetohydrodynamics and minimum dissipation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated that all solutions of the equations of ''reduced'' magnetohydrodynamics approach a uniform-current, zero-flow state for long times, given a constant wall electric field, uniform scalar viscosity and resistivity, and uniform mass density. This state is the state of minimum energy dissipation rate for these boundary conditions. No steady-state turbulence is possible. The result contrasts sharply with results for full three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics before the reduction occurs

  19. The minimum wage in the Czech enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Lajtkepová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the statutory minimum wage is not a new category, in the Czech Republic we encounter the definition and regulation of a minimum wage for the first time in the 1990 amendment to Act No. 65/1965 Coll., the Labour Code. The specific amount of the minimum wage and the conditions of its operation were then subsequently determined by government regulation in February 1991. Since that time, the value of minimum wage has been adjusted fifteenth times (the last increase was in January 2007. The aim of this article is to present selected results of two researches of acceptance of the statutory minimum wage by Czech enterprises. The first research makes use of the data collected by questionnaire research in 83 small and medium-sized enterprises in the South Moravia Region in 2005, the second one the data of 116 enterprises in the entire Czech Republic (in 2007. The data have been processed by means of the standard methods of descriptive statistics and of the appropriate methods of the statistical analyses (Spearman correlation coefficient of sequential correlation, Kendall coefficient, χ2 - independence test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and others.

  20. Allocation of optimal distributed generation using GA for minimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    quality of supply and reliability in tern extending equipment maintenance intervals and ... The performance of the method is tested on 33-bus test system and ... minimum real power losses of the system by calculating DG size at different buses.

  1. Quark bag coupling to finite size pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Kam, J.; Pirner, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    A standard approximation in theories of quark bags coupled to a pion field is to treat the pion as an elementary field ignoring its substructure and finite size. A difficulty associated with these treatments in the lack of stability of the quark bag due to the rapid increase of the pion pressure on the bad as the bag size diminishes. We investigate the effects of the finite size of the qanti q pion on the pion quark bag coupling by means of a simple nonlocal pion quark interaction. With this amendment the pion pressure on the bag vanishes if the bag size goes to zero. No stability problems are encountered in this description. Furthermore, for extended pions, no longer a maximum is set to the bag parameter B. Therefore 'little bag' solutions may be found provided that B is large enough. We also discuss the possibility of a second minimum in the bag energy function. (orig.)

  2. Degree of Response to Homeopathic Potencies Correlates with Dipole Moment Size in Molecular Detectors: Implications for Understanding the Fundamental Nature of Serially Diluted and Succussed Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Steven J

    2018-02-01

     The use of solvatochromic dyes to investigate homeopathic potencies holds out the promise of understanding the nature of serially succussed and diluted solutions at a fundamental physicochemical level. Recent studies have shown that a range of different dyes interact with potencies and, moreover, the nature of the interaction is beginning to allow certain specific characteristics of potencies to be delineated.  The study reported in this article takes previous investigations further and aims to understand more about the nature of the interaction between potencies and solvatochromic dyes. To this end, the UV-visible spectra of a wide range of potential detectors of potencies have been examined using methodologies previously described.  Results presented demonstrate that solvatochromic dyes are a sub-group of a larger class of compounds capable of demonstrating interactions with potencies. In particular, amino acids containing an aromatic bridge also show marked optical changes in the presence of potencies. Several specific features of molecular detectors can now be shown to be necessary for significant interactions with homeopathic potencies. These include systems with a large dipole moment, electron delocalisation, polarizability and molecular rigidity.  Analysis of the optical changes occurring on interaction with potencies suggests that in all cases potencies increase the polarity of molecular detectors to a degree that correlates with the size of the compound's permanent or ground dipole moment. These results can be explained by inferring that potencies themselves have polarity. Possible candidates for the identity of potencies, based on these and previously reported results, are discussed. The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  3. On (dynamic) range minimum queries in external memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arge, L.; Fischer, Johannes; Sanders, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We study the one-dimensional range minimum query (RMQ) problem in the external memory model. We provide the first space-optimal solution to the batched static version of the problem. On an instance with N elements and Q queries, our solution takes Θ(sort(N + Q)) = Θ( N+QB log M /B N+QB ) I...

  4. Analysis of minimum rail size in heavy axle load environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The effects of increasing axle loads on rail integrity are examined in this paper. In the present context, rail integrity refers to the prevention and control of rail failures. Rail failures usually occur because cracks or defects develop and grow fr...

  5. Towards a mathematical foundation of minimum-variance theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Jianfeng [COGS, Sussex University, Brighton (United Kingdom); Zhang Kewei [SMS, Sussex University, Brighton (United Kingdom); Wei Gang [Mathematical Department, Baptist University, Hong Kong (China)

    2002-08-30

    The minimum-variance theory which accounts for arm and eye movements with noise signal inputs was proposed by Harris and Wolpert (1998 Nature 394 780-4). Here we present a detailed theoretical analysis of the theory and analytical solutions of the theory are obtained. Furthermore, we propose a new version of the minimum-variance theory, which is more realistic for a biological system. For the new version we show numerically that the variance is considerably reduced. (author)

  6. Minimum-Cost Reachability for Priced Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Fehnker, Ansgar; Hune, Thomas Seidelin

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces the model of linearly priced timed automata as an extension of timed automata, with prices on both transitions and locations. For this model we consider the minimum-cost reachability problem: i.e. given a linearly priced timed automaton and a target state, determine...... the minimum cost of executions from the initial state to the target state. This problem generalizes the minimum-time reachability problem for ordinary timed automata. We prove decidability of this problem by offering an algorithmic solution, which is based on a combination of branch-and-bound techniques...

  7. Quality assessment in in vivo NMR spectroscopy: III. Clinical test objects: design, construction, and solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J.; Keevil, S

    1995-01-01

    /Perspex interface produced minimum susceptibility effects. The design of the objects has been evaluated in trials on different magnetic resonance instruments, with size and loading being adjusted to allow use on currently available equipment. Appropriate test solutions for 31P and 1H measurements have been...

  8. Feedback brake distribution control for minimum pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernini, Davide; Velenis, Efstathios; Longo, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    The distribution of brake forces between front and rear axles of a vehicle is typically specified such that the same level of brake force coefficient is imposed at both front and rear wheels. This condition is known as 'ideal' distribution and it is required to deliver the maximum vehicle deceleration and minimum braking distance. For subcritical braking conditions, the deceleration demand may be delivered by different distributions between front and rear braking forces. In this research we show how to obtain the optimal distribution which minimises the pitch angle of a vehicle and hence enhances driver subjective feel during braking. A vehicle model including suspension geometry features is adopted. The problem of the minimum pitch brake distribution for a varying deceleration level demand is solved by means of a model predictive control (MPC) technique. To address the problem of the undesirable pitch rebound caused by a full-stop of the vehicle, a second controller is designed and implemented independently from the braking distribution in use. An extended Kalman filter is designed for state estimation and implemented in a high fidelity environment together with the MPC strategy. The proposed solution is compared with the reference 'ideal' distribution as well as another previous feed-forward solution.

  9. Minimum Q Electrically Small Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, O. S.

    2012-01-01

    Theoretically, the minimum radiation quality factor Q of an isolated resonance can be achieved in a spherical electrically small antenna by combining TM1m and TE1m spherical modes, provided that the stored energy in the antenna spherical volume is totally suppressed. Using closed-form expressions...... for a multiarm spherical helix antenna confirm the theoretical predictions. For example, a 4-arm spherical helix antenna with a magnetic-coated perfectly electrically conducting core (ka=0.254) exhibits the Q of 0.66 times the Chu lower bound, or 1.25 times the minimum Q....

  10. Calculation of the minimum critical mass of fissile nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.Q.; Hopper, Calvin Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    The OB-1 method for the calculation of the minimum critical mass of fissile actinides in metal/water systems was described in a previous paper. A fit to the calculated minimum critical mass data using the extended criticality parameter is the basis of the revised method. The solution density (grams/liter) for the minimum critical mass is also obtained by a fit to calculated values. Input to the calculation consists of the Maxwellian averaged fission and absorption cross sections and the thermal values of nubar. The revised method gives more accurate values than the original method does for both the minimum critical mass and the solution densities. The OB-1 method has been extended to calculate the uncertainties in the minimum critical mass for 12 different fissile nuclides. The uncertainties for the fission and capture cross sections and the estimated nubar uncertainties are used to determine the uncertainties in the minimum critical mass, either in percent or grams. Results have been obtained for U-233, U-235, Pu-236, Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-242m, Cm-243, Cm-245, Cf-249, Cf-251, Cf-253, and Es-254. Eight of these 12 nuclides are included in the ANS-8.15 standard.

  11. USING GENETIC ALGORTIHM TO SOLVE STEINER MINIMUM SPANNING TREE PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öznur İŞÇİ

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithms (GA are a stochastic research methods, and they produce solutions that are close to optimum or near optimum. In addition to GA's successful application to traveling salesman problem, square designation, allocation, workshop table, preparation of lesson/examination schedules, planning of communication networks, assembling line balanced, minimum spanning tree type many combinatorial optimization problems it would be applicable to make the best comparison in optimization. In this study a Java program is developed to solve Steiner minimum spanning tree problem by genetic algorithm and its performance is examined. According to the tests carried out on the problems that were given before in the literature, results that are close to optimum are obtained in by GA approach that is recommended in this study. For the predetermined points in the study, length and gain are calculated for Steiner minimum spanning tree problem and minimum spanning tree problem.

  12. Fermat and the Minimum Principle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arguably, least action and minimum principles were offered or applied much earlier. This (or these) principle(s) is/are among the fundamental, basic, unifying or organizing ones used to describe a variety of natural phenomena. It considers the amount of energy expended in performing a given action to be the least required ...

  13. Coupling between minimum scattering antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.; Lessow, H; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    1974-01-01

    Coupling between minimum scattering antennas (MSA's) is investigated by the coupling theory developed by Wasylkiwskyj and Kahn. Only rotationally symmetric power patterns are considered, and graphs of relative mutual impedance are presented as a function of distance and pattern parameters. Crossed...

  14. Smoothing-Norm Preconditioning for Regularizing Minimum-Residual Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jensen, Toke Koldborg

    2006-01-01

    take into account a smoothing norm for the solution. This technique is well established for CGLS, but it does not immediately carry over to minimum-residual methods when the smoothing norm is a seminorm or a Sobolev norm. We develop a new technique which works for any smoothing norm of the form $\\|L...

  15. Examining the relationship between school district size and science achievement in Texas including rural school administrator perceptions of challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Matthew James

    Rural and small schools have almost one-third of all public school enrollment in America, yet typically have the fewest financial and research based resources. Educational models have been developed with either the urban or suburban school in mind, and the rural school is often left with no other alternative except this paradigm. Rural based educational resources are rare and the ability to access these resources for rural school districts almost non-existent. Federal and state based education agencies provide some rural educational based programs, but have had virtually no success in answering rural school issues. With federal and state interest in science initiatives, the challenge that rural schools face weigh in. To align with that focus, this study examined Texas middle school student achievement in science and its relationship with school district enrollment size. This study involved a sequential transformative mixed methodology with the quantitative phase driving the second qualitative portion. The quantitative research was a non-experimental causal-comparative study conducted to determine whether there is a significant difference between student achievement on the 2010 Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills 8 th grade science results and school district enrollment size. The school districts were distributed into four categories by size including: a) small districts (32-550); b) medium districts (551-1500); c) large districts (1501-6000); and d) mega-sized districts (6001-202,773). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the district averages from the 2010 TAKS 8th grade science assessment results and the four district enrollment groups. The second phase of the study was qualitative utilizing constructivism and critical theory to identify the issues facing rural and small school administrators concerning science based curriculum and development. These themes and issues were sought through a case study method and through use of semi

  16. Quantum mechanics the theoretical minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    From the bestselling author of The Theoretical Minimum, an accessible introduction to the math and science of quantum mechanicsQuantum Mechanics is a (second) book for anyone who wants to learn how to think like a physicist. In this follow-up to the bestselling The Theoretical Minimum, physicist Leonard Susskind and data engineer Art Friedman offer a first course in the theory and associated mathematics of the strange world of quantum mechanics. Quantum Mechanics presents Susskind and Friedman’s crystal-clear explanations of the principles of quantum states, uncertainty and time dependence, entanglement, and particle and wave states, among other topics. An accessible but rigorous introduction to a famously difficult topic, Quantum Mechanics provides a tool kit for amateur scientists to learn physics at their own pace.

  17. Minimum resolvable power contrast model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuai; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Jingjing

    2018-01-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio and MTF are important indexs to evaluate the performance of optical systems. However,whether they are used alone or joint assessment cannot intuitively describe the overall performance of the system. Therefore, an index is proposed to reflect the comprehensive system performance-Minimum Resolvable Radiation Performance Contrast (MRP) model. MRP is an evaluation model without human eyes. It starts from the radiance of the target and the background, transforms the target and background into the equivalent strips,and considers attenuation of the atmosphere, the optical imaging system, and the detector. Combining with the signal-to-noise ratio and the MTF, the Minimum Resolvable Radiation Performance Contrast is obtained. Finally the detection probability model of MRP is given.

  18. Modulating the size of ZnO nanorods on SiO2 substrates by incorporating reduced graphene oxide into the seed layer solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yi Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, reduced graphene oxide was incorporated into the ZnO seed layer to modulate the rod diameter of ZnO nanorods (NRs during solgel/hydrothermal growth. To characterize the reduced graphene oxide incorporated ZnO NRs, multiple material analysis techniques including field-emission scanning electron microscopy, surface contact angle measurements, X-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence were used to explore distinct properties of these size modulatable NRs. Results indicate ZnO NRs with smaller diameters could be observed with more reduced graphene oxide added into the ZnO seed layer. Furthermore, better crystallinity, higher hydrophobicity and lower defect concentration could be obtained with more amount of reduced graphene oxide added into the ZnO seed layer. The modulatable reduced graphene oxide-incorporated ZnO NRs growth is promising for future ZnO NRs based nanodevice applications.

  19. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  20. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for all...

  1. Spectrum of hydrodynamic volumes and sizes of macromolecules of linear polyelectrolytes versus their charge density in salt-free aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Georges M; Dommes, Olga A; Okatova, Olga V; Gavrilova, Irina I; Panarin, Evgenii F

    2018-04-18

    Molecular characteristics of statistical copolymers based on hydrophilic poly(N-methyl-N-vinylacetamide) have been monitored throughout the entire possible range of charge density from 1.5 to 39 mol%. Different trends in the dependence of intrinsic viscosity on the average charge density of polymer chains at minimal ionic strength were revealed. A new parameter, lqq/Abare, describing this behavior was proposed (lqq is the average distance between the neighboring charges along the chain, and Abare is the statistical segment length of a non-charged homologue). For polyelectrolyte chains, this parameter allows the regions of charge density values where electrostatic long-range or short-range interactions dominate to be indicated. Two homologous series of copolymers were characterized by methods of molecular hydrodynamics under conditions of suppressed charge effects. Intrinsic viscosity in salt-free solutions characterizing an individual macromolecule was estimated by a method proposed earlier [Pavlov et al., Russ. J. Appl. Chem., 2006, 79, 1407-1412].

  2. Minimum relative entropy, Bayes and Kapur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Allan D.

    2011-04-01

    The focus of this paper is to illustrate important philosophies on inversion and the similarly and differences between Bayesian and minimum relative entropy (MRE) methods. The development of each approach is illustrated through the general-discrete linear inverse. MRE differs from both Bayes and classical statistical methods in that knowledge of moments are used as ‘data’ rather than sample values. MRE like Bayes, presumes knowledge of a prior probability distribution and produces the posterior pdf itself. MRE attempts to produce this pdf based on the information provided by new moments. It will use moments of the prior distribution only if new data on these moments is not available. It is important to note that MRE makes a strong statement that the imposed constraints are exact and complete. In this way, MRE is maximally uncommitted with respect to unknown information. In general, since input data are known only to within a certain accuracy, it is important that any inversion method should allow for errors in the measured data. The MRE approach can accommodate such uncertainty and in new work described here, previous results are modified to include a Gaussian prior. A variety of MRE solutions are reproduced under a number of assumed moments and these include second-order central moments. Various solutions of Jacobs & van der Geest were repeated and clarified. Menke's weighted minimum length solution was shown to have a basis in information theory, and the classic least-squares estimate is shown as a solution to MRE under the conditions of more data than unknowns and where we utilize the observed data and their associated noise. An example inverse problem involving a gravity survey over a layered and faulted zone is shown. In all cases the inverse results match quite closely the actual density profile, at least in the upper portions of the profile. The similar results to Bayes presented in are a reflection of the fact that the MRE posterior pdf, and its mean

  3. Solution of two-dimensional electromagnetic scattering problem by FDTD with optimal step size, based on a semi-norm analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monsefi, Farid [Division of Applied Mathematics, The School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, MDH, Västerås, Sweden and School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, IDT, Mälardalen University, MDH Väs (Sweden); Carlsson, Linus; Silvestrov, Sergei [Division of Applied Mathematics, The School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, MDH, Västerås (Sweden); Rančić, Milica [Division of Applied Mathematics, The School of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalen University, MDH, Västerås, Sweden and Department of Theoretical Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Electronic Engineering, University (Serbia); Otterskog, Magnus [School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, IDT, Mälardalen University, MDH Västerås (Sweden)

    2014-12-10

    To solve the electromagnetic scattering problem in two dimensions, the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is used. The order of convergence of the FDTD algorithm, solving the two-dimensional Maxwell’s curl equations, is estimated in two different computer implementations: with and without an obstacle in the numerical domain of the FDTD scheme. This constitutes an electromagnetic scattering problem where a lumped sinusoidal current source, as a source of electromagnetic radiation, is included inside the boundary. Confined within the boundary, a specific kind of Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC) is chosen and the outside of the boundary is in form of a Perfect Electric Conducting (PEC) surface. Inserted in the computer implementation, a semi-norm has been applied to compare different step sizes in the FDTD scheme. First, the domain of the problem is chosen to be the free-space without any obstacles. In the second part of the computer implementations, a PEC surface is included as the obstacle. The numerical instability of the algorithms can be rather easily avoided with respect to the Courant stability condition, which is frequently used in applying the general FDTD algorithm.

  4. Solution of two-dimensional electromagnetic scattering problem by FDTD with optimal step size, based on a semi-norm analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsefi, Farid; Carlsson, Linus; Silvestrov, Sergei; Rančić, Milica; Otterskog, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    To solve the electromagnetic scattering problem in two dimensions, the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is used. The order of convergence of the FDTD algorithm, solving the two-dimensional Maxwell’s curl equations, is estimated in two different computer implementations: with and without an obstacle in the numerical domain of the FDTD scheme. This constitutes an electromagnetic scattering problem where a lumped sinusoidal current source, as a source of electromagnetic radiation, is included inside the boundary. Confined within the boundary, a specific kind of Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC) is chosen and the outside of the boundary is in form of a Perfect Electric Conducting (PEC) surface. Inserted in the computer implementation, a semi-norm has been applied to compare different step sizes in the FDTD scheme. First, the domain of the problem is chosen to be the free-space without any obstacles. In the second part of the computer implementations, a PEC surface is included as the obstacle. The numerical instability of the algorithms can be rather easily avoided with respect to the Courant stability condition, which is frequently used in applying the general FDTD algorithm

  5. Increased photocatalytic activity of NiO and ZnO in photodegradation of a model drug aqueous solution: Effect of coupling, supporting, particles size and calcination temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derikvandi, Hadis [Department of Chemistry, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 311-86145, Shahreza, Isfahan, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers and Elite Club, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shahreza (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza, E-mail: arnezamzadeh@iaush.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 311-86145, Shahreza, Isfahan, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers and Elite Club, Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shahreza (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Razi Chemistry Research Center (RCRC), Shahreza Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Increased photoactivity of hybridized/supported NiO-ZnO whit respect to monocomponent one. • Strong dependence of photocatalytic activity of NiO-ZnO to calcination temperature. • Calcination temperature varied the crystallite forms of the semiconductors. • Red shifts in band gaps of the supported coupled semiconductors whit respect to monocomponent one. - Abstract: Mechanically ball-mill prepared clinoptilolite nanoparticles (NC) were used for increasing photocatalytic activity of NiO and ZnO as alone and binary systems. The semiconductors were supported onto the zeolite during calcination of Ni(II)-Zn(II)-exchanged NC at different calcinations temperatures. XRD, FTIR, SEM-EDX, X-ray mapping, DRS, TEM and BET techniques were used for characterization of the samples. The calcined catalysts at 400 °C for 4 h showed the best photocatalytic activity for metronidazole (MNZ) in aqueous solution. The mole ratio of ZnO/NiO affected the photodegradation efficiency because activity of the coupled catalysts depends to the both e/h production and electron scavenging processes. In the used system, NiO acted as e/h production source and ZnO as an electron sink. Red shifts in band gaps of the supported coupled semiconductors was observed whit respect to monocomponent one, confirming formation of nanoparticles of the semiconductors onto the zeolitic bed. The best activities were obtained for the NiO{sub 1.3}–ZnO{sub 1.5}/NC (NZ-NC) and NiO{sub 0.7}–ZnO{sub 4.3}/NC (NZ{sub 3}-NC) catalysts at pH 3, 1.2 g L{sup −1} of the catalysts and 1 g L{sup −1} of MNZ.

  6. The economic production lot size model extended to include more than one production rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian

    2001-01-01

    btween the demand rate and the production rate which minimizes unit production costs, and should be used in an increasing order. Then, given the production rates, we derive closed-form expressions for all optimal runtimes as well as the minimum average cost. This analysis reveals that it is the size...... of the setup cost that determines the need for being able to use several production rates. Finally, we show how to derive a near-optimal solution of the general problem....

  7. Comparison of Effect of Sodium Silicate Particle Size in Nutritional Solution on Physiological Growth Trials of Maize Seedlings under Cadmium Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Saadatian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Although silicon (Si is the second most abundant element in the earth’s crust and its content in plants often reaches values of macronutrients, it is not listed among plant essential elements. However, the beneficial effects of Si in alleviation of various kinds of biotic stresses are well known. Concerning biotic stress, Si enhances, for instance, the resistance of plants to the pathogenic fungi, and it protects plants against and various kinds of insects. Silicon can also mitigate abiotic stresses in plants. Silicon can also reduce the negative effects of some toxic metals in plant species. Cadmium (Cd is one of the most dangerous toxic metals for living organisms. It is a hazardous contaminant of food and through the food chains enters the human body as a cumulative poison. Contamination of agricultural soils by Cd represents a serious. Environmental problem in many countries and ranks high in food safety issues. Silicon was recently described as an effective substance for alleviation of Cd toxicity in some plants. The use of nano-compound material has given a lot of attention by the agricultural researchers, especially by those investigating seed characteristics, although their exact mechanisms of actions are not well understood. Nanomaterials, because of their tiny size, show unique characteristics. For example, they can change physico-chemical properties compared to bulk materials. They have greater surface area than bulk materials, and due to this larger surface area, their solubility and surface reactivity tend to be higher. Materials and Methods This experiment was conducted in an environmentally controlled Research greenhouse in Department of Agronomy, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. Corn (SC 704 seeds were germinated in a soil less growing system in cocopite. When the seedlings were at the two leaves stage of growth, they were transplanted hydroponic culture. Experiment was carried out as a factorial based using

  8. The minimum yield in channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uguzzoni, A.; Gaertner, K.; Lulli, G.; Andersen, J.U.

    2000-01-01

    A first estimate of the minimum yield was obtained from Lindhard's theory, with the assumption of a statistical equilibrium in the transverse phase-space of channeled particles guided by a continuum axial potential. However, computer simulations have shown that this estimate should be corrected by a fairly large factor, C (approximately equal to 2.5), called the Barrett factor. We have shown earlier that the concept of a statistical equilibrium can be applied to understand this result, with the introduction of a constraint in phase-space due to planar channeling of axially channeled particles. Here we present an extended test of these ideas on the basis of computer simulation of the trajectories of 2 MeV α particles in Si. In particular, the gradual trend towards a full statistical equilibrium is studied. We also discuss the introduction of this modification of standard channeling theory into descriptions of the multiple scattering of channeled particles (dechanneling) by a master equation and show that the calculated minimum yields are in very good agreement with the results of a full computer simulation

  9. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwee, Regina

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.2 < |η| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presented. We also highlight the advantage of these triggers for particle correlation analyses. (author)

  10. Minimum-Cost Reachability for Priced Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Fehnker, Ansgar; Hune, Thomas Seidelin

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces the model of linearly priced timed automata as an extension of timed automata, with prices on both transitions and locations. For this model we consider the minimum-cost reachability problem: i.e. given a linearly priced timed automaton and a target state, determine...... the minimum cost of executions from the initial state to the target state. This problem generalizes the minimum-time reachability problem for ordinary timed automata. We prove decidability of this problem by offering an algorithmic solution, which is based on a combination of branch-and-bound techniques...... and a new notion of priced regions. The latter allows symbolic representation and manipulation of reachable states together with the cost of reaching them....

  11. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-11-09

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  12. Approximating the minimum cycle mean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Chatterjee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider directed graphs where each edge is labeled with an integer weight and study the fundamental algorithmic question of computing the value of a cycle with minimum mean weight. Our contributions are twofold: (1 First we show that the algorithmic question is reducible in O(n^2 time to the problem of a logarithmic number of min-plus matrix multiplications of n-by-n matrices, where n is the number of vertices of the graph. (2 Second, when the weights are nonnegative, we present the first (1 + ε-approximation algorithm for the problem and the running time of our algorithm is ilde(O(n^ω log^3(nW/ε / ε, where O(n^ω is the time required for the classic n-by-n matrix multiplication and W is the maximum value of the weights.

  13. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-01-08

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  14. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  15. Youth minimum wages and youth employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marimpi, Maria; Koning, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This paper performs a cross-country level analysis on the impact of the level of specific youth minimum wages on the labor market performance of young individuals. We use information on the use and level of youth minimum wages, as compared to the level of adult minimum wages as well as to the median

  16. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those…

  17. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  18. Minimum income protection in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Peijpe, T.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers an overview of the Dutch legal system of minimum income protection through collective bargaining, social security, and statutory minimum wages. In addition to collective agreements, the Dutch statutory minimum wage offers income protection to a small number of workers. Its

  19. Optimal Sizing and Placement of Battery Energy Storage in Distribution System Based on Solar Size for Voltage Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazaripouya, Hamidreza [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wang, Yubo [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chu, Peter [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pota, Hemanshu R. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gadh, Rajit [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-07-26

    This paper proposes a new strategy to achieve voltage regulation in distributed power systems in the presence of solar energy sources and battery storage systems. The goal is to find the minimum size of battery storage and its corresponding location in the network based on the size and place of the integrated solar generation. The proposed method formulates the problem by employing the network impedance matrix to obtain an analytical solution instead of using a recursive algorithm such as power flow. The required modifications for modeling the slack and PV buses (generator buses) are utilized to increase the accuracy of the approach. The use of reactive power control to regulate the voltage regulation is not always an optimal solution as in distribution systems R/X is large. In this paper the minimum size and the best place of battery storage is achieved by optimizing the amount of both active and reactive power exchanged by battery storage and its gridtie inverter (GTI) based on the network topology and R/X ratios in the distribution system. Simulation results for the IEEE 14-bus system verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Allowable minimum upper shelf toughness for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahoor, A.

    1988-05-01

    The paper develops methodology and procedure for determining the allowable minimum upper shelf toughness for continued safe operation of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis method based on the J-integral tearing modulus (J/T) approach is used. Closed from expressions for the applied J and tearing modulus are presented for finite length, part-throughwall axial flaw with aspect ratio of 1/6. Solutions are then presented for Section III, Appendix G flaw. A simple flaw evaluation procedure that can be applied quickly by utility engineers is presented. An attractive feature of the simple procedure is that tearing modulus calculations are not required by the user, and a solution for the slope of the applied J/T line is provided. Results for the allowable minimum upper shelf toughness are presented for a range of reactor pressure vessel thickness and heatup/cooldown rates.

  1. Allowable minimum upper shelf toughness for nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahoor, A.

    1988-01-01

    The paper develops methodology and procedure for determining the allowable minimum upper shelf toughness for continued safe operation of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis method based on the J-integral tearing modulus (J/T) approach is used. Closed from expressions for the applied J and tearing modulus are presented for finite length, part-throughwall axial flaw with aspect ratio of 1/6. Solutions are then presented for Section III, Appendix G flaw. A simple flaw evaluation procedure that can be applied quickly by utility engineers is presented. An attractive feature of the simple procedure is that tearing modulus calculations are not required by the user, and a solution for the slope of the applied J/T line is provided. Results for the allowable minimum upper shelf toughness are presented for a range of reactor pressure vessel thickness and heatup/cooldown rates. (orig.)

  2. Minimum wage development in the Russian Federation

    OpenAIRE

    Bolsheva, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the effectiveness of the minimum wage policy at the national level in Russia and its impact on living standards in the country. The analysis showed that the national minimum wage in Russia does not serve its original purpose of protecting the lowest wage earners and has no substantial effect on poverty reduction. The national subsistence minimum is too low and cannot be considered an adequate criterion for the setting of the minimum wage. The minimum wage d...

  3. Minimum weight passive insulation requirements for hypersonic cruise vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical solutions are derived for two representative cases of the transient heat conduction equation to determine the minimum weight requirements for passive insulation systems of hypersonic cruise vehicles. The cases discussed are the wet wall case with the interior wall temperature held to that of the boiling point of the fuel throughout the flight, and the dry wall case where the heat transferred through the insulation is absorbed by the interior structure whose temperature is allowed to rise.

  4. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-05-14

    This thesis presents a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves, at some unknown time, differently than the “background” motion, which can be induced from camera motion. The goal of proposed method is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Since motion estimation can be unreliable between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Observing more frames before declaring a detection may lead to a more accurate detection and segmentation, since more motion may be observed leading to a stronger motion cue. However, this leads to greater delay. The proposed method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms, defined as declarations of detection before the object moves or incorrect or inaccurate segmentation at the detection time. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  5. Minimum nonuniform graph partitioning with unrelated weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarychev, K. S.; Makarychev, Yu S.

    2017-12-01

    We give a bi-criteria approximation algorithm for the Minimum Nonuniform Graph Partitioning problem, recently introduced by Krauthgamer, Naor, Schwartz and Talwar. In this problem, we are given a graph G=(V,E) and k numbers ρ_1,\\dots, ρ_k. The goal is to partition V into k disjoint sets (bins) P_1,\\dots, P_k satisfying \\vert P_i\\vert≤ ρi \\vert V\\vert for all i, so as to minimize the number of edges cut by the partition. Our bi-criteria algorithm gives an O(\\sqrt{log \\vert V\\vert log k}) approximation for the objective function in general graphs and an O(1) approximation in graphs excluding a fixed minor. The approximate solution satisfies the relaxed capacity constraints \\vert P_i\\vert ≤ (5+ \\varepsilon)ρi \\vert V\\vert. This algorithm is an improvement upon the O(log \\vert V\\vert)-approximation algorithm by Krauthgamer, Naor, Schwartz and Talwar. We extend our results to the case of 'unrelated weights' and to the case of 'unrelated d-dimensional weights'. A preliminary version of this work was presented at the 41st International Colloquium on Automata, Languages and Programming (ICALP 2014). Bibliography: 7 titles.

  6. Isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration reduction by fentanyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, A I; Smith, C; Dyar, O; Goodman, D; Smith, L R; Glass, P S

    1993-05-01

    Isoflurane is commonly combined with fentanyl during anesthesia. Because of hysteresis between plasma and effect site, bolus administration of fentanyl does not accurately describe the interaction between these drugs. The purpose of this study was to determine the MAC reduction of isoflurane by fentanyl when both drugs had reached steady biophase concentrations. Seventy-seven patients were randomly allocated to receive either no fentanyl or fentanyl at several predetermined plasma concentrations. Fentanyl was administered using a computer-assisted continuous infusion device. Patients were also randomly allocated to receive a predetermined steady state end-tidal concentration of isoflurane. Blood samples for fentanyl concentration were taken at 10 min after initiation of the infusion and before and immediately after skin incision. A minimum of 20 min was allowed between the start of the fentanyl infusion and skin incision. The reduction in the MAC of isoflurane by the measured fentanyl concentration was calculated using a maximum likelihood solution to a logistic regression model. There was an initial steep reduction in the MAC of isoflurane by fentanyl, with 3 ng/ml resulting in a 63% MAC reduction. A ceiling effect was observed with 10 ng/ml providing only a further 19% reduction in MAC. A 50% decrease in MAC was produced by a fentanyl concentration of 1.67 ng/ml. Defining the MAC reduction of isoflurane by all the opioids allows their more rational administration with inhalational anesthetics and provides a comparison of their relative anesthetic potencies.

  7. 7 CFR 51.344 - Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Size § 51.344 Size. (a) The minimum and maximum sizes or range...

  8. Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    In the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization(MAWS) concept, actual waste streams are utilized as additive resources for vitrification, which may contain the basic components (glass formers and fluxes) for making a suitable glass or glassy slag. If too much glass former is present, then the melt viscosity or temperature will be too high for processing; while if there is too much flux, then the durability may suffer. Therefore, there are optimum combinations of these two important classes of constituents depending on the criteria required. The challenge is to combine these resources in such a way that minimizes the use of non-waste additives yet yields a processable and durable final waste form for disposal. The benefit to this approach is that the volume of the final waste form is minimized (waste loading maximized) since little or no additives are used and vitrification itself results in volume reduction through evaporation of water, combustion of organics, and compaction of the solids into a non-porous glass. This implies a significant reduction in disposal costs due to volume reduction alone, and minimizes future risks/costs due to the long term durability and leach resistance of glass. This is accomplished by using integrated systems that are both cost-effective and produce an environmentally sound waste form for disposal. individual component technologies may include: vitrification; thermal destruction; soil washing; gas scrubbing/filtration; and, ion-exchange wastewater treatment. The particular combination of technologies will depend on the waste streams to be treated. At the heart of MAWS is vitrification technology, which incorporates all primary and secondary waste streams into a final, long-term, stabilized glass wasteform. The integrated technology approach, and view of waste streams as resources, is innovative yet practical to cost effectively treat a broad range of DOE mixed and low-level wastes

  9. Minimum emittance of three-bend achromats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoyu; Xu Gang

    2012-01-01

    The calculation of the minimum emittance of three-bend achromats (TBAs) made by Mathematical software can ignore the actual magnets lattice in the matching condition of dispersion function in phase space. The minimum scaling factors of two kinds of widely used TBA lattices are obtained. Then the relationship between the lengths and the radii of the three dipoles in TBA is obtained and so is the minimum scaling factor, when the TBA lattice achieves its minimum emittance. The procedure of analysis and the results can be widely used in achromats lattices, because the calculation is not restricted by the actual lattice. (authors)

  10. A Pareto-Improving Minimum Wage

    OpenAIRE

    Eliav Danziger; Leif Danziger

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows that a graduated minimum wage, in contrast to a constant minimum wage, can provide a strict Pareto improvement over what can be achieved with an optimal income tax. The reason is that a graduated minimum wage requires high-productivity workers to work more to earn the same income as low-productivity workers, which makes it more difficult for the former to mimic the latter. In effect, a graduated minimum wage allows the low-productivity workers to benefit from second-degree pr...

  11. The minimum wage in the Czech enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Lajtkepová

    2010-01-01

    Although the statutory minimum wage is not a new category, in the Czech Republic we encounter the definition and regulation of a minimum wage for the first time in the 1990 amendment to Act No. 65/1965 Coll., the Labour Code. The specific amount of the minimum wage and the conditions of its operation were then subsequently determined by government regulation in February 1991. Since that time, the value of minimum wage has been adjusted fifteenth times (the last increase was in January 2007). ...

  12. Sizing through simulation of systems for photovoltaic solar energy applied to rural electrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez‐Borges, Ciaddy Gina; Sarmiento‐Sera, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The present work is based on the sizing method by means of simulation of the photovoltaic systems energy behavior, applied to rural electrification in regions far from the electric net. The denomination of infra/over sized systems is made and a requested analysis of one particular case is exposed, where it is considered two energy options of different qualities of electric service and the economic valuation of each option is requested, with its corresponding argument. The quality level is established with the fault index in the electricity service for energy lack in the batteries, besides the quantity of energy autonomy days of the system. As conclusions, in infra-sizing conditions systems, and with established quality level of service, multiple sizing solutions exist, and under certain conditions, not always the systems with more quality level, are those of more cost, as well as the presence of a minimum cost in the sizing can be obtained by simulation methods. (author)

  13. Construction of Protograph LDPC Codes with Linear Minimum Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Jones, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    A construction method for protograph-based LDPC codes that simultaneously achieve low iterative decoding threshold and linear minimum distance is proposed. We start with a high-rate protograph LDPC code with variable node degrees of at least 3. Lower rate codes are obtained by splitting check nodes and connecting them by degree-2 nodes. This guarantees the linear minimum distance property for the lower-rate codes. Excluding checks connected to degree-1 nodes, we show that the number of degree-2 nodes should be at most one less than the number of checks for the protograph LDPC code to have linear minimum distance. Iterative decoding thresholds are obtained by using the reciprocal channel approximation. Thresholds are lowered by using either precoding or at least one very high-degree node in the base protograph. A family of high- to low-rate codes with minimum distance linearly increasing in block size and with capacity-approaching performance thresholds is presented. FPGA simulation results for a few example codes show that the proposed codes perform as predicted.

  14. Minimum Energy Requirements in Complex Distillation Arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorsen, Ivar J.

    2001-07-01

    Distillation is the most widely used industrial separation technology and distillation units are responsible for a significant part of the total heat consumption in the world's process industry. In this work we focus on directly (fully thermally) coupled column arrangements for separation of multicomponent mixtures. These systems are also denoted Petlyuk arrangements, where a particular implementation is the dividing wall column. Energy savings in the range of 20-40% have been reported with ternary feed mixtures. In addition to energy savings, such integrated units have also a potential for reduced capital cost, making them extra attractive. However, the industrial use has been limited, and difficulties in design and control have been reported as the main reasons. Minimum energy results have only been available for ternary feed mixtures and sharp product splits. This motivates further research in this area, and this thesis will hopefully give some contributions to better understanding of complex column systems. In the first part we derive the general analytic solution for minimum energy consumption in directly coupled columns for a multicomponent feed and any number of products. To our knowledge, this is a new contribution in the field. The basic assumptions are constant relative volatility, constant pressure and constant molar flows and the derivation is based on Underwood's classical methods. An important conclusion is that the minimum energy consumption in a complex directly integrated multi-product arrangement is the same as for the most difficult split between any pair of the specified products when we consider the performance of a conventional two-product column. We also present the Vmin-diagram, which is a simple graphical tool for visualisation of minimum energy related to feed distribution. The Vmin-diagram provides a simple mean to assess the detailed flow requirements for all parts of a complex directly coupled arrangement. The main purpose in

  15. Minimum Energy Requirements in Complex Distillation Arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halvorsen, Ivar J

    2001-07-01

    Distillation is the most widely used industrial separation technology and distillation units are responsible for a significant part of the total heat consumption in the world's process industry. In this work we focus on directly (fully thermally) coupled column arrangements for separation of multicomponent mixtures. These systems are also denoted Petlyuk arrangements, where a particular implementation is the dividing wall column. Energy savings in the range of 20-40% have been reported with ternary feed mixtures. In addition to energy savings, such integrated units have also a potential for reduced capital cost, making them extra attractive. However, the industrial use has been limited, and difficulties in design and control have been reported as the main reasons. Minimum energy results have only been available for ternary feed mixtures and sharp product splits. This motivates further research in this area, and this thesis will hopefully give some contributions to better understanding of complex column systems. In the first part we derive the general analytic solution for minimum energy consumption in directly coupled columns for a multicomponent feed and any number of products. To our knowledge, this is a new contribution in the field. The basic assumptions are constant relative volatility, constant pressure and constant molar flows and the derivation is based on Underwood's classical methods. An important conclusion is that the minimum energy consumption in a complex directly integrated multi-product arrangement is the same as for the most difficult split between any pair of the specified products when we consider the performance of a conventional two-product column. We also present the Vmin-diagram, which is a simple graphical tool for visualisation of minimum energy related to feed distribution. The Vmin-diagram provides a simple mean to assess the detailed flow requirements for all parts of a complex directly coupled arrangement. The main purpose in the first

  16. Stochastic variational approach to minimum uncertainty states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illuminati, F.; Viola, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Padova Univ. (Italy)

    1995-05-21

    We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schroedinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials. (author)

  17. Zero forcing parameters and minimum rank problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barioli, F.; Barrett, W.; Fallat, S.M.; Hall, H.T.; Hogben, L.; Shader, B.L.; Driessche, van den P.; Holst, van der H.

    2010-01-01

    The zero forcing number Z(G), which is the minimum number of vertices in a zero forcing set of a graph G, is used to study the maximum nullity/minimum rank of the family of symmetric matrices described by G. It is shown that for a connected graph of order at least two, no vertex is in every zero

  18. 30 CFR 281.30 - Minimum royalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 281.30 Section 281.30 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations § 281.30 Minimum royalty...

  19. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark,…

  20. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  1. Boiling characteristics of dilute polymer solutions and implications for the suppression of vapor explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K.H.; Kim, M.H. [Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-01

    Quenching experiments of hot solid spheres in dilute aqueous solutions of polyethylene oxide polymer have been conducted for the purpose of investigating the physical mechanisms of the suppression of vapor explosions in this polymer solutions. Two spheres of 22.2mm and 9.5mm-diameter were tested in the polymer solutions of various concentrations at 30{degrees}C. Minimum film boiling temperature ({Delta}T{sub MFB}) in this highly-subcooled liquid rapidly decreased from over 700{degrees}c for pure water to about 150{degrees}C as the polymer concentration was increased up to 300ppm for 22.2mm sphere, and it decreased to 350{degrees}C for 9.5mm sphere. This rapid reduction of minimum film boiling temperature in the PEO aqueous solutions can explain its ability of the suppression of spontaneous vapor explosions. The ability of suppression of vapor explosions by dilute polyethylene oxide solutions against an external trigger pressure was tested by dropping molten tin into the polymer solutions at 25{degrees}C. It was observed that in 50ppm solutions more mass fragmented than in pure water, but produced weaker explosion pressures. The explosion was completely suppressed in 300ppm solutions with the external trigger. The debris size distributions of fine fragments smaller than 0.7mm were shown almost identical regardless of the polymer concentrations.

  2. Examination of soil contaminated by coal-liquids by size exclusion chromatography in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone solution to evaluate interference from humic and fulvic acids and extracts from peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T J; Herod, A A; Brain, S A; Chambers, F M; Kandiyoti, R

    2005-11-18

    Soil from a redundant coke oven site has been examined by extraction of soluble materials using 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of the extracted material. The extracted material was found to closely resemble a high temperature coal tar pitch. Standard humic and fulvic acids were also examined since these materials are very soluble in NMP and would be extracted with pitch if present in the soil. Humic substances derived from peat samples and NMP-extracts of peats were also examined. The results show that the humic and fulvic substances were not extracted directly by NMP from peats. They were extracted using caustic soda solution and were different from the peat extracts in NMP. These results indicate that humic and fulvic acids were soluble in NMP in the protonated polyelectrolyte form but not in the original native polyelectrolyte form. The extraction of soil using NMP followed by SEC appears to be a promising method for identifying contamination by coal-based industries.

  3. Normalized Minimum Error Entropy Algorithm with Recursive Power Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namyong Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The minimum error entropy (MEE algorithm is known to be superior in signal processing applications under impulsive noise. In this paper, based on the analysis of behavior of the optimum weight and the properties of robustness against impulsive noise, a normalized version of the MEE algorithm is proposed. The step size of the MEE algorithm is normalized with the power of input entropy that is estimated recursively for reducing its computational complexity. The proposed algorithm yields lower minimum MSE (mean squared error and faster convergence speed simultaneously than the original MEE algorithm does in the equalization simulation. On the condition of the same convergence speed, its performance enhancement in steady state MSE is above 3 dB.

  4. The minimum coronary artery diameter in which coronary spasm can be identified by synchrotron radiation coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Shonosuke; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Imazuru, Tomohiro; Tokunaga, Chiho; Sato, Fujio; Enomoto, Yoshiharu; Hiramatsu, Yuji; Sakakibara, Yuzuru

    2008-01-01

    Background: Coronary vasospasm is defined as a temporary, intense narrowing of the coronary conduit artery. It brings about ischemic chest pain and becomes one of the causes of myocardial infarction. Coronary spasms are divided into two categories. One is the coronary spasm of the conduit artery and the other is the coronary microvascular spasm. Although coronary spasms are diagnosed with the images of coronary angiography, microvascular spasms cannot be diagnosed because of the limitations of conventional angiographic systems. However, synchrotron radiation coronary angiography (SRCA) can identify coronary arteries down to 100 μm in diameter in the beating heart and 50 μm in arrested heart. Aim: The purpose of this study was to confirm whether microvascular spasms could be identified or not using SRCA, and then down that size identification was possible. Methods: The Langendorff perfusion system with isolated rat hearts was employed. Krebs-Henseleit solution (KH solution) was used as a perfusate. 10 mM of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP: a voltage-gated potassium channel blocker; spasm inducer) was added to the KH solution and maintained for 5 min. SRCA was performed at pre-, during and 10 min after cessation of the KH solution with 4-AP. Coronary spasms were defined as a temporal 75% reduction of coronary arterial diameter. Results and conclusion: Multiple sizes of coronary arteries showed coronary spasms. The minimum stenosed coronary artery size was 100 μm. Since coronary microvascular spasms are seen in the arterioles (50-400 μm), coronary microvascular spasms may be diagnosed with the use of synchrotron radiation coronary angiography

  5. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  6. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Gang; Peng Yuemei

    2015-01-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 3 1/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design. (authors)

  7. Who Benefits from a Minimum Wage Increase?

    OpenAIRE

    John W. Lopresti; Kevin J. Mumford

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how a minimum wage increase affects the wages of low-wage workers. Most studies assume that there is a simple mechanical increase in the wage for workers earning a wage between the old and the new minimum wage, with some studies allowing for spillovers to workers with wages just above this range. Rather than assume that the wages of these workers would have remained constant, this paper estimates how a minimum wage increase impacts a low-wage worker's wage...

  8. Wage inequality, minimum wage effects and spillovers

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Mark B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates possible spillover effects of the UK minimum wage. The halt in the growth in inequality in the lower half of the wage distribution (as measured by the 50:10 percentile ratio) since the mid-1990s, in contrast to the continued inequality growth in the upper half of the distribution, suggests the possibility of a minimum wage effect and spillover effects on wages above the minimum. This paper analyses individual wage changes, using both a difference-in-differences estimat...

  9. Portion size

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cards One 3-ounce (84 grams) serving of fish is a checkbook One-half cup (40 grams) ... for the smallest size. By eating a small hamburger instead of a large, you will save about 150 calories. ...

  10. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C T; Jian, L K; Luhmann, J G

    2013-05-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23-24 transition.

  11. Impact of the Minimum Wage on Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Michael N.; Candland, Charles W.

    1979-01-01

    Assesses the impact of increases in the minimum wage on salary schedules, provides guidelines for creating a philosophy to deal with the impact, and outlines options and presents recommendations. (IRT)

  12. Long Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Long-Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized, primary screening and assessment tool of health status that forms the foundation of the comprehensive...

  13. The SME gauge sector with minimum length

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belich, H.; Louzada, H.L.C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2017-12-15

    We study the gauge sector of the Standard Model Extension (SME) with the Lorentz covariant deformed Heisenberg algebra associated to the minimum length. In order to find and estimate corrections, we clarify whether the violation of Lorentz symmetry and the existence of a minimum length are independent phenomena or are, in some way, related. With this goal, we analyze the dispersion relations of this theory. (orig.)

  14. The SME gauge sector with minimum length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belich, H.; Louzada, H. L. C.

    2017-12-01

    We study the gauge sector of the Standard Model Extension (SME) with the Lorentz covariant deformed Heisenberg algebra associated to the minimum length. In order to find and estimate corrections, we clarify whether the violation of Lorentz symmetry and the existence of a minimum length are independent phenomena or are, in some way, related. With this goal, we analyze the dispersion relations of this theory.

  15. Rate-Compatible LDPC Codes with Linear Minimum Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Jones, Christopher; Dolinar, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    A recently developed method of constructing protograph-based low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes provides for low iterative decoding thresholds and minimum distances proportional to block sizes, and can be used for various code rates. A code constructed by this method can have either fixed input block size or fixed output block size and, in either case, provides rate compatibility. The method comprises two submethods: one for fixed input block size and one for fixed output block size. The first mentioned submethod is useful for applications in which there are requirements for rate-compatible codes that have fixed input block sizes. These are codes in which only the numbers of parity bits are allowed to vary. The fixed-output-blocksize submethod is useful for applications in which framing constraints are imposed on the physical layers of affected communication systems. An example of such a system is one that conforms to one of many new wireless-communication standards that involve the use of orthogonal frequency-division modulation

  16. The minimum work required for air conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhazmy, Majed M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis based on the second law of thermodynamics to estimate the minimum work required for the air conditioning process. The air conditioning process for hot and humid climates involves reducing air temperature and humidity. In the present analysis the inlet state is the state of the environment which has also been chosen as the dead state. The final state is the human thermal comfort fixed at 20 o C dry bulb temperature and 60% relative humidity. The general air conditioning process is represented by an equivalent path consisting of an isothermal dehumidification followed by a sensible cooling. An exergy analysis is performed on each process separately. Dehumidification is analyzed as a separation process of an ideal mixture of air and water vapor. The variations of the minimum work required for the air conditioning process with the ambient conditions is estimated and the ratio of the work needed for dehumidification to the total work needed to perform the entire process is presented. The effect of small variations in the final conditions on the minimum required work is evaluated. Tolerating a warmer or more humid final condition can be an easy solution to reduce the energy consumptions during critical load periods

  17. Application of the minimum fuel neural network to music signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, Anders La-Cour

    2004-01-01

    ) for finding sparse representations of music signals. This method is a set of two ordinary differential equations. We argue that the most important parameter for optimal use of this method is the discretization step size, and we demonstrate that this can be a priori determined. This significantly speeds up......Finding an optimal representation of a signal in an over-complete dictionary is often quite difficult. Since general results in this field are not very application friendly it truly helps to specify the framework as much as possible. We investigate the method Minimum Fuel Neural Network (MFNN...

  18. Sustainable Sizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinette, Kathleen M; Veitch, Daisy

    2016-08-01

    To provide a review of sustainable sizing practices that reduce waste, increase sales, and simultaneously produce safer, better fitting, accommodating products. Sustainable sizing involves a set of methods good for both the environment (sustainable environment) and business (sustainable business). Sustainable sizing methods reduce (1) materials used, (2) the number of sizes or adjustments, and (3) the amount of product unsold or marked down for sale. This reduces waste and cost. The methods can also increase sales by fitting more people in the target market and produce happier, loyal customers with better fitting products. This is a mini-review of methods that result in more sustainable sizing practices. It also reviews and contrasts current statistical and modeling practices that lead to poor fit and sizing. Fit-mapping and the use of cases are two excellent methods suited for creating sustainable sizing, when real people (vs. virtual people) are used. These methods are described and reviewed. Evidence presented supports the view that virtual fitting with simulated people and products is not yet effective. Fit-mapping and cases with real people and actual products result in good design and products that are fit for person, fit for purpose, with good accommodation and comfortable, optimized sizing. While virtual models have been shown to be ineffective for predicting or representing fit, there is an opportunity to improve them by adding fit-mapping data to the models. This will require saving fit data, product data, anthropometry, and demographics in a standardized manner. For this success to extend to the wider design community, the development of a standardized method of data collection for fit-mapping with a globally shared fit-map database is needed. It will enable the world community to build knowledge of fit and accommodation and generate effective virtual fitting for the future. A standardized method of data collection that tests products' fit methodically

  19. Size matter!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe; Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    2015-01-01

    trash bags according to size of plates and weighed in bulk. Results Those eating from smaller plates (n=145) left significantly less food to waste (aver. 14,8g) than participants eating from standard plates (n=75) (aver. 20g) amounting to a reduction of 25,8%. Conclusions Our field experiment tests...... the hypothesis that a decrease in the size of food plates may lead to significant reductions in food waste from buffets. It supports and extends the set of circumstances in which a recent experiment found that reduced dinner plates in a hotel chain lead to reduced quantities of leftovers....

  20. Exploring Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among…

  1. Non linear photons: a non singular cosmological solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The validity of equivalence principle as principle of minimum coupling between field interactions, is discussed. The non minimum coupling between vector field and gravitational field, and some consequences of this coupling are analysed. Starting from spherical symmetry metric, the coupled field equations, obtaining exact solutions and interpreting these solutions, are solved. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. Size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forst, Michael

    2012-11-01

    The shakeout in the solar cell and module industry is in full swing. While the number of companies and production locations shutting down in the Western world is increasing, the capacity expansion in the Far East seems to be unbroken. Size in combination with a good sales network has become the key to success for surviving in the current storm. The trade war with China already looming on the horizon is adding to the uncertainties. (orig.)

  3. Risk control and the minimum significant risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, F.A.; Alvarez, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Risk management implies that the risk manager can, by his actions, exercise at least a modicum of control over the risk in question. In the terminology of control theory, a management action is a control signal imposed as feedback on the system to bring about a desired change in the state of the system. In the terminology of risk management, an action is taken to bring a predicted risk to lower values. Even if it is assumed that the management action taken is 100% effective and that the projected risk reduction is infinitely well known, there is a lower limit to the desired effects that can be achieved. It is based on the fact that all risks, such as the incidence of cancer, exhibit a degree of variability due to a number of extraneous factors such as age at exposure, sex, location, and some lifestyle parameters such as smoking or the consumption of alcohol. If the control signal is much smaller than the variability of the risk, the signal is lost in the noise and control is lost. This defines a minimum controllable risk based on the variability of the risk over the population considered. This quantity is the counterpart of the minimum significant risk which is defined by the uncertainties of the risk model. Both the minimum controllable risk and the minimum significant risk are evaluated for radiation carcinogenesis and are shown to be of the same order of magnitude. For a realistic management action, the assumptions of perfectly effective action and perfect model prediction made above have to be dropped, resulting in an effective minimum controllable risk which is determined by both risk limits. Any action below that effective limit is futile, but it is also unethical due to the ethical requirement of doing more good than harm. Finally, some implications of the effective minimum controllable risk on the use of the ALARA principle and on the evaluation of remedial action goals are presented

  4. Interspecific geographic range size-body size relationship and the diversification dynamics of Neotropical furnariid birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inostroza-Michael, Oscar; Hernández, Cristián E; Rodríguez-Serrano, Enrique; Avaria-Llautureo, Jorge; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M

    2018-05-01

    Among the earliest macroecological patterns documented, is the range and body size relationship, characterized by a minimum geographic range size imposed by the species' body size. This boundary for the geographic range size increases linearly with body size and has been proposed to have implications in lineages evolution and conservation. Nevertheless, the macroevolutionary processes involved in the origin of this boundary and its consequences on lineage diversification have been poorly explored. We evaluate the macroevolutionary consequences of the difference (hereafter the distance) between the observed and the minimum range sizes required by the species' body size, to untangle its role on the diversification of a Neotropical species-rich bird clade using trait-dependent diversification models. We show that speciation rate is a positive hump-shaped function of the distance to the lower boundary. The species with highest and lowest distances to minimum range size had lower speciation rates, while species close to medium distances values had the highest speciation rates. Further, our results suggest that the distance to the minimum range size is a macroevolutionary constraint that affects the diversification process responsible for the origin of this macroecological pattern in a more complex way than previously envisioned. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution © 2018 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. Minimum qualifications for nuclear criticality safety professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketzlach, N.

    1990-01-01

    A Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Training Committee has been established within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety and Technology Project to review and, if necessary, develop standards for the training of personnel involved in nuclear criticality safety (NCS). The committee is exploring the need for developing a standard or other mechanism for establishing minimum qualifications for NCS professionals. The development of standards and regulatory guides for nuclear power plant personnel may serve as a guide in developing the minimum qualifications for NCS professionals

  6. A minimum achievable PV electrical generating cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabisky, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The role and share of photovoltaic (PV) generated electricity in our nation's future energy arsenal is primarily dependent on its future production cost. This paper provides a framework for obtaining a minimum achievable electrical generating cost (a lower bound) for fixed, flat-plate photovoltaic systems. A cost of 2.8 $cent/kWh (1990$) was derived for a plant located in Southwestern USA sunshine using a cost of money of 8%. In addition, a value of 22 $cent/Wp (1990$) was estimated as a minimum module manufacturing cost/price

  7. Discretization of space and time: determining the values of minimum length and minimum time

    OpenAIRE

    Roatta , Luca

    2017-01-01

    Assuming that space and time can only have discrete values, we obtain the expression of the minimum length and the minimum time interval. These values are found to be exactly coincident with the Planck's length and the Planck's time but for the presence of h instead of ħ .

  8. The economic production lot size model extended to include more than one production rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    production rates should be chosen in the interval between the demand rate and the production rate which minimizes unit production costs, and should be used in an increasing order. Then, given the production rates, we derive closed-form expressions for all optimal runtimes as well as the minimum average cost....... This analysis reveals that it is the size of the setup cost that determines the need for being able to use several production rates. We also show how to derive a near-optimal solution of the general problem....

  9. Dirac's minimum degree condition restricted to claws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, Haitze J.; Ryjacek, Z.; Schiermeyer, I.

    1997-01-01

    Let G be a graph on n 3 vertices. Dirac's minimum degree condition is the condition that all vertices of G have degree at least . This is a well-known sufficient condition for the existence of a Hamilton cycle in G. We give related sufficiency conditions for the existence of a Hamilton cycle or a

  10. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1...

  11. Minimum Risk Pesticide: Definition and Product Confirmation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minimum risk pesticides pose little to no risk to human health or the environment and therefore are not subject to regulation under FIFRA. EPA does not do any pre-market review for such products or labels, but violative products are subject to enforcement.

  12. The Minimum Distance of Graph Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Justesen, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    We study codes constructed from graphs where the code symbols are associated with the edges and the symbols connected to a given vertex are restricted to be codewords in a component code. In particular we treat such codes from bipartite expander graphs coming from Euclidean planes and other...... geometries. We give results on the minimum distances of the codes....

  13. Minimum maintenance solar pump | Assefa | Zede Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A minimum maintenance solar pump (MMSP), Fig 1, has been simulated for Addis Ababa, taking solar meteorological data of global radiation, diffuse radiation and ambient air temperature as input to a computer program that has been developed. To increase the performance of the solar pump, by trapping the long-wave ...

  14. Context quantization by minimum adaptive code length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Wu, Xiaolin

    2007-01-01

    Context quantization is a technique to deal with the issue of context dilution in high-order conditional entropy coding. We investigate the problem of context quantizer design under the criterion of minimum adaptive code length. A property of such context quantizers is derived for binary symbols....

  15. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum quantity. 35.13 Section 35.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... part, transport or receive for transportation to any foreign destination, a shipment of 25 packages or...

  16. Minimum impact house prototype for sustainable building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Götz, E.; Klenner, K.; Lantelme, M.; Mohn, A.; Sauter, S.; Thöne, J.; Zellmann, E.; Drexler, H.; Jauslin, D.

    2010-01-01

    The Minihouse is a prototupe for a sustainable townhouse. On a site of only 29 sqm it offers 154 sqm of urban life. The project 'Minimum Impact House' adresses two important questions: How do we provide living space in the cities without distroying the landscape? How to improve sustainably the

  17. 49 CFR 639.27 - Minimum criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... dollar value to any non-financial factors that are considered by using performance-based specifications..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CAPITAL LEASES Cost-Effectiveness § 639.27 Minimum criteria. In making the... used where possible and appropriate: (a) Operation costs; (b) Reliability of service; (c) Maintenance...

  18. Computing nonsimple polygons of minimum perimeter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, S.P.; Haas, A.; Hemmer, M.; Hoffmann, M.; Kostitsyna, I.; Krupke, D.; Maurer, F.; Mitchell, J.S.B.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, C.; Troegel, J.

    2018-01-01

    We consider the Minimum Perimeter Polygon Problem (MP3): for a given set V of points in the plane, find a polygon P with holes that has vertex set V , such that the total boundary length is smallest possible. The MP3 can be considered a natural geometric generalization of the Traveling Salesman

  19. Minimum-B mirrors plus EBT principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1983-01-01

    Electrons are heated at the minimum B location(s) created by the multipole field and the toroidal field. Resulting hot electrons can assist plasma confinement by (1) providing mirror, (2) creating azimuthally symmetric toroidal confinement, or (3) creating modified bumpy torus

  20. Completeness properties of the minimum uncertainty states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The completeness properties of the Schrodinger minimum uncertainty states (SMUS) and of some of their subsets are considered. The invariant measures and the resolution unity measures for the set of SMUS are constructed and the representation of squeezing and correlating operators and SMUS as superpositions of Glauber coherent states on the real line is elucidated.

  1. Minimum Description Length Shape and Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling is reviewed. It solves the point correspondence problem of selecting points on shapes defined as curves so that the points correspond across a data set. An efficient numerical implementation is presented and made available as open s...

  2. Faster Fully-Dynamic minimum spanning forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jacob; Rotenberg, Eva; Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We give a new data structure for the fully-dynamic minimum spanning forest problem in simple graphs. Edge updates are supported in O(log4 n/log logn) expected amortized time per operation, improving the O(log4 n) amortized bound of Holm et al. (STOC’98, JACM’01).We also provide a deterministic data...

  3. Minimum Wage Effects throughout the Wage Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Schweitzer, Mark; Wascher, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence on a wide set of margins along which labor markets can adjust in response to increases in the minimum wage, including wages, hours, employment, and ultimately labor income. Not surprisingly, the evidence indicates that low-wage workers are most strongly affected, while higher-wage workers are little affected. Workers…

  4. Asymptotics for the minimum covariance determinant estimator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, R.W.; Davies, P.L.; Jhun, M.

    1993-01-01

    Consistency is shown for the minimum covariance determinant (MCD) estimators of multivariate location and scale and asymptotic normality is shown for the former. The proofs are made possible by showing a separating ellipsoid property for the MCD subset of observations. An analogous property is shown

  5. Planetary tides during the Maunder sunspot minimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smythe, C.M.; Eddy, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Sun-centered planetary conjunctions and tidal potentials are here constructed for the AD1645 to 1715 period of sunspot absence, referred to as the 'Maunder Minimum'. These are found to be effectively indistinguishable from patterns of conjunctions and power spectra of tidal potential in the present era of a well established 11 year sunspot cycle. This places a new and difficult restraint on any tidal theory of sunspot formation. Problems arise in any direct gravitational theory due to the apparently insufficient forces and tidal heights involved. Proponents of the tidal hypothesis usually revert to trigger mechanisms, which are difficult to criticise or test by observation. Any tidal theory rests on the evidence of continued sunspot periodicity and the substantiation of a prolonged period of solar anomaly in the historical past. The 'Maunder Minimum' was the most drastic change in the behaviour of solar activity in the last 300 years; sunspots virtually disappeared for a 70 year period and the 11 year cycle was probably absent. During that time, however, the nine planets were all in their orbits, and planetary conjunctions and tidal potentials were indistinguishable from those of the present era, in which the 11 year cycle is well established. This provides good evidence against the tidal theory. The pattern of planetary tidal forces during the Maunder Minimum was reconstructed to investigate the possibility that the multiple planet forces somehow fortuitously cancelled at the time, that is that the positions of the slower moving planets in the 17th and early 18th centuries were such that conjunctions and tidal potentials were at the time reduced in number and force. There was no striking dissimilarity between the time of the Maunder Minimum and any period investigated. The failure of planetary conjunction patterns to reflect the drastic drop in sunspots during the Maunder Minimum casts doubt on the tidal theory of solar activity, but a more quantitative test

  6. MEDOF - MINIMUM EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE OPTIMAL FILTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Minimum Euclidean Distance Optimal Filter program, MEDOF, generates filters for use in optical correlators. The algorithm implemented in MEDOF follows theory put forth by Richard D. Juday of NASA/JSC. This program analytically optimizes filters on arbitrary spatial light modulators such as coupled, binary, full complex, and fractional 2pi phase. MEDOF optimizes these modulators on a number of metrics including: correlation peak intensity at the origin for the centered appearance of the reference image in the input plane, signal to noise ratio including the correlation detector noise as well as the colored additive input noise, peak to correlation energy defined as the fraction of the signal energy passed by the filter that shows up in the correlation spot, and the peak to total energy which is a generalization of PCE that adds the passed colored input noise to the input image's passed energy. The user of MEDOF supplies the functions that describe the following quantities: 1) the reference signal, 2) the realizable complex encodings of both the input and filter SLM, 3) the noise model, possibly colored, as it adds at the reference image and at the correlation detection plane, and 4) the metric to analyze, here taken to be one of the analytical ones like SNR (signal to noise ratio) or PCE (peak to correlation energy) rather than peak to secondary ratio. MEDOF calculates filters for arbitrary modulators and a wide range of metrics as described above. MEDOF examines the statistics of the encoded input image's noise (if SNR or PCE is selected) and the filter SLM's (Spatial Light Modulator) available values. These statistics are used as the basis of a range for searching for the magnitude and phase of k, a pragmatically based complex constant for computing the filter transmittance from the electric field. The filter is produced for the mesh points in those ranges and the value of the metric that results from these points is computed. When the search is concluded, the

  7. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharipov, A U; Yangirov, I Z

    1982-01-01

    A clay-powder, cement, and water-base plugging solution is proposed having reduced solution viscosity characteristics while maintaining tensile strength in cement stone. This solution utilizes silver graphite and its ingredients, by mass weight, are as follows: cement 51.2-54.3%; claypowder 6.06-9.1%; silver graphite 0.24-0.33%; with water making up the remainder.

  8. Rhizosphere size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Razavi, Bahar

    2017-04-01

    Estimation of the soil volume affected by roots - the rhizosphere - is crucial to assess the effects of plants on properties and processes in soils and dynamics of nutrients, water, microorganisms and soil organic matter. The challenges to assess the rhizosphere size are: 1) the continuum of properties between the root surface and root-free soil, 2) differences in the distributions of various properties (carbon, microorganisms and their activities, various nutrients, enzymes, etc.) along and across the roots, 3) temporal changes of properties and processes. Thus, to describe the rhizosphere size and root effects, a holistic approach is necessary. We collected literature and own data on the rhizosphere gradients of a broad range of physico-chemical and biological properties: pH, CO2, oxygen, redox potential, water uptake, various nutrients (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn and Fe), organic compounds (glucose, carboxylic acids, amino acids), activities of enzymes of C, N, P and S cycles. The collected data were obtained based on the destructive approaches (thin layer slicing), rhizotron studies and in situ visualization techniques: optodes, zymography, sensitive gels, 14C and neutron imaging. The root effects were pronounced from less than 0.5 mm (nutrients with slow diffusion) up to more than 50 mm (for gases). However, the most common effects were between 1 - 10 mm. Sharp gradients (e.g. for P, carboxylic acids, enzyme activities) allowed to calculate clear rhizosphere boundaries and so, the soil volume affected by roots. The first analyses were done to assess the effects of soil texture and moisture as well as root system and age on these gradients. The most properties can be described by two curve types: exponential saturation and S curve, each with increasing and decreasing concentration profiles from the root surface. The gradient based distribution functions were calculated and used to extrapolate on the whole soil depending on the root density and rooting intensity. We

  9. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings -or- Thinking Outside the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  10. Practical implementation of Channelized Hotelling Observers: Effect of ROI size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Andrea; Favazza, Christopher P; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2017-03-01

    Fundamental to the development and application of channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) models is the selection of the region of interest (ROI) to evaluate. For assessment of medical imaging systems, reducing the ROI size can be advantageous. Smaller ROIs enable a greater concentration of interrogable objects in a single phantom image, thereby providing more information from a set of images and reducing the overall image acquisition burden. Additionally, smaller ROIs may promote better assessment of clinical patient images as different patient anatomies present different ROI constraints. To this end, we investigated the minimum ROI size that does not compromise the performance of the CHO model. In this study, we evaluated both simulated images and phantom CT images to identify the minimum ROI size that resulted in an accurate figure of merit (FOM) of the CHO's performance. More specifically, the minimum ROI size was evaluated as a function of the following: number of channels, spatial frequency and number of rotations of the Gabor filters, size and contrast of the object, and magnitude of the image noise. Results demonstrate that a minimum ROI size exists below which the CHO's performance is grossly inaccurate. The minimum ROI size is shown to increase with number of channels and be dictated by truncation of lower frequency filters. We developed a model to estimate the minimum ROI size as a parameterized function of the number of orientations and spatial frequencies of the Gabor filters, providing a guide for investigators to appropriately select parameters for model observer studies.

  11. The Cost-Optimal Size of Future Reusable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelle, D. E.

    2000-07-01

    The paper answers the question, what is the optimum vehicle size — in terms of LEO payload capability — for a future reusable launch vehicle ? It is shown that there exists an optimum vehicle size that results in minimum specific transportation cost. The optimum vehicle size depends on the total annual cargo mass (LEO equivalent) enviseaged, which defines at the same time the optimum number of launches per year (LpA). Based on the TRANSCOST-Model algorithms a wide range of vehicle sizes — from 20 to 100 Mg payload in LEO, as well as launch rates — from 2 to 100 per year — have been investigated. It is shown in a design chart how much the vehicle size as well as the launch rate are influencing the specific transportation cost (in MYr/Mg and USS/kg). The comparison with actual ELVs (Expendable Launch Vehicles) and Semi-Reusable Vehicles (a combination of a reusable first stage with an expendable second stage) shows that there exists only one economic solution for an essential reduction of space transportation cost: the Fully Reusable Vehicle Concept, with rocket propulsion and vertical take-off. The Single-stage Configuration (SSTO) has the best economic potential; its feasibility is not only a matter of technology level but also of the vehicle size as such. Increasing the vehicle size (launch mass) reduces the technology requirements because the law of scale provides a better mass fraction and payload fraction — practically at no cost. The optimum vehicle design (after specification of the payload capability) requires a trade-off between lightweight (and more expensive) technology vs. more conventional (and cheaper) technology. It is shown that the the use of more conventional technology and accepting a somewhat larger vehicle is the more cost-effective and less risky approach.

  12. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 °C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient ( b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 °C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 °C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 °C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass

  13. Measurement of Minimum Bias Observables with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kvita, Jiri; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The modelling of Minimum Bias (MB) is a crucial ingredient to learn about the description of soft QCD processes. It has also a significant relevance for the simulation of the environment at the LHC with many concurrent pp interactions (“pileup”). The ATLAS collaboration has provided new measurements of the inclusive charged particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam currents, recorded at center of mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The measurements cover a wide spectrum using charged particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV and in various phase space regions of low and high charged particle multiplicities.

  14. Comments on the 'minimum flux corona' concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiochos, S.K.; Underwood, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Hearn's (1975) models of the energy balance and mass loss of stellar coronae, based on a 'minimum flux corona' concept, are critically examined. First, it is shown that the neglect of the relevant length scales for coronal temperature variation leads to an inconsistent computation of the total energy flux F. The stability arguments upon which the minimum flux concept is based are shown to be fallacious. Errors in the computation of the stellar wind contribution to the energy budget are identified. Finally we criticize Hearn's (1977) suggestion that the model, with a value of the thermal conductivity modified by the magnetic field, can explain the difference between solar coronal holes and quiet coronal regions. (orig.) 891 WL [de

  15. Minimum wakefield achievable by waveguide damped cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, X.E.; Kroll, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    The authors use an equivalent circuit to model a waveguide damped cavity. Both exponentially damped and persistent (decay t -3/2 ) components of the wakefield are derived from this model. The result shows that for a cavity with resonant frequency a fixed interval above waveguide cutoff, the persistent wakefield amplitude is inversely proportional to the external Q value of the damped mode. The competition of the two terms results in an optimal Q value, which gives a minimum wakefield as a function of the distance behind the source particle. The minimum wakefield increases when the resonant frequency approaches the waveguide cutoff. The results agree very well with computer simulation on a real cavity-waveguide system

  16. Protocol for the verification of minimum criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaggiano, M.; Spiccia, P.; Gaetano Arnetta, P.

    2014-01-01

    This Protocol has been prepared with reference to the provisions of article 8 of the Legislative Decree of May 26, 2000 No. 187. Quality controls of radiological equipment fit within the larger 'quality assurance Program' and are intended to ensure the correct operation of the same and the maintenance of that State. The pursuit of this objective guarantees that the radiological equipment subjected to those controls also meets the minimum criteria of acceptability set out in annex V of the aforementioned legislative decree establishing the conditions necessary to allow the functions to which each radiological equipment was designed, built and for which it is used. The Protocol is established for the purpose of quality control of radiological equipment of Cone Beam Computer Tomography type and reference document, in the sense that compliance with stated tolerances also ensures the subsistence minimum acceptability requirements, where applicable.

  17. Low Streamflow Forcasting using Minimum Relative Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H.; Singh, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    Minimum relative entropy spectral analysis is derived in this study, and applied to forecast streamflow time series. Proposed method extends the autocorrelation in the manner that the relative entropy of underlying process is minimized so that time series data can be forecasted. Different prior estimation, such as uniform, exponential and Gaussian assumption, is taken to estimate the spectral density depending on the autocorrelation structure. Seasonal and nonseasonal low streamflow series obtained from Colorado River (Texas) under draught condition is successfully forecasted using proposed method. Minimum relative entropy determines spectral of low streamflow series with higher resolution than conventional method. Forecasted streamflow is compared to the prediction using Burg's maximum entropy spectral analysis (MESA) and Configurational entropy. The advantage and disadvantage of each method in forecasting low streamflow is discussed.

  18. Minimum Wage Laws and the Distribution of Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin

    The desirability of raising the minimum wage long revolved around just one question: the effect of higher minimum wages on the overall level of employment. An even more critical effect of the minimum wage rests on the composition of employment--who gets the minimum wage job. An examination of employment in eating and drinking establishments…

  19. Binary cluster collision dynamics and minimum energy conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Francisco [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Rogan, José; Valdivia, J.A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Varas, A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group, ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Av. Tolosa 72, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Kiwi, Miguel, E-mail: m.kiwi.t@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    The collision dynamics of one Ag or Cu atom impinging on a Au{sub 12} cluster is investigated by means of DFT molecular dynamics. Our results show that the experimentally confirmed 2D to 3D transition of Au{sub 12}→Au{sub 13} is mostly preserved by the resulting planar Au{sub 12}Ag and Au{sub 12}Cu minimum energy clusters, which is quite remarkable in view of the excess energy, well larger than the 2D–3D potential barrier height. The process is accompanied by a large s−d hybridization and charge transfer from Au to Ag or Cu. The dynamics of the collision process mainly yields fusion of projectile and target, however scattering and cluster fragmentation also occur for large energies and large impact parameters. While Ag projectiles favor fragmentation, Cu favors scattering due to its smaller mass. The projectile size does not play a major role in favoring the fragmentation or scattering channels. By comparing our collision results with those obtained by an unbiased minimum energy search of 4483 Au{sub 12}Ag and 4483 Au{sub 12}Cu configurations obtained phenomenologically, we find that there is an extra bonus: without increase of computer time collisions yield the planar lower energy structures that are not feasible to obtain using semi-classical potentials. In fact, we conclude that phenomenological potentials do not even provide adequate seeds for the search of global energy minima for planar structures. Since the fabrication of nanoclusters is mainly achieved by synthesis or laser ablation, the set of local minima configurations we provide here, and their distribution as a function of energy, are more relevant than the global minimum to analyze experimental results obtained at finite temperatures, and is consistent with the dynamical coexistence of 2D and 3D liquid Au clusters conformations obtained previously.

  20. Minimum intervention dentistry: periodontics and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, I B; Ngo, L

    2013-06-01

    This article will look at the role of minimum intervention dentistry in the management of periodontal disease. It will discuss the role of appropriate assessment, treatment and risk factors/indicators. In addition, the role of the patient and early intervention in the continuing care of dental implants will be discussed as well as the management of peri-implant disease. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  1. Minimum quality standards and international trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltzer, Kenneth Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of a non-discriminating minimum quality standard (MQS) on trade and welfare when the market is characterized by imperfect competition and asymmetric information. A simple partial equilibrium model of an international Cournot duopoly is presented in which a domes...... prefer different levels of regulation. As a result, international trade disputes are likely to arise even when regulation is non-discriminating....

  2. Minimum K_2,3-saturated Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ya-Chen

    2010-01-01

    A graph is K_{2,3}-saturated if it has no subgraph isomorphic to K_{2,3}, but does contain a K_{2,3} after the addition of any new edge. We prove that the minimum number of edges in a K_{2,3}-saturated graph on n >= 5 vertices is sat(n, K_{2,3}) = 2n - 3.

  3. Minimum degree and density of binary sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Stephan; Müttel, J.; Rautenbach, D.

    2010-01-01

    For d,k∈N with k ≤ 2d, let g(d,k) denote the infimum density of binary sequences (x)∈{0,1} which satisfy the minimum degree condition σ(x+) ≥ k for all i∈Z with xi=1. We reduce the problem of computing g(d,k) to a combinatorial problem related to the generalized k-girth of a graph G which...

  4. Runge-Kutta methods with minimum storage implementations

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2010-03-01

    Solution of partial differential equations by the method of lines requires the integration of large numbers of ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In such computations, storage requirements are typically one of the main considerations, especially if a high order ODE solver is required. We investigate Runge-Kutta methods that require only two storage locations per ODE. Existing methods of this type require additional memory if an error estimate or the ability to restart a step is required. We present a new, more general class of methods that provide error estimates and/or the ability to restart a step while still employing the minimum possible number of memory registers. Examples of such methods are found to have good properties. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Finding Minimum-Power Broadcast Trees for Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabshahi, Payman; Gray, Andrew; Das, Arindam; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed; Marks, Robert, II

    2004-01-01

    Some algorithms have been devised for use in a method of constructing tree graphs that represent connections among the nodes of a wireless communication network. These algorithms provide for determining the viability of any given candidate connection tree and for generating an initial set of viable trees that can be used in any of a variety of search algorithms (e.g., a genetic algorithm) to find a tree that enables the network to broadcast from a source node to all other nodes while consuming the minimum amount of total power. The method yields solutions better than those of a prior algorithm known as the broadcast incremental power algorithm, albeit at a slightly greater computational cost.

  6. Design for minimum energy in interstellar communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerschmitt, David G.

    2015-02-01

    Microwave digital communication at interstellar distances is the foundation of extraterrestrial civilization (SETI and METI) communication of information-bearing signals. Large distances demand large transmitted power and/or large antennas, while the propagation is transparent over a wide bandwidth. Recognizing a fundamental tradeoff, reduced energy delivered to the receiver at the expense of wide bandwidth (the opposite of terrestrial objectives) is advantageous. Wide bandwidth also results in simpler design and implementation, allowing circumvention of dispersion and scattering arising in the interstellar medium and motion effects and obviating any related processing. The minimum energy delivered to the receiver per bit of information is determined by cosmic microwave background alone. By mapping a single bit onto a carrier burst, the Morse code invented for the telegraph in 1836 comes closer to this minimum energy than approaches used in modern terrestrial radio. Rather than the terrestrial approach of adding phases and amplitudes increases information capacity while minimizing bandwidth, adding multiple time-frequency locations for carrier bursts increases capacity while minimizing energy per information bit. The resulting location code is simple and yet can approach the minimum energy as bandwidth is expanded. It is consistent with easy discovery, since carrier bursts are energetic and straightforward modifications to post-detection pattern recognition can identify burst patterns. Time and frequency coherence constraints leading to simple signal discovery are addressed, and observations of the interstellar medium by transmitter and receiver constrain the burst parameters and limit the search scope.

  7. Optimum workforce-size model using dynamic programming approach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an optimum workforce-size model which determines the minimum number of excess workers (overstaffing) as well as the minimum total recruitment cost during a specified planning horizon. The model is an extension of other existing dynamic programming models for manpower planning in the sense ...

  8. Efficient Minimum-Phase Prefilter Computation Using Fast QL-Factorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Christensen, Lars P.B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for computing both the minimum-phase filter and the associated all-pass filter in a computationally efficient way using the fast QL-factorization. A desirable property of this approach is that the complexity is independent on the size of the matrix which is QL...

  9. Detection of minimum-ionizing particles in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, S.N.; Fujieda, I.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Ward, W.; Street, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    Based on previously-reported results of the successful detection of alpha particles and 1- and 2-MeV protons with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H) diodes, detection of a single minimum-ionizing particle will require a total sensitive thickness of approximately 100 to 150 μm, either in the form of a single thick diode, or as a stack of several thinner diodes. Signal saturation at high dE/dx makes it necessary to simulate minimum ionization in order to evaluate present detectors. Two techniques, using pulsed infrared light, and pulsed x-rays, give single-pulse signals large enough for direct measurements. A third, using beta rays, requires multiple-transit signal averaging to produce signals measurable above noise. Signal amplitudes from the a-Si : H limit at 60% of the signal size from Si crystals extrapolated to the same thickness. This is consistent with an a-Si : H radiation ionization energy, W = 6 eV/electron-hole pair. Beta-ray signals are observed at the expected amplitude

  10. RR Tel: Determination of Dust Properties During Minimum Obscuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurkić T.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available the ISO infrared spectra and the SAAO long-term JHKL photometry of RR Tel in the epochs during minimum obscuration are studied in order to construct a circumstellar dust model. the spectral energy distribution in the near- and the mid-IR spectral range (1–15 μm was obtained for an epoch without the pronounced dust obscuration. the DUSTY code was used to solve the radiative transfer through the dust and to determine the circumstellar dust properties of the inner dust regions around the Mira component. Dust temperature, maximum grain size, dust density distribution, mass-loss rate, terminal wind velocity and optical depth are determined. the spectral energy distribution and the long-term JHKL photometry during an epoch of minimum obscuration show almost unattenuated stellar source and strong dust emission which cannot be explained by a single dust shell model. We propose a two-component model consisting of an optically thin circmustellar dust shell and optically thick dust outside the line of sight in some kind of a flattened geometry, which is responsible for most of the observed dust thermal emission.

  11. Minimum triplet covers of binary phylogenetic X-trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, K T; Moulton, V; Steel, M

    2017-12-01

    Trees with labelled leaves and with all other vertices of degree three play an important role in systematic biology and other areas of classification. A classical combinatorial result ensures that such trees can be uniquely reconstructed from the distances between the leaves (when the edges are given any strictly positive lengths). Moreover, a linear number of these pairwise distance values suffices to determine both the tree and its edge lengths. A natural set of pairs of leaves is provided by any 'triplet cover' of the tree (based on the fact that each non-leaf vertex is the median vertex of three leaves). In this paper we describe a number of new results concerning triplet covers of minimum size. In particular, we characterize such covers in terms of an associated graph being a 2-tree. Also, we show that minimum triplet covers are 'shellable' and thereby provide a set of pairs for which the inter-leaf distance values will uniquely determine the underlying tree and its associated branch lengths.

  12. 77 FR 38229 - Rules Prohibiting the Aggregation of Orders To Satisfy Minimum Block Sizes or Cap Size...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ..., and financial integrity of futures markets; (3) price discovery; (4) sound risk management practices... discovery. (2) Efficiency, competitiveness, and financial integrity of the futures markets. The Commission... salary information for the securities industry compiled by the Securities Industry and Financial Markets...

  13. Unit size limitations in smaller power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnach, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    The developing nations have generally found it an economic necessity to accept the minimum commercial size limit of 600 MWe. Smaller reactor sizes tendered as 'one off' specials carry high specific cost penalties which considerably weaken the competitiveness of nuclear versus conventional thermal plants. The revised IAEA market survey for nuclear power in developing countries (1974 edition) which takes account of the recent heavy escalation in oil prices, indicates a reasonable market for smaller size reactors in the range 150 MWe to 400 MWe, but until this market is approached seriously by manufacturers, the commercial availability and economic viability of smaller size reactors remains uncertain. (orig.) [de

  14. Sample size optimization in nuclear material control. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladitz, J.

    1982-01-01

    Equations have been derived and exemplified which allow the determination of the minimum variables sample size for given false alarm and detection probabilities of nuclear material losses and diversions, respectively. (author)

  15. A dual exterior point simplex type algorithm for the minimum cost network flow problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geranis George

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new dual simplex type algorithm for the Minimum Cost Network Flow Problem (MCNFP is presented. The proposed algorithm belongs to a special 'exterior- point simplex type' category. Similarly to the classical network dual simplex algorithm (NDSA, this algorithm starts with a dual feasible tree-solution and reduces the primal infeasibility, iteration by iteration. However, contrary to the NDSA, the new algorithm does not always maintain a dual feasible solution. Instead, the new algorithm might reach a basic point (tree-solution outside the dual feasible area (exterior point - dual infeasible tree.

  16. 50 CFR 635.20 - Size limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... review of landings, the period of time remaining in the current fishing year, current and historical..., 2011. For the convenience of the user, the added and revised text is set forth as follows: § 635.20..., current and historical landing trends, and any other relevant factors. NMFS will adjust the minimum size...

  17. Decentralized Pricing in Minimum Cost Spanning Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moulin, Hervé; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    In the minimum cost spanning tree model we consider decentralized pricing rules, i.e. rules that cover at least the ecient cost while the price charged to each user only depends upon his own connection costs. We de ne a canonical pricing rule and provide two axiomatic characterizations. First......, the canonical pricing rule is the smallest among those that improve upon the Stand Alone bound, and are either superadditive or piece-wise linear in connection costs. Our second, direct characterization relies on two simple properties highlighting the special role of the source cost....

  18. The Risk Management of Minimum Return Guarantees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Mahayni

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Contracts paying a guaranteed minimum rate of return and a fraction of a positive excess rate, which is specified relative to a benchmark portfolio, are closely related to unit-linked life-insurance products and can be considered as alternatives to direct investment in the underlying benchmark. They contain an embedded power option, and the key issue is the tractable and realistic hedging of this option, in order to rigorously justify valuation by arbitrage arguments and prevent the guarantees from becoming uncontrollable liabilities to the issuer. We show how to determine the contract parameters conservatively and implement robust risk-management strategies.

  19. Iterative Regularization with Minimum-Residual Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Toke Koldborg; Hansen, Per Christian

    2007-01-01

    subspaces. We provide a combination of theory and numerical examples, and our analysis confirms the experience that MINRES and MR-II can work as general regularization methods. We also demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the same is not true, in general, for GMRES and RRGMRES their success......We study the regularization properties of iterative minimum-residual methods applied to discrete ill-posed problems. In these methods, the projection onto the underlying Krylov subspace acts as a regularizer, and the emphasis of this work is on the role played by the basis vectors of these Krylov...... as regularization methods is highly problem dependent....

  20. Iterative regularization with minimum-residual methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Toke Koldborg; Hansen, Per Christian

    2006-01-01

    subspaces. We provide a combination of theory and numerical examples, and our analysis confirms the experience that MINRES and MR-II can work as general regularization methods. We also demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the same is not true, in general, for GMRES and RRGMRES - their success......We study the regularization properties of iterative minimum-residual methods applied to discrete ill-posed problems. In these methods, the projection onto the underlying Krylov subspace acts as a regularizer, and the emphasis of this work is on the role played by the basis vectors of these Krylov...... as regularization methods is highly problem dependent....

  1. Distribution of the minimum path on percolation clusters: A renormalization group calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hipsh, Lior.

    1993-06-01

    This thesis uses the renormalization group for the research of the chemical distance or the minimal path on percolation clusters on a 2 dimensional square lattice. Our aims are to calculate analytically (iterative calculation) the fractal dimension of the minimal path. d min. , and the distributions of the minimum paths, l min for different lattice sizes and for different starting densities (including the threshold value p c ). For the distributions. We seek for an analytic form which describes them. The probability to get a minimum path for each linear size L is calculated by iterating the distribution of l min for the basic cell of size 2*2 to the next scale sizes, using the H cell renormalization group. For the threshold value of p and for values near to p c . We confirm a scaling in the form: P(l,L) =f1/l(l/(L d min ). L - the linear size, l - the minimum path. The distribution can be also represented in the Fourier space, so we will try to solve the renormalization group equations in this space. A numerical fitting is produced and compared to existing numerical results. In order to improve the agreement between the renormalization group and the numerical simulations, we also present attempts to generalize the renormalization group by adding more parameters, e.g. correlations between bonds in different directions or finite densities for occupation of bonds and sites. (author) 17 refs

  2. Solution preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results

  3. Exploring manufacturing solutions for SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Agnieszka; Blichfeldt, Henrik; Bilberg, Arne

    This exploratory study provides an overview over current state of manufacturing solutions in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in region of Southern Denmark. Building on manufacturing paradigms, this paper reveals relevant aspects for the development and implementation of improving SMEs...... of manufacturing solutions, which are required to increase their competitiveness and assure sustainable growth....

  4. Rocket photographs of fine structure and wave patterns in the solar temperature minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, R. M.; Decaudin, M.; Foing, B.; Bruner, M.; Acton, L. W.; Brown, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    A new series of high resolution pictures of the sun has been obtained during the second flight of the Transition Region Camera which occurred on September 23, 1980. The qualitative analysis of the results indicates that a substantial portion of the solar surface at the temperature minimum radiates in non-magnetic regions and from features below 1 arcsec in size. Wave patterns are observed on the 160 nm temperature minimum pictures. They are absent on the Lyman alpha pictures. Their physical characteristics are compatible with those of gravitational and acoustic waves generated by exploding granules.

  5. On the optimal sizing problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    1994-01-01

    The paper studies the problem of determining the number and dimensions of sizes of apparel so as to maximize profits. It develops a simple one-variable bisection search algorithm that gives the optimal solution. An example is solved interactively using a Macintosh LC and Math CAD, a mathematical...

  6. Minimum X-ray source size of the on-axis corona in AGN

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dovčiak, Michal; Done, C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 337, 4-5 (2016), s. 441-447 ISSN 0004-6337 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : accretion disks * black hole physics * active galaxies Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.916, year: 2016

  7. Integrated planning for a fuel industry with emphasis on minimum size to fabricate own fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondal Rao, N.; Katiyar, H.C.; Rajendran, R.; Sinha, K.K.; Swaminathan, N.; Subramanyam, R.B.; Pande, B.P.; Krishnan, T.S.; Agarwala, G.C.; Chandramouli, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Indian nuclear energy programme is based on the utilization of indigenous resources for the economic generation of power, developing its own know-how. In order to gain time, the first nuclear power station at Tarapur is a turn-key job based on enriched uranium fuel. Taking into consideration the established resources of uranium and thorium in the country, a strategy for nuclear power programme has been drawn up. The first phase is based on natural uranium fuel, the second phase on the recycle of plutonium and conversion of thorium and the third phase is the breeder system based on utilization of U 233 and conversion of thorium. This programme is specially significant for India in view of its vast resources of thorium. After the experience and confidence gained with the manufacture of metallic uranium fuel for the research reactors and about 40 tonnes of fuel for the initial loading of the Rajasthan Reactor, the fuel manufacturing programme within the country has been implemented to meet the entire initial and reload fuel requirements. The plant capacities are small compared to similar activities in developed countries. Further, by planning for an integrated fuel and component manufacturing complex, any draw-back in smaller scale of some of the operations is off-set. At the Nuclear Fuel Complex, set up on the above principles, production plants are in operation for the manufacture of reload fuel for the 400 MW Tarapur station, natural uranium oxide fuel, various zircaloy components such as fuel sheaths, pressure tubes, calandria tubes, channels and various other zircaloy components. Provisions have been made to expand the production facilities as the demand for reload fuel grows. With the facilities provided, the production programme can be diversified to take up the production of fast breeder reactor components of stainless steel and also the blanket thorium elements. The unitary control of all aspects of the manufacture and quality control of different types of fuel, off-sets the disadvantage in the lower scale of operation and manufacture of different types of fuel. The cost estimates for setting up the plants and the production costs are dealt with in the paper

  8. Construction of a minimum-size functional flagellin of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwajima, G

    1988-01-01

    Various deletions were introduced into the central region of Escherichia coli flagellin (497 residues) without destroying its ability to form flagellar filaments. The smallest flagellin retained only the N-terminal 193 residues and the C-terminal 117 residues, which are suggested to be the domains essential for filament formation.

  9. The Effects of Soil Type, Particle Size, Temperature, and Moisture on Reproduction of Belonolaimus longicaudatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, R T; Barker, K R

    1974-01-01

    Effects of soil type, particle size, temperature, and moisture on the reproduction of Belonolaimus longicaudatus were investigated under greenhouse conditions. Nematode increases occurred only in soils with a minimum of 80% sand and a maximum of 10% clay. Optimum soil particle size for reproduction of the Tarboro, N.C. and Tifton, Ga. populations of the nematode was near that of 120-370 mum (65-mesh) silica sand. Reproduction was greatest at 25-30 C. Some reproduction by the Tifton, Ga. population occurred at 35 C, whereas the Tarboro, N.C. population declined, as compared to the initial inoculum. Both populations reproduced slightly at 20 C. Nematode reproduction was greater at a moisture level of 7% than at a high of 30% or a low of 2%. Reproduction occurred at the high moisture level only when the nutrient solution was aerated.

  10. Do minimum wages reduce poverty? Evidence from Central America ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-16

    Dec 16, 2010 ... Raising minimum wages has traditionally been considered a way to protect poor ... However, the effect of raising minimum wages remains an empirical question ... ​More than 70 of Vietnamese entrepreneurs choose to start a ...

  11. The Achilles Heel of Normal Determinations via Minimum Variance Techniques: Worldline Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Z.; Scudder, J. D.; Omidi, N.

    2002-12-01

    Time series of data collected across current layers are usually organized by divining coordinate transformations (as from minimum variance) that permits a geometrical interpretation for the data collected. Almost without exception the current layer geometry is inferred by supposing that the current carrying layer is locally planar. Only after this geometry is ``determined'' can the various quantities predicted by theory calculated. The precision of reconnection rated ``measured'' and the quantitative support for or against component reconnection be evaluated. This paper defines worldline traversals across fully resolved Hall two fluid models of reconnecting current sheets (with varying sizes of guide fields) and across a 2-D hybrid solution of a super critical shock layer. Along each worldline various variance techniques are used to infer current sheet normals based on the data observed along this worldline alone. We then contrast these inferred normals with those known from the overview of the fully resolved spatial pictures of the layer. Absolute errors of 20 degrees in the normal are quite commonplace, but errors of 40-90 deg are also implied, especially for worldlines that make more and more oblique angles to the true current sheet normal. These mistaken ``inferences'' are traceable to the degree that the data collected sample 2-D variations within these layers or not. While it is not surprising that these variance techniques give incorrect errors in the presence of layers that possess 2-D variations, it is illuminating that such large errors need not be signalled by the traditional error formulae for the error cones on normals that have been previously used to estimate the errors of normal choices. Frequently the absolute errors that depend on worldline path can be 10 times the random error that formulae would predict based on eigenvalues of the covariance matrix. A given time series cannot be associated in any a priori way with a specific worldline

  12. 30 CFR 56.19021 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... feet: Minimum Value=Static Load×(7.0-0.001L) For rope lengths 3,000 feet or greater: Minimum Value=Static Load×4.0 (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static Load×(7.0-0.0005L) For rope lengths 4,000 feet or greater: Minimum Value=Static Load×5.0 (c) Tail ropes...

  13. Does increasing the minimum wage reduce poverty in developing countries?

    OpenAIRE

    Gindling, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    Do minimum wage policies reduce poverty in developing countries? It depends. Raising the minimum wage could increase or decrease poverty, depending on labor market characteristics. Minimum wages target formal sector workers—a minority of workers in most developing countries—many of whom do not live in poor households. Whether raising minimum wages reduces poverty depends not only on whether formal sector workers lose jobs as a result, but also on whether low-wage workers live in poor househol...

  14. On a Minimum Problem in Smectic Elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonsanti, Michele; Giovine, Pasquale

    2008-01-01

    Smectic elastomers are layered materials exhibiting a solid-like elastic response along the layer normal and a rubbery one in the plane. Balance equations for smectic elastomers are derived from the general theory of continua with constrained microstructure. In this work we investigate a very simple minimum problem based on multi-well potentials where the microstructure is taken into account. The set of polymeric strains minimizing the elastic energy contains a one-parameter family of simple strain associated with a micro-variation of the degree of freedom. We develop the energy functional through two terms, the first one nematic and the second one considering the tilting phenomenon; after, by developing in the rubber elasticity framework, we minimize over the tilt rotation angle and extract the engineering stress

  15. Minimum DNBR Prediction Using Artificial Intelligence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Ju Hyun; Na, Man Gyun [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The minimum DNBR (MDNBR) for prevention of the boiling crisis and the fuel clad melting is very important factor that should be consistently monitored in safety aspects. Artificial intelligence methods have been extensively and successfully applied to nonlinear function approximation such as the problem in question for predicting DNBR values. In this paper, support vector regression (SVR) model and fuzzy neural network (FNN) model are developed to predict the MDNBR using a number of measured signals from the reactor coolant system. Also, two models are trained using a training data set and verified against test data set, which does not include training data. The proposed MDNBR estimation algorithms were verified by using nuclear and thermal data acquired from many numerical simulations of the Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 (YGN-3)

  16. Image Segmentation Using Minimum Spanning Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, M. P.; Armiati, A.; Alvini, S.

    2018-04-01

    This research aim to segmented the digital image. The process of segmentation is to separate the object from the background. So the main object can be processed for the other purposes. Along with the development of technology in digital image processing application, the segmentation process becomes increasingly necessary. The segmented image which is the result of the segmentation process should accurate due to the next process need the interpretation of the information on the image. This article discussed the application of minimum spanning tree on graph in segmentation process of digital image. This method is able to separate an object from the background and the image will change to be the binary images. In this case, the object that being the focus is set in white, while the background is black or otherwise.

  17. Statistical physics when the minimum temperature is not absolute zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Won Sang; Hassanabadi, Hassan

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the nonzero minimum temperature is considered based on the third law of thermodynamics and existence of the minimal momentum. From the assumption of nonzero positive minimum temperature in nature, we deform the definitions of some thermodynamical quantities and investigate nonzero minimum temperature correction to the well-known thermodynamical problems.

  18. 12 CFR 564.4 - Minimum appraisal standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum appraisal standards. 564.4 Section 564.4 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY APPRAISALS § 564.4 Minimum appraisal standards. For federally related transactions, all appraisals shall, at a minimum: (a...

  19. 29 CFR 505.3 - Prevailing minimum compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prevailing minimum compensation. 505.3 Section 505.3 Labor... HUMANITIES § 505.3 Prevailing minimum compensation. (a)(1) In the absence of an alternative determination...)(2) of this section, the prevailing minimum compensation required to be paid under the Act to the...

  20. An Empirical Analysis of the Relationship between Minimum Wage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Empirical Analysis of the Relationship between Minimum Wage, Investment and Economic Growth in Ghana. ... In addition, the ratio of public investment to tax revenue must increase as minimum wage increases since such complementary changes are more likely to lead to economic growth. Keywords: minimum wage ...

  1. Minimum Covers of Fixed Cardinality in Weighted Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lee J.

    Reported is the result of research on combinatorial and algorithmic techniques for information processing. A method is discussed for obtaining minimum covers of specified cardinality from a given weighted graph. By the indicated method, it is shown that the family of minimum covers of varying cardinality is related to the minimum spanning tree of…

  2. Minimum Price Guarantees In a Consumer Search Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.W. Janssen (Maarten); A. Parakhonyak (Alexei)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis paper is the first to examine the effect of minimum price guarantees in a sequential search model. Minimum price guarantees are not advertised and only known to consumers when they come to the shop. We show that in such an environment, minimum price guarantees increase the value of

  3. Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages. Recent Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David

    Using a specially constructed panel data set on state minimum wage laws and labor market conditions, Neumark and Wascher (1992) presented evidence that countered the claim that minimum wages could be raised with no cost to employment. They concluded that estimates indicating that minimum wages reduced employment on the order of 1-2 percent for a…

  4. Minimum Wages and Skill Acquisition: Another Look at Schooling Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Wascher, William

    2003-01-01

    Examines the effects of minimum wage on schooling, seeking to reconcile some of the contradictory results in recent research using Current Population Survey data from the late 1970s through the 1980s. Findings point to negative effects of minimum wages on school enrollment, bolstering the findings of negative effects of minimum wages on enrollment…

  5. Minimum Wage Effects on Educational Enrollments in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Gail A.; Cruickshank, Amy A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the impact of minimum wages on educational enrollments in New Zealand. A significant reform to the youth minimum wage since 2000 has resulted in some age groups undergoing a 91% rise in their real minimum wage over the last 10 years. Three panel least squares multivariate models are estimated from a national sample…

  6. 41 CFR 50-201.1101 - Minimum wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Minimum wages. 50-201... Contracts PUBLIC CONTRACTS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 201-GENERAL REGULATIONS § 50-201.1101 Minimum wages. Determinations of prevailing minimum wages or changes therein will be published in the Federal Register by the...

  7. 29 CFR 4.159 - General minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true General minimum wage. 4.159 Section 4.159 Labor Office of... General minimum wage. The Act, in section 2(b)(1), provides generally that no contractor or subcontractor... a contract less than the minimum wage specified under section 6(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards...

  8. 29 CFR 783.43 - Computation of seaman's minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of seaman's minimum wage. 783.43 Section 783.43...'s minimum wage. Section 6(b) requires, under paragraph (2) of the subsection, that an employee...'s minimum wage requirements by reason of the 1961 Amendments (see §§ 783.23 and 783.26). Although...

  9. 24 CFR 891.145 - Owner deposit (Minimum Capital Investment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... General Program Requirements § 891.145 Owner deposit (Minimum Capital Investment). As a Minimum Capital... Investment shall be one-half of one percent (0.5%) of the HUD-approved capital advance, not to exceed $25,000. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Owner deposit (Minimum Capital...

  10. 12 CFR 931.3 - Minimum investment in capital stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum investment in capital stock. 931.3... CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL STOCK § 931.3 Minimum investment in capital stock. (a) A Bank shall require each member to maintain a minimum investment in the capital stock of the Bank, both...

  11. 9 CFR 147.51 - Authorized laboratory minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorized laboratory minimum requirements. 147.51 Section 147.51 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... Authorized Laboratories and Approved Tests § 147.51 Authorized laboratory minimum requirements. These minimum...

  12. Computation of distribution of minimum resolution for log-normal distribution of chromatographic peak heights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joe M

    2011-10-28

    General equations are derived for the distribution of minimum resolution between two chromatographic peaks, when peak heights in a multi-component chromatogram follow a continuous statistical distribution. The derivation draws on published theory by relating the area under the distribution of minimum resolution to the area under the distribution of the ratio of peak heights, which in turn is derived from the peak-height distribution. Two procedures are proposed for the equations' numerical solution. The procedures are applied to the log-normal distribution, which recently was reported to describe the distribution of component concentrations in three complex natural mixtures. For published statistical parameters of these mixtures, the distribution of minimum resolution is similar to that for the commonly assumed exponential distribution of peak heights used in statistical-overlap theory. However, these two distributions of minimum resolution can differ markedly, depending on the scale parameter of the log-normal distribution. Theory for the computation of the distribution of minimum resolution is extended to other cases of interest. With the log-normal distribution of peak heights as an example, the distribution of minimum resolution is computed when small peaks are lost due to noise or detection limits, and when the height of at least one peak is less than an upper limit. The distribution of minimum resolution shifts slightly to lower resolution values in the first case and to markedly larger resolution values in the second one. The theory and numerical procedure are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The minimum sit-to-stand height test: reliability, responsiveness and relationship to leg muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Karl; Sherrington, Catherine; Wallbank, Geraldine; Pamphlett, Patricia; Olivetti, Lynette

    2012-07-01

    To determine the reliability of the minimum sit-to-stand height test, its responsiveness and its relationship to leg muscle strength among rehabilitation unit inpatients and outpatients. Reliability study using two measurers and two test occasions. Secondary analysis of data from two clinical trials. Inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation services in three public hospitals. Eighteen hospital patients and five others participated in the reliability study. Seventy-two rehabilitation unit inpatients and 80 outpatients participated in the clinical trials. The minimum sit-to-stand height test was assessed using a standard procedure. For the reliability study, a second tester repeated the minimum sit-to-stand height test on the same day. In the inpatient clinical trial the measures were repeated two weeks later. In the outpatient trial the measures were repeated five weeks later. Knee extensor muscle strength was assessed in the clinical trials using a hand-held dynamometer. The reliability for the minimum sit-to-stand height test was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81-0.96). The standard error of measurement was 34 mm. Responsiveness was moderate in the inpatient trial (effect size: 0.53) but small in the outpatient trial (effect size: 0.16). A small proportion (8-17%) of variability in minimum sit-to-stand height test was explained by knee extensor muscle strength. The minimum sit-to-stand height test has excellent reliability and moderate responsiveness in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. Responsiveness in an outpatient rehabilitation setting requires further investigation. Performance is influenced by factors other than knee extensor muscle strength.

  14. An ILP based memetic algorithm for finding minimum positive influence dominating sets in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Geng; Guan, Jian; Feng, Huibin

    2018-06-01

    The positive influence dominating set problem is a variant of the minimum dominating set problem, and has lots of applications in social networks. It is NP-hard, and receives more and more attention. Various methods have been proposed to solve the positive influence dominating set problem. However, most of the existing work focused on greedy algorithms, and the solution quality needs to be improved. In this paper, we formulate the minimum positive influence dominating set problem as an integer linear programming (ILP), and propose an ILP based memetic algorithm (ILPMA) for solving the problem. The ILPMA integrates a greedy randomized adaptive construction procedure, a crossover operator, a repair operator, and a tabu search procedure. The performance of ILPMA is validated on nine real-world social networks with nodes up to 36,692. The results show that ILPMA significantly improves the solution quality, and is robust.

  15. DESIGN OF MINIMUM-WEIGHT DIFFUSION BATTERIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Until recently, the measurement of particle sizes in aerosols was largely a laboratory exercise. Currently, however, particulates in the atmosphere and in the industrial exhaust gases are being monitored extensively in the field. While the weight and volume of laboratory apparatu...

  16. PENAFSIRAN HAKIM TERHADAP KETENTUAN PIDANA MINIMUM KHUSUS DALAM UNDANG-UNDANG TINDAK PIDANA KORUPSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Rumadan

    2013-11-01

    provision in the formulation of minimum deliknya against perpetrators of corruption . It is certainly different from the general criminal provisions in the draft Criminal Law (Penal Code which is more familiar maximum penal provision . The results showed that the minimum pinadana special provisions in the law of corruption can bebreached so long as the judge has the legal resening or residenti proper ratio to a corruption case by looking at the size scale of the corruption case with consideration and interpretation of the patterns perspective, social - justice, moral justice and community justice decision was taken to drop the minimum punishment. Criminal punishment under the criminal provisions of the special minimum in some court decisions can be made by several criteria into consideration the provisions of the criminal judges deviate minimum , the criteria of the element of state assets or state economy as a result of the acts of corruption tiundak and criteria of the role and position of the defendant in acts of corruption.

  17. Minimum Financial Outlays for Purchasing Alcohol Brands in the U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Alison Burke; DeJong, William; Naimi, Timothy S.; Siegel, Michael; Shoaff, Jessica Ruhlman; Jernigan, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Low alcohol prices are a potent risk factor for excessive drinking, underage drinking, and adverse alcohol-attributable outcomes. Presently, there is little reported information on alcohol prices in the U.S., in particular as it relates to the costs of potentially beneficial amounts of alcohol. Purpose To determine the minimum financial outlay necessary to purchase individual brands of alcohol using online alcohol price data from January through March 2012. Methods The smallest container size and the minimum price at which that size beverage could be purchased in the U.S. in 2012 were determined for 898 brands of alcohol, across 17 different alcoholic beverage types. The analyses were conducted in March 2012. Results The majority of alcoholic beverage categories contain brands that can be purchased in the U.S. for very low minimum financial outlays. Conclusions In the U.S., a wide variety of alcohol brands, across many types of alcohol, are available at very low prices. Given that both alcohol use and abuse are responsive to price, particularly among adolescents, the prevalence of low alcohol prices is concerning. Surveillance of alcohol prices and minimum pricing policies should be considered in the U.S. as part of a public health strategy to reduce excessive alcohol consumption and related harms. PMID:23253652

  18. Electro-spray of high viscous liquids for producing mono-sized spherical alginate beads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Moghadam; Mohsen Samimi; Abdolreza Samimi; Mohamad Khorram

    2008-01-01

    Alginate beads, often used for controlled release of enzymes and drugs, are usually produced by spraying sodium alginate liquid into a gelling agent using mechanical vibration nozzle or air jet. In this work an alternative method of electro-spray was employed to form droplets with desired size from a highly viscous sodium alginate solution using constant DC voltage. The droplets were then cured in a calcium chloride solution. The main objective was to produce mono-sized beads from such a highly viscous and non-Newtonian liquid (1000-5000 mPa s). The effects of nozzle diameter, flow rate and concentration of liquid on the size of the beads were investigated. Among the parameters studied, voltage had a pronounced effect on the size of beads as compared to flow rate zzle diameter and concentration of alginate liquid. The size of beads was reduced to a minimum value with increasing the voltage in the range of 0-10 kV. At the early stages of voltage increase (I.e. Up to about 4 kV), the rate of size reduction was relatively low, while the dripping mode dominated. However, in the middle part of the range of applied voltage, where the rate of size reduction was high (I.e. About 4-7 kV), an unstable transition occurred between dripping and jetting. At the end part of the range (I.e. 7-10 kV) jet mode of spray was observed. Increasing the height of fall of the droplets was found to improve the sphericity of the beads, because of the increased time of flight for the droplets. This was especially identifiable at higher concentrations of the alginate liquid (I.e. 3 w/v%)

  19. Soil Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the soil solution in the root environment in the greenhouse industry differ much from those for field grown crops. This is caused firstly by the growing conditions in the greenhouse, which strongly differ from those in the field and secondly the function attributed to the soil

  20. Seeding Solutions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Crucible Group operates on the basis of good faith –– producing best effort non-consensus texts. ..... science and technology-based solutions to agricultural production constraints, it is ...... In 1997 researchers at Case Western Reserve Medical School in Ohio (US) ...... Is there a need to update the system-wide IP audit?

  1. Circular Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annevelink, E.; Bos, H.L.; Meesters, K.P.H.; Oever, van den M.J.A.; Haas, de W.; Kuikman, P.J.; Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Sikirica, N.

    2016-01-01

    The fifth part of this report on Circular Solutions is about the circular principle From Waste to Resource. The purpose of this study is to select promising options for the implementation of this circular principle and to elaborate these options further.

  2. Podcast solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Podcasting is the art of recording radio show style audio tracks, then distributing them to listeners on the Web via podcasting software such as iPodder. From downloading podcasts to producing a track for fun or profit, ""Podcast Solutions"" covers the entire world of podcasting with insight, humor, and the unmatched wisdom of experience.

  3. A new fast algorithm for solving the minimum spanning tree problem based on DNA molecules computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaocai; Huang, Dongmei; Meng, Huajun; Tang, Chengpei

    2013-10-01

    The minimum spanning tree (MST) problem is to find minimum edge connected subsets containing all the vertex of a given undirected graph. It is a vitally important NP-complete problem in graph theory and applied mathematics, having numerous real life applications. Moreover in previous studies, DNA molecular operations usually were used to solve NP-complete head-to-tail path search problems, rarely for NP-hard problems with multi-lateral path solutions result, such as the minimum spanning tree problem. In this paper, we present a new fast DNA algorithm for solving the MST problem using DNA molecular operations. For an undirected graph with n vertex and m edges, we reasonably design flexible length DNA strands representing the vertex and edges, take appropriate steps and get the solutions of the MST problem in proper length range and O(3m+n) time complexity. We extend the application of DNA molecular operations and simultaneity simplify the complexity of the computation. Results of computer simulative experiments show that the proposed method updates some of the best known values with very short time and that the proposed method provides a better performance with solution accuracy over existing algorithms. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Minimum Release of Tributyltin to Prevent Macrofouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    Thain, J.E., M.J. Waldock, and M.E. Wait, Toxicity and degradation studies of Tributyltin ( TBT ) and Dibutyltin (DBT) in the aquatic environment, in...MATERIALS AND METHODS The test system used was designed to pump a known volume of a tributyltin ( TBT ) solution of known concentration through a porous...ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) nimum Release of Tributyltin to Prevent Macrofoulinq 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  5. Analysis of glass fibre sizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Helga Nørgaard; Kusano, Yukihiro; Brøndsted, Povl

    2014-01-01

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer composites are widely used for industrial and engineering applications which include construction, aerospace, automotive and wind energy industry. During the manufacturing glass fibres, they are surface-treated with an aqueous solution. This process and the treated...... surfaces are called sizing. The sizing influences the properties of the interface between fibres and a matrix, and subsequently affects mechanical properties of composites. In this work the sizing of commercially available glass fibres was analysed so as to study the composition and chemical structures....... Soxhlet extraction was used to extract components of the sizing from the glass fibres. The glass fibres, their extracts and coated glass plates were analysed by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis combined with a mass spectrometer (TGA-MS), and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR...

  6. THE STRUCTURES AND TOTAL (MINOR + MAJOR) MERGER HISTORIES OF MASSIVE GALAXIES UP TO z ∼ 3 IN THE HST GOODS NICMOS SURVEY: A POSSIBLE SOLUTION TO THE SIZE EVOLUTION PROBLEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluck, Asa F. L.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Buitrago, Fernando; Grützbauch, Ruth; Hoyos, Carlos; Mortlock, Alice; Bauer, Amanda E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the total major (>1:4 by stellar mass) and minor (>1:100 by stellar mass) merger history of a population of 80 massive (M * > 10 11 M ☉ ) galaxies at high redshifts (z = 1.7-3). We utilize extremely deep and high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope H-band imaging from the GOODS NICMOS Survey, which corresponds to rest-frame optical wavelengths at the redshifts probed. We find that massive galaxies at high redshifts are often morphologically disturbed, with a CAS (concentration, C; asymmetry, A; clumpiness, S) deduced merger fraction f m = 0.23 ± 0.05 at z = 1.7-3. We find close accord between close pair methods (within 30 kpc apertures) and CAS methods for deducing major merger fractions at all redshifts. We deduce the total (minor + major) merger history of massive galaxies with M * > 10 9 M ☉ galaxies, and find that this scales roughly linearly with log-stellar-mass and magnitude range. We test our close pair methods by utilizing mock galaxy catalogs from the Millennium Simulation. We compute the total number of mergers to be (4.5 ± 2.9)/(τ m ) from z = 3 to the present, to a stellar mass sensitivity threshold of ∼1:100 (where τ m is the merger timescale in Gyr which varies as a function of mass). This corresponds to an average mass increase of (3.4 ± 2.2) × 10 11 M ☉ over the past 11.5 Gyr due to merging. We show that the size evolution observed for these galaxies may be mostly explained by this merging.

  7. THE STRUCTURES AND TOTAL (MINOR + MAJOR) MERGER HISTORIES OF MASSIVE GALAXIES UP TO z {approx} 3 IN THE HST GOODS NICMOS SURVEY: A POSSIBLE SOLUTION TO THE SIZE EVOLUTION PROBLEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluck, Asa F. L. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Conselice, Christopher J.; Buitrago, Fernando; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Hoyos, Carlos; Mortlock, Alice [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Bauer, Amanda E., E-mail: abluck@gemini.edu, E-mail: conselice@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: abauer@aa0.gov.au [Australian Astronomical Observatory, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the total major (>1:4 by stellar mass) and minor (>1:100 by stellar mass) merger history of a population of 80 massive (M{sub *} > 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) galaxies at high redshifts (z = 1.7-3). We utilize extremely deep and high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope H-band imaging from the GOODS NICMOS Survey, which corresponds to rest-frame optical wavelengths at the redshifts probed. We find that massive galaxies at high redshifts are often morphologically disturbed, with a CAS (concentration, C; asymmetry, A; clumpiness, S) deduced merger fraction f{sub m} = 0.23 {+-} 0.05 at z = 1.7-3. We find close accord between close pair methods (within 30 kpc apertures) and CAS methods for deducing major merger fractions at all redshifts. We deduce the total (minor + major) merger history of massive galaxies with M{sub *} > 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} galaxies, and find that this scales roughly linearly with log-stellar-mass and magnitude range. We test our close pair methods by utilizing mock galaxy catalogs from the Millennium Simulation. We compute the total number of mergers to be (4.5 {+-} 2.9)/({tau}{sub m}) from z = 3 to the present, to a stellar mass sensitivity threshold of {approx}1:100 (where {tau}{sub m} is the merger timescale in Gyr which varies as a function of mass). This corresponds to an average mass increase of (3.4 {+-} 2.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} over the past 11.5 Gyr due to merging. We show that the size evolution observed for these galaxies may be mostly explained by this merging.

  8. Minimum Bias Measurements at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00022031; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive charged particle measurements at hadron colliders probe the low-energy nonperturbative region of QCD. Pseudorapidity distributions of charged-particles produced in pp collisions at 13 TeV have been measured by the CMS experiment. The ATLAS collaboration has measured the inclusive charged particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam current, recorded at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The measurements present the first detailed studies in inclusive phase spaces with a minimum transverse momentum of 100 MeV and 500 MeV. The distribution of electromagnetic and hadronic energy in the very forward phase-space has been measured with the CASTOR calorimeters located at a pseudorapidity of -5.2 to -6.6 in the very forward region of CMS. The energy distributions are very powerful benchmarks to study the performance of MPI in hadronic interactions models at 13 TeV collision energy. All measurements are compared with predictions of ...

  9. Topside measurements at Jicamarca during solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-pulse topside radar data acquired at Jicamarca and processed using full-profile analysis are compared to data processed using more conventional, range-gated approaches and with analytic and computational models. The salient features of the topside observations include a dramatic increase in the Te/Ti temperature ratio above the F peak at dawn and a local minimum in the topside plasma temperature in the afternoon. The hydrogen ion fraction was found to exhibit hyperbolic tangent-shaped profiles that become shallow (gradually changing above the O+-H+ transition height during the day. The profile shapes are generally consistent with diffusive equilibrium, although shallowing to the point of changes in inflection can only be accounted for by taking the effects of E×B drifts and meridional winds into account. The SAMI2 model demonstrates this as well as the substantial effect that drifts and winds can have on topside temperatures. Significant quiet-time variability in the topside composition and temperatures may be due to variability in the mechanical forcing. Correlations between topside measurements and magnetometer data at Jicamarca support this hypothesis.

  10. Topside measurements at Jicamarca during solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-pulse topside radar data acquired at Jicamarca and processed using full-profile analysis are compared to data processed using more conventional, range-gated approaches and with analytic and computational models. The salient features of the topside observations include a dramatic increase in the Te/Ti temperature ratio above the F peak at dawn and a local minimum in the topside plasma temperature in the afternoon. The hydrogen ion fraction was found to exhibit hyperbolic tangent-shaped profiles that become shallow (gradually changing above the O+-H+ transition height during the day. The profile shapes are generally consistent with diffusive equilibrium, although shallowing to the point of changes in inflection can only be accounted for by taking the effects of E×B drifts and meridional winds into account. The SAMI2 model demonstrates this as well as the substantial effect that drifts and winds can have on topside temperatures. Significant quiet-time variability in the topside composition and temperatures may be due to variability in the mechanical forcing. Correlations between topside measurements and magnetometer data at Jicamarca support this hypothesis.

  11. Designing from minimum to optimum functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannova, Olga; Bell, Larry

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses a multifaceted strategy to link NASA Minimal Functionality Habitable Element (MFHE) requirements to a compatible growth plan; leading forward to evolutionary, deployable habitats including outpost development stages. The discussion begins by reviewing fundamental geometric features inherent in small scale, vertical and horizontal, pressurized module configuration options to characterize applicability to meet stringent MFHE constraints. A proposed scenario to incorporate a vertical core MFHE concept into an expanded architecture to provide continuity of structural form and a logical path from "minimum" to "optimum" design of a habitable module. The paper describes how habitation and logistics accommodations could be pre-integrated into a common Hab/Log Module that serves both habitation and logistics functions. This is offered as a means to reduce unnecessary redundant development costs and to avoid EVA-intensive on-site adaptation and retrofitting requirements for augmented crew capacity. An evolutionary version of the hard shell Hab/Log design would have an expandable middle section to afford larger living and working accommodations. In conclusion, the paper illustrates that a number of cargo missions referenced for NASA's 4.0.0 Lunar Campaign Scenario could be eliminated altogether to expedite progress and reduce budgets. The plan concludes with a vertical growth geometry that provides versatile and efficient site development opportunities using a combination of hard Hab/Log modules and a hybrid expandable "CLAM" (Crew Lunar Accommodations Module) element.

  12. Differences in soil solution chemistry between soils amended with nanosized CuO or Cu reference materials: implications for nanotoxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Heather V A; Sunahara, Geoffrey I; Whalen, Joann K; Hendershot, William H

    2014-07-15

    Soil toxicity tests for metal oxide nanoparticles often include micrometer-sized oxide and metal salt treatments to distinguish between toxicity from nanometer-sized particles, non-nanometer-sized particles, and dissolved ions. Test result will be confounded if each chemical form has different effects on soil solution chemistry. We report on changes in soil solution chemistry over 56 days-the duration of some standard soil toxicity tests-in three soils amended with 500 mg/kg Cu as nanometer-sized CuO (nano), micrometer-sized CuO (micrometer), or Cu(NO3)2 (salt). In the CuO-amended soils, the log Cu2+ activity was initially low (minimum -9.48) and increased with time (maximum -5.20), whereas in the salt-amended soils it was initially high (maximum -4.80) and decreased with time (minimum -6.10). The Cu2+ activity in the nano-amended soils was higher than in the micrometer-amended soils for at least the first 11 days, and lower than in the salt-amended soils for at least 28 d. The pH, and dissolved Ca and Mg concentrations in the CuO-amended soils were similar, but the salt-amended soils had lower pH for at least 14 d, and higher Ca and Mg concentrations throughout the test. Soil pretreatments such as leaching and aging prior to toxicity tests are suggested.

  13. Queuing theory models used for port equipment sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragu, V.; Dinu, O.; Ruscă, A.; Burciu, Ş.; Roman, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    The significant growth of volumes and distances on road transportation led to the necessity of finding solutions to increase water transportation market share together with the handling and transfer technologies within its terminals. It is widely known that the biggest times are consumed within the transport terminals (loading/unloading/transfer) and so the necessity of constantly developing handling techniques and technologies in concordance with the goods flows size so that the total waiting time of ships within ports is reduced. Port development should be achieved by harmonizing the contradictory interests of port administration and users. Port administrators aim profit increase opposite to users that want savings by increasing consumers’ surplus. The difficulty consists in the fact that the transport demand - supply equilibrium must be realised at costs and goods quantities transiting the port in order to satisfy the interests of both parties involved. This paper presents a port equipment sizing model by using queueing theory so that the sum of costs for ships waiting operations and equipment usage would be minimum. Ship operation within the port is assimilated to a mass service waiting system in which parameters are later used to determine the main costs for ships and port equipment.

  14. A Phosphate Minimum in the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) off Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmier, A.; Giraud, M.; Sudre, J.; Jonca, J.; Leon, V.; Moron, O.; Dewitte, B.; Lavik, G.; Grasse, P.; Frank, M.; Stramma, L.; Garcon, V.

    2016-02-01

    The Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) off Peru is known to be associated with the advection of Equatorial SubSurface Waters (ESSW), rich in nutrients and poor in oxygen, through the Peru-Chile UnderCurrent (PCUC), but this circulation remains to be refined within the OMZ. During the Pelágico cruise in November-December 2010, measurements of phosphate revealed the presence of a phosphate minimum (Pmin) in various hydrographic stations, which could not be explained so far and could be associated with a specific water mass. This Pmin, localized at a relatively constant layer ( 20minimum with a mean vertical phosphate decrease of 0.6 µM but highly variable between 0.1 and 2.2 µM. In average, these Pmin are associated with a predominant mixing of SubTropical Under- and Surface Waters (STUW and STSW: 20 and 40%, respectively) within ESSW ( 25%), complemented evenly by overlying (ESW, TSW: 8%) and underlying waters (AAIW, SPDW: 7%). The hypotheses and mechanisms leading to the Pmin formation in the OMZ are further explored and discussed, considering the physical regional contribution associated with various circulation pathways ventilating the OMZ and the local biogeochemical contribution including the potential diazotrophic activity.

  15. Road networks as collections of minimum cost paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Jan Dirk; Montoya-Zegarra, Javier Alexander; Schindler, Konrad

    2015-10-01

    We present a probabilistic representation of network structures in images. Our target application is the extraction of urban roads from aerial images. Roads appear as thin, elongated, partially curved structures forming a loopy graph, and this complex layout requires a prior that goes beyond standard smoothness and co-occurrence assumptions. In the proposed model the network is represented as a union of 1D paths connecting distant (super-)pixels. A large set of putative candidate paths is constructed in such a way that they include the true network as much as possible, by searching for minimum cost paths in the foreground (road) likelihood. Selecting the optimal subset of candidate paths is posed as MAP inference in a higher-order conditional random field. Each path forms a higher-order clique with a type of clique potential, which attracts the member nodes of cliques with high cumulative road evidence to the foreground label. That formulation induces a robust PN -Potts model, for which a global MAP solution can be found efficiently with graph cuts. Experiments with two road data sets show that the proposed model significantly improves per-pixel accuracies as well as the overall topological network quality with respect to several baselines.

  16. Solving crystal structures with the symmetry minimum function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estermann, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Unravelling the Patterson function (the auto-correlation function of the crystal structure) (A.L. Patterson, Phys. Rev. 46 (1934) 372) can be the only way of solving crystal structures from neutron and incomplete diffraction data (e.g. powder data) when direct methods for phase determination fail. The negative scattering lengths of certain isotopes and the systematic loss of information caused by incomplete diffraction data invalidate the underlying statistical assumptions made in direct methods. In contrast, the Patterson function depends solely on the quality of the available diffraction data. Simpson et al. (P.G. Simpson et al., Acta Crystallogr. 18 (1965) 169) showed that solving a crystal structure with a particular superposition of origin-shifted Patterson functions, the symmetry minimum function, is advantageous over using the Patterson function alone, for single-crystal X-ray data.This paper describes the extension of the Patterson superposition approach to neutron data and powder data by (a) actively using the negative regions in the Patterson map caused by negative scattering lengths and (b) using maximum entropy Patterson maps (W.I.F. David, Nature 346 (1990) 731). Furthermore, prior chemical knowledge such as bond lengths and angles from known fragments have been included. Two successful structure solutions of a known and a previously unknown structure (M. Hofmann, J. Solid State Chem., in press) illustrate the potential of this new development. ((orig.))

  17. Microbial eukaryote diversity in the marine oxygen minimum zone off northern Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Parris, Darren J.; Ganesh, Sangita; Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Stewart, Frank J.; DeLong, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Molecular surveys are revealing diverse eukaryotic assemblages in oxygen-limited ocean waters. These communities may play pivotal ecological roles through autotrophy, feeding, and a wide range of symbiotic associations with prokaryotes. We used 18S rRNA gene sequencing to provide the first snapshot of pelagic microeukaryotic community structure in two cellular size fractions (0.2-1.6 µm, >1.6 µm) from seven depths through the anoxic oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off northern Chile. Sequencing ...

  18. The Consequences of Indexing the Minimum Wage to Average Wages in the U.S. Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, David A.; Even, William E.

    The consequences of indexing the minimum wage to average wages in the U.S. economy were analyzed. The study data were drawn from the 1974-1978 May Current Population Survey (CPS) and the 180 monthly CPS Outgoing Rotation Group files for 1979-1993 (approximate annual sample sizes of 40,000 and 180,000, respectively). The effects of indexing on the…

  19. Modeling and Sizing of Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETREUS, D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Faced with numerous challenges raised by the requirements of the modern industries for higher power and higher energy, supercapacitors study started playing an important role in offering viable solutions for some of these requirements. This paper presents the surface redox reactions based modeling in order to study the origin of high capacity of EDLC (electrical double-layer capacitor for better understanding the working principles of supercapacitors. Some application-dependent sizing methods are also presented since proper sizing can increase the efficiency and the life cycle of the supercapacitor based systems.

  20. Solution Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efeoglu, Arkin; Møller, Charles; Serie, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines an artifact building and evaluation proposal. Design Science Research (DSR) studies usually consider encapsulated artifact that have relationships with other artifacts. The solution prototype as a composed artifact demands for a more comprehensive consideration in its systematic...... environment. The solution prototype that is composed from blending product and service prototype has particular impacts on the dualism of DSR’s “Build” and “Evaluate”. Since the mix between product and service prototyping can be varied, there is a demand for a more agile and iterative framework. Van de Ven......’s research framework seems to fit this purpose. Van de Ven allows for an iterative research approach to problem solving with flexible starting point. The research activity is the result between the iteration of two dimensions. This framework focuses on the natural evaluation, particularly on ex...

  1. RCoronae Borealis at the 2003 light minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswara Rao, N.; Lambert, David L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.

    2006-08-01

    A set of five high-resolution optical spectra of R CrB obtained in 2003 March is discussed. At the time of the first spectrum (March 8), the star was at V = 12.6, a decline of more than six magnitudes. By March 31, the date of the last observation, the star at V = 9.3 was on the recovery to maximum light (V = 6). The 2003 spectra are compared with the extensive collection of spectra from the 1995-1996 minimum presented previously. Spectroscopic features common to the two minima include the familiar ones also seen in spectra of other R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) in decline: sharp emission lines of neutral and singly ionized atoms, broad emission lines including HeI, [NII] 6583 Å, Na D and CaII H & K lines, and blueshifted absorption lines of Na D, and KI resonance lines. Prominent differences between the 2003 and 1995-1996 spectra are seen. The broad Na D and Ca H & K lines in 2003 and 1995-1996 are centred approximately on the mean stellar velocity. The 2003 profiles are fit by a single Gaussian, but in 1995-1996 two Gaussians separated by about 200 km s-1 were required. However, the HeI broad emission lines are fit by a single Gaussian at all times; the emitting He and Na-Ca atoms are probably not colocated. The C2 Phillips 2-0 lines were detected as sharp absorption lines and the C2 Swan band lines as sharp emission lines in 2003, but in 1995-1996 the Swan band emission lines were broad and the Phillips lines were undetected. The 2003 spectra show CI sharp emission lines at minimum light with a velocity changing in 5 d by about 20 km s-1 when the velocity of `metal' sharp lines is unchanged; the CI emission may arise from shock-heated gas. Reexamination of spectra obtained at maximum light in 1995 shows extended blue wings to strong lines with the extension dependent on a line's lower excitation potential; this is the signature of a stellar wind, also revealed by published observations of the HeI 10830 Å line at maximum light. Changes in the cores of the

  2. Water-Reflected 233U Uranyl Nitrate Solutions in Simple Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, K.R.

    2001-01-01

    A number of critical experiments involving 233 U were performed in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Building 9213 Critical Experiments Facility during the years 1952 and 1953. These experiments, reported in Reference 1, were directed toward determining bounding values for the minimum critical mass, minimum critical volume, and maximum safe pipe size of water-moderated solutions of 233 U. Additional information on the critical experiments was found in the experimental logbooks. Two experiments utilizing uranyl nitrate (UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ) solutions in simple geometry are evaluated in this report. Experiment 37 is in a 10.4-inch diameter sphere, and Experiment 39 is in a 10-inch diameter cylinder. The 233 U concentration ranges from 49 to 62 g 233 U/l. Both experiments were reflected by at least 6 inches of water in all directions. Paraffin-reflected uranyl nitrate experiments, also reported in Reference 1, are evaluated elsewhere. Experiments with smaller paraffin reflected 5-, 6-, and 7.5-inch diameter cylinders are evaluated in U233-SOL-THERM-004. Experiments with paraffin reflected 8-, 8.5-, 9-, 10-, and 12-inch diameter cylinders are evaluated in U233-SOL-THERM-002. Later experiments with highly-enriched 235 U uranyl fluoride solution in the same 10.4-inch diameter sphere are reported in HEU-SOL-THERM-010. Both experiments were judged acceptable for use as criticality-safety benchmark experiments

  3. The Distribution of the Sample Minimum-Variance Frontier

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond Kan; Daniel R. Smith

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a finite sample analysis of the sample minimum-variance frontier under the assumption that the returns are independent and multivariate normally distributed. We show that the sample minimum-variance frontier is a highly biased estimator of the population frontier, and we propose an improved estimator of the population frontier. In addition, we provide the exact distribution of the out-of-sample mean and variance of sample minimum-variance portfolios. This allows us t...

  4. Minimum Wages and Teen Employment: A Spatial Panel Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Charlene Kalenkoski; Donald Lacombe

    2011-01-01

    The authors employ spatial econometrics techniques and Annual Averages data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics for 1990-2004 to examine how changes in the minimum wage affect teen employment. Spatial econometrics techniques account for the fact that employment is correlated across states. Such correlation may exist if a change in the minimum wage in a state affects employment not only in its own state but also in other, neighboring states. The authors show that state minimum wages negat...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1431 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., including rotation resistant). For rope lengths less than 3,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static Load×(7.0−0.001L) For rope lengths 3,000 feet or greater: Minimum Value=Static Load×4.0 (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static Load×(7.0−0.0005L) For rope lengths 4,000 feet...

  6. Minimum Wages and the Distribution of Family Incomes

    OpenAIRE

    Dube, Arindrajit

    2017-01-01

    Using the March Current Population Survey data from 1984 to 2013, I provide a comprehensive evaluation of how minimum wage policies influence the distribution of family incomes. I find robust evidence that higher minimum wages shift down the cumulative distribution of family incomes at the bottom, reducing the share of non-elderly individuals with incomes below 50, 75, 100, and 125 percent of the federal poverty threshold. The long run (3 or more years) minimum wage elasticity of the non-elde...

  7. The Minimum Impact House : Applications of the Frankfurt Prototype for sustainable building in Cities of the European Rhine Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drexler, H.; Jauslin, D.; Curiel, F.

    2010-01-01

    The Minimum Impact House in Frankfurt am Main is a sustainable solution for low cost living within city centers - a prototype typology with minimal footprint, built on a leftover urban space. The planning process itself became part of a scientific study. The ecological advantages of building in the

  8. Pediatric Program Director Minimum Milestone Expectations before Allowing Supervision of Others and Unsupervised Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Ting T; Tancredi, Daniel J; Schwartz, Alan; Guillot, Ann; Burke, Ann E; Trimm, R Franklin; Guralnick, Susan; Mahan, John D; Gifford, Kimberly

    2018-04-25

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires semiannual Milestone reporting on all residents. Milestone expectations of performance are unknown. Determine pediatric program director (PD) minimum Milestone expectations for residents prior to being ready to supervise and prior to being ready to graduate. Mixed methods survey of pediatric PDs on their programs' Milestone expectations before residents are ready to supervise and before they are ready to graduate, and in what ways PDs use Milestones to make supervision and graduation decisions. If programs had no established Milestone expectations, PDs indicated expectations they considered for use in their program. Mean minimum Milestone level expectations adjusted for program size, region, and clustering of Milestone expectations by program were calculated for prior to supervise and prior to graduate. Free-text questions were analyzed using thematic analysis. The response rate was 56.8% (113/199). Most programs had no required minimum Milestone level before residents are ready to supervise (80%; 76/95) or ready to graduate (84%; 80/95). For readiness to supervise, minimum Milestone expectations PDs considered establishing for their program were highest for humanism (2.46, 95% CI: 2.21-2.71) and professionalization (2.37, 2.15-2.60). Minimum Milestone expectations for graduates were highest for help-seeking (3.14, 2.83-3.46). Main themes included the use of Milestones in combination with other information to assess learner performance and Milestones are not equally weighted when making advancement decisions. Most PDs have not established program minimum Milestones, but would vary such expectations by competency. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Minimum Distance Estimation on Time Series Analysis With Little Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tekin, Hakan

    2001-01-01

    .... Minimum distance estimation has been demonstrated better standard approaches, including maximum likelihood estimators and least squares, in estimating statistical distribution parameters with very small data sets...

  10. 30 CFR 57.19021 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... feet: Minimum Value=Static Load×(7.0−0.001L) For rope lengths 3,000 feet or greater: Minimum Value=Static Load×4.0. (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static Load×(7.0−0.0005L) For rope lengths 4,000 feet or greater: Minimum Value=Static Load×5.0. (c) Tail...

  11. 30 CFR 77.1431 - Minimum rope strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... feet: Minimum Value=Static Load×(7.0−0.001L) For rope lengths 3,000 feet or greater: Minimum Value=Static Load×4.0 (b) Friction drum ropes. For rope lengths less than 4,000 feet: Minimum Value=Static Load×(7.0−0.0005L) For rope lengths 4,000 feet or greater: Minimum Value=Static Load×5.0 (c) Tail ropes...

  12. Decision trees with minimum average depth for sorting eight elements

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2015-11-19

    We prove that the minimum average depth of a decision tree for sorting 8 pairwise different elements is equal to 620160/8!. We show also that each decision tree for sorting 8 elements, which has minimum average depth (the number of such trees is approximately equal to 8.548×10^326365), has also minimum depth. Both problems were considered by Knuth (1998). To obtain these results, we use tools based on extensions of dynamic programming which allow us to make sequential optimization of decision trees relative to depth and average depth, and to count the number of decision trees with minimum average depth.

  13. Training and minimum wages: first evidence from the introduction of the minimum wage in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bellmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We analyze the short-run impact of the introduction of the new statutory minimum wage in Germany on further training at the workplace level. Applying difference-in-difference methods to data from the IAB Establishment Panel, we do not find a reduction in the training incidence but a slight reduction in the intensity of training at treated establishments. Effect heterogeneities reveal that the negative impact is mostly driven by employer-financed training. On the worker level, we observe a reduction of training for medium- and high-skilled employees but no significant effects on the training of low-skilled employees.

  14. Minimum weight protection - Gradient method; Protection de poids minimum - Methode du gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danon, R.

    1958-12-15

    After having recalled that, when considering a mobile installation, total weight has a crucial importance, and that, in the case of a nuclear reactor, a non neglectable part of weight is that of protection, this note presents an iterative method which results, for a given protection, to a configuration with a minimum weight. After a description of the problem, the author presents the theoretical formulation of the gradient method as it is applied to the concerned case. This application is then discussed, as well as its validity in terms of convergence and uniqueness. Its actual application is then reported, and possibilities of practical applications are evoked.

  15. A Minimum Variance Algorithm for Overdetermined TOA Equations with an Altitude Constraint.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Louis A; Mason, John J.

    2018-04-01

    We present a direct (non-iterative) method for solving for the location of a radio frequency (RF) emitter, or an RF navigation receiver, using four or more time of arrival (TOA) measurements and an assumed altitude above an ellipsoidal earth. Both the emitter tracking problem and the navigation application are governed by the same equations, but with slightly different interpreta- tions of several variables. We treat the assumed altitude as a soft constraint, with a specified noise level, just as the TOA measurements are handled, with their respective noise levels. With 4 or more TOA measurements and the assumed altitude, the problem is overdetermined and is solved in the weighted least squares sense for the 4 unknowns, the 3-dimensional position and time. We call the new technique the TAQMV (TOA Altitude Quartic Minimum Variance) algorithm, and it achieves the minimum possible error variance for given levels of TOA and altitude estimate noise. The method algebraically produces four solutions, the least-squares solution, and potentially three other low residual solutions, if they exist. In the lightly overdermined cases where multiple local minima in the residual error surface are more likely to occur, this algebraic approach can produce all of the minima even when an iterative approach fails to converge. Algorithm performance in terms of solution error variance and divergence rate for bas eline (iterative) and proposed approach are given in tables.

  16. Multi-UAV Routing for Area Coverage and Remote Sensing with Minimum Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellar, Gustavo S C; Pereira, Guilherme A S; Pimenta, Luciano C A; Iscold, Paulo

    2015-11-02

    This paper presents a solution for the problem of minimum time coverage of ground areas using a group of unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) equipped with image sensors. The solution is divided into two parts: (i) the task modeling as a graph whose vertices are geographic coordinates determined in such a way that a single UAV would cover the area in minimum time; and (ii) the solution of a mixed integer linear programming problem, formulated according to the graph variables defined in the first part, to route the team of UAVs over the area. The main contribution of the proposed methodology, when compared with the traditional vehicle routing problem's (VRP) solutions, is the fact that our method solves some practical problems only encountered during the execution of the task with actual UAVs. In this line, one of the main contributions of the paper is that the number of UAVs used to cover the area is automatically selected by solving the optimization problem. The number of UAVs is influenced by the vehicles' maximum flight time and by the setup time, which is the time needed to prepare and launch a UAV. To illustrate the methodology, the paper presents experimental results obtained with two hand-launched, fixed-wing UAVs.

  17. Solving portfolio selection problems with minimum transaction lots based on conditional-value-at-risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, E. P.; Rosadi, D.

    2017-01-01

    Portfolio selection problems conventionally means ‘minimizing the risk, given the certain level of returns’ from some financial assets. This problem is frequently solved with quadratic or linear programming methods, depending on the risk measure that used in the objective function. However, the solutions obtained by these method are in real numbers, which may give some problem in real application because each asset usually has its minimum transaction lots. In the classical approach considering minimum transaction lots were developed based on linear Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD), variance (like Markowitz’s model), and semi-variance as risk measure. In this paper we investigated the portfolio selection methods with minimum transaction lots with conditional value at risk (CVaR) as risk measure. The mean-CVaR methodology only involves the part of the tail of the distribution that contributed to high losses. This approach looks better when we work with non-symmetric return probability distribution. Solution of this method can be found with Genetic Algorithm (GA) methods. We provide real examples using stocks from Indonesia stocks market.

  18. A Computable Plug-In Estimator of Minimum Volume Sets for Novelty Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Chiwoo

    2010-10-01

    A minimum volume set of a probability density is a region of minimum size among the regions covering a given probability mass of the density. Effective methods for finding the minimum volume sets are very useful for detecting failures or anomalies in commercial and security applications-a problem known as novelty detection. One theoretical approach of estimating the minimum volume set is to use a density level set where a kernel density estimator is plugged into the optimization problem that yields the appropriate level. Such a plug-in estimator is not of practical use because solving the corresponding minimization problem is usually intractable. A modified plug-in estimator was proposed by Hyndman in 1996 to overcome the computation difficulty of the theoretical approach but is not well studied in the literature. In this paper, we provide theoretical support to this estimator by showing its asymptotic consistency. We also show that this estimator is very competitive to other existing novelty detection methods through an extensive empirical study. ©2010 INFORMS.

  19. An Improved Minimum Error Interpolator of CNC for General Curves Based on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiye HUANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved minimum error interpolation algorithm for general curves generation in computer numerical control (CNC. Compared with the conventional interpolation algorithms such as the By-Point Comparison method, the Minimum- Error method and the Digital Differential Analyzer (DDA method, the proposed improved Minimum-Error interpolation algorithm can find a balance between accuracy and efficiency. The new algorithm is applicable for the curves of linear, circular, elliptical and parabolic. The proposed algorithm is realized on a field programmable gate array (FPGA with Verilog HDL language, and simulated by the ModelSim software, and finally verified on a two-axis CNC lathe. The algorithm has the following advantages: firstly, the maximum interpolation error is only half of the minimum step-size; and secondly the computing time is only two clock cycles of the FPGA. Simulations and actual tests have proved that the high accuracy and efficiency of the algorithm, which shows that it is highly suited for real-time applications.

  20. A Computable Plug-In Estimator of Minimum Volume Sets for Novelty Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Chiwoo; Huang, Jianhua Z.; Ding, Yu

    2010-01-01

    A minimum volume set of a probability density is a region of minimum size among the regions covering a given probability mass of the density. Effective methods for finding the minimum volume sets are very useful for detecting failures or anomalies in commercial and security applications-a problem known as novelty detection. One theoretical approach of estimating the minimum volume set is to use a density level set where a kernel density estimator is plugged into the optimization problem that yields the appropriate level. Such a plug-in estimator is not of practical use because solving the corresponding minimization problem is usually intractable. A modified plug-in estimator was proposed by Hyndman in 1996 to overcome the computation difficulty of the theoretical approach but is not well studied in the literature. In this paper, we provide theoretical support to this estimator by showing its asymptotic consistency. We also show that this estimator is very competitive to other existing novelty detection methods through an extensive empirical study. ©2010 INFORMS.

  1. 75 FR 77561 - Regulations Issued Under the Export Grape and Plum Act; Revision to the Minimum Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... amount of product sold and an increase in returns to producers, shippers, exporters, and carriers... additional 2 percent tolerance for sealed berry cracks on the Exotic grape variety. This action was... minimum size and quality requirements for export shipments of any variety of vinifera species table grapes...

  2. Six months into Myanmar's minimum wage: Reflecting on progress ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... Participants examined recent results from an IDRC-funded enterprise survey, ... of a minimum wage, and how they have coped with the new situation.” ... Debate on the impact of minimum wages on employment continues ...

  3. The impact of minimum wages on youth employment in Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Pereira

    2003-01-01

    textabstractFrom January 1, 1987, the legal minimum wage for workers aged 18 and 19 in Portugal was uprated to the full adult rate, generating a 49.3% increase between 1986 and 1987 in the legal minimum wage for this age group. This shock is used as a ?natural experiment? to evaluate the impact of

  4. The Impact Of Minimum Wage On Employment Level And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research work has been carried out to analyze the critical impact of minimum wage of employment level and productivity in Nigeria. A brief literature on wage and its determination was highlighted. Models on minimum wage effect are being look into. This includes research work done by different economist analyzing it ...

  5. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84... Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section each respirator shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container...

  7. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  8. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except..., durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type of respirator it contains...

  9. 42 CFR 84.74 - Apparatus containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Apparatus containers; minimum requirements. 84.74...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.74 Apparatus containers; minimum requirements. (a) Apparatus may be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  10. 14 CFR 91.155 - Basic VFR weather minimums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Basic VFR weather minimums. 91.155 Section...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Flight Rules Visual Flight Rules § 91.155 Basic VFR weather minimums. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section and...

  11. 42 CFR 422.382 - Minimum net worth amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... that CMS considers appropriate to reduce, control or eliminate start-up administrative costs. (b) After... section. (c) Calculation of the minimum net worth amount—(1) Cash requirement. (i) At the time of application, the organization must maintain at least $750,000 of the minimum net worth amount in cash or cash...

  12. 7 CFR 1610.5 - Minimum Bank loan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum Bank loan. 1610.5 Section 1610.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL TELEPHONE BANK, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOAN POLICIES § 1610.5 Minimum Bank loan. A Bank loan will not be made unless the applicant qualifies for a Bank...

  13. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year... subject to its child labor provisions, with certain exceptions not applicable here. (b) 18-year minimum... occupation found and declared by the Secretary of Labor to be particularly hazardous for the employment of...

  14. 76 FR 15368 - Minimum Security Devices and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Minimum Security Devices and Procedures... concerning the following information collection. Title of Proposal: Minimum Security Devices and Procedures... security devices and procedures to discourage robberies, burglaries, and larcenies, and to assist in the...

  15. 76 FR 30243 - Minimum Security Devices and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Minimum Security Devices and Procedures.... Title of Proposal: Minimum Security Devices and Procedures. OMB Number: 1550-0062. Form Number: N/A... respect to the installation, maintenance, and operation of security devices and procedures to discourage...

  16. 12 CFR 567.2 - Minimum regulatory capital requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum regulatory capital requirement. 567.2... Regulatory Capital Requirements § 567.2 Minimum regulatory capital requirement. (a) To meet its regulatory capital requirement a savings association must satisfy each of the following capital standards: (1) Risk...

  17. Minimum bias measurement at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, Nicola; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The modelling of Minimum Bias (MB) is a crucial ingredient to learn about the description of soft QCD processes and to simulate the environment at the LHC with many concurrent pp interactions (pile-up). We summarise the ATLAS minimum bias measurements with proton-proton collision at 13 TeV center-of-mass-energy at the Large Hadron Collider.

  18. Solving the minimum flow problem with interval bounds and flows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... with crisp data. In this paper, the idea of Ghiyasvand was extended for solving the minimum flow problem with interval-valued lower, upper bounds and flows. This problem can be solved using two minimum flow problems with crisp data. Then, this result is extended to networks with fuzzy lower, upper bounds and flows.

  19. 47 CFR 25.205 - Minimum angle of antenna elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum angle of antenna elevation. 25.205 Section 25.205 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.205 Minimum angle of antenna elevation. (a) Earth station...

  20. 77 FR 43196 - Minimum Internal Control Standards and Technical Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION 25 CFR Parts 543 and 547 Minimum Internal Control Standards [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Part 543 addresses minimum internal control standards (MICS) for Class II gaming operations. The regulations require tribes to establish controls and implement...

  1. 12 CFR 3.6 - Minimum capital ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... should have well-diversified risks, including no undue interest rate risk exposure; excellent control... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum capital ratios. 3.6 Section 3.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MINIMUM CAPITAL RATIOS; ISSUANCE...

  2. Minimum Competencies in Undergraduate Motor Development. Guidance Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The minimum competency guidelines in Motor Development described herein at the undergraduate level may be gained in one or more motor development course(s) or through other courses provided in an undergraduate curriculum. The minimum guidelines include: (1) Formulation of a developmental perspective; (2) Knowledge of changes in motor behavior…

  3. 30 CFR 77.606-1 - Rubber gloves; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. 77.606-1... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.606-1 Rubber gloves; minimum requirements. (a) Rubber gloves (lineman's gloves) worn while handling high-voltage trailing cables shall be rated at least 20,000 volts and shall...

  4. 42 CFR 84.117 - Gas mask containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. 84.117... SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.117 Gas mask containers; minimum requirements. (a) Gas masks shall be equipped with a substantial...

  5. State cigarette minimum price laws - United States, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    Cigarette price increases reduce the demand for cigarettes and thereby reduce smoking prevalence, cigarette consumption, and youth initiation of smoking. Excise tax increases are the most effective government intervention to increase the price of cigarettes, but cigarette manufacturers use trade discounts, coupons, and other promotions to counteract the effects of these tax increases and appeal to price-sensitive smokers. State cigarette minimum price laws, initiated by states in the 1940s and 1950s to protect tobacco retailers from predatory business practices, typically require a minimum percentage markup to be added to the wholesale and/or retail price. If a statute prohibits trade discounts from the minimum price calculation, these laws have the potential to counteract discounting by cigarette manufacturers. To assess the status of cigarette minimum price laws in the United States, CDC surveyed state statutes and identified those states with minimum price laws in effect as of December 31, 2009. This report summarizes the results of that survey, which determined that 25 states had minimum price laws for cigarettes (median wholesale markup: 4.00%; median retail markup: 8.00%), and seven of those states also expressly prohibited the use of trade discounts in the minimum retail price calculation. Minimum price laws can help prevent trade discounting from eroding the positive effects of state excise tax increases and higher cigarette prices on public health.

  6. Decision trees with minimum average depth for sorting eight elements

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.; Chikalov, Igor; Moshkov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We prove that the minimum average depth of a decision tree for sorting 8 pairwise different elements is equal to 620160/8!. We show also that each decision tree for sorting 8 elements, which has minimum average depth (the number of such trees

  7. 30 CFR 18.97 - Inspection of machines; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection of machines; minimum requirements... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Field Approval of Electrically Operated Mining Equipment § 18.97 Inspection of machines; minimum...

  8. 12 CFR 615.5330 - Minimum surplus ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum surplus ratios. 615.5330 Section 615.5330 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS, LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS, AND FUNDING OPERATIONS Surplus and Collateral Requirements § 615.5330 Minimum...

  9. 19 CFR 144.33 - Minimum quantities to be withdrawn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum quantities to be withdrawn. 144.33 Section 144.33 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... Warehouse § 144.33 Minimum quantities to be withdrawn. Unless by special authority of the Commissioner of...

  10. The impact of minimum wage adjustments on Vietnamese wage inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Rand, John; Torm, Nina

    Using Vietnamese Labour Force Survey data we analyse the impact of minimum wage changes on wage inequality. Minimum wages serve to reduce local wage inequality in the formal sectors by decreasing the gap between the median wages and the lower tail of the local wage distributions. In contrast, local...

  11. Minimum Moduli in Von Neumann Algebras | Gopalraj | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we answer a question raised in [12] in the affirmative, namely that the essential minimum modulus of an element in a von. Neumann algebra, relative to any norm closed two-sided ideal, is equal to the minimum modulus of the element perturbed by an element from the ideal. As a corollary of this result, we ...

  12. 12 CFR 932.8 - Minimum liquidity requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum liquidity requirements. 932.8 Section... CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS § 932.8 Minimum liquidity requirements. In addition to meeting the deposit liquidity requirements contained in § 965.3 of this chapter, each Bank...

  13. Is a Minimum Wage an Appropriate Instrument for Redistribution?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.F. Gerritsen (Aart); B. Jacobs (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe analyze the redistributional (dis)advantages of a minimum wage over income taxation in competitive labor markets, without imposing assumptions on the (in)efficiency of labor rationing. Compared to a distributionally equivalent tax change, a minimum-wage increase raises involuntary

  14. The Minimum Wage and the Employment of Teenagers. Recent Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallick, Bruce; Currie, Janet

    A study used individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth to examine the effects of changes in the federal minimum wage on teenage employment. Individuals in the sample were classified as either likely or unlikely to be affected by these increases in the federal minimum wage on the basis of their wage rates and industry of…

  15. The Minimum Wage, Restaurant Prices, and Labor Market Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, Daniel; French, Eric; MacDonald, James

    2008-01-01

    Using store-level and aggregated Consumer Price Index data, we show that restaurant prices rise in response to minimum wage increases under several sources of identifying variation. We introduce a general model of employment determination that implies minimum wage hikes cause prices to rise in competitive labor markets but potentially fall in…

  16. The Effect of Minimum Wage Rates on High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, John Robert; Hamrock, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    Does increasing the minimum wage reduce the high school completion rate? Previous research has suffered from (1. narrow time horizons, (2. potentially inadequate measures of states' high school completion rates, and (3. potentially inadequate measures of minimum wage rates. Overcoming each of these limitations, we analyze the impact of changes in…

  17. Do minimum wages reduce poverty? Evidence from Central America ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In all three countries, these multiple minimum wages are negotiated among representatives of the central government, labour unions and the chambers of commerce. Minimum wage legislation applies to all private-sector employees, but in all three countries a large part of the work force is self-employed or works as unpaid ...

  18. Minimum Variance Portfolios in the Brazilian Equity Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rubesam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate minimum variance portfolios in the Brazilian equity market using different methods to estimate the covariance matrix, from the simple model of using the sample covariance to multivariate GARCH models. We compare the performance of the minimum variance portfolios to those of the following benchmarks: (i the IBOVESPA equity index, (ii an equally-weighted portfolio, (iii the maximum Sharpe ratio portfolio and (iv the maximum growth portfolio. Our results show that the minimum variance portfolio has higher returns with lower risk compared to the benchmarks. We also consider long-short 130/30 minimum variance portfolios and obtain similar results. The minimum variance portfolio invests in relatively few stocks with low βs measured with respect to the IBOVESPA index, being easily replicable by individual and institutional investors alike.

  19. Reducing tobacco use and access through strengthened minimum price laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Ian; Pearson, Anne; Laird-Metke, Elisa; Ribisl, Kurt

    2014-10-01

    Higher prices reduce consumption and initiation of tobacco products. A minimum price law that establishes a high statutory minimum price and prohibits the industry's discounting tactics for tobacco products is a promising pricing strategy as an alternative to excise tax increases. Although some states have adopted minimum price laws on the basis of statutorily defined price "markups" over the invoice price, existing state laws have been largely ineffective at increasing the retail price. We analyzed 3 new variations of minimum price laws that hold great potential for raising tobacco prices and reducing consumption: (1) a flat rate minimum price law similar to a recent enactment in New York City, (2) an enhanced markup law, and (3) a law that incorporates both elements.

  20. The impact of minimum wage adjustments on Vietnamese wage inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Rand, John; Torm, Nina

    Using Vietnamese Labour Force Survey data we analyse the impact of minimum wage changes on wage inequality. Minimum wages serve to reduce local wage inequality in the formal sectors by decreasing the gap between the median wages and the lower tail of the local wage distributions. In contrast, local...... wage inequality is increased in the informal sectors. Overall, the minimum wages decrease national wage inequality. Our estimates indicate a decrease in the wage distribution Gini coefficient of about 2 percentage points and an increase in the 10/50 wage ratio of 5-7 percentage points caused...... by the adjustment of the minimum wages from 2011to 2012 that levelled the minimum wage across economic sectors....

  1. A parametric LTR solution for discrete-time systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Jannerup, Ole Erik

    1989-01-01

    A parametric LTR (loop transfer recovery) solution for discrete-time compensators incorporating filtering observers which achieve exact recovery is presented for both minimum- and non-minimum-phase systems. First the recovery error, which defines the difference between the target loop transfer...... and the full loop transfer function, is manipulated into a general form involving the target loop transfer matrix and the fundamental recovery matrix. A parametric LTR solution based on the recovery matrix is developed. It is shown that the LQR/LTR (linear quadratic Gaussian/loop transfer recovery) solution...

  2. The need to reconcile the habitability regulations with the acoustic rehabilitation of the minimum dwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Daumal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There is no scientific literature on the interaction between the correction processes of acoustic pathologies and the habitability conditions in housing buildings. In this paper, the authors deduce the main interferences caused by the acoustic refurbishment of minimum dwellings in their habitability conditions from more than one hundred cases of legal claims in Catalonia. An analysis of the degree of interference is performed using as a case study the social housing of Aragon from the period 1939-1975 before and after a theoretical acoustic refurbishment. It is verified that the acoustic refurbishment solutions can have inopportune consequences in the habitability parameters of the dwellings. In addition, some of these dwellings before a hypothetical intervention are already deficient in this sense, raising the need for a revision of the habitability regulations for the minimum housing stock.

  3. Application of Pontryagin’s Minimum Principle in Optimum Time of Missile Manoeuvring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Cahyaningtias

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Missile is a guided weapon and designed to protect outermost island from a thread of other country. It, commonly, is used as self defense. This research presented surface-to-surface missile in final dive manoeuvre for fixed target. Furthermore, it was proposed manoeuvring based on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV, autopilot system, which needs accuration and minimum both time and thrust of missile while attacking object. This paper introduced pontryagin’s Minimum Principle, which is useable to solve the problem. The numerical solution showed that trajectory of the missile is split it up in three sub-intervals; flight, climbing, and diving. The numerical simulation showed that the missile must climb in order to satisfy the final dive condition and the optimum time of a missile depend on initial condition of the altitude and the terminal velocity

  4. Minimum Time Trajectory Optimization of CNC Machining with Tracking Error Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An off-line optimization approach of high precision minimum time feedrate for CNC machining is proposed. Besides the ordinary considered velocity, acceleration, and jerk constraints, dynamic performance constraint of each servo drive is also considered in this optimization problem to improve the tracking precision along the optimized feedrate trajectory. Tracking error is applied to indicate the servo dynamic performance of each axis. By using variable substitution, the tracking error constrained minimum time trajectory planning problem is formulated as a nonlinear path constrained optimal control problem. Bang-bang constraints structure of the optimal trajectory is proved in this paper; then a novel constraint handling method is proposed to realize a convex optimization based solution of the nonlinear constrained optimal control problem. A simple ellipse feedrate planning test is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach. Then the practicability and robustness of the trajectory generated by the proposed approach are demonstrated by a butterfly contour machining example.

  5. Esthetic, occlusal, and periodontal rehabilitation of anterior teeth with minimum thickness porcelain laminate veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Pedroche, Lorena Oliveira; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Ceramic veneers of minimum thickness provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure. Dental ceramics can both improve the esthetic appearance and reestablish the strength and function of teeth. In worn anterior teeth, functional surfaces, for example, anterior and lateral guidance, can be restored effectively. The characteristics of dental ceramics, such as color stability and mechanical and optical properties, make this material a good choice for indirect restorations, especially when optimum function and esthetics are required. This clinical report presents an occlusal, periodontal, and restorative solution with minimum thickness glass ceramic veneers for worn anterior teeth with multiple diastemas. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, Ram [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Smith, Susan [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Kirkpatrick, J. M. [Canberra Industries (AREVA BDNM), Meriden, CT (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  7. Minimum weight design of inhomogeneous rotating discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahed, Hamid; Farshi, Behrooz; Bidabadi, Jalal

    2005-01-01

    There are numerous applications for gas turbine discs in the aerospace industry such as in turbojet engines. These discs normally work under high temperatures while subjected to high angular velocities. Minimizing the weight of such items in aerospace applications results in benefits such as low dead weights and lower costs. High speed of rotation causes large centrifugal forces in a disc and simultaneous application of high temperatures reduces disc material strength. Thus, the latter effects tend to increase deformations of the disc under the applied loads. In order to obtain a reliable disc analysis and arrive at the corresponding correct stress distribution, solutions should consider changes in material properties due to the temperature field throughout the disc. To achieve this goal, an inhomogeneous disc model with variable thickness is considered. Using the variable material properties method, stresses are obtained for the disc under rotation and a steady temperature field. In this paper this is done by modelling the rotating disc as a series of rings of different but constant properties. The optimum disc profile is arrived at by sequentially proportioning the thicknesses of each ring to satisfy the stress requirements. This method vis-a-vis a mathematical programming procedure for optimization shows several advantages. Firstly, it is simple iterative proportioning in each design cycle not requiring involved mathematical operations. Secondly, due to its simplicity it alleviates the necessity of certain simplifications that are common in so-called rigorous mathematical procedures. The results obtained, compared to those published in the literature show agreement and superiority. A further advantage of the proposed method is the independence of the end results from the initially assumed point in the iterative design routine, unlike most methods published so far

  8. Application of multiphysics models to efficient design of experiments of solute transport across articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouran, Behdad; Arbabi, Vahid; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-11-01

    Transport of solutes helps to regulate normal physiology and proper function of cartilage in diarthrodial joints. Multiple studies have shown the effects of characteristic parameters such as concentration of proteoglycans and collagens and the orientation of collagen fibrils on the diffusion process. However, not much quantitative information and accurate models are available to help understand how the characteristics of the fluid surrounding articular cartilage influence the diffusion process. In this study, we used a combination of micro-computed tomography experiments and biphasic-solute finite element models to study the effects of three parameters of the overlying bath on the diffusion of neutral solutes across cartilage zones. Those parameters include bath size, degree of stirring of the bath, and the size and concentration of the stagnant layer that forms at the interface of cartilage and bath. Parametric studies determined the minimum of the finite bath size for which the diffusion behavior reduces to that of an infinite bath. Stirring of the bath proved to remarkably influence neutral solute transport across cartilage zones. The well-stirred condition was achieved only when the ratio of the diffusivity of bath to that of cartilage was greater than ≈1000. While the thickness of the stagnant layer at the cartilage-bath interface did not significantly influence the diffusion behavior, increase in its concentration substantially elevated solute concentration in cartilage. Sufficient stirring attenuated the effects of the stagnant layer. Our findings could be used for efficient design of experimental protocols aimed at understanding the transport of molecules across articular cartilage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Teaching the Minimum Wage in Econ 101 in Light of the New Economics of the Minimum Wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Alan B.

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the recent controversy over the effect of the minimum wage on employment offers an opportunity for teaching introductory economics. Examines eight textbooks to determine topic coverage but finds little consensus. Describes how minimum wage effects should be taught. (RLH)

  10. Designing Hyper-V solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Grover, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed at IT admins, consultants, and architects alike who wish to deploy, manage, and maintain Hyper-V solutions in organizations of various sizes. You are expected to have a working knowledge of managing Windows Server and a fair understanding of networking and storage concepts.

  11. A result-driven minimum blocking method for PageRank parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wan; Liu, Tao; Yu, Wei; Huang, Gan

    2017-01-01

    Matrix blocking is a common method for improving computational efficiency of PageRank, but the blocking rules are hard to be determined, and the following calculation is complicated. In tackling these problems, we propose a minimum blocking method driven by result needs to accomplish a parallel implementation of PageRank algorithm. The minimum blocking just stores the element which is necessary for the result matrix. In return, the following calculation becomes simple and the consumption of the I/O transmission is cut down. We do experiments on several matrixes of different data size and different sparsity degree. The results show that the proposed method has better computational efficiency than traditional blocking methods.

  12. Minimum BER Receiver Filters with Block Memory for Uplink DS-CDMA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mérouane Debbah

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of synchronous multiuser receiver design in the case of direct-sequence single-antenna code division multiple access (DS-CDMA uplink networks is studied over frequency selective fading channels. An exact expression for the bit error rate (BER is derived in the case of BPSK signaling. Moreover, an algorithm is proposed for finding the finite impulse response (FIR receiver filters with block memory such that the exact BER of the active users is minimized. Several properties of the minimum BER FIR filters with block memory are identified. The algorithm performance is found for scenarios with different channel qualities, spreading code lengths, receiver block memory size, near-far effects, and channel mismatch. For the BPSK constellation, the proposed FIR receiver structure with block memory has significant better BER with respect to Eb/N0 and near-far resistance than the corresponding minimum mean square error (MMSE filters with block memory.

  13. Minimum BER Receiver Filters with Block Memory for Uplink DS-CDMA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbah Mérouane

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problem of synchronous multiuser receiver design in the case of direct-sequence single-antenna code division multiple access (DS-CDMA uplink networks is studied over frequency selective fading channels. An exact expression for the bit error rate (BER is derived in the case of BPSK signaling. Moreover, an algorithm is proposed for finding the finite impulse response (FIR receiver filters with block memory such that the exact BER of the active users is minimized. Several properties of the minimum BER FIR filters with block memory are identified. The algorithm performance is found for scenarios with different channel qualities, spreading code lengths, receiver block memory size, near-far effects, and channel mismatch. For the BPSK constellation, the proposed FIR receiver structure with block memory has significant better BER with respect to and near-far resistance than the corresponding minimum mean square error (MMSE filters with block memory.

  14. Improvement in minimum detectable activity for low energy gamma by optimization in counting geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma spectrometry for environmental samples of low specific activities demands low minimum detection levels of measurement. An attempt has been made to lower the gamma detection level of measurement by optimizing the sample geometry, without compromising on the sample size. Gamma energy of 50–200 keV range was chosen for the study, since low energy gamma photons suffer the most self-attenuation within matrix. The simulation study was carried out using MCNP based software “EffCalcMC” for silica matrix and cylindrical geometries. A volume of 250 ml sample geometry of 9 cm diameter is optimized as the best suitable geometry for use, against the in-practice 7 cm diameter geometry of same volume. An increase in efficiency of 10%–23% was observed for the 50–200 keV gamma energy range and a corresponding lower minimum detectable activity of 9%–20% could be achieved for the same.

  15. Setting a minimum age for juvenile justice jurisdiction in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Barnert, Elizabeth; S Abrams, Laura; Maxson, Cheryl; Gase, Lauren; Soung, Patricia; Carroll, Paul; Bath, Eraka

    2017-03-13

    Purpose Despite the existence of minimum age laws for juvenile justice jurisdiction in 18 US states, California has no explicit law that protects children (i.e. youth less than 12 years old) from being processed in the juvenile justice system. In the absence of a minimum age law, California lags behind other states and international practice and standards. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In this policy brief, academics across the University of California campuses examine current evidence, theory, and policy related to the minimum age of juvenile justice jurisdiction. Findings Existing evidence suggests that children lack the cognitive maturity to comprehend or benefit from formal juvenile justice processing, and diverting children from the system altogether is likely to be more beneficial for the child and for public safety. Research limitations/implications Based on current evidence and theory, the authors argue that minimum age legislation that protects children from contact with the juvenile justice system and treats them as children in need of services and support, rather than as delinquents or criminals, is an important policy goal for California and for other national and international jurisdictions lacking a minimum age law. Originality/value California has no law specifying a minimum age for juvenile justice jurisdiction, meaning that young children of any age can be processed in the juvenile justice system. This policy brief provides a rationale for a minimum age law in California and other states and jurisdictions without one.

  16. Setting a minimum age for juvenile justice jurisdiction in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnert, Elizabeth S.; Abrams, Laura S.; Maxson, Cheryl; Gase, Lauren; Soung, Patricia; Carroll, Paul; Bath, Eraka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Despite the existence of minimum age laws for juvenile justice jurisdiction in 18 US states, California has no explicit law that protects children (i.e. youth less than 12 years old) from being processed in the juvenile justice system. In the absence of a minimum age law, California lags behind other states and international practice and standards. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In this policy brief, academics across the University of California campuses examine current evidence, theory, and policy related to the minimum age of juvenile justice jurisdiction. Findings Existing evidence suggests that children lack the cognitive maturity to comprehend or benefit from formal juvenile justice processing, and diverting children from the system altogether is likely to be more beneficial for the child and for public safety. Research limitations/implications Based on current evidence and theory, the authors argue that minimum age legislation that protects children from contact with the juvenile justice system and treats them as children in need of services and support, rather than as delinquents or criminals, is an important policy goal for California and for other national and international jurisdictions lacking a minimum age law. Originality/value California has no law specifying a minimum age for juvenile justice jurisdiction, meaning that young children of any age can be processed in the juvenile justice system. This policy brief provides a rationale for a minimum age law in California and other states and jurisdictions without one. Paper type Conceptual paper PMID:28299968

  17. Minimum wall pressure coefficient of orifice plate energy dissipater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-zheng Ai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orifice plate energy dissipaters have been successfully used in large-scale hydropower projects due to their simple structure, convenient construction procedure, and high energy dissipation ratio. The minimum wall pressure coefficient of an orifice plate can indirectly reflect its cavitation characteristics: the lower the minimum wall pressure coefficient is, the better the ability of the orifice plate to resist cavitation damage is. Thus, it is important to study the minimum wall pressure coefficient of the orifice plate. In this study, this coefficient and related parameters, such as the contraction ratio, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate diameter to the flood-discharging tunnel diameter; the relative thickness, defined as the ratio of the orifice plate thickness to the tunnel diameter; and the Reynolds number of the flow through the orifice plate, were theoretically analyzed, and their relationships were obtained through physical model experiments. It can be concluded that the minimum wall pressure coefficient is mainly dominated by the contraction ratio and relative thickness. The lower the contraction ratio and relative thickness are, the larger the minimum wall pressure coefficient is. The effects of the Reynolds number on the minimum wall pressure coefficient can be neglected when it is larger than 105. An empirical expression was presented to calculate the minimum wall pressure coefficient in this study.

  18. Neutron slowing down and transport in monoisotopic media with constant cross sections or with a square-well minimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    A specialized moments-method computer code was constructed for the calculation of the even spatial moments of the scalar flux, phi/sub 2n/, through 2n = 80. Neutron slowing-down and transport in a medium with constant cross sections was examined and the effect of a superimposed square-well cross section minimum on the penetrating flux was studied. In the constant cross section case, for nuclei that are not too light, the scalar flux is essentially independent of the nuclide mass. The numerical results obtained were used to test the validity of existing analytic approximations to the flux at both small and large lethargies relative to the source energy. As a result it was possible to define the regions in the lethargy--distance plane where these analytic solutions apply with reasonable accuracy. A parametric study was made of the effect of a square-well cross section minimum on neutron fluxes at energies below the minimum. It was shown that the flux at energies well below the minimum is essentially independent of the position of the minimum in lethargy. The results can be described by a convolution-of-sources model involving only the lethargy separation between detector and source, the width and the relative depth of the minimum. On the basis of the computations and the corresponding model, it is possible to predict, e.g., the conditions under which transport in the region of minimum completely determines the penetrating flux. At the other extreme, the model describes when the transport in the minimum can be treated in the same manner as in any comparable lethargy interval. With the aid of these criteria it is possible to understand the apparent paradoxical effects of certain minima in neutron penetration through such media as iron and sodium

  19. Global minimum-energy structure and spectroscopic properties of I2(*-) x n H2O clusters: a Monte Carlo simulated annealing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Arup Kumar; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Maity, Dilip Kumar

    2010-01-18

    The vibrational (IR and Raman) and photoelectron spectral properties of hydrated iodine-dimer radical-anion clusters, I(2)(*-) x n H(2)O (n=1-10), are presented. Several initial guess structures are considered for each size of cluster to locate the global minimum-energy structure by applying a Monte Carlo simulated annealing procedure including spin-orbit interaction. In the Raman spectrum, hydration reduces the intensity of the I-I stretching band but enhances the intensity of the O-H stretching band of water. Raman spectra of more highly hydrated clusters appear to be simpler than the corresponding IR spectra. Vibrational bands due to simultaneous stretching vibrations of O-H bonds in a cyclic water network are observed for I(2)(*-) x n H(2)O clusters with n > or = 3. The vertical detachment energy (VDE) profile shows stepwise saturation that indicates closing of the geometrical shell in the hydrated clusters on addition of every four water molecules. The calculated VDE of finite-size small hydrated clusters is extrapolated to evaluate the bulk VDE value of I(2)(*-) in aqueous solution as 7.6 eV at the CCSD(T) level of theory. Structure and spectroscopic properties of these hydrated clusters are compared with those of hydrated clusters of Cl(2)(*-) and Br(2)(*-).

  20. SU-F-T-78: Minimum Data Set of Measurements for TG 71 Based Electron Monitor-Unit Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H; Guerrero, M; Prado, K; Yi, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Building up a TG-71 based electron monitor-unit (MU) calculation protocol usually involves massive measurements. This work investigates a minimum data set of measurements and its calculation accuracy and measurement time. Methods: For 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV of our Varian Clinac-Series linear accelerators, the complete measurements were performed at different depth using 5 square applicators (6, 10, 15, 20 and 25 cm) with different cutouts (2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 15 and 20 cm up to applicator size) for 5 different SSD’s. For each energy, there were 8 PDD scans and 150 point measurements for applicator factors, cutout factors and effective SSDs that were then converted to air-gap factors for SSD 99–110cm. The dependence of each dosimetric quantity on field size and SSD was examined to determine the minimum data set of measurements as a subset of the complete measurements. The “missing” data excluded in the minimum data set were approximated by linear or polynomial fitting functions based on the included data. The total measurement time and the calculated electron MU using the minimum and the complete data sets were compared. Results: The minimum data set includes 4 or 5 PDD’s and 51 to 66 point measurements for each electron energy, and more PDD’s and fewer point measurements are generally needed as energy increases. Using only <50% of complete measurement time, the minimum data set generates acceptable MU calculation results compared to those with the complete data set. The PDD difference is within 1 mm and the calculated MU difference is less than 1.5%. Conclusion: Data set measurement for TG-71 electron MU calculations can be minimized based on the knowledge of how each dosimetric quantity depends on various setup parameters. The suggested minimum data set allows acceptable MU calculation accuracy and shortens measurement time by a few hours.

  1. SU-F-T-78: Minimum Data Set of Measurements for TG 71 Based Electron Monitor-Unit Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H; Guerrero, M; Prado, K; Yi, B [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Building up a TG-71 based electron monitor-unit (MU) calculation protocol usually involves massive measurements. This work investigates a minimum data set of measurements and its calculation accuracy and measurement time. Methods: For 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV of our Varian Clinac-Series linear accelerators, the complete measurements were performed at different depth using 5 square applicators (6, 10, 15, 20 and 25 cm) with different cutouts (2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 15 and 20 cm up to applicator size) for 5 different SSD’s. For each energy, there were 8 PDD scans and 150 point measurements for applicator factors, cutout factors and effective SSDs that were then converted to air-gap factors for SSD 99–110cm. The dependence of each dosimetric quantity on field size and SSD was examined to determine the minimum data set of measurements as a subset of the complete measurements. The “missing” data excluded in the minimum data set were approximated by linear or polynomial fitting functions based on the included data. The total measurement time and the calculated electron MU using the minimum and the complete data sets were compared. Results: The minimum data set includes 4 or 5 PDD’s and 51 to 66 point measurements for each electron energy, and more PDD’s and fewer point measurements are generally needed as energy increases. Using only <50% of complete measurement time, the minimum data set generates acceptable MU calculation results compared to those with the complete data set. The PDD difference is within 1 mm and the calculated MU difference is less than 1.5%. Conclusion: Data set measurement for TG-71 electron MU calculations can be minimized based on the knowledge of how each dosimetric quantity depends on various setup parameters. The suggested minimum data set allows acceptable MU calculation accuracy and shortens measurement time by a few hours.

  2. Design of a minimum emittance nBA lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Y.

    1998-04-01

    An attempt to design a minimum emittance n-bend achromat (nBA) lattice has been made. One distinct feature is that dipoles with two different lengths were used. As a multiple bend achromat, five bend achromat lattices with six superperiod were designed. The obtained emittace is three times larger than the theoretical minimum. Tunes were chosen to avoid third order resonances. In order to correct first and second order chromaticities, eight family sextupoles were placed. The obtained emittance of five bend achromat lattices is almost equal to the minimum emittance of five bend achromat lattice consisting of dipoles with equal length.

  3. [Hospitals failing minimum volumes in 2004: reasons and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraedts, M; Kühnen, C; Cruppé, W de; Blum, K; Ohmann, C

    2008-02-01

    In 2004 Germany introduced annual minimum volumes nationwide on five surgical procedures: kidney, liver, stem cell transplantation, complex oesophageal, and pancreatic interventions. Hospitals that fail to reach the minimum volumes are no longer allowed to perform the respective procedures unless they raise one of eight legally accepted exceptions. The goal of our study was to investigate how many hospitals fell short of the minimum volumes in 2004, whether and how this was justified, and whether hospitals that failed the requirements experienced any consequences. We analysed data on meeting the minimum volume requirements in 2004 that all German hospitals were obliged to publish as part of their biannual structured quality reports. We performed telephone interviews: a) with all hospitals not achieving the minimum volumes for complex oesophageal, and pancreatic interventions, and b) with the national umbrella organisations of all German sickness funds. In 2004, one quarter of all German acute care hospitals (N=485) performed 23,128 procedures where minimum volumes applied. 197 hospitals (41%) did not meet at least one of the minimum volumes. These hospitals performed N=715 procedures (3.1%) where the minimum volumes were not met. In 43% of these cases the hospitals raised legally accepted exceptions. In 33% of the cases the hospitals argued using reasons that were not legally acknowledged. 69% of those hospitals that failed to achieve the minimum volumes for complex oesophageal and pancreatic interventions did not experience any consequences from the sickness funds. However, one third of those hospitals reported that the sickness funds addressed the issue and partially announced consequences for the future. The sickness funds' umbrella organisations stated that there were only sparse activities related to the minimum volumes and that neither uniform registrations nor uniform proceedings in case of infringements of the standards had been agreed upon. In spite of the

  4. On the road again: traffic fatalities and auto insurance minimums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel A. Yakovlev

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Prior research on policy-induced moral hazard effects in the auto insurance market has focused on the impact of compulsory insurance, no-fault liability, and tort liability laws on traffic fatalities. In contrast, this paper examines the moral hazard effect of a previously overlooked policy variable: minimum auto insurance coverage. We hypothesize that state-mandated auto insurance minimums may “over-insure” some drivers, lowering their incentives to drive carefully. Using a longitudinal panel of American states from 1982 to 2006, we find that policy-induced increases in auto insurance minimums are associated with higher traffic fatality rates, ceteris paribus.

  5. Minimum airflow reset of single-duct VAV terminal boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Hum

    Single duct Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems are currently the most widely used type of HVAC system in the United States. When installing such a system, it is critical to determine the minimum airflow set point of the terminal box, as an optimally selected set point will improve the level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) while at the same time lower overall energy costs. In principle, this minimum rate should be calculated according to the minimum ventilation requirement based on ASHRAE standard 62.1 and maximum heating load of the zone. Several factors must be carefully considered when calculating this minimum rate. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences may result in occupant discomfort and energy waste. If the minimum rate of airflow is set too high, the AHUs will consume excess fan power, and the terminal boxes may cause significant simultaneous room heating and cooling. At the same time, a rate that is too low will result in poor air circulation and indoor air quality in the air-conditioned space. Currently, many scholars are investigating how to change the algorithm of the advanced VAV terminal box controller without retrofitting. Some of these controllers have been found to effectively improve thermal comfort, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency. However, minimum airflow set points have not yet been identified, nor has controller performance been verified in confirmed studies. In this study, control algorithms were developed that automatically identify and reset terminal box minimum airflow set points, thereby improving indoor air quality and thermal comfort levels, and reducing the overall rate of energy consumption. A theoretical analysis of the optimal minimum airflow and discharge air temperature was performed to identify the potential energy benefits of resetting the terminal box minimum airflow set points. Applicable control algorithms for calculating the ideal values for the minimum airflow reset were developed and

  6. Minimum Propellant Low-Thrust Maneuvers near the Libration Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, A.; Dumitrache, M.

    equations of the extremals and integrating these differential equations we obtain the desired extremals which characterize the minimum propellant optimal manoeuvres of transfer from libration points to their orbits. By means of Legendre conditions for weak minimum and Weierstrass condition for strong minimum, is demonstrated that variational problem so formulated has sense and is a problem of minimum. The integration of extremal's differential equations system can not lead to analytical solutions easily to obtain and for this we have directed to a numerical integration. The problem is a bilocal one because the motion parameter values are predicted at the beginning and of the maneuver (the manoeuvre duration coincides with the combustion duration) the values of the Lagrange multipliers not being specified at the beginning and end of the manoeuvre. For determination of the velocities at any point on the libration point L4 and L2 has been elaborated the program of calculus on the integration of the motion equations without accelerations due thrust during a revolution period the coordinates and velocities to be equal, with which have been calculated the velocities at the apoapsis A and respectively A'. With these specifications, the final conditions (at the end of the maneuver) could be established, and the determination of optimal transfer parameters in the specified points could be determined. The calculus performed for the transfer from the libration points L4 and L2 to their orbits, shows that the evolution velocities on the orbits are in general small, the velocities on the L2 orbits being greater than the velocities on L 4 orbits having the same semimajor axis. This fact is explicable because the period of evolution on orbits of libration point L4 is greater than the period of orbits of the libration point L2. For the transfer in the apoapsis of both orbits (the points A. and A') on can remarque the fact the accelerations due thrust are greater for orbits around the

  7. Minimum Wages and Regional Disparity: An analysis on the evolution of price-adjusted minimum wages and their effects on firm profitability (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    MORIKAWA Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper, using prefecture level panel data, empirically analyzes 1) the recent evolution of price-adjusted regional minimum wages and 2) the effects of minimum wages on firm profitability. As a result of rapid increases in minimum wages in the metropolitan areas since 2007, the regional disparity of nominal minimum wages has been widening. However, the disparity of price-adjusted minimum wages has been shrinking. According to the analysis of the effects of minimum wages on profitability us...

  8. Predicting Minimum Control Speed on the Ground (VMCG) and Minimum Control Airspeed (VMCA) of Engine Inoperative Flight Using Aerodynamic Database and Propulsion Database Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadder, Eric Michael

    There are many computer aided engineering tools and software used by aerospace engineers to design and predict specific parameters of an airplane. These tools help a design engineer predict and calculate such parameters such as lift, drag, pitching moment, takeoff range, maximum takeoff weight, maximum flight range and much more. However, there are very limited ways to predict and calculate the minimum control speeds of an airplane in engine inoperative flight. There are simple solutions, as well as complicated solutions, yet there is neither standard technique nor consistency throughout the aerospace industry. To further complicate this subject, airplane designers have the option of using an Automatic Thrust Control System (ATCS), which directly alters the minimum control speeds of an airplane. This work addresses this issue with a tool used to predict and calculate the Minimum Control Speed on the Ground (VMCG) as well as the Minimum Control Airspeed (VMCA) of any existing or design-stage airplane. With simple line art of an airplane, a program called VORLAX is used to generate an aerodynamic database used to calculate the stability derivatives of an airplane. Using another program called Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS), a propulsion database is generated to use with the aerodynamic database to calculate both VMCG and VMCA. This tool was tested using two airplanes, the Airbus A320 and the Lockheed Martin C130J-30 Super Hercules. The A320 does not use an Automatic Thrust Control System (ATCS), whereas the C130J-30 does use an ATCS. The tool was able to properly calculate and match known values of VMCG and VMCA for both of the airplanes. The fact that this tool was able to calculate the known values of VMCG and VMCA for both airplanes means that this tool would be able to predict the VMCG and VMCA of an airplane in the preliminary stages of design. This would allow design engineers the ability to use an Automatic Thrust Control System (ATCS) as part

  9. The impact of preparation parameters on typical attributes of chitosan-heparin nanohydrogels: particle size, loading efficiency, and drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2013-11-01

    Today, developing an optimized nanoparticle (NP) preparation procedure is of paramount importance in all nanoparticulate drug delivery researches, leading to expanding more operative and clinically validated nanomedicines. In this study, a one-at-a-time experimental approach was used for evaluating the effect of various preparation factors on size, loading, and drug release of hydrogel NPs prepared with ionotropic gelation between heparin and chitosan. The size, loading efficiency (LE) and drug release profile of the NPs were evaluated when the chitosan molecular weight, chitosan concentration, heparin addition time to chitosan solution, heparin concentration, pH value of chitosan solution, temperature, and mixing rate were changed separately while other factors were in optimum condition. The results displayed that size and LE are highly influenced by chitosan concentration, getting an optimum of 63 ± 0.57 and 75.19 ± 2.65, respectively, when chitosan concentration was 0.75 mg/ml. Besides, heparin addition time of 3 min leaded to 74.1 ± 0.79 % LE with no sensible effect on size and release profile. In addition, pH 5.5 showed a minimum size of 63 ± 1.87, maximum LE of 73.81 ± 3.13 and the slowest drug release with 63.71 ± 3.84 % during one week. Although LE was not affected by temperature, size and release reduced to 63 ± 0 and 74.21 ± 1.99% when temperature increased from 25°C to 55°C. Also, continuous increase of mixer rate from 500 to 3500 rpm resulted in constant enhancement of LE from 58.3 ± 3.6 to 74.4 ± 2.59 as well as remarkable decrease in size from 148 ± 4.88 to 63 ± 2.64.

  10. Robustification and Optimization in Repetitive Control For Minimum Phase and Non-Minimum Phase Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasitmeeboon, Pitcha

    repetitive control FIR compensator. The aim is to reduce the final error level by using real time frequency response model updates to successively increase the cutoff frequency, each time creating the improved model needed to produce convergence zero error up to the higher cutoff. Non-minimum phase systems present a difficult design challenge to the sister field of Iterative Learning Control. The third topic investigates to what extent the same challenges appear in RC. One challenge is that the intrinsic non-minimum phase zero mapped from continuous time is close to the pole of repetitive controller at +1 creating behavior similar to pole-zero cancellation. The near pole-zero cancellation causes slow learning at DC and low frequencies. The Min-Max cost function over the learning rate is presented. The Min-Max can be reformulated as a Quadratically Constrained Linear Programming problem. This approach is shown to be an RC design approach that addresses the main challenge of non-minimum phase systems to have a reasonable learning rate at DC. Although it was illustrated that using the Min-Max objective improves learning at DC and low frequencies compared to other designs, the method requires model accuracy at high frequencies. In the real world, models usually have error at high frequencies. The fourth topic addresses how one can merge the quadratic penalty to the Min-Max cost function to increase robustness at high frequencies. The topic also considers limiting the Min-Max optimization to some frequencies interval and applying an FIR zero-phase low-pass filter to cutoff the learning for frequencies above that interval.

  11. Minimum Energy Control of 2D Positive Continuous-Discrete Linear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaczorek Tadeusz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The minimum energy control problem for the 2D positive continuous-discrete linear systems is formulated and solved. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the reachability at the point of the systems are given. Sufficient conditions for the existence of solution to the problem are established. It is shown that if the system is reachable then there exists an optimal input that steers the state from zero boundary conditions to given final state and minimizing the performance index for only one step (q = 1. A procedure for solving of the problem is proposed and illustrated by a numerical example.

  12. A Possible Minimum Toy Model with Negative Differential Capacitance for Self-sustained Current Oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Gang; Sun Zhouzhou; Wang Xiangrong

    2007-01-01

    We generalize a simple model for superlattices to include the effect of differential capacitance. It is shown that the model always has a stable steady-state solution (SSS) if all differential capacitances are positive. On the other hand, when negative differential capacitance is included, the model can have no stable SSS and be in a self-sustained current oscillation behavior. Therefore, we find a possible minimum toy model with both negative differential resistance and negative differential capacitance which can include the phenomena of both self-sustained current oscillation and I-V oscillation of stable SSSs.

  13. Computational Comparison of Several Greedy Algorithms for the Minimum Cost Perfect Matching Problem on Large Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wøhlk, Sanne; Laporte, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to computationally compare several algorithms for the Minimum Cost Perfect Matching Problem on an undirected complete graph. Our work is motivated by the need to solve large instances of the Capacitated Arc Routing Problem (CARP) arising in the optimization of garbage...... collection in Denmark. Common heuristics for the CARP involve the optimal matching of the odd-degree nodes of a graph. The algorithms used in the comparison include the CPLEX solution of an exact formulation, the LEDA matching algorithm, a recent implementation of the Blossom algorithm, as well as six...

  14. Labour Market Regulations in China: Minimum Wage Policy | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    At the same time, wage and income inequalities have grown significantly and wages have fallen. ... wages are set, and the wages' effects on employment and inequality. ... Impact of minimum wage on gender wage gaps in urban China.

  15. EFFECTS DISTRIBUTIVE THE WAGE MINIMUM IN MARKET OF LABOR CEARENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyciane Coelho Vasconcelos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the contribution of the minimum wage (MW for the devolution of income from the labor market at Ceará in the period 2002-2012. This research was based on National Sample Survey (PNAD of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE.It was used the simulation methodology proposed in DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (1996 from the estimated counterfactual Kernel density functions. The simulations were performed for females and males. The results revealed by the decompositions than the minimum wage, the degree of formalization and the personal attributes had impacts not concentrators to workers female and male. However, for women, the de-concentrating effect of the minimum wage is more intense in the sample compared to men. In summary, the simulations indicate the importance of the minimum wage to reduce the dispersion of labor income in recent years.

  16. Minimum uncertainty and squeezing in diffusion processes and stochastic quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demartino, S.; Desiena, S.; Illuminati, Fabrizo; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    1994-01-01

    We show that uncertainty relations, as well as minimum uncertainty coherent and squeezed states, are structural properties for diffusion processes. Through Nelson stochastic quantization we derive the stochastic image of the quantum mechanical coherent and squeezed states.

  17. Appearance of minimum on the curve of cerium melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguslavskij, Yu.Ya.; Grigor'ev, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown by means of simple and obvious thermodynamical considerations that the reduced stability line continues up to the solid phase boundary. The existence of this line causes the appearance of minimum on the fcc cerium melting curve

  18. Parameterization of ion channeling half-angles and minimum yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2016-03-15

    A MS Excel program has been written that calculates ion channeling half-angles and minimum yields in cubic bcc, fcc and diamond lattice crystals. All of the tables and graphs in the three Ion Beam Analysis Handbooks that previously had to be manually looked up and read from were programed into Excel in handy lookup tables, or parameterized, for the case of the graphs, using rather simple exponential functions with different power functions of the arguments. The program then offers an extremely convenient way to calculate axial and planar half-angles, minimum yields, effects on half-angles and minimum yields of amorphous overlayers. The program can calculate these half-angles and minimum yields for 〈u v w〉 axes and [h k l] planes up to (5 5 5). The program is open source and available at (http://www.sandia.gov/pcnsc/departments/iba/ibatable.html).

  19. Solving Minimum Cost Multi-Commodity Network Flow Problem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2018-03-23

    Mar 23, 2018 ... network-based modeling framework for integrated fixed and mobile ... Minimum Cost Network Flow Problem (MCNFP) and some ..... Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Routing in Traffic. Incident ... Ph.D. Thesis, Dept. of Surveying &.

  20. Decoding Reed-Solomon Codes beyond half the minimum distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Nielsen, Rasmus Refslund

    1999-01-01

    We describe an efficient implementation of M.Sudan"s algorithm for decoding Reed-Solomon codes beyond half the minimum distance. Furthermore we calculate an upper bound of the probabilty of getting more than one codeword as output...

  1. Resident Assessment Instrument/Minimum Data Set (RAI/MDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Resident Assessment Instrument/Minimum Data Set (RAI/MDS) is a comprehensive assessment and care planning process used by the nursing home industry since 1990 as...

  2. The debate on the economic effects of minimum wage legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Miguel Ruesga-Benito

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The minimum wage establishment has its origin in the first third of the last century. Since its creation has been a focus of continuing controversy and an unfinished debate on economics field. This work reviews the effects of the minimum wage on employment and other macroeconomic variables, from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. The method is based on the revision of the literature and the main economic indicators. The central contribution of this paper is providing a general reflection on theoretical and empirical analysis about the debate on minimum wage and its effects. The results showed that some labor policies are taking account the effects of austerity strategies, shifting the attention towards the implementation of minimum wages or their updating, in order to reduce the growing inequalities in the distribution of income, and even poverty levels.

  3. 77 FR 76979 - Pesticides; Revisions to Minimum Risk Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... industries such as animal feed (NAICS code 311119), cosmetics (NAICS code 325620), and soap and detergents... reporting of production to EPA. To meet the criteria for the minimum risk exemption, a pesticide must...

  4. The economic production lot size model with several production rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian

    should be chosen in the interval between the demand rate and the production rate, which minimize unit production costs, and should be used in an increasing order. Then, given the production rates, we derive closed form solutions for the optimal runtimes as well as the minimum average cost. Finally we...

  5. Minimum emittance of isochronus rings for synchrotron light source

    CERN Document Server

    Shoji, Y

    1999-01-01

    Theoretically achievable minimum emittances of isochronus rings for synchrotron light source are calculated. The rings discussed in this paper consist of isochronus and achromatic bending cells, isochronus TBA (triple bend achromat) cells with negative dispersion, isochronus TBA cells with inverse bends or isochronus QBA (four bend achromat) cells. We show that the minimum emittances of these rings are roughly 2 or 3 times of those of the optimized non-isochronus rings.

  6. Great expectations: Reservation wages and the minimum wage reform

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorets, Alexandra; Filatov, Alexey; Shupe, Cortnie

    2018-01-01

    We use the German Socio-Economic Panel to show that introducing a high-impact statutory minimum wage causes an increase in reservation wages of approximately 4 percent at the low end of the distribution. The shifts in reservation wages and observed wages due to the minimum wage reform are comparable in their magnitude. Additional results show that German citizens adjust their reservation wages more than immigrants. Moreover, suggestive evidence points to a compensation mechanism in which immi...

  7. Pay equity, minimum wage and equality at work

    OpenAIRE

    Rubery, Jill

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the underlying causes of pay discrimination embedded within the organization of the labour market and structures of pay and reward. Discusses the need to focus on pay equity as part of a general strategy of promoting equity and decent work and examines the case for using minimum wage policies in comparison to more targeted equal pay policies to reduce gender pay equity. Identifies potential obstacles to or support for such policies and describes experiences of the use of minimum wages...

  8. A method for minimum risk portfolio optimization under hybrid uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Yu E.; Yazenin, A. V.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate a minimum risk portfolio model under hybrid uncertainty when the profitability of financial assets is described by fuzzy random variables. According to Feng, the variance of a portfolio is defined as a crisp value. To aggregate fuzzy information the weakest (drastic) t-norm is used. We construct an equivalent stochastic problem of the minimum risk portfolio model and specify the stochastic penalty method for solving it.

  9. A Minimum Spanning Tree Representation of Anime Similarities

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Canggih Puspo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new way to represent Japanese animation (anime) is presented. We applied a minimum spanning tree to show the relation between anime. The distance between anime is calculated through three similarity measurements, namely crew, score histogram, and topic similarities. Finally, the centralities are also computed to reveal the most significance anime. The result shows that the minimum spanning tree can be used to determine the similarity anime. Furthermore, by using centralities c...

  10. Energy and environmental norms on Minimum Vital Flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maran, S.

    2008-01-01

    By the end of the year will come into force the recommendations on Minimum Vital flow and operators of hydroelectric power plants will be required to make available part of water of their derivations in order to protect river ecosystems. In this article the major energy and environmental consequences of these rules, we report some quantitative evaluations and are discusses the proposals for overcoming the weaknesses of the approach in the estimation of Minimum Vital Flux [it

  11. Optimal ship forms for minimum total resistance in shallow water

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lian-en

    1984-01-01

    Optimal ship forms for minimum total resistance in shallow water Optimal ship forms for minimum total resistance in shallow water: An attempt is made to obtain shallow-water optimal ship forms for total resistance by means of "tent" function representation under the constraints that the main dimensions of the ship and the water-line area were kept constant. The objective function in the quadratic programming is the sum of wave-making resistance calculated by Sretenski's formula and viscou...

  12. MINIMUM BRACING STIFFNESS FOR MULTI-COLUMN SYSTEMS: THEORY

    OpenAIRE

    ARISTIZÁBAL-OCHOA, J. DARÍO

    2011-01-01

    A method that determines the minimum bracing stiffness required by a multi-column elastic system to achieve non-sway buckling conditions is proposed. Equations that evaluate the required minimum stiffness of the lateral and torsional bracings and the corresponding “braced" critical buckling load for each column of the story level are derived using the modified stability functions. The following effects are included: 1) the types of end connections (rigid, semirigid, and simple); 2) the bluepr...

  13. Colacium Minimum (Euglenophyta, A New Epiphytic Species For Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wołowski Konrad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Colacium minimum Fott & Komárek, known so far from a few localities in Central Europe (Czech Republic, is reported here for the first time from Asia (Thailand. This epiphytic species was found growing on eight taxa of loricated euglenoids. The process of surface colonization of Trachelomonas Ehrenb. and Strombomonas Deflandre taxa by C. minimum in natural populations is briefly discussed and originally documented using LM and SEM.

  14. A theory of compliance with minimum wage legislation

    OpenAIRE

    Jellal, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce firm heterogeneity in the context of a model of non-compliance with minimum wage legislation. The introduction of heterogeneity in the ease with which firms can be monitored for non compliance allows us to show that non-compliance will persist in sectors which are relatively difficult to monitor, despite the government implementing non stochastic monitoring. Moreover, we show that the incentive not to comply is an increasing function of the level of the minimum wag...

  15. Minimum Wage Policy and Country’s Technical Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Karim, Mohd Zaini Abd; Chan, Sok-Gee; Hassan, Sallahuddin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the government has decided that Malaysia would introduce a minimum wage policy. However, some quarters argued against the idea of a nationwide minimum wage asserting that it will lead to an increase in the cost of doing business and thus will hurt Malaysian competitiveness. Although standard economic theory unambiguously implies that wage floors have a negative impact on employment, the existing empirical literature is not so clear. Some studies have found the expected negative impa...

  16. The Einstein-Hilbert gravitation with minimum length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzada, H. L. C.

    2018-05-01

    We study the Einstein-Hilbert gravitation with the deformed Heisenberg algebra leading to the minimum length, with the intention to find and estimate the corrections in this theory, clarifying whether or not it is possible to obtain, by means of the minimum length, a theory, in D=4, which is causal, unitary and provides a massive graviton. Therefore, we will calculate and analyze the dispersion relationships of the considered theory.

  17. Technological Aspects of Creating Large-size Optical Telescopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sychev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept of the telescope creation, first of all, depends both on a choice of the optical scheme to form optical radiation and images with minimum losses of energy and information and on a choice of design to meet requirements for strength, stiffness, and stabilization characteristics in real telescope operation conditions. Thus, the concept of creating large-size telescopes, certainly, involves the use of adaptive optics methods and means.The level of technological capabilities to realize scientific and engineering ideas define a successful development of large-size optical telescopes in many respects. All developers pursue the same aim that is to raise an amount of information by increasing a main mirror diameter of the telescope.The article analyses the adaptive telescope designs developed in our country. Using a domestic ACT-25 telescope as an example, it considers creation of large-size optical telescopes in terms of technological aspects. It also describes the telescope creation concept features, which allow reaching marginally possible characteristics to ensure maximum amount of information.The article compares a wide range of large-size telescopes projects. It shows that a domestic project to create the adaptive ACT-25 super-telescope surpasses its foreign counterparts, and there is no sense to implement Euro50 (50m and OWL (100m projects.The considered material gives clear understanding on a role of technological aspects in development of such complicated optic-electronic complexes as a large-size optical telescope. The technological criteria of an assessment offered in the article, namely specific informational content of the telescope, its specific mass, and specific cost allow us to reveal weaknesses in the project development and define a reserve regarding further improvement of the telescope.The analysis of results and their judgment have shown that improvement of optical largesize telescopes in terms of their maximum

  18. The Unusual Minimum of Cycle 23: Observations and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Petrus C.; Nandy, D.; Munoz-Jaramillo, A.

    2009-05-01

    The current minimum of cycle 23 is unusual in its long duration, the very low level to which Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) has fallen, and the small flux of the open polar fields. The deep minimum of TSI seems to be related to an unprecedented dearth of polar faculae, and hence to the small amount of open flux. Based upon surface flux transport models it has been suggested that the causes of these phenomena may be an unusually vigorous meridional flow, or even a deviation from Joy's law resulting in smaller Joy angles than usual for emerging flux in cycle 23. There is also the possibility of a connection with the recently inferred emergence in polar regions of bipoles that systematically defy Hale's law. Much speculation has been going on as to the consequences of this exceptional minimum: are we entering another global minimum, is this the end of the 80 year period of exceptionally high solar activity, or is this just a statistical hiccup? Dynamo simulations are underway that may help answer this question. As an aside it must be mentioned that the current minimum of TSI puts an upper limit in the TSI input for global climate simulations during the Maunder minimum, and that a possible decrease in future solar activity will result in a very small but not insignificant reduction in the pace of global warming.

  19. The Median Solution of the Newsvendor Problem and Some Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Pritibhushan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the median solution of the Newsvendor Problem. Some properties of such a solution are shown through a theoretical analysis and a numerical experiment. Sometimes, though not often, median solution may be better than solutions maximizing expected profit, or maximizing minimum possible, over distribution with the same average and standard deviation, expected profit, according to some criteria. We discuss the practical suitability of the objective function set and the solution derived, for the Newsvendor Problem, and other such random optimization problems.

  20. Minimum error discrimination for an ensemble of linearly independent pure states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singal, Tanmay; Ghosh, Sibasish

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the work done by Belavkin (1975 Stochastics 1 315) and independently by Mochon, (2006 Phys. Rev. A 73 032328), we formulate the problem of minimum error discrimination (MED) of any ensemble of n linearly independent pure states by stripping the problem of its rotational covariance and retaining only the rotationally invariant aspect of the problem. This is done by embedding the optimal conditions in a matrix equality as well as matrix inequality. Employing the implicit function theorem in these conditions we get a set of first-order coupled ordinary nonlinear differential equations which can be used to drag the solution from an initial point (where solution is known) to another point (whose solution is sought). This way of obtaining the solution can be done through a simple Taylor series expansion and analytic continuation when required. Thus, we complete the work done by Belavkin and Mochon by ultimately leading their theory to a solution for the MED problem of linearly independent pure state ensembles. We also compare the computational complexity of our technique with the barrier-type interior point method of SDP and show that our technique is computationally as efficient as (actually, a bit more than) the SDP algorithm, with the added advantage of being much simpler to implement. (paper)

  1. Two cosmological solutions of Regge calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two cosmological solutions of Regge calculus are presented which correspond to the flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and the Kasner solutions of general relativity. By taking advantage of the symmetries that are present, I am able to show explicitly that a limit of Regge calculus does yield Einstein's equations for these cases. The method of averaging these equations when taking limits is important, especially for the Kasner model. I display the leading error term that arises from keeping the Regge equations in discrete form rather than using their continuum limit. In particular, this work shows that for the ''Reggeized'' Friedmann model the minimum volume is a velocity-dominated singularity as in the continuum Friedmann model. However, unlike the latter, the Regge version has a nonzero minimum volume

  2. Variation in clutch size in relation to nest size in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders P; Adriaensen, Frank; Artemyev, Alexandr; Bańbura, Jerzy; Barba, Emilio; Biard, Clotilde; Blondel, Jacques; Bouslama, Zihad; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Camprodon, Jordi; Cecere, Francesco; Charmantier, Anne; Charter, Motti; Cichoń, Mariusz; Cusimano, Camillo; Czeszczewik, Dorota; Demeyrier, Virginie; Doligez, Blandine; Doutrelant, Claire; Dubiec, Anna; Eens, Marcel; Eeva, Tapio; Faivre, Bruno; Ferns, Peter N; Forsman, Jukka T; García-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Goldshtein, Aya; Goodenough, Anne E; Gosler, Andrew G; Góźdź, Iga; Grégoire, Arnaud; Gustafsson, Lars; Hartley, Ian R; Heeb, Philipp; Hinsley, Shelley A; Isenmann, Paul; Jacob, Staffan; Järvinen, Antero; Juškaitis, Rimvydas; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Laaksonen, Toni; Leclercq, Bernard; Lehikoinen, Esa; Loukola, Olli; Lundberg, Arne; Mainwaring, Mark C; Mänd, Raivo; Massa, Bruno; Mazgajski, Tomasz D; Merino, Santiago; Mitrus, Cezary; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Morales-Fernaz, Judith; Morin, Xavier; Nager, Ruedi G; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nilsson, Sven G; Norte, Ana C; Orell, Markku; Perret, Philippe; Pimentel, Carla S; Pinxten, Rianne; Priedniece, Ilze; Quidoz, Marie-Claude; Remeš, Vladimir; Richner, Heinz; Robles, Hugo; Rytkönen, Seppo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Seppänen, Janne T; da Silva, Luís P; Slagsvold, Tore; Solonen, Tapio; Sorace, Alberto; Stenning, Martyn J; Török, János; Tryjanowski, Piotr; van Noordwijk, Arie J; von Numers, Mikael; Walankiewicz, Wiesław; Lambrechts, Marcel M

    2014-09-01

    Nests are structures built to support and protect eggs and/or offspring from predators, parasites, and adverse weather conditions. Nests are mainly constructed prior to egg laying, meaning that parent birds must make decisions about nest site choice and nest building behavior before the start of egg-laying. Parent birds should be selected to choose nest sites and to build optimally sized nests, yet our current understanding of clutch size-nest size relationships is limited to small-scale studies performed over short time periods. Here, we quantified the relationship between clutch size and nest size, using an exhaustive database of 116 slope estimates based on 17,472 nests of 21 species of hole and non-hole-nesting birds. There was a significant, positive relationship between clutch size and the base area of the nest box or the nest, and this relationship did not differ significantly between open nesting and hole-nesting species. The slope of the relationship showed significant intraspecific and interspecific heterogeneity among four species of secondary hole-nesting species, but also among all 116 slope estimates. The estimated relationship between clutch size and nest box base area in study sites with more than a single size of nest box was not significantly different from the relationship using studies with only a single size of nest box. The slope of the relationship between clutch size and nest base area in different species of birds was significantly negatively related to minimum base area, and less so to maximum base area in a given study. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that bird species have a general reaction norm reflecting the relationship between nest size and clutch size. Further, they suggest that scientists may influence the clutch size decisions of hole-nesting birds through the provisioning of nest boxes of varying sizes.

  3. NEW EVIDENCE FOR CHARGE-SIGN-DEPENDENT MODULATION DURING THE SOLAR MINIMUM OF 2006 TO 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Felice, V. [INFN, Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata,” I-00133 Rome (Italy); Munini, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Vos, E. E.; Potgieter, M. S. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa)

    2017-01-01

    The PAMELA space experiment, in orbit since 2006, has measured cosmic rays (CRs) through the most recent period of minimum solar activity with the magnetic field polarity as A  < 0. During this entire time, galactic electrons and protons have been detected down to 70 MV and 400 MV, respectively, and their differential variation in intensity with time has been monitored with unprecedented accuracy. These observations are used to show how differently electrons and protons responded to the quiet modulation conditions that prevailed from 2006 to 2009. It is well known that particle drifts, as one of four major mechanisms for the solar modulation of CRs, cause charge-sign-dependent solar modulation. Periods of minimum solar activity provide optimal conditions in which to study these drift effects. The observed behavior is compared to the solutions of a three-dimensional model for CRs in the heliosphere, including drifts. The numerical results confirm that the difference in the evolution of electron and proton spectra during the last prolonged solar minimum is attributed to a large extent to particle drifts. We therefore present new evidence of charge-sign-dependent solar modulation, with a perspective on its peculiarities for the observed period from 2006 to 2009.

  4. Beam-transport study of an isocentric rotating ion gantry with minimum number of quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, Marius; Griesmayer, Erich; Seemann, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    A beam-transport study of an isocentric gantry for ion therapy is presented. The gantry is designed with the number of quadrupoles down to the theoretical minimum, which is the feature published for the first time in this paper. This feature has been achieved without compromising the ion-optical functions of the beam-transport system that is capable of handling non-symmetric beams (beams with different emittances in vertical and horizontal plane), pencil-beam scanning, double-achromatic optics and beam-size control. Ion-optical properties of the beam-transport system are described, discussed and illustrated by computer simulations performed by the TRANSPORT-code

  5. Poverty and household size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanjouw, P.; Ravallion, M.

    1995-01-01

    The widely held view that larger families tend to be poorer in developing countries has influenced research and policy. The scope for size economies in consumption cautions against this view. The authors find that the correlation between poverty and size vanishes in Pakistan when the size elasticity

  6. Mid-size urbanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, de B.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To speak of the project for the mid-size city is to speculate about the possibility of mid-size urbanity as a design category. An urbanism not necessarily defined by the scale of the intervention or the size of the city undergoing transformation, but by the framing of the issues at hand and the

  7. Experimental investigations of the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of inert and combustible dust cloud mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addai, Emmanuel Kwasi; Gabel, Dieter; Krause, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ignition sensitivity of a highly flammable dust decreases upon addition of inert dust. • Minimum ignition temperature of a highly flammable dust increases when inert concentration increase. • Minimum ignition energy of a highly flammable dust increases when inert concentration increase. • The permissible range for the inert mixture to minimize the ignition risk lies between 60 to 80%. - Abstract: The risks associated with dust explosions still exist in industries that either process or handle combustible dust. This explosion risk could be prevented or mitigated by applying the principle of inherent safety (moderation). This is achieved by adding an inert material to a highly combustible material in order to decrease the ignition sensitivity of the combustible dust. The presented paper deals with the experimental investigation of the influence of adding an inert dust on the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of the combustible/inert dust mixtures. The experimental investigation was done in two laboratory scale equipment: the Hartmann apparatus and the Godbert-Greenwald furnace for the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature test respectively. This was achieved by mixing various amounts of three inert materials (magnesium oxide, ammonium sulphate and sand) and six combustible dusts (brown coal, lycopodium, toner, niacin, corn starch and high density polyethylene). Generally, increasing the inert materials concentration increases the minimum ignition energy as well as the minimum ignition temperatures until a threshold is reached where no ignition was obtained. The permissible range for the inert mixture to minimize the ignition risk lies between 60 to 80%.

  8. Experimental investigations of the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of inert and combustible dust cloud mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addai, Emmanuel Kwasi, E-mail: emmanueladdai41@yahoo.com; Gabel, Dieter; Krause, Ulrich

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Ignition sensitivity of a highly flammable dust decreases upon addition of inert dust. • Minimum ignition temperature of a highly flammable dust increases when inert concentration increase. • Minimum ignition energy of a highly flammable dust increases when inert concentration increase. • The permissible range for the inert mixture to minimize the ignition risk lies between 60 to 80%. - Abstract: The risks associated with dust explosions still exist in industries that either process or handle combustible dust. This explosion risk could be prevented or mitigated by applying the principle of inherent safety (moderation). This is achieved by adding an inert material to a highly combustible material in order to decrease the ignition sensitivity of the combustible dust. The presented paper deals with the experimental investigation of the influence of adding an inert dust on the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of the combustible/inert dust mixtures. The experimental investigation was done in two laboratory scale equipment: the Hartmann apparatus and the Godbert-Greenwald furnace for the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature test respectively. This was achieved by mixing various amounts of three inert materials (magnesium oxide, ammonium sulphate and sand) and six combustible dusts (brown coal, lycopodium, toner, niacin, corn starch and high density polyethylene). Generally, increasing the inert materials concentration increases the minimum ignition energy as well as the minimum ignition temperatures until a threshold is reached where no ignition was obtained. The permissible range for the inert mixture to minimize the ignition risk lies between 60 to 80%.

  9. Useless Memory Allocation: Problems and Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Gonciari, Paul Theo; Al-Hashimi, Bashir; Nicolici, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Unlike the existing research direction that focuses on useful test data reduction, this paper analyzes the useless test data memory requirements for system-on-a-chip test. The proposed solution to minimize the useless test memory is based on a new test methodology which combines a novel core wrapper design algorithm with a new test vector deployment procedure stored in the automatic test equipment (ATE). To reduce memory requirements, the proposed core wrapper design finds the minimum number ...

  10. Experimental investigations of the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of inert and combustible dust cloud mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addai, Emmanuel Kwasi; Gabel, Dieter; Krause, Ulrich

    2016-04-15

    The risks associated with dust explosions still exist in industries that either process or handle combustible dust. This explosion risk could be prevented or mitigated by applying the principle of inherent safety (moderation). This is achieved by adding an inert material to a highly combustible material in order to decrease the ignition sensitivity of the combustible dust. The presented paper deals with the experimental investigation of the influence of adding an inert dust on the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of the combustible/inert dust mixtures. The experimental investigation was done in two laboratory scale equipment: the Hartmann apparatus and the Godbert-Greenwald furnace for the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature test respectively. This was achieved by mixing various amounts of three inert materials (magnesium oxide, ammonium sulphate and sand) and six combustible dusts (brown coal, lycopodium, toner, niacin, corn starch and high density polyethylene). Generally, increasing the inert materials concentration increases the minimum ignition energy as well as the minimum ignition temperatures until a threshold is reached where no ignition was obtained. The permissible range for the inert mixture to minimize the ignition risk lies between 60 to 80%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Minimum Cycle Basis and All-Pairs Min Cut of a Planar Graph in Subquadratic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    equivalent to the minimum cycle basis problem for planar graphs. We also obtain O(n3/2 log n) time and O(n3/2) space algorithms for finding, respectively, the weight vector and a Gomory-Hu tree of G. The previous best time and space bound for these two problems was quadratic. From our Gomory-Hu tree...... show that this is optimal if an explicit represen- tation of the basis is required. We then present an O(n3/2 log n) time and O(n3/2) space algorithm that computes a minimum cycle basis implicitly. From this result, we obtain an output-sensitive algorithm that explicitly computes a minimum cycle basis...... in O(n3/2 log n + C) time and O(n3/2 + C) space, where C is the total size (number of edges and vertices) of the cycles in the basis. These bounds reduce to O(n3/2 log n) and O(n3/2), respectively, when G is unweighted. We get similar results for the all-pairs min cut problem since it is dual...

  12. Anesthesiologists' perceptions of minimum acceptable work habits of nurse anesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvinov, Ilana I; Dexter, Franklin; Hindman, Bradley J; Brull, Sorin J

    2017-05-01

    Work habits are non-technical skills that are an important part of job performance. Although non-technical skills are usually evaluated on a relative basis (i.e., "grading on a curve"), validity of evaluation on an absolute basis (i.e., "minimum passing score") needs to be determined. Survey and observational study. None. None. The theme of "work habits" was assessed using a modification of Dannefer et al.'s 6-item scale, with scores ranging from 1 (lowest performance) to 5 (highest performance). E-mail invitations were sent to all consultant and fellow anesthesiologists at Mayo Clinic in Florida, Arizona, and Minnesota. Because work habits expectations can be generational, the survey was designed for adjustment based on all invited (responding or non-responding) anesthesiologists' year of graduation from residency. The overall mean±standard deviation of the score for anesthesiologists' minimum expectations of nurse anesthetists' work habits was 3.64±0.66 (N=48). Minimum acceptable scores were correlated with the year of graduation from anesthesia residency (linear regression P=0.004). Adjusting for survey non-response using all N=207 anesthesiologists, the mean of the minimum acceptable work habits adjusted for year of graduation was 3.69 (standard error 0.02). The minimum expectations for nurse anesthetists' work habits were compared with observational data obtained from the University of Iowa. Among 8940 individual nurse anesthetist work habits scores, only 2.6% were habits scores were significantly greater than the Mayo estimate (3.69) for the minimum expectations; all Phabits of nurse anesthetists within departments should not be compared with an appropriate minimum score (i.e., of 3.69). Instead, work habits scores should be analyzed based on relative reporting among anesthetists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nonlinear Cross-Diffusion with Size Exclusion

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the mathematical properties of a continuum model for diffusion of multiple species incorporating size exclusion effects. The system for two species leads to nonlinear cross-diffusion terms with double degeneracy, which creates significant novel challenges in the analysis of the system. We prove global existence of weak solutions and well-posedness of strong solutions close to equilibrium. We further study some asymptotics of the model, and in particular we characterize the large-time behavior of solutions. 2010 © Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  14. An ant colony optimization algorithm for phylogenetic estimation under the minimum evolution principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milinkovitch Michel C

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distance matrix methods constitute a major family of phylogenetic estimation methods, and the minimum evolution (ME principle (aiming at recovering the phylogeny with shortest length is one of the most commonly used optimality criteria for estimating phylogenetic trees. The major difficulty for its application is that the number of possible phylogenies grows exponentially with the number of taxa analyzed and the minimum evolution principle is known to belong to the NP MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGacaGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaWenfgDOvwBHrxAJfwnHbqeg0uy0HwzTfgDPnwy1aaceaGae8xdX7Kaeeiuaafaaa@3888@-hard class of problems. Results In this paper, we introduce an Ant Colony Optimization (ACO algorithm to estimate phylogenies under the minimum evolution principle. ACO is an optimization technique inspired from the foraging behavior of real ant colonies. This behavior is exploited in artificial ant colonies for the search of approximate solutions to discrete optimization problems. Conclusion We show that the ACO algorithm is potentially competitive in comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms for the minimum evolution principle. This is the first application of an ACO algorithm to the phylogenetic estimation problem.

  15. Evaluation of the minimum iodine concentration for contrast-enhanced subtraction mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldelli, P; Bravin, A; Maggio, C Di; Gennaro, G; Sarnelli, A; Taibi, A; Gambaccini, M

    2006-01-01

    Early manifestation of breast cancer is often very subtle and is displayed in a complex and variable pattern of normal anatomy that may obscure the disease. The use of dual-energy techniques, that can remove the structural noise, and contrast media, that enhance the region surrounding the tumour, could help us to improve the detectability of the lesions. The aim of this work is to investigate the use of an iodine-based contrast medium in mammography with two different double exposure techniques: K-edge subtraction mammography and temporal subtraction mammography. Both techniques have been investigated by using an ideal source, like monochromatic beams produced at a synchrotron radiation facility and a clinical digital mammography system. A dedicated three-component phantom containing cavities filled with different iodine concentrations has been developed and used for measurements. For each technique, information about the minimum iodine concentration, which provides a significant enhancement of the detectability of the pathology by minimizing the risk due to high dose and high concentration of contrast medium, has been obtained. In particular, for cavities of 5 and 8 mm in diameter filled with iodine solutions, the minimum concentration needed to obtain a contrast-to-noise ratio of 5 with a mean glandular dose of 2 mGy has been calculated. The minimum concentrations estimated with monochromatic beams and K-edge subtraction mammography are 0.9 mg ml -1 and 1.34 mg ml -1 for the biggest and smallest details, respectively, while for temporal subtraction mammography they are 0.84 mg ml -1 and 1.31 mg ml -1 . With the conventional clinical system the minimum concentrations for the K-edge subtraction mammography are 4.13 mg ml -1 (8 mm diameter) and 5.75 mg ml -1 (5 mm diameter), while for the temporal subtraction mammography they are 1.01 mg ml -1 (8 mm diameter) and 1.57 mg ml -1 (5 mm diameter)

  16. Optimal dual-fuel propulsion for minimum inert weight or minimum fuel cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical investigation of single-stage vehicles with multiple propulsion phases has been conducted with the phasing optimized to minimize a general cost function. Some results are presented for linearized sizing relationships which indicate that single-stage-to-orbit, dual-fuel rocket vehicles can have lower inert weight than similar single-fuel rocket vehicles and that the advantage of dual-fuel vehicles can be increased if a dual-fuel engine is developed. The results also indicate that the optimum split can vary considerably with the choice of cost function to be minimized.

  17. Size effect in the strength of concrete structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The fracture mechanics size effect, as opposed to the Weibull statistical size effect, is a .... Solutions for TPB beam and a typical wedge-splitting geometry have been ..... Bazant Z P 1984 Size effect in blunt fracture: Concrete, rock, metal. J. Eng.

  18. Study of Thermal Properties, Turbidity, Effective Factors on Particle Size and Oscillatory Rheology of Pectin-Caseinate Biopolymer Nanocomplexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajedeh Bahrani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The biopolymer-based nanocomplexes are a group of nanocapsules that are used for encapsulation and control delivery of nutraceuticals. They are formed by binding of proteins and polysaccharides. In this study, complex formation between pectin and sodium caseinate was taken place by addition of pectin solutions(0.2, 0.45 and 0.7 % w/v into the caseinate solutions (0.5, 1 and 1.5 % w/v and adjusted their pH below isoelecteric point of sodium caseinate. The effect of various factors such as biopolymer concentration, salt concentration, temperature and time of ultrasound on the properties of pectin-casein nanocomplexes was investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and particle size analyzer were used for study of complex formation and particle size determination, respectively. The results of DSC and turbidimetry showed complex formation between the pectin and casein at pH below 5 and the results of particle size showed formation of stable dispersion with a minimum size of 86 nm at pH 4.1, caseinate of 1 % w/v and pectin 0.45 % w/v concentration. The ultrasound for more than 1 min reduced particle size and addition of salt at high and low concentrations had different effects on the stability of the colloidal system. The lowering of temperature from 21 to 4°C resulted in smaller particle size of nanocomplexes. The oscillatory rheological results showed that with increasing pectin concentration, viscoelastic moduli were increased and loss moduli were higher than storage modulus.

  19. Experimental tests on winter cereal: Sod seeding compared to minimum tillage and traditional plowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniotto Guidobono Cavalchini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Compared to traditional plowing and minimum tillage, the sod seeding technique has been tested in order to evaluate the differences in energy consumption, labor and machinery requirement and CO2 emission reduction. The experiments were conducted on winter cereal seeding in a Po valley farm in October 2011. The tests were carried out as follows: wheat variety seeding, over corn and alfalfa crops, in large plots with three repetitions for each thesis. They included: sod seeding anticipated by round up weeding in the case of the plots over alfalfa; traditional plowing at 35 cm followed by rotary tillage and combined seeding (seeder plus rotary tiller; minimum tillage based on ripping at the same depth (35 cm and combined seeder ( seeder plus rotary tiller. The following farm operations - fertilizer, and other agrochemical distributionshave been the same in all the considered theses. The results, statistically significant (P<0.001 in terms of yields, highlighted slight differences: the best data in the case of the traditional plowing both in the case of wheat crop over corn and alfalfa (84.43 and 6.75 t/ha; slightly lower yields for the sod seeding (6.23 and 79.9 t/ha for corn and alfalfa respectively; lower in the case of minimum tillage (5.87; 79.77 t/ha in the two situations. Huge differences in energy and oil consumption have been recorded: in the case of succession to corn 61.47; 35.31; 4.27 kg oil/ha respectively for, traditional plowing, minimum tillage and sod seeding; in the case of alfalfa 61.2; 50.96; 5.14 kg oil/ha respectively for traditional plowing, minimum tillage and sod seeding. The innovative technique, highlighted huge energy saving with an oil consumption equal to 92% and 89% (P<0.001 of what happens in traditional plowing and minimum tillage. Large differences concern labor and machine productivity. These parameters together with oil consumption and machine size [power (kW and weight (t] lead to even greater differences in

  20. Optimization of Minimum Quantity Lubricant Conditions and Cutting Parameters in Hard Milling of AISI H13 Steel

    OpenAIRE

    The-Vinh Do; Quang-Cherng Hsu

    2016-01-01

    As a successful solution applied to hard machining, the minimum quantity lubricant (MQL) has already been established as an alternative to flood coolant processing. The optimization of MQL parameters and cutting parameters under MQL condition are essential and pressing. The study was divided into two parts. In the first part of this study, the Taguchi method was applied to find the optimal values of MQL condition in the hard milling of AISI H13 with consideration of reduced surface roughness....

  1. Global-scale high-resolution ( 1 km) modelling of mean, maximum and minimum annual streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Valerio; Huijbregts, Mark; Hendriks, Jan; Beusen, Arthur; Clavreul, Julie; King, Henry; Schipper, Aafke

    2017-04-01

    Quantifying mean, maximum and minimum annual flow (AF) of rivers at ungauged sites is essential for a number of applications, including assessments of global water supply, ecosystem integrity and water footprints. AF metrics can be quantified with spatially explicit process-based models, which might be overly time-consuming and data-intensive for this purpose, or with empirical regression models that predict AF metrics based on climate and catchment characteristics. Yet, so far, regression models have mostly been developed at a regional scale and the extent to which they can be extrapolated to other regions is not known. We developed global-scale regression models that quantify mean, maximum and minimum AF as function of catchment area and catchment-averaged slope, elevation, and mean, maximum and minimum annual precipitation and air temperature. We then used these models to obtain global 30 arc-seconds (˜ 1 km) maps of mean, maximum and minimum AF for each year from 1960 through 2015, based on a newly developed hydrologically conditioned digital elevation model. We calibrated our regression models based on observations of discharge and catchment characteristics from about 4,000 catchments worldwide, ranging from 100 to 106 km2 in size, and validated them against independent measurements as well as the output of a number of process-based global hydrological models (GHMs). The variance explained by our regression models ranged up to 90% and the performance of the models compared well with the performance of existing GHMs. Yet, our AF maps provide a level of spatial detail that cannot yet be achieved by current GHMs.

  2. The Paperless Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    REI Systems, Inc. developed a software solution that uses the Internet to eliminate the paperwork typically required to document and manage complex business processes. The data management solution, called Electronic Handbooks (EHBs), is presently used for the entire SBIR program processes at NASA. The EHB-based system is ideal for programs and projects whose users are geographically distributed and are involved in complex management processes and procedures. EHBs provide flexible access control and increased communications while maintaining security for systems of all sizes. Through Internet Protocol- based access, user authentication and user-based access restrictions, role-based access control, and encryption/decryption, EHBs provide the level of security required for confidential data transfer. EHBs contain electronic forms and menus, which can be used in real time to execute the described processes. EHBs use standard word processors that generate ASCII HTML code to set up electronic forms that are viewed within a web browser. EHBs require no end-user software distribution, significantly reducing operating costs. Each interactive handbook simulates a hard-copy version containing chapters with descriptions of participants' roles in the online process.

  3. Solute-vacancy binding in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolverton, C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous efforts to understand solute-vacancy binding in aluminum alloys have been hampered by a scarcity of reliable, quantitative experimental measurements. Here, we report a large database of solute-vacancy binding energies determined from first-principles density functional calculations. The calculated binding energies agree well with accurate measurements where available, and provide an accurate predictor of solute-vacancy binding in other systems. We find: (i) some common solutes in commercial Al alloys (e.g., Cu and Mg) possess either very weak (Cu), or even repulsive (Mg), binding energies. Hence, we assert that some previously reported large binding energies for these solutes are erroneous. (ii) Large binding energies are found for Sn, Cd and In, confirming the proposed mechanism for the reduced natural aging in Al-Cu alloys containing microalloying additions of these solutes. (iii) In addition, we predict that similar reduction in natural aging should occur with additions of Si, Ge and Au. (iv) Even larger binding energies are found for other solutes (e.g., Pb, Bi, Sr, Ba), but these solutes possess essentially no solubility in Al. (v) We have explored the physical effects controlling solute-vacancy binding in Al. We find that there is a strong correlation between binding energy and solute size, with larger solute atoms possessing a stronger binding with vacancies. (vi) Most transition-metal 3d solutes do not bind strongly with vacancies, and some are even energetically strongly repelled from vacancies, particularly for the early 3d solutes, Ti and V

  4. UBV photometry of dwarf novae in the brightness minimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshina, I.B.; Lyutyj, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Photoelectric one-night observations of the dwarf novae SS Cyg at minimum light evidence for the existence of eclipses in this system at the moments of conjuctions. The orbital inclination of the system is estimated to be i approximately 70 deg C. The components of this system are low-massive (white and red dwarf stars) and low-luminous objects. As the optical luminosity of the dwarf novae at the minimum light is dependent on the accretion disk and hot spot at its periphery, where the substance jet run out from a nondegenerated component falls, eclipses should be associated with the disk and hot spot. The white dwarf star contributes greatly to the luminosity at the minimum light, but its eclipses are possible only at i approximately 90 deg

  5. CONSEQUENCES OF INCREASING THE MINIMUM WAGE IN UKRAINE TWICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Boreiko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the views of scientists on the role of incomes of the poorest people in providing of economic development of the country and consequences of increasing the minimum wage in Ukraine twice are investigated; the dynamics of change in Ukraine minimum wage during a decade are analyzed and decline in living standards of population during this period is shown; measures, which should be taken for non-inflationary growth in incomes of the population, are grounded; it is disclosed that such measures should include unification of income tax for individuals and single social contribution and restoration of a progressive taxation of incomes of the working population. Key words: minimum wage, household income, the poorest part of the population, the economy of country, tax system.

  6. Nursing Minimum Data Set Based on EHR Archetypes Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigolon, Dandara N; Moro, Cláudia M C

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of a Nursing Minimum Data Set (NMDS) can facilitate the use of health information systems. The adoption of these sets and represent them based on archetypes are a way of developing and support health systems. The objective of this paper is to describe the definition of a minimum data set for nursing in endometriosis represent with archetypes. The study was divided into two steps: Defining the Nursing Minimum Data Set to endometriosis, and Development archetypes related to the NMDS. The nursing data set to endometriosis was represented in the form of archetype, using the whole perception of the evaluation item, organs and senses. This form of representation is an important tool for semantic interoperability and knowledge representation for health information systems.

  7. Split-plot fractional designs: Is minimum aberration enough?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat; Ramirez, Jose; Tobias, Randy

    2006-01-01

    Split-plot experiments are commonly used in industry for product and process improvement. Recent articles on designing split-plot experiments concentrate on minimum aberration as the design criterion. Minimum aberration has been criticized as a design criterion for completely randomized fractional...... factorial design and alternative criteria, such as the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions, are suggested (Wu and Hamada (2000)). The need for alternatives to minimum aberration is even more acute for split-plot designs. In a standard split-plot design, there are several types of two...... for completely randomized designs. Consequently, we provide a modified version of the maximum number of clear two-factor interactions design criterion to be used for split-plot designs....

  8. Realistic minimum accident source terms - Evaluation, application, and risk acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, P. L.

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation, application, and risk acceptance for realistic minimum accident source terms can represent a complex and arduous undertaking. This effort poses a very high impact to design, construction cost, operations and maintenance, and integrated safety over the expected facility lifetime. At the 2005 Nuclear Criticality Safety Division (NCSD) Meeting in Knoxville Tenn., two papers were presented mat summarized the Y-12 effort that reduced the number of criticality accident alarm system (CAAS) detectors originally designed for the new Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility (HEUMF) from 258 to an eventual as-built number of 60. Part of that effort relied on determining a realistic minimum accident source term specific to the facility. Since that time, the rationale for an alternate minimum accident has been strengthened by an evaluation process that incorporates realism. A recent update to the HEUMF CAAS technical basis highlights the concepts presented here. (authors)

  9. Aseptic minimum volume vitrification technique for porcine parthenogenetically activated blastocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Yu, Yutao; Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars; Callesen, Henrik; Vajta, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    Minimum volume vitrification may provide extremely high cooling and warming rates if the sample and the surrounding medium contacts directly with the respective liquid nitrogen and warming medium. However, this direct contact may result in microbial contamination. In this work, an earlier aseptic technique was applied for minimum volume vitrification. After equilibration, samples were loaded on a plastic film, immersed rapidly into factory derived, filter-sterilized liquid nitrogen, and sealed into sterile, pre-cooled straws. At warming, the straw was cut, the filmstrip was immersed into a 39 degree C warming medium, and the sample was stepwise rehydrated. Cryosurvival rates of porcine blastocysts produced by parthenogenetical activation did not differ from control, vitrified blastocysts with Cryotop. This approach can be used for minimum volume vitrification methods and may be suitable to overcome the biological dangers and legal restrictions that hamper the application of open vitrification techniques.

  10. Optimal heliocentric trajectories for solar sail with minimum area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhov, Vyacheslav G.

    2018-05-01

    The fixed-time heliocentric trajectory optimization problem is considered for planar solar sail with minimum area. Necessary optimality conditions are derived, a numerical method for solving the problem is developed, and numerical examples of optimal trajectories to Mars, Venus and Mercury are presented. The dependences of the minimum area of the solar sail from the date of departure from the Earth, the time of flight and the departing hyperbolic excess of velocity are analyzed. In particular, for the rendezvous problem (approaching a target planet with zero relative velocity) with zero departing hyperbolic excess of velocity for a flight duration of 1200 days it was found that the minimum area-to-mass ratio should be about 12 m2/kg for trajectory to Venus, 23.5 m2/kg for the trajectory to Mercury and 25 m2/kg for trajectory to Mars.

  11. On kinematical minimum principles for rates and increments in plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouain, N.

    1984-01-01

    The optimization approach for elastoplastic analysis is discussed showing that some minimum principles related to numerical methods can be derived by means of duality and penalization procedures. Three minimum principles for velocity and plastic multiplier rate fields are presented in the framework of perfect plasticity. The first one is the classical Greenberg formulation. The second one, due to Capurso, is developed here with different motivation, and modified by penalization of constraints so as to arrive at a third principle for rates. The counterparts of these optimization formulations in terms of discrete increments of displacements of displacements and plastic multipliers are discussed. The third one of these minimum principles for finite increments is recognized to be closely related to Maier's formulation of holonomic plasticity. (Author) [pt

  12. The impact of the minimum wage on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyeva, Elena; Ukert, Benjamin

    2018-03-07

    This study evaluates the effect of minimum wage on risky health behaviors, healthcare access, and self-reported health. We use data from the 1993-2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, and employ a difference-in-differences strategy that utilizes time variation in new minimum wage laws across U.S. states. Results suggest that the minimum wage increases the probability of being obese and decreases daily fruit and vegetable intake, but also decreases days with functional limitations while having no impact on healthcare access. Subsample analyses reveal that the increase in weight and decrease in fruit and vegetable intake are driven by the older population, married, and whites. The improvement in self-reported health is especially strong among non-whites, females, and married.

  13. Topological and nontopological solutions for the chiral bag model with constituent quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sveshnikov, K.; Malakhov, I.; Khalili, M.; Fedorov, S.

    2002-01-01

    The three-phase version of the hybrid chiral bag model, containing the phase of asymptotic freedom, the hadronization phase as well as the intermediate phase of constituent quarks is proposed. For this model the self-consistent solutions of different topology are found in (1 + 1)D with due regard for fermion vacuum polarization effects. The renormalized total energy of the bag is studied as a function of its geometry and topological charge. It is shown that in the case of nonzero topological charge there exists a set of configurations being the local minima of the total energy of the bag and containing all the three phases, while in the nontopological case the minimum of the total energy of the bag corresponds to vanishing size of the phase of asymptotic freedom

  14. TF4SM: A Framework for Developing Traceability Solutions in Small Manufacturing Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordel Sánchez, Borja; Alcarria, Ramón; Martín, Diego; Robles, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, manufacturing processes have become highly complex. Besides, more and more, governmental institutions require companies to implement systems to trace a product’s life (especially for foods, clinical materials or similar items). In this paper, we propose a new framework, based on cyber-physical systems, for developing traceability systems in small manufacturing companies (which because of their size cannot implement other commercial products). We propose a general theoretical framework, study the requirements of these companies in relation to traceability systems, propose a reference architecture based on both previous elements and build the first minimum functional prototype, to compare our solution to a traditional tag-based traceability system. Results show that our system reduces the number of inefficiencies and reaction time. PMID:26610509

  15. Novel HPGe Probe solution for Harsh Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauss, J.; Pirard, B.; Menaa, N.; Quirin, P.; Flamanc, J.; Marian, V.; Lampert, M.O. [CANBERRA France, Parc des Tanneries, 1, chemin de la roseraie, 67380 Lingolsheim (France)

    2015-07-01

    In situ measurement is a privileged way of monitoring radioactive contamination compared to analyzing samples in a distant, specialized laboratory. Scintillators based spectrometers offer small footprints and are easy to easy to use, however they do not provide an accurate nuclide identification capability and activities measurement because notably of their limited energy resolution, for instance when low minimum detectable activity (MDA) are required, or in complex mixture of sources. On the other hand, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors provide unmatched nuclide identification capability with the lowest MDA but they are not always of practical use on the field because the crystal needs to be cooled down to liquid nitrogen temperature, increasing the overall weight, bulkiness and complexity of the measurement. This paper presents the configuration and performance of a novel turnkey and compact HPGe solution developed by Canberra for radionuclide identification under harsh environments. Radio-contaminations surveys now can be undertaken outdoor under various weather conditions, in contaminated areas, underground or underwater locations (including under sea water), with fast on site deployment. The spectrometer is also designed in a small diameter tubular shape to offer minimal footprint for an operation in narrow and confined spaces. Besides, this innovative design does not mitigate the performances nor the reliability experienced with standard laboratory-grade HPGe spectrometers. This achievement relies on advanced technologies such as the encapsulation of the crystal in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) which provides higher robustness and does not requires thermal cycles faced with regular HPGe equipment. It also relies on a low vibration, low consumption electrical cooler so that no liquid nitrogen is being used. The detector is connected to a state-of-the-art digital spectroscopy suite embedded in an autonomous acquisition station monitoring the cryo-cooler and

  16. Simultaneous control of nanocrystal size and nanocrystal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    applications such as a photo-sensor [11]. Thus, it is desirable to have, not only a control on the size of the nanocrystals, but also an independent tunability of the ... 1-thioglycerol) in 25 ml methanol under inert atmosphere. 10 ml of 0.2 M sodium sulfide solution is then added to the reaction mixture dropwise and the reaction.

  17. Minimum area requirements for an at-risk butterfly based on movement and demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Leone M; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2016-02-01

    Determining the minimum area required to sustain populations has a long history in theoretical and conservation biology. Correlative approaches are often used to estimate minimum area requirements (MARs) based on relationships between area and the population size required for persistence or between species' traits and distribution patterns across landscapes. Mechanistic approaches to estimating MAR facilitate prediction across space and time but are few. We used a mechanistic MAR model to determine the critical minimum patch size (CMP) for the Baltimore checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas phaeton), a locally abundant species in decline along its southern range, and sister to several federally listed species. Our CMP is based on principles of diffusion, where individuals in smaller patches encounter edges and leave with higher probability than those in larger patches, potentially before reproducing. We estimated a CMP for the Baltimore checkerspot of 0.7-1.5 ha, in accordance with trait-based MAR estimates. The diffusion rate on which we based this CMP was broadly similar when estimated at the landscape scale (comparing flight path vs. capture-mark-recapture data), and the estimated population growth rate was consistent with observed site trends. Our mechanistic approach to estimating MAR is appropriate for species whose movement follows a correlated random walk and may be useful where landscape-scale distributions are difficult to assess, but demographic and movement data are obtainable from a single site or the literature. Just as simple estimates of lambda are often used to assess population viability, the principles of diffusion and CMP could provide a starting place for estimating MAR for conservation. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. Relativistic distances, sizes, lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    Such notion as light or retarded distance, field size, formation way, visible size of a body, relativistic or radar length and wave length of light from a moving atom are considered. The relation between these notions is cleared up, their classification is given. It is stressed that the formation way is defined by the field size of a moving particle. In the case of the electromagnetic field, longitudinal sizes increase proportionally γ 2 with growing charge velocity (γ is the Lorentz-factor). 18 refs

  19. The influence of surface roughness and solution concentration on pool boiling process in Diethanolamine aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshechin, Mohsen; Salimi, Farhad; Jahangiri, Alireza

    2018-04-01

    In this research, the effect of surface roughness and concentration of solution on bubble departing frequency and nucleation site density for pool boiling of water/diethanolamine (DEA) binary solution were investigated experimentally. In this investigation, boiling heat transfer coefficient, bubble departing frequency and nucleation site density have been experimentally investigated in various concentrations and heat fluxes. Microstructured surfaces with a wide range of well-defined surface roughness were fabricated, and a heat flux between 1.5-86 kW/m2 was achieved under atmospheric conditions. The Results indicated that surface roughness and concentration of solution increase the bubble departing frequency and nucleation site density with increasing heat flux. The boiling heat transfer coefficient in mixtures of water/DEA increases with increasing concentration of DEA in water. The experimental results were compared with predictions of several used correlations in the literatures. Results showed that the boiling heat transfer coefficients of this case study are much higher than the predicted values by major existing correlations and models. The excellent agreement for bubble departing frequency found between the models of Jackob and Fritz (1966) and experimental data and also the nucleation site density were in close agreement with the model of Paul (1983) data. f bubble departure frequency, 1/s or Hz N Number of nucleation sites per area per time R c Minimum cavity size, m D c critical diameter, m g gravitational acceleration, m/s2 ρ density, kg/m3 T temperature, °c ΔT temperature difference, °c d d vapor bubble diameter, m h fg enthalpy of vaporization, J/kg R Roughness, μm Ja Jakob number cp specific heat, J/kg °c Pr Prandtl number Ar Archimedes number h Heat transfer coefficient, J/(m2 °c) tg time it takes to grow a bubble, s q/A heat flux (kW/m2) tw time required to heat the layer, s gc Correction coefficient of incompatible units R a Surface

  20. Mars ionopause during solar minimum: A lesson from Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, K.K.; Mayr, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    The ion densities measured by the Viking landers (Hanson et al., 1977) do not show an abrupt falloff with height, giving the false impression that Mars has no ionopause. On the basis of knowledge gained from the solar wind interaction at Venus during solar minimum, they demonstrate that the observed O 2 + profile above about 160 km on Mars is a distributed photodynamical ionosphere and can produce an ionopause at around 325 km, similar to that observed on Venus during solar minimum. They conclude that the solar wind interacts directly with the Mars ionosphere, suggesting that the planet does not have an intrinsic magnetic field of any consequence