WorldWideScience

Sample records for minimum orbital transfer

  1. Algebraic Approach to the Minimum-Cost Multi-Impulse Orbit-Transfer Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño, M.; Martín-Molina, V.; Martín-Morales, J.; Ortigas-Galindo, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a purely algebraic formulation (i.e. polynomial equations only) of the minimum-cost multi-impulse orbit transfer problem without time constraints, while keeping all the variables with a precise physical meaning. We apply general algebraic techniques to solve these equations (resultants, Gr\\"obner bases, etc.) in several situations of practical interest of different degrees of generality. For instance, we provide a proof of the optimality of the Hohmann transfer for the minimum fuel 2-impulse circular to circular orbit transfer problem, and we provide a general formula for the optimal 2-impulse in-plane transfer between two rotated elliptical orbits under a mild symmetry assumption on the two points where the impulses are applied (which we conjecture that can be removed).

  2. Qualitative Properties of Orbits for Minimum-Fuel Impulsive Transfers between Circular Coplanar Orbits with a Given Launch Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichnikov, S. N.; Vorobyev, A. Yu.; Teterin, S. N.

    2003-09-01

    The coplanar problem of minimizing propellant consumption in impulsive transfer between circular boundary orbits is investigated. The launch time and the initial configuration of objects on the boundary orbits are specified arbitrarily. The qualitative properties of optimal two-impulse trajectories and their optimality in the class of multi-impulse transfers are studied.

  3. Minimum fuel coplanar aeroassisted orbital transfer using collocation and nonlinear programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yun Yuan; Young, D. H.

    1991-01-01

    The fuel optimal control problem arising in coplanar orbital transfer employing aeroassisted technology is addressed. The mission involves the transfer from high energy orbit (HEO) to low energy orbit (LEO) without plane change. The basic approach here is to employ a combination of propulsive maneuvers in space and aerodynamic maneuvers in the atmosphere. The basic sequence of events for the coplanar aeroassisted HEO to LEO orbit transfer consists of three phases. In the first phase, the transfer begins with a deorbit impulse at HEO which injects the vehicle into a elliptic transfer orbit with perigee inside the atmosphere. In the second phase, the vehicle is optimally controlled by lift and drag modulation to satisfy heating constraints and to exit the atmosphere with the desired flight path angle and velocity so that the apogee of the exit orbit is the altitude of the desired LEO. Finally, the second impulse is required to circularize the orbit at LEO. The performance index is maximum final mass. Simulation results show that the coplanar aerocapture is quite different from the case where orbital plane changes are made inside the atmosphere. In the latter case, the vehicle has to penetrate deeper into the atmosphere to perform the desired orbital plane change. For the coplanar case, the vehicle needs only to penetrate the atmosphere deep enough to reduce the exit velocity so the vehicle can be captured at the desired LEO. The peak heating rates are lower and the entry corridor is wider. From the thermal protection point of view, the coplanar transfer may be desirable. Parametric studies also show the maximum peak heating rates and the entry corridor width are functions of maximum lift coefficient. The problem is solved using a direct optimization technique which uses piecewise polynomial representation for the states and controls and collocation to represent the differential equations. This converts the optimal control problem into a nonlinear programming problem

  4. CVs Around the Minimum Orbital Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zharikov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We discussed features of Cataclysmic Variables at the period minimum. In general, most of them must be WZ Sge-type objects. Main characteristics of the prototype star (WZ Sge are discussed. A part of WZ Sge-type objects has evolved past the period limit and formed the bounce back systems. We also explore conditions and structure of accretion disks in such systems. We show that the accretion disk in a system with extreme mass ratio grows in size reaching a 2:1 resonance radius and are relatively cool. They also become largely optically thin in the continuum, contributing to the total flux less than the stellar components of the system. In contrast, the viscosity and the temperature in spiral arms formed at the outer edge of the disk are higher and their contribution in continuum plays an increasingly important role. We model such disks and generate light curves which successfully simulate the observed double-humped light curves in the quiescence.

  5. A Galactic Ring of Minimum Stellar Density Near the Solar Orbit Radius

    CERN Document Server

    Barros, Douglas A; Junqueira, Thiago C

    2013-01-01

    We analyse the secular effects of a long-lived Galactic spiral structure on the stellar orbits with mean radii close to the corotation resonance. By test-particle simulations and different spiral potential models with parameters constrained on observations, we verified the formation of a minimum with amplitude ~ 30% - 40% of the background disk stellar density at corotation. Such minimum is formed by the secular angular momentum transfer between stars and the spiral density wave on both sides of corotation. We demonstrate that the secular loss (gain) of angular momentum and decrease (increase) of mean orbital radius of stars just inside (outside) corotation can counterbalance the opposite trend of exchange of angular momentum shown by stars orbiting the librational points L_4/5 at the corotation circle. Such secular processes actually allow steady spiral waves to promote radial migration across corotation. We propose some observational evidences for the minimum stellar density in the Galactic disk, such as it...

  6. Minimum-fuel aerodynamic orbital plane change maneuvers. [for Space Shuttle Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, B. K.; Pierson, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    Several minimum-fuel, aerodynamically controlled, orbital plane change problems are formulated and solved as optimal control problems. A gradient projection algorithm is used to iteratively modify both the control functions, angle of attack and bank angle, and two control parameters to obtain the optimal trajectory. The atmospheric flight profile is combined with two Keplerian (two-body vacuum flight) arcs so that a complete orbit-to-orbit analysis results. The vehicle used in this investigation is the Space Transportation System Shuttle Orbiter. The effects of heat load constraint level and plane change angle are analysed.

  7. The Subscale Orbital Fluid Transfer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meserole, J. S.; Collins, Frank G.; Jones, Ogden; Antar, Basil; Menzel, Reinhard; Gray, Perry

    1989-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Spacecraft Propulsion (CASP) is a subcontractor to Boeing Aerospace Corporation to provide support for the concept definition and design of a subscale orbital fluid transfer experiment (SOFTE). SOFTE is an experiment that will look at the fluid mechanics of the process of transfer of a saturated fluid between two tanks. The experiment will be placed in two get away special (GAS) can containers; the tanks will be in one container and the power and electronics will be in a second container. Since GAS cans are being used, the experiment will be autonomous. The work during the present year consisted of examining concepts for visual observation of the fluid transfer process, methods for accurately metering the amount of fluid transferred between the two tanks, possible test fluids, and materials for the elastomeric diaphragm.

  8. United States orbital transfer vehicle programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Charles R.

    The United States will rely on five orbital transfer vehicles to carry spacecraft to higher energy orbits than achievable by the Space Shuttle or various Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELV). These vehicles are the Payload Assist Module-Delta (PAM-D), an upgraded version designated PAM-DII, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS), and the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). Development of these vehicles have evolved through contrasting cultures of government and commercial management. The spectrum of their capabilities range from providing spacecraft with only a preprogrammed perigee velocity additions to man-in-the-loop remote controlled spacecraft rendezvous, docking, retrieval and return to a space base; either the Shuttle or the Space Station Freedom. The PAM-D, PAM-DII, and IUS are now nearing maturity. Their characteristics, flight record, costs, and projected future uses are defined. The TOS and OMV are currently in development with first uses scheduled in 1992 and 1993, respectively. The TOS is being commercially developed while the OMV is government developed. The TOS and OMV capabilities, constraints, and costs are reviewed.

  9. Orbit Clustering Based on Transfer Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Eric D.; Arrieta-Camacho, Juan J.; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose using cluster analysis to perform quick screening for combinatorial global optimization problems. The key missing component currently preventing cluster analysis from use in this context is the lack of a useable metric function that defines the cost to transfer between two orbits. We study several proposed metrics and clustering algorithms, including k-means and the expectation maximization algorithm. We also show that proven heuristic methods such as the Q-law can be modified to work with cluster analysis.

  10. Transfer orbit stage mechanisms thermal vacuum test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleary, Scott T.

    1990-01-01

    A systems level mechanisms test was conducted on the Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS). The TOS is a unique partially reusable transfer vehicle which will boost a satellite into its operational orbit from the Space Shuttle's cargo bay. The mechanical cradle and tilt assemblies will return to earth with the Space Shuttle while the Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) and avionics package are expended. A mechanisms test was performed on the forward cradle and aft tilting assemblies of the TOS under thermal vacuum conditions. Actuating these assemblies under a 1 g environment and thermal vacuum conditions proved to be a complex task. Pneumatic test fixturing was used to lift the forward cradle, and tilt the SRM, and avionics package. Clinometers, linear voltage displacement transducers, and load cells were used in the thermal vacuum chamber to measure the performance and characteristics of the TOS mechanism assembly. Incorporation of the instrumentation and pneumatic system into the test setup was not routine since pneumatic actuation of flight hardware had not been previously performed in the facility. The methods used are presented along with the problems experienced during the design, setup and test phases.

  11. Computational chemistry and aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D. M.; Jaffe, R. L.; Arnold, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the radiative heating phenomena encountered during a typical aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) trajectory was made to determine the potential impact of computational chemistry on AOTV design technology. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation mechanisms were considered. This analysis showed that computational chemistry can be used to predict (1) radiative intensity factors and spectroscopic data; (2) the excitation rates of both atoms and molecules; (3) high-temperature reaction rate constants for metathesis and charge exchange reactions; (4) particle ionization and neutralization rates and cross sections; and (5) spectral line widths.

  12. Hubble Space Telescope On-orbit Transfer Function Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlamudi, N.; Blair, M. A.; Clapp, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the On-orbit Transfer Function Test (TFT) designed for on-orbit vibration testing of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The TFT provides means for extracting accurate on-orbit characteristics of HST flexible body dynamics, making it possible to check periodically the state of the vehicle on-orbit and to assess changes in modal parameters.

  13. Orbital Transfer Techniques for Round-Trip Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Damon

    2013-01-01

    The human exploration of Phobos and Deimos or the retrieval of a surface sample launched to low-Mars orbit presents a highly constrained orbital transfer problem. In general, the plane of the target orbit will not be accessible from the arrival or departure interplanetary trajectories with an (energetically optimal) tangential burn at periapsis. The orbital design is further complicated by the addition of a high-energy parking orbit for the relatively massive Deep Space Vehicle to reduce propellant expenditure, while the crew transfers to and from the target orbit in a smaller Space Exploration Vehicle. The proposed strategy shifts the arrival and departure maneuvers away from periapsis so that the apsidal line of the parking orbit lies in the plane of the target orbit, permitting highly efficient plane change maneuvers at apoapsis of the elliptical parking orbit. An apsidal shift during the arrival or departure maneuver is approximately five times as efficient as maneuvering while in Mars orbit, thus significantly reducing the propellant necessary to transfer between the arrival, target, and departure orbits.

  14. Orbital Transfer Techniques for Round-Trip Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Damon

    2013-01-01

    The human exploration of Phobos and Deimos or the retrieval of a surface sample launched to low-Mars orbit presents a highly constrained orbital transfer problem. In general, the plane of the target orbit will not be accessible from the arrival or departure interplanetary trajectories with an (energetically optimal) tangential burn at periapsis. The orbital design is further complicated by the addition of a high-energy parking orbit for the relatively massive Deep Space Vehicle to reduce propellant expenditure, while the crew transfers to and from the target orbit in a smaller Space Exploration Vehicle. The proposed strategy shifts the arrival and departure maneuvers away from periapsis so that the apsidal line of the parking orbit lies in the plane of the target orbit, permitting highly efficient plane change maneuvers at apoapsis of the elliptical parking orbit. An apsidal shift during the arrival or departure maneuver is approximately five times as efficient as maneuvering while in Mars orbit, thus significantly reducing the propellant necessary to transfer between the arrival, target, and departure orbits.

  15. Study of the transfer between libration point orbits and lunar orbits in Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Gómez, Gerard; Masdemont, Josep J.; Yuan, Jianping

    2017-02-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of the transfer problem from a libration point orbit of the Earth-Moon system to an orbit around the Moon. The transfer procedure analysed has two legs: the first one is an orbit of the unstable manifold of the libration orbit and the second one is a transfer orbit between a certain point on the manifold and the final lunar orbit. There are only two manoeuvres involved in the method and they are applied at the beginning and at the end of the second leg. Although the numerical results given in this paper correspond to transfers between halo orbits around the L_1 point (of several amplitudes) and lunar polar orbits with altitudes varying between 100 and 500 km, the procedure we develop can be applied to any kind of lunar orbits, libration orbits around the L_1 or L_2 points of the Earth-Moon system, or to other similar cases with different values of the mass ratio.

  16. Spiraling Away from Vesta: Design of the Transfer from the Low to High Altitude Dawn Mapping Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John C.; Parcher, Daniel W.; Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Dawn has successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta and is currently en route to an orbital rendezvous with Ceres in 2015. The longest duration and most complex portion of the Vesta departure trajectory was the transfer from the low to high altitude science orbit. This paper describes the design of this low-thrust trajectory optimized assuming a minimum-propellant mass objective. The transfer utilized solar-electric ion propulsion applied over 139 spacecraft revolutions about Vesta. Science drivers, operational constraints, and robustness to statistical uncertainties are addressed. The 45-day transfer trajectory was successfully implemented in early 2012.

  17. Dynamical modeling and lifetime analysis of geostationary transfer orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Gurfil, Pini

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics and lifetime reduction of geostationary transfer orbits (GTOs) are of great importance to space debris mitigation. The orbital dynamics, subjected to a complex interplay of multiple perturbations, are complicated and sensitive to the initial conditions and model parameters. In this paper, a simple but effective non-singular orbital dynamics model in terms of Milankovitch elements is derived. The orbital dynamics, which include the Earth oblateness, luni-solar perturbations, and atmospheric drag, are averaged over the orbital motion of the GTO object, or, as needed, also over the orbital motions of the Moon and Sun, to eliminate the short-period terms. After the averaging process, the effect of the atmospheric drag assumes a simple analytical form. The averaged orbital model is verified through a numerical simulation compared with commercial orbit propagators. GTO lifetime reduction by using the luni-solar perturbations is studied. It is shown that the long-period luni-solar perturbation is induced by the precession of the GTO orbital plane and apsidal line, whereas the short-period perturbation is induced by the periodic luni-solar orbital motions. The long- and short-period perturbations are isolated and studied separately, and their global distribution with respect to the orbital geometry is given. The desired initial orbital geometry with a short orbital lifetime is found and verified by a numerical simulation.

  18. A new method for determination of satellite orbits by transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The original idea of a new method for determination of satellite orbits by transfer is from Two-Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT). The original method is called "determination of satellite orbit by transfer". The method is not only for determination of satellite orbit but also for the time transfer with high accuracy and precision. The advantage is that the accuracy and the precision for determination of satellite orbit are very high and the new method is favorable for various applications. The combination of various signals disseminated and received forms various modes of satellite orbit determinations. If receivers at stations receive the own station-disseminated signals via a satellite transponder, it forms an orbit determination mode called "receiving the own station-disseminated signals mode". If receivers at all stations receive the signals disseminated from the master station via satellite transponders, it forms an orbit determination mode called "receiving the master station-disseminated signals mode". If all of receivers at stations receive all stations-disseminated signals via satellite transponders, it forms an orbit determination mode called "receiving all stations-disseminated signals mode". Also there are other combinations of signals for satellite orbit determination. For dif- ferent orbit determination modes with different signal combinations, their rigorous formulae of proc- essing are hereby presented in this paper. The accurate and the precise satellite orbit determination for both of the modes, "receiving the own station-disseminated signals mode" and "receiving the master station-disseminated signals mode" is attempted. It shows that the accuracy and precision for both of modes are nearly the same, the ranging accuracy is better than 1 cm, and the observation residuals of satellite orbit determination are better than 9 cm in the observation duration of 1 day.

  19. A new method for determination of satellite orbits by transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ZhiGang; YANG XuHai; AI GuoXiang; SI HuLi; QIAO RongChuan; FENG ChuGang

    2009-01-01

    The original idea of a new method for determination of satellite orbits by transfer is from Two-Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT).The original method is called "determination of satellite orbit by transfer".The method is not only for determination of satellite orbit but also for the time transfer with high accuracy and precision.The advantage is that the accuracy and the precision for determination of satellite orbit are very high and the new method is favorable for various applications.The combination of various signals disseminated and received forms various modes of satellite orbit determinations.If receivers at stations receive the own station-disseminated signals via a satellite transponder,it forms an orbit determination mode called "receiving the own station-disseminated signals mode".If receivers at all stations receive the signals disseminated from the master station via satellite transponders,it forms an orbit determination mode called "receiving the master station-disseminated signals mode".If all of receivers at stations receive all stations-disseminated signals via satellite transponders,it forms an orbit determination mode called "receiving all stations-disseminated signals mode".Also there are other combinations of signals for satellite orbit determination.For different orbit determination modes with different signal combinations,their rigorous formulae of processing are hereby presented in this paper.The accurate and the precise satellite orbit determination for both of the modes,"receiving the own station-disseminated signals mode" and "receiving the master station-disseminated signals mode" is attempted.It shows that the accuracy and precision for both of modes are nearly the same,the ranging accuracy is better than 1 cm,and the observation residuals of satellite orbit determination are better than 9 cm in the observation duration of 1 day.

  20. Tangent-impulse transfer from elliptic orbit to an excess velocity vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Gang; Zhang Xiangyu; Cao Xibin

    2014-01-01

    The two-body orbital transfer problem from an elliptic parking orbit to an excess veloc-ity vector with the tangent impulse is studied. The direction of the impulse is constrained to be aligned with the velocity vector, then speed changes are enough to nullify the relative velocity. First, if one tangent impulse is used, the transfer orbit is obtained by solving a single-variable function about the true anomaly of the initial orbit. For the initial circular orbit, the closed-form solution is derived. For the initial elliptic orbit, the discontinuous point is solved, then the initial true anomaly is obtained by a numerical iterative approach; moreover, an alternative method is proposed to avoid the singularity. There is only one solution for one-tangent-impulse escape trajectory. Then, based on the one-tangent-impulse solution, the minimum-energy multi-tangent-impulse escape trajectory is obtained by a numerical optimization algorithm, e.g., the genetic method. Finally, several examples are provided to validate the proposed method. The numerical results show that the minimum-energy multi-tangent-impulse escape trajectory is the same as the one-tangent-impulse trajectory.

  1. Tangent-impulse transfer from elliptic orbit to an excess velocity vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Gang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The two-body orbital transfer problem from an elliptic parking orbit to an excess velocity vector with the tangent impulse is studied. The direction of the impulse is constrained to be aligned with the velocity vector, then speed changes are enough to nullify the relative velocity. First, if one tangent impulse is used, the transfer orbit is obtained by solving a single-variable function about the true anomaly of the initial orbit. For the initial circular orbit, the closed-form solution is derived. For the initial elliptic orbit, the discontinuous point is solved, then the initial true anomaly is obtained by a numerical iterative approach; moreover, an alternative method is proposed to avoid the singularity. There is only one solution for one-tangent-impulse escape trajectory. Then, based on the one-tangent-impulse solution, the minimum-energy multi-tangent-impulse escape trajectory is obtained by a numerical optimization algorithm, e.g., the genetic method. Finally, several examples are provided to validate the proposed method. The numerical results show that the minimum-energy multi-tangent-impulse escape trajectory is the same as the one-tangent-impulse trajectory.

  2. Particle swarm optimization applied to impulsive orbital transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontani, Mauro; Conway, Bruce A.

    2012-05-01

    The particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique is a population-based stochastic method developed in recent years and successfully applied in several fields of research. It mimics the unpredictable motion of bird flocks while searching for food, with the intent of determining the optimal values of the unknown parameters of the problem under consideration. At the end of the process, the best particle (i.e. the best solution with reference to the objective function) is expected to contain the globally optimal values of the unknown parameters. The central idea underlying the method is contained in the formula for velocity updating. This formula includes three terms with stochastic weights. This research applies the particle swarm optimization algorithm to the problem of optimizing impulsive orbital transfers. More specifically, the following problems are considered and solved with the PSO algorithm: (i) determination of the globally optimal two- and three-impulse transfer trajectories between two coplanar circular orbits; (ii) determination of the optimal transfer between two coplanar, elliptic orbits with arbitrary orientation; (iii) determination of the optimal two-impulse transfer between two circular, non-coplanar orbits; (iv) determination of the globally optimal two-impulse transfer between two non-coplanar elliptic orbits. Despite its intuitiveness and simplicity, the particle swarm optimization method proves to be capable of effectively solving the orbital transfer problems of interest with great numerical accuracy.

  3. Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent lunar missions have begun to take advantage of the benefits of low-energy ballistic transfers between the Earth and the Moon rather than implementing conventional Hohmann-like lunar transfers. Both Artemis and GRAIL plan to implement low-energy lunar transfers in the next few years. This paper explores the characteristics and potential applications of many different families of low-energy ballistic lunar transfers. The transfers presented here begin from a wide variety of different orbits at the Earth and follow several different distinct pathways to the Moon. This paper characterizes these pathways to identify desirable low-energy lunar transfers for future lunar missions.

  4. Polyhedral representation of invariant manifolds applied to orbit transfers in the Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontani, Mauro; Teofilatto, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Recently, manifold dynamics has assumed an increasing relevance for analysis and design of low-energy missions, both in the Earth-Moon system and in alternative multibody environments. This work proposes and describes an intuitive polyhedral interpolative approach for each state component associated with manifold trajectories, both in two and in three dimensions. An adequate grid of data, coming from the numerical propagation of a finite number of manifold trajectories, is employed. Accuracy of this representation is evaluated with reference to the invariant manifolds associated with a two-dimensional Lyapunov orbit and a three-dimensional Halo orbit, and is proven to be satisfactory, with the exclusion of limited regions of the manifolds. As a first, preliminary application, the polyhedral interpolation technique allows identifying the orbits in the proximity of the interior collinear libration point as either asymptotic, transit, or bouncing trajectories. Then, two applications to orbital maneuvering are addressed. First, the globally optimal two-impulse transfer between a specified low Earth orbit and a Lyapunov orbit (through its stable manifold) is determined. Second, the minimum-time low-thrust transfer from the same terminal orbits is found using again the stable manifold. These applications prove the effectiveness of the polyhedral interpolative technique and represent the premise for its application also to different problems involving invariant manifold dynamics.

  5. Interacting Binaries with Eccentric Orbits. Secular Orbital Evolution Due To Conservative Mass Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Sepinsky, J F; Kalogera, V; Rasio, F A

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the secular evolution of the orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity due to mass transfer in eccentric binaries, assuming conservation of total system mass and orbital angular momentum. Assuming a delta function mass transfer rate centered at periastron, we find rates of secular change of the orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity which are linearly proportional to the magnitude of the mass transfer rate at periastron. The rates can be positive as well as negative, so that the semi-major axis and eccentricity can increase as well as decrease in time. Adopting a delta-function mass-transfer rate of $10^{-9} M_\\sun {\\rm yr}^{-1}$ at periastron yields orbital evolution timescales ranging from a few Myr to a Hubble time or more, depending on the binary mass ratio and orbital eccentricity. Comparison with orbital evolution timescales due to dissipative tides furthermore shows that tides cannot, in all cases, circularize the orbit rapidly enough to justify the often adopted assumption of instantan...

  6. Phasing Delta-V for transfers from Sun-Earth halo orbits to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongru; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Hanada, Toshiya

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by successful extended missions such as the ISEE-3, an investigation for the extended mission that involves a lunar encounter following a Sun-Earth halo orbit mission is considered valuable. Most previous studies present the orbit-to-orbit transfers where the lunar phase is not considered. Intended for extended missions, the present work aims to solve for the minimum phasing ∆V for various initial lunar phases. Due to the solution multiplicity of the two-point boundary value problem, the general constrained optimization algorithm that does not identify multiple feasible solutions is shown to miss minima. A two-step differential corrector with a two-body Lambert solver is developed for identifying multiple solutions. The minimum ∆V associated with the short-way and long-way approaches can be recovered. It is acquired that the required ∆V to cover all initial lunar phases is around 45 m/s for the halo orbit with out-of-plane amplitude Az greater than 3.5×105 km, and 14 m/s for a small halo orbit with Az=1×105 km. In addition, the paper discusses the phasing planning based on the ∆V result and the shift of lunar phase with halo orbit revolution.

  7. Engine Optimization for a Solar Thermal Powered Orbit Transfer Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Recent technological advancements in solar thermal rocket propulsion and solar orbit transfer vehicles make it critical to perform additional engine performance analyses. Several system level flight demonstrations are imminent. Space flight hardware component testing is being conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards AFB, California. The focus of current research is engine and nozzle configurations for a solar orbit transfer vehicle. The optimal design must produce 1-10 pounds thrust, perform at high lsp and be compatible in a hybrid of spiral, perigee, and apogee (multi-burn) configurations. The nozzle material must not ablate when subjected to extreme thermal loading, yet be durable enough to withstand widely varying temperature differentials during frequent thermal cycling. This paper addresses propulsive needs in the orbit transfer arena and defines governing upper stage vehicle engine equations. These equations are modified versions of rocket engine equations used for chemical systems. The correction factors and modifications are for Solar Thermal Propulsion specific hardware.

  8. Interacting Binaries with Eccentric Orbits II. Secular Orbital Evolution Due To Non-Conservative Mass Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Sepinsky, J F; Kalogera, V; Rasio, F A

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the secular evolution of the orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity due to mass transfer in eccentric binaries, allowing for both mass and angular momentum loss from the system. Adopting a delta function mass transfer rate at the periastron of the binary orbit, we find that, depending on the initial binary properties at the onset of mass transfer, the orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity can either increase or decrease at a rate linearly proportional to the magnitude of the mass transfer rate at periastron. The range of initial binary mass ratios and eccentricities that leads to increasing orbital semi-major axes and eccentricities broadens with increasing degrees of mass loss from the system and narrows with increasing orbital angular momentum loss from the binary. Comparison with tidal evolution timescales shows that the usual assumption of rapid circularization at the onset of mass transfer in eccentric binaries is not justified, irrespective of the degree of systemic mass and angular ...

  9. Teen families, welfare transfers, and the minimum wage: evidence from Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Anindya Sen; Hideki Ariizumi

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the impacts of welfare transfers and the minimum wage on teen family formation by pooling provincial data from Canada between 1990 and 2005. OLS estimates suggest that welfare transfers have had limited impact on teen births. On the other hand, a 10% increase in the minimum wage is significantly correlated with a 3% -5% rise in teen birth rates. This finding is explained by further regressions, which reveal that an increase in the minimum wage is significantly associated ...

  10. Minimum time solar sailing from geosynchronous orbit to the sun-earth L2 point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Sun H.; Bryson, Arthur E., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    An approximate time-optimal of a solar sail from a geosynchronous orbit to the sun-earth L2 libration point is found using a combined method of local optimization and single shooting. The local optimization strategy is based on maximizing the time rate of change of an energy variable at each time. This strategy overcomes the numerical difficulties associated with solving optimal control problems of long duration like the solar sail transfer problem. The single shooting portion of the method is employed to meet the terminal constraints. The combined method can be applied to other optimal low thrust transfer problems of long duration.

  11. Angular dependence of spin-orbit spin-transfer torques

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Ki-Seung

    2015-04-06

    In ferromagnet/heavy-metal bilayers, an in-plane current gives rise to spin-orbit spin-transfer torque, which is usually decomposed into fieldlike and dampinglike torques. For two-dimensional free-electron and tight-binding models with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, the fieldlike torque acquires nontrivial dependence on the magnetization direction when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling becomes comparable to the exchange interaction. This nontrivial angular dependence of the fieldlike torque is related to the Fermi surface distortion, determined by the ratio of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling to the exchange interaction. On the other hand, the dampinglike torque acquires nontrivial angular dependence when the Rashba spin-orbit coupling is comparable to or stronger than the exchange interaction. It is related to the combined effects of the Fermi surface distortion and the Fermi sea contribution. The angular dependence is consistent with experimental observations and can be important to understand magnetization dynamics induced by spin-orbit spin-transfer torques.

  12. Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, P.; Dipirro, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    The in-flight tests and the operational sequences of the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment are outlined. These tests include the transfer of superfluid helium at a variety of rates, the transfer into cold and warm receivers, the operation of an extravehicular activity coupling, and tests of a liquid acquisition device. A variety of different types of instrumentation will be required for these tests. These include pressure sensors and liquid flow meters that must operate in liquid helium, accurate thermometry, two types of quantity gauges, and liquid-vapor sensors.

  13. A minimum state multibody/FEM approach for modeling flexible orbiting space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisculli, A.; Gasbarri, P.

    2015-05-01

    In the past the deployment of space structures has widely been analyzed by using multibody formulations. The two leading approaches are usually based on the Newton-Euler (NE) formulation and Euler-Lagrange (EL) formulation. Both of them present advantages and drawbacks. The ideal approach for describing multi-body systems can be represented by a combination between NE and EL formulations. This can be obtained by considering the NE formulation for assembling the equation of motion and then by defining the ODE governing equations with the use of a minimum set of variables. In this paper the authors present a mixed NE/EL formulation suitable for synthesizing optimal control strategies during the deploying maneuvers of robotic arms or solar arrays. The proposed method has two main characteristics: (i) the reference frame, which all the bodies motions are referred to, is a floating reference frame attached to the orbiting base platform body; (ii) it leads to a more organic formulation which makes a shifting from the NE to the EL formulations possible, through the use of a Jacobian matrix. In the present work this mixed formulation is derived to describe a fully elastic multi-body spacecraft. Furthermore the presented formulation, complemented with gravity, gravity gradient and generalized gravitational modal forces, will be used to study the dynamic behavior of an orbiting manipulator with flexible appendages. Finally a Reaction Null/Jacobian Transpose control strategy will be applied to control and deploy the robotic arms to grasp an orbiting flexible spacecraft.

  14. Optimization adn Guidance of Very Low-Thrust Transfers to Geostatoinary Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Fernandez, J.; Tarabini, L.; Graziano, M.; Gomez-Tierno, M. A.

    A new hybrid direct-indirect optimization algorithm is presented to compute the minimum-time transfer between two orbits, including the phasing with a desired spacecraft. Very-low thrust means several hundred revolutions to perform the large change in orbital elements. The optimal control solution of the fast-evolution problem combined with a direct method for the secular trajectory avoids the numerical instability arising in very long propagations, decreases the computational time, reduces the sensitivity to the initial guess and provides a feasible transfer at every optimization step. Optimization of transfers from GTO to GEO is presented and two types of trajectories are analysed, sub-synchronous (apogee constrained below GEO altitude) and super-synchronous (free apogee altitude). The optimization of a transfer from LEO to a very high orbit (11 x 23 RE) is presented, showing the applicability of the method to different problems. A guidance algorithm is presented to compensate the deviations of the real trajectory from the optimal one due to off-nominal conditions. The results in closed-loop simulation of the guidance scheme to compensate deterministic perturbations not considered in the optimization show good performances in both analysed missions.

  15. The K-1 Active Dispenser for Orbit Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, G.; Cochran, D.; Curtis, R.

    2002-01-01

    Kistler Aerospace Corporation is building the K-1, the world's first fully reusable launch vehicle. The two-stage K- 1 is designed primarily to service the market for low-earth orbit (LEO) missions, due to Kistler's need to recover both stages. For customers requiring payload delivery to high-energy orbits, Kistler can outfit the payload with a K- 1 Active Dispenser (an expendable third stage). The K-1 second stage will deploy the Active Dispenser mated with its payload into a 200 km circular LEO parking orbit. From this orbit, the Active Dispenser would use its own propulsion to place its payload into the final desired drop-off orbit or earth-escape trajectory. This approach allows Kistler to combine the low-cost launch services offered by the reusable two-stage K-1 with the versatility of a restartable, expendable upper stage. Enhanced with an Active Dispenser, the K-1 will be capable of delivering 1,500 kg to a geosynchronous transfer orbit or up to approximately 1,000 kg into a Mars rendezvous trajectory. The list price of a K-1 Active Dispenser launch is 25 million (plus the price of mission unique integration services) significantly less than the price of any launch vehicle service in the world with comparable capability.

  16. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic thin films induced by spin-orbit interaction with Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jia, E-mail: lijia@wipm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-10-07

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic thin films induced by spin-orbit interaction with Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque. We reproduce the experimental results of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy films by micromagnetic simulation. Due to the spin-orbit interaction, the magnetization can be switched by changing the direction of the current with the assistant of magnetic field. By increasing the current amplitude, wider range of switching events can be achieved. Time evolution of magnetization has provided us a clear view of the process, and explained the role of minimum external field. Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque modifies the magnetization when current is present. The magnitude of the minimum external field is determined by the strength of the Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque. The investigations may provide potential applications in magnetic memories.

  17. Optimal trajectories for LEO-to-LEO aeroassisted orbital transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, A.; Lee, W. Y.; Mease, K. D.

    This paper considers both classical and minimax problems of optimal control arising in the study of noncoplanar, aeroassisted orbital transfer. The maneuver considered involves the transfer from one planetary orbit to another having different orbital inclination, but the same radius. An example is the LEO-to-LEO transfer of a spacecraft with a prescribed plane change, where LEO denotes low Earth orbit. The basic idea is to employ the hybrid combination of propulsive maneuvers in space and aerodynamic maneuvers in the sensible atmosphere. Hence, this type of flight is also called synergetic space flight. With reference to the atmospheric part of the maneuver, trajectory control is achieved by modulating the lift coefficient (hence, the angle of attack) and the angle of bank. The presence of upper and lower bounds on the lift coefficient is considered. Three different transfer maneuvers are studied. Type 1 involves four impulses and four space plane changes; Type 2 involves three impulses and three space plane changes; and Type 3 involves three impulses and no space plane change. In Type 1, the initial impulse directs the spacecraft away from Earth, and then is followed by an apogee impulse propelling the spacecraft toward Earth; in Types 2 and 3, the initial impulse directs the spacecraft toward Earth. A common element of these maneuvers is that they all include an atmospheric pass, with velocity depletion coupled with plane change. Within the framework of classical optimal control, the following problems are studied: (P1) minimize the energy required for orbital transfer; (P4) maximize the time of flight during the atmospheric portion of the trajectory; (P5) minimize the time integral of the square of the path inclination. Within the framework of minimax optimal control, the following problem is studied: (Q1) minimize the peak heating rate. Numerical solutions for Problems (P1), (P4), (P5), (Q1) are obtained by means of the sequential gradient-restoration algorithm

  18. Change in Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance due to General Relativistic Precession in Small Solar System Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Aswin; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Asher, David; Werner, Stephanie; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Li, Gongjie

    2017-06-01

    One of the greatest successes of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity (GR) was the correct prediction of the perihelion precession of Mercury. The closed form expression to compute this precession tells us that substantial GR precession would occur only if the bodies have a combination of both moderately small perihelion distance and semi-major axis. Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance (MOID) is a quantity which helps us to understand the closest proximity of two orbits in space. Hence evaluating MOID is crucial to understand close encounters and collision scenarios better. In this work, we look at the possible scenarios where a small GR precession in argument of pericentre can create substantial changes in MOID for small bodies ranging from meteoroids to comets and asteroids.Previous works have looked into neat analytical techniques to understand different collision scenarios and we use those standard expressions to compute MOID analytically. We find the nature of this mathematical function is such that a relatively small GR precession can lead to drastic changes in MOID values depending on the initial value of argument of pericentre. Numerical integrations were done with the MERCURY package incorporating GR code to test the same effects. A numerical approach showed the same interesting relationship (as shown by analytical theory) between values of argument of pericentre and the peaks or dips in MOID values. There is an overall agreement between both analytical and numerical methods.We find that GR precession could play an important role in the calculations pertaining to MOID and close encounter scenarios in the case of certain small solar system bodies (depending on their initial orbital elements) when long term impact risk possibilities are considered. Previous works have looked into impact probabilities and collision scenarios on planets from different small body populations. This work aims to find certain sub-sets of small bodies where GR could play an

  19. Solar electric propulsion for the orbital transfer of large spacecraft to geosynchronous orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, James L.

    1992-01-01

    Low thrust trajectories utilizing electric propulsion and photovoltaic power sources are derived for the transfer of a large spacecraft from assembly in low earth orbit to operation at geosynchronous orbit. Conventional silicon photovoltaic devices are assumed. A 1 MeV equivalent electron flux model is used. The solar panel mass and size are taken from Advanced Photovoltaic Solar Array design concepts with 3-mil shielding. Shadowing of the vehicle and low earth orbit atmospheric drag are also modeled. The power system is sized so that end of life output is 30 percent of initial output. Steering of the thrust vector is defined by a three term series in which the coefficients are varied as controls to minimize the total power loss with cumulative exposure in the Van Allen region.

  20. Spin Orbit Interaction Engineering for beyond Spin Transfer Torque memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang L.

    Spin transfer torque memory uses electron current to transfer the spin torque of electrons to switch a magnetic free layer. This talk will address an alternative approach to energy efficient non-volatile spintronics through engineering of spin orbit interaction (SOC) and the use of spin orbit torque (SOT) by the use of electric field to improve further the energy efficiency of switching. I will first discuss the engineering of interface SOC, which results in the electric field control of magnetic moment or magneto-electric (ME) effect. Magnetic memory bits based on this ME effect, referred to as magnetoelectric RAM (MeRAM), is shown to have orders of magnitude lower energy dissipation compared with spin transfer torque memory (STTRAM). Likewise, interests in spin Hall as a result of SOC have led to many advances. Recent demonstrations of magnetization switching induced by in-plane current in heavy metal/ferromagnetic heterostructures have been shown to arise from the large SOC. The large SOC is also shown to give rise to the large SOT. Due to the presence of an intrinsic extraordinarily strong SOC and spin-momentum lock, topological insulators (TIs) are expected to be promising candidates for exploring spin-orbit torque (SOT)-related physics. In particular, we will show the magnetization switching in a chromium-doped magnetic TI bilayer heterostructure by charge current. A giant SOT of more than three orders of magnitude larger than those reported in heavy metals is also obtained. This large SOT is shown to come from the spin-momentum locked surface states of TI, which may further lead to innovative low power applications. I will also describe other related physics of SOC at the interface of anti-ferromagnetism/ferromagnetic structure and show the control exchange bias by electric field for high speed memory switching. The work was in part supported by ERFC-SHINES, NSF, ARO, TANMS, and FAME.

  1. Low-Thrust Transfers from Distant Retrograde Orbits to L2 Halo Orbits in the Earth-Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Nathan L.; Parker, Jeffrey S.; Hughes, Steven P.; Heiligers, Jennette

    2016-01-01

    Enable future missions Any mission to a DRO or halo orbit could benefit from the capability to transfer between these orbits Chemical propulsion could be used for these transfers, but at high propellant cost Fill gaps in knowledge A variety of transfers using SEP or solar sails have been studied for the Earth-Moon system Most results in literature study a single transfer This is a step toward understanding the wide array of types of transfers available in an N-body force model.

  2. Transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to a bound electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, Christian T.; Schulz, Jonas; Kaufmann, Henning; Ruster, Thomas; Poschinger, Ulrich G.; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-10-01

    Photons can carry angular momentum, not only due to their spin, but also due to their spatial structure. This extra twist has been used, for example, to drive circular motion of microscopic particles in optical tweezers as well as to create vortices in quantum gases. Here we excite an atomic transition with a vortex laser beam and demonstrate the transfer of optical orbital angular momentum to the valence electron of a single trapped ion. We observe strongly modified selection rules showing that an atom can absorb two quanta of angular momentum from a single photon: one from the spin and another from the spatial structure of the beam. Furthermore, we show that parasitic ac-Stark shifts from off-resonant transitions are suppressed in the dark centre of vortex beams. These results show how light's spatial structure can determine the characteristics of light-matter interaction and pave the way for its application and observation in other systems.

  3. Superfluid helium orbital resupply - The status of the SHOOT flight experiment and preliminary user requirements. [Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Kittel, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) flight experiment is designed to demonstrate the components and techniques necessary to resupply superfluid helium to satellites or Space Station based facilities. A top level description as well as the development status of the critical components to be used in SHOOT are discussed. Some of these components include the thermomechanical pump, the fluid acquisition system, the normal helium and superfluid helium phase separators, Venturi flow meter, cryogenic valves, burst disks, and astronaut-compatible EVA coupler and transfer line. The requirements for the control electronics and software are given. A preliminary description of the requirements that must be met by a satellite requiring superfluid helium servicing is given. In particular, minimum and optimum plumbing arrangements are shown, transfer line flow impedance and heat input impacts are assessed, instrumentation is described, and performance parameters are considered.

  4. Orbit-to-ground Wireless Power Transfer test mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsrud, C.; Noghanian, S.; Straub, J.; Whalen, D.; Fevig, R.

    Since the 1970s the concept of transferring power from orbit for use on Earth has had a great deal of consideration for future energy and environmental sustainability here on Earth. The cost, size and complexity of a production-grade system are extremely large, and have many environmental considerations. There has never been a publicly disclosed orbit-to-ground power transfer test mission. A proposed project provides an opportunity to test the conceptual operation of such a system, albeit at a much lower power level than the `grand' or `real scale' system. During this test, a small Solar Powered (SP) 6-U CubSat will be deployed into Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) (225 or 325 km) to collect and store 1 KW of power from solar energy as the satellite is orbiting. The goal is to transmit 1 KW of wireless power at a microwave frequency of 5.8 or 10 GHz to a ground antenna array system. This paper presents the architecture for the proposed mission and discusses the regulatory, legal, and environmental issues that such a mission poses. Furthermore, the gain of the transmitter is analyzed at 20 and 30 dB as well as the gain of the receiver is analyzed at 30, 40, and 50 dB. A SP 6-U CubeSat will have a Lithium Ion (LIon) battery capable of storing enough energy for 83.33 Whr charge to run the satellites controls, and 1 KW necessary for a 5-minute demonstration and test (in addition to power required for its own operational requirements). Once charged, the satellite will use highly accurate position and attitude knowledge provided by an onboard star-tracker, Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) and inertial measurement unit to determine the proper orientation for the power transfer test. The onboard Attitude Determination and Control (ADCS) will be utilized to achieve and maintain this orientation during the test period. A cold-gas propulsion system will be available to de-spin the reaction wheels to ensure that sufficient ADCS capabilities exist for attitude-stabilization use during

  5. Identification of Nilsson orbitals in the superdeformed minimum of {sup 237}Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Thomas James

    2008-03-31

    In this thesis, a spectroscopy experiment in the second minimum of the double humped fission barrier of {sup 237}Pu is presented, in which, for the first time, single - particle states for a neutron - rich shape isomer with odd neutron number were identified and characterised by their Nilsson quantum numbers. While rotational ({sup 236f}U and {sup 240f}Pu) and vibrational excitations ({sup 240f}Pu) had already been identified earlier in the even-even neighbouring nuclei, now the fission isomers in {sup 237}Pu (t{sub 1/2}=115 ns/1.12 {mu}s) were investigated in a {gamma}-spectroscopy experiment at the Cologne Tandem accelerator. Using the {sup 235}U({alpha},2n) reaction with a pulsed R beam, states in the second minimum were populated. Following the prompt decay of excited states into the ground states of the two shape isomers, the nucleus decays with its halflife, the resulting fission fragments were detected in a specially built 4{pi} parallel plate detector. The extremely rare isomeric {gamma} decays were measured in coincidence with the fission fragments using the highly efficient MINIBALL spectrometer. The background-subtracted {gamma}-ray spectrum was disentangled into contributions from the two shape isomers and 9 excited rotational bands were identified built on the ground states of the two isomers. The ground state spins of the two shape isomers were determined to be I=5/2 (115 ns isomer) and I=9/2 (1120 ns isomer). From the 149 identified {gamma} transitions, independent level schemes were constructed for the two fission isomers in {sup 237}Pu. The consistency of these level schemes was supported by the connecting {gamma} transitions between rotational bands. Furthermore, both level schemes could be combined to a common level scheme, in which the ground state of the long-lived 9/2 isomer was placed 54.0(3) keV above the ground state of the short-lived 5/2 isomer. The resulting level scheme was compared to Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov single

  6. Minimum Fuel Low-Thrust Transfers for Satellites Using a Permanent Magnet Hall Thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Carneiro Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the satellite missions require orbital maneuvers to accomplish its goals. An orbital maneuver is an operation where the orbit of a satellite is changed, usually applying a type of propulsion. The maneuvers may have several purposes, such as the transfer of a satellite to its final orbit, the interception of another spacecraft, or the adjustment of the orbit to compensate the shifts caused by external forces. In this situation it is essential to minimize the fuel consumption to allow a greater number of maneuvers to be performed, and thus the lifetime of the satellite can be extended. There are several papers and studies which aim at the fuel minimization in maneuvers performed by space vehicles. In this context, this paper has two goals: (i to develop an algorithm capable of finding optimal trajectories with continuous thrust that can fit different types of missions and constraints at the same time and (ii to study the performance of two propulsion devices for orbital maneuvers under development at the Universidade de Brasilia, including a study of the effects of the errors in magnitude of these new devices.

  7. Cost curves for the navigation between families of low energy Fast Periodic Transfer Orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular restricted Three Body Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, J. P.; Leiva, A. M.; Briozzo, C. B.

    Using characteristic curves of low energy fast periodic transfer orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular restricted three body problem we constructed cost curves that enable the study of maneuvers between them. In an appropiate surface of section the numerical diagrams show regions where transfer maneuvers involve lower costs and that would allow determine family members which make the propelent minimum for these maneuvers. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH.

  8. Optimal aeroassisted orbital transfer with plane change using collocation and nonlinear programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yun. Y.; Nelson, R. L.; Young, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    The fuel optimal control problem arising in the non-planar orbital transfer employing aeroassisted technology is addressed. The mission involves the transfer from high energy orbit (HEO) to low energy orbit (LEO) with orbital plane change. The basic strategy here is to employ a combination of propulsive maneuvers in space and aerodynamic maneuvers in the atmosphere. The basic sequence of events for the aeroassisted HEO to LEO transfer consists of three phases. In the first phase, the orbital transfer begins with a deorbit impulse at HEO which injects the vehicle into an elliptic transfer orbit with perigee inside the atmosphere. In the second phase, the vehicle is optimally controlled by lift and bank angle modulations to perform the desired orbital plane change and to satisfy heating constraints. Because of the energy loss during the turn, an impulse is required to initiate the third phase to boost the vehicle back to the desired LEO orbital altitude. The third impulse is then used to circularize the orbit at LEO. The problem is solved by a direct optimization technique which uses piecewise polynomial representation for the state and control variables and collocation to satisfy the differential equations. This technique converts the optimal control problem into a nonlinear programming problem which is solved numerically. Solutions were obtained for cases with and without heat constraints and for cases of different orbital inclination changes. The method appears to be more powerful and robust than other optimization methods. In addition, the method can handle complex dynamical constraints.

  9. Operationally optimal maneuver strategy for spacecraft injected into sub-geosynchronous transfer orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, B. S.; Singh, Satyendra; Negi, Kuldeep

    The GSAT-12 spacecraft is providing Communication services from the INSAT/GSAT system in the Indian region. The spacecraft carries 12 extended C-band transponders. GSAT-12 was launched by ISRO’s PSLV from Sriharikota, into a sub-geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (sub-GTO) of 284 x 21000 km with inclination 18 deg. This Mission successfully accomplished combined optimization of launch vehicle and satellite capabilities to maximize operational life of the s/c. This paper describes mission analysis carried out for GSAT-12 comprising launch window, orbital events study and orbit raising maneuver strategies considering various Mission operational constraints. GSAT-12 is equipped with two earth sensors (ES), three gyroscopes and digital sun sensor. The launch window was generated considering mission requirement of minimum 45 minutes of ES data for calibration of gyros with Roll-sun-pointing orientation in T.O. Since the T.O. period was a rather short 6.1 hr, required pitch biases were worked out to meet the gyro-calibration requirement. A 440 N Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) is used for orbit raising. The objective of the maneuver strategy is to achieve desired drift orbit satisfying mission constraints and minimizing propellant expenditure. In case of sub-GTO, the optimal strategy is to first perform an in-plane maneuver at perigee to raise the apogee to synchronous level and then perform combined maneuvers at the synchronous apogee to achieve desired drift orbit. The perigee burn opportunities were examined considering ground station visibility requirement for monitoring the burn. Two maneuver strategies were proposed: an optimal five-burn strategy with two perigee burns centered around perigee#5 and perigee#8 with partial ground station visibility and three apogee burns with dual station visibility, a near-optimal five-burn strategy with two off-perigee burns at perigee#5 and perigee#8 with single ground station visibility and three apogee burns with dual station visibility

  10. Minimum Number of Observation Points for LEO Satellite Orbit Estimation by OWL Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Maru; Jo, Jung Hyun; Cho, Sungki; Choi, Jin; Kim, Chun-Hwey; Park, Jang-Hyun; Yim, Hong-Suh; Choi, Young-Jun; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Bae, Young-Ho; Park, Sun-Youp; Kim, Ji-Hye; Roh, Dong-Goo; Jang, Hyun-Jung; Park, Young-Sik; Jeong, Min-Ji

    2015-12-01

    By using the Optical Wide-field Patrol (OWL) network developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) we generated the right ascension and declination angle data from optical observation of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. We performed an analysis to verify the optimum number of observations needed per arc for successful estimation of orbit. The currently functioning OWL observatories are located in Daejeon (South Korea), Songino (Mongolia), and Oukaïmeden (Morocco). The Daejeon Observatory is functioning as a test bed. In this study, the observed targets were Gravity Probe B, COSMOS 1455, COSMOS 1726, COSMOS 2428, SEASAT 1, ATV-5, and CryoSat-2 (all in LEO). These satellites were observed from the test bed and the Songino Observatory of the OWL network during 21 nights in 2014 and 2015. After we estimated the orbit from systematically selected sets of observation points (20, 50, 100, and 150) for each pass, we compared the difference between the orbit estimates for each case, and the Two Line Element set (TLE) from the Joint Space Operation Center (JSpOC). Then, we determined the average of the difference and selected the optimal observation points by comparing the average values.

  11. Effect of perturbations on debris-to-debris orbital transfers: A quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kartik; Hekma, Enne; Agrawal, Abhishek; Topputo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the applicability of the Lambert solver (Izzo, 2014) for preliminary design of Multi-Target Active Debris Removal missions. Firstly, we computed ≈25 million debris-to-debris transfers using the Lambert solver for selected sets of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit, Geostationary Transfer Orbit, and Geosynchronous Orbit. Subsequently, we propagated the departure states of the Lambert transfers below selected ΔV cut-offs using the SGP4/SDP4 propagator (Vallado et al., 2006). We recorded the arrival position and velocity error vectors incurred by neglecting perturbations and analyzed the results for each orbital regime. Our results indicate that perturbations can play a significant role in determining the feasibility of debris-to-debris transfers. By using the Lambert solver and neglecting perturbations, the errors in the arrival position and velocity for individual legs can be large. The largest errors were obtained for transfers between debris objects in Sun-Synchronous Orbit (O (100) km error in magnitude of position vector and O (0.1) km/s error in magnitude of velocity vector). Hence, solely employing the Lambert solver to rank transfer legs could lead to incorrect choices for sequencing of multi-target trajectories. This is particularly relevant for transfers in Low Earth Orbit, where the effects of perturbations are the strongest.

  12. Low-Thrust Transfer Design of Low-Observable Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Hua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With radar and surface-to-air missiles posing an increasing threat to on-orbit spacecraft, low-observable satellites play an important role in low-thrust transfers. This paper presents the design for a low-thrust geostationary earth orbit (GEO transfer control strategy which takes into consideration the low-observable constraint and discusses Earth shadow and perturbation. A control parameter optimization addresses the orbit transfer problem, and five thrust modes are used. Simulation results show that the method outlined in this paper is simple and feasible and results in reduced transfer time with a small amount of calculation. The method therefore offers a useful reference for low-thrust GEO transfer design.

  13. Transfer of orbital angular momentum through sub-wavelength waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqin; Ma, Xiaoliang; Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Zhao, Bo; Cui, Jianhua; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-02-01

    Data capacity of optical communication is achieving its limit owing to the non-linear effect of optical fiber. As an effective alternative, light carrying orbital angular momentum can greatly increase the capacity for its unprecedented degree of freedom. We demonstrate the propagation of orbital angular momentum with topological charge of 1 and 2 in plasmonic circular waveguide with sub-wavelength diameter with little propagation loss of 2.73 dB/μm, which has never been observed in optical fibers with sub-wavelength diameter. We also confirm that lights carrying orbital angular momentum can be maintained in sharp bended sub-wavelength waveguide. This plasmonic waveguide may serve as a key component in on-chip systems involving OAM.

  14. Low-Thrust Orbital Transfers in the Two-Body Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sukhanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-thrust transfers between given orbits within the two-body problem are considered; the thrust is assumed power limited. A simple method for obtaining the transfer trajectories based on the linearization of the motion near reference orbits is suggested. Required calculation accuracy can be reached by means of use of a proper number of the reference orbits. The method may be used in the case of a large number of the orbits around the attracting center; no averaging is necessary in this case. The suggested method also is applicable to the cases of partly given final orbit and if there are constraints on the thrust direction. The method gives an optimal solution to the linearized problem which is not optimal for the original nonlinear problem; the difference between the optimal solutions to the original and linearized problems is estimated using a numerical example. Also examples illustrating the method capacities are given.

  15. Lyapunov-based Low-thrust Optimal Orbit Transfer: An approach in Cartesian coordinates

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hantian; Cao, Qingjie

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a simple approach to low-thrust optimal-fuel and optimal-time transfer problems between two elliptic orbits using the Cartesian coordinates system. In this case, an orbit is described by its specific angular momentum and Laplace vectors with a free injection point. Trajectory optimization with the pseudospectral method and nonlinear programming are supported by the initial guess generated from the Chang-Chichka-Marsden Lyapunov-based transfer controller. This approach successfully solves several low-thrust optimal problems. Numerical results show that the Lyapunov-based initial guess overcomes the difficulty in optimization caused by the strong oscillation of variables in the Cartesian coordinates system. Furthermore, a comparison of the results shows that obtaining the optimal transfer solution through the polynomial approximation by utilizing Cartesian coordinates is easier than using orbital elements, which normally produce strongly nonlinear equations of motion. In this paper, the Eart...

  16. Transferring orbital and spin angular momenta of light to atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picon, A; Benseny, A; Mompart, J [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Vazquez de Aldana, J R; Plaja, L [Servicio Laser, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Calvo, G F [Mathematics Department and IMACI-Institute of Applied Mathematics in Science and Engineering, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Roso, L, E-mail: antonio.picon@uab.ca [Centro de Laseres Pulsados, CLPU, Patio de Escuelas 1, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Light beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), such as Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams, give rise to the violation of the standard dipolar selection rules during interaction with matter, yielding, in general, an exchange of angular momentum larger than {h_bar} per absorbed photon. By means of ab initio three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations, we investigate in detail the interaction of a hydrogen atom with intense Gaussian and LG light pulses. We analyze the dependence of the angular momentum exchange with the polarization, the OAM and the carrier-envelope phase of light, as well as with the relative position between the atom and the light vortex. In addition, a quantum-trajectory approach based on the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics is used to gain physical insight into the absorption of angular momentum by the hydrogen atom.

  17. Synergetic plane-change capability of a conceptual aeromaneuvering-orbital-transfer vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menees, Gene P.; Wilson, John F.; Adelman, Henry G.

    1987-01-01

    The flight strategy for a general low-earth orbit plane-change is analyzed for a conceptual, high-lift, aeromaneuvering-orbital-transfer vehicle, and applied to the important case of the 45 deg plane-inclination change. The study focuses on two principal methods: (1) the procedure to obtain a change in the inclination of the vehicle's orbital plane, and (2) the full rendezvous procedure. Optimal trajectories for minimal propellant use during the synergetic aerotransit are developed, which incorporate best estimates of constraints imposed by reusable thermal-protection requirements and human tolerance to g-load levels. The performance capability for one-way payload delivery to the target orbit is analyzed in detail and the capability for return to the base orbit demonstrated.

  18. Optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from plasmonic vortex lens to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Yang, Haifang; Xu, Xiangang; Wang, Zhengping; Petrov, V; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-11-12

    We demonstrate the optical orbital angular momentum conservation during the transfer process from subwavelength plasmonic vortex lens (PVLs) to light and the generating process of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Illuminating plasmonic vortex lenses with beams carrying optical orbital angular momentum, the SP vortices with orbital angular momentum were generated and inherit the optical angular momentum of light beams and PVLs. The angular momentum of twisting SP electromagnetic field is tunable by the twisted metal/dielectric interfaces of PVLs and angular momentum of illuminating singular light. This work may open the door for several possible applications of SP vortices in subwavelength region.

  19. Nitrogen Transfer from Cover Crop Residues to Onion Grown under Minimum Tillage in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoncio de Paula Koucher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nitrogen derived from cover crop residues may contribute to the nutrition of onion grown under minimum tillage (MT and cultivated in rotation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the N transferred from different cover crop residues to the onion crop cultivated under MT in southern Brazil. In June 2014, oilseed radish, black oat, and oilseed radish + black oat residues labeled with 15N were deposited on the soil surface before transplanting onions. During the growth season and at harvest, young expanded onion leaves, complete plants, and samples from different soil layers were collected and analyzed for recovery of 15N-labeled residue. Oilseed radish decomposed faster than other residues and 4 % of residue N was recovered in leaves and bulbs at harvest, but in general, N in plant organs was derived from sources other than the cover crop residues. In addition, leaf N was in the proper range for all treatments and was adequately mobilized to the bases for bulbing. The N derived from decomposing residues contributed little to onion development and the use of these plants should be chosen based on their advantages for physical and biological soil quality.

  20. Maximum orbit plane change with heat-transfer-rate considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. Y.; Hull, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    Two aerodynamic maneuvers are considered for maximizing the plane change of a circular orbit: gliding flight with a maximum thrust segment to regain lost energy (aeroglide) and constant altitude cruise with the thrust being used to cancel the drag and maintain a high energy level (aerocruise). In both cases, the stagnation heating rate is limited. For aeroglide, the controls are the angle of attack, the bank angle, the time at which the burn begins, and the length of the burn. For aerocruise, the maneuver is divided into three segments: descent, cruise, and ascent. During descent the thrust is zero, and the controls are the angle of attack and the bank angle. During cruise, the only control is the assumed-constant angle of attack. During ascent, a maximum thrust segment is used to restore lost energy, and the controls are the angle of attack and bank angle. The optimization problems are solved with a nonlinear programming code known as GRG2. Numerical results for the Maneuverable Re-entry Research Vehicle with a heating-rate limit of 100 Btu/ft(2)-s show that aerocruise gives a maximum plane change of 2 deg, which is only 1 deg larger than that of aeroglide. On the other hand, even though aerocruise requires two thrust levels, the cruise characteristics of constant altitude, velocity, thrust, and angle of attack are easy to control.

  1. Orbit Transfers for Dawn's Vesta Operations : Navigation and Mission Design Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongsuk

    2012-01-01

    Dawn, a mission belonging to NASA's Discovery Program, was launched on September 27, 2007 to explore main belt asteroids in order to yield insights into important questions about the formation and evolution of the solar system. From July of 2011 to August of 2012, the Dawn spacecraft successfully returned valuable science data, collected during the four planned mapping orbits at its first target asteroid, Vesta. Each mapping orbit was designed to enable a different set of scientific observations. Such a mission would have been impossible without the low thrust ion propulsion system (IPS). Maneuvering a spacecraft using only the IPS for the transfers between the mapping orbits posed many technical challenges to Dawn's flight team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Each transfer needs a robust plan that accounts for uncertainties in maneuver execution, orbit determination, and physical characteristics of Vesta. This paper discusses the mission design and navigational experience during Dawn's Vesta operations. Topics include requirements and constraints from Dawn's science and spacecraft teams, orbit determination and maneuver design and building process for transfers, developing timelines for thrust sequence build cycles, and the process of scheduling very demanding coverage with ground antennae at NASA's Deep Space Network.

  2. Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2008-01-01

    This is the first book of the satellite era which describes orbit theory with analytical solutions of the second order with respect to all possible disturbances. Based on such theory, the algorithms of orbits determination are completely revolutionized.

  3. The role of solar apsidal resonance in the evolution of geostationary transfer orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Gurfil, Pini

    2017-04-01

    Subjected to multiple perturbations and their complex interplay, the dynamical evolution of geostationary transfer orbits (GTOs) is sensitive to initial conditions and model parameters. As one of the most remarkable outcomes of multiple perturbations, the solar apsidal resonance, i.e., the 1:1 resonance between the solar orbital motion and the rotation of the orbital apsidal line caused by Earth's oblateness, is an important feature of the GTO evolution. It occurs when the semi-major axis is reduced by the atmospheric drag to the critical value, with which the rotation of the orbital apsidal line is commensurate with the solar orbital motion. In the present paper, we show that the solar apsidal resonance plays an important role in the evolution and decay of GTOs. To do so, we first explain the underlying dynamical mechanism of the solar apsidal resonance, which is the U-turn of the solar azimuth with respect to the orbital apsidal line and the resulting monotonic increase or decrease of the eccentricity. The resonance is then classified into three kinds, and their causes and effects are analyzed. Previous studies have regarded the solar apsidal resonance as a mechanism extending the orbital lifetime. However, we find that in most cases the GTO will re-enter Earth's atmosphere soon or only several years after the resonance, and so the solar apsidal resonance can be regarded as the prelude to the GTO final re-entry. Finally, the sensitivity of orbital dynamics is studied through numerical simulations. It is shown that the high sensitivity of the dynamics can be attributed to the resonance, which is difficult to predict or manage. With the initial state, it is possible to predict the orbit evolution of GTO only before the solar apsidal resonance. To predict the lifetime of GTO, new measurements on the orbit after the resonance are required.

  4. Effect of element size on the solution accuracies of finite-element heat transfer and thermal stress analyses of space shuttle orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.; Olona, Timothy

    1987-01-01

    The effect of element size on the solution accuracies of finite-element heat transfer and thermal stress analyses of space shuttle orbiter was investigated. Several structural performance and resizing (SPAR) thermal models and NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) structural models were set up for the orbiter wing midspan bay 3. The thermal model was found to be the one that determines the limit of finite-element fineness because of the limitation of computational core space required for the radiation view factor calculations. The thermal stresses were found to be extremely sensitive to a slight variation of structural temperature distributions. The minimum degree of element fineness required for the thermal model to yield reasonably accurate solutions was established. The radiation view factor computation time was found to be insignificant compared with the total computer time required for the SPAR transient heat transfer analysis.

  5. Space-to-Space Power Beaming Enabling High Performance Rapid Geocentric Orbit Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Vassallo, Corinne; Tadge, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The use of electric propulsion is more prevalent than ever, with industry pursuing all electric orbit transfers. Electric propulsion provides high mass utilization through efficient propellant transfer. However, the transfer times become detrimental as the delta V transitions from near-impulsive to low-thrust. Increasing power and therefore thrust has diminishing returns as the increasing mass of the power system limits the potential acceleration of the spacecraft. By using space-to-space power beaming, the power system can be decoupled from the spacecraft and allow significantly higher spacecraft alpha (W/kg) and therefore enable significantly higher accelerations while maintaining high performance. This project assesses the efficacy of space-to-space power beaming to enable rapid orbit transfer while maintaining high mass utilization. Concept assessment requires integrated techniques for low-thrust orbit transfer steering laws, efficient large-scale rectenna systems, and satellite constellation configuration optimization. This project includes the development of an integrated tool with implementation of IPOPT, Q-Law, and power-beaming models. The results highlight the viability of the concept, limits and paths to infusion, and comparison to state-of-the-art capabilities. The results indicate the viability of power beaming for what may be the only approach for achieving the desired transit times with high specific impulse.

  6. Trajectory and Correction Maneuver During the Transfer from Earth to Halo Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ming; Xu Shijie

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the design of the trajectory transferring fi'om Earth to Halo orbit,and proposes a timing closed-loop strategy of correction maneuver during the trausfer in the frame of circular restricted three body problem (CR3BP).The relation between the Floquet multipliers and the magnitudes of Halo orbit is established,so that the suitable magnitude for the aerospace mission is chosen in previous researches,and six types of single-impulse transfer trajectories are attained from the geometry of the invariant manifolds.Based on one of the trajectories of indirect transfer which arc ignored in the most of literatures,the stochastic control theory for imperfect information of the discrete linear stochastic system is applied to design the trajectory correction maneuver.The statistical dispersion analysis is performed by Monte-Carlo simulation.

  7. Low-thrust orbit transfer optimization with refined Q-law and multi-objective genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwon; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.; von Allmen, Paul

    2005-01-01

    An optimization method for low-thrust orbit transfers around a central body is developed using the Q-law and a multi-objective genetic algorithm. in the hybrid method, the Q-law generates candidate orbit transfers, and the multi-objective genetic algorithm optimizes the Q-law control parameters in order to simultaneously minimize both the consumed propellant mass and flight time of the orbit tranfer. This paper addresses the problem of finding optimal orbit transfers for low-thrust spacecraft.

  8. Coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control for an electric sail in a heliocentric transfer mission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingying Huo

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control of an electric-sail-based spacecraft in a heliocentric transfer mission. The mathematical model characterizing the propulsive thrust is first described as a function of the orbital radius and the sail angle. Since the solar wind dynamic pressure acceleration is induced by the sail attitude, the orbital and attitude dynamics of electric sails are coupled, and are discussed together. Based on the coupled equations, the flight control is investigated, wherein the orbital control is studied in an optimal framework via a hybrid optimization method and the attitude controller is designed based on feedback linearization control. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, a transfer problem from Earth to Mars is considered. The numerical results show that the proposed strategy can control the coupled system very well, and a small control torque can control both the attitude and orbit. The study in this paper will contribute to the theory study and application of electric sail.

  9. Coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control for an electric sail in a heliocentric transfer mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Mingying; Zhao, Jun; Xie, Shaobiao; Qi, Naiming

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control of an electric-sail-based spacecraft in a heliocentric transfer mission. The mathematical model characterizing the propulsive thrust is first described as a function of the orbital radius and the sail angle. Since the solar wind dynamic pressure acceleration is induced by the sail attitude, the orbital and attitude dynamics of electric sails are coupled, and are discussed together. Based on the coupled equations, the flight control is investigated, wherein the orbital control is studied in an optimal framework via a hybrid optimization method and the attitude controller is designed based on feedback linearization control. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, a transfer problem from Earth to Mars is considered. The numerical results show that the proposed strategy can control the coupled system very well, and a small control torque can control both the attitude and orbit. The study in this paper will contribute to the theory study and application of electric sail.

  10. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Yavorsky, M. A. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Universite Bordeaux and CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, FR-33400 Talence (France)

    2011-12-15

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  11. Transfer Maneuvers Between Periodic Earth-Moon Orbits Using Stable an Unstable Manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, J. P.; Leiva, A. M.; Briozzo, C. B.

    In this paper we have determined the stable and unstable manifold of six unstable periodic orbits (h=-1,586656) in an appropriate surface of section in the Earth-Moon coplanar circular restricted three body problem. The cost diagrams give account of a low transfer tax on using this technique and they would allow to determine the lower cost regions in order to apply the required propellent in each maneuver. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  12. Catalytic surface effect on ceramic coatings for an aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, D. A.; Leiser, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Surface catalytic efficiencies of glassy coatings were determined from a reaction boundary layer computation and arc-jet data. The catalytic efficiencies of the various coatings examined are discussed in terms of their reaction-rate constants. These constants are a function of the wall temperature (1290 K to 2000 K). In addition, the advantage of a thermal protection system for a bent biconic, aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle with a low surface catalytic efficiency is discussed.

  13. Understanding Spacecraft Agility for Orbit Transfers on the Dawn Low-thrust Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brett A.; Vanelli, C. Anthony; Lee, Allan Y.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional maneuver design processes were inadequate. Long thrusting durations with the small force of SEP. Increased coupling between ACS and NAV teams. Definition of quantifiable constraints proved impractical. Specifically for the Dawn mission, because of the attitude steering algorithm. A time-efficient simulation tool, qSTAT, was developed and allowed fast verification of candidate thrust profile designs. This approach allowed Dawn to overcome the complications of low-thrust orbit transfers.

  14. Thrust vector control of upper stage with a gimbaled thruster during orbit transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Jia, Yinghong; Jin, Lei; Duan, Jiajia

    2016-10-01

    In launching Multi-Satellite with One-Vehicle, the main thruster provided by the upper stage is mounted on a two-axis gimbal. During orbit transfer, the thrust vector of this gimbaled thruster (GT) should theoretically pass through the mass center of the upper stage and align with the command direction to provide orbit transfer impetus. However, it is hard to be implemented from the viewpoint of the engineering mission. The deviations of the thrust vector from the command direction would result in large velocity errors. Moreover, the deviations of the thrust vector from the upper stage mass center would produce large disturbance torques. This paper discusses the thrust vector control (TVC) of the upper stage during its orbit transfer. Firstly, the accurate nonlinear coupled kinematic and dynamic equations of the upper stage body, the two-axis gimbal and the GT are derived by taking the upper stage as a multi-body system. Then, a thrust vector control system consisting of the special attitude control of the upper stage and the gimbal rotation of the gimbaled thruster is proposed. The special attitude control defined by the desired attitude that draws the thrust vector to align with the command direction when the gimbal control makes the thrust vector passes through the upper stage mass center. Finally, the validity of the proposed method is verified through numerical simulations.

  15. Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer Satellite (COLD-SAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, John R.; Russ, Edwin J.; Wachter, Joseph P.

    1990-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer Satellite (COLD-SAT) will perform subcritical liquid hydrogen handling experiments under low gravity conditions to provide engineering data for future space transportation missions. Comprising the four Class 1 enabling experiments are tank press control, tank chilldown, tank no-vent fill, and liquid acquisition device fill/refill. The nine Class 2 enhancing experiments are tanker thermal performance, pressurization, low-gravity setting and outflow, liquid acquisition device performance, transfer line chilldown, outflow subcooling, low-gravity vented fill, fluid dumping, and advanced instrumentation. Consisting of an experiment module mated to a spacecraft bus, COLD-SAT will be placed in an initial 1300 km circular orbit by an Atlas commercial launch vehicle, and will perform experiments in a semi-autonomous mode for a period of up to six months. The three-axis controlled spacecraft bus provides electric power, control and data management, communications, and attitude control along with propulsive acceleration levels ranging from 10(exp -6) to 10(exp -4) g. It is desired to understand the effects that low acceleration levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved in some of the experiments. The experiment module contains the three liquid hydrogen tanks, valves, pressurization and pumping equipment, and instrumentation. Within the highly insulated tanks are specialized fluid management equipment that might be used in future space transportation systems. At launch all the liquid hydrogen for the experiments is contained in the largest tank, which has helium-purged insulation to prevent cryo-pumping of air on the launch pad. The tank is loaded by the hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas. After reaching orbit the two smaller tanks become receivers for fluid transfers, and when tanked, become the vessels for performing many of the experiments.

  16. Evaluation of minimum coverage size and orbital accuracy at different orbital regimes for one order of magnitude reduction of the catastrophic collision risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Domínguez-González, Raúl; Krag, Holger

    2015-03-01

    One of the main objectives of Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) systems is to support space collision avoidance activities. This collision avoidance capability aims to significantly reduce the catastrophic collision risk of space objects. In particular, for the case of the future European SST, the objective is translated into a risk reduction of one order of magnitude whilst keeping a low number of false alarm events. In order to translate this aim into system requirements, an evaluation of the current catastrophic collision risk for different orbital regimes is addressed. The reduction of such risk depends on the amount of catalogued objects (coverage) and the knowledge of the associated orbits in the catalogue (accuracy). This paper presents an analysis of the impact of those two aspects in the capability to reduce the catastrophic collision risk at some orbital regimes. A reliable collision avoidance support depends on the accuracy of the predicted miss-events. The assessment of possible conjunctions is normally done by computing the estimated miss-distances between objects (which is compared with a defined distance threshold) or by computing the associated collision risk (which is compared with the corresponding accepted collision probability level). This second method is normally recommended because it takes into account the reliability of the orbits and allows reducing false alarm events. The collision risk depends on the estimated miss-distance, the object sizes and the accuracy of the two orbits at the time of event. This accuracy depends on the error of the orbits at the orbit determination epoch and the error derived from the propagation from that epoch up to the time of event. The modified DRAMA ARES (Domínguez-González et al., 2012, 2013a,b; Gelhaus et al., 2014) provides information on the expected number of encounters for a given mission and year. It also provides information on the capacity to reduce the risk of collision by means of avoidance

  17. Shuttle and Transfer Orbit Thermal Analysis and Testing of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory CCD Imaging Spectrometer Radiator Shades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Contents include the following: (1) Introduction: Chandra X-ray observatory. Advanced CCD imaging spectrometer. (2) LEO and transfer orbit analyses: Geometric modeling in TSS w/specularity. Low earth orbital heating calculations. (3) Thermal testing and LMAC. (4) Problem solving. (5) VDA overcoat analyses. (6) VDA overcoat testing and MSFC. (7) Post-MSFC test evaluation.

  18. Shape similarity of charge-transfer (CT) excitation energy curves in a series of donor-acceptor complexes and its description with a transferable energy of CT orbital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-08-01

    A simple nature of charge-transfer (CT) in the prototype complexes Dp -F2 (Dp =NH3 , H2O) manifests itself in a very close shape of their CT excitation energy curves ωCT (R) along the donor-acceptor separation R. It affords a simple orbital description in terms of the CT orbitals (CTOs) obtained with a transformation of the virtual orbitals of the standard local density approximation (LDA). The transferable energy of the relevant CTO as a function of R closely approximates the common shape of ωCT (R) , while the height of the individual curve is determined with the ionization potential of Dp .

  19. Optical and thermal characterization of membrane reflector materials for solar orbit transfer vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Gregory D.; McGee, Jennie K.; Partch, Russell; Lester, Dean M.

    2002-01-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), is advancing technologies to enable greater mobility for future AF spacecraft. The Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicle (SOTV) program is developing components for a concept based on a solar thermal rocket and solar thermal power generation. The program is performing ground testing of a thin film membrane concentrator concept. To better understand system performance, a series of optical characterization tests of the membrane material were performed. The objective was to quantify the relationship between membrane optical properties and the concentrator on-orbit transmission performance and thermal profile. During testing we collected reflectivity, absorptivity, transmissivity, and emissivity data for un-coated and coated membrane material. The membrane material tested was fabricated using a flight-qualified polyimide material and proven manufacturing processes. The test results, and system thermal analysis are presented in this paper. The results of this research will be used to refine hardware performance predictions and improve sizing for flight demonstration. .

  20. Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation in low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Akopova, A. B.; Magradze, N. V.; Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Integral linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of cosmic radiation (CR) particles were measured on five Cosmos series spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO). Particular emphasis is placed on results of the Cosmos 1887 biosatellite which carried a set of joint U.S.S.R.-U.S.A. radiation experiments involving passive detectors that included thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's), plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's), fission foils, nuclear photo-emulsions, etc. which were located both inside and outside the spacecraft. Measured LET spectra are compared with those theoretically calculated. Results show that there is some dependence of LET spectra on orbital parameters. The results are used to estimate the CR quality factor (QF) for the COSMOS 1887 mission.

  1. Studies on fluid dynamics of the flow field and gas transfer in orbitally shaken tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Kuan; Song, Bo-Yan; Wang, Zhen-Long; Monteil, Dominique T; Shen, Xiao; Hacker, David L; De Jesus, Maria; Wurm, Florian M

    2017-01-01

    Orbitally shaken cylindrical bioreactors [OrbShake bioreactors (OSRs)] without an impeller or sparger are increasingly being used for the suspension cultivation of mammalian cells. Among small volume OSRs, 50-mL tubes with a ventilated cap (OSR50), originally derived from standard laboratory centrifuge tubes with a conical bottom, have found many applications including high-throughput screening for the optimization of cell cultivation conditions. To better understand the fluid dynamics and gas transfer rates at the liquid surface in OSR50, we established a three-dimensional simulation model of the unsteady liquid forms (waves) in this vessel. The studies verified that the operating conditions have a large effect on the interfacial surface. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kL a) was determined experimentally and from simulations under various working conditions. We also determined the liquid-phase mass transfer coefficient (kL ) and the specific interfacial area (a) under different conditions to demonstrate that the value of a affected the gas transfer rate more than did the value of kL . High oxygen transfer rates, sufficient for supporting the high-density culture of mammalian cells, were found. Finally, the average axial velocity of the liquid was identified to be an important parameter for maintaining cells in suspension. Overall these studies provide valuable insights into the preferable operating conditions for the OSR50, such as those needed for cell cultures requiring high oxygen levels. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:192-200, 2017.

  2. Charge efficiency of Ni/H2 cells during transfer orbit of Telstar 4 satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, W. C.; Maurer, Dean W.; Vyas, B.; Thomas, M. N.

    1994-02-01

    The TELSTAR 4 communication satellites being manufactured by Martin Marietta Astro Space (Astro Space) for AT&T are three axis stabilized spacecraft scheduled to be launched on expendable vehicles such as the Atlas or Ariane rockets. Typically, these spacecraft consist of a box that holds the electronics and supports the antenna reflectors and the solar array wings. The wings and reflectors are folded against the sides of the box during launch and the spacecraft is spun for attitude control in that phase; they are then deployed after achieving the final orbit. The launch phase and transfer orbits required to achieve the final geosynchronous orbit typically take 4 to 5 days during which time the power required for command, telemetry, attitude control, heaters, etc., is provided by two 50 AH nickel hydrogen batteries augmented by the exposed outboard solar panels. In the past, this situation has presented no problem since there was a considerable excess of power available from the array. In the case of large high powered spacecraft such as TELSTAR 4, however, the design power levels in transfer orbit approach the time-averaged power available from the exposed surface area of the solar arrays, resulting in a very tight power margin. To compound the difficulty, the array output of the spinning spacecraft in transfer orbit is shaped like a full wave rectified sine function and provides very low charging rates to the batteries during portions of the rotation. In view of the typically low charging efficiency of alkaline nickel batteries at low rates, it was decided to measure the efficiency during a simulation of the TELSTAR 4 conditions at the expected power levels and temperatures on three nickel hydrogen cells of similar design. The unique feature of nickel hydrogen cells that makes the continuous measurement of efficiency possible is that hydrogen is one of the active materials and thus, cell pressure is a direct measure of the state of charge or available capacity

  3. Orbital localization, charge transfer, and band gaps in semilocal density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armiento, R; Kümmel, S

    2013-07-19

    We derive an exchange energy functional of generalized gradient form with a corresponding potential that changes discontinuously at integer particle numbers. The functional is semilocal, yet incorporates key features that are connected to the derivative discontinuity of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. We validate our construction for several paradigm systems and explain how it addresses central well-known deficiencies of antecedent semilocal methods, i.e., the description of charge transfer, properly localized orbitals, and band gaps. We find, e.g., an improved shell structure for atoms, eigenvalues that more closely correspond to ionization energies, and an improved description of band structure where localized states are lowered in energy.

  4. Topological charge transfer in frequency doubling of fractional orbital angular momentum state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, R.; Niu, Y. F.; Du, L.; Hu, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear frequency conversion is promising for manipulating photons with orbital angular momentum (OAM). In this letter, we investigate the second harmonic generation (SHG) of light beams carrying fractional OAM. By measuring the OAM components of the generated second harmonic (SH) waves, we find that the integer components of the fundamental beam will interact with each other during the nonlinear optical process; thus, we figure out the law for topological charge transfer in frequency doubling of the fractional OAM state. Theoretical predictions by solving the nonlinear coupled wave equations are consistent with the experimental results.

  5. The minimum heat consumption for heat-driven binary separation processes with linear phenomenological heat transfer law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU LiWei; CHEN LinGen; SUN FengRui

    2009-01-01

    The optimal performance of heat-driven binary separation processes with linear phenomenological heat transfer law(q∝△(T-1))is analyzed by taking the processes as heat engines which work between high-and low-temperature reservoirs and produce enthalpy and energy flows out of the system,and the temperatures of the heat reservoirs are assumed to be time-and space-variables.A numerical method is employed to solve convex optimization problem and Lagrangian function is employed to solve the average optimal control problem.The dimensionless entropy production rate coefficient and dimensionless enthalpy flow rate coefficient are adopted to indicate the major influence factors on the performance of the separation process,such as the properties of different materials and various separation requirements for the separation process.The dimensionless minimum average entropy production rate and dimensionless minimum average heat consumption of the heat-driven binary separation processes are obtained.The obtained results are compared with those obtained with the Newtonian heat transfer law(q∝△(T)).

  6. The minimum heat consumption for heat-driven binary separation processes with linear phenomenological heat transfer law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The optimal performance of heat-driven binary separation processes with linear phenomenological heat transfer law(q∝△(T-1)) is analyzed by taking the processes as heat engines which work between high-and low-temperature reservoirs and produce enthalpy and energy flows out of the system,and the temperatures of the heat reservoirs are assumed to be time-and space-variables.A numerical method is employed to solve convex optimization problem and Lagrangian function is employed to solve the average optimal control problem.The dimensionless entropy production rate coefficient and dimensionless enthalpy flow rate coefficient are adopted to indicate the major influence factors on the performance of the separation process,such as the properties of different materials and various separation requirements for the separation process.The dimensionless minimum average entropy production rate and dimensionless minimum average heat consumption of the heat-driven binary separation processes are obtained.The obtained results are compared with those obtained with the Newtonian heat transfer law(q∝△(T)).

  7. Electron-impact vibrational excitation rates in the flow field of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.-H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the vibrational excitation rate processes expected in the flow field of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs). An analysis of the multiple-quantum vibrational excitation processes by electron impact is made to predict the vibrational excitation cross sections, rate coefficients, and relaxation times which control vibrational temperature. The expression for the rate of electron-vibration energy transfer is derived by solving the system of master equations which account for the multiple-level transitions. The vibrational excitation coefficients, which are the prerequisite physical quantities in solving the obtained vibrational equation, are calculated based on the theoretically predicted cross sections. These cross sections are obtained from quantum mechanical calculations, based on the concept that vibrational excitation of molecules by electron impact occurs through formation of an intermediate negative ion state. Finally, the modified Landau-Teller-type rate equation, which is suitable for the numerical calculations for the AOTV flow fields, is suggested.

  8. Beyond frontier molecular orbital theory: a systematic electron transfer model (ETM) for polar bimolecular organic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Katharine J; Johnson, Richard P

    2013-03-01

    Polar bimolecular reactions often begin as charge-transfer complexes and may proceed with a high degree of electron transfer character. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory is predicated in part on this concept. We have developed an electron transfer model (ETM) in which we systematically transfer one electron between reactants and then use density functional methods to model the resultant radical or radical ion intermediates. Sites of higher reactivity are revealed by a composite spin density map (SDM) of odd electron character on the electron density surface, assuming that a new two-electron bond would occur preferentially at these sites. ETM correctly predicts regio- and stereoselectivity for a broad array of reactions, including Diels-Alder, dipolar and ketene cycloadditions, Birch reduction, many types of nucleophilic additions, and electrophilic addition to aromatic rings and polyenes. Conformational analysis of radical ions is often necessary to predict reaction stereochemistry. The electronic and geometric changes due to one-electron oxidation or reduction parallel the reaction coordinate for electrophilic or nucleophilic addition, respectively. The effect is more dramatic for one-electron reduction.

  9. The transfer function method for gear system dynamics applied to conventional and minimum excitation gearing designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A transfer function method for predicting the dynamic responses of gear systems with more than one gear mesh is developed and applied to the NASA Lewis four-square gear fatigue test apparatus. Methods for computing bearing-support force spectra and temporal histories of the total force transmitted by a gear mesh, the force transmitted by a single pair of teeth, and the maximum root stress in a single tooth are developed. Dynamic effects arising from other gear meshes in the system are included. A profile modification design method to minimize the vibration excitation arising from a pair of meshing gears is reviewed and extended. Families of tooth loading functions required for such designs are developed and examined for potential excitation of individual tooth vibrations. The profile modification design method is applied to a pair of test gears.

  10. Influence of radiant energy exchange on the determination of convective heat transfer rates to Orbiter leeside surfaces during entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throckmorton, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Temperatures measured at the aerodynamic surface of the Orbiter's thermal protection system (TPS), and calorimeter measurements, are used to determine heating rates to the TPS surface during atmospheric entry. On the Orbiter leeside, where convective heating rates are low, it is possible that a significant portion of the total energy input may result from solar radiation, and for the wing, cross radiation from the hot (relatively) Orbiter fuselage. In order to account for the potential impact of these sources, values of solar- and cross-radiation heat transfer are computed, based upon vehicle trajectory and attitude information and measured surface temperatures. Leeside heat-transfer data from the STS-2 mission are presented, and the significance of solar radiation and fuselage-to-wing cross-radiation contributions to total energy input to Orbiter leeside surfaces is assessed.

  11. Lab tests of a thermomechanical pump for shoot. [Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael J.; Boyle, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory tests of a thermomechanical (TM) pump utilizing a commercially available porous disk have been conducted. Various size disks, heater configurations, and outlet flow impedances have been used to characterize scale models of the pump proposed for the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) Flight Experiment. The results yield the scalability of the TM pump to larger diameters, and hence larger pumping rates, the dependence of flow rate on back pressure and heater power, and the limits of pumping speed due to internal losses within the porous disk due to mutual and superfluid friction. Analysis indicates that for low back pressures the flow rate is limited by the superfluid friction rather than the mutual friction. For the porous plug used in the early tests this amounts to a practical limit of 4.4 liters per hour per square centimeter. For a baselined flight plug area of 180 sq cm this yields 790 liters per hour.

  12. Solution accuracies of finite element reentry heat transfer and thermal stress analyses of Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Accuracies of solutions (structural temperatures and thermal stresses) obtained from different thermal and structural FEMs set up for the Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO) are compared and discussed. For studying the effect of element size on the solution accuracies of heat-transfer and thermal-stress analyses of the SSO, five SPAR thermal models and five NASTRAN structural models were set up for wing midspan bay 3. The structural temperature distribution over the wing skin (lower and upper) surface of one bay was dome shaped and induced more severe thermal stresses in the chordwise direction than in the spanwise direction. The induced thermal stresses were extremely sensitive to slight variation in structural temperature distributions. Both internal convention and internal radiation were found to have equal effects on the SSO.

  13. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Outer Planet Orbital Transfer and Lander Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and deuterium can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and deuterium were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. Analyses of orbital transfer vehicles (OTVs), landers, and the issues with in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) mining factories are included. Preliminary observations are presented on near-optimal selections of moon base orbital locations, OTV power levels, and OTV and lander rendezvous points. For analyses of round trip OTV flights from Uranus to Miranda or Titania, a 10- Megawatt electric (MWe) OTV power level and a 200 metricton (MT) lander payload were selected based on a relative short OTV trip time and minimization of the number of lander flights. A similar optimum power level is suggested for OTVs flying from low orbit around Neptune to Thalassa or Triton. Several moon base sites at Uranus and Neptune and the OTV requirements to support them are also addressed.

  14. Transfer orbits to L4 with a solar sail in the Earth-Sun system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrés, Ariadna

    2017-08-01

    Solar sails are enablers for long interplanetary transfers, but also offer many advantages in Libration Point Orbits missions. The extra effect of the Solar Radiation Pressure allows a space vehicle, by changing the sail orientation, to be artificially displaced from the classical Lagrangian equilibrium points, L1 , … ,L5 , as well perturbed from the Lyapunov, Halo and Lissajous orbits that appear around them. Most of these equilibrium points are linearly unstable and have stable and unstable invariant manifolds associated with them. In this paper we explore the possibilities that these invariant manifolds offer to navigate in a natural way around a circular, restricted, three-body system. We take the Earth-Sun Restricted Three Body Problem as a model and, for different fixed sail orientations, we compute the stable and unstable manifolds associated with the equilibrium points of the system. We find natural trajectories that allow the vehicle to move around the family of equilibria in a controlled way and to go from a region close to L1 or L2 to a region close to L4.

  15. A First-Order Analytical Theory for Optimal Low-Thrust Limited-Power Transfers between Arbitrary Elliptical Coplanar Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro da Silva Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete first-order analytical solution, which includes the short periodic terms, for the problem of optimal low-thrust limited-power transfers between arbitrary elliptic coplanar orbits in a Newtonian central gravity field is obtained through canonical transformation theory. The optimization problem is formulated as a Mayer problem of optimal control theory with Cartesian elements—position and velocity vectors—as state variables. After applying the Pontryagin maximum principle and determining the maximum Hamiltonian, classical orbital elements are introduced through a Mathieu transformation. The short periodic terms are then eliminated from the maximum Hamiltonian through an infinitesimal canonical transformation built through Hori method. Closed-form analytical solutions are obtained for the average canonical system by solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation through separation of variables technique. For transfers between close orbits a simplified solution is straightforwardly derived by linearizing the new Hamiltonian and the generating function obtained through Hori method.

  16. Integrated control and health management. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzmann, Wilfried A.; Hayden, Warren R.

    1988-01-01

    To insure controllability of the baseline design for a 7500 pound thrust, 10:1 throttleable, dual expanded cycle, Hydrogen-Oxygen, orbit transfer rocket engine, an Integrated Controls and Health Monitoring concept was developed. This included: (1) Dynamic engine simulations using a TUTSIM derived computer code; (2) analysis of various control methods; (3) Failure Modes Analysis to identify critical sensors; (4) Survey of applicable sensors technology; and, (5) Study of Health Monitoring philosophies. The engine design was found to be controllable over the full throttling range by using 13 valves, including an oxygen turbine bypass valve to control mixture ratio, and a hydrogen turbine bypass valve, used in conjunction with the oxygen bypass to control thrust. Classic feedback control methods are proposed along with specific requirements for valves, sensors, and the controller. Expanding on the control system, a Health Monitoring system is proposed including suggested computing methods and the following recommended sensors: (1) Fiber optic and silicon bearing deflectometers; (2) Capacitive shaft displacement sensors; and (3) Hot spot thermocouple arrays. Further work is needed to refine and verify the dynamic simulations and control algorithms, to advance sensor capabilities, and to develop the Health Monitoring computational methods.

  17. Improvement of orbit determination accuracy for Beidou Navigation Satellite System with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chengpan; Hu, Xiaogong; Zhou, Shanshi; Guo, Rui; He, Feng; Liu, Li; Zhu, Lingfeng; Li, Xiaojie; Wu, Shan; Zhao, Gang; Yu, Yang; Cao, Yueling

    2016-10-01

    The Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) manages to estimate simultaneously the orbits and clock offsets of navigation satellites, using code and carrier phase measurements of a regional network within China. The satellite clock offsets are also directly measured with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT). Satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals and comparisons with the precise ephemeris indicate that the radial error of GEO satellites is much larger than that of IGSO and MEO satellites and that the BDS orbit accuracy is worse than GPS. In order to improve the orbit determination accuracy for BDS, a new orbit determination strategy is proposed, in which the satellite clock measurements from TWSTFT are fixed as known values, and only the orbits of the satellites are solved. However, a constant systematic error at the nanosecond level can be found in the clock measurements, which is obtained and then corrected by differencing the clock measurements and the clock estimates from orbit determination. The effectiveness of the new strategy is verified by a GPS regional network orbit determination experiment. With the IGS final clock products fixed, the orbit determination and prediction accuracy for GPS satellites improve by more than 50% and the 12-h prediction User Range Error (URE) is better than 0.12 m. By processing a 25-day of measurement from the BDS regional network, an optimal strategy for the satellite-clock-fixed orbit determination is identified. User Equivalent Ranging Error is reduced by 27.6% for GEO satellites, but no apparent reduction is found for IGSO/MEO satellites. The SLR residuals exhibit reductions by 59% and 32% for IGSO satellites but no reductions for GEO and MEO satellites.

  18. Energy loss spectroscopy of Buckminster C60 with twisted electrons: Influence of orbital angular momentum transfer on plasmon generation

    CERN Document Server

    Schüler, M

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental progress in creating and controlling singular electron beams that carry orbital angular momentum allows for new types of local spectroscopies. We theoretically investigate the twisted-electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) from the C60 fullerene. Of particular interest are the strong multipolar collective excitations and their selective response to the orbital angular momentum of the impinging electron beam. Based on ab-initio calculations for the collective response we compute EELS signals with twisted electron beams and uncover the interplay between the plasmon polarity and the amount of angular momentum transfer.

  19. Charge-transfer (CT) orbitals for the one-electron description of CT excitations in a wide range of donor-acceptor separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    A transformation of the virtual Kohn-Sham orbitals is proposed to a set of charge-transfer orbitals (CTOs) adapted to description of CT excitations. The CTO scheme offers a simple estimate of the CT excitation energy with an orbital energy difference. This estimate reproduces well the reference values of the configuration interaction (CI) method in a wide range of donor-acceptor separations in the paradigmatic He -Be complex. CTO-based orbital energy and shape indices are proposed to assess the suitability of the CT description with virtual orbitals of a given basis set. Both indices yield correct trends for the Kohn-Sham and Hartree-Fock orbitals.

  20. The Earth-Moon CR3BP: A full Atlas of low-energy fast periodic transfer orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Leiva, A M; Leiva, Alejandro M.; Briozzo, Carlos B.

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the planar CR3BP for mass parameter mu=0.0121505, corresponding to the Earth-Moon system, we identify and describe 80 families of periodic orbits encircling both the Earth and the Moon ("transfer" orbits). All the orbits in these families have very low energies, most of them corresponding to values of the Jacobi constant C for which the Hill surface is closed at the Lagrangian point L2. All of these orbits have also short period T, generally under six months. Most of the families are composed of orbits that are asymmetric with respect to the Earth-Moon axis. The main results presented for each family are: (i) the characteristic curves T(h), y(h), v_y(h), and v_x(h) on the Poincare section Sigma_1={x=0.836915310,y,v_x>0,v_y} normal to the Earth-Moon axis at the Lagrangian point L1, parameterized by their energy h=-C/2 in the synodic coordinate system; (ii) the stability parameter along each family; (iii) the intersections x_i(h) of the orbits with the Earth-Moon axis, on the Poincare sectio...

  1. The NASA-UC Eta-Earth Program: II. A Planet Orbiting HD 156668 with a Minimum Mass of Four Earth Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Fischer, Debra A; Wright, Jason T; Henry, Gregory W; Isaacson, Howard; Valenti, Jeff A; Anderson, Jay; Piskunov, Nikolai E

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of HD 156668b, an extrasolar planet with a minimum mass of M_P sin i = 4.15 M_Earth. This planet was discovered through Keplerian modeling of precise radial velocities from Keck-HIRES and is the second super-Earth to emerge from the NASA-UC Eta-Earth Survey. The best-fit orbit is consistent with circular and has a period of P = 4.6455 d. The Doppler semi-amplitude of this planet, K = 1.89 m/s, is among the lowest ever detected, on par with the detection of GJ 581e using HARPS. A longer period (P ~ 2.3 yr), low-amplitude signal of unknown origin was also detected in the radial velocities and was filtered out of the data while fitting the short-period planet. Additional data are required to determine if the long-period signal is due to a second planet, stellar activity, or another source. Photometric observations using the Automated Photometric Telescopes at Fairborn Observatory show that HD 156668 (an old, quiet K3 dwarf) is photometrically constant over the radial velocity period to 0....

  2. Experimental verification of orbital engineering at the atomic scale: Charge transfer and symmetry breaking in nickelate heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Rui, Xue; Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Disa, Ankit S.; Longo, Paolo; Okunishi, Eiji; Walker, Fred; Ahn, Charles H.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Klie, Robert F.

    2017-05-01

    Epitaxial strain, layer confinement, and inversion symmetry breaking have emerged as powerful new approaches to control the electronic and atomic-scale structural properties of complex metal oxides. Trivalent rare-earth (RE) nickelate R E NiO3 heterostructures have been shown to be exemplars since the orbital occupancy, degeneracy, and, consequently, electronic/magnetic properties can be altered as a function of epitaxial strain, layer thickness, and superlattice structure. One recent example is the tricomponent LaTiO3-LaNiO3-LaAlO3 superlattice which exhibits charge transfer and orbital polarization as the result of its interfacial dipole electric field. A crucial step towards control of these parameters for future electronic and magnetic device applications is to develop an understanding of both the magnitude and range of the octahedral network's response towards interfacial strain and electric fields. An approach that provides atomic-scale resolution and sensitivity towards the local octahedral distortions and orbital occupancy is therefore required. Here, we employ atomic-resolution imaging coupled with electron spectroscopies and first-principles theory to examine the role of interfacial charge transfer and symmetry breaking in a tricomponent nickelate superlattice system. We find that nearly complete charge transfer occurs between the LaTiO3 and LaNiO3 layers, resulting in a mixed Ni2 +/Ni3 + valence state. We further demonstrate that this charge transfer is highly localized with a range of about 1 unit cell within the LaNiO3 layers. We also show how Wannier-function-based electron counting provides a simple physical picture of the electron distribution that connects directly with formal valence charges. The results presented here provide important feedback to synthesis efforts aimed at stabilizing new electronic phases that are not accessible by conventional bulk or epitaxial film approaches.

  3. Spectroscopic studies and molecular orbital calculations of charge transfer complexation between 3,5-dimethylpyrazole with DDQ in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeb, Moustafa M; Al-Attas, Amirah S; Al-Raimi, Doaa S

    2015-05-05

    Charge transfer (CT) interaction between 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP) with the π-acceptor 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinon (DDQ) has been investigated spectrophotometrically in acetonitrile (AN). Simultaneous reddish brown color has been observed upon mixing donor with acceptor solutions attributing to CT complex formation. The electronic spectra of the formed complex exhibited multi-charge transfer bands at 429, 447, 506, 542 and 589nm, respectively. Job(')s method of continuous variations and spectrophotometric titration methods confirmed the formation of the studied complex in 1:2 ratio between DMP and DDQ. Benesi-Hildebrand equation has been applied to calculate the stability constant of the formed complex where it recorded high value supporting formation of stable complex. Molecular orbital calculations using MM2 method and GAMESS (General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System) interface computations as a package of ChemBio3D Ultra12 software were carried out for more analysis of the formed complex in the gas phase. The computational analysis included energy minimisation, stabilisation energy, molecular geometry, Mullikan charges, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces of reactants and complex as well as characterization of the higher occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO) and lower unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) surfaces of the complex. A good consistency between experimental and theoretical results has been recorded.

  4. Electronic structure of novel charge transfer compounds: application of Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Torsten; Rückerl, Florian; Liebing, Simon; Pederson, Mark

    We present our experimental and theoretical results on novel Picene/F4TCNQ and Manganese-Phthalocyanine/F4TCNQ donor / acceptor systems. We apply the recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for self-interaction corrected density functional theory (FO-SIC DFT) to these materials and compare the results to standard DFT calculations and to experimental data obtained by photoemission spectroscopy. We focus our analysis on the description of the magnitude of the ground state charge transfer and on the details of the formed hybrid orbitals. Further, we show that for weakly bound donor / acceptor systems the FO-SIC approach delivers a more realistic description of the electronic structure compared to standard DFT calculations Support by DFG FOR1154 is greatly acknowledged.

  5. Low gravity thermal stratification of liquid helium on SHOOT. [Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirron, P. J.; Dipirro, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Estimates of the extent and impact of thermal stratification are presented as well as predictions of the behavior of the HeI/HeII boundary. Although thermal stratification of cryogens can be problematic and lead to their inefficient use in low gravity, for SHOOT the occurrence is beneficial both during ground hold and in orbit and presents no hazards. On the ground the parasitic heat load is both reduced and more efficiently removed. In orbit the pumpdown proceeds at a much more rapid rate, allowing orbital operations to begin earlier. The thermal conductivity of the aluminum tank and the normal liquid plus cooling at the liquid/vapor interface as the vapor bubble grows are sufficient to prevent undesirably high vapor pressures in the tank.

  6. NASA's CSTI Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion Program - On-target technology transfer to advanced space flight programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.; Herr, Paul N.; Stephenson, Frank W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Civil Space Technology Initiative encompasses among its major elements the Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion Program (ETOPP) for future launch vehicles, which is budgeted to the extent of $20-30 million/year for the development of essential technologies. ETOPP technologies include, in addition to advanced materials and processes and design/analysis computational tools, the advanced systems-synthesis technologies required for definition of highly reliable LH2 and hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines to be operated at significantly reduced levels of risk and cost relative to the SSME. Attention is given to the technology-transfer services of ETOPP.

  7. Numerical and Analytical Study of Optimal Low-Thrust Limited-Power Transfers between Close Circular Coplanar Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro da Silva Fernandes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical and analytical study of optimal low-thrust limited-power trajectories for simple transfer (no rendezvous between close circular coplanar orbits in an inverse-square force field is presented. The numerical study is carried out by means of an indirect approach of the optimization problem in which the two-point boundary value problem, obtained from the set of necessary conditions describing the optimal solutions, is solved through a neighboring extremal algorithm based on the solution of the linearized two-point boundary value problem through Riccati transformation. The analytical study is provided by a linear theory which is expressed in terms of nonsingular elements and is determined through the canonical transformation theory. The fuel consumption is taken as the performance criterion and the analysis is carried out considering various radius ratios and transfer durations. The results are compared to the ones provided by a numerical method based on gradient techniques.

  8. 地球静止轨道—低轨道最优异面转移方法%Optimal noncoplanar orbital transfer between GEO and low-earth orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符俊; 蔡洪; 丁智坚

    2012-01-01

    研究了轨道转移飞行器(orbital transfer vehicle,OTV)从地球静止轨道向低轨道的最优异面转移过程,提出了解析法和智能优化算法.在解析法中,完整地推导了最优转移轨道的求解方法,提出了最优转移轨道应满足的条件,并采用牛顿迭代法求解第1次速度脉冲应改变的轨道倾角.以离轨点位置、入轨点位置和转移时间为优化变量,采用遗传算法对最优转移过程进行求解,给出了遗传算法求解该优化问题的设计步骤,并将变轨过程在卫星工具包(satellite tool kit,STK)场景中进行了演示.仿真结果表明两种方法均能满足Lawden一阶最优必要条件.%The optimal noncoplanar orbital transfer between geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low-earth orbit for the orbital transfer vehicle (OTV) is studied,and analytical method and intelligence optimization algorithm are proposed.For the analytical method,the solution of the optimal transfer orbit is fully derived.The conditions which the optimal transfer orbit should be satisfied are given,and the optimal changed inclination due to the first impulse is solved by Newton iteration.The genetic algorithm (GA) is used to solve the optimal transfer orbit,where the optimal solution is composed of deorbit position,reorbit position and transfer time.The steps for GA are given and the demo of orbital transfer is carried out in Satellite Tool Kit (STK).The simulation results show that the Lawden's first-order optimality condition can be satisfied for both methods.

  9. Searching for the minimum energy path in the sulfuryl transfer reaction catalyzed by human estrogen sulfotransferase: Role of enzyme dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping; Yang, Weitao; Pedersen, Lars C.; Negishi, Masa; Pedersen, Lee G.

    The enzymatic transfer of a sulfuryl group from the ubiquitous biological source of sulfate 3?-phosphoadenosine 5?-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to estrogen is investigated by the pseudo-bond quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method (QM/MM) method. Calculations of the reaction path are performed starting with models based on two crystal structures, which differ in information about the cofactor and substrates. In addition, a subsequent relaxation of the enzyme was performed with the found transition state frozen, followed by redetermination of the path. An activation barrier of 22 kcal/mol is estimated. The reaction mechanism features a proton transfer from the estrogen to a catalytic histidine followed by the rate determining SO3 transfer. The mechanism found is largely dissociative.

  10. Analytical Equations for Orbital Transfer Maneuvers of a Vehicle Using Constant Low Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    136auks" ,b , .. .. a. AFIT/GA/AA/81D -3 ANALITICAL EQUATIOIS FOR OR.BITAL TRASFER MANIUVRS OF A V 1CI, USING CONSTANT LOW THRUST THESIS AFIT/GA/AA...conventional chemical propulsion system- (Ref 1). Changing the velocity of a satellite such as described above can be used to boost a satellite into...taneously. This is a valid assumption for high thrust chemical propulsion, but not for low thrust electric propulsion. Therefore, a set of equations

  11. Evidence of Charge Transfer and Orbital Magnetic Moment in Multiferroic CuFeO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Yasuo; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ikeno, Hidekazu; Terada, Noriki; Morioka, Takayuki; Saito, Kota; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Kindo, Koichi; Nojiri, Hiroyuki

    2016-11-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) and magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) of Fe and Cu L2,3 edges have been measured on the triangular lattice antiferromagnet CuFeO2. By applying sum rule analysis to the XMCD of Fe, the ratio of the orbital to spin magnetic moments is determined to be -0.071. Because the nominal valence of Fe in CuFeO2 was Fe3+ (3d5), the orbital magnetic moment was considered to be zero in the past. However, the present research demonstrates that the orbital magnetic moment of Fe takes a finite value and it is possibly due to Fe4+ (3d4), which is considered to be responsible for the strong magnetic anisotropy and the ferroelectricity. We compare the experimental results with the results of ab initio multiplet calculations based on the configuration interaction theory and discuss the anomalous electronic structures of Fe and Cu ions in CuFeO2.

  12. An Integrated Approach to Modeling Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicles During Long Duration, Near-Earth Orbit Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David A.; Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Sjauw, Waldy K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent NASA interest in utilizing solar electronic propulsion (SEP) technology to transfer payloads, e.g. from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to higher energy geostationary-Earth orbit (GEO) or to Earth escape, has necessitated the development of high fidelity SEP vehicle models and simulations. These models and simulations need to be capable of capturing vehicle dynamics and sub-system interactions experienced during the transfer trajectories which are typically accomplished with continuous-burn (potentially interrupted by solar eclipse), long duration "spiral out" maneuvers taking several months or more to complete. This paper presents details of an integrated simulation approach achieved by combining a high fidelity vehicle simulation code with a detailed solar array model. The combined simulation tool gives researchers the functionality to study the integrated effects of various vehicle sub-systems (e.g. vehicle guidance, navigation and control (GN&C), electric propulsion system (EP)) with time varying power production. Results from a simulation model of a vehicle with a 50 kW class SEP system using the integrated tool are presented and compared to the results from another simulation model employing a 50 kW end-of-life (EOL) fixed power level assumption. These models simulate a vehicle under three degree of freedom dynamics (i.e. translational dynamics only) and include the effects of a targeting guidance algorithm (providing a "near optimal" transfer) during a LEO to near Earth escape (C (sub 3) = -2.0 km (sup 2) / sec (sup -2) spiral trajectory. The presented results include the impact of the fully integrated, time-varying solar array model (e.g. cumulative array degradation from traversing the Van Allen belts, impact of solar eclipses on the vehicle and the related temperature responses in the solar arrays due to operating in the Earth's thermal environment, high fidelity array power module, etc.); these are used to assess the impact on vehicle performance (i

  13. Orbital transfers in an asteroid system considering the solar radiation pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Geraldo Magela Couto; Bertachini de A. Prado, Antonio F.; Sanchez, Diogo Merguizo; Gomes, Vivian Martins

    2017-10-01

    The present paper studies the effects of the radiation pressure in the trajectories of a spacecraft in transfers between the collinear Lagrange points of a double asteroid system. The system considered is this paper is formed by the double asteroid 1996FG3 and the maneuvers are always assumed to be bi-impulsive. In a system formed by asteroids, the solar radiation pressure has a significant influence in the transfers paths. This occurs because the gravitational forces in these systems are smaller if compared with systems formed by larger bodies. Solutions with lower and higher fuel consumption can be found by adding the solar radiation pressure. The radiation pressure was not used as a control but its effects over the transfers were measured. For a small system of primaries such as an asteroid system, it is very important to take into account this force to make sure that the spacecraft will reach the desired point.

  14. Coherent transfer of optical orbital angular momentum in multi-order Raman sideband generation

    CERN Document Server

    Strohaber, J; Sokolov, A V; Kolomenskii, A A; Paulus, G G; Schuessler, H A

    2012-01-01

    Experimental results from the generation of Raman sidebands using optical vortices are presented. By generating two sets of sidebands originating from different locations in a Raman active crystal, one set containing optical orbital angular momentum and the other serving as a reference, a Young's double slit experiment was simultaneously realized for each sideband. The interference between the two sets of sidebands was used to determine the helicity and topological charge in each order. Topological charges in all orders were found to be discrete and follow selection rules predicted by a cascaded Raman process.

  15. Coherent transfer of optical orbital angular momentum in multi-order Raman sideband generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohaber, J; Zhi, M; Sokolov, A V; Kolomenskii, A A; Paulus, G G; Schuessler, H A

    2012-08-15

    Experimental results from the generation of Raman sidebands using optical vortices are presented. By generating two sets of sidebands originating from different locations in a Raman-active crystal, one set containing optical orbital angular momentum and the other serving as a reference, Young's double slit experiment was simultaneously realized for each sideband. The interference between the two sets of sidebands was used to determine the helicity and topological charge in each order. Topological charges in all orders were found to be discrete and follow selection rules predicted by a cascaded Raman process.

  16. Orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing in free-space optical data transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiao; Yuan, Xiao-Cong; Tao, Shaohua

    2006-08-01

    In the optical wireless communication systems proposed by Gibson, et al, the information is encoded as states of orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light and the transmitter unit can produce laser beam with single OAM-state in a time-slot. Recently we have proved that it is possible to generate multiple OAM-states simultaneously by single spatial light modulator. This method is adopted in our free-space optical wireless communication system and these OAM-states can be detected in the receiving unit by a computer-generated hologram. Hence, the transmission capacity is enhanced significantly without increasing the complexity of system.

  17. Molecular orbital (SCF-Xα-SW) theory of metal-metal charge transfer processes in minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, David M.

    1987-01-01

    A number of mixed valence iron oxides and silicates (e.g., magnetite, ilvaite) exhibit thermally induced electron delocalization between adjacent Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions and optically induced electronic transitions which are assigned to Fe2+→Fe3+ intervalence charge transfer.

  18. Feedback Optimal Control of Low-thrust Orbit Transfer in Central Gravity Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf H. Owis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-thrust trajectories with variable radial thrust is studied in this paper. The problem is tackled by solving the Hamilton- Jacobi-Bellman equation via State Dependent Riccati Equation( STDE technique devised for nonlinear systems. Instead of solving the two-point boundary value problem in which the classical optimal control is stated, this technique allows us to derive closed-loop solutions. The idea of the work consists in factorizing the original nonlinear dynamical system into a quasi-linear state dependent system of ordinary differential equations. The generating function technique is then applied to this new dynamical system, the feedback optimal control is solved. We circumvent in this way the problem of expanding the vector field and truncating higher-order terms because no remainders are lost in the undertaken approach. This technique can be applied to any planet-to-planet transfer; it has been applied here to the Earth-Mars low-thrust transfer

  19. Cryogenic and thermal design for the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. H.; Maa, S.; Brooks, W. F.; Ng, Y. S.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis and trade-offs of the external thermal design of the two 200-liter dewars required in the SHOOT experiment to extend space mission life by superfluid helium replenishment are discussed. Also considered are the support electronics and the optimization and prediction of the performance of the dewar and cryostat assemblies. Particular attention is given to the ground-hold and standby performance of the dewars, along with the temperature of the helium bath during high-flow-rate helium transfers.

  20. Orbital Interaction and Electron Density Transfer in PdII([9]aneB2AL2 Complexes: Theoretical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Keun Park

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The geometric structures of Pd-complexes {Pd([9]aneB2AL2 and Pd([9]aneBABL2 where A = P, S; B = N; L = PH3, P(CH33, Cl−}, their selective orbital interaction towards equatorial or axial (soft A…Pd coordination of macrocyclic [9]aneB2A tridentate to PdL2, and electron density transfer from the electron-rich trans L-ligand to the low-lying unfilled a1g(5s-orbital of PdL2 were investigated using B3P86/lanl2DZ for Pd and 6-311+G** for other atoms. The pentacoordinate endo-[Pd([9]aneB2A(L-donor2]2+ complex with an axial (soft A--Pd quasi-bond was optimized for stability. The fifth (soft A--Pd quasi-bond between the σ-donor of soft A and the partially unfilled a1g(5s-orbital of PdL2 was formed. The pentacoordinate endo-Pd([9]aneB2A(L-donor2]2+ complex has been found to be more stable than the corresponding tetracoordinate endo-Pd complexes. Except for the endo-Pd pentacoordinates, the tetracoordinate Pd([9]aneBABL2 complex with one equatorial (soft A-Pd bond is found to be more stable than the Pd([9]aneB2AL2 isomer without the equatorial (A-Pd bond. In particular, the geometric configuration of endo-[Pd([9]anePNP(L-donor2]2+ could not be optimized.

  1. Measurements of the linear energy transfer spectra on the Mir orbital station and comparison with radiation transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Konradi, A.; Atwell, W.; Golightly, M. J.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Petrov, V. M.; Tchernykh, I. V.; Shurshakov, V. A.; Lobakov, A. P.

    1996-01-01

    A tissue equivalent proportional counter designed to measure the linear energy transfer spectra (LET) in the range 0.2-1250 keV/micrometer was flown in the Kvant module on the Mir orbital station during September 1994. The spacecraft was in a 51.65 degrees inclination, elliptical (390 x 402 km) orbit. This is nearly the lower limit of its flight altitude. The total absorbed dose rate measured was 411.3 +/- 4.41 microGy/day with an average quality factor of 2.44. The galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) dose rate was 133.6 microGy/day with a quality factor of 3.35. The trapped radiation belt dose rate was 277.7 microGy/day with an average quality factor of 1.94. The peak rate through the South Atlantic Anomaly was approximately 12 microGy/min and nearly constant from one pass to another. A detailed comparison of the measured LET spectra has been made with radiation transport models. The GCR results are in good agreement with model calculations; however, this is not the case for radiation belt particles and again points to the need for improving the AP8 omni-directional trapped proton models.

  2. Spatial statistical point prediction guidance for heating-rate-limited aeroassisted orbital transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pradipto; Conway, Bruce A.

    2015-06-01

    Feedback control of constrained non-linear dynamical systems satisfying a certain optimality criterion and meeting a specified transfer objective in the state space is recognized as one of the most challenging problems in control theory. One approach to computing optimal feedback policies is the dynamic programming route of numerically solving the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) partial differential equation directly. In this paper an alternate and more tractable dynamic programming approach, the optimal feedback synthesis method, is utilized. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated through an explicit guidance scheme for the heating-rate-constrained maneuver of an Aeroassisted Transfer Vehicle (AOTV). In optimal feedback synthesis, a feedback chart is constructed from a family of open-loop extremals, thus ensuring optimality with respect to any initial condition in the family. This paper presents a solution to the AOTV optimal feedback synthesis problem using the Gaussian process spatial prediction method of universal kriging. A closed-form expression for a near-optimal guidance law is derived. Its performance is found to be very promising; initial atmospheric entry errors due to simulated thruster misfiring are seen to be accurately corrected while the algebraic state-inequality constraint is closely respected.

  3. Halo orbit to science orbit captures at planetary moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin A.; Russell, Ryan P.

    2017-05-01

    Ballisticly connecting halo orbits to science orbits in the circular-restricted three-body problem is investigated. Two classes of terminal science orbits are considered: low-altitude, tight orbits that are deep in the gravity well of the secondary body, and high-altitude, loose orbits that are strongly perturbed by the gravity of the primary body. General analytic expressions are developed to provide a minimum bound on impulse cost in both the circular restricted and the Hill's approximations. The equations are applied to a broad range of planetary moons, providing a mission design reference. Systematic grid search methods are developed to numerically find feasible transfers from halo orbits at Europa, confirming the analytical lower bound formulas. The two-impulse capture options in the case of Europa reveal a diverse set of potential solutions. Tight captures result in maneuver costs of 425-550 m/s while loose captures are found with costs as low as 30 m/s. The terminal orbits are verified to avoid escape or impact for at least 45 days.

  4. Surprising microscopy subtleties: Measuring picoscale thicknesses, visualizing core orbitals, and detecting charge transfer using the TEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odlyzko, Michael Luke

    50 years ago, Richard Feynman delivered a now-famous address outlining why there was "plenty of room left at the bottom": there remained much progress to be made in seeing and manipulating matter all the way down to the atomic scale. One of many means to that end, argued Feynman, was to make electron microscopes better. Why could not electrons with wavelengths of a few picometers not be used to clearly image atoms hundreds of picometers in size? Why could not electron beams be used to pattern miniscule wires a handful of metal atoms across? Over the course of decades, Feynman's vision has been pursued zealously with rich reward, not least in the electron microscopy field. Enabled by the development of bright field-emission electron sources, high-resolution polepieces, and now aberration correctors, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at atomic resolution has become routine. Seemingly, there is little room left at the bottom; after all, once you can clearly see atoms, what more is there left to do? Thankfully, there is plenty. Much of the hard work has been in the development of equipment that expands TEM to allow unprecedented spatially resolved analysis of elemental composition, inelastic scattering, and temporal processes. But there are also many opportunities to uncover new information using now widely available techniques and equipment. In the studies presented here, there has been some success in following the latter path. In tandem with careful computational analysis, selected-area electron diffraction allows not only determination of crystal symmetry, lattice parameter, and microstructure, but also measurements of material thickness on the scale of atomic layers. Supported by careful data processing and rigorous simulations, spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy data is converted into real-space measurements of core-level electronic orbitals, in addition to providing routine atomic resolution chemical mapping. And aided by the development of novel bonding

  5. Charge transfer and polarization for chloride ions bound in ClC transport proteins: natural bond orbital and energy decomposition analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jonathan; Pezeshki, Soroosh; Davis, Christal; Lin, Hai

    2013-12-19

    ClC transport proteins show a distinct "broken-helix" architecture, in which certain α-helices are oriented with their N-terminal ends pointed toward the binding sites where the chloride ions are held extensively by the backbone amide nitrogen atoms from the helices. To understand the effectiveness of such binding structures, we carried out natural bond orbital analysis and energy decomposition analysis employing truncated active-site model systems for the bound chloride ions along the translocation pore of the EcClC proteins. Our results indicated that the chloride ions are stabilized in such a binding environment by electrostatic, polarization, and charge-transfer interactions with the backbone and a few side chains. Up to ~25% of the formal charges of the chloride ions were found smeared out to the surroundings primarily via charge transfer from the chloride's lone pair n(Cl) orbitals to the protein's antibonding σ*(N-H) or σ*(O-H) orbitals; those σ* orbitals are localized at the polar N-H and O-H bonds in the chloride's first solvation shells formed by the backbone amide groups and the side chains of residues Ser107, Arg147, Glu148, and Tyr445. Polarizations by the chloride ions were dominated by the redistribution of charge densities among the π orbitals and lone pair orbitals of the protein atoms, in particular the atoms of the backbone peptide links and of the side chains of Arg147, Glu148, and Tyr445. The substantial amounts of electron density involved in charge transfer and in polarization were consistent with the large energetic contributions by the two processes revealed by the energy decomposition analysis. The significant polarization and charge-transfer effects may have impacts on the mechanisms and dynamics of the chloride transport by the ClC proteins.

  6. Transfer efficiency of angular momentum in sum-frequency generation and control of its spin and orbital parts by varying polarization and frequency of fundamental beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perezhogin, I. A.; Grigoriev, K. S.; Potravkin, N. N.; Cherepetskaya, E. B.; Makarov, V. A.

    2017-08-01

    Considering sum-frequency generation in an isotropic chiral nonlinear medium, we analyze the transfer of the spin angular momentum of fundamental elliptically polarized Gaussian light beams to the signal beam, which appears as the superposition of two Laguerre-Gaussian modes with both spin and orbital angular momentum. Only for the circular polarization of the fundamental radiation is its angular momentum fully transferred to the sum-frequency beam; otherwise, part of it can be transferred to the medium. Its value, as well as the ratio of spin and orbital contributions in the signal beam, depends on the fundamental frequency ratio and the polarization of the incident beams. Higher energy conversion efficiency in sum-frequency generation does not always correspond to higher angular momentum conversion efficiency.

  7. Definition, technology readiness, and development cost of the orbit transfer vehicle engine integrated control and health monitoring system elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, I.; Balcer, S.; Cochran, M.; Klop, J.; Peterson, S.

    1991-01-01

    An Integrated Control and Health Monitoring (ICHM) system was conceived for use on a 20 Klb thrust baseline Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) engine. Considered for space used, the ICHM was defined for reusability requirements for an OTV engine service free life of 20 missions, with 100 starts and a total engine operational time of 4 hours. Functions were derived by flowing down requirements from NASA guidelines, previous OTV engine or ICHM documents, and related contracts. The elements of an ICHM were identified and listed, and these elements were described in sufficient detail to allow estimation of their technology readiness levels. These elements were assessed in terms of technology readiness level, and supporting rationale for these assessments presented. The remaining cost for development of a minimal ICHM system to technology readiness level 6 was estimated. The estimates are within an accuracy range of minus/plus 20 percent. The cost estimates cover what is needed to prepare an ICHM system for use on a focussed testbed for an expander cycle engine, excluding support to the actual test firings.

  8. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study, 1985. Volume 5: Work breakdown structure and dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James H.; Callan, Daniel R.

    1985-01-01

    To establish consistency and visibility within the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) program, a preliminary work breakdown structure (WBS) and dictionary were developed. The dictionary contains definitions of terms to be used in conjunction with the WBS so that a clear understanding of the content of the hardware, function, and cost elements may be established. The OTV WBS matrix is a two-dimensional structure which shows the interrelationship of these dimensions: the hardware elements dimension and the phase and function dimension. The dimension of time cannot be shown graphically, but must be considered. Each cost entry varies with time so that it is necessary to know these cost values by year for budget planning and approval as well as for establishing cost streams for discounting purposes in the economic analysis. While a multiple dimensional approach may at first appear complex, it actually provides benefits which outweigh any concern. This structural interrelationship provides the capability to view and analyze the OTV costs from a number of different financial and management aspects. Cost may be summed by hardware groupings, phases, or functions. The WBS may be used in a number of dimensional or single listing format applications.

  9. TARGET/CRYOCHIL - THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS AND SUBSCALE MODELING OF SPACE-BASED ORBIT TRANSFER VEHICLE CRYOGENIC PROPELLANT RESUPPLY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelice, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    The resupply of the cryogenic propellants is an enabling technology for space-based transfer vehicles. As part of NASA Lewis's ongoing efforts in micro-gravity fluid management, thermodynamic analysis and subscale modeling techniques have been developed to support an on-orbit test bed for cryogenic fluid management technologies. These efforts have been incorporated into two FORTRAN programs, TARGET and CRYOCHIL. The TARGET code is used to determine the maximum temperature at which the filling of a given tank can be initiated and subsequently filled to a specified pressure and fill level without venting. The main process is the transfer of the energy stored in the thermal mass of the tank walls into the inflowing liquid. This process is modeled by examining the end state of the no-vent fill process. This state is assumed to be at thermal equilibrium between the tank and the fluid which is well mixed and saturated at the tank pressure. No specific assumptions are made as to the processes or the intermediate thermodynamic states during the filling. It is only assumed that the maximum tank pressure occurs at the final state. This assumption implies that, during the initial phases of the filling, the injected liquid must pass through the bulk vapor in such a way that it absorbs a sufficient amount of its superheat so that moderate tank pressures can be maintained. It is believed that this is an achievable design goal for liquid injection systems. TARGET can be run with any fluid for which the user has a properties data base. Currently it will only run for hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen since pressure-enthalpy data sets have been included for these fluids only. CRYOCHIL's primary function is to predict the optimum liquid charge to be injected for each of a series of charge-hold-vent chilldown cycles. This information can then be used with specified mass flow rates and valve response times to control a liquid injection system for tank chilldown operations. This will

  10. On-board orbit determination for low thrust LEO-MEO transfer by Consider Kalman Filtering and multi-constellation GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzione, Francesco; Renga, Alfredo; Grassi, Michele

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the novel navigation scenario offered by the next generation satellite low thrust autonomous LEO-to-MEO orbit transfer, this study proposes and tests a GNSS based navigation system aimed at providing on-board precise and robust orbit determination strategy to override rising criticalities. The analysis introduces the challenging design issues to simultaneously deal with the variable orbit regime, the electric thrust control and the high orbit GNSS visibility conditions. The Consider Kalman Filtering approach is here proposed as the filtering scheme to process the GNSS raw data provided by a multi-antenna/multi-constellation receiver in presence of uncertain parameters affecting measurements, actuation and spacecraft physical properties. Filter robustness and achievable navigation accuracy are verified using a high fidelity simulation of the low-thrust rising scenario and performance are compared with the one of a standard Extended Kalman Filtering approach to highlight the advantages of the proposed solution. Performance assessment of the developed navigation solution is accomplished for different transfer phases.

  11. Time-transfer experiments between satellite laser ranging ground stations via one-way laser ranging to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, D.; Sun, X.; Skillman, D. R.; Mcgarry, J.; Hoffman, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Torrence, M. H.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) has long been used to measure the distance from a ground station to an Earth-orbiting satellite in order to determine the spacecraft position in orbit, and to conduct other geodetic measurements such as plate motions. This technique can also be used to transfer time between the station and satellite, and between remote SLR sites, as recently demonstrated by the Time Transfer by Laser Link (T2L2) project by the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiaes (CNES) and Observatorire de la Cote d'Azur (OCA) as well as the Laser Time Transfer (LTT) project by the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, where two-way and one-way measurements were obtained at the same time. Here we report a new technique to transfer time between distant SLR stations via simultaneous one-way laser ranging (LR) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft at lunar distance. The major objectives are to establish accurate ground station times and to improve LRO orbit determination via these measurements. The results of these simultaneous LR measurements are used to compare the SLR station times or transfer time from one to the other using times-of-flight estimated from conventional radio frequency tracking of LRO. The accuracy of the time transfer depends only on the difference of the times-of-flight from each ground station to the spacecraft, and is expected to be at sub-nano second level. The technique has been validated by both a ground-based experiment and an experiment that utilized LRO. Here we present the results to show that sub-nanosecond precision and accuracy are achievable. Both experiments were carried out between the primary LRO-LR station, The Next Generation Satellite Laser Ranging (NGSLR) station, and its nearby station, Mobile Laser System (MOBLAS-7), both at Greenbelt, Maryland. The laser transmit time from both stations were recorded by the same event timer referenced to a Hydrogen maser. The results have been compared to data from a common All

  12. Orbit design for a space ambulance vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Walter C.

    A number of rendezvous maneuvers between space stations in geocentric orbits at altitudes ranging between 200 km and geosynchronous altitude are examined. Minimum time to complete rendezvous is studied for purposes of expediting crew patient transfer to an orbiting medical base station (MBS) for the stabilization of trauma and definitive care. The vehicle to be used for the crew patient transfer to the MBS is the space ambulance vehicle (SAV). The SAV is assumed to use two velocity impulses to complete rendezvous maneuvers between an SS and the MBS: an accelerating impulse when departing the SS and a second decelerating impulse prior to docking with the MBS. Recommendations are made concerning the planning of space operations which will reduce both time and propulsive energy for rendezvous maneuvers. It is suggested that throttleable engines be used when transferring a crew patient whose trauma could be exacerbated by excessive acceleration of the carrier vehicle.

  13. Trajectory Design from GTO to Near-Equatorial Lunar Orbit for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Yang Yang, Fan; Perez, Andres Dono; Galal, Ken F.; Faber, Nicolas T.; Mitchell, Scott; Landin, Brett; Burns, Jack O.

    2015-01-01

    The trajectory design for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) mission concept involves launching the DARE spacecraft into a geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) as a secondary payload. From GTO, the spacecraft then transfers to a lunar orbit that is stable (i.e., no station-keeping maneuvers are required with minimum perilune altitude always above 40 km) and allows for more than 1,000 cumulative hours for science measurements in the radio-quiet region located on the lunar farside.

  14. Shuttle and Transfer Orbit Thermal Analysis and Testing of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Charge-Couple Device Imaging Spectrometer Radiator Shades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal analyses of the Shuttle and Transfer Orbit of the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), one of two science instruments on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, revealed a low-earth orbit (LEO) overheating problem on the goldized Kapton faces of two radiator shades. The shades were coated with the goldized Kapton to provide a low hemispherical emittance to minimize direct and backloaded heating from the sun and the observatory and high specularity to optimize the coupling to space on two passive radiators which cool the focal plane to -120 C +/- 1 C during on-orbit operations. Since the observatory has a highly elliptical final orbit of 10,000 kilometers by 140,000 kilometers and the ACIS radiators and shades are oriented anti-sun, the high solar absorptance to emittance ratio of the goldized Kapton was not an issue. However, during Shuttle bay-to-earth operations, the short duration solar heating occurring near the eclipse entry and exit resulted in shade temperatures in excess of the cure temperature of the adhesive used to bond the goldized Kapton and honeycomb face-sheets. The detailed thermal analysis demonstrating the LEO overheating as well as the redesign options and thermal testing of a redesigned development unit shade are presented.

  15. Alternative Transfers to the NEOs 99942 Apophis, 1994 WR12, and 2007 UW1 via Derived Trajectories from Periodic Orbits of Family G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. de Melo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Swing-by techniques are extensively used in interplanetary missions to minimize fuel consumption and to raise payloads of spacecrafts. The effectiveness of this type of maneuver has been proven since the beginning of space exploration. According to this premise, we have explored the existence of a natural and direct link between low Earth orbits and the lunar sphere of influence to get low-energy transfer trajectories to the Near Earth Objects (NEOs 99942 Apophis, 1994 WR12, and 2007 UW1 through swing-bys with the Moon. The existence of this link is related to a family of retrograde periodic orbits around the Lagrangian equilibrium point L1 predicted for the circular, planar, restricted three-body Earth-Moon-particle problem. The trajectories in this link are sensitive to small disturbances. This enables them to be conveniently diverted reducing so the cost of the swing-by maneuver. These maneuvers allow a gain in energy sufficient for the trajectories to escape from the Earth-Moon system and to stabilize in heliocentric orbits between the Earth and Venus or Earth and Mars. Therefore, the trajectories have sufficient reach to intercept the NEOs' orbits.

  16. Orbit Control Scheme of Automated Transfer Vehicle%自动转移飞行器的轨控总体方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳永强; 毕雨雯

    2011-01-01

    The orbit control scheme and technology of the automated transfer vehicle (ATV) of ESA were discussed in this paper. The flying scheme, the configuration of the sensor system and actuators, and the different orbit control strategies during the phasing, homing, approaching and final approaching were analyzed.%介绍了欧空局的自动转移飞行器(ATV)的轨道控制方案和技术。给出了ATV的飞行方案、测量敏感器和执行机构的配置,以及在空间站调相段、寻的段、接近段和最终逼近段的轨控策略。

  17. Charge-transfer mechanism for electrophilic aromatic nitration and nitrosation via the convergence of (ab initio) molecular-orbital and Marcus-Hush theories with experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, Steven R; Rosokha, Sergiy V; Head-Gordon, Martin; Kochi, Jay K

    2003-03-19

    The highly disparate rates of aromatic nitrosation and nitration, despite the very similar (electrophilic) properties of the active species: NO(+) and NO(2)(+) in Chart 1, are quantitatively reconciled. First, the thorough mappings of the potential-energy surfaces by high level (ab initio) molecular-orbital methodologies involving extensive coupled-cluster CCSD(T)/6-31G optimizations establish the intervention of two reactive intermediates in nitration (Figure 8) but only one in nitrosation (Figure 7). Second, the same distinctive topologies involving double and single potential-energy minima (Figures 6 and 5) also emerge from the semiquantitative application of the Marcus-Hush theory to the transient spectral data. Such a striking convergence from quite different theoretical approaches indicates that the molecular-orbital and Marcus-Hush (potential-energy) surfaces are conceptually interchangeable. In the resultant charge-transfer mechanism, the bimolecular interactions of arene donors with both NO(+) and NO(2)(+) spontaneously lead (barrierless) to pi-complexes in which electron transfer is concurrent with complexation. Such a pi-complex in nitration is rapidly converted to the sigma-complex, whereas this Wheland adduct in nitrosation merely represents a high energy (transition-state) structure. Marcus-Hush analysis thus demonstrates how the strongly differentiated (arene) reactivities toward NO(+) and NO(2)(+) can actually be exploited in the quantitative development of a single coherent (electron-transfer) mechanism for both aromatic nitrosation and nitration.

  18. Cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage acquisition and transfer (COLD-SAT) experiment subsystem instrumentation and wire harness design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lawrence G.

    1994-01-01

    Subcritical cryogens such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are required for space based transportation propellant, reactant, and life support systems. Future long-duration space missions will require on-orbit systems capable of long-term cryogen storage and efficient fluid transfer capabilities. COLD-SAT, which stands for cryogenic orbiting liquid depot-storage acquisition and transfer, is a free-flying liquid hydrogen management flight experiment. Experiments to determine optimum methods of fluid storage and transfer will be performed on the COLD-SAT mission. The success of the mission is directly related to the type and accuracy of measurements made. The instrumentation and measurement techniques used are therefore critical to the success of the mission. This paper presents the results of the COLD-SAT experiment subsystem instrumentation and wire harness design effort. Candidate transducers capable of fulfilling the COLD-SAT experiment measurement requirements are identified. Signal conditioning techniques, data acquisition requirements, and measurement uncertainty analysis are presented. Electrical harnessing materials and wiring techniques for the instrumentation designed to minimize heat conduction to the cryogenic tanks and provide optimum measurement accuracy are listed.

  19. Calibration chain design based on integrating sphere transfer radiometer for SI-traceable on-orbit spectral radiometric calibration and its uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Ning; Fang, Wei; Sun, Li-Wei; Cui, Li-Hong; Wang, Yu-Peng

    2016-09-01

    In order to satisfy the requirement of SI-traceable on-orbit absolute radiation calibration transfer with high accuracy for satellite remote sensors, a transfer chain consisting of a fiber coupling monochromator (FBM) and an integrating sphere transfer radiometer (ISTR) was designed in this paper. Depending on the Sun, this chain based on detectors provides precise spectral radiometric calibration and measurement to spectrometers in the reflective solar band (RSB) covering 300-2500 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 0.5-6 nm. It shortens the traditional chain based on lamp source and reduces the calibration uncertainty from 5% to 0.5% by using the cryogenic radiometer in space as a radiometric benchmark and trap detectors as secondary standard. This paper also gives a detailed uncertainty budget with reasonable distribution of each impact factor, including the weak spectral signal measurement with uncertainty of 0.28%. According to the peculiar design and comprehensive uncertainty analysis, it illustrates that the spectral radiance measurement uncertainty of the ISTR system can reach to 0.48%. The result satisfies the requirements of SI-traceable on-orbit calibration and has wider significance for expanding the application of the remote sensing data with high-quality. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41474161) and the National High-Technology Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA123703).

  20. Abort Options for Human Missions to Earth-Moon Halo Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesick, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Abort trajectories are optimized for human halo orbit missions about the translunar libration point (L2), with an emphasis on the use of free return trajectories. Optimal transfers from outbound free returns to L2 halo orbits are numerically optimized in the four-body ephemeris model. Circumlunar free returns are used for direct transfers, and cislunar free returns are used in combination with lunar gravity assists to reduce propulsive requirements. Trends in orbit insertion cost and flight time are documented across the southern L2 halo family as a function of halo orbit position and free return flight time. It is determined that the maximum amplitude southern halo incurs the lowest orbit insertion cost for direct transfers but the maximum cost for lunar gravity assist transfers. The minimum amplitude halo is the most expensive destination for direct transfers but the least expensive for lunar gravity assist transfers. The on-orbit abort costs for three halos are computed as a function of abort time and return time. Finally, an architecture analysis is performed to determine launch and on-orbit vehicle requirements for halo orbit missions.

  1. Receding Horizon Control of the Spacecraft for Transferring between Halo Orbits%航天器Halo轨道间转移的滚动时域控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭海军; 谭述君; 吴志刚

    2012-01-01

    针对航天器在日/地系统共线平动点附近Halo轨道族之间的轨道转移问题,提出了一种在线实时求解滚动时域控制的新方法.首先采用高效的辛自适应非线性最优控制数值算法,离线规划出航天器在不同Halo轨道之间转移的最优轨迹和最优控制输入.然后提出一种在线实时求解滚动时域控制的新方法,基于已规划好的最优转移轨迹,应用滚动时域控制方法完成航天器在初始入轨偏差下的在线实时制导控制任务.最后的非线性动力学系统数值仿真结果表明:所提出的求解滚动时域控制的方法具有高效率特点,能够在线实时求解航天器在Halo轨道之间转移的制导控制问题,并很快消除初始入轨误差的影响.%A new method is presented for solving the on-line receding horizon control problem in real time, and it has been successfully applied into the transfer mission between the Halo orbits near collinear Libration points in the Sun-Earth system. First, by employing the efficient symplectic adaptive algorithm for nonlinear optimal control, the optimal transfer trajectory and control input are programmed off-line. Then, a new on-line real time numerical algorithm is proposed for solving the receding horizon control. Based on the optimal transfer trajectory and control, the transfer mission of the spacecraft with initial injection error is accomplished by using the receding horizon control method. Finally, the receding horizon controller is implemented for the transfer mission between Halo orbits. Finally numerical simulation results for nonlinear dynamics system show that the numerical method proposed for receding horizon control is effective, and it can solve the transfer mission between Halo orbits in real time. Beside, the initial injection error can be removed quickly.

  2. SeaWiFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 5; The SeaWiFS Solar Radiation-Based Calibration and the Transfer-to-Orbit Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Zalewski, Edward F.; Slater, Philip N.; Holmes, Alan W.

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation-based calibration (SRBC) of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) was performed on 1 November 1993. Measurements were made outdoors in the courtyard of the instrument manufacturer. SeaWiFS viewed the solar irradiance reflected from the sensor's diffuser in the same manner as viewed on orbit. The calibration included measurements using a solar radiometer designed to determine the transmittances of principal atmospheric constituents. The primary uncertainties in the outdoor measurements are the transmission of the atmosphere and the reflectance of the diffuser. Their combined uncertainty is about 5 or 6%. The SRBC also requires knowledge of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum. Four solar models are used. When averaged over the responses of the SeaWiFS bands, the irradiance models agree at the 3.6% level, with the greatest difference for SeaWiFS band 8. The calibration coefficients from the SRBC are lower than those from the laboratory calibration of the instrument in 1997. For a representative solar model, the ratios of the SRBC coefficients to laboratory values average 0.962 with a standard deviation of 0.012. The greatest relative difference is 0.946 for band 8. These values are within the estimated uncertainties of the calibration measurements. For the transfer-to-orbit experiment, the measurements in the manufacturer's courtyard are used to predict the digital counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit (August 1, 1997). This experiment requires an estimate of the relative change in the diffuser response for the period between the launch of the instrument and its first solar measurements on orbit (September 9, 1997). In relative terms, the counts from the instrument on its first day on orbit averaged 1.3% higher than predicted, with a standard deviation of 1.2% and a greatest difference of 2.4% or band 7. The estimated uncertainty for the transfer-to-orbit experiment is about 3 or 4%.

  3. Electron density characteristics and charge transfer effect of hydrogen bond O-H···Pt(II): atoms in molecules study and natural bond orbital analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiqiu; Li, Xiwen; Li, Yan; Chen, Dezhan

    2013-11-01

    In this report, we extended the works of Rizzato et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 7440 (2010)] on the nature of O-H...Pt hydrogen bond in trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(N-glycine)].H2O(1.H2O) complex, by computational study of O-H...Pt interaction in [NBu4][Pt(C6F5)3(8-hydroxyquinaldine)], with emphasis on charge transfer effect in this interaction of platinum(II) and hydrogen atom. According to the crystallographic geometry reported by José María Casas et al., [NBu4][Pt(C6F5)3(8-hydroxyquinaldine)] possesses one O-H...Pt hydrogen bridging interaction, similar to the case in trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(N-glycine)].H2O(1.H2O) complex. On the basis of topological criteria of electron density, we characterised this O-H...Pt interaction. Charge transferred between platinum(II) and σ*O-H orbital in this complex was calculated by using NBO method. The stabilised energy associated to charge transfer was estimated using a direct proportionality, that is 2-3 eV per electron transferred. Charge transfer effects in O-H...Pt hydrogen bonds were studied for these two complexes. Our results indicate that the interaction of O-H...Pt is closed-shell in nature with significant charge transfer, and that charge transfer effect is not negligible in the interaction of O-H...Pt. The second conclusion is different from the result of Rizzato et al.

  4. Orbital alignment dependence of electron transfer cross sections. I : H+-Na(3p) near the matching velocity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, U.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Holme, N.C.R.; Kmit, M.; Lauritsen, J.H.V.; Pedersen, J.O.P.; Richter, C.; Thomsen, J.W.; Andersen, N.; Nielsen, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results for the influence of target excitation and orbital alignment on the charge exchange process for the system H+-Na(3s,3p). The experimental velocity range covers for the first time the region around and beyond the "matching velocity" of 0.47 a.u.

  5. CNDO/SCF molecular orbital structural studies and charge transfer complex formation between 4,4’-dimethoxydiquinone and uracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar S. El-Shahawy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Through CNDO/SCF molecular orbital calculations, the structure of 4,4’-dimethoxy- diquinone (DQ has been discussed and compared with some related compounds. The electron transfer between DQ and uracil was studied in ethanol as an interaction medium. The ionization potentials and the electron affinities of the studied molecules have been calculated in addition to their charge densities giving the columbic potential energy of the donor and acceptor. The experimental charge transfer band lies at 500 nm. The electronic transitions have been calculated for the singlet and triplet transitions in uracil and DQ molecules using the SCF eigenvectors of the two HOMO’s, ψn-1 and ψ n, and the two LUMO’s, ψ n+1 and ψ n+2, using CI theory. The calculated electronic transitions are compared with those of the experimental data to verify the non-planar structure of the DQ molecule.

  6. Single-event and total-dose effects in geo-stationary transfer orbit during solar-activity maximum period measured by the Tsubasa satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiishi, H.; Kimoto, Y.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    The Tsubasa satellite developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency was launched in Feb 2002 into Geo-stationary Transfer Orbit GTO Perigee 500km Apogee 36000km and had been operated well until Sep 2003 The objective of this satellite was to verify the function of commercial parts and new technologies of bus-system components in space Thus the on-board experiments were conducted in the more severe radiation environment of GTO rather than in Geo-stationary Earth Orbit GEO or Low Earth Orbit LEO The Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment SEDA on board the Tsubasa satellite had the Single-event Upset Monitor SUM and the DOSimeter DOS to evaluate influences on electronic devices caused by radiation environment that was also measured by the particle detectors of the SEDA the Standard DOse Monitor SDOM for measurements of light particles and the Heavy Ion Telescope HIT for measurements of heavy ions The SUM monitored single-event upsets and single-event latch-ups occurred in the test sample of two 64-Mbit DRAMs The DOS measured accumulated radiation dose at fifty-six locations in the body of the Tsubasa satellite Using the data obtained by these instruments single-event and total-dose effects in GTO during solar-activity maximum period especially their rapid changes due to solar flares and CMEs in the region from L 1 1 through L 11 is discussed in this paper

  7. Nitrogen transfers and air-sea N2O fluxes in the upwelling off Namibia within the oxygen minimum zone: a 3-D model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paulmier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available As regions of high primary production and being often associated to Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs, Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N cycle. Indeed, by exporting the Organic Matter (OM and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. Losses of fixed inorganic N, through denitrification and anammox processes and through nitrous oxide (N2O emissions to the atmosphere, take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and alleviate the role of these regions as a source of N. In the present study, we developed a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical (ROMS/BioBUS model for investigating the full N budget in the Namibian sub-system of the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS. The different state variables of a climatological experiment have been compared to different data sets (satellite and in situ observations and show that the model is able to represent this biogeochemical oceanic region. The N transfer is investigated in the Namibian upwelling system using this coupled model, especially in the Walvis Bay area between 22° S and 24° S where the OMZ is well developed (O2 2 l−1. The upwelling process advects 24.2 × 1010 mol N yr−1 of nitrate enriched waters over the first 100 m over the slope and over the continental shelf. The meridional advection by the alongshore Benguela current brings also nutrient-rich waters with 21.1 × 1010 mol N yr−1. 10.5 × 1010 mol N yr−1 of OM are exported outside of the continental shelf (between 0 and 100-m depth. 32.4% and 18.1% of this OM are exported by advection in the form of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matters (DOM and POM, respectively, however vertical sinking of POM represents the main contributor (49.5% to OM export outside of the first 100-m depth of the water column on the continental shelf. The continental slope also represents a net N

  8. Application of Minimum Entropy Method in Fluid Heat Transfer on the Basis of Temperature and Enthalpy Analysis%基于温焓分析的最小熵增法在流体换热中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋卫东; 赵力

    2011-01-01

    In order to obtain the working condition of minimum heat transfer entropy increase and to avoid the maximum entropy increase, the method of minimum entropy increase based on temperature and enthalpy analysis is proposed. Firstly, with the extreme values of the entropy increase as benchmark, the expression is deduced on the basis of the relationship between temperature and enthalpy. Then, the relationships between temperature and enthalpy of the two heat transfer fluids are fitted. With a constant logarithmic mean temperature difference, the C language program is compiled to compute the heat transfer conditions of condensations of the carbon dioxide transcritical cycle and R407C heat pump cycle. The results indicate that the minimum heat transfer entropy increase will be obtained when the heat transfer temperature differences approach to the logarithmic mean temperature difference at both ends of the heat exchanger, or the cold fluid side is nearly isothermal and the outlet temperature of hot fluid is close to the inlet temperature of cold fluid. While the maximum heat transfer entropy increase will be obtained when the heat transfer fluids on both sides are isothermal; when the entropy increase with unit heat transfer rate at the pinch point is small and shows small-scale fluctuations, the system entropy increase with unit heat transfer rate will present large range fluctuations. In general, the smaller the entropy increase with unit heat transfer rate at the pinch point is, the smaller the system entropy increase with unit heat transfer rate will be. This method is not only used to forecast the working condition of minimum energy loss, but also provides a reliable theoretical way for establishing the standard design conditions of heat exchangers.%为寻求最小熵增工况,避免最大熵增的出现,提出基于温焓分析的最小熵增法.基于温焓关系推导出极值熵增工况需满足的表达式.拟合出换热流体的温焓关系.在一定

  9. Suppression of angular momentum transfer in cold collisions of transition metal atoms in ground States with nonzero orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancox, Cindy I; Doret, S Charles; Hummon, Matthew T; Krems, Roman V; Doyle, John M

    2005-01-14

    The Zeeman relaxation rate in cold collisions of Ti(3d(2)4s(2) 3F2) with He is measured. We find that collisional transfer of angular momentum is dramatically suppressed due to the presence of the filled 4s(2) shell. The degree of electronic interaction anisotropy, which is responsible for Zeeman relaxation, is estimated to be about 200 times smaller in the Ti-He complex than in He complexes with typical non-S-state atoms.

  10. Boundary problem solution of an optimal control transfer between circular orbits for an electric propulsion spacecraft in an irregular gravitational field of an asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shornikov, Andrey; Starinova, Olga

    2017-01-01

    There is a problem to control spacecraft's motion near objects with irregular gravitational fields as asteroids. In this paper we present a mathematical model of spacecraft motion with an electric propulsion engine in an irregular non-spherical gravitational field of the asteroid Eros 433. We propose to use the model of single gravity points for simulation of the motion of a spacecraft in the irregular gravitational field. The equations of spacecraft motion are corresponding equations of the n-body problem. A boundary task of the control spacecraft's transfer between circular orbits from 200 km to 100 km is considered. Authors propose a combination of the Pontryagin's maximum principle and the Newton's step by step approximation as solutions methods for the boundary problem.

  11. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Chemistry Department, Kenyatta University, P. 0. Box 43844 ... harvester (X) [L 2] in a manner consistent with the following Forster equation for long range energy transfer [3-7]. .... sensitive foods, chemical reactors and essences. Recently we ...

  12. Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory and its analytic gradients: accurate equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Sherrill, C David

    2013-08-07

    Orbital-optimized coupled-electron pair theory [or simply "optimized CEPA(0)," OCEPA(0), for short] and its analytic energy gradients are presented. For variational optimization of the molecular orbitals for the OCEPA(0) method, a Lagrangian-based approach is used along with an orbital direct inversion of the iterative subspace algorithm. The cost of the method is comparable to that of CCSD [O(N(6)) scaling] for energy computations. However, for analytic gradient computations the OCEPA(0) method is only half as expensive as CCSD since there is no need to solve the λ2-amplitude equation for OCEPA(0). The performance of the OCEPA(0) method is compared with that of the canonical MP2, CEPA(0), CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods, for equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and hydrogen transfer reactions between radicals. For bond lengths of both closed and open-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method improves upon CEPA(0) and CCSD by 25%-43% and 38%-53%, respectively, with Dunning's cc-pCVQZ basis set. Especially for the open-shell test set, the performance of OCEPA(0) is comparable with that of CCSD(T) (ΔR is 0.0003 Å on average). For harmonic vibrational frequencies of closed-shell molecules, the OCEPA(0) method again outperforms CEPA(0) and CCSD by 33%-79% and 53%-79%, respectively. For harmonic vibrational frequencies of open-shell molecules, the mean absolute error (MAE) of the OCEPA(0) method (39 cm(-1)) is fortuitously even better than that of CCSD(T) (50 cm(-1)), while the MAEs of CEPA(0) (184 cm(-1)) and CCSD (84 cm(-1)) are considerably higher. For complete basis set estimates of hydrogen transfer reaction energies, the OCEPA(0) method again exhibits a substantially better performance than CEPA(0), providing a mean absolute error of 0.7 kcal mol(-1), which is more than 6 times lower than that of CEPA(0) (4.6 kcal mol(-1)), and comparing to MP2 (7.7 kcal mol(-1)) there is a more than 10-fold reduction in errors. Whereas the MAE for the CCSD method is

  13. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study, 1985. Volume 2: OTV concept definition and evaluation. Book 4: Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jack C.; Keeley, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The benefits of the reusable Space Shuttle and the advent of the new Space Station hold promise for increasingly effective utilization of space by the scientific and commercial as well as military communities. A high energy reusable oribital transfer vehicle (OTV) represents an additional capability which also exhibits potential for enhancing space access by allowing more ambitious missions and at the same time reducing launch costs when compared to existing upper stages. This section, Vol. 2: Book 4, covers launch operations and flight operations. The launch operations section covers analyses of ground based and space based vehicles, launch site facilities, logistics requirements, propellant loading, space based maintenance and aft cargo carrier access options. The flight operations sections contain summary descriptions of ground based and space based OTV missions, operations and support requirements, and a discussion of fleet implications.

  14. Trajectory Design From GTO To Lunar Equatorial Orbit For The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) Spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Genova, Anthony L; Perez, Andres Dono; Galal, Ken F; Faber, Nicolas T; Mitchell, Scott; Landin, Brett; Datta, Abhirup; Burns, Jack O

    2015-01-01

    The trajectory design for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) mission con-cept involves launching the DARE spacecraft into a geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) as a secondary payload. From GTO, the spacecraft then transfers to a lunar orbit that is stable (i.e., no station-keeping maneuvers are required with minimum perilune altitude always above 40 km) and allows for more than 1,000 cumulative hours for science measurements in the radio-quiet region located on the lunar farside.

  15. 载人登月转移轨道偏差传播机理分析与稳健性设计%Analysis of transfer orbit deviation propagation mechanism and robust design for manned lunar landing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺波勇; 李海阳; 张波

    2013-01-01

    载人登月转移轨道具有飞行时间长,动力学模型复杂,非线性强且变系数的特点,而载人登月工程对转移轨道可靠性要求极高,研究地月转移轨道偏差传播机理和轨道稳健性设计不仅具有工程意义,更具有探索地月空间复杂引力场对轨道偏差作用的科学意义。本文首先分析了日地月中心引力和地球J2项摄动等主要作用力对转移轨道偏差的作用范围与影响大小,其次提出了一种基于标称轨道数据的变系数非线性动力学系统偏差传播机理解析分析方法,最后构建了基于偏差传播矩阵的转移轨道稳健性评价指标,并基于NSGA-II (Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithms)算法求解了载人登月转移轨道稳健性优化设计问题。仿真结果表明,本文提出的偏差传播机理分析方法能快速准确地求解出载人登月转移轨道偏差传播矩阵,利用偏差传播矩阵进行协方差分析和中途修正脉冲计算是简单准确的,考虑稳健性的转移轨道优化设计可以提高标称轨道品质。%Earth-moon transfer orbit for manned lunar landing needs a long flight time, complex, nonlinear and variable coefficient dynamics model, and asks for a high reliability. Analysis of deviation propagation mechanism and robust design of transfer orbit are investigated in this paper. It is not only practical for projecting, but also significant for exploring the role of earth-moon space gravitational field upon transfer orbit deviation. This paper analyses firstly the boundary and the amplitude of the sun, earth, and moon central gravitation, the earth J2 perturbation that affect the transfer orbit deviation transmission. And then a method to analyse the deviation propagation mechanism based on nominal orbital data is obtained analytically. A robust indicator of transfer orbit based on deviation transition matrix is proposed,and a robust optimization design method that employs NSGA

  16. Orbiter OMS and RCS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Orbiter Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) and Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) tankage has proved to be highly successful in shuttle flights on-orbit propellant transfer tests were done. Tank qualification tests along with flight demonstrations were carried out future uses of storable propellants are cited.

  17. 利用能量分析方法研究太阳帆的轨道转移%The orbit transfer design of solar sail based on energy analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张轲; 周凤歧; 祝开建; 熊菁

    2011-01-01

    Aim To study the orbit transfer problem of solar sails from a circular orbit around the Earth to the artificial Lagrange points under the conditions of Hill's restricted three-body problem. Methods Energy analysis method is used. In the parking orbit around the Earth, solar sail is expanded and the impulse is applied simultaneously. Then solar sail flies into the transfer orbit of artificial Lagrange point. Without active control, under certain attitude angle, solar sail moves into artificial Lagrange point stably. Results The analytical method is used to analyze the theoretical optimum of the orbital transfer, the result is close to the value of numerical result. Conclusion When the solar sail's attitude angle remains unchanged, it determines the constant of generalized energy. If attitude angle stays in several areas, an optimal transfer orbit exists. In these areas, the right attitude angle can be chosen to minimize the transfer energy from a certain orbit height to artificial Lagrange point. Meanwhile the transfer time is also shorter.%目的 考虑在Hill限制性三体问题的条件下,研究太阳帆从地球附近的圆轨道到人工拉格朗日点的轨道转移问题.方法 利用能量分析的方法,在地球附近的停泊轨道施加脉冲同时展开太阳帆,让太阳帆进入人工拉格朗日点的转移轨道,在无主动控制的情况下,太阳帆以某一姿态角沿转移轨道被动稳定地飞行到人工拉格朗日点.结果 利用解析方法分析了轨道转移的理论最优值,并与数值结果进行比较发现两者非常接近.结论 当太阳帆的姿态角保持不变的情况下,太阳帆的姿态角决定了太阳帆的广义能量常数.姿态角在几个区域内时,存在着最优转移轨道.在这些区域内,可以选择合适的姿态角使得从某一个轨道高度到人工拉格朗日点的转移能量最小,同时转移时间也较小.

  18. Orbital-selective charge transfer at oxygen-deficient LaAlO3/SrTiO3(001) interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, P. V.; Lee, Jaichan

    2013-05-01

    Density-functional theory within the local density approximation + Hubbard U approach was used to study interface electronic structures in stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) superlattices with regularly spaced n-type and p-type interfaces. Asymmetric behaviors between complementary n-type and p-type interfaces were revealed in terms of orbital-selective charge transfer. Extra electrons induced by oxygen vacancies at the p-type interface easily spread to the n-type interface and occupy the Ti 3dxyorbitals, while those induced by the vacancies at the n-type interface are strictly confined and reside in Ti 3dx2-y2 and/or 3d3z2-r2 orbtials. The electronic behavior of oxygen vacancies at the LAO/STO interfaces and the possibility of distinguishing between intrinsic electronic states, which are induced by the polar catastrophe, and extrinsic states due to oxygen vacancies are discussed in detail.

  19. Orbital cellulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemolytic streptococci may also cause orbital cellulitis. Orbital cellulitis infections in children may get worse very quickly and ... in the space around the eye. An orbital cellulitis infection can get worse very quickly. A person with ...

  20. Solar sail heliocentric transfer orbit control based on analytical control laws%基于解析控制律的太阳帆星际转移轨道控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史晓宁; 郭继峰; 荣思远; 崔乃刚

    2013-01-01

    Solar sail spacecrafts can provide motivation rely on reflecting the sun photons, so that it is suitable for long distance interstellar transfer task. Aiming at the problem of solar sail interstellar transfer orbit control, a new analytical control law is presented. This control law can realize the combination control of each orbit elements by setting the blending weights. The modified equinoctial orbital elements are introduced to the optimal derivation of the analytical optimal control law, and numerical simulations for the method are performed based on mercury exploration mission. Simulation results show that, the proposed control law has higher computational speed and the capability of realizing the combination control of each orbit elements, thus the solar sail interstellar transfer orbit can be obtained, which can satisfy the requirements of the project.%太阳帆航天器可依靠反射太阳光子提供动力,因此较适用于远距离的星际转移任务.针对太阳帆航天器星际转移轨道控制问题,提出一种新的解析最优控制律,通过设定混合权重对各轨道根数进行联合控制.引入改进春分点轨道根数对解析控制律进行了优化推导,并以水星探测任务为背景进行了相应的仿真分析.仿真结果表明,该控制律计算速度较快,可对各个轨道根数进行联合控制,从而得到满足工程要求的太阳帆航天器星际转移轨道.

  1. Electronic Coupling Calculations for Bridge-Mediated Charge Transfer Using Constrained Density Functional Theory (CDFT) and Effective Hamiltonian Approaches at the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Fragment-Orbital Density Functional Tight Binding (FODFTB) Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillet, Natacha; Berstis, Laura; Wu, Xiaojing; Gajdos, Fruzsina; Heck, Alexander; de la Lande, Aurelien; Blumberger, Jochen; Elstner, Marcus

    2016-10-11

    In this article, four methods to calculate charge transfer integrals in the context of bridge-mediated electron transfer are tested. These methods are based on density functional theory (DFT). We consider two perturbative Green's function effective Hamiltonian methods (first, at the DFT level of theory, using localized molecular orbitals; second, applying a tight-binding DFT approach, using fragment orbitals) and two constrained DFT implementations with either plane-wave or local basis sets. To assess the performance of the methods for through-bond (TB)-dominated or through-space (TS)-dominated transfer, different sets of molecules are considered. For through-bond electron transfer (ET), several molecules that were originally synthesized by Paddon-Row and co-workers for the deduction of electronic coupling values from photoemission and electron transmission spectroscopies, are analyzed. The tested methodologies prove to be successful in reproducing experimental data, the exponential distance decay constant and the superbridge effects arising from interference among ET pathways. For through-space ET, dedicated p-stacked systems with heterocyclopentadiene molecules were created and analyzed on the basis of electronic coupling dependence on donor-acceptor distance, structure of the bridge, and ET barrier height. The inexpensive fragment-orbital density functional tight binding (FODFTB) method gives similar results to constrained density functional theory (CDFT) and both reproduce the expected exponential decay of the coupling with donor-acceptor distances and the number of bridging units. These four approaches appear to give reliable results for both TB and TS ET and present a good alternative to expensive ab initio methodologies for large systems involving long-range charge transfers.

  2. Electronic Coupling Calculations for Bridge-Mediated Charge Transfer Using Constrained Density Functional Theory (CDFT) and Effective Hamiltonian Approaches at the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Fragment-Orbital Density Functional Tight Binding (FODFTB) Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Natacha; Berstis, Laura; Wu, Xiaojing; Gajdos, Fruzsina; Heck, Alexander; de la Lande, Aurélien; Blumberger, Jochen; Elstner, Marcus

    2016-10-11

    In this article, four methods to calculate charge transfer integrals in the context of bridge-mediated electron transfer are tested. These methods are based on density functional theory (DFT). We consider two perturbative Green's function effective Hamiltonian methods (first, at the DFT level of theory, using localized molecular orbitals; second, applying a tight-binding DFT approach, using fragment orbitals) and two constrained DFT implementations with either plane-wave or local basis sets. To assess the performance of the methods for through-bond (TB)-dominated or through-space (TS)-dominated transfer, different sets of molecules are considered. For through-bond electron transfer (ET), several molecules that were originally synthesized by Paddon-Row and co-workers for the deduction of electronic coupling values from photoemission and electron transmission spectroscopies, are analyzed. The tested methodologies prove to be successful in reproducing experimental data, the exponential distance decay constant and the superbridge effects arising from interference among ET pathways. For through-space ET, dedicated π-stacked systems with heterocyclopentadiene molecules were created and analyzed on the basis of electronic coupling dependence on donor-acceptor distance, structure of the bridge, and ET barrier height. The inexpensive fragment-orbital density functional tight binding (FODFTB) method gives similar results to constrained density functional theory (CDFT) and both reproduce the expected exponential decay of the coupling with donor-acceptor distances and the number of bridging units. These four approaches appear to give reliable results for both TB and TS ET and present a good alternative to expensive ab initio methodologies for large systems involving long-range charge transfers.

  3. New model of angular momentum transfer from the rotating central body of a two-body system into the orbital motion of this system (with application to the earth-moon system)

    CERN Document Server

    Schmutzer, E

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper we treated within the framework of our Projective Unified Field Theory (Schmutzer 2004, Schmutzer 2005a) the 2-body system (e.g. earth-moon system) with a rotating central body in a rather abstract manner. Here a concrete model of the transfer of angular momentum from the rotating central body to the orbital motion of the whole 2-body system is presented, where particularly the transfer is caused by the inhomogeneous gravitational force of the moon acting on the oceanic waters of the earth, being modeled by a spherical shell around the solid earth. The theory is numerically tested. Key words: transfer of angular momentum from earth to moon, action of the gravitational force of the moon on the waters of the earth.

  4. LLOFX earth orbit to lunar orbit delta V estimation program user and technical documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The LLOFX computer program calculates in-plane trajectories from an Earth-orbiting space station to Lunar orbit in such a way that the journey requires only two delta V burns (one to leave Earth circular orbit and one to circularize into Lunar orbit). The program requires the user to supply the Space Station altitude and Lunar orbit altitude (in km above the surface), and the desired time of flight for the transfer (in hours). It then determines and displays the trans-Lunar injection (TLI) delta V required to achieve the transfer, the Lunar orbit insertion (LOI) delta V required to circularize the orbit around the Moon, the actual time of flight, and whether the transfer orbit is elliptical or hyperbolic. Return information is also displayed. Finally, a plot of the transfer orbit is displayed.

  5. A spin transfer torque magnetoresistance random access memory-based high-density and ultralow-power associative memory for fully data-adaptive nearest neighbor search with current-mode similarity evaluation and time-domain minimum searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yitao; Miura, Sadahiko; Honjo, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Shoji; Hanyu, Takahiro; Ohno, Hideo; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2017-04-01

    A high-density nonvolatile associative memory (NV-AM) based on spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory (STT-MRAM), which achieves highly concurrent and ultralow-power nearest neighbor search with full adaptivity of the template data format, has been proposed and fabricated using the 90 nm CMOS/70 nm perpendicular-magnetic-tunnel-junction hybrid process. A truly compact current-mode circuitry is developed to realize flexibly controllable and high-parallel similarity evaluation, which makes the NV-AM adaptable to any dimensionality and component-bit of template data. A compact dual-stage time-domain minimum searching circuit is also developed, which can freely extend the system for more template data by connecting multiple NM-AM cores without additional circuits for integrated processing. Both the embedded STT-MRAM module and the computing circuit modules in this NV-AM chip are synchronously power-gated to completely eliminate standby power and maximally reduce operation power by only activating the currently accessed circuit blocks. The operations of a prototype chip at 40 MHz are demonstrated by measurement. The average operation power is only 130 µW, and the circuit density is less than 11 µm2/bit. Compared with the latest conventional works in both volatile and nonvolatile approaches, more than 31.3% circuit area reductions and 99.2% power improvements are achieved, respectively. Further power performance analyses are discussed, which verify the special superiority of the proposed NV-AM in low-power and large-memory-based VLSIs.

  6. Minimum-fuel station-change for geostationary satellites using low-thrust considering perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, ShuGe; Zhang, JingRui

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to find the minimum-fuel station change for geostationary satellites with low-thrust while considering significant perturbation forces for geostationary Earth orbit (GEO). The effect of Earth's triaxiality, lunisolar perturbations, and solar radiation pressure on the terminal conditions of a long duration GEO transfer is derived and used for establishing the station change model with consideration of significant perturbation forces. A method is presented for analytically evaluating the effect of Earth's triaxiality on the semimajor axis and longitude during a station change. The minimum-fuel problem is solved by the indirect optimization method. The easier and related minimum-energy problem is first addressed and then the energy-to-fuel homotopy is employed to finally obtain the solution of the minimum-fuel problem. Several effective techniques are employed in solving the two-point boundary-value problem with a shooting method to overcome the problem of the small convergence radius and the sensitivity of the initial costate variables. These methods include normalization of the initial costate vector, computation of the analytic Jacobians matrix, and switching detection. The simulation results show that the solution of the minimum-fuel station change with low-thrust considering significant perturbation forces can be obtained by applying these preceding techniques.

  7. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Aiyub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  8. On periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some results on existence, minimum period, number of periodic orbits, and stability of periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems. Some examples are presented to illustrate these results.

  9. Aerobrake assembly with minimum Space Station accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, Steven J.; Butler, David H.; Doggett, William R.; Russell, James W.; Hurban, Theresa

    1991-01-01

    The minimum Space Station Freedom accommodations required for initial assembly, repair, and refurbishment of the Lunar aerobrake were investigated. Baseline Space Station Freedom support services were assumed, as well as reasonable earth-to-orbit possibilities. A set of three aerobrake configurations representative of the major themes in aerobraking were developed. Structural assembly concepts, along with on-orbit assembly and refurbishment scenarios were created. The scenarios were exercised to identify required Space Station Freedom accommodations. Finally, important areas for follow-on study were also identified.

  10. Uncertainty Requirement Analysis for the Orbit, Attitude, and Burn Performance of the 1st Lunar Orbit Insertion Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Joo; Bae, Jonghee; Kim, Young-Rok; Kim, Bang-Yeop

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the uncertainty requirements for orbit, attitude, and burn performance were estimated and analyzed for the execution of the 1st lunar orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver of the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO) mission. During the early design phase of the system, associate analysis is an essential design factor as the 1st LOI maneuver is the largest burn that utilizes the onboard propulsion system; the success of the lunar capture is directly affected by the performance achieved. For the analysis, the spacecraft is assumed to have already approached the periselene with a hyperbolic arrival trajectory around the moon. In addition, diverse arrival conditions and mission constraints were considered, such as varying periselene approach velocity, altitude, and orbital period of the capture orbit after execution of the 1st LOI maneuver. The current analysis assumed an impulsive LOI maneuver, and two-body equations of motion were adapted to simplify the problem for a preliminary analysis. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the statistical analysis to analyze diverse uncertainties that might arise at the moment when the maneuver is executed. As a result, three major requirements were analyzed and estimated for the early design phase. First, the minimum requirements were estimated for the burn performance to be captured around the moon. Second, the requirements for orbit, attitude, and maneuver burn performances were simultaneously estimated and analyzed to maintain the 1st elliptical orbit achieved around the moon within the specified orbital period. Finally, the dispersion requirements on the B-plane aiming at target points to meet the target insertion goal were analyzed and can be utilized as reference target guidelines for a mid-course correction (MCC) maneuver during the transfer. More detailed system requirements for the KPLO mission, particularly for the spacecraft bus itself and for the flight dynamics subsystem at the ground control center

  11. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles: Moderate lift/drag (0.75-1.5). Volume 3: Cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary, phase 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Technology payoffs of representative ground based (Phase 1) and space based (Phase 2) mid lift/drag ratio aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles (AOTV) were assessed and prioritized. A narrative summary of the cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary for both study phases is presented. Costs were estimated using the Grumman Space Programs Algorithm for Cost Estimating (SPACE) computer program and results are given for four AOTV configurations. The work breakdown structure follows the standard of the joint government/industry Space Systems Cost Analysis Group (SSCAG). A table is provided which shows cost estimates for each work breakdown structure element.

  12. On the optimization of the generalized coplanar Hohmann impulsive transfer adopting energy change concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamel, Osman M. [Cairo Univ., Astronomy and Space Sciences Dept., Giza (Egypt); Soliman, Adel S. [National Research Center, Theoretical Physics Dept., Dokki, Giza (Egypt)

    2005-02-15

    We considered the problem of transferring the rocket's orbit to higher energy orbit, using minimum fuel cost, as a problem in change of energy, since this is most convenient. For the generalized Hohmann case (the departure; the transferring and the destination orbits are ellipses), we adopt the first configuration only, when the apogee of transfer orbit, and the apogee of destination orbit are coincident. Firstly, we assign the {delta}v{sub A}, {delta}v{sub B} increments in velocity at points A,B (the position of peri-apse and apo-apse impulses respectively), as functions of the eccentricity of the transfer orbit, e{sub T}. Subsequently, we apply the optimum condition leading to the derivation of the quartic equation in e{sub T}, and showed how to deduce ({delta}v{sub A}+{delta}v{sub B}){sub Min}. A numerical example is presented, in which we determined the four roots of the quartic equation, by a numerical Mathematica Version 2.2. We selected the adequate consistent root, only one in this case, and evaluated ({delta}v{sub A}+{delta}v{sub B}){sub Min} for the two orbits of the couple Earth and Mars. This article is a new approach and leads to new discoveries involved in the problem, consequently adds new insight and avoids complexities of previous procedures. (Author)

  13. Minimum dV for Targeted Spacecraft Disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, John

    2017-01-01

    The density scale height of the Earth's atmosphere undergoes significant reduction in the final phases of a natural decay. It can be shown that for most realistic ballistic numbers, it is possible to exploit this effect to amplify available spacecraft dV by using it at the penultimate perigee to penetrate into higher drag regions at final apogee. The drag at this lower pass can more effectively propel a spacecraft towards the final target region than applying the same dV direct Hohmann transfer at that final apogee. This study analyzes the potential use of this effect-- in combination with small phasing burns--to calculate the absolute minimum delta-V that would be required to reliably guide a spacecraft to any specified safe unoccupied ocean region as a function of ballistic number, orbit inclination, and initial eccentricity. This calculation is made for controllable spacecraft in several orbit inclinations and eccentricities with arbitrary initial LAN and ArgP one week before final entry, under three-sigma atmospheric perturbations. The study analyzes the dV required under varying levels of final controllable altitude at which dV may be imparted, and various definitions of the length and location of a "safe" disposal area. The goal of such research is to improve public safety by creating assured safe disposal strategies for low-dV and/or low-thrust spacecraft that under more traditional strategies would need to be abandoned to a fully random decay.

  14. Minimum Length - Maximum Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Panes, Boris

    2011-01-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA about superluminal neutrinos.

  15. Application and analysis of formation satellites cluster orbit transfer based on genetic algorithm%遗传算法在编队卫星群轨道机动中的应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李京生; 邓忠民

    2009-01-01

    Orbit transfer of formation satellites was a potential way for future spacecrafts. The Lambert maneuver problem of formation satellites with initial and target positions was studied. Relative motion model including central orbit elements and perturbation was set up using Gim-Alfriend matrix, and an impulse thrust control strategy for coordinated formation keeping on transfer orbit was designed. Genetic algorithm (GA) was applied to optimize the maneuver of formation satellites, with the goal to minimize the total fuel consumption, or weighted index which concerns the fuel consumption and time duration. Factors affecting fuel consumption were analyzed. Simulation results indicate that GA is available to solve the maneuver problem of formation satellites.%卫星群机动是航天器发展的一个方向.针对编队卫星群的Lambert机动问题,采用Gim-Alfriend矩阵建立了包含中心轨道根数和摄动项的群卫星的相对运动模型,设计了转移轨道上的卫星群队形协同保持的脉冲控制策略.应用遗传算法对编队卫星群轨道机动问题进行了优化,优化指标分别为卫星群协同变轨过程中总燃料消耗最少或燃料均衡分配最小.分析了群机动过程中燃料消耗的影响因素.算例结果表明遗传算法可以很好地应用于编队卫星群机动问题.

  16. Orbital pseudotumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Goodlick TA, Kay MD, Glaser JS, Tse DT, Chang WJ. Orbital disease and neuro-ophthalmology. In: Tasman ... 423. Review Date 8/20/2016 Updated by: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La ...

  17. Study of the deformation-driving νd5/2 orbital in 6728Ni39 using one-neutron transfer reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Diriken

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The νg9/2,d5/2,s1/2 orbitals are assumed to be responsible for the swift onset of collectivity observed in the region below 68Ni. Especially the single-particle energies and strengths of these orbitals are of importance. We studied such properties in the nearby 67Ni nucleus, by performing a (d,p-experiment in inverse kinematics employing a post-accelerated radioactive ion beam (RIB at the REX-ISOLDE facility. The experiment was performed at an energy of 2.95 MeV/u using a combination of the T-REX particle detectors, the Miniball γ-detection array and a newly-developed delayed-correlation technique as to investigate μs-isomers. Angular distributions of the ground state and multiple excited states in 67Ni were obtained and compared with DWBA cross-section calculations, leading to the identification of positive-parity states with substantial νg9/2 (1007 keV and νd5/2 (2207 keV and 3277 keV single-particle strengths up to an excitation energy of 5.8 MeV. 50% of the νd5/2 single-particle strength relative to the νg9/2-orbital is concentrated in and shared between the first two observed 5/2+ levels. A comparison with extended Shell Model calculations and equivalent (3He, d studies in the region around 9040Zr50 highlights similarities for the strength of the negative-parity pf and positive-parity g9/2 state, but differences are observed for the d5/2 single-particle strength.

  18. Foreign body orbital cyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanfard, Younes; Heegard, Steffen; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology......Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology...

  19. Long-term orbital period behaviour of contact binaries V343 Ori and FZ Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Muhammed Faruk; Soydugan, Faruk

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated orbital period variations of two contact binaries V343 Ori and FZ Ori based on published minima times. Using the O-C analysis, it was found that both systems indicate orbital period increase. Mass transfer from less massive component to more massive component was used to explain increases in the orbital periods. On the other hand, the secular changes in their periods can be a sign of the thermal relaxation oscillation. In the O-C diagram of FZ Ori, periodic variations also exist. Cyclic periodic changes can be explained as being the result of a light-travel time effect via a tertiary body around the eclipsing pair. The minimum mass of probable tertiary component around FZ Ori was found to be 0.63 M⊙. In addition, the cyclic variation may be evidence of magnetic activity of the components, which are late-type stars.

  20. 'Orbital volume restoration rate after orbital fracture'; a CT-based orbital volume measurement for evaluation of orbital wall reconstructive effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, J M; Sung, K H; Chi, M

    2017-01-13

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of orbital reconstruction and factors related to the effect of orbital reconstruction by assessing of orbital volume using orbital computed tomography (CT) in cases of orbital wall fracture.MethodsIn this retrospective study, 68 patients with isolated blowout fractures were evaluated. The volumes of orbits and herniated orbital tissues were determined by CT scans using a three-dimensional reconstruction technique (the Eclipse Treatment Planning System). Orbital CT was performed preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and at final follow ups (minimum of 6 months). We evaluated the reconstructive effect of surgery making a new formula, 'orbital volume reconstruction rate' from orbital volume differences between fractured and contralateral orbits before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at final follow up.ResultsMean volume of fractured orbits before surgery was 23.01±2.60 cm(3) and that of contralateral orbits was 21.31±2.50 cm(3) (P=0.005). Mean volume of the fractured orbits immediately after surgery was 21.29±2.42 cm(3), and that of the contralateral orbits was 21.33±2.52 cm(3) (P=0.921). Mean volume of fractured orbits at final follow up was 21.50±2.44 cm(3), and that of contralateral orbits was 21.32±2.50 cm(3) (P=0.668). The mean orbital volume reconstruction rate was 100.47% immediately after surgery and 99.17% at final follow up. No significant difference in orbital volume reconstruction rate was observed with respect to fracture site or orbital implant type. Patients that underwent operation within 14 days of trauma had a better reconstruction rate at final follow up than patients who underwent operation over 14 days after trauma (P=0.039).ConclusionComputer-based measurements of orbital fracture volume can be used to evaluate the reconstructive effect of orbital implants and provide useful quantitative information. Significant reduction of orbital volume is observed immediately after orbital wall

  1. Orbital Fluid Resupply Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.

    1989-01-01

    Orbital fluid resupply can significantly increase the cost-effectiveness and operational flexibility of spacecraft, satellites, and orbiting platforms and observatories. Reusable tankers are currently being designed for transporting fluids to space. A number of options exist for transporting the fluids and propellant to the space-based user systems. The fluids can be transported to space either in the Shuttle cargo bay or using expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). Resupply can thus be accomplished either from the Shuttle bay, or the tanker can be removed from the Shuttle bay or launched on an ELV and attached to a carrier such as the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) or Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) for transport to the user to be serviced. A third option involves locating the tanker at the space station or an unmanned platform as a quasi-permanent servicing facility or depot which returns to the ground for recycling once its tanks are depleted. Current modular tanker designs for monopropellants, bipropellants, and water for space station propulsion are discussed. Superfluid helium tankers are addressed, including trade-offs in tanker sizes, shapes to fit the range of ELVs currently available, and boil-off losses associated with longer-term (greater than 6-month) space-basing. It is concluded that the mixed fleet approach to on-orbit consumables resupply offers significant advantages to the overall logistics requirements.

  2. Solar sail time-optimal interplanetary transfer trajectory design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Ping Gong; Yun-Feng Gao; Jun-Feng Li

    2011-01-01

    The fuel consumption associated with some interplanetary transfer trajectories using chemical propulsion is not affordable.A solar sail is a method of propulsion that does not consume fuel.Transfer time is one of the most pressing problems of solar sail transfer trajectory design.This paper investigates the time-optimal interplanetary transfer trajectories to a circular orbit of given inclination and radius.The optimal control law is derived from the principle of maximization.An indirect method is used to solve the optimal control problem by selecting values for the initial adjoint variables,which are normalized within a unit sphere.The conditions for the existence of the time-optimal transfer are dependent on the lightness number of the sail and the inclination and radius of the target orbit.A numerical method is used to obtain the boundary values for the time-optimal transfer trajectories.For the cases where no time-optimal transfer trajectories exist,first-order necessary conditions of the optimal control are proposed to obtain feasible solutions.The results show that the transfer time decreases as the minimum distance from the Sun decreases during the transfer duration.For a solar sail with a small lightness number,the transfer time may be evaluated analytically for a three-phase transfer trajectory.The analytical results are compared with previous results and the associated numerical results.The transfer time of the numerical result here is smaller than the transfer time from previous results and is larger than the analytical result.

  3. Starshade Orbital Maneuver Study for WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Gabriel; Savransky, Dmitry; Garrett, Daniel; Delacroix, Christian; Sinha, Amlan

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, scheduled for launch in the mid-2020s will perform exoplanet science via both microlensing surveys and direct imaging. Currently, an internal coronagraph is planned to perform starlight suppression for exoplanet imaging. Alternatively, an external starshade could be used to achieve the required high contrasts. A starshade could potentially have higher throughput than an equivalent coronagraph, would also have the benefit of a wavelength-independent inner working angle (IWA), and would remove the requirement of deformable mirrors in the telescope optics. The starshade approach would require a separately-launched occulter spacecraft to be positioned at exact distances from the telescope along the line of sight to a target star system. We perform a detailed study to quantify the Δv requirements and feasibility of deploying this additional spacecraft as a means of exoplanet imaging. The fuel use of the occulter can be categorized into two phases: station-keeping during imaging and repositioning between different targets. WFIRST is assumed to be in a halo orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 point with an out of plane amplitude of 250,000km. Based on its designed IWA, the occulter is given an offset distance from the nominal WFIRST orbit. Target star systems and look vectors are generated using Exoplanet Open-Source Imaging Simulator (EXOSIMS); a boundary value problem is then solved between successive targets. Given a list of possible targets, the minimum time and minimum Δv transfers are computed. These methods are used to estimate the number of possible observations that could be performed with the expected available fuel mass limit imposed by the likely occulter launch vehicle.

  4. Minimum Nuclear Deterrence Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-15

    délivrer une frappe d’ultime avertissement sur des objectifs navals ou terrestres ." The translation is the SAIC author’s. Projet de loi de finances... orbit .”75 As China’s nuclear force posture has changed, so too have the assigned targets. For example, the DF-2 was initially based to target Japan

  5. Reversible Switching of Redox-Active Molecular Orbitals and Electron Transfer Pathways in Cu(A) Sites of Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitare, Ulises; Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Morgada, Marcos N; Abriata, Luciano A; Vila, Alejandro J; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-08-10

    The Cu(A) site of cytochrome c oxidase is a redox hub that participates in rapid electron transfer at low driving forces with two redox cofactors in nearly perpendicular orientations. Spectroscopic and electrochemical characterizations performed on first and second-sphere mutants have allowed us to experimentally detect the reversible switching between two alternative electronic states that confer different directionalities to the redox reaction. Specifically, the M160H variant of a native Cu(A) shows a reversible pH transition that allows to functionally probe both states in the same protein species. Alternation between states exerts a dramatic impact on the kinetic redox parameters, thereby suggesting this effect as the mechanism underlying the efficiency and directionality of Cu(A) electron transfer in vivo. These findings may also prove useful for the development of molecular electronics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Three planets orbiting Wolf 1061

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, D J; Tinney, C G; Bentley, J S; Zhao, Jinglin

    2015-01-01

    We use archival HARPS spectra to detect three planets orbiting the M3 dwarf Wolf1061 (GJ 628). We detect a 1.36 Mearth minimum-mass planet with an orbital period P = 4.888d (Wolf1061b), a 4.25 Mearth minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 17.867d (Wolf1061c), and a likely 5.21 Mearth minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 67.274d (Wolf1061d). All of the planets are of sufficiently low mass that they may be rocky in nature. The 17.867d planet falls within the habitable zone for Wolf 1061 and the 67.274d planet falls just outside the outer boundary of the habitable zone. There are no signs of activity observed in the bisector spans, cross-correlation full-width-half-maxima, Calcium H & K indices, NaD indices, or H-alpha indices near the planetary periods. We use custom methods to generate a cross-correlation template tailored to the star. The resulting velocities do not suffer the strong annual variation observed in the HARPS DRS velocities. This differential technique should deliver better exploi...

  7. THREE PLANETS ORBITING WOLF 1061

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D. J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Tinney, C. G.; Bentley, J. S.; Zhao, Jinglin, E-mail: duncan.wright@unsw.edu.au [Department of Astronomy and Australian Centre for Astrobiology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    We use archival HARPS spectra to detect three planets orbiting the M3 dwarf Wolf 1061 (GJ 628). We detect a 1.36 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with an orbital period P = 4.888 days (Wolf 1061b), a 4.25 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 17.867 days (Wolf 1061c), and a likely 5.21 M{sub ⊕} minimum-mass planet with orbital period P = 67.274 days (Wolf 1061d). All of the planets are of sufficiently low mass that they may be rocky in nature. The 17.867 day planet falls within the habitable zone for Wolf 1061 and the 67.274 day planet falls just outside the outer boundary of the habitable zone. There are no signs of activity observed in the bisector spans, cross-correlation FWHMs, calcium H and K indices, NaD indices, or Hα indices near the planetary periods. We use custom methods to generate a cross-correlation template tailored to the star. The resulting velocities do not suffer the strong annual variation observed in the HARPS DRS velocities. This differential technique should deliver better exploitation of the archival HARPS data for the detection of planets at extremely low amplitudes.

  8. Charge transfer and orbital reconstruction in the (La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3}){sub m}/(SrRuO{sub 3}){sub n} superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Kai [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstrucutres, Lab of Solid State Microstructures, School of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Physics and Electronic information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China); Zhu, H. P.; Zou, W. Q.; Zhang, F. M.; Wu, X. S., E-mail: xswu@nju.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstrucutres, Lab of Solid State Microstructures, School of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-05-14

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of (La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3}){sub m}/(SrRuO{sub 3}){sub n} superlattices have been investigated based on the first principles calculations. An obvious Jahn-Teller distortion, which depends on m, n, appears in MnO{sub 6} octahedron in the superlattices. The stretch along c-axis of MnO{sub 6} octahedron at the interface lifts the Mn e{sub g} orbital degeneracy, with electrons preferring the lower energy 3z{sup 2}−r{sup 2} to the higher energy x{sup 2}−y{sup 2}. Benefitting from the charge transfer at the interface, the still occupied x{sup 2}−y{sup 2} orbital can mediate a robust in-plane double exchange interaction. La{sub 2/3}Sr{sub 1/3}MnO{sub 3} block is ferromagnetic and metallic, even for the superlattice with m = n = 1.

  9. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  10. Minimum Entropy Orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinal, Jean; Joret, Gwenaël

    2008-01-01

    We study graph orientations that minimize the entropy of the in-degree sequence. The problem of finding such an orientation is an interesting special case of the minimum entropy set cover problem previously studied by Halperin and Karp [Theoret. Comput. Sci., 2005] and by the current authors [Algorithmica, to appear]. We prove that the minimum entropy orientation problem is NP-hard even if the graph is planar, and that there exists a simple linear-time algorithm that returns an approximate solution with an additive error guarantee of 1 bit. This improves on the only previously known algorithm which has an additive error guarantee of log_2 e bits (approx. 1.4427 bits).

  11. Three Temperate Neptunes Orbiting Nearby Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fulton, Benjamin J; Weiss, Lauren M; Sinukoff, Evan; Petigura, Erik A; Isaacson, Howard; Hirsch, Lea; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Henry, Gregory W; Grunblatt, Samuel K; Huber, Daniel; von Braun, Kaspar; Boyajian, Tabetha S; Kane, Stephen R; Wittrock, Justin; Horch, Elliott P; Ciardi, David R; Howell, Steve B; Wright, Jason T; Ford, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of three modestly-irradiated, roughly Neptune-mass planets orbiting three nearby Solar-type stars. HD 42618 b has a minimum mass of $15.4 \\pm 2.4$ M$_{\\oplus}$, a semi-major axis of 0.55 AU, an equilibrium temperature of 337 K, and is the first planet discovered to orbit the solar analogue host star, HD 42618. We also discover new planets orbiting the known exoplanet host stars HD 164922 and HD 143761 ($\\rho$ CrB). The new planet orbiting HD 164922 has a minimum mass of $12.9 \\pm 1.6$ M$_{\\oplus}$ and orbits interior to the previously known Jovian mass planet orbiting at 2.1 AU. HD 164922 c has a semi-major axis of 0.34 AU and an equilibrium temperature of 418 K. HD 143761 c orbits with a semi-major axis of 0.44 AU, has a minimum mass of $25 \\pm 2$ M$_{\\oplus}$, and is the warmest of the three new planets with an equilibrium temperature of 445 K. It orbits exterior to the previously known warm Jupiter in the system. A transit search using space-based CoRoT data and ground-based photom...

  12. DILEMATIKA PENETAPAN UPAH MINIMUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Pitaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the effort of creating appropiate wage for employees, it is necessary to determine the wages by considering the increase of poverty without ignoring the increase of productivity, the progressivity of companies and the growth of economic. The new minimum wages in the provincial level and the regoinal/municipality level have been implemented per 1st January in Indonesia since 2001. The determination of minimum wage for provinvial level should be done 30 days before 1st January, whereas the determination of minimumwage for regional/municipality level should be done 40 days before 1st January. Moreover,there is an article which governs thet the minimumwage will be revised annually. By considering the time of determination and the time of revision above,it can be predicted that before and after the determination date will be crucial time. This is because the controversy among parties in industrial relationships will arise. The determination of minimum wage will always become a dilemmatic step which has to be done by the Government. Through this policy, on one side the government attempts to attract many investors, however, on the other side the government also has to protect the employees in order to have the appropiate wage in accordance with the standard of living.

  13. Minimum quality standards and exports

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the interaction of a minimum quality standard and exports in a vertical product differentiation model when firms sell global products. If ex ante quality of foreign firms is lower (higher) than the quality of exporting firms, a mild minimum quality standard in the home market hinders (supports) exports. The minimum quality standard increases quality in both markets. A welfare maximizing minimum quality standard is always lower under trade than under autarky. A minimum quali...

  14. Modelling the impact of blood flow on the temperature distribution in the human eye and the orbit: fixed heat transfer coefficients versus the Pennes bioheat model versus discrete blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flyckt, V M M; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-10-07

    Prediction of the temperature distribution in the eye depends on how the impact of the blood flow is taken into account. Three methods will be compared: a simplified eye anatomy that applies a single heat transfer coefficient to describe all heat transport mechanisms between the sclera and the body core, a detailed eye anatomy in which the blood flow is accounted for either by the bioheat approach, or by including the discrete vasculature in the eye and the orbit. The comparison is done both for rabbit and human anatomies, normo-thermally and when exposed to homogeneous power densities. The first simplified model predicts much higher temperatures than the latter two. It was shown that the eye is very hard to heat when taking physiological perfusion correctly into account. It was concluded that the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat transport from the sclera to the body core reported in the literature for the first simplified model is too low. The bioheat approach is appropriate for a first-order approximation of the temperature distribution in the eye when exposed to a homogeneous power density, but the discrete vasculature down to 0.2 mm in diameter needs to be taken into account when the heterogeneity of the temperature distribution at a mm scale is of interest.

  15. Modelling the impact of blood flow on the temperature distribution in the human eye and the orbit: fixed heat transfer coefficients versus the Pennes bioheat model versus discrete blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyckt, V. M. M.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2006-10-01

    Prediction of the temperature distribution in the eye depends on how the impact of the blood flow is taken into account. Three methods will be compared: a simplified eye anatomy that applies a single heat transfer coefficient to describe all heat transport mechanisms between the sclera and the body core, a detailed eye anatomy in which the blood flow is accounted for either by the bioheat approach, or by including the discrete vasculature in the eye and the orbit. The comparison is done both for rabbit and human anatomies, normo-thermally and when exposed to homogeneous power densities. The first simplified model predicts much higher temperatures than the latter two. It was shown that the eye is very hard to heat when taking physiological perfusion correctly into account. It was concluded that the heat transfer coefficient describing the heat transport from the sclera to the body core reported in the literature for the first simplified model is too low. The bioheat approach is appropriate for a first-order approximation of the temperature distribution in the eye when exposed to a homogeneous power density, but the discrete vasculature down to 0.2 mm in diameter needs to be taken into account when the heterogeneity of the temperature distribution at a mm scale is of interest.

  16. Minimum Error Entropy Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Marques de Sá, Joaquim P; Santos, Jorge M F; Alexandre, Luís A

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the minimum error entropy (MEE) concept applied to data classification machines. Theoretical results on the inner workings of the MEE concept, in its application to solving a variety of classification problems, are presented in the wider realm of risk functionals. Researchers and practitioners also find in the book a detailed presentation of practical data classifiers using MEE. These include multi‐layer perceptrons, recurrent neural networks, complexvalued neural networks, modular neural networks, and decision trees. A clustering algorithm using a MEE‐like concept is also presented. Examples, tests, evaluation experiments and comparison with similar machines using classic approaches, complement the descriptions.

  17. Geometric orbit datum and orbit covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁科; 侯自新

    2001-01-01

    Vogan conjectured that the parabolic induction of orbit data is independent of the choice of the parabolic subgroup. In this paper we first give the parabolic induction of orbit covers, whose relationship with geometric orbit datum is also induced. Hence we show a geometric interpretation of orbit data and finally prove the conjugation for geometric orbit datum using geometric method.

  18. Do Minimum Wages Fight Poverty?

    OpenAIRE

    David Neumark; William Wascher

    1997-01-01

    The primary goal of a national minimum wage floor is to raise the incomes of poor or near-poor families with members in the work force. However, estimates of employment effects of minimum wages tell us little about whether minimum wages are can achieve this goal; even if the disemployment effects of minimum wages are modest, minimum wage increases could result in net income losses for poor families. We present evidence on the effects of minimum wages on family incomes from matched March CPS s...

  19. Minimum fuel mode evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    The minimum fuel mode of the NASA F-15 research aircraft is designed to minimize fuel flow while maintaining constant net propulsive force (FNP), effectively reducing thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), during cruise flight conditions. The test maneuvers were at stabilized flight conditions. The aircraft test engine was allowed to stabilize at the cruise conditions before data collection initiated; data were then recorded with performance seeking control (PSC) not-engaged, then data were recorded with the PSC system engaged. The maneuvers were flown back-to-back to allow for direct comparisons by minimizing the effects of variations in the test day conditions. The minimum fuel mode was evaluated at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers and focused on three altitudes: 15,000; 30,000; and 45,000 feet. Flight data were collected for part, military, partial, and maximum afterburning power conditions. The TSFC savings at supersonic Mach numbers, ranging from approximately 4% to nearly 10%, are in general much larger than at subsonic Mach numbers because of PSC trims to the afterburner.

  20. Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Peter L.; Vincent, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of solar system tests of gravitational theory could be very much improved by range and Doppler measurements to a Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter. A nearly circular orbit at roughly 2400 km altitude is assumed in order to minimize problems with orbit determination and thermal radiation from the surface. The spacecraft is spin-stabilized and has a 30 cm diameter de-spun antenna. With K-band and X-band ranging systems using a 50 MHz offset sidetone at K-band, a range accuracy of 3 cm appears to be realistically achievable. The estimated spacecraft mass is 50 kg. A consider-covariance analysis was performed to determine how well the Earth-Mercury distance as a function of time could be determined with such a Relativity Orbiter. The minimum data set is assumed to be 40 independent 8-hour arcs of tracking data at selected times during a two year period. The gravity field of Mercury up through degree and order 10 is solved for, along with the initial conditions for each arc and the Earth-Mercury distance at the center of each arc. The considered parameters include the gravity field parameters of degree 11 and 12 plus the tracking station coordinates, the tropospheric delay, and two parameters in a crude radiation pressure model. The conclusion is that the Earth-Mercury distance can be determined to 6 cm accuracy or better. From a modified worst-case analysis, this would lead to roughly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in the knowledge of the precession of perihelion, the relativistic time delay, and the possible change in the gravitational constant with time.

  1. First-principles study of Sr2Ir1-xRhxO4: charge transfer, spin-orbit coupling change, and the metal-insulator transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Heung-Sik; Han, Myung Joon

    2015-03-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigated the electronic structure of Rh-doped iridate, Sr2Ir1-xRhxO4 for which the doping (x) dependent metal-insulator transition (MIT) has been reported experimentally and the controversial discussion developed regarding the origin of this transition. Our DFT+U calculation shows that the value of remains largely intact over the entire doping range considered here (x = 0 . 0 , 0 . 125 , 0 . 25 , 0 . 50 , 0 . 75 , and 1 . 0) in good agreement with the branching ratio measured by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Also contrary to a previous picture to explain MIT based on the charge transfer between the transition-metal sites, our calculation clearly shows that those sites remain basically isoelectronic while the impurity bands of predominantly rhodium character are introduced near the Fermi level. As the doping increases, this impurity band overlaps with lower Hubbard band of iridium, leading to metal-insulator transition. The results will be discussed with comparison to the case of Ru doping. Computational resources were suported by The National Institute of Supercomputing and Networking/Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information with supercomputing resources including technical spport (Grant No. KSC-2013-C2-23).

  2. Minimum wages, earnings, and migration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boffy-Ramirez, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    Does increasing a state’s minimum wage induce migration into the state? Previous literature has shown mobility in response to welfare benefit differentials across states, yet few have examined the minimum wage as a cause of mobility...

  3. Molecular Orbital and Density Functional Study of the Formation, Charge Transfer, Bonding and the Conformational Isomerism of the Boron Trifluoride (BF3 and Ammonia (NH3 Donor-Acceptor Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulal C. Ghosh

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the F3B–NH3 supermolecule by chemical interaction of its fragment parts, BF3 and NH3, and the dynamics of internal rotation about the ‘B–N’ bond have been studied in terms of parameters provided by the molecular orbital and density functional theories. It is found that the pairs of frontier orbitals of the interacting fragments have matching symmetry and are involved in the charge transfer interaction. The donation process stems from the HOMO of the donor into the LUMO of the acceptor and simultaneously, back donation stems from the HOMO of acceptor into the LUMO of the donor. The density functional computation of chemical activation in the donor and acceptor fragments, associated with the physical process of structural reorganization just prior to the event of chemical reaction, indicates that BF3 becomes more acidic and NH3 becomes more basic, compared to their separate equilibrium states. Theoretically it is observed that the chemical reaction event of the formation of the supermolecule from its fragment parts is in accordance with the chemical potential equalization principle of the density functional theory and the electronegativity equalization principle of Sanderson. The energetics of the chemical reaction, the magnitude of the net charge transfer and the energy of the newly formed bond are quite consistent, both internally and with the principle of maximum hardness, PMH. The dynamics of the internal rotation of one part with respect to the other part of the supermolecule about the ‘B–N’ bond mimics the pattern of the conformational isomerism of the isostructural ethane molecule. It is also observed that the dynamics and evolution of molecular conformations as a function of dihedral angles is also in accordance with the principle of maximum hardness, PMH. Quite consistent with spectroscopic predictions, the height of the molecule

  4. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  5. Orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  6. Inflammation of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Exams, Study Finds Additional Content Medical News Inflammation of the Orbit (Inflammatory Orbital Pseudotumor) By James ... Introduction to Eye Socket Disorders Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis Inflammation of the Orbit Orbital Cellulitis Preseptal Cellulitis Tumors ...

  7. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-01-01

    Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only...

  8. Popularity at Minimum Cost

    CERN Document Server

    Kavitha, Telikepalli; Nimbhorkar, Prajakta

    2010-01-01

    We consider an extension of the {\\em popular matching} problem in this paper. The input to the popular matching problem is a bipartite graph G = (A U B,E), where A is a set of people, B is a set of items, and each person a belonging to A ranks a subset of items in an order of preference, with ties allowed. The popular matching problem seeks to compute a matching M* between people and items such that there is no matching M where more people are happier with M than with M*. Such a matching M* is called a popular matching. However, there are simple instances where no popular matching exists. Here we consider the following natural extension to the above problem: associated with each item b belonging to B is a non-negative price cost(b), that is, for any item b, new copies of b can be added to the input graph by paying an amount of cost(b) per copy. When G does not admit a popular matching, the problem is to "augment" G at minimum cost such that the new graph admits a popular matching. We show that this problem is...

  9. The minimum entropy principle and task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J; Gorin, Hillary; Huschen, Samuel; Peters, Natalie E; Fabisch, Megan; Poston, Kirsten; Weinberger, Kelsey

    2013-07-01

    According to the minimum entropy principle, efficient cognitive performance is produced with a neurocognitive strategy that involves a minimum of degrees of freedom. Although high performance is often regarded as consistent performance as well, some variability in performance still remains which allows the person to adapt to changing goal conditions or fatigue. The present study investigated the connection between performance, entropy in performance, and four task-switching strategies. Fifty-one undergraduates performed 7 different computer-based cognitive tasks producing sets of 49 responses under instructional conditions requiring task quotas or no quotas. The temporal patterns of performance were analyzed using orbital decomposition to extract pattern types and lengths, which were then compared with regard to Shannon entropy, topological entropy, and overall performance. Task switching strategies from a previous study were available for the same participants as well. Results indicated that both topological entropy and Shannon entropy were negatively correlated with performance. Some task-switching strategies produced lower entropy in performance than others. Stepwise regression showed that the top three predictors of performance were Shannon entropy and arithmetic and spatial abilities. Additional implications for the prediction of work performance with cognitive ability measurements and the applicability of the minimum entropy principle to multidimensional performance criteria and team work are discussed.

  10. Social Security's special minimum benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, K A; Hoffmeyer, D

    Social Security's special minimum primary insurance amount (PIA) provision was enacted in 1972 to increase the adequacy of benefits for regular long-term, low-earning covered workers and their dependents or survivors. At the time, Social Security also had a regular minimum benefit provision for persons with low lifetime average earnings and their families. Concerns were rising that the low lifetime average earnings of many regular minimum beneficiaries resulted from sporadic attachment to the covered workforce rather than from low wages. The special minimum benefit was seen as a way to reward regular, low-earning workers without providing the windfalls that would have resulted from raising the regular minimum benefit to a much higher level. The regular minimum benefit was subsequently eliminated for workers reaching age 62, becoming disabled, or dying after 1981. Under current law, the special minimum benefit will phase out over time, although it is not clear from the legislative history that this was Congress's explicit intent. The phaseout results from two factors: (1) special minimum benefits are paid only if they are higher than benefits payable under the regular PIA formula, and (2) the value of the regular PIA formula, which is indexed to wages before benefit eligibility, has increased faster than that of the special minimum PIA, which is indexed to inflation. Under the Social Security Trustees' 2000 intermediate assumptions, the special minimum benefit will cease to be payable to retired workers attaining eligibility in 2013 and later. Their benefits will always be larger under the regular benefit formula. As policymakers consider Social Security solvency initiatives--particularly proposals that would reduce benefits or introduce investment risk--interest may increase in restoring some type of special minimum benefit as a targeted protection for long-term low earners. Two of the three reform proposals offered by the President's Commission to Strengthen

  11. Orbital liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbolla-Pertierra, A M; Morales-Baños, D R; Martínez-Nava, L R; Garrido-Sánchez, G A; López-Hernández, C M; Velasco-Ramos, P

    2017-02-01

    The case is presented of a 46-year-old male with right eye proptosis and conjunctival hyperaemia, of 18 months onset. A well-defined intraconal mass was found in the computed tomography. In magnetic resonance this was hypo-intense on T1, enhanced with gadolinium and hyperintense on T2. Excisional biopsy was performed, which was reported as a well-differentiated liposarcoma in the histopathology study. Liposarcoma is a malignant adipose tissue tumour. It is very rare in the orbit, with 5 histological types, the most common being myxoid. The treatment of choice is wide surgical excision and may be accompanied with radiotherapy. As it is an infiltrative tumour, It has a high rate of recurrence. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Impulsive orbit control for spacecraft around asteroid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔祜涛; 崔平远; 栾恩杰

    2003-01-01

    An impulse feedback control law to change the mean orbit elements of spacecraft around asteroid is presented. First, the mean orbit elements are transferred to the osculating orbit elements at the burning time.Then, the feedback control law based on Gauss' s perturbation equations of motion is given. And the impulse control for targeting from the higher circulation orbit to the specified periapsis is developed. Finally, the numerical simulation is performed and the simulation results show that the presented impulse control law is effective.

  13. Improved Minimum Detectable Velocity in Bistatic Space-Based Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua; TANG Jun; PENG Yingning

    2008-01-01

    Single orbit bistatic space-based radar (SBR) is composed of two radars in the same orbit. The characteristics of the clutter Doppler-angle spectrum of a single orbit bistatic SBR show that the slope of the mainbeam clutter spectrum is highly sensitive to the cone angles. Therefore, the minimum detectable veloc-ity of the bistatic system is dependent on the cone angle. Then a new combined working mode of single-orbit bistatic SBR system was developed in which one radar will act as the transmitter and another as the receiver to improve detection performance for all angles. Simulation results by space-time adaptive process-ing verify the improved detection performance. The new design also reduces the average power of each ra-dar system and the size and weight of the on-board solar array-battery system.

  14. Molecular orbital imaging for partially aligned molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Meiyan; Zhu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    We investigate molecular orbital reconstruction using high-order harmonic emissions from partially aligned molecular ensembles. By carrying out the reconstruction procedure using the harmonic sampling with or without the spectral minimum, the roles of the harmonic phase and amplitude modulation due to the partial alignment can be separately studied. It is found that with the prior knowledge of the orbital symmetry, the reconstructed result is very sensitive to the modulation of the harmonic phase for the πg orbital, while in the case of σg orbital, the reconstructed result is mainly determined by the harmonic amplitude. These results can provide an important reference for the future experiment of molecular orbital imaging.

  15. Small Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Borsten, L; Ferrara, S; Marrani, A; Rubens, W

    2012-01-01

    We study both the "large" and "small" U-duality charge orbits of extremal black holes appearing in D = 5 and D = 4 Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories with symmetric scalar manifolds. We exploit a formalism based on cubic Jordan algebras and their associated Freudenthal triple systems, in order to derive the minimal charge representatives, their stabilizers and the associated "moduli spaces". After recalling N = 8 maximal supergravity, we consider N = 2 and N = 4 theories coupled to an arbitrary number of vector multiplets, as well as N = 2 magic, STU, ST^2 and T^3 models. While the STU model may be considered as part of the general N = 2 sequence, albeit with an additional triality symmetry, the ST^2 and T^3 models demand a separate treatment, since their representative Jordan algebras are Euclidean or only admit non-zero elements of rank 3, respectively. Finally, we also consider minimally coupled N = 2, matter coupled N = 3, and "pure" N = 5 theories.

  16. An Exploration Of Fuel Optimal Two-impulse Transfers To Cyclers in the Earth-Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinisianaki, Saghar

    2011-12-01

    This research explores the optimum two-impulse transfers between a low Earth orbit and cycler orbits in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body framework, emphasizing the optimization strategy. Cyclers are those types of periodic orbits that meet both the Earth and the Moon periodically. A spacecraft on such trajectories are under the influence of both the Earth and the Moon gravitational fields. Cyclers have gained recent interest as baseline orbits for several Earth-Moon mission concepts, notably in relation to human exploration. In this thesis it is shown that a direct optimization starting from the classic lambert initial guess may not be adequate for these problems and propose a three-step optimization solver to improve the domain of convergence toward an optimal solution. The first step consists of finding feasible trajectories with a given transfer time. I employ Lambert's problem to provide initial guess to optimize the error in arrival position. This includes the analysis of the liability of Lambert's solution as an initial guess. Once a feasible trajectory is found, the velocity impulse is only a function of transfer time, departure, and arrival points' phases. The second step consists of the optimization of impulse over transfer time which results in the minimum impulse transfer for fixed end points. Finally, the third step is mapping the optimal solutions as the end points are varied.

  17. Updates in Orbital Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nila; F.Moeloek

    1993-01-01

    Orbital anatomy, the clinical features of orbital tumors, the recent development of the diagnosis and management of orbital tumors were described. The incidence of orbital tumors in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in the past years were introduced. The principle of management of orbital tumors and their prognosis were discussed.

  18. Minimum signals in classical physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓文基; 许基桓; 刘平

    2003-01-01

    The bandwidth theorem for Fourier analysis on any time-dependent classical signal is shown using the operator approach to quantum mechanics. Following discussions about squeezed states in quantum optics, the problem of minimum signals presented by a single quantity and its squeezing is proposed. It is generally proved that all such minimum signals, squeezed or not, must be real Gaussian functions of time.

  19. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  20. Imaging of Orbital Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Preseptal and orbital cellulitis occur more commonly in children than adults. The history and physical examination are crucial in distinguishing between preseptal and orbital cellulitis. The orbital septum delineates the anterior eyelid soft tissues from the orbital soft tissue. Infections anterior to the orbital septum are classified as preseptal cellulitis and those posterior to the orbital septum are termed orbital cellulitis. "nRecognition of orbital involvement is important not only because of the threatened vision loss associated with orbital cellulitis but also because of the potential for central nervous system complications including cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis, and death. "nOrbital imaging should be obtained in all patients suspected of having orbital cellulitis. CT is preferred to MR imaging, as the orbital tissues have high con-trast and the bone can be well visualized. Orbital CT scanning allows localization of the disease process to the preseptal area, the extraconal or intraconal fat, or the subperiosteal space. Axial CT views allow evaluation of the medial orbit and ethmoid sinuses, whereas coronal scans image the orbital roof and floor and the frontal and maxillary sinuses. If direct coronal imaging is not possible, reconstruction of thin axial cuts may help the assessment of the orbital roof and floor. Potential sources of orbital cellulitis such as sinusitis, dental infection, and facial cellulitis are often detectable on CT imaging. "nIn this presentation, the imaging considerations of the orbital infections; including imaging differentiation criteria of all types of orbital infections are reviewed.

  1. Preseptal Cellulitis, Orbital Cellulitis, Orbital Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Rana Altan Yaycıoğlu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with orbital infections present to our clinic usually with unilateral pain, hyperemia, and edema of the eyelids. The differentiation between preseptal and orbital cellulitis is utmost important in that the second requires hospitalization. Since in orbital cellulitis, the tissues posterior to the orbital septum are involved, signs such as conjunctival chemosis, limited eye movement, decreased vision, as well as afferent pupil defect secondary to optic nerve involvement may al...

  2. Three Orbital Burns to Molniya Orbit via Shuttle Centaur G Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.

    2014-01-01

    An unclassified analytical trajectory design, performance, and mission study was done for the 1982-86 joint NASA-USAF Shuttle/Centaur G upper stage development program to send performance-demanding payloads to high orbits such as Molniya using an unconventional orbit transfer. This optimized three orbital burn transfer to Molniya orbit was compared to the then-baselined two burn transfer. The results of the three dimensional trajectory optimization performed include powered phase steering data and coast phase orbital element data. Time derivatives of the orbital elements as functions of thrust components were evaluated and used to explain the optimization's solution. Vehicle performance as a function of parking orbit inclination was given. Performance and orbital element data was provided for launch windows as functions of launch time. Ground track data was given for all burns and coasts including variation within the launch window. It was found that a Centaur with fully loaded propellant tanks could be flown from a 37deg inclination low Earth parking orbit and achieve Molniya orbit with comparable performance to the baselined transfer which started from a 57deg inclined orbit: 9,545 lb vs. 9,552 lb of separated spacecraft weight respectively. There was a significant reduction in the need for propellant launch time reserve for a one hour window: only 78 lb for the three burn transfer vs. 320 lb for the two burn transfer. Conversely, this also meant that longer launch windows over more orbital revolutions could be done for the same amount of propellant reserve. There was no practical difference in ground tracking station or airborne assets needed to secure telemetric data, even though the geometric locations of the burns varied considerably. There was a significant adverse increase in total mission elapsed time for the three vs. two burn transfer (12 vs. 11/4 hrs), but could be accommodated by modest modifications to Centaur systems. Future applications were

  3. Three Orbital Burns to Molniya Orbit Via Shuttle_Centaur G Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.

    2015-01-01

    An unclassified analytical trajectory design, performance, and mission study was done for the 1982 to 1986 joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-United States Air Force (USAF) Shuttle/Centaur G upper stage development program to send performance-demanding payloads to high orbits such as Molniya using an unconventional orbit transfer. This optimized three orbital burn transfer to Molniya orbit was compared to the then-baselined two burn transfer. The results of the three dimensional trajectory optimization performed include powered phase steering data and coast phase orbital element data. Time derivatives of the orbital elements as functions of thrust components were evaluated and used to explain the optimization's solution. Vehicle performance as a function of parking orbit inclination was given. Performance and orbital element data was provided for launch windows as functions of launch time. Ground track data was given for all burns and coasts including variation within the launch window. It was found that a Centaur with fully loaded propellant tanks could be flown from a 37 deg inclination low Earth parking orbit and achieve Molniya orbit with comparable performance to the baselined transfer which started from a 57 deg inclined orbit: 9,545 versus 9,552 lb of separated spacecraft weight, respectively. There was a significant reduction in the need for propellant launch time reserve for a 1 hr window: only 78 lb for the three burn transfer versus 320 lb for the two burn transfer. Conversely, this also meant that longer launch windows over more orbital revolutions could be done for the same amount of propellant reserve. There was no practical difference in ground tracking station or airborne assets needed to secure telemetric data, even though the geometric locations of the burns varied considerably. There was a significant adverse increase in total mission elapsed time for the three versus two burn transfer (12 vs. 1-1/4 hr), but could be

  4. Bilateral orbital cavernous haemangiomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Fries, P D; Char, D. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral orbital lesions are rare. The differential diagnosis includes orbital pseudotumour, metastasis, leukaemia, lymphoma, Wegener's granulomatosis, and neurofibromatosis. We report what we believe to be the first case of bilateral orbital cavernous haemangiomas.

  5. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  6. Against a Minimum Voting Age

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Philip

    2013-01-01

    A minimum voting age is defended as the most effective and least disrespectful means of ensuring all members of an electorate are sufficiently competent to vote. Whilst it may be reasonable to require competency from voters, a minimum voting age should be rejected because its view of competence is unreasonably controversial, it is incapable of defining a clear threshold of sufficiency and an alternative test is available which treats children more respectfully. This alternative is a procedura...

  7. Estimates of AGN Black Hole Mass and Minimum Variability Timescale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Zhong Xie; Luo-En Chen; Huai-Zhen Li; Li-Sheng Mao; Hong Dai; Zhao-Hua Xie; Li Ma; Shu-Bai Zhou

    2005-01-01

    Black hole mass is one of the fundamental physical parameters of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), for which many methods of estimation have been proposed.One set of methods assumes that the broad-line region (BLR) is gravitationally bound by the central black hole potential, so the black hole mass can be estimated from the orbital radius and the Doppler velocity. Another set of methods assumes the observed variability timescale is determined by the orbital timescale near the innermost stable orbit around the Schwarzschild black hole or the Kerr black hole,or by the characteristic timescale of the accretion disk. We collect a sample of 21AGNs, for which the minimum variability timescales have been obtained and their black hole masses (Mσ) have been well estimated from the stellar velocity dispersion or the BLR size-luminosity relation. Using the minimum variability timescales we estimated the black hole masses for 21 objects by the three different methods,the results are denoted by Ms, Mk and Md, respectively. We compared each of them with Mσ individually and found that: (1) using the minimum variability timescale with the Kerr black hole theory leads to small differences between Mσand Mk, none exceeding one order of magnitude, and the mean difference between them is about 0.53 dex; (2) using the minimum variability timescale with the Schwarzschild black hole theory leads to somewhat larger difference between Mσ and Ms: larger than one order of magnitude for 6 of the 21 sources, and the mean difference is 0.74 dex; (3) using the minimum variability timescale with the accretion disk theory leads to much larger differences between Mσ and Md, for 13of the 21 sources the differences are larger than two orders of magnitude; and the mean difference is as high as about 2.01 dex.

  8. Orbital dystopia due to orbital roof defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Eun Young; Joo, Hong Sil; Byeon, Jun Hee

    2013-01-01

    We performed a retrospective review of patients who presented with delayed dystopia as a consequence of an orbital roof defect due to fractures and nontraumatic causes to search for a correlation between orbital roof defect size and surgical indications for the treatment thereof. Retrospective analyses were performed in 7 patients, all of whom presented with delayed dystopia due to orbital roof defects, between January 2001 and June 2011. The causes of orbital roof defects were displaced orbital roof fractures (5 cases), tumor (1 case), and congenital sphenoid dysplasia (1 case). All 7 patients had initially been treated conservatively and later presented with significant dystopia. The sizes of the defects were calculated on computed tomographic scans. Among the 7 patients, aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid, which caused ocular symptoms, in 1 patient with minimal displaced orbital roof and reconstruction with calvarial bone, titanium micromesh, or Medpor in 6 other patients were performed. The minimal size of the orbital roof in patients who underwent orbital roof reconstruction was 1.2 cm (defect height) x 1.0 cm (defect length), 0.94 cm(2). For all patients with orbital dystopia, displacement of the globe was corrected without any complications, regardless of whether the patient was evaluated grossly or by radiology. In this retrospective study, continuous monitoring of clinical signs and active surgical management should be considered for cases in which an orbital roof defect is detected, even if no definite symptoms are noted, to prevent delayed sequelae.

  9. Dealing with Uncertainties in Initial Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellin, Roberto; Di Lizia, Pierluigi; Zanetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    A method to deal with uncertainties in initial orbit determination (IOD) is presented. This is based on the use of Taylor differential algebra (DA) to nonlinearly map the observation uncertainties from the observation space to the state space. When a minimum set of observations is available DA is used to expand the solution of the IOD problem in Taylor series with respect to measurement errors. When more observations are available high order inversion tools are exploited to obtain full state pseudo-observations at a common epoch. The mean and covariance of these pseudo-observations are nonlinearly computed by evaluating the expectation of high order Taylor polynomials. Finally, a linear scheme is employed to update the current knowledge of the orbit. Angles-only observations are considered and simplified Keplerian dynamics adopted to ease the explanation. Three test cases of orbit determination of artificial satellites in different orbital regimes are presented to discuss the feature and performances of the proposed methodology.

  10. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  11. The one-electron description of excited states: Natural excitation orbitals of density matrix theory and Kohn-Sham orbitals of density functional theory as ideal orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2015-10-01

    Linear response density matrix functional theory has been shown to solve the main problems of time-dependent density functional theory (deficient in case of double, charge transfer and bond breaking excitations). However, the natural orbitals preclude the description of excitations as (approximately) simple orbital-to-orbital transitions: many weakly occupied 'virtual' natural orbitals are required to describe the excitations. Kohn-Sham orbitals on the other hand afford for many excitations such a simple orbital description. In this communication we show that a transformation of the set of weakly occupied NOs can be defined such that the resulting natural excitation orbitals (NEOs) restore the single orbital transition structure for excitations generated by the linear response DMFT formalism.

  12. 基于信用风险迁移条件风险价值最小化的贷款组合优化模型%Loan's Portfolio Optimization Model of CvaR Minimum Based on Credit Risk Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪忠诚; 迟国泰; 许文

    2009-01-01

    把企业信用风险迁移引入贷款收益率的计算中,引入条件风险价值(CVaR)来度量贷款组合风险,建立了组合贷款优化决策模型.本模型的特色:① 用CVaR代替VaR,控制了贷款组合极端损失的发生;② 反映了企业信用等级迁移对企业收益率波动的影响,更加客观地反映了贷款的真实风险,解决了现有研究仅简单求解各笔贷款的收益率标准差而忽略信用风险迁移的问题;③ 通过现行法律法规为约束条件,在约束条件中,控制了流动性风险,避免了资产配置的流动性危机,保证了银行资产配给的合法性与合规性.%Introducing credit risk transfer to calculate loan yield and introducing Conditional Value at Risk to measure loan's portfolio risk, the loan's portfolio optimization model of CvaR minimum based on credit risk transfer is set up.The contribution of the model is firstly that the CVaR of consistency risk calculation parameter is used instead of VaR, so the extremity loss of loan's portfolio is controlled.Secondly, the influence of credit risk transfer on the return rate standard deviation is reflected in the model, and the real risk of loan is reflected more impersonally, thus the problem to only calculate individual loan's yield whereas neglecting the credit transfer in the current topic is solved. Tirdly, through law constrain, we control the liquidity risk to avoid the liquidity hazard of asset allocation to guarantee the allocation legal and operational.

  13. A Design Method for Earth-Moon Halo Orbit Transfer Trajectory Under Different Constraints to Moon Gravity-Assisted Maneuvers%不同月球借力约束下的地月 Halo 轨道转移轨道设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张景瑞; 曾豪; 李明涛

    2016-01-01

    To design low-energy Earth-Moon L2 Halo orbit transfer trajectory for different mission requirements,a deep research on the influence of different constraints to the moon gravity-assisted maneuvers and Halo orbit insertion (HOI) points with different amplitudes on time of flight and fuel consumption is made,and a selection strategy for HOI points is proposed in this paper.Firstly,combined with mission requirements and effects of the moon gravity,different constraints are applied to the moon gravity-assisted maneuvers.Stable manifold of Halo orbit is adjusted through differential correction algorithm and the transfer trajectory from moon to Halo orbit is designed.Then,in consideration of orbit altitude ,orbit inclination,right ascension of ascending node and track angle at the same time,the hybrid optimization strategy combined genetic algorithm with differential correction algorithm is adopted to study Earth-Moon Halo orbit transfer trajectories with optimal fuel consumption.At last,the influence of moon gravity-assisted altitude and azimuth as well as different HOI points on flight time and fuel consumption of transfer trajectories is respectively analyzed,which has reference value for design and application of Earth-Moon Halo orbit transfer trajectories.%针对地月系 L2点不同任务需求下的低耗能转移轨道设计问题,基于不变流形理论与混合优化技术,深入研究了不同月球借力约束与不同幅值 Halo 轨道的入轨点(简称 HOI 点)对转移轨道飞行时间与燃料消耗的影响,给出了 HOI 点选择策略。首先结合任务要求并考虑月球引力影响,在月球借力点施加不同约束条件,通过微分修正算法调整 Halo 轨道的稳定流形,设计月球到 Halo 轨道的转移轨道。采用遗传算法与微分修正算法相结合的混合优化策略,在同时考虑地球停泊轨道高度、倾角、升交点赤经与航迹角等多约束条件下,对燃料最优的地月转

  14. Minimum Q Electrically Small Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, O. S.

    2012-01-01

    for a multiarm spherical helix antenna confirm the theoretical predictions. For example, a 4-arm spherical helix antenna with a magnetic-coated perfectly electrically conducting core (ka=0.254) exhibits the Q of 0.66 times the Chu lower bound, or 1.25 times the minimum Q.......Theoretically, the minimum radiation quality factor Q of an isolated resonance can be achieved in a spherical electrically small antenna by combining TM1m and TE1m spherical modes, provided that the stored energy in the antenna spherical volume is totally suppressed. Using closed-form expressions...... for the stored energies obtained through the vector spherical wave theory, it is shown that a magnetic-coated metal core reduces the internal stored energy of both TM1m and TE1m modes simultaneously, so that a self-resonant antenna with the Q approaching the fundamental minimum is created. Numerical results...

  15. Orbital Energy-Based Reaction Analysis of SN2 Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Tsuneda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An orbital energy-based reaction analysis theory is presented as an extension of the orbital-based conceptual density functional theory. In the orbital energy-based theory, the orbitals contributing to reactions are interpreted to be valence orbitals giving the largest orbital energy variation from reactants to products. Reactions are taken to be electron transfer-driven when they provide small variations for the gaps between the contributing occupied and unoccupied orbital energies on the intrinsic reaction coordinates in the initial processes. The orbital energy-based theory is then applied to the calculations of several S N2 reactions. Using a reaction path search method, the Cl− + CH3I → ClCH3 + I− reaction, for which another reaction path called “roundabout path” is proposed, is found to have a precursor process similar to the roundabout path just before this SN2 reaction process. The orbital energy-based theory indicates that this precursor process is obviously driven by structural change, while the successor SN2 reaction proceeds through electron transfer between the contributing orbitals. Comparing the calculated results of the SN2 reactions in gas phase and in aqueous solution shows that the contributing orbitals significantly depend on solvent effects and these orbitals can be correctly determined by this theory.

  16. Preseptal Cellulitis, Orbital Cellulitis, Orbital Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Altan Yaycıoğlu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with orbital infections present to our clinic usually with unilateral pain, hyperemia, and edema of the eyelids. The differentiation between preseptal and orbital cellulitis is utmost important in that the second requires hospitalization. Since in orbital cellulitis, the tissues posterior to the orbital septum are involved, signs such as conjunctival chemosis, limited eye movement, decreased vision, as well as afferent pupil defect secondary to optic nerve involvement may also be observed. Prompt intravenous antibiotic treatment should be started, and surgical drainage may be performed if patient shows failure to improve in 48 hours despite optimal management. Without treatment, the clinical course may progress to subperiosteal or orbital abscess, and even to cavernous sinus thrombosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: Supplement 52-6

  17. Minimum Thermal Conductivity of Superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simkin, M. V.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-01-31

    The phonon thermal conductivity of a multilayer is calculated for transport perpendicular to the layers. There is a crossover between particle transport for thick layers to wave transport for thin layers. The calculations show that the conductivity has a minimum value for a layer thickness somewhat smaller then the mean free path of the phonons. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Minimum aanlandingsmaat Brasem (Abramis brama)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hal, van R.; Miller, D.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Ter ondersteuning van een besluit aangaande een minimum aanlandingsmaat voor brasem, primair voor het IJsselmeer en Markermeer, heeft het ministerie van Economische Zaken IMARES verzocht een overzicht te geven van aanlandingsmaten voor brasem in andere landen en waar mogelijk de motivatie achter dez

  19. Coupling between minimum scattering antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.; Lessow, H; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    1974-01-01

    Coupling between minimum scattering antennas (MSA's) is investigated by the coupling theory developed by Wasylkiwskyj and Kahn. Only rotationally symmetric power patterns are considered, and graphs of relative mutual impedance are presented as a function of distance and pattern parameters. Crossed...

  20. Orbit design for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gerhard; HEINZEL; Albrecht; RDIGER

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint ESA-NASA mission for detecting low-frequency gravitational waves in the frequency range from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz, by using accurate laser interferometry between three spacecrafts, which will be launched around 2018 and one year later reach their operational orbits around the Sun. In order to operate successfully, it is crucial for the constellation of the three spacecrafts to have extremely high stability. Based on the study of operational orbits for a 2015 launch, we design the operational orbits of beginning epoch on 2019-03-01, and introduce the method of orbit design and optimization. We design the orbits of the transfer from Earth to the operational orbits, including launch phase and separation phase; furthermore, the relationship between energy requirement and flight time of these two orbit phases is investigated. Finally, an example of the whole orbit design is presented.

  1. On the Construction of Low-Energy Cislunar and Trans-lunar Transfers Based on the Libration Points

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Shijie

    2014-01-01

    There exist cislunar and trans-lunar libration points near the Moon, which are referred as the LL1 and LL2 points respectively and can generate the different types of low-energy trajectories transferring from Earth to Moon. The time-dependent analytic model including the gravitational forces from the Sun, Earth and Moon is employed to investigate the energy-minimal and practical transfer trajectories. However, different from the circular restricted three-body problem, the equivalent gravitational equilibria are defined according to the geometry of instantaneous Hill's boundary due to the gravitational perturbation from the Sun. The relationship between the altitudes of periapsis and eccentricities is achieved from the Poincar\\'e mapping for all the lunar captured trajectories, which presents the statistical feature of the fuel cost and captured orbital elements rather than generating a specified Moon-captured segment. The minimum energy required by the captured trajectory on a lunar circular orbit is deduced ...

  2. Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Orbiter Photo Gallery is an extensive collection of over 2,600 high- and moderate-resolution photographs produced by all five of the Lunar Orbiter...

  3. ASC Champ Orbit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Jørgensen, John Leif

    1999-01-01

    This documents describes a test of the implementation of the ASC orbit model for the Champ satellite.......This documents describes a test of the implementation of the ASC orbit model for the Champ satellite....

  4. Polygons in billiard orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Don, Henk

    2011-01-01

    We study the geometry of billiard orbits on rectangular billiards. A truncated billiard orbit induces a partition of the rectangle into polygons. We prove that thirteen is a sharp upper bound for the number of different areas of these polygons.

  5. Traumatic transconjunctival orbital emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Stroh, E M; Finger, P T

    1990-01-01

    Orbital emphysema can be produced by trans-conjunctival migration of air from a high pressure airgun. In an industrial accident an 8 mm conjunctival laceration was produced in the superior fornix which acted as a portal of entry for air into the subconjunctival, subcutaneous, and retrobulbar spaces. Computed tomography revealed no evidence of orbital fracture and showed that traumatic orbital emphysema occurred without a broken orbital bone.

  6. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  7. Novel modelling of ultracompact X-ray binary evolution - stable mass transfer from white dwarfs to neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengar, Rahul; Tauris, Thomas M.; Langer, Norbert; Istrate, Alina G.

    2017-09-01

    Tight binaries of helium white dwarfs (He WDs) orbiting millisecond pulsars (MSPs) will eventually `merge' due to gravitational damping of the orbit. The outcome has been predicted to be the production of long-lived ultracompact X-ray binaries (UCXBs), in which the WD transfers material to the accreting neutron star (NS). Here we present complete numerical computations, for the first time, of such stable mass transfer from a He WD to a NS. We have calculated a number of complete binary stellar evolution tracks, starting from pre-low-mass X-ray binary systems, and evolved these to detached MSP+WD systems and further on to UCXBs. The minimum orbital period is found to be as short as 5.6 min. We followed the subsequent widening of the systems until the donor stars become planets with a mass of ˜0.005 M⊙ after roughly a Hubble time. Our models are able to explain the properties of observed UCXBs with high helium abundances and we can identify these sources on the ascending or descending branch in a diagram displaying mass-transfer rate versus orbital period.

  8. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  9. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for all...

  10. Stochastic Analysis of Orbital Lifetimes of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Washito; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses (1) a Monte-Carlo-based methodology for probabilistic prediction and analysis of orbital lifetimes of spacecraft and (2) Orbital Lifetime Monte Carlo (OLMC)--a Fortran computer program, consisting of a previously developed long-term orbit-propagator integrated with a Monte Carlo engine. OLMC enables modeling of variances of key physical parameters that affect orbital lifetimes through the use of probability distributions. These parameters include altitude, speed, and flight-path angle at insertion into orbit; solar flux; and launch delays. The products of OLMC are predicted lifetimes (durations above specified minimum altitudes) for the number of user-specified cases. Histograms generated from such predictions can be used to determine the probabilities that spacecraft will satisfy lifetime requirements. The document discusses uncertainties that affect modeling of orbital lifetimes. Issues of repeatability, smoothness of distributions, and code run time are considered for the purpose of establishing values of code-specific parameters and number of Monte Carlo runs. Results from test cases are interpreted as demonstrating that solar-flux predictions are primary sources of variations in predicted lifetimes. Therefore, it is concluded, multiple sets of predictions should be utilized to fully characterize the lifetime range of a spacecraft.

  11. Quantum mechanics the theoretical minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    From the bestselling author of The Theoretical Minimum, an accessible introduction to the math and science of quantum mechanicsQuantum Mechanics is a (second) book for anyone who wants to learn how to think like a physicist. In this follow-up to the bestselling The Theoretical Minimum, physicist Leonard Susskind and data engineer Art Friedman offer a first course in the theory and associated mathematics of the strange world of quantum mechanics. Quantum Mechanics presents Susskind and Friedman’s crystal-clear explanations of the principles of quantum states, uncertainty and time dependence, entanglement, and particle and wave states, among other topics. An accessible but rigorous introduction to a famously difficult topic, Quantum Mechanics provides a tool kit for amateur scientists to learn physics at their own pace.

  12. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp-collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.09 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presen...

  13. A minimum mass nebula for M dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, E.

    2017-09-01

    Recently revealed differences in planets around M dwarf versus solar-type stars could arise from differences in their primordial discs and surveys of T Tauri stars find a correlation between stellar mass and disc mass. 'Minimum' discs have been reconstructed for the Solar system and solar-type stars and here this exercise is performed for M dwarfs using Kepler-detected planets. Distribution of planet mass between current orbits produces a disc with total mass of ≈0.009 M⊙ and a power-law profile with index α = 2.2. Disc reconstruction from the output of a forward model of planet formation indicates that the effect of detection bias on disc profile is slight and that the observed scatter in planet masses and semimajor axes are consistent with a universal disc profile. This nominal M dwarf disc is more centrally concentrated than those inferred around the solar-type stars observed by Kepler, and the mass surface density beyond 0.02 au is sufficient for in situ accretion of planets as single embryos. The mass of refractory solids within 0.5 au is 5.6 M⊕ compared to 4 M⊕ for solar-type stars in contrast with the trend with total disc mass. The total solid beyond 0.5 au is sufficient for the core of at least one giant planet.

  14. Minimum thickness anterior porcelain restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radz, Gary M

    2011-04-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) provide the dentist and the patient with an opportunity to enhance the patient's smile in a minimally to virtually noninvasive manner. Today's PLV demonstrates excellent clinical performance and as materials and techniques have evolved, the PLV has become one of the most predictable, most esthetic, and least invasive modalities of treatment. This article explores the latest porcelain materials and their use in minimum thickness restoration.

  15. Periodic and homoclinic orbits in a toy climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toner

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A two dimensional system of autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations models glacier growth and temperature changes on an idealized planet. We apply standard perturbative techniques from dynamical systems theory to study small amplitude periodic orbits about a constant equilibrium. The equations are put in cononical form and the local phase space topology is examined. Maximum and minimum periods of oscillation are obtained and related to the radius of the orbit. An adjacent equilibrium is shown to have saddle character and the inflowing and outflowing manifolds of this saddle are studied using numerical integration. The inflowing manifolds show the region of attraction for the periodic orbit. As the frequency gets small, the adjacent (saddle equilibrium approaches the radius of the periodic orbit. The bifurcation of the periodic orbit to a stable homoclinic orbit is observed when an inflowing manifold and an outflowing manifold of the adjacent equilibrium cross.

  16. Fingerprinting with Minimum Distance Decoding

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Chun; Gamal, Hesham El

    2007-01-01

    This work adopts an information theoretic framework for the design of collusion-resistant coding/decoding schemes for digital fingerprinting. More specifically, the minimum distance decision rule is used to identify 1 out of t pirates. Achievable rates, under this detection rule, are characterized in two distinct scenarios. First, we consider the averaging attack where a random coding argument is used to show that the rate 1/2 is achievable with t=2 pirates. Our study is then extended to the general case of arbitrary $t$ highlighting the underlying complexity-performance tradeoff. Overall, these results establish the significant performance gains offered by minimum distance decoding as compared to other approaches based on orthogonal codes and correlation detectors. In the second scenario, we characterize the achievable rates, with minimum distance decoding, under any collusion attack that satisfies the marking assumption. For t=2 pirates, we show that the rate $1-H(0.25)\\approx 0.188$ is achievable using an ...

  17. Minimum feature size preserving decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Aloupis, Greg; Demaine, Martin L; Dujmovic, Vida; Iacono, John

    2009-01-01

    The minimum feature size of a crossing-free straight line drawing is the minimum distance between a vertex and a non-incident edge. This quantity measures the resolution needed to display a figure or the tool size needed to mill the figure. The spread is the ratio of the diameter to the minimum feature size. While many algorithms (particularly in meshing) depend on the spread of the input, none explicitly consider finding a mesh whose spread is similar to the input. When a polygon is partitioned into smaller regions, such as triangles or quadrangles, the degradation is the ratio of original to final spread (the final spread is always greater). Here we present an algorithm to quadrangulate a simple n-gon, while achieving constant degradation. Note that although all faces have a quadrangular shape, the number of edges bounding each face may be larger. This method uses Theta(n) Steiner points and produces Theta(n) quadrangles. In fact to obtain constant degradation, Omega(n) Steiner points are required by any al...

  18. Three Temperate Neptunes Orbiting Nearby Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Weiss, Lauren M.; Sinukoff, Evan; Petigura, Erik A.; Isaacson, Howard; Hirsch, Lea; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Henry, Gregory W.; Grunblatt, Samuel K.; Huber, Daniel; von Braun, Kaspar; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Kane, Stephen R.; Wittrock, Justin; Horch, Elliott P.; Ciardi, David R.; Howell, Steve B.; Wright, Jason T.; Ford, Eric B.

    2016-10-01

    We present the discovery of three modestly irradiated, roughly Neptune-mass planets orbiting three nearby Solar-type stars. HD 42618 b has a minimum mass of 15.4 ± 2.4 {M}\\oplus , a semimajor axis of 0.55 au, an equilibrium temperature of 337 K, and is the first planet discovered to orbit the solar analogue host star, HD 42618. We also discover new planets orbiting the known exoplanet host stars HD 164922 and HD 143761 (ρ CrB). The new planet orbiting HD 164922 has a minimum mass of 12.9 ± 1.6 {M}\\oplus and orbits interior to the previously known Jovian mass planet orbiting at 2.1 au. HD 164922 c has a semimajor axis of 0.34 au and an equilibrium temperature of 418 K. HD 143761 c orbits with a semimajor axis of 0.44 au, has a minimum mass of 25 ± 2 {M}\\oplus , and is the warmest of the three new planets with an equilibrium temperature of 445 K. It orbits exterior to the previously known warm Jupiter in the system. A transit search using space-based CoRoT data and ground-based photometry from the Automated Photometric Telescopes (APTs) at Fairborn Observatory failed to detect any transits, but the precise, high-cadence APT photometry helped to disentangle planetary-reflex motion from stellar activity. These planets were discovered as part of an ongoing radial velocity survey of bright, nearby, chromospherically inactive stars using the Automated Planet Finder (APF) telescope at Lick Observatory. The high-cadence APF data combined with nearly two decades of radial velocity data from Keck Observatory and gives unprecedented sensitivity to both short-period low-mass, and long-period intermediate-mass planets. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time was granted for this project by the University of Hawai‘i, the University of California, and NASA.

  19. Painless orbital myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul T Chakor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic orbital inflammation is the third most common orbital disease, following Graves orbitopathy and lymphoproliferative diseases. We present a 11 year old girl with 15 days history of painless diplopia. There was no history of fluctuation of symptoms, drooping of eye lids or diminished vision. She had near total restricted extra-ocular movements and mild proptosis of the right eye. There was no conjunctival injection, chemosis, or bulb pain. There was no eyelid retraction or lid lag. Rest of the neurological examination was unremarkable.Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was raised with eosinophilia. Antinuclear antibodies were positive. Liver, renal and thyroid functions were normal. Antithyroid, double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid and acetylcholine receptor antibodies were negative. Repetitive nerve stimulation was negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the orbit was typical of orbital myositis. The patient responded to oral steroids. Orbital myositis can present as painless diplopia. MRI of orbit is diagnostic in orbital myositis.

  20. Orbital fractures: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey M Joseph, Ioannis P GlavasDivision of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USAAbstract: This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1 to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2 to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3 to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training.Keywords: orbit, trauma, fracture, orbital floor, medial wall, zygomatic, zygomatic complex, zmc fracture, zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures 

  1. Orbit Response Measurements at the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, J

    2004-01-01

    The optics of the SPS ring and the TT40 transfer line have been analyzed using the closed orbit (respectively trajectory) response to controlled corrector magnet deflections. A large amount of information on the machine model, beam position monitor quality and orbit corrector calibrations can be extracted from te response data. The data was analyzed with the LOCO fit program that was adapted to the SPS machine model. A large amount of data was collected on the SPS ring, and the modelling was tested under a number of different conditions. The SPS ring data showed that a significant number of horizontal SPS orbit correctors do not provide the nominal kick strength and are damaged at the level of the magnet coil. This note describes the experience that has been gained at the SPS, the information that could be extracted from orbit data and some of the limitations of the analysis procedure in the context of the SPS.

  2. LET spectra of trapped anomalous cosmic rays in low-Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylka, A. J.; Boberg, P. R.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Observations aboard Cosmos satelites discovered trapped anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs), tracked the variation in their intensity in 1986-1988, and measured their fluence, spectrum, and composition at solar minimum in the previous solar cycle. The MAST instrument aboard the SAMPEX satellite has observed trapped anomalous cosmic rays in the present solar cycle, confirmed the general features of the Cosmos data, and provided the first detailed observations of trapped ACRs. In this paper we apply theoretical modeling of trapped ACRs, which is shown to provide a reasonably good description of both the Cosmos and SAMPEX data, to calculate the integral linear-energy-transfer (LET) spectra due to trapped ACRs in typical low-Earth orbits. We compare these calculations with the LET spectra produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and non-trapped ACRs in order to assess the relative radiation hazard posed by trapped ACRs.

  3. Extracting d-orbital occupancy from magnetic Compton scattering in bilayer manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiellini, B.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Kaprzyk, S.; Bansil, A.; Li, Yinwan; Mitchell, J. F.; Montano, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    We consider the shape of the magnetic Compton profile (MCP), Jmag(pz), in La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7 for momentum transfer pz along the [110] direction and the associated reciprocal form factor B(r) defined by taking the one-dimensional Fourier transform of Jmag(pz). B(r) is shown to contain a prominent dip at r≈1 Å, where the minimum value Bmin of B(r) can be related to the occupancies of the eg orbitals of d and d symmetry in the system. We illustrate our procedure in detail by analyzing the measured MCP at 5 K and the MCP computed within the framework of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and comment on the differences between the measured and computed eg occupancies as a reflection of the limitations of the LSDA in treating electron correlation effects.

  4. Study on relative orbital configuration in satellite formation flying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfeng Li; Xin Meng; Yunfeng Gao; Xiang Li

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the relative orbital configurations of satellites in formation flying with non-perturbation and J2 perturbation are studied, and an orbital elements method is proposed to obtain the relative orbital configurations of satellites in formation. Firstly, under the condition of nonperturbation, we obtain many shapes of relative orbital configurations when the semi-major axes of satellites are equal.These shapes can be lines, ellipses or distorted closed curves.Secondly, on the basis of the analysis of J2 effect on relative orbital configurations, we find out that J2 effect can induce two kinds of changes of relative orbital configurations. They are distortion and drifting, respectively. In addition, when J2perturbation is concerned, we also find that the semi-major axes of the leading and following satellites should not be the same exactly in order to decrease the J2 effect. The relationship of relative orbital elements and J2 effect is obtained through simulations. Finally, the minimum relation perturbation conditions are established in order to reduce the influence of the J2 effect. The results show that the minimum relation perturbation conditions can reduce the J2 effect significantly when the orbital element differences are small enough, and they can become rules for the design of satellite formation flying.

  5. Refinement of thermal imager minimum resolvable temperature difference calculating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobrodov, V. G.; Mykytenko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Calculating methods, which accurately predict minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD), are of significant interest for many years. The article deals with improvement the accuracy of determining the thermal imaging system MRTD by elaboration the visual perception model. We suggest MRTD calculating algorithm, which is based on a reliable approximation of the human visual system modulation transfer function (MTF) proposed by N. Nill. There was obtained a new expression for the bandwidth evaluation, which is independent of angular size of the Foucault bar target.

  6. 太阳帆航天器地球逃逸轨道解析最优控制律%Solar sail analytical optimal control law for earth escape transfer orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史晓宁; 李立涛; 崔乃刚

    2013-01-01

    针对太阳帆航天器地球逃逸轨道控制问题,给出一种新的解析最优控制律.该控制律可使航天器在逃逸过程中轨道能量变化速率最大,从而保证逃逸时间最短.考虑到地球逃逸轨道形状,引入改进春分点轨道根数对航天器运动学方程进行描述,并给出了地球逃逸轨道最优控制律的推导过程.仿真分析表明,该控制律计算速度较快,而且可以根据航天器状态实时计算姿态控制角,因此比较适用于未来太阳帆航天器在轨自主控制系统.%Aiming at orbit control problem for escaping the earth with solar sail, a new analytical optimal control law is presented. This approach maximizes the instantaneous rate of the increase of the total orbital energy in the process of escaping the earth, so as to ensure the shortest escape time. The equations of motion for the trajectory are expressed in modified equinoctial orbital elements, which are well behaved as the trajectory going from elliptic to hyperbolic during escape. Furthermore, the derivation of escaping the earth optimal control law is given. Simulation analysis shows that the control law has higher computational speed, and can real-timely calculate the attitude control angle according to the state of spacecraft by the simulation analysis, hence the control law is suitable for the application in future on-orbit solar sail autonomous control system.

  7. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) missions applications and systems requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, W. G.; Cramblit, D. C.

    The routine delivery of large payloads to low earth orbit has become a reality with the Space Transportation System (STS). However, once earth orbit has been achieved, orbit transfer operations represent an inefficient use of the Space Shuttle. The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) will add a new and needed dimension to STS capabilities. Utilized in a reusable manner, the OMV is needed to deliver and retrieve satellites to and from orbital altitudes or inclinations beyond the practical limits of the Space Shuttle and to support basic Space Station activities. The initial OMV must also be designed to permit the addition of future mission kits to support the servicing, module changeout, or refueling of satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), and the retrieval and deorbit of space debris. This paper addresses the mission needs along with the resulting performance implications, design requirements and operational capabilities imposed on the OMV planned for use in the late 1980s.

  8. Orbit Maneuver of Spinning Tether via Tidal Force

    CERN Document Server

    Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the spinning tethered system is regarded as a typical and fundamental space structure attracting great interest of the aerospace engineers, and has been discussed primarily for specific space missions in past decades, including on-orbit capture and propellantless orbit transfer etc. The present work studies the dynamical behaviours of a fast spinning tethered binary system under central gravitational field, and derives principles of the basic laws of orbital maneuver. Considering the characteristics of coupled librational and orbital motions, an averaging method is introduced to deal with the slow-fast system equation, thus a definite equivalent model is derived. The general orbit motion is completely determined analytically, including the orbit geometry, periodicity, conversations and moving region etc. Since the possibility of orbit control using tether reaction has been proved by previous studies, special attention is paid to the transportation mode of angular momentum and mechanical energy betwe...

  9. Second Law Analysis of the Optimal Fin by Minimum Entropy Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the entropy generation concept of thermodynamics, this paper established a general theoretical model for the analysis of entropy generation to optimize fms, in which the minimum entropy generation was selected as the object to be studied. The irreversibility due to heat transfer and friction was taken into account so that the minimum entropygeneration number has been analyzed with respect to second law of thermodynamics in the forced cross-flow. The optimum dimensions of cylinder pins were discussed. It's found that the minimum entropy generation number depends on parameters related to the fluid and fin physical parameters. Variations of the minimum entropy generation number with different parameters were analyzed.

  10. Alternative paths to Earth-Moon transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The planar, circular, restricted three-body problem predicts the existence of periodic orbits around the Lagrangian equilibrium point L1. Considering the Earth-lunar-probe system, some of these orbits pass very close to the surfaces of the Earth and the Moon. These characteristics make it possible for these orbits, in spite of their instability, to be used in transfer maneuvers between Earth and lunar parking orbits. The main goal of this paper is to explore this scenario, adopting a more complex and realistic dynamical system, the four-body problem Sun-Earth-Moon-probe. We defined and investigated a set of paths, derived from the orbits around L1, which are capable of achieving transfer between low-altitude Earth (LEO and lunar orbits, including high-inclination lunar orbits, at a low cost and with flight time between 13 and 15 days.

  11. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure.

  12. Periodic orbits around areostationary points in the Martian gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Dong; Baoyin, Hexi; Ma, Xing-Rui

    2012-05-01

    This study investigates the problem of areostationary orbits around Mars in three-dimensional space. Areostationary orbits are expected to be used to establish a future telecommunication network for the exploration of Mars. However, no artificial satellites have been placed in these orbits thus far. The characteristics of the Martian gravity field are presented, and areostationary points and their linear stability are calculated. By taking linearized solutions in the planar case as the initial guesses and utilizing the Levenberg-Marquardt method, families of periodic orbits around areostationary points are shown to exist. Short-period orbits and long-period orbits are found around linearly stable areostationary points, but only short-period orbits are found around unstable areostationary points. Vertical periodic orbits around both linearly stable and unstable areostationary points are also examined. Satellites in these periodic orbits could depart from areostationary points by a few degrees in longitude, which would facilitate observation of the Martian topography. Based on the eigenvalues of the monodromy matrix, the evolution of the stability index of periodic orbits is determined. Finally, heteroclinic orbits connecting the two unstable areostationary points are found, providing the possibility for orbital transfer with minimal energy consumption.

  13. Periodic orbits around areostationary points in the Martian gravity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Liu; Hexi Baoyin; Xing-Rui Ma

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the problem of areostationary orbits around Mars in three-dimensional space.Areostationary orbits are expected to be used to establish a future telecommunication network for the exploration of Mars.However,no artificial satellites have been placed in these orbits thus far.The characteristics of the Martian gravity field are presented,and areostationary points and their linear stability are calculated.By taking linearized solutions in the planar case as the initial guesses and utilizing the Levenberg-Marquardt method,families of periodic orbits around areostationary points are shown to exist.Short-period orbits and long-period orbits are found around linearly stable areostationary points,but only short-period orbits are found around unstable areostationary points.Vertical periodic orbits around both linearly stable and unstable areostationary points are also examined.Satellites in these periodic orbits could depart from areostationary points by a few degrees in longitude,which would facilitate observation of the Martian topography.Based on the eigenvalues of the monodromy matrix,the evolution of the stability index of periodic orbits is determined.Finally,heteroclinic orbits connecting the two unstable areostationary points are found,providing the possibility for orbital transfer with minimal energy consumption.

  14. Minimum Time Path Planning for Robotic Manipulator in Drilling/ Spot Welding Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a minimum time path planning strategy is proposed for multi points manufacturing problems in drilling/spot welding tasks. By optimizing the travelling schedule of the set points and the detailed transfer path between points, the minimum time manufacturing task is realized under fully utilizing the dynamic performance of robotic manipulator. According to the start-stop movement in drilling/spot welding task, the path planning problem can be converted into a traveling salesman problem (TSP and a series of point to point minimum time transfer path planning problems. Cubic Hermite interpolation polynomial is used to parameterize the transfer path and then the path parameters are optimized to obtain minimum point to point transfer time. A new TSP with minimum time index is constructed by using point-point transfer time as the TSP parameter. The classical genetic algorithm (GA is applied to obtain the optimal travelling schedule. Several minimum time drilling tasks of a 3-DOF robotic manipulator are used as examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  15. PHL 1445: An eclipsing cataclysmic variable with a substellar donor near the period minimum

    CERN Document Server

    McAllister, M J; Baraffe, I; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Bento, J; Bochinski, J; Bours, M C P; Breedt, E; Copperwheat, C M; Hardy, L K; Kerry, P; Parsons, S G; Rostron, J W; Sahman, D I; Savoury, C D J; Tunnicliffe, R L

    2015-01-01

    We present high-speed, three-colour photometry of the eclipsing dwarf nova PHL 1445, which, with an orbital period of 76.3 min, lies just below the period minimum of ~82 min for cataclysmic variable stars. Averaging four eclipses reveals resolved eclipses of the white dwarf and bright spot. We determined the system parameters by fitting a parameterised eclipse model to the averaged lightcurve. We obtain a mass ratio of q = 0.087 +- 0.006 and inclination i = 85.2 +- 0.9 degrees. The primary and donor masses were found to be Mw = 0.73 +- 0.03 Msun and Md = 0.064 +- 0.005 Msun, respectively. Through multicolour photometry a temperature of the white dwarf of Tw = 13200 +- 700 K and a distance of 220 +- 50 pc were determined. The evolutionary state of PHL 1445 is uncertain. We are able to rule out a significantly evolved donor, but not one that is slightly evolved. Formation with a brown dwarf donor is plausible; though the brown dwarf would need to be no older than 600 Myrs at the start of mass transfer, requirin...

  16. The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Jason T; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Han, Eunkyu; Feng, Ying; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W; Valenti, Jeff A; Anderson, Jay; Piskunov, Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    We present a database of well determined orbital parameters of exoplanets. This database comprises spectroscopic orbital elements measured for 421 planets orbiting 357 stars from radial velocity and transit measurements as reported in the literature. We have also compiled fundamental transit parameters, stellar parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets with robust, well measured orbital parameters reported in peer-reviewed articles. The database is available in a searchable, filterable, and sortable form on the Web at http://exoplanets.org through the Exoplanets Data Explorer Table, and the data can be plotted and explored through the Exoplanets Data Explorer Plotter. We use the Data Explorer to generate publication-ready plots giving three examples of the signatures of exoplanet migration and dynamical evolution: We illustrate the character of the apparent correlation between mass and period in exoplanet orbits, the selection different biase...

  17. Preseptal and orbital cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Akçay; Gamze Dereli Can; Nurullah Çağıl

    2014-01-01

    Preseptal cellulitis (PC) is defined as an inflammation of the eyelid and surrounding skin, whereas orbital cellulitis (OC) is an inflammation of the posterior septum of the eyelid affecting the orbit and its contents. Periorbital tissues may become infected as a result of trauma (including insect bites) or primary bacteremia. Orbital cellulitis generally occurs as a complication of sinusitis. The most commonly isolated organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. epid...

  18. Orbital inflammation: Corticosteroids first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagi Glass, Lora R; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Orbital inflammation is common, and may affect all ages and both genders. By combining a thorough history and physical examination, targeted ancillary laboratory testing and imaging, a presumptive diagnosis can often be made. Nearly all orbital inflammatory pathology can be empirically treated with corticosteroids, thus obviating the need for histopathologic diagnosis prior to initiation of therapy. In addition, corticosteroids may be effective in treating concurrent systemic disease. Unless orbital inflammation responds atypically or incompletely, patients can be spared biopsy.

  19. Geometric orbit datum and orbit covers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG; Ke(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Vogan, D. , Dixmier algebras, sheets and representation theory (in Actes du colloque en I' honneur de Jacques Dixmier),Progress in Math. 92, Boston: Birkhauser Verlag, 1990, 333-397.[2]McGovern, W., Dixmier Algebras and Orbit Method, Operator Algebras, Unitary Representations and Invariant Theory,Boston: Birkhauser, 1990, 397-416.[3]Liang, K. , Parabolic inductions of nilpotent geometric orbit datum, Chinese Science Bulletin (in Chinese) , 1996, 41 (23):2116-2118.[4]Vogan, D., Representations of Real Reductive Lie Groups, Boston-Basel-Stuttgart: Birkhauser, 1981.[5]Lustig, G., Spaltenstein, N., Induced unipotent class, J. London Math. Soc., 1997, 19. 41-52.[6]Collingwood, D. H. , McGovern, W. M. , Nilpotent Orbits in Semisimple Lie Algebras, New York: Van Nostremt Reinhold,1993.

  20. Family of Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows the paths of three spacecraft currently in orbit around Mars, as well as the path by which NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander will approach and land on the planet. The t-shaped crosses show where the orbiters will be when Phoenix enters the atmosphere, while the x-shaped crosses show their location at landing time. All three orbiters, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, NASA's Mars Odyssey and the European Space Agency's Mars Express, will be monitoring Phoenix during the final steps of its journey to the Red Planet. Phoenix will land just south of Mars's north polar ice cap.

  1. Near Earth Asteroids- Prospection, Orbit Modification and Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandl, W.; Bazso, A.

    2014-04-01

    The number of known Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) has increased continuously during the last decades. Now we understand the role of asteroid impacts for the evolution of life on Earth. To ensure that mankind will survive in the long run, we have to face the "asteroid threat" seriously. On one hand we will have to develop methods of detection and deflection for Hazardous Asteroids, on the other hand we can use these methods to modify their orbits and exploit their resources. Rare-earth elements, rare metals like platinum group elements, etc. may be extracted more easily from NEAs than from terrestrial soil, without environmental pollution or political and social problems. In a first step NEAs, which are expected to contain resources like nickel-iron, platinum group metals or rare-earth elements, will be prospected by robotic probes. Then a number of asteroids with a minimum bulk density of 2 g/cm^3 and a diameter of 150 to 500 m will be selected for mining. Given the long duration of an individual mission time of 10-20 years, the authors propose a "pipeline" concept. While the observation of NEAs can be done in parallel, the precursor missions of the the next phase can be launched in short intervals, giving time for technical corrections and upgrades. In this way a continuous data flow is established and there are no idle times. For our purpose Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) seem to be a favorable choice for the following reasons: They have frequent closeencounters to Earth, their minimum orbit intersection distance is less than 0.05 AU (Astronomic Units) and they have diameters exceeding 150 meters. The necessary velocity change (delta V) for a spaceship is below 12 km/s to reach the PHA. The authors propose to modify the orbits of the chosen PHAs by orbital maneuvers from solar orbits to stable Earth orbits beyond the Moon. To change the orbits of these celestial bodies it is necessary to develop advanced propulsion systems. They must be able to deliver high

  2. Asymmetric k-Center with Minimum Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we give approximation algorithms and inapproximability results for various asymmetric k-center with minimum coverage problems. In the k-center with minimum coverage problem, each center is required to serve a minimum number of clients. These problems have been studied by Lim et al. [A....... Lim, B. Rodrigues, F. Wang, Z. Xu, k-center problems with minimum coverage, Theoret. Comput. Sci. 332 (1–3) (2005) 1–17] in the symmetric setting....

  3. Bonding analysis using localized relativistic orbitals: water, the ultrarelativistic case and the heavy homologues H2X (X = Te, Po, eka-Po).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubillard, S; Rota, J-B; Saue, T; Faegri, K

    2006-04-21

    We report the implementation of Pipek-Mezey [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 4916 (1989)] localization of molecular orbitals in the framework of a four-component relativistic molecular electronic structure theory. We have used an exponential parametrization of orbital rotations which allows the use of unconstrained optimization techniques. We demonstrate the strong basis set dependence of the Pipek-Mezey localization criterion and how it can be eliminated. We have employed localization in conjunction with projection analysis to study the bonding in the water molecule and its heavy homologues. We demonstrate that in localized orbitals the repulsion between hydrogens in the water molecule is dominated by electrostatic rather than exchange interactions and that freezing the oxygen 2s orbital blocks polarization of this orbital rather than hybridization. We also point out that the bond angle of the water molecule cannot be rationalized from the potential energy alone due to the force term of the molecular virial theorem that comes into play at nonequilibrium geometries and which turns out to be crucial in order to correctly reproduce the minimum of the total energy surface. In order to rapidly assess the possible relativistic effects we have carried out the geometry optimizations of the water molecule at various reduced speed of light with and without spin-orbit interaction. At intermediate speeds, the bond angle is reduced to around 90 degrees , as is known experimentally for H(2)S and heavier homologues, although our model of ultrarelativistic water by construction does not allow any contribution from d orbitals to bonding. At low speeds of light the water molecule becomes linear which is in apparent agreement with the valence shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR) model since the oxygen 2s12 and 2p12 orbitals both become chemically inert. However, we show that linearity is brought about by the relativistic stabilization of the (n + 1)s orbital, the same mechanism that leads to an

  4. Orbital engineering in symmetry-breaking polar heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disa, Ankit S; Kumah, Divine P; Malashevich, Andrei; Chen, Hanghui; Arena, Dario A; Specht, Eliot D; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, F J; Ahn, Charles H

    2015-01-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel approach to substantially modify orbital occupations and symmetries in electronically correlated oxides. In contrast to methods using strain or confinement, this orbital tuning is achieved by exploiting charge transfer and inversion symmetry breaking using atomically layered heterostructures. We illustrate the technique in the LaTiO_{3}-LaNiO_{3}-LaAlO_{3} system; a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio theory reveals electron transfer and concomitant polar fields, resulting in a ∼50% change in the occupation of Ni d orbitals. This change is sufficiently large to remove the orbital degeneracy of bulk LaNiO_{3} and creates an electronic configuration approaching a single-band Fermi surface. Furthermore, we theoretically show that such three-component heterostructuring is robust and tunable by choice of insulator in the heterostructure, providing a general method for engineering orbital configurations and designing novel electronic systems.

  5. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-01-08

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  6. Congenital orbital encephalocele, orbital dystopia, and exophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon

    2012-07-01

    We present here an exceedingly rare variant of a nonmidline basal encephalocele of the spheno-orbital type, and this was accompanied with orbital dystopia in a 56-year-old man. On examination, his left eye was located more inferolaterally than his right eye, and the patient said this had been this way since his birth. The protrusion of his left eye was aggravated when he is tired. His naked visual acuity was 0.7/0.3, and the ocular pressure was 14/12 mm Hg. The exophthalmometry was 10/14 to 16 mm. His eyeball motion was not restricted, yet diplopia was present in all directions. The distance from the midline to the medial canthus was 20/15 mm. The distance from the midline to the midpupillary line was 35/22 mm. The vertical dimension of the palpebral fissure was 12/9 mm. The height difference of the upper eyelid margin was 11 mm, and the height difference of the lower eyelid margin was 8 mm. Facial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed left sphenoid wing hypoplasia and herniation of the left anterior temporal pole and dura mater into the orbit, and this resulted into left exophthalmos and encephalomalacia in the left anterior temporal pole. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the second case of basal encephalocele and orbital dystopia.

  7. Minimum Competency Testing and the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    This brief overview of minimum competency testing and disabled high school students discusses: the inclusion or exclusion of handicapped students in minimum competency testing programs; approaches to accommodating the individual needs of handicapped students; and legal issues. Surveys of states that have mandated minimum competency tests indicate…

  8. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those…

  9. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  10. Minimum income protection in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Peijpe, T.

    2009-01-01

    This article offers an overview of the Dutch legal system of minimum income protection through collective bargaining, social security, and statutory minimum wages. In addition to collective agreements, the Dutch statutory minimum wage offers income protection to a small number of workers. Its effect

  11. Patterns of orbital disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses various patterns of presentations of orbital lesions. Since this article has been authored by an otolaryngologist, the entire concept has been viewed from otolaryngologist's angle. With the advent of nasal endoscope trans nasal access to orbit is becoming the order of the day. Major advantage being that external skin incision is avoided.

  12. LUNISOLAR INVARIANT RELATIVE ORBITS

    OpenAIRE

    Walid Ali Rahoma

    2013-01-01

    The present study deal with constructing an analytical model within Hamiltonian formulation to design invariant relative orbits due to the perturbation of J2 and the lunisolar attraction. To fade the secular drift separation over the time between two neighboring orbits, two second order conditions that guarantee that drift are derived and enforced to be equal.

  13. Reticulohistiocytoma of the Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Heather M.; Hayek, Brent R.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2015-01-01

    Reticulohistiocytoma is a rare, benign histiocytic proliferation of the skin or soft tissue. While ocular involvement has been documented in the past, there have been no previously reported cases of reticulohistiocytoma of the orbit. In this report, the authors describe a reticulohistiocytoma of the orbit in a middle-aged woman. PMID:24807799

  14. Methods of rapid orbit forecasting after maneuvers for geostationary satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XuHai; LI ZhiGang; FENG ChuGang; GUO Ji; SHI HuLi; AI GuoXiang; WU FengLei; QIAO RongChuan

    2009-01-01

    A geostationary (GEO) satellite may serve as a navigation satellite,but there is a problem that maneuvers frequently occur and the forces are difficult to model.Based on the technique of determining setellite orbits by transfer,a predicted orbit with high accuracy may be achieved by the method of statistical orbit determination in case of no maneuver force.The predicted orbit will soon be invalid after the maneuver starts,and it takes a long time to get a valid orbit after the maneuver ends.In order to improve ephemeris usability,the method of rapid orbit forecasting after maneuvers is studied.First,GEO satellite movement is analyzed in case of maneuvers based on the observation from the orbit measurement system by transfer.Then when a GEO satellite is in the free status just after maneuvers,the short arc observation is used to forecast the orbit.It is assumed that the common system bias and biases of each station are constant,which can be obtained from orbit determination with long arc observations.In this way,only 6 orbit elements would be solved by the method of statistical orbit determination,and the ephemeris with high accuracy may be soon obtained.Actual orbit forecasting with short arc observation for SlNOSAT-1 satellite shows that,with the tracking network available,the precision of the predicted orbit (RMS of O-C) can reach about 5 m with 15 min arc observation,and about 3 m with 30 min arc observation.

  15. Methods of rapid orbit forecasting after maneuvers for geostationary satellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A geostationary(GEO) satellite may serve as a navigation satellite,but there is a problem that maneuvers frequently occur and the forces are difficult to model.Based on the technique of determining satellite orbits by transfer,a predicted orbit with high accuracy may be achieved by the method of statis-tical orbit determination in case of no maneuver force.The predicted orbit will soon be invalid after the maneuver starts,and it takes a long time to get a valid orbit after the maneuver ends.In order to improve ephemeris usability,the method of rapid orbit forecasting after maneuvers is studied.First,GEO satellite movement is analyzed in case of maneuvers based on the observation from the orbit meas-urement system by transfer.Then when a GEO satellite is in the free status just after maneuvers,the short arc observation is used to forecast the orbit.It is assumed that the common system bias and biases of each station are constant,which can be obtained from orbit determination with long arc observations.In this way,only 6 orbit elements would be solved by the method of statistical orbit determination,and the ephemeris with high accuracy may be soon obtained.Actual orbit forecasting with short arc observation for SINOSAT-1 satellite shows that,with the tracking network available,the precision of the predicted orbit(RMS of O-C) can reach about 5 m with 15 min arc observation,and about 3 m with 30 min arc observation.

  16. Orbital Plots Using Gnuplot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian G.

    2000-06-01

    The plotting program Gnuplot is freely available, general purpose, easy to use, and available on a variety of platforms. Complex three-dimensional surfaces, including the familiar angular parts of the hydrogen atom orbitals, are easily represented using Gnuplot. Contour plots allow viewing the radial and angular variation of the probability density in an orbital. Examples are given of how Gnuplot is used in an undergraduate physical chemistry class to view familiar atomic orbitals in new ways or to generate views of orbital functions that the student may have not seen before. Gnuplot may also be easily integrated into the environment of a Web page; an example of this is discussed (and is available at http://onsager.bd.psu.edu/~moore/orbitals_gnuplot). The plotting commands are entered with a form and a CGI script is used to run Gnuplot and display the result back to the browser.

  17. The Dynamics of Orbit-Clearing for Planets on Eccentric Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Danielle; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2016-10-01

    The third requirement in the 2006 International Astronomical Union (IAU) definition of a planet is that the object has cleared the neighborhood around its orbit. Margot (2015) proposed a metric that quantitatively determines if an object has enough mass to clear an orbital zone of a specific extent within a defined time interval. In this metric, the size of the zone to be cleared is given by CRH, where C is a constant and RH is the Hill Radius. Margot (2015) adopts C=2*31/2 to describe the minimum extent of orbital clearing on the basis of the planet's feeding zone. However, this value of C may only apply for eccentricities up to about 0.3 (Quillen & Faber 2006). Here, we explore the timescales and boundaries of orbital clearing for planets over a range of orbital eccentricities and planet-star mass ratios using the MERCURY integration package (Chambers 1999). The basic setup for the integrations includes a single planet orbiting a star and a uniform distribution of massless particles extending beyond CRH. The system is integrated for at least 106 revolutions and the massless particles are tracked in order to quantify the timescale and extent of the clearing.

  18. Orbit Stabilization of Nanosat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON,DAVID J.

    1999-12-01

    An algorithm is developed to control a pulsed {Delta}V thruster on a small satellite to allow it to fly in formation with a host satellite undergoing time dependent atmospheric drag deceleration. The algorithm uses four short thrusts per orbit to correct for differences in the average radii of the satellites due to differences in drag and one thrust to symmetrize the orbits. The radial difference between the orbits is the only input to the algorithm. The algorithm automatically stabilizes the orbits after ejection and includes provisions to allow azimuthal positional changes by modifying the drag compensation pulses. The algorithm gives radial and azimuthal deadbands of 50 cm and 3 m for a radial measurement accuracy of {+-} 5 cm and {+-} 60% period variation in the drag coefficient of the host. Approaches to further reduce the deadbands are described. The methodology of establishing a stable orbit after ejection is illustrated in an appendix. The results show the optimum ejection angle to minimize stabilization thrust is upward at 86{sup o} from the orbital velocity. At this angle the stabilization velocity that must be supplied by the thruster is half the ejection velocity. An ejection velocity of 0.02 m/sat 86{sup o} gives an azimuthal separation after ejection and orbit stabilization of 187 m. A description of liquid based gas thrusters suitable for the satellite control is included in an appendix.

  19. Impact evaluation of an orbital depot on on-orbit servicing infrastructures dedicated to modularized earth-orbiting platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarton du Jonchay, Tristan; Ho, Koki

    2017-03-01

    This paper aims to quantify the responsiveness of two on-orbit servicing infrastructures providing services to multiple serviceable platforms in coplanar medium Earth orbit (MEO) and geostationary orbit (GEO). The platforms to be serviced are assumed to be made of elementary units (EUs). EUs are small standardized structural units capable of aggregating with each other and gathering the key functions of a typical satellite within the size of a 6U cubesat. The first servicing infrastructure considered in this paper, called "Without Depot" (WoD), includes a launch vehicle and a robotic servicer. The second servicing infrastructure, called "With Depot" (WD) includes a launch vehicle, a robotic servicer and an orbital depot of EUs. The responsiveness of these infrastructures is quantified using a queueing theory-based stochastic simulation on Simulink taking into account the launch and platform random failures. The metrics used to quantify the responsiveness are the service completion rate and the average waiting time before an EU is replaced over a 10-year period of operation. With respect to those metrics, it is demonstrated that WD is more responsive than WoD. However, WD is also shown to be likely to cost more than WoD. Finally, the sensitivity of the responsiveness of WD to the capacity of the orbital depot is analyzed to find the minimum storage capacity for which WD is the most responsive. This last result could be of interest for space designers dealing with the sizing of on-orbit servicing infrastructures. We believe that the concept introduced in this paper will be a critical milestone in the design of a responsive integrated space infrastructure dedicated to the development and prosperity of a new MEO/GEO economy.

  20. Linear Minimum variance estimation fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yunmin; LI Xianrong; ZHAO Juan

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows that a general mulitisensor unbiased linearly weighted estimation fusion essentially is the linear minimum variance (LMV) estimation with linear equality constraint, and the general estimation fusion formula is developed by extending the Gauss-Markov estimation to the random paramem of distributed estimation fusion in the LMV setting.In this setting ,the fused estimator is a weighted sum of local estimatess with a matrix quadratic optimization problem subject to a convex linear equality constraint. Second, we present a unique solution to the above optimization problem, which depends only on the covariance matrixCK. Third, if a priori information, the expectation and covariance, of the estimated quantity is unknown, a necessary and sufficient condition for the above LMV fusion becoming the best unbiased LMV estimation with dnown prior information as the above is presented. We also discuss the generality and usefulness of the LMV fusion formulas developed. Finally, we provied and off-line recursion of Ck for a class of multisensor linear systems with coupled measurement noises.

  1. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-05-14

    This thesis presents a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves, at some unknown time, differently than the “background” motion, which can be induced from camera motion. The goal of proposed method is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Since motion estimation can be unreliable between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Observing more frames before declaring a detection may lead to a more accurate detection and segmentation, since more motion may be observed leading to a stronger motion cue. However, this leads to greater delay. The proposed method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms, defined as declarations of detection before the object moves or incorrect or inaccurate segmentation at the detection time. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  2. Dose variation during solar minimum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussenhoven, M.S.; Mullen, E.G.; Brautigam, D.H. (Phillips Lab., Geophysics Directorate, Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (US)); Holeman, E. (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-12-01

    In this paper, the authors use direct measurement of dose to show the variation in inner and outer radiation belt populations at low altitude from 1984 to 1987. This period includes the recent solar minimum that occurred in September 1986. The dose is measured behind four thicknesses of aluminum shielding and for two thresholds of energy deposition, designated HILET and LOLET. The authors calculate an average dose per day for each month of satellite operation. The authors find that the average proton (HILET) dose per day (obtained primarily in the inner belt) increased systematically from 1984 to 1987, and has a high anticorrelation with sunspot number when offset by 13 months. The average LOLET dose per day behind the thinnest shielding is produced almost entirely by outer zone electrons and varies greatly over the period of interest. If any trend can be discerned over the 4 year period it is a decreasing one. For shielding of 1.55 gm/cm{sup 2} (227 mil) Al or more, the LOLET dose is complicated by contributions from {gt} 100 MeV protons and bremsstrahlung.

  3. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  4. Prototyping LHC Orbit Control

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, Thijs; Srinivasan, B

    2002-01-01

    Orbit correction consists in adjusting the strengths of the corrector magnets to make the measured beam position match a predefined reference. In the LHC, this involves around 2000 sensors and more than 1000 actuators that are distributed along both rings. The orbit correction scheme should be able to compensate for very slow orbit drifts in the range of a 10-2 Hz but also for fast motions (vibrations) up to 1 Hz. In this paper we investigate correction schemes that could be used in either case. The choice of design formalisms is based on the experience we gained with the SPS and the LEP.

  5. Dynamical mass transfer in cataclysmic binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Fulvio; Lamb, D. Q.

    1987-01-01

    When a binary comes into contact and mass transfer begins, orbital angular momentum is stored in the accretion disk until the disk couples tidally to the binary system. Taam and McDermott (1987) have suggested that this leads to unstable dynamical mass transfer in many cataclysmic variables in which mass transfer would otherwise be stable, and that it explains the gap between 2 and 3 h in the orbital period distribution of these systems. Here the consequences of this hypothesis for the evolution of cataclysmic binaries are explored. It is found that systems coming into contact longward of the period gap undergo one or more episodes of dynamical mass transfer.

  6. The difficulty of measuring orbital angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Preece

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Light can carry angular momentum as well as energy and momentum; the transfer of this angular momentum to an object results in an optical torque. The development of a rotational analogue to the force measurement capability of optical tweezers is hampered by the difficulty of optical measurement of orbital angular momentum. We present an experiment with encouraging results, but emphasise the difficulty of the task.

  7. Investigation of the core-halo structure of the neutron-rich nuclei {sup 6}He and {sup 8}He by intermediate-energy elastic proton scattering at high momentum transfer; Etude de la structure coeur-halo des noyaux riches en neutron {sup 6}He et {sup 8}He par la diffusion elastique de protons aux energies intermediaires etendue a la region du premier minimum de diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksouh, F

    2002-12-01

    The elastic proton scattering from the halo nuclei {sup 6}He and {sup 8}He was investigated in inverse kinematics at energies around 700 MeV/u with the aim to deduce the differential cross sections for the region of high momentum transfer, covering the first diffraction minimum. For this purpose, a liquid-hydrogen target was specially developed and used for the first time allowing to obtain low-background data as compared to commonly used targets made from C-H compounds. Previous data taken in the region of small momentum transfer were sensitive to the size and the peripheral shape of the total nuclear matter density distribution but not to the inner part. The present data allow for a more detailed insight in the structure of the alike core in {sup 6,8}He through a better determination of the matter density distributions. Several density distributions calculated from different microscopic models were used to derive elastic scattering cross sections which are compared with the obtained data. (author)

  8. Envelopes of Cometary Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijajlović, Ž.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss cometary orbits from the standpoint of Nonstandard (Leibnitz analysis, a relatively new branch of mathematics. In particular, we consider parabolic cometary paths. It appears that, in a sense, every parabola is an ellipse.

  9. Orbital interactions in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, Thomas A; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Explains the underlying structure that unites all disciplines in chemistry Now in its second edition, this book explores organic, organometallic, inorganic, solid state, and materials chemistry, demonstrating how common molecular orbital situations arise throughout the whole chemical spectrum. The authors explore the relationships that enable readers to grasp the theory that underlies and connects traditional fields of study within chemistry, thereby providing a conceptual framework with which to think about chemical structure and reactivity problems. Orbital Interactions

  10. Dexter energy transfer pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M; Beratan, David N

    2016-07-19

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor-acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways.

  11. Antisymmetric Orbit Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Klimyk

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, properties of antisymmetric orbit functions are reviewed and further developed. Antisymmetric orbit functions on the Euclidean space $E_n$ are antisymmetrized exponential functions. Antisymmetrization is fulfilled by a Weyl group, corresponding to a Coxeter-Dynkin diagram. Properties of such functions are described. These functions are closely related to irreducible characters of a compact semisimple Lie group $G$ of rank $n$. Up to a sign, values of antisymmetric orbit functions are repeated on copies of the fundamental domain $F$ of the affine Weyl group (determined by the initial Weyl group in the entire Euclidean space $E_n$. Antisymmetric orbit functions are solutions of the corresponding Laplace equation in $E_n$, vanishing on the boundary of the fundamental domain $F$. Antisymmetric orbit functions determine a so-called antisymmetrized Fourier transform which is closely related to expansions of central functions in characters of irreducible representations of the group $G$. They also determine a transform on a finite set of points of $F$ (the discrete antisymmetric orbit function transform. Symmetric and antisymmetric multivariate exponential, sine and cosine discrete transforms are given.

  12. Evaluation of Attenuation/Minimum-Phase Pairs by Means of Two Fast Fourier Transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-31

    Hilbert Transform Logarithmic Singularities Mini mum- Phase Filter Phase Poles and Zeros Principal Value Integral UNCLASSIFIED MCUNITV...minimum- phase filters , in terms of their group delay and rate of energy flow through the filter, are given in [5; pages 132-3]. In particular, the...minimum- phase filter has the smallest group delay of any stable filter with specified magnitude transfer function. ATTENUATION AND PHASE There is

  13. How Do Alternative Minimum Wage Variables Compare?

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Lemos

    2005-01-01

    Several minimum wage variables have been suggested in the literature. Such a variety of variables makes it difficult to compare the associated estimates across studies. One problem is that these estimates are not always calibrated to represent the effect of a 10% increase in the minimum wage. Another problem is that these estimates measure the effect of the minimum wage on the employment of different groups of workers. In this paper we critically compare employment effect estimates using five...

  14. Minimum wages, globalization and poverty in Honduras

    OpenAIRE

    Gindling, T. H.; Terrell, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    To be competitive in the global economy, some argue that Latin American countries need to reduce or eliminate labour market regulations such as minimum wage legislation because they constrain job creation and hence increase poverty. On the other hand, minimum wage increases can have a direct positive impact on family income and may therefore help to reduce poverty. We take advantage of a complex minimum wage system in a poor country that has been exposed to the forces of globalization to test...

  15. Tracking error with minimum guarantee constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Barro; Elio Canestrelli

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the popularity of indexing has greatly increased in financial markets and many different families of products have been introduced. Often these products also have a minimum guarantee in the form of a minimum rate of return at specified dates or a minimum level of wealth at the end of the horizon. Period of declining stock market returns together with low interest rate levels on Treasury bonds make it more difficult to meet these liabilities. We formulate a dynamic asset alloca...

  16. Application of Steenbeck's minimum principle for three-dimensional modelling of DC arc plasma torches

    CERN Document Server

    Li He Ping; Chen, X

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, physical/mathematical models for the three-dimensional, quasi-steady modelling of the plasma flow and heat transfer inside a non-transferred DC arc plasma torch are described in detail. The Steenbeck's minimum principle (Finkelnburg W and Maecker H 1956 Electric arcs and thermal plasmas Encyclopedia of Physics vol XXII (Berlin: Springer)) is employed to determine the axial position of the anode arc-root at the anode surface. This principle postulates a minimum arc voltage for a given arc current, working gas flow rate, and torch configuration. The modelling results show that the temperature and flow fields inside the DC non-transferred arc plasma torch show significant three-dimensional features. The predicted anode arc-root attachment position and the arc shape by employing Steenbeck's minimum principle are reasonably consistent with experimental observations. The thermal efficiency and the torch power distribution are also calculated in this paper. The results show that the thermal efficiency...

  17. Image Stacking Method Application for Low Earth Orbit Faint Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Kitazawa, Y.; Hanada, T.

    2013-09-01

    Space situational awareness is one of the most important actions for safe and sustainable space development and its utilization. Tracking and maintaining debris catalog are the basis of the actions. Current minimum size of objects in the catalog that routinely tracked and updated is approximately 10 cm in the Low Earth Orbit region. This paper proposes collaborative observation of space-based sensors and ground facilities to improve tracking capability in low Earth orbit. This observation geometry based on role-sharing idea. A space-based sensor has advantage in sensitivity and observation opportunity however, it has disadvantages in periodic observation which is essential for catalog maintenance. On the other hand, a ground facility is inferior to space-based sensors in sensitivity however; observation network composed of facilities has an advantage in periodic observation. Whole observation geometry is defined as follows; 1) space-based sensors conduct initial orbit estimation for a target 2) ground facility network tracks the target based on estimated orbit 3) the network observes the target periodically and updates its orbit information. The second phase of whole geometry is based on image stacking method developed by the Japan aerospace exploration agency and this method is verified for objects in geostationary orbit. This method enables to detect object smaller than a nominal size limitation by stacking faint light spot along archived time-series frames. The principle of this method is prediction and searching target's motion on the images. It is almost impossible to apply the method to objects in Low Earth Orbit without proper orbit information because Low Earth Orbit objects have varied orbital characteristics. This paper discusses whether or not initial orbit estimation results given by space-based sensors have enough accuracy to apply image stacking method to Low Earth Orbit objects. Ground-based observation procedure is assumed as being composed of

  18. Effect of Pressure on Minimum Fluidization Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhiping; Na Yongjie; Lu Qinggang

    2007-01-01

    Minimum fluidization velocity of quartz sand and glass bead under different pressures of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Mpa were investigated. The minimum fluidization velocity decreases with the increasing of pressure. The influence of pressure to the minimum fluidization velocities is stronger for larger particles than for smaller ones.Based on the test results and Ergun equation, an experience equation of minimum fluidization velocity is proposed and the calculation results are comparable to other researchers' results.

  19. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Denmark, East Germany, England, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein..., Switzerland, Wales, West Germany, Yugoslavia), or Greenland shall meet each applicable minimum requirement...

  20. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  1. Calculation of minimum quench energies in Rutherford cables

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, M N

    1996-01-01

    The Minimum Quench Energy MQE of a conductor may give some indication about the likelihood of training in magnets. We have used a numerical solution of the heat flow equation to calculate the MQE of a single superconducting wire and have found the results to be in good agreement with experiment. This model was then extended to an approximate representation of Rutherford cable by including current and heat transfer between strands. Reasonable agreement with experiment has been found, although in some cases it appears that the effective thermal contact between strands is greater than expected from electrical resistance measurements.

  2. A comparative study between control strategies for a solar sailcraft in an Earth-Mars transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainenti-Lopes, I.; Souza, L. C. Gadelha; De Sousa, Fabiano. L.

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this work was a comparative study of solar sail trajectory optimization using different control strategies. Solar sailcraft is propulsion system with great interest in space engineering, since it uses solar radiation to propulsion. So there is no need for propellant to be used, thus it can remains active throughout the entire transfer maneuver. This type of propulsion system opens the possibility to reduce the cost of exploration missions in the solar system. In its simplest configuration, a Flat Solar Sail (FSS) consists of a large and thin structure generally composed by a film fixed to flexible rods. The performance of these vehicles depends largely on the sails attitude relative to the Sun. Using a FSS as propulsion, an Earth-Mars transfer optimization problem was tackled by the algorithms GEOreal1 and GEOreal2 (Generalized Extremal Optimization with real codification). Those algorithms are Evolutionary Algorithms (AE) based on the theory of Self-Organized Criticality. They were used to optimize the FSS attitude angle so it could reach Mars orbit in minimum time. It was considered that the FSS could perform up to ten attitude maneuvers during orbital transfer. Moreover, the time between maneuvers can be different. So, the algorithms had to optimize an objective function with 20 design variables. The results obtained in this work were compared with previously results that considered constant values of time between maneuvers.

  3. Minimum energy control and optimal-satisfactory control of Boolean control network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangfei, E-mail: li_fangfei@163.com; Lu, Xiwen

    2013-12-09

    In the literatures, to transfer the Boolean control network from the initial state to the desired state, the expenditure of energy has been rarely considered. Motivated by this, this Letter investigates the minimum energy control and optimal-satisfactory control of Boolean control network. Based on the semi-tensor product of matrices and Floyd's algorithm, minimum energy, constrained minimum energy and optimal-satisfactory control design for Boolean control network are given respectively. A numerical example is presented to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  4. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS) configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP). The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan t...

  5. Orbits for sixteen binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetković Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper orbits for 13 binaries are recalculated and presented. The reason is that recent observations show higher residuals than the corresponding ephemerides calculated by using the orbital elements given in the Sixth Catalog of Orbits of Visual Binary Stars. The binaries studied were: WDS 00182+7257 = A 803, WDS 00335+4006 = HO 3, WDS 00583+2124 = BU 302, WDS 01011+6022 = A 926, WDS 01014+1155 = BU 867, WDS 01112+4113 = A 655, WDS 01361−2954 + HJ 3447, WDS 02333+5219 = STT 42 AB,WDS 04362+0814 = A 1840 AB,WDS 08017−0836 = A 1580, WDS 08277−0425 = A 550, WDS 17471+1742 = STF 2215 and WDS 18025+4414 = BU 1127 Aa-B. In addition, for three binaries - WDS 01532+1526 = BU 260, WDS 02563+7253 = STF 312 AB and WDS 05003+3924 = STT 92 AB - the orbital elements are calculated for the first time. In this paper the authors present not only the orbital elements, but the masses dynamical parallaxes, absolute magnitudes and ephemerides for the next five years, as well.

  6. Helioseismology with Solar Orbiter

    CERN Document Server

    Löptien, Björn; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper; Appourchaux, Thierry; Rodríguez, Julián Blanco; Cally, Paul S; Dominguez-Tagle, Carlos; Gandorfer, Achim; Hill, Frank; Hirzberger, Johann; Scherrer, Philip H; Solanki, Sami K

    2014-01-01

    The Solar Orbiter mission, to be launched in July 2017, will carry a suite of remote sensing and in-situ instruments, including the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI). PHI will deliver high-cadence images of the Sun in intensity and Doppler velocity suitable for carrying out novel helioseismic studies. The orbit of the Solar Orbiter spacecraft will reach a solar latitude of up to 21 deg (up to 34 deg by the end of the extended mission) and thus will enable the first local helioseismology studies of the polar regions. Here we consider an array of science objectives to be addressed by helioseismology within the baseline telemetry allocation (51 Gbit per orbit, current baseline) and within the science observing windows (baseline 3 x 10 days per orbit). A particularly important objective is the measurement of large-scale flows at high latitudes (rotation and meridional flow), which are largely unknown but play an important role in flux transport dynamos. The full range of Earth-Sun-spacecraft angles provi...

  7. Extended duration orbiter (EDO) insignia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Extended duration orbiter (EDO) insignia incorporates a space shuttle orbiter with payload bay doors (PLBDs) open and a spacelab module inside. Trailing the orbiter are the initials EDO. The EDO-modified Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, will be flown for the first EDO mission, STS-50.

  8. Dealing with uncertainties in angles-only initial orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellin, Roberto; Di Lizia, Pierluigi; Zanetti, Renato

    2016-08-01

    A method to deal with uncertainties in initial orbit determination (IOD) is presented. This is based on the use of Taylor differential algebra (DA) to nonlinearly map uncertainties from the observation space to the state space. When a minimum set of observations is available, DA is used to expand the solution of the IOD problem in Taylor series with respect to measurement errors. When more observations are available, high order inversion tools are exploited to obtain full state pseudo-observations at a common epoch. The mean and covariance of these pseudo-observations are nonlinearly computed by evaluating the expectation of high order Taylor polynomials. Finally, a linear scheme is employed to update the current knowledge of the orbit. Angles-only observations are considered and simplified Keplerian dynamics adopted to ease the explanation. Three test cases of orbit determination of artificial satellites in different orbital regimes are presented to discuss the feature and performances of the proposed methodology.

  9. Conformation effects on the molecular orbitals of serine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ke-Dong; Ma Peng-Fei; Shan Xu

    2011-01-01

    This paper calculates the five most stable conformers of serine with Hartree-Fock theory, density functional theory (B3LYP), M0ller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP4(SDQ)) and electron propagation theory with the 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set. The calculated vertical ionization energies for the valence molecular orbitals of each conformer are in agreement with the experimental data, indicating that a range of molecular conformations would coexist in an equilibrium sample. Information of the five outer valence molecular orbitals for each conformer is explored in coordinate and momentum spaces using dual space analysis to investigate the conformational processes, which are generated from the global minimum conformer Serl by rotation of C2-C3 (Ser4), C1-C2 (Ser5) and C1-O2 (Ser2 and Ser3). Orbitals 28a, 27a and 26a are identified as the fingerprint orbitals for all the conformational processes.

  10. LOP- LONG-TERM ORBIT PREDICTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The Long-Term Orbit Predictor (LOP) trajectory propagation program is a useful tool in lifetime analysis of orbiting spacecraft. LOP is suitable for studying planetary orbit missions with reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) trajectories. Sample data is included for a geosynchronous station drift cycle study, a Venus radar mapping strategy, a frozen orbit about Mars, and a repeat ground trace orbit. LOP uses the variation-of-parameters method in formulating the equations of motion. Terms involving the mean anomaly are removed from numerical integrations so that large step sizes, on the order of days, are possible. Consequently, LOP executes much faster than programs based on Cowell's method, such as the companion program ASAP (the Artificial Satellite Analysis Program, NPO-17522, also available through COSMIC). The program uses a force model with a gravity field of up to 21 by 21, lunisolar perturbation, drag, and solar radiation pressure. The input includes classical orbital elements (either mean or oscillating), orbital elements of the sun relative to the planet, reference time and dates, drag coefficients, gravitational constants, planet radius, rotation rate. The printed output contains the classical elements for each time step or event step, and additional orbital data such as true anomaly, eccentric anomaly, latitude, longitude, periapsis altitude, and the rate of change per day of certain elements. Selected output is additionally written to a plot file for postprocessing by the user. LOP is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution on IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS with a minimum of 256K RAM. Recompiling the source requires the Lahey F77 v2.2 compiler. The LOP package includes examples that use LOTUS 1-2-3 for graphical displays, but any graphics software package should be able to handle the ASCII plot file. The program is available on two 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskettes. The program was written in 1986 and last updated in 1989. LOP is

  11. Orbital maneuvers around irregular shaped bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Flaviane; Rocco, E. M.; Almeida Prado, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In the solar system there are many small bodies called asteroids. The large majority of these bodies are located in the asteroid belt, between the orbits of the planets Mars and Jupiter. The Near- Earth Objects, or NEOs, are objects with perihelion below 1.3AU, which include comets and asteroids. The NEOs are considered to have orbits passing close to the Earth’s orbit and, in the case of asteroids, are called Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs). Among the NEAs there are bodies considered potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs), whose minimum orbit intersection distance with Earth is 0.05AU and that have absolute magnitude (H) of 22, which would mean an asteroid of at least 110-240 meters, depending on its albedo. One of the major characteristic of the asteroids is the irregular shape, causing the dynamics of orbits around these bodies to be different from a spherical shaped one. The fact that an object is not spherical generates a perturbation on the gravitational field. The disturbing force can be determined considering the shape of the specific body. A satellite orbiting this body would suffer the effects of this perturbation, but knowing the disturbing force, it’s possible to correct and control the orbit according to the desired mission. The polyhedron method is a traditional way to model an asteroid by dividing the object into smaller parts. The data used on this work are composed by a combination of triangular faces. The total disturbing force is a sum of the force on each piece of the model. Therefore, after the simulations are obtained, it’s possible to apply the desired corrections of the perturbation using continuous low thrust in closed loop, making it possible to perform maneuvers near these bodies. One of the important applications of the study shown above is in the ASTER mission, that is under study by INPE and several other Brazilian academic institutions, which goal is to send a spacecraft to an asteroid and then

  12. Interacting Binaries with Eccentric Orbits. III. Orbital Evolution due to Direct Impact and Self-Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Sepinsky, J F; Kalogera, V; Rasio, F A

    2010-01-01

    The rapid circularization and synchronization of the stellar components in an eccentric binary system at the onset of mass transfer is a fundamental assumption common to all binary stellar evolution and population synthesis codes, even though the validity of this assumption is questionable both theoretically and observationally. Here we calculate the evolution of the orbital elements of an eccentric binary through the direct three-body integration of a massive particle ejected through the inner Lagrangian point of the donor star at periastron. The trajectory of this particle leads to three possible outcomes: direct accretion onto the companion star within a single orbit, self-accretion back onto the donor star within a single orbit, or a quasi-periodic orbit around the companion star, possibly leading to the formation of a disk. We calculate the secular evolution of the binary orbit in the first two cases and conclude that direct impact accretion can increase as well as decrease the orbital semi-major axis an...

  13. A Possible Cause of the Diminished Solar Wind During the Solar Cycle 23 - 24 Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Wu, Chin-Chun

    2016-12-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma density observed at 1 AU during Solar Cycle 23 - 24 (SC-23/24) minimum were significantly smaller than those during its previous solar cycle (SC-22/23) minimum. Because the Earth's orbit is embedded in the slow wind during solar minimum, changes in the geometry and/or content of the slow wind region (SWR) can have a direct influence on the solar wind parameters near the Earth. In this study, we analyze solar wind plasma and magnetic field data of hourly values acquired by Ulysses. It is found that the solar wind, when averaging over the first (1995.6 - 1995.8) and third (2006.9 - 2008.2) Ulysses' perihelion ({˜} 1.4 AU) crossings, was about the same speed, but significantly less dense ({˜} 34 %) and cooler ({˜} 20 %), and the total magnetic field was {˜} 30 % weaker during the third compared to the first crossing. It is also found that the SWR was {˜} 50 % wider in the third ({˜} 68.5^deg; in heliographic latitude) than in the first ({˜} 44.8°) solar orbit. The observed latitudinal increase in the SWR is sufficient to explain the excessive decline in the near-Earth solar wind density during the recent solar minimum without speculating that the total solar output may have been decreasing. The observed SWR inflation is also consistent with a cooler solar wind in the SC-23/24 than in the SC-22/23 minimum. Furthermore, the ratio of the high-to-low latitude photospheric magnetic field (or equatorward magnetic pressure force), as observed by the Mountain Wilson Observatory, is smaller during the third than the first Ulysses' perihelion orbit. These findings suggest that the smaller equatorward magnetic pressure at the Sun may have led to the latitudinally-wider SRW observed by Ulysses in SC-23/24 minimum.

  14. Numerical simulation of orbitally shaken viscous fluids with free surface

    OpenAIRE

    Discacciati, Marco; Hacker, David; Quarteroni, A.; Quinodoz, Samuel; Tissot, Stéphanie; Wurm, M. Florian

    2013-01-01

    Orbitally shaken bioreactors are an emerging alternative to stirred-tank bioreactors for large-scale mam- malian cell culture, but their fluid dynamics is still not well defined. Among the theoretical and practical issues that remain to be resolved, the characterization of the liquid free surface during orbital shaking remains a major challenge because it is an essential aspect of gas transfer and mixing in these reactors. To simulate the fluid behavior and the free surface shape, we develope...

  15. Stochastic variational approach to minimum uncertainty states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illuminati, F.; Viola, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Padova Univ. (Italy)

    1995-05-21

    We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schroedinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials. (author)

  16. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  17. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark,…

  18. 5 CFR 630.206 - Minimum charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum charge. 630.206 Section 630.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Definitions and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave § 630.206 Minimum charge. (a) Unless an agency...

  19. Stochastic variational approach to minimum uncertainty states

    CERN Document Server

    Illuminati, F; Illuminati, F; Viola, L

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a new variational characterization of Gaussian diffusion processes as minimum uncertainty states. We then define a variational method constrained by kinematics of diffusions and Schr\\"{o}dinger dynamics to seek states of local minimum uncertainty for general non-harmonic potentials.

  20. Monotonic Stable Solutions for Minimum Coloring Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, H.J.M.; Miquel, S.; Norde, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    For the class of minimum coloring games (introduced by Deng et al. (1999)) we investigate the existence of population monotonic allocation schemes (introduced by Sprumont (1990)). We show that a minimum coloring game on a graph G has a population monotonic allocation scheme if and only if G is (P4,

  1. Vertical orbital dystopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S T; Ashworth, G; Czypionka, S; Poole, M D; Briggs, M

    1996-06-01

    Many pathologic processes may lead to vertical orbital dystopia. We reviewed 47 consecutive cases seen over a 13-year period. Twenty-nine patients underwent eye leveling procedures to improve cosmesis, 2 of these by camouflage procedures and 27 by orbital translocation. Ten patients had 16 secondary operations. There was one death, serious complications occurred in 3 patients, and nuisance complications occurred in 20 others. Seven patients developed diplopia postoperatively, and in 6 patients it was troublesome. In these, it resolved fully in 2 patients, improved to be of no consequence in 2, and in the remaining 2 troublesome symptoms persisted requiring inferior oblique muscle recession in 1. Binocular vision was never restored when not present preoperatively, and in 3 patients temporary loss occurred. There was an overall modest but significant improvement in appearance after surgery. It is concluded that vertical orbital translocation is rewarding and worthwhile.

  2. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  3. [Secondary orbital lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basanta, I; Sevillano, C; Álvarez, M D

    2015-09-01

    A case is presented of an 85 year-old Caucasian female with lymphoma that recurred in the orbit (secondary ocular adnexal lymphoma). The orbital tumour was a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to the REAL classification (Revised European-American Lymphoma Classification). Orbital lymphomas are predominantly B-cell proliferations of a variety of histological types, and most are low-grade tumours. Patients are usually middle-aged or elderly, and it is slightly more common in women. A palpable mass, proptosis and blepharoptosis are the most common signs of presentation. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Minimum-fuel rocket trajectories involving intermediate-thrust arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breakwell, J. V.; Dixon, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    The optimal trajectories in the neighborhood of an optimal intermediate-thrust arc are investigated for the minimum-fuel orbit rendezvous problem with fixed specific impulse. Since such an arc is singular, the thrust acceleration magnitude being the singular control component, a second-variation analysis leads to the identification of a field of neighboring, singular arcs in a state space of dimension four rather than six, provided that a suitable Jacobi condition is met. A given neighboring initial six-dimensional state vector does not generally lie on a neighboring singular arc, and junction onto the appropriate singular arc must be accomplished by a short period of strong variations in the acceleration. The neighboring singular arc meets the final condition in 4 dimensions, rather than 6 dimensions, and rendezvous must be completed by another, terminal short period of strong variations in the acceleration. Implications for midcourse guidance near a singular arc are discussed.

  5. New Measurements of Orbital Period Change in Cygnus X-3

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, N S; Paul, B; Agrawal, P C; Rao, A R; Singh, K Y

    2002-01-01

    A nonlinear nature of the binary ephemeris of Cygnus X-3 indicates either a change in the orbital period or an apsidal motion of the orbit. We have made extended observations of Cygnus X-3 with the Pointed Proportional Counters (PPCs) of the Indian X-ray Astronomy Experiment (IXAE) during 1999 July 3-13 and October 11-14. Using the data from these observations and the archival data from ROSAT, ASCA, BeppoSAX and RXTE, we have extended the data base for this source. Adding these new arrival time measurements to the published results, we make a comparison between the various possibilities, (a) orbital decay due to mass loss from the system, (b) mass transfer between the stars, and (c) apsidal motion of the orbit due to gravitational interaction between the two components. Orbital decay due to mass loss from the companion star seems to be the most probable scenario.

  6. Optical orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069775

  7. Optical orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  8. The use of laser altimetry data in Chang'E-1 precision orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Qi; Huang, Yong; Li, Pei-Jia; Hu, Xiao-Gong; Fan, Min

    2016-09-01

    Accurate altimetric measurement not only can be applied to the calculation of a topography model but also can be used to improve the quality of the orbit reconstruction in the form of crossovers. Altimetry data from the Chang'E-1 (CE-1) laser altimeter are analyzed in this paper. The differences between the crossover constraint equation in the form of height discrepancies and in the form of minimum distances are mainly discussed. The results demonstrate that the crossover constraint equation in the form of minimum distances improves the CE-1 orbit precision. The overlap orbit performance has increased ∼ 30% compared to the orbit using only tracking data. External assessment using the topography model also shows orbit improvement. The results will be helpful for recomputing ephemeris and improving the CE-1 topography model.

  9. The use of laser altimetry data in Chang'E-1 precision orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Qi; Huang, Yong; Li, Pei-Jia; Hu, Xiao-Gong; Fan, Min

    2016-09-01

    Accurate altimetric measurement not only can be applied to the calculation of a topography model but also can be used to improve the quality of the orbit reconstruction in the form of crossovers. Altimetry data from the Chang'E-1 (CE-1) laser altimeter are analyzed in this paper. The differences between the crossover constraint equation in the form of height discrepancies and in the form of minimum distances are mainly discussed. The results demonstrate that the crossover constraint equation in the form of minimum distances improves the CE-1 orbit precision. The overlap orbit performance has increased ˜ 30% compared to the orbit using only tracking data. External assessment using the topography model also shows orbit improvement. The results will be helpful for recomputing ephemeris and improving the CE-1 topography model.

  10. Lyapunov Orbits in the Jupiter System Using Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin; Russell, Ryan P.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Various researchers have proposed the use of electrodynamic tethers for power generation and capture from interplanetary transfers. The effect of tether forces on periodic orbits in Jupiter-satellite systems are investigated. A perturbation force is added to the restricted three-body problem model and a series of simplifications allows development of a conservative system that retains the Jacobi integral. Expressions are developed to find modified locations of equilibrium positions. Modified families of Lyapunov orbits are generated as functions of tether size and Jacobi integral. Zero velocity curves and stability analyses are used to evaluate the dynamical properties of tether-modified orbits.

  11. Lyapunov Orbits in the Jupiter System Using Electrodynamic Tethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokelmann, Kevin; Russell, Ryan P.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Various researchers have proposed the use of electrodynamic tethers for power generation and capture from interplanetary transfers. The effect of tether forces on periodic orbits in Jupiter-satellite systems are investigated. A perturbation force is added to the restricted three-body problem model and a series of simplifications allows development of a conservative system that retains the Jacobi integral. Expressions are developed to find modified locations of equilibrium positions. Modified families of Lyapunov orbits are generated as functions of tether size and Jacobi integral. Zero velocity curves and stability analyses are used to evaluate the dynamical properties of tether-modified orbits.

  12. Design requirements for orbit maintenance of SPS elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the design and operational requirements that will be imposed by the need to avoid unplanned reentry of SPS elements. The LEO Staging Base, Electric Orbit Transfer Vehicle, the LEO Construction Base, and SPS Self-Power Module are the SPS elements selected for this analysis. The orbit decay rates and attitude control/orbit maintenance propellant requirements for nominal and worst case conditions are defined. The sequence of events that could cause unplanned reentry are defined. The design and operational requirements that will be used to prevent the various elements from deorbiting are defined.

  13. Radionuclide transfer. Radionuklid Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG)

  14. Local orbitals by minimizing powers of the orbital variance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansik, Branislav; Høst, Stinne; Kristensen, Kasper;

    2011-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a set of local orthonormal Hartree–Fock (HF) molecular orbitals can be obtained for both the occupied and virtual orbital spaces by minimizing powers of the orbital variance using the trust-region algorithm. For a power exponent equal to one, the Boys localization function...... is obtained. For increasing power exponents, the penalty for delocalized orbitals is increased and smaller maximum orbital spreads are encountered. Calculations on superbenzene, C60, and a fragment of the titin protein show that for a power exponent equal to one, delocalized outlier orbitals may...

  15. The minimum work requirement for distillation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunus, Cerci; Yunus, A. Cengel; Byard, Wood [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    A typical ideal distillation process is proposed and analyzed using the first and second-laws of thermodynamics with particular attention to the minimum work requirement for individual processes. The distillation process consists of an evaporator, a condenser, a heat exchanger, and a number of heaters and coolers. Several Carnot engines are also employed to perform heat interactions of the distillation process with the surroundings and determine the minimum work requirement for processes. The Carnot engines give the maximum possible work output or the minimum work input associated with the processes, and therefore the net result of these inputs and outputs leads to the minimum work requirement for the entire distillation process. It is shown that the minimum work relation for the distillation process is the same as the minimum work input relation found by Cerci et al [1] for an incomplete separation of incoming saline water, and depends only on the properties of the incoming saline water and the outgoing pure water and brine. Also, certain aspects of the minimum work relation found are discussed briefly. (authors)

  16. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MINIMUM IGNITION TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor WACHTER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this scientific paper is an analysis of the minimum ignition temperature of dust layer and the minimum ignition temperatures of dust clouds. It could be used to identify the threats in industrial production and civil engineering, on which a layer of combustible dust could occure. Research was performed on spent coffee grounds. Tests were performed according to EN 50281-2-1:2002 Methods for determining the minimum ignition temperatures of dust (Method A. Objective of method A is to determine the minimum temperature at which ignition or decomposition of dust occurs during thermal straining on a hot plate at a constant temperature. The highest minimum smouldering and carbonating temperature of spent coffee grounds for 5 mm high layer was determined at the interval from 280 °C to 310 °C during 600 seconds. Method B is used to determine the minimum ignition temperature of a dust cloud. Minimum ignition temperature of studied dust was determined to 470 °C (air pressure – 50 kPa, sample weight 0.3 g.

  17. An Orbit And Dispersion Correction Scheme for the PEP II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y.; Donald, M.; Shoaee, H.; White, G.; Yasukawa, L.A.; /SLAC

    2011-09-01

    To achieve optimum luminosity in a storage ring it is vital to control the residual vertical dispersion. In the original PEP storage ring, a scheme to control the residual dispersion function was implemented using the ring orbit as the controlling element. The 'best' orbit not necessarily giving the lowest vertical dispersion. A similar scheme has been implemented in both the on-line control code and in the simulation code LEGO. The method involves finding the response matrices (sensitivity of orbit/dispersion at each Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM) to each orbit corrector) and solving in a least squares sense for minimum orbit, dispersion function or both. The optimum solution is usually a subset of the full least squares solution. A scheme of simultaneously correcting the orbits and dispersion has been implemented in the simulation code and on-line control system for PEP-II. The scheme is based on the eigenvector decomposition method. An important ingredient of the scheme is to choose the optimum eigenvectors that minimize the orbit, dispersion and corrector strength. Simulations indicate this to be a very effective way to control the vertical residual dispersion.

  18. Solar Orbiter Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly; St. Cyr, Orville Chris; Mueller, Daniel; Zouganelis, Yannis; Velli, Marco

    2017-08-01

    With the delivery of the instruments to the spacecraft builder, the Solar Orbiter mission is in the midst of Integration & Testing phase at Airbus in Stevenage, U.K. This mission to “Explore the Sun-Heliosphere Connection” is the first medium-class mission of ESA’s Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program and is being jointly implemented with NASA. The dedicated payload of 10 remote-sensing and in-situ instruments will orbit the Sun as close as 0.3 A.U. and will provide measurments from the photosphere into the solar wind. The three-axis stabilized spacecraft will use Venus gravity assists to increase the orbital inclination out of the ecliptic to solar latitudes as high as 34 degrees in the extended mission. The science team of Solar Orbiter has been working closely with the Solar Probe Plus scientists to coordinate observations between these two highly-complementary missions. This will be a status report on the mission development; the interested reader is referred to the recent summary by Müller et al., Solar Physics 285 (2013).

  19. Sedna Orbit Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the location of the newly discovered planet-like object, dubbed 'Sedna,' in relation to the rest of the solar system. Starting at the inner solar system, which includes the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars (all in yellow), the view pulls away through the asteroid belt and the orbits of the outer planets beyond (green). Pluto and the distant Kuiper Belt objects are seen next until finally Sedna comes into view. As the field widens the full orbit of Sedna can be seen along with its current location. Sedna is nearing its closest approach to the Sun; its 10,000 year orbit typically takes it to far greater distances. Moving past Sedna, what was previously thought to be the inner edge of the Oort cloud appears. The Oort cloud is a spherical distribution of cold, icy bodies lying at the limits of the Sun's gravitational pull. Sedna's presence suggests that this Oort cloud is much closer than scientists believed.

  20. Myxoma of the orbit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambhatla Saptagirish

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxomas are rare, benign neoplasms of mesenchymal origin that usually develop in soft tissues. As the clinical manifestations are non-specific, it is difficult to diagnose the tumour without biopsy and histopathological examination. We report a case of orbital myxoma with histopathological correlation.

  1. Sedna Orbit Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the location of the newly discovered planet-like object, dubbed 'Sedna,' in relation to the rest of the solar system. Starting at the inner solar system, which includes the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars (all in yellow), the view pulls away through the asteroid belt and the orbits of the outer planets beyond (green). Pluto and the distant Kuiper Belt objects are seen next until finally Sedna comes into view. As the field widens the full orbit of Sedna can be seen along with its current location. Sedna is nearing its closest approach to the Sun; its 10,000 year orbit typically takes it to far greater distances. Moving past Sedna, what was previously thought to be the inner edge of the Oort cloud appears. The Oort cloud is a spherical distribution of cold, icy bodies lying at the limits of the Sun's gravitational pull. Sedna's presence suggests that this Oort cloud is much closer than scientists believed.

  2. Orientation and resonance locks for satellites in the elliptic orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1972-01-01

    In order to achieve the maximum strength of higher resonance locks for satellites in the elliptic orbit, the condition of satellite orientation during the process of deployment is established. It is shown that for maximum strength locks the axis of the minimum moment of inertia of satellites should point toward the attracting body at plus or minus (5/8) pi and 0 values of the true anomaly f. This condition of deployment is applicable to all cases of resonance rotation regardless of the value of lock number k and orbit eccentricity e.

  3. Does the Minimum Wage Cause Inefficient Rationing?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何满辉; 梁明秋

    2008-01-01

    By not allowing wages to dearthe labor market,the minimum wage could cause workers with low reservation wages to be rationed out while equally skilled woTkers with higher reservation wages are employed.I find that proxies for reservation wages of unskilled workers in high-impact stales did not rise relative to reservation wages in other states,suggesting that the increase in the minimum wage did not cause jobs to be allocated less efficiently.However,even if rationing is efficient,the minimum wage can still entail other efficiency costs.

  4. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  5. Trajectory Design and Orbital Dynamics of Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. H.

    2013-05-01

    The term of deep space exploration is used for the exploration in which a probe, unlike an earth satellite, escapes from the Earth's gravitation field, and conducts the exploration of celestial bodies within or away from the solar system. As the progress of aerospace science and technology, the exploration of the Moon and other planets of the solar system has attracted more and more attention throughout the world since late 1990s. China also accelerated its progress of the lunar exploration in recent years. Its first lunar-orbiting spacecraft, Chang'e 1, was successfully launched on 2007 October 24. It then achieved the goals of accurate maneuver and lunar orbiting, acquired a large amount of scientific data and a full lunar image, and finally impacted the Moon under control. On 2010 October 1, China launched Chang'e 2 with success, which obtained a full lunar image with a higher resolution and a high-definition image of the Sinus Iridum, and completed multiple extended missions such as orbiting the Lagrangian point L2, laying the groundwork for future deep space exploration. As the first phase of the three main operational phases (orbiting, landing, return) of the Chinese Lunar Exploration Program, the successful launches and flights of Chang'e 1 and Chang'e 2 are excellent applications of the orbit design of both the Earth-Moon transfer orbit and the circumlunar orbit, yet not involving the design of the entire trajectory consisting of the Earth-Moon transfer orbit, the circumlunar orbit, and the return orbit, which is produced particularly for sample return spacecraft. This paper studies the entire orbit design of the lunar sample return spacecraft which would be employed in both the third phase of the lunar exploration program and the human lunar landing program, analyzes the dynamic characteristics of the orbit, and works out the launch windows based on specific conditions. The results are universally applicable, and could serve as the basis of the orbit

  6. Integrated MLI: Advanced Thermal Insulation for Propellant Storage and Transfer Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cryogenic propellants, orbital cryogenic fuel depots and the ability to store, transfer, handle and refuel spacecraft in orbit are critical to NASA future missions...

  7. Spectroscopic orbits of two short-period early-type binaries using two-dimensional cross-correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J. F.; Lapasset, E.

    2003-06-01

    We apply the two-dimensional cross-correlation technique TODCOR to derive spectroscopic orbits for the two B-type double-lined spectroscopic binaries HD 66066A and HD 315031, previously mentioned as blue straggler candidates of the open clusters NGC 2516 and NGC 6530, respectively. Reliable radial velocities for both components are measured even for orbital phases for which the separation between the spectral lines are about 0.5 times the quadratic sum of the full-width at half-maximum of the lines. Both binaries have circular orbits and the orbital periods are 1.67 and 1.38 days for HD 66066A and HD 315031, respectively. We calculate minimum masses with errors of 3-5% and obtain the projected radii from the line widths. We derive absolute stellar parameters which are consistent with the age and distance of the clusters. Both binary systems are formed by main-sequence stars and it is expected that they will experience mass-transfer between their components before the end of the core H-burning stage. HD 315031 is likely a triple system as suggested by the variation of the center-of-mass velocity. The observations presented here were obtained at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET) and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  8. Long Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Long-Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized, primary screening and assessment tool of health status that forms the foundation of the comprehensive...

  9. Quantitative Research on the Minimum Wage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert S.

    1975-01-01

    The article reviews recent research examining the impact of minimum wage requirements on the size and distribution of teenage employment and earnings. The studies measure income distribution, employment levels and effect on unemployment. (MW)

  10. Impact of the Minimum Wage on Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Michael N.; Candland, Charles W.

    1979-01-01

    Assesses the impact of increases in the minimum wage on salary schedules, provides guidelines for creating a philosophy to deal with the impact, and outlines options and presents recommendations. (IRT)

  11. Long Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Long-Term Care Minimum Data Set (MDS) is a standardized, primary screening and assessment tool of health status that forms the foundation of the comprehensive...

  12. Minimum wages and employment in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fang, Tony; Lin, Carl

    2015-01-01

    ... that minimum wage changes led to significant adverse effects on employment in the Eastern and Central regions of China, and resulted in disemployment for females, young adults, and low-skilled workers...

  13. Minimum Wage Policy and Country's Technical Efficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohd Zaini Abd Karim; Sok-Gee Chan; Sallahuddin Hassan

    2016-01-01

    .... However, some quarters argued against the idea of a nationwide minimum wage asserting that it will lead to an increase in the cost of doing business and thus will hurt Malaysian competitiveness...

  14. Graph theory for FPGA minimum configurations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruan Aiwu; Li Wenchang; Xiang Chuanyin; Song Jiangmin; Kang Shi; Liao Yongbo

    2011-01-01

    A traditional bottom-up modeling method for minimum configuration numbers is adopted for the study of FPGA minimum configurations.This method is limited ifa large number of LUTs and multiplexers are presented.Since graph theory has been extensively applied to circuit analysis and test,this paper focuses on the modeling FPGA configurations.In our study,an internal logic block and interconnections of an FPGA are considered as a vertex and an edge connecting two vertices in the graph,respectively.A top-down modeling method is proposed in the paper to achieve minimum configuration numbers for CLB and IOB.Based on the proposed modeling approach and exhaustive analysis,the minimum configuration numbers for CLB and IOB are five and three,respectively.

  15. Unusual Sclerosing Orbital Pseudotumor Infiltrating Orbits and Maxillofacial Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Toprak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses.

  16. Orbit correction algorithm for SSRF fast orbit feedback system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming; YIN Chongxian; LIU Dekang

    2009-01-01

    A fast orbit feedback system is designed at SSRF to suppress beam orbit disturbance within sub-micron in the bandwidth up to 100 Hz.The SVD (Singular value decomposition) algorithm is applied to calculate the inverse response matrix in global orbit correction.The number of singular eigenvalues will influence orbit noise suppression and corrector strengths.The method to choose singular eigenvalue rejection threshold is studied in this paper,and the simulation and experiment results are also presented.

  17. Comparison of Low Earth Orbit and Geosynchronous Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological, environmental, social, and political ramifications of low Earth orbits as compared to geosynchronous Earth orbits for the solar power satellite (SPS) are assessed. The capital cost of the transmitting facilities is dependent on the areas of the antenna and rectenna relative to the requirement of high efficiency power transmission. The salient features of a low orbit Earth orbits are discussed in terms of cost reduction efforts.

  18. Price pass-through and minimum wages

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Aaronson

    1997-01-01

    A textbook consequence of competitive markets is that an industry-wide increase in the price of inputs will be passed on to consumers through an increase in prices. This fundamental implication has been explored by researchers interested in who bears the burden of taxation and exchange rate fluctuations. However, little attention has focused on the price implications of minimum wage hikes. From a policy perspective, this is an oversight. Welfare analysis of minimum wage laws should not ignore...

  19. The minimum wage and restaurant prices

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Aaronson; Eric French; MacDonald, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Using both store-level and aggregated price data from the food away from home component of the Consumer Price Index survey, we show that restaurant prices rise in response to an increase in the minimum wage. These results hold up when using several different sources of variation in the data. We interpret these findings within a model of employment determination. The model implies that minimum wage hikes cause employment to fall and prices to rise if labor markets are competitive but potential...

  20. Minimum Dominating Tree Problem for Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Hao; LIN Lan

    2014-01-01

    A dominating tree T of a graph G is a subtree of G which contains at least one neighbor of each vertex of G. The minimum dominating tree problem is to find a dominating tree of G with minimum number of vertices, which is an NP-hard problem. This paper studies some polynomially solvable cases, including interval graphs, Halin graphs, special outer-planar graphs and others.

  1. Solution for Nonlinear Three-Dimensional Intercept Problem with Minimum Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henzeh Leeghim

    2013-01-01

    a minimum-energy application, which then generates both the desired initial interceptor velocity and the TOF for the minimum-energy transfer. The optimization problem is formulated by using the classical Lagrangian f and g coefficients, which map initial position and velocity vectors to future times, and a universal time variable x. A Newton-Raphson iteration algorithm is introduced for iteratively solving the problem. A generalized problem formulation is introduced for minimizing the TOF as part of the optimization problem. Several examples are presented, and the results are compared with the Hohmann transfer solution approaches. The resulting minimum-energy intercept solution algorithm is expected to be broadly useful as a starting iterative for applications spanning: targeting, rendezvous, interplanetary trajectory design, and so on.

  2. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  3. Pragmatic Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Gabriele

    1992-01-01

    Attempting to clarify the concept of pragmatic transfer, this article proposes as a basic distinction Leech/Thomas' dichotomy of sociopragmatics versus pragmalinguistics, presenting evidence for transfer at both levels. Issues discussed include pragmatic universals in speech act realization, conditions for pragmatic transfer, communicative…

  4. Diplopia secondary to orbital surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, David I; Matta, Noelle S; Singman, Eric L

    2012-01-01

    Diplopia may occur following any type of ocular or pericocular surgery. The surgeries most frequently associated with postoperative diplopia include: repair of orbital fracture, endoscopic sinus surgery (from inadvertent orbital penetration), and orbital decompression for thyroid-related immune orbitopathy (TRIO). Postoperative diplopia after orbital tumor resection has been reported--e.g., after excision of fibrous dysplasia and osteoma. However, a recent case series suggests diplopia after orbital tumor resection is uncommon and transient. Surgical intervention for orbital trauma carries the highest risk of postoperative diplopia and will be the focus of this review. We will also present a case report of worsening diplopia following repair of orbital floor fracture to highlight potential motility issues that can arise when implants are employed to treat orbital floor fractures.

  5. Topics in orbit equivalence

    CERN Document Server

    Kechris, Alexander S

    2004-01-01

    This volume provides a self-contained introduction to some topics in orbit equivalence theory, a branch of ergodic theory. The first two chapters focus on hyperfiniteness and amenability. Included here are proofs of Dye's theorem that probability measure-preserving, ergodic actions of the integers are orbit equivalent and of the theorem of Connes-Feldman-Weiss identifying amenability and hyperfiniteness for non-singular equivalence relations. The presentation here is often influenced by descriptive set theory, and Borel and generic analogs of various results are discussed. The final chapter is a detailed account of Gaboriau's recent results on the theory of costs for equivalence relations and groups and its applications to proving rigidity theorems for actions of free groups.

  6. New evidence for charge-sign dependent modulation during the solar minimum of 2006 to 2009

    CERN Document Server

    Di Felice, V; Vos, E E; Potgieter, M S

    2016-01-01

    The PAMELA space experiment, in orbit since 2006, has measured cosmic rays through the most recent A < 0 solar minimum activity period. During this entire time, galactic electrons and protons have been detected down to 70 MV and 400 MV, respectively, and their differential intensity variation in time has been monitored with unprecedented accuracy. These observations are used to show how differently electrons and protons responded to the quiet modulation conditions that prevailed from 2006 to 2009. It is well known that particle drifts, as one of four major mechanisms for the solar modulation of cosmic rays, cause charge-sign dependent solar modulation. Solar minimum activity periods provide optimal conditions to study these drift effects. The observed behaviour is compared to the solutions of a three-dimensional model for cosmic rays in the heliosphere, including drifts. The numerical results confirm that the difference in the evolution of electron and proton spectra during the last prolonged solar minimum...

  7. Preseptal and orbital cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Akçay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Preseptal cellulitis (PC is defined as an inflammation of the eyelid and surrounding skin, whereas orbital cellulitis (OC is an inflammation of the posterior septum of the eyelid affecting the orbit and its contents. Periorbital tissues may become infected as a result of trauma (including insect bites or primary bacteremia. Orbital cellulitis generally occurs as a complication of sinusitis. The most commonly isolated organisms are Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. epidermidis, Haempphilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and S. pyogenes. The method for the diagnosis of OS and PS is computed tomography. Using effective antibiotics is a mainstay for the treatment of PC and OC. There is an agreement that surgical drainage should be performed in cases of complete ophthalmoplegia or significant visual impairment or large abscesses formation. This infections are also at a greater risk of acute visual loss, cavernous sinus thrombosis, meningitis, cerebritis, endophthalmitis, and brain abscess in children. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are crucial to control the infection. Diagnosis, treatment, management and complications of PC and OC are summarized in this manuscript. J MicrobiolInfect Dis 2014; 4(3: 123-127

  8. Superoutburst of WZ Sge-type dwarf nova below the period minimum: ASASSN-15po

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namekata, Kosuke; Isogai, Keisuke; Kato, Taichi; Littlefield, Colin; Matsumoto, Katsura; Kojiguchi, Naoto; Sugiura, Yuki; Uto, Yusuke; Fukushima, Daiki; Tatsumi, Taiki; Yamada, Eiji; Kamibetsunawa, Taku; de Miguel, Enrique; Stein, William L.; Sabo, Richard; Andreev, Maksim V.; Morelle, Etienne; Pavlenko, E. P.; Babina, Julia V.; Baklanov, Alex V.; Antonyuk, Kirill A.; Antonyuk, Okasana I.; Sosnovskij, Aleksei A.; Shugarov, Sergey Yu.; Golysheva, Polina Yu.; Gladilina, Natalia G.; Miller, Ian; Neustroev, Vitaly V.; Chavushyan, Vahram; Valdés, José R.; Sjoberg, George; Maeda, Yutaka; Itoh, Hiroshi; Masi, Gianluca; Michel, Raúl; Dubovsky, Pavol A.; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Tordai, Tamás; Oksanen, Arto; Ruiz, Javier; Nogami, Daisaku

    2017-02-01

    We report on a superoutburst of a WZ Sge-type dwarf nova (DN), ASASSN-15po. The light curve showed the main superoutburst and multiple rebrightenings. In this outburst, we observed early superhumps and growing (stage A) superhumps with periods of 0.050454(2) and 0.051809(13) d, respectively. We estimated that the mass ratio of secondary to primary (q) is 0.0699(8) by using Porb and a superhump period PSH of stage A. ASASSN-15po [Porb ˜ 72.6 min] is the first DN with an orbital period between 67-76 min. Although the theoretical predicted period minimum Pmin of hydrogen-rich cataclysmic variables (CVs) is about 65-70 min, the observational cut-off of the orbital period distribution at 80 min implies that the period minimum is about 82 min, and the value is widely accepted. We suggest the following four possibilities: the object is (1) a theoretical period minimum object, (2) a binary with a evolved secondary, (3) a binary with a metal-poor (Popullation II) seconday, or (4) a binary which was born with a brown-dwarf donor below the period minimum.

  9. Flight Performance Handbook for Orbital Operations: Orbital Mechanics and Astrodynamics Formulae, Theorems, Techniques, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Alphonso; Blitzer, Leon; Conte, S.D.; Cooper, Donald H.; Dergarabedian, P.; Dethlefsen, D.G.; Lunn, Richard L.; Ireland, Richard O.; Jensen, Arnold A.; Kang, Garfield; Levy, Ezra C.; Liu, Anthony; Marcus, Silvia R.; Mickelwait, A.B.; Moe, Kenneth; Moe, Mildred M.; Pitton, A.R.; Scheuer, Ernest M.; Tompkins, E.H.; Weiser, Peter B.; Whitford, R.K.; Wolverton, R.W.

    1961-01-01

    This handbook provides parametric data useful both to the space vehicle designer and mission analyst. It provides numerical and analytical relationships between missions and gross vehicle characteristics as a function of performance parameters. The effects of missile constraints and gross guidance limitations plus operational constraints such as launch site location, tracking net location, orbit visibility and mission on trajectory and orbit design parameters are exhibited. The influence of state-of- the-art applications of solar power as compared to future applications of nuclear power on orbit design parameters, such as eclipse time, are among the parameters included in the study. The principal aim, however, is in providing the analyst with useful parametric design information to cover the general area of earth satellite missions in the region of near-earth to cislunar space and beyond and from injection to atmospheric entry and controlled descent. The chapters are organized around the central idea of orbital operations in the 1961-1969 era with emphasis on parametric flight mechanics studies for ascent phase and parking orbits, transfer maneuvers, rendezvous maneuver, operational orbit considerations, and operational orbit control. The results are based almost entirely on the principles of flight and celestial mechanics. Numerous practical examples have been worked out in detail. This is especially important where it has been difficult or impossible to represent all possible variations of the parameters. The handbook contains analytical formulae and sufficient textual material to permit their proper use. The analytic methods consist of both exact and rapid, approximate methods. Scores of tables, working graphs and illustrations amplify the mathematical models which, together with important facts and data, cover the engineering and scientific applications of orbital mechanics. Each of the five major chapters are arranged to provide a rapid review of an entire

  10. Chaos Behaviour of Molecular Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-Tang; SUN Fu-Yan; SHEN Shu-Lan

    2007-01-01

    Based on H(u)ckel's molecular orbit theory,the chaos and;bifurcation behaviour of a molecular orbit modelled by a nonlinear dynamic system is studied.The relationship between molecular orbit and its energy level in the nonlinear dynamic system is obtained.

  11. Spin Orbit Torque in Ferromagnetic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Hang

    2016-06-21

    Electrons not only have charges but also have spin. By utilizing the electron spin, the energy consumption of electronic devices can be reduced, their size can be scaled down and the efficiency of `read\\' and `write\\' in memory devices can be significantly improved. Hence, the manipulation of electron spin in electronic devices becomes more and more appealing for the advancement of microelectronics. In spin-based devices, the manipulation of ferromagnetic order parameter using electrical currents is a very useful means for current-driven operation. Nowadays, most of magnetic memory devices are based on the so-called spin transfer torque, which stems from the spin angular momentum transfer between a spin-polarized current and the magnetic order parameter. Recently, a novel spin torque effect, exploiting spin-orbit coupling in non-centrosymmetric magnets, has attracted a massive amount of attention. This thesis addresses the nature of spin-orbit coupled transport and torques in non-centrosymmetric magnetic semiconductors. We start with the theoretical study of spin orbit torque in three dimensional ferromagnetic GaMnAs. Using the Kubo formula, we calculate both the current-driven field-like torque and anti-damping-like torque. We compare the numerical results with the analytical expressions in the model case of a magnetic Rashba two-dimensional electron gas. Parametric dependencies of the different torque components and similarities to the analytical results of the Rashba two-dimensional electron gas in the weak disorder limit are described. Subsequently we study spin-orbit torques in two dimensional hexagonal crystals such as graphene, silicene, germanene and stanene. In the presence of staggered potential and exchange field, the valley degeneracy can be lifted and we obtain a valley-dependent Berry curvature, leading to a tunable antidamping torque by controlling the valley degree of freedom. This thesis then addresses the influence of the quantum spin Hall

  12. The EJSM Jupiter-Ganymede Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, M.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Stankov, A.; Greeley, R.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Fujimoto, M.

    2008-09-01

    The Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), currently subject of a joint study by NASA, ESA and JAXA, would combine a fleet of three satellites in order to investigate in depth many questions related to the Jupiter System. These investigations are essential for our understanding of the emergence and evolution of habitable worlds, not only within the Solar System, but also for extrasolar planet investigations. Scientific targets of EJSM focus on Europa and Ganymede as a key pair of Galilean satellites, to address the questions on their habitability, formation, and internal structure, as well as the coupling with the whole Jovian system: Jupiter's atmosphere and interior, magnetosphere and magnetodisk.. In combination with a Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO that would be provided by NASA) and a Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO that would be provided by JAXA), ESA is studying a Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). The mission scenario includes a launch in 2020 with a transfer time to Jupiter of ~6 years. After the orbit insertion around Jupiter, a first phase (~2 years) will be devoted to Jupiter system and Callisto studies, with multiple flybys of Callisto planned at low altitude (~200 km), followed by a Ganymede orbit insertion and extensive study of Ganymede (~1 year). In depth comparative study of inner (Io and Europe) and outer (Ganymede and Callisto) satellites with combined payload of JEO and JGO will address the question of the geologic relative evolution of the satellites. On JGO, the transport phenomena in the magnetosphere of Jupiter will be studied in combination with JMO, and the Ganymede magnetosphere will be observed in situ. Jupiter atmosphere investigations on JGO will focus on coupling phenomena between troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere, the stratospheric composition and the question of thermospheric heating.

  13. Multi-Body Capture to Low-altitude Circular Orbits at Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebow, Daniel J.; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.; Finlayson, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    For capture to a 200-km circular orbit around Europa, millions of different points along the orbit are simulated in the Jupiter-Europa Restricted 3-Body Problem. The transfers exist as members of families of trajectories, where certain families consistently outperform the others. The trajectories are not sensitive to changes in inclination for the final circular orbit. The top performing trajectories appear to follow the invariant manifolds of L2 Lyapunov orbits for capture into a retrograde orbit, and in some cases saving up to 40% of the from the patched 2-body problem. Transfers are attached to the current nominal mission for NASA's Jupiter-Europa Orbiter, where the total cost is roughly 100 m/s less than the baseline mission.

  14. Orbital Optimization in the Active Space Decomposition Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Inkoo; Shiozaki, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We report the derivation and implementation of orbital optimization algorithms for the active space decomposition (ASD) model, which are extensions of complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and its occupation-restricted variants in the conventional multiconfiguration electronic-structure theory. Orbital rotations between active subspaces are included in the optimization, which allows us to unambiguously partition the active space into subspaces, enabling application of ASD to electron and exciton dynamics in covalently linked chromophores. One- and two-particle reduced density matrices, which are required for evaluation of orbital gradient and approximate Hessian elements, are computed from the intermediate tensors in the ASD energy evaluation. Numerical results on 4-(2-naphthylmethyl)-benzaldehyde and [3$_6$]cyclophane and model Hamiltonian analyses of triplet energy transfer processes in the Closs systems are presented. Furthermore model Hamiltonians for hole and electron transfer processes in...

  15. DynAstVO : the Europlanet orbital asteroid database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmars, Josselin; Thuillot, William; Hestroffer, Daniel J.; David, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    DynAstVO is a new orbital database dedicated to Near Earth Asteroid orbits, developed within the Europlanet 2020 RI framework.It provides parameters of asteroid orbits: orbital elements, observational information, minimum distance with Earth and planets, ephemeris and in particular, orbit uncertainty and associated covariance matrix.This database is updated daily on the basis of the Minor Planet Electronic Circulars.Orbit determination and improvement is computed as soon as new observations are available or an object is discovered.This database conforms to EPN-TAP environment (Erard et al. 2015, A&C 7) and is accessible through VO protocols or classical web access. Auxiliary data such as SPICE kernels for their ephemerides are provided.Finally, we present a comparison with other classical databases such as Astorb or MPCORB.Acknowledgements: This work is done in the framework of Europlanet 2020 RI which has received fundingfrom the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 654208.

  16. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) errors for grass minimum temperature and the 4-h nowcasts.

  17. Binary evolution using the theory of osculating orbits: conservative Algol evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, P J; Deschamps, R

    2014-01-01

    Our aim is to calculate the evolution of Algol binaries within the framework of the osculating orbital theory, which considers the perturbing forces acting on the orbit of each star arising from mass exchange via Roche lobe overflow (RLOF). The scheme is compared to results calculated from a `classical' prescription. Using our stellar binary evolution code BINSTAR, we calculate the orbital evolution of Algol binaries undergoing case A and case B mass transfer, by applying the osculating scheme. The velocities of the ejected and accreted material are evaluated by solving the restricted three-body equations of motion, within the ballistic approximation. This allows us to determine the change of linear momentum of each star, and the gravitational force applied by the mass transfer stream. Torques applied on the stellar spins by tides and mass transfer are also considered. Using the osculating formalism gives shorter post-mass transfer orbital periods typically by a factor of 4 compared to the classical scheme, o...

  18. Earth Orbit Raise Design for the Artemis Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiffen, Gregory J.; Sweetser, Theodore H.

    2011-01-01

    The Artemis mission is an extension of the Themis mission. The Themis mission1 consisted of five identical spacecraft in varying sized Earth orbits designed to make simultaneous measurements of the Earth's electric and magnetic environment. Themis was designed to observe geomagnetic storms resulting from solar wind's interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere. Themis was meant to answer the age old question of why the Earth's aurora can change rapidly on a global scale. The Themis spacecraft are spin stabilized with 20 meter long electric field booms as well as several shorter magnetometer booms. The goal of the Artemis2 mission extension is to deliver the field and particle measuring capabilities of two of the Themis spacecraft to the vicinity of the Moon. The Artemis mission required transferring two Earth orbiting Themis spacecraft on to two different low energy trans-lunar trajectories ultimately ending in lunar orbit. This paper describes the processes that resulted in successful orbit raise designs for both spacecraft.

  19. Libration Point Orbit Utilization for Tactical Advantage in Communications, Surveillance, and Risk Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-27

    2013 Received Paper 4.00 Kathryn Davis, George Born, Eric Butcher. Transfers to Earth–Moon L3 halo orbits, Acta Astronautica , (07 2013): 116. doi...Orbits,”Acta Astronautica , doi: 10.1016/j.actaastro.2013.03.004 (2013). [12] Lee, D. Butcher, E. A., and Sanyal, A. K., “Optimal Interior Earth

  20. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP. The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan to use a nonlinear filtering method for immediate orbit tasks requires more precise satellite orbit state parameters in a short time. Although the traditional extended Kalman filter (EKF method is widely used, its linear approximation of the drawbacks in dealing with nonlinear problems was especially evident, without compromising Kalman filter (unscented Kalman Filter, UKF. As a new nonlinear estimation method, it is measured at the estimated measurements on more and more applications. This paper will be the first study on UKF microsatellites in LEO orbit in real time, trying to explore the real-time precision orbit determination techniques. Through the preliminary simulation results, they show that, based on orbit mission requirements and conditions using UKF, they can satisfy the positioning accuracy and compute two indicators.

  1. Galactic Habitable Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, A.; Mao, S.; Kawata, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fossil record shows that the Earth has experienced several mass extinctions over the past 500 million years1, and it has been suggested that there is a periodicity in extinction events on timescales of tens1 and/or hundreds of millions of years. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of the mass extinctions, including the suggestion that the Earth's ozone layer may have been destroyed by intense radiation from a nearby supernovae2- 3, exposing the Earth's surface to damaging UV radiation. Recent observations of cores taken from the ocean floor revealed atoms of a very rare isotope of iron (60Fe) believed to have arrived on Earth around 2 million years ago as fallout from a nearby supernovae4. Astronomical evidence for that past supernovae was recently found in the debris of a young cluster of massive stars5, by tracing its past orbit, putting it at the right place at the right time to explain the mild extinction event. Here we report new high-resolution (both in space and time) N-body chemodynamical simulations (carried out with our novel code GCD+6) of the evolution of a model Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the orbit of èsun-like' stars over a 500 million year period, checking the proximity to supernovae throughout the history of the orbit and comparing the times when this occurs with past mass extinctions on Earth. We additionally explain the important effects of the spiral arm pattern, radial migration of stars and Galactic chemistry on habitability.

  2. Review of orbital imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, P.S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)], E-mail: dnrgohps@nus.edu.sg; Gi, M.T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore); Charlton, A. [Department of Pathology, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore); Tan, C.; Gangadhara Sundar, J.K.; Amrith, S. [Department of Ophthalmology, National University Hospital, 5 Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore 119074 (Singapore)

    2008-06-15

    CT and MRI are commonly used in the evaluation of patients with suspected orbital disease. Many different diseases may present within this small anatomical space. The purpose of this article is to present a diagnostic strategy based on a compartment model. Localizing pathology to sinus, bone, extraconal space, muscle cone, intraconal space, optic nerve, globe or lacrimal fossa allows significant reduction in the number of differential diagnoses as these compartments contain different tissues which disease may involve or arise from. Certain diseases may also present in multiple compartments. Common diseases which might present in one or multiple compartments will be discussed.

  3. Lunar Exploration Orbiter (LEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, R.; Spohn, T.; Hiesinger, H.; Jessberger, E. K.; Neukum, G.; Oberst, J.; Helbert, J.; Christensen, U.; Keller, H. U.; Mall, U.; Böhnhardt, H.; Hartogh, P.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Auster, H.-U.; Moreira, A.; Werner, M.; Pätzold, M.; Palme, H.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.; Mandea, M.; Lesur, V.; Häusler, B.; Hördt, A.; Eichentopf, K.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Köhler, U.; Kührt, E.; Michaelis, H.; Pauer, M.; Sohl, F.; Denk, T.; van Gasselt, S.

    2007-08-01

    The Moon is an integral part of the Earth-Moon system, it is a witness to more than 4.5 b. y. of solar system history, and it is the only planetary body except Earth for which we have samples from known locations. The Moon is our closest companion and can easily be reached from Earth at any time, even with a relatively modest financial budget. Consequently, the Moon was the first logical step in the exploration of our solar system before we pursued more distant targets such as Mars and beyond. The vast amount of knowledge gained from the Apollo and other lunar missions of the late 1960's and early 1970's demonstrates how valuable the Moon is for the understanding of our planetary system. Even today, the Moon remains an extremely interesting target scientifically and technologically, as ever since, new data have helped to address some of our questions about the Earth-Moon system, many questions remained. Therefore, returning to the Moon is the critical stepping-stone to further exploring our immediate planetary neighborhood. In this concept study, we present scientific and technological arguments for a national German lunar mission, the Lunar Explorations Orbiter (LEO). Numerous space-faring nations have realized and identified the unique opportunities related to lunar exploration and have planned missions to the Moon within the next few years. Among these missions, LEO will be unique, because it will globally explore the Moon in unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution. LEO will significantly improve our understanding of the lunar surface composition, surface ages, mineralogy, physical properties, interior, thermal history, gravity field, regolith structure, and magnetic field. The Lunar Explorations Orbiter will carry an entire suite of innovative, complementary technologies, including high-resolution camera systems, several spectrometers that cover previously unexplored parts of the electromagnetic spectrum over a broad range of wavelengths, microwave and

  4. Analysis of medium-energy transfers to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Kenta; Topputo, Francesco; Campagnola, Stefano; Yanao, Tomohiro

    2017-03-01

    This study analyzes a recently discovered class of exterior transfers to the Moon. These transfers terminate in retrograde ballistic capture orbits, i.e., orbits with negative Keplerian energy and angular momentum with respect to the Moon. Yet, their Jacobi constant is relatively low, for which no forbidden regions exist, and the trajectories do not appear to mimic the dynamics of the invariant manifolds of the Lagrange points. This paper shows that these orbits shadow instead lunar collision orbits. We investigate the dynamics of singular, lunar collision orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular restricted three-body problem, and reveal their rich phase space structure in the medium-energy regime, where invariant manifolds of the Lagrange point orbits break up. We show that lunar retrograde ballistic capture trajectories lie inside the tube structure of collision orbits. We also develop a method to compute medium-energy transfers by patching together orbits inside the collision tube and those whose apogees are located in the appropriate quadrant in the Sun-Earth system. The method yields the novel family of transfers as well as those ending in direct capture orbits, under particular energetic and geometrical conditions.

  5. Deep solar minimum and global climate changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Hady

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and its potential impact on climate change. In addition, a source region of the solar winds at solar activity minimum, especially in the solar cycle 23, the deepest during the last 500 years, has been studied. Solar activities have had notable effect on palaeoclimatic changes. Contemporary solar activity are so weak and hence expected to cause global cooling. Prevalent global warming, caused by building-up of green-house gases in the troposphere, seems to exceed this solar effect. This paper discusses this issue.

  6. A minimum achievable PV electrical generating cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabisky, E.S. [11 Carnation Place, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 (United States)

    1996-03-22

    The role and share of photovoltaic (PV) generated electricity in our nation`s future energy arsenal is primarily dependent on its future production cost. This paper provides a framework for obtaining a minimum achievable electrical generating cost (a lower bound) for fixed, flat-plate photovoltaic systems. A cost of 2.8 $cent/kWh (1990$) was derived for a plant located in Southwestern USA sunshine using a cost of money of 8%. In addition, a value of 22 $cent/Wp (1990$) was estimated as a minimum module manufacturing cost/price

  7. Weight-Constrained Minimum Spanning Tree Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Henn, Sebastian Tobias

    2007-01-01

    In an undirected graph G we associate costs and weights to each edge. The weight-constrained minimum spanning tree problem is to find a spanning tree of total edge weight at most a given value W and minimum total costs under this restriction. In this thesis a literature overview on this NP-hard problem, theoretical properties concerning the convex hull and the Lagrangian relaxation are given. We present also some in- and exclusion-test for this problem. We apply a ranking algorithm and the me...

  8. Science Planning and Orbit Classification for Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusterer, M. B.; Fox, N. J.; Rodgers, D. J.; Turner, F. S.

    2016-12-01

    There are a number of challenges for the Science Planning Team (SPT) of the Solar Probe Plus (SPP) Mission. Since SPP is using a decoupled payload operations approach, tight coordination between the mission operations and payload teams will be required. The payload teams must manage the volume of data that they write to the spacecraft solid-state recorders (SSR) for their individual instruments for downlink to the ground. Making this process more difficult, the geometry of the celestial bodies and the spacecraft during some of the SPP mission orbits cause limited uplink and downlink opportunities. The payload teams will also be required to coordinate power on opportunities, command uplink opportunities, and data transfers from instrument memory to the spacecraft SSR with the operation team. The SPT also intend to coordinate observations with other spacecraft and ground based systems. To solve these challenges, detailed orbit activity planning is required in advance for each orbit. An orbit planning process is being created to facilitate the coordination of spacecraft and payload activities for each orbit. An interactive Science Planning Tool is being designed to integrate the payload data volume and priority allocations, spacecraft ephemeris, attitude, downlink and uplink schedules, spacecraft and payload activities, and other spacecraft ephemeris. It will be used during science planning to select the instrument data priorities and data volumes that satisfy the orbit data volume constraints and power on, command uplink and data transfer time periods. To aid in the initial stages of science planning we have created an orbit classification scheme based on downlink availability and significant science events. Different types of challenges arise in the management of science data driven by orbital geometry and operational constraints, and this scheme attempts to identify the patterns that emerge.

  9. Binary cluster collision dynamics and minimum energy conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Francisco [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Rogan, José; Valdivia, J.A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Varas, A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group, ETSF Scientific Development Centre, Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Av. Tolosa 72, E-20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Kiwi, Miguel, E-mail: m.kiwi.t@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avenida Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    The collision dynamics of one Ag or Cu atom impinging on a Au{sub 12} cluster is investigated by means of DFT molecular dynamics. Our results show that the experimentally confirmed 2D to 3D transition of Au{sub 12}→Au{sub 13} is mostly preserved by the resulting planar Au{sub 12}Ag and Au{sub 12}Cu minimum energy clusters, which is quite remarkable in view of the excess energy, well larger than the 2D–3D potential barrier height. The process is accompanied by a large s−d hybridization and charge transfer from Au to Ag or Cu. The dynamics of the collision process mainly yields fusion of projectile and target, however scattering and cluster fragmentation also occur for large energies and large impact parameters. While Ag projectiles favor fragmentation, Cu favors scattering due to its smaller mass. The projectile size does not play a major role in favoring the fragmentation or scattering channels. By comparing our collision results with those obtained by an unbiased minimum energy search of 4483 Au{sub 12}Ag and 4483 Au{sub 12}Cu configurations obtained phenomenologically, we find that there is an extra bonus: without increase of computer time collisions yield the planar lower energy structures that are not feasible to obtain using semi-classical potentials. In fact, we conclude that phenomenological potentials do not even provide adequate seeds for the search of global energy minima for planar structures. Since the fabrication of nanoclusters is mainly achieved by synthesis or laser ablation, the set of local minima configurations we provide here, and their distribution as a function of energy, are more relevant than the global minimum to analyze experimental results obtained at finite temperatures, and is consistent with the dynamical coexistence of 2D and 3D liquid Au clusters conformations obtained previously.

  10. Space shuttle engineering and operations support. Orbiter to spacelab electrical power interface. Avionics system engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are presented of an investigation of the factors which affect the determination of Spacelab (S/L) minimum interface main dc voltage and available power from the orbiter. The dedicated fuel cell mode of powering the S/L is examined along with the minimum S/L interface voltage and available power using the predicted fuel cell power plant performance curves. The values obtained are slightly lower than current estimates and represent a more marginal operating condition than previously estimated.

  11. High-order harmonics generated from single and multiple molecular orbits in mid-infrared laser fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jingtao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available High-order harmonics generated from aligned molecules are studied by a nonperturbative QED theory and the effect of the multiple molecular orbits is included.The harmonic spectra generated from single molecular orbit exhibit an interference minimum which is induced by the molecular structure.The location of the spectral minimum shifts with the laser intensity in long laser pulses,but is fixed in ultrashort laser pulses.This difference is owed to the quiver motion of the electron in the laser pulses.The maximal shift of the spectral minimum equals to the increment of the ponderomotive energy and depends linearly on the laser intensity.The interference between the harmonics generated from multiple molecular orbits has two principal effects:one is obscuring the deep minima in the overall harmonic spectrum,the other is manifesting the phase jump in the harmonics generated from single molecular orbit.

  12. Periodic orbits for three and four co-orbital bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, P. E.; McInnes, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the natural families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibrium configurations of the planar-restricted 1 + n-body problem for the case 2 ≤ n ≤ 4 equal-mass satellites. Such periodic orbits can be used to model both trojan exoplanetary systems and parking orbits for captured asteroids within the Solar system. For n = 2, there are two families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibria of the system: the well-known horseshoe and tadpole orbits. For n = 3, there are three families that emanate from the equilibrium configurations of the satellites, while for n = 4, there are six such families as well as numerous additional connecting families. The families of periodic orbits are all of the horseshoe or tadpole type, and several have regions of neutral linear stability.

  13. Periodic orbits for 3 and 4 co-orbital bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the natural families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibrium configurations of the the planar restricted $1+n$ body problem for the case $2\\leq n \\leq 4$ equal mass satellites. Such periodic orbits can be used to model both trojan exoplanetary systems and parking orbits for captured asteroids within the solar system. For $n=2$ there are two families of periodic orbits associated with the equilibria of the system: the well known horseshoe and tadpole orbits. For $n=3$ there are three families that emanate from the equilibrium configurations of the satellites, while for $n=4$ there are six such families as well as numerous additional connecting families. The families of periodic orbits are all of the horseshoe or tadpole type, and several have regions of neutral linear stability.

  14. Orbital debris issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, D. J.

    Orbital debris issues fall into three major topics: Environment Definition, Spacecraft Hazard, and Space Object Management. The major issue under Environment Definition is defining the debris flux for sizes smaller (10 cm in diameter) than those tracked by the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Sources for this size debris are fragmentation of larger objects, either by explosion or collision, and solid rocket motor products. Modeling of these sources can predict fluxes in low Earth orbit which are greater than the meteoroid environment. Techniques to measure the environment in the size interval between 1 mm and 10 cm are being developed, including the use of telescopes and radar both on the ground and in space. Some impact sensors designed to detect meteoroids may have detected solid rocket motor products. Once the environment is defined, it can be combined with hypervelocity impact data and damage criteria to evaluate the Spacecraft Hazard. Shielding may be required to obtain an acceptable damage level. Space Object Management includes techniques to control the environment and the desired policy to effectively minimize the hazard to spacecraft. One control technique - reducing the likelihood of future explosions in space - has already been implemented by NASA. The effectiveness of other techniques has yet to be evaluated.

  15. MIT Orbital Transfer Vehicle (MOTV): CASTOR Satellite: Design Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    with Chocolate Satellite ................................................... 38 Figure 2.1-1: Ground System Layout...292 Figure 6.2-8: Analog Output Channels ........................................................................... 293 Figure 6.2-9: Turn PID Off...connections. Diagrams of the pin connections are included. The Grounding section identifies the type of grounding connections (i.e. analog , digital

  16. Molecular orbitals for properties and spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, Vincent [Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique, Institut de Chimie, Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Blaise Pascal 67000 Strasbourg-France (France); Domingo, Alex [Quantum Chemistry and Physical Chemistry Celestijnenlaan 200f, 3001 Heverlee - Belgium (Belgium); Braunstein, Pierre; Danopoulos, Andreas; Monakhov, Kirill [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination, Institut de Chimie, Université de Strasbourg, 4 rue Blaise Pascal 67081 Strasbourg-France (France)

    2015-12-31

    The description and clarification of spectroscopies and properties goes through ab initio calculations. Wave function based calculations (CASSCF/CASPT2) are particularly appealing since they offer spectroscopic accuracy and means of interpretation. we performed such calculations to elucidate the origin of unusual structural changes and intramolecular electron transfer phenomenon. Based on optimized molecular orbitals and a reading of the multireference wave function, it is suggested that intimate interactions are likely to considerably modify the standard pictures. A so-called PIMA (polarization-induced metalâĹŠarene) interaction similar to the more familiar anion-π interaction is responsible for a significant deviation from sp{sup 3} geometry and an energetic stabilization of 50 kJ/mol in Cr(II) benzyl organometallic complexes. In a similar fashion, it is proposed that the energetic profile of the IVCT (inter valence charge transfer) exhibits strong similarities to the Marcus’ theory, suggesting a response behaviour of the ensemble of electrons as electron transfer occurs in Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} bimetallic compound. The electronic reorganization induced by the IVCT process accounts for 11.8 eV, a very large effect that reduces the transfer energy down to 0.89 eV, in very good agreement with experiments.

  17. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) remote servicing kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Norman S.

    1988-01-01

    With the design and development of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) progressing toward an early 1990 initial operating capability (IOC), a new era in remote space operations will evolve. The logical progression to OMV front end kits would make available in situ satellite servicing, repair, and consummables resupply to the satellite community. Several conceptual design study efforts are defining representative kits (propellant tanks, debris recovery, module servicers); additional focus must also be placed on an efficient combination module servicer and consummables resupply kit. A remote servicer kit of this type would be designed to perform many of the early maintenance/resupply tasks in both nominal and high inclination orbits. The kit would have the capability to exchange Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs), exchange propellant tanks, and/or connect fluid transfer umbilicals. Necessary transportation system functions/support could be provided by interfaces with the OMV, Shuttle (STS), or Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV). Specific remote servicer kit designs, as well as ground and flight demonstrations of servicer technology are necessary to prepare for the potential overwhelming need. Ground test plans should adhere to the component/system/breadboard test philosophy to assure maximum capability of one-g testing. The flight demonstration(s) would most likely be a short duration, Shuttle-bay experiment to validate servicer components requiring a micro-g environment.

  18. [Endoscopic approaches to the orbit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebula, H; Lahlou, A; De Battista, J C; Debry, C; Froelich, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the pituitary has increased considerably. The endoscopic endonasal and transantral approaches offer a minimally invasive alternative to the classic transcranial or transconjunctival approaches to the medial aspect of the orbit. The medial wall of the orbit, the orbital apex, and the optic canal can be exposed through a middle meatal antrostomy, an anterior and posterior ethmoidectomy, and a sphenoidotomy. The inferomedial wall of the orbit can be also perfectly visualized through a sublabial antrostomy or an inferior meatal antrostomy. Several reports have described the use of an endoscopic approach for the resection or the biopsy of lesions located on the medial extraconal aspect of the orbit and orbital apex. However, the resection of intraconal lesions is still limited by inadequate instrumentation. Other indications for the endoscopic approach to the orbit are the decompression of the orbit for Graves' ophthalmopathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. However, the optimal management of traumatic optic neuropathy remains very controversial. Endoscopic endonasal decompression of the optic nerve in case of tumor compression could be a more valid indication in combination with radiation therapy. Finally, the endoscopic transantral treatment of blowout fracture of the floor of the orbit is an interesting option that avoids the eyelid or conjunctive incision of traditional approaches. The collaboration between the neurosurgeon and the ENT surgeon is mandatory and reduces the morbidity of the approach. Progress in instrumentation and optical devices will certainly make this approach promising for intraconal tumor of the orbit.

  19. Minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Grønvall Rasmussen, J B

    2008-01-01

    To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease.......To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease....

  20. Spin-orbit and electron correlation effects on the structure of EF3 (E = I, At, and element 117).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoseok; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2008-12-18

    Structures and vibrational frequencies of group 17 fluorides EF3 (E = I, At, and element 117) are calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level of theory using relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs) with and without spin-orbit terms in order to investigate the effects of spin-orbit interactions and electron correlations on the structures and vibrational frequencies of EF3. Various tests imply that spin-orbit and electron correlation effects estimated presently from Hartree-Fock (HF) and DFT calculations with RECPs with and without spin-orbit terms are quite reasonable. Spin-orbit and electron correlation effects generally increase bond lengths and/or angles in both C2v and D3h structures. For IF3, the C2v structure is a global minimum, and the D3h structure is a second-order saddle point in both HF and DFT calculations with and without spin-orbit interactions. Spin-orbit effects for IF3 are negligible in comparison to electron correlation effects. The D3h global minimum is the only minimum structure for (117)F3 in all RECP calculations, and the C2v structure is neither a local minimum nor a saddle point. In the case of AtF3, the C2v structure is found to be a local minimum in all RECP calculations without spin-orbit terms, and the D3h structure becomes a local minimum at the DFT level of theory with and without spin-orbit interactions. In the HF calculation with spin-orbit terms, the D3h structure of AtF3 is a second-order saddle point. AtF3 is a borderline case between the valence-shell-electron-pair-repulsion (VSEPR) structure of IF3 and the non-VSEPR structure of (117)F3. Relativistic effects, including scalar relativistic and spin-orbit effects, and electron correlation effects together or separately stabilize the D3h structures more than the C2v structures. As a result, one may suggest that the VSEPR predictions agree very well with the structures optimized by the nonrelativistic HF level of theory even for heavy-atom molecules but not so

  1. Completeness properties of the minimum uncertainty states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The completeness properties of the Schrodinger minimum uncertainty states (SMUS) and of some of their subsets are considered. The invariant measures and the resolution unity measures for the set of SMUS are constructed and the representation of squeezing and correlating operators and SMUS as superpositions of Glauber coherent states on the real line is elucidated.

  2. Minimum Wage Effects throughout the Wage Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Schweitzer, Mark; Wascher, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence on a wide set of margins along which labor markets can adjust in response to increases in the minimum wage, including wages, hours, employment, and ultimately labor income. Not surprisingly, the evidence indicates that low-wage workers are most strongly affected, while higher-wage workers are little affected. Workers…

  3. A Minimum Relative Entropy Principle for AGI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, Antoine van de; Schouten, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the principle of minimum relative entropy (PMRE) is proposed as a fundamental principle and idea that can be used in the field of AGI. It is shown to have a very strong mathematical foundation, that it is even more fundamental then Bayes rule or MaxEnt alone and that it can be related

  4. What's Happening in Minimum Competency Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Robert; Covington, Jimmie

    An examination of the current status of minimum competency testing is presented in a series of short essays, which discuss case studies of individual school systems and state approaches. Sections are also included on the viewpoints of critics and supporters, teachers and teacher organizations, principals and students, and the federal government.…

  5. Statistical inference of Minimum Rank Factor Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, A; Ten Berge, JMF

    2002-01-01

    For any given number of factors, Minimum Rank Factor Analysis yields optimal communalities for an observed covariance matrix in the sense that the unexplained common variance with that number of factors is minimized, subject to the constraint that both the diagonal matrix of unique variances and the

  6. Minimum Bias and Underlying Event at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Fano, Livio

    2006-01-01

    The prospects of measuring minimum bias collisions (MB) and studying the underlying event (UE) at CMS are discussed. Two methods are described. The first is based on the measurement of charged tracks in the transverse region with respect to a charge-particle jet. The second technique relies on the selection of muon-pair events from Drell-Yan process.

  7. 44 CFR 62.6 - Minimum commissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS Issuance of Policies § 62.6 Minimum commissions. (a) The earned commission which shall be paid to any property or casualty insurance agent or broker duly licensed by a state insurance regulatory authority, with respect to each policy or renewal the agent duly procures on behalf of the...

  8. Context quantization by minimum adaptive code length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Wu, Xiaolin

    2007-01-01

    Context quantization is a technique to deal with the issue of context dilution in high-order conditional entropy coding. We investigate the problem of context quantizer design under the criterion of minimum adaptive code length. A property of such context quantizers is derived for binary symbols...

  9. A Minimum Relative Entropy Principle for AGI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.M. Ben Schouten; Antoine van de van de Ven

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the principle of minimum relative entropy (PMRE) is proposed as a fundamental principle and idea that can be used in the field of AGI. It is shown to have a very strong mathematical foundation, that it is even more fundamental then Bayes rule or MaxEnt alone and that it can be related

  10. Statistical inference of Minimum Rank Factor Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapiro, A; Ten Berge, JMF

    For any given number of factors, Minimum Rank Factor Analysis yields optimal communalities for an observed covariance matrix in the sense that the unexplained common variance with that number of factors is minimized, subject to the constraint that both the diagonal matrix of unique variances and the

  11. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Faizal, Mir; Das, Saurya

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  12. Minimum impact house prototype for sustainable building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drexler, H.; Jauslin, D.

    2010-01-01

    The Minihouse is a prototupe for a sustainable townhouse. On a site of only 29 sqm it offers 154 sqm of urban life. The project 'Minimum Impact House' adresses two important questions: How do we provide living space in the cities without distroying the landscape? How to improve sustainably the ecolo

  13. ASSESSMENT OF ANNUAL MINIMUM TEMPERATURE IN SOME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-04-11

    Apr 11, 2016 ... This work attempts investigating the pattern of minimum temperature from 19 1 to 2006, an attempt was also .... Similarly the heavy cloud cover acts as blanket for terrestrial ... within a General Circulation Model. (GCM) can be ...

  14. Minimum Competency Testing--Grading or Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Madhu Suri

    The consequences of the minimum competency testing movement may bring into question the basic assumptions, goals, and expectations of our school system. The intended use of these tests is the assessment of students; the unintended consequence may be the assessment of the school system. There are two ways in which schools may fail in the context of…

  15. Minimum intervention dentistry: periodontics and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, I B; Ngo, L

    2013-06-01

    This article will look at the role of minimum intervention dentistry in the management of periodontal disease. It will discuss the role of appropriate assessment, treatment and risk factors/indicators. In addition, the role of the patient and early intervention in the continuing care of dental implants will be discussed as well as the management of peri-implant disease.

  16. Minimum output entropy of Gaussian channels

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, S; Maccone, L; Pirandola, S; Garcia-Patron, R

    2009-01-01

    We show that the minimum output entropy for all single-mode Gaussian channels is additive and is attained for Gaussian inputs. This allows the derivation of the channel capacity for a number of Gaussian channels, including that of the channel with linear loss, thermal noise, and linear amplification.

  17. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum quantity. 35.13 Section 35.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT...

  18. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  19. A Typical Presentation of Orbital Pseudotumor Mimicking Orbital Cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ayatollahi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Orbital pseudotumor, also known as idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome (IOIS, is a benign, non- infective inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. The disease may mimics a variety of pathologic conditions. We pre-sent a case of pseudotumor observed in a patient admitted under the name of orbital celluli-ties. Case Report: A 26-year-old woman reffered to our hospital with the history of left ocular pain and headache 2 days before her visit.. Ophthalmological examination of the patient was normal except for the redness and lid edema, mild chemosis and conjunctival injection. Gen-eral assessment was normal but a low grade fever was observed. She was hospitalized as an orbital cellulitis patient. She was treated with intravenous antibiotics. On the third day , sud-denly diplopia, proptosis in her left eye and ocular pain in her right side appeared. MRI re-vealed bilateral enlargement of extraocular muscles. Diagnosis of orbital pseudotumor was made and the patient was treated with oral steroid.She responded promptly to the treatment. Antibiotics were discontinued and steroid was tapered in one month period under close fol-low up. Conclusion: The clinical features of orbital pseudotumor vary widely . Orbital pseudotumor and orbital cellulitis can occasionally demonstrate overlapping features.. Despite complete physical examination and appropriate imaging, sometimes correct diagnosis of the disease would be difficult (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (3:256-259

  20. Towards a standardized grasping and refuelling on-orbit servicing for geo spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Alberto; Tomassini, Angelo; Suatoni, Matteo; Avilés, Marcos; Solway, Nick; Coxhill, Ian; Paraskevas, Iosif S.; Rekleitis, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Evangelos; Krenn, Rainer; Brito, André; Sabbatinelli, Beatrice; Wollenhaupt, Birk; Vidal, Christian; Aziz, Sarmad; Visentin, Gianfranco

    2017-05-01

    Exploitation of space must benefit from the latest advances in robotics. On-orbit servicing is a clear candidate for the application of autonomous rendezvous and docking mechanisms. However, during the last three decades most of the trials took place combining extravehicular activities (EVAs) with telemanipulated robotic arms. The European Space Agency (ESA) considers that grasping and refuelling are promising near-mid-term capabilities that could be performed by servicing spacecraft. Minimal add-ons on spacecraft to enhance their serviceability may protect them for a changing future in which satellite servicing may become mainstream. ESA aims to conceive and promote standard refuelling provisions that can be installed in present and future European commercial geostationary orbit (GEO) satellite platforms and scientific spacecraft. For this purpose ESA has started the ASSIST activity addressing the analysis, design and validation of internal provisions (such as modifications to fuel, gas, electrical and data architecture to allow servicing) and external provisions (such as integrated berthing fixtures with peripheral electrical, gas, liquid connectors, leak check systems and corresponding optical and radio markers for cooperative rendezvous and docking). This refuelling approach is being agreed with European industry (OHB, Thales Alenia Space) and expected to be consolidated with European commercial operators as a first step to become an international standard; this approach is also being considered for on-orbit servicing spacecraft, such as the SpaceTug, by Airbus DS. This paper describes in detail the operational means, structure, geometry and accommodation of the system. Internal and external provisions will be designed with the minimum possible impact on the current architecture of GEO satellites without introducing additional risks in the development and commissioning of the satellite. End-effector and berthing fixtures are being designed in the range of few

  1. The periodicity of Grand Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel

    2016-07-01

    The sunspot number is the most used index to quantify the solar activity. Nevertheless, the sunspot is a syn- thetic index and not a physical index. Therefore, we should be careful to use the sunspot number to quantify the low (high) solar activity. One of the major problems of using sunspot to quantify solar activity is that its minimum value is zero. This zero value hinders the reconstruction of the solar cycle during the Maunder minimum. All solar indexes can be used as analog signals, which can be easily converted into digital signals. In con- trast, the conversion of a digital signal into an analog signal is not in general a simple task. The sunspot number during the Maunder minimum can be studied as a digital signal of the solar activity In 1894, Maunder published a discovery that has maintained the Solar Physics in an impasse. In his fa- mous work on "A Prolonged Sunspot Minimum" Maunder wrote: "The sequence of maximum and minimum has, in fact, been unfailing during the present century [..] and yet there [..], the ordinary solar cycle was once interrupted, and one long period of almost unbroken quiescence prevailed". The search of new historical Grand solar minima has been one of the most important questions in Solar Physics. However, the possibility of estimating a new Grand solar minimum is even more valuable. Since solar activity is the result of electromagnetic processes; we propose to employ the power to quantify solar activity: this is a fundamental physics concept in electrodynamics. Total Solar Irradiance is the primary energy source of the Earth's climate system and therefore its variations can contribute to natural climate change. In this work, we propose to consider the fluctuations in the power of the Total Solar Irradiance as a physical measure of the energy released by the solar dynamo, which contributes to understanding the nature of "profound solar magnetic field in calm". Using a new reconstruction of the Total Solar Irradiance we found the

  2. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...

  3. OrbitMaster: An Online Tool for Investigating Solar System Dynamics and Visualizing Orbital Uncertainties in the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Andrew W.; Rector, Travis A.; Baalke, Ron; Ajiki, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    OrbitMaster is a 3-D orbit visualization tool designed for the undergraduate astronomy classroom. It has been adapted from AstroArts' interactive OrbitViewer applet under the GNU General Public License, as part of the Research-Based Science Education for Undergraduates (RBSEU) curriculum. New features allow the user to alter an asteroid's orbital parameters using slider controls, and to monitor its changing position and speed relative to both Sun and Earth. It detects close approaches and collisions with Earth, and calculates revised distances and impact speeds due to Earth's gravitational attraction. It can also display many asteroid orbits at once, with direct application to visualizing the uncertainty in a single asteroid's orbital parameters. When paired with Project Pluto's Find_Orb orbit determination software and a source of asteroid astrometry, this enables monitoring of changes in orbital uncertainties with time and/or additional observational data. See http://facstaff.columbusstate.edu/puckett_andrew/orbitmaster.html.A series of undergraduate labs using the OrbitMaster applet are available as part of the RBSEU curriculum. In the first lab, students gain hands-on experience with the mechanics of asteroid orbits and confirm Kepler's laws of planetary motion. In the second, they study the orbits of Potentially Hazardous Asteroids as they build their own "Killer Asteroids" and investigate the minimum and maximum speed limits that apply to Earth-impacting objects. In the third and fourth labs, they discover the kinetic energy-crater size relationship, engage in their own Crater Scene Investigation (C.S.I.) to estimate impactor size, and understand the regional consequences of impacts. These labs may be used separately, or in support of a further seven-week sequence culminating in an authentic research project in which students submit measurements to the Minor Planet Center to refine a real asteroid's orbit. As with all RBSE projects, the overarching goal is

  4. Comparison of Volume Rendering CT cholangiography and Minimum intensity projection CT cholangiography in patients with obstructive biliary disease

    OpenAIRE

    牛見, 尚史; 佃, 俊二; 平敷, 淳子

    2002-01-01

     We compared the detectability and conspicuity of minimum intensity projection CT cholangiography (Min-IP CTC)with volume rendering CT cholangiography (VRCTC).The subjects were ten patients (6 men, 4 women, mean age 64.7) who clinically suspected obstructive biliary truct disease. They underwent enhanced helical CT. Volume data of delayed phase that reconstructed by 2 or 1 mm thickness was transferred to work station (Advantage Windows) and data processing by Minimum Intensity Projection (Min...

  5. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T.; Chin, G.

    2007-08-01

    NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) plans to launch in October 2008 with a companion secondary impactor mission, LCROSS, as the inaugural missions for the Exploration System Mission Directorate. LRO is a pathfinder whose objective is to obtain the needed information to prepare for eventual human return to the Moon. LRO will undertake at least one baseline year of operation with additional extended mission phase sponsored by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. LRO will employ six individual instruments to produce accurate maps and high-resolution images of future landing sites, to assess potential lunar resources, and to characterize the radiation environment. LRO will also test the feasibility of one advanced technology demonstration package. The LRO payload includes: Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) which will determine the global topography of the lunar surface at high resolution, measure landing site slopes, surface roughness, and search for possible polar surface ice in shadowed regions; Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) which will acquire targeted narrow angle images of the lunar surface capable of resolving meter-scale features to support landing site selection, as well as wide-angle images to characterize polar illumination conditions and to identify potential resources; Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) which will map the flux of neutrons from the lunar surface to search for evidence of water ice, and will provide space radiation environment measurements that may be useful for future human exploration; Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (DLRE) which will chart the temperature of the entire lunar surface at approximately 300 meter horizontal resolution to identify cold-traps and potential ice deposits; Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) which will map the entire lunar surface in the far ultraviolet. LAMP will search for surface ice and frost in the polar regions and provide images of permanently shadowed regions illuminated only

  6. Orbital State Uncertainty Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwood, J.; Poore, A. B.

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental to the success of the space situational awareness (SSA) mission is the rigorous inclusion of uncertainty in the space surveillance network. The *proper characterization of uncertainty* in the orbital state of a space object is a common requirement to many SSA functions including tracking and data association, resolution of uncorrelated tracks (UCTs), conjunction analysis and probability of collision, sensor resource management, and anomaly detection. While tracking environments, such as air and missile defense, make extensive use of Gaussian and local linearity assumptions within algorithms for uncertainty management, space surveillance is inherently different due to long time gaps between updates, high misdetection rates, nonlinear and non-conservative dynamics, and non-Gaussian phenomena. The latter implies that "covariance realism" is not always sufficient. SSA also requires "uncertainty realism"; the proper characterization of both the state and covariance and all non-zero higher-order cumulants. In other words, a proper characterization of a space object's full state *probability density function (PDF)* is required. In order to provide a more statistically rigorous treatment of uncertainty in the space surveillance tracking environment and to better support the aforementioned SSA functions, a new class of multivariate PDFs are formulated which more accurately characterize the uncertainty of a space object's state or orbit. The new distribution contains a parameter set controlling the higher-order cumulants which gives the level sets a distinctive "banana" or "boomerang" shape and degenerates to a Gaussian in a suitable limit. Using the new class of PDFs within the general Bayesian nonlinear filter, the resulting filter prediction step (i.e., uncertainty propagation) is shown to have the *same computational cost as the traditional unscented Kalman filter* with the former able to maintain a proper characterization of the uncertainty for up to *ten

  7. Precise Orbit Determination for ALOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Ryo; Nakamura, Shinichi; Kudo, Nobuo; Katagiri, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has been developed to contribute to the fields of mapping, precise regional land coverage observation, disaster monitoring, and resource surveying. Because the mounted sensors need high geometrical accuracy, precise orbit determination for ALOS is essential for satisfying the mission objectives. So ALOS mounts a GPS receiver and a Laser Reflector (LR) for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). This paper deals with the precise orbit determination experiments for ALOS using Global and High Accuracy Trajectory determination System (GUTS) and the evaluation of the orbit determination accuracy by SLR data. The results show that, even though the GPS receiver loses lock of GPS signals more frequently than expected, GPS-based orbit is consistent with SLR-based orbit. And considering the 1 sigma error, orbit determination accuracy of a few decimeters (peak-to-peak) was achieved.

  8. Orbital Eccrine Hidrocystoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Marangoz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old female patient presented with a painless mass on her upper eyelid medially. She noticed the mass 4 years earlier and it had increased in size over time. She had no diplopia, eyelid swelling, skin lesion overlying the mass, or visual disturbances. On ocular examination, eye movements and funduscopy were normal. The mass was movable and painless with palpation. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast showed a 12x8x7 mm well-circumscribed cystic lesion with no contrast dye appearance. Surgical removal was performed delicately and no capsular rupture occured. Pathological examination revealed an eccrine hidrocystoma. Our aim is to underline that eccrine hidrocystoma should be included in differential diagnosis of orbital masses.

  9. Exploratory orbit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal.

  10. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  11. Orbital science's 'Bermuda Triangle'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Thomas J.

    1991-02-01

    The effects of a part of the inner Van Allen belt lying closest to the earth, known as the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) upon spacecraft including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), are discussed. The area consists of positively charged ions and electrons from the Van Allen Belt which become trapped in the earth's dipole field. Contor maps representing the number of protons per square centimeter per second having energies greater than 10 million electron volts are presented. It is noted that the HST orbit causes it to spend about 15 percent of its time in the SAA, but that, unlike the experience with earlier spacecraft, the satellite's skin, internal structure, and normal electronic's packaging provides sufficient protection against eletrons, although some higher energy protons still get through. Various charged particle effects which can arise within scientific instruments including fluorescence, Cerenkov radiation, and induced radioactivity are described.

  12. Geology orbiter comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, J. A. J.; Blasius, K. R.; Davis, D. R.; Pang, K. D.; Shreve, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Instrument requirements of planetary geology orbiters were examined with the objective of determining the feasibility of applying standard instrument designs to a host of terrestrial targets. Within the basic discipline area of geochemistry, gamma-ray, X-ray fluorescence, and atomic spectroscopy remote sensing techniques were considered. Within the discipline area of geophysics, the complementary techniques of gravimetry and radar were studied. Experiments using these techniques were analyzed for comparison at the Moon, Mercury, Mars and the Galilean satellites. On the basis of these comparative assessments, the adaptability of each sensing technique was judged as a basic technique for many targets, as a single instrument applied to many targets, as a single instrument used in different mission modes, and as an instrument capability for nongeoscience objectives.

  13. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  14. Orbit Determination Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, James R.; Berry, Kevin; Gregpru. Late; Speckman, Keith; Hur-Diaz, Sun; Surka, Derek; Gaylor, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Orbit Determination Toolbox is an orbit determination (OD) analysis tool based on MATLAB and Java that provides a flexible way to do early mission analysis. The toolbox is primarily intended for advanced mission analysis such as might be performed in concept exploration, proposal, early design phase, or rapid design center environments. The emphasis is on flexibility, but it has enough fidelity to produce credible results. Insight into all flight dynamics source code is provided. MATLAB is the primary user interface and is used for piecing together measurement and dynamic models. The Java Astrodynamics Toolbox is used as an engine for things that might be slow or inefficient in MATLAB, such as high-fidelity trajectory propagation, lunar and planetary ephemeris look-ups, precession, nutation, polar motion calculations, ephemeris file parsing, and the like. The primary analysis functions are sequential filter/smoother and batch least-squares commands that incorporate Monte-Carlo data simulation, linear covariance analysis, measurement processing, and plotting capabilities at the generic level. These functions have a user interface that is based on that of the MATLAB ODE suite. To perform a specific analysis, users write MATLAB functions that implement truth and design system models. The user provides his or her models as inputs to the filter commands. The software provides a capability to publish and subscribe to a software bus that is compliant with the NASA Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) standards, to exchange data with other flight dynamics tools to simplify the flight dynamics design cycle. Using the publish and subscribe approach allows for analysts in a rapid design center environment to seamlessly incorporate changes in spacecraft and mission design into navigation analysis and vice versa.

  15. The conservation of orbital symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Woodward, R B

    2013-01-01

    The Conservation of Orbital Symmetry examines the principle of conservation of orbital symmetry and its use. The central content of the principle was that reactions occur readily when there is congruence between orbital symmetry characteristics of reactants and products, and only with difficulty when that congruence does not obtain-or to put it more succinctly, orbital symmetry is conserved in concerted reaction. This principle is expected to endure, whatever the language in which it may be couched, or whatever greater precision may be developed in its application and extension. The book ope

  16. Homogeneous orbit closures and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lindenstrauss, Elon

    2011-01-01

    We give new classes of examples of orbits of the diagonal group in the space of unit volume lattices in R^d for d > 2 with nice (homogeneous) orbit closures, as well as examples of orbits with explicitly computable but irregular orbit closures. We give Diophantine applications to the former, for instance we show that if x is the cubic root of 2 then for any y,z in R liminf |n|=0 (as |n| goes to infinity), where denotes the distance of a real number c to the integers.

  17. Orbit Alignment in Triple Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2017-08-01

    The statistics of the angle Φ between orbital angular momenta in hierarchical triple systems with known inner visual or astrometric orbits are studied. A correlation between apparent revolution directions proves the partial orbit alignment known from earlier works. The alignment is strong in triples with outer projected separation less than ∼50 au, where the average Φ is about 20^\\circ . In contrast, outer orbits wider than 1000 au are not aligned with the inner orbits. It is established that the orbit alignment decreases with the increasing mass of the primary component. The average eccentricity of inner orbits in well-aligned triples is smaller than in randomly aligned ones. These findings highlight the role of dissipative interactions with gas in defining the orbital architecture of low-mass triple systems. On the other hand, chaotic dynamics apparently played a role in shaping more massive hierarchies. The analysis of projected configurations and triples with known inner and outer orbits indicates that the distribution of Φ is likely bimodal, where 80% of triples have {{Φ }}< 70^\\circ and the remaining ones are randomly aligned.

  18. Oil-flow study of a Space Shuttle orbiter tip-fin controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, V. T., III

    1983-01-01

    Possible use of tip-fin controllers instead of a vertical tail on advanced winged entry vehicles was examined. Elimination of the vertical tail and using tip-fins offers the advantages of positive yaw control at high angles of attack and a potential weight savings. Oil-flow technique was used to obtain surface flow patterns on a tip-fin installed on a 0.01-scale Space Shuttle orbiter model for the purpose of assessing the extent of flow interference effects on the wing and tip-fin which might lead to serious heating problems. Tests were conducted in air at Mach 10 for a free-stream Reynolds numbers of .000113 at 20, 30, and 40 degree angle of attack and sideslip angles of 0 and 2 degree. Elevon deflections of -10, 0, and 10 degree and tip-fin control-surface deflections of 0, 20, and 40 degree were employed. Test results were also used to aid in the interpretation of heating data obtained on a Shuttle orbiter tip-fin on another model in a different facility. A limited comparison of oil-flow patterns and heat-transfer data is included. It was determined that elevon deflection angles from -10 to 10 degree and sideslip angles up to 2 degree have very little effect on tip-fin surface flow patterns. Also, there is a minimum of interference between the tip-fin and the wing. The most significant flow interactions occur on the tip-fin onboard surface as a result of its control-surface deflections.

  19. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  20. Reasons for Supporting the Minimum Wage: Asking Signatories of the "Raise the Minimum Wage" Statement

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In October 2006, the Economic Policy Institute released a “Raise the Minimum Wage†statement signed by more than 650 individuals. Using an open-ended, non-anonymous questionnaire, we asked the signatories to explain their thinking on the issue. The questionnaire asked about the specific mechanisms at work, possible downsides, and whether the minimum wage violates liberty. Ninety-five participated. This article reports the responses. It also summarizes findings from minimum-wage surveys sin...

  1. On-Orbit Asset Management System, September 1995. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-10

    Declining budgets have prompted the need to decrease launch cost, increase satellite lifetime, and accomplish more with each satellite. This study evaluates an OOAMS system for its ability to lengthen lifetime of on-orbit assets, decrease the number of satellites required to perform a mission, increase responsiveness, and provide increased mission capability/tactical advantage. Lifetime analysis suggest that the larger satellite systems (NASA and military communication systems, surveillance satellites and earth observing satellites) would benefit most from a nuclear bimodal OOAMS. Evaluation of satellite constellations indicate that a modest reduction in the number of satellites could be realized using OOAMS if the thermal restart capability was at least ten. An OOAMS could improve the responsiveness (launching of new assets) using on-orbit reconstitution of assets. A top level utility assessment was done to address system cost issues relating to funding profiles, first unit cost, and break-even analysis. From mission capture and orbital lifetime criteria, the recommended minimum orbital altitude is 900 km. The on-orbit thermal restart capability should be increased from five to ten. Analysis of total impulse vs propellant consumed for selected missions suggests that total impulse be increased from 40 million to 48 million Newton-seconds.

  2. Superoutburst of WZ Sge-type Dwarf Nova Below the Period Minimum: ASASSN-15po

    CERN Document Server

    Namekata, Kosuke; Kato, Taichi; Littlefield, Colin; Matsumoto, Katsura; Kojiguchi, Naoto; Sugiura, Yuki; Uto, Yusuke; Fukushima, Daiki; Tatsumi, Taiki; Yamada, Eiji; Kamibetsunawa, Taku; de Miguel, Enrique; Stein, William L; Sabo, Richard; Andreev, Maksim V; Morelle, Etienne; Pavlenko, E P; Babina, Julia V; Baklanov, Alex V; Antonyuk, Kirill A; Antonyuk, Okasana I; Sosnovskij, Aleksei A; Shugarov, Sergey Yu; Golysheva, Polina Yu; Gladilina, Natalia G; Miller, Ian; Neustroev, Vitaly V; Chavushyan, Vahram; Valdes, Jose R; Sjoberg, George; Maeda, Yutaka; Itoh, Hiroshi; Masi, Gianluca; Michel, Raul; Dubovsky, Pavol A; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Tordai, Tamas; Oksanen, Arto; Ruiz, Javier; Nogami, Daisaku

    2016-01-01

    We report on a superoutburst of a WZ Sge-type dwarf nova (DN), ASASSN-15po. The light curve showed the main superoutburst and multiple rebrightenings. In this outburst, we observed early superhumps and growing (stage A) superhumps with periods of 0.050454(2) and 0.051809(13) d, respectively. We estimated that the mass ratio of secondary to primary ($q$) is 0.0699(8) by using $P_{\\rm orb}$ and a superhump period $P_{\\rm SH}$ of stage A. ASASSN-15po [$P_{\\rm orb} \\sim$ 72.6 min] is the first DN with the orbital period between 67--76 min. Although the theoretical predicted period minimum $P_{\\rm min}$ of hydrogen-rich cataclysmic variables (CVs) is about 65--70 min, the observational cut-off of the orbital period distribution at 80 min implies that the period minimum is about 82 min, and the value is widely accepted. We suggest the following four possibilities: the object is (1) a theoretical period minimum object (2) a binary with a evolved secondary (3) a binary with a metal-poor (Popullation II) seconday (4) ...

  3. Minimum energy and the end of the inspiral in the post-Newtonian approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Cabero, Miriam; Lundgren, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The early inspiral phase of a compact binary coalescence is well modelled by the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation to the orbital energy and gravitational wave flux. The transition from the inspiral phase to the plunge can be defined by the minimum energy circular orbit (MECO). In the extreme mass-ratio limit, up to the highest PN order known, the PN energy equals the energy of the exact Kerr solution. However, for comparable-mass systems the MECO of the PN energy does not exist when bodies have large spins. By including the exact Kerr limit and recently published post-Newtonian terms we extract a well-defined minimum of the orbital energy beyond which the plunge or merger occurs. We study the hybrid condition for a number of cases of both black hole and neutron stars and compare to other commonly employed definitions. Our method can be used for any known order of the post-Newtonian series and enables the MECO condition to be used to define the end of the inspiral phase for highly spinning, comparable mass sy...

  4. Spectrum and orbit conservation as a factor in future mobile satellite system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    Access to the radio spectrum and geostationary orbit is essential to current and future mobile satellite systems. This access is difficult to obtain for current systems, and may be even more so for larger future systems. In this environment, satellite systems that minimize the amount of spectrum orbit resource required to meet a specific traffic requirement are essential. Several spectrum conservation techniques are discussed, some of which are complementary to designing the system at minimum cost. All may need to be implemented to the limits of technological feasibility if network growth is not to be constrained because of the lack of available spectrum-orbit resource.

  5. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  6. PyORBIT: A Python Shell For ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy; Jeffrey Holmes

    2003-07-01

    ORBIT is code developed at SNS to simulate beam dynamics in accumulation rings and synchrotrons. The code is structured as a collection of external C++ modules for SuperCode, a high level interpreter shell developed at LLNL in the early 1990s. SuperCode is no longer actively supported and there has for some time been interest in replacing it by a modern scripting language, while preserving the feel of the original ORBIT program. In this paper, we describe a new version of ORBIT where the role of SuperCode is assumed by Python, a free, well-documented and widely supported object-oriented scripting language. We also compare PyORBIT to ORBIT from the standpoint of features, performance and future expandability.

  7. Orbital Chondroma: A rare mesenchymal tumor of orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi S Kabra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While relatively common in the skeletal system, cartilaginous tumors are rarely seen originating from the orbit. Here, we report a rare case of an orbital chondroma. A 27-year-old male patient presented with a painless hard mass in the superonasal quadrant (SNQ of left orbit since 3 months. On examination, best-corrected visual acuity of both eyes was 20/20, with normal anterior and posterior segment with full movements of eyeballs and normal intraocular pressure. Computerized tomography scan revealed well defined soft tissue density lesion in SNQ of left orbit. Patient was operated for anteromedial orbitotomy under general anesthesia. Mass was excised intact and sent for histopathological examination (HPE. HPE report showed lobular aggregates of benign cartilaginous cells with mild atypia suggesting of benign cartilaginous tumor - chondroma. Very few cases of orbital chondroma have been reported in literature so far.

  8. Minimum Wage Laws and the Distribution of Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin

    The desirability of raising the minimum wage long revolved around just one question: the effect of higher minimum wages on the overall level of employment. An even more critical effect of the minimum wage rests on the composition of employment--who gets the minimum wage job. An examination of employment in eating and drinking establishments…

  9. 14 CFR 25.149 - Minimum control speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.149 Section 25... Minimum control speed. (a) In establishing the minimum control speeds required by this section, the method... prevent a heading change of more than 20 degrees. (e) VMCG, the minimum control speed on the ground,...

  10. 49 CFR 538.5 - Minimum driving range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum driving range. 538.5 Section 538.5... Minimum driving range. (a) The minimum driving range that a passenger automobile must have in order to be... electricity. (b) The minimum driving range that a passenger automobile using electricity as an...

  11. 12 CFR 3.6 - Minimum capital ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum capital ratios. 3.6 Section 3.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MINIMUM CAPITAL RATIOS; ISSUANCE OF DIRECTIVES Minimum Capital Ratios § 3.6 Minimum capital ratios. (a) Risk-based capital ratio....

  12. Jovian Tour Design for Orbiter and Lander Missions to Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Stefano; Buffington, Brent B.; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.

    2013-01-01

    Europa is one of the most interesting targets for solar system exploration, as its ocean of liquid water could harbor life. Following the recommendation of the Planetary Decadal Survey, NASA commissioned a study for a flyby mission, an orbiter mission, and a lander mission. This paper presents the moon tours for the lander and orbiter concepts. The total delta v and radiation dose would be reduced by exploiting multi-body dynamics and avoiding phasing loops in the Ganymede-to- Europa transfer. Tour 11-O3, 12-L1 and 12-L4 are presented in details and their performaces compared to other tours from previous Europa mission studies.

  13. Orbital Debris Quarterly News. Volume 13; No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C. (Editor); Shoots, Debi (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    Topics discussed include: new debris from a decommissioned satellite with a nuclear power source; debris from the destruction of the Fengyun-1C meteorological satellite; quantitative analysis of the European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle 'Jules Verne' reentry event; microsatellite impact tests; solar cycle 24 predictions and other long-term projections and geosynchronus (GEO) environment for the Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2008). Abstracts from the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office, examining satellite reentry risk assessments and statistical issues for uncontrolled reentry hazards, are also included.

  14. On-orbit operational scenarios, tools and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Walker, James

    1991-01-01

    This paper concentrates on methods and techniques used to develop operational scenarios for orbital missions, including development of models to analyze alternatives, modification of tools and refinement of techniques for future missions. Many of these tools and techniques have been derived from previous tools, techniques and experience from the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) program. Results from use of these tools show the current Cargo Transfer Vehicle nominal mission scenario, with 95 discrete events defined for the CTV mission from the NLS Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) to Space Station Freedom (SSF).

  15. Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) three-point docking latch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, W. Neill; Forbes, John C.; Barnes, Wayne L.

    1990-01-01

    The primary purpose of the OMV is to dock with orbiting payloads and then either transfer them to a different orbit or return them to the Space Shuttle for servicing. Some such missions will involve docking with payloads equipped with a Flight Support System (FSS) type of interface; an example is the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The design and development of a mechanism to be used for testing this docking concept on the NASA-Marshall test beds is described. The test results to date are also presented.

  16. Minimum and terminal velocities in projectile motion

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, E N; Riba, R

    2012-01-01

    The motion of a projectile with horizontal initial velocity V0, moving under the action of the gravitational field and a drag force is studied analytically. As it is well known, the projectile reaches a terminal velocity Vterm. There is a curious result concerning the minimum speed Vmin; it turns out that the minimum velocity is lower than the terminal one if V0 > Vterm and is lower than the initial one if V0 < Vterm. These results show that the velocity is not a monotonous function. If the initial speed is not horizontal, there is an angle range where the velocity shows the same behavior mentioned previously. Out of that range, the volocity is a monotonous function. These results come out from numerical simulations.

  17. DETERMINING MINIMUM HIKING TIME USING DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZSOLT MAGYARI-SÁSKA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Determining minimum hiking time using DEM. Minimum hiking time calculus can be used to assess the maximum area where a lost person can be. Such area delimitation can help rescue teams to efficiently organize their missions. The two well known walking time rules was used to determine, compare and correlate the obtained result in a test area. The calculated times has a high correlation coefficient which makes possible a precise conversion between Naismith and Tobler walking times. For delimiting the rescue area a graph based modeling from a raster layer was implemented using R environment. The main challenge in such a modeling is the efficient memory management as the use of Dijkstra algorithm on directional costgraph requires high memory resources.

  18. Measurement of Minimum Bias Observables with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kvita, Jiri; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The modelling of Minimum Bias (MB) is a crucial ingredient to learn about the description of soft QCD processes. It has also a significant relevance for the simulation of the environment at the LHC with many concurrent pp interactions (“pileup”). The ATLAS collaboration has provided new measurements of the inclusive charged particle multiplicity and its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in special data sets with low LHC beam currents, recorded at center of mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The measurements cover a wide spectrum using charged particle selections with minimum transverse momentum of both 100 MeV and 500 MeV and in various phase space regions of low and high charged particle multiplicities.

  19. Bistable dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianwen; Wang, Shu; McCoul, David; Xing, Zhiguang; Huang, Bo; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer minimum energy structures (DEMES) can realize large angular deformations by small voltage-induced strains, which make them an attractive candidate for use as soft actuators. If the task only needs binary action, the bistable structure will be an efficient solution and can save energy because it requires only a very short duration of voltage to switch its state. To obtain bistable DEMES, a method to realize the two stable states of traditional DEMES is provided in this paper. Based on this, a type of symmetrical bistable DEMES is proposed, and the required actuation pulse duration is shorter than 0.1 s. When a suitable mass is attached to end of the DEMES, or two layers of dielectric elastomer are affixed to both sides of the primary frame, the DEMES can realize two stable states and can be switched by a suitable pulse duration. To calculate the required minimum pulse duration, a mathematical model is provided and validated by experiment.

  20. Minimum Energy Demand Locomotion on Space Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing Kwong Chung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy of a space station is a precious resource, and the minimization of energy consumption of a space manipulator is crucial to maintain its normal functionalities. This paper first presents novel gaits for space manipulators by equipping a new gripping mechanism. With the use of wheels locomotion, lower energy demand gaits can be achieved. With the use of the proposed gaits, we further develop a global path planning algorithm for space manipulators which can plan a moving path on a space station with a minimum total energy demand. Different from existing approaches, we emphasize both the use of the proposed low energy demand gaits and the gaits composition during the path planning process. To evaluate the performance of the proposed gaits and path planning algorithm, numerous simulations are performed. Results show that the energy demand of both the proposed gaits and the resultant moving path is also minimum.

  1. Study of closed orbit response to magnet vibrations at the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-Hui; ZHAO Zhen-Tang; DAI Zhi-Min; LIU Gui-Min

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the analytical and simulation responses of the closed orbit distortion in the SSRF storage ring to random and plane wave like magnet vibrations respectively. It is shown that the use of girder is very beneficial in the view of suppressing this response function. Effect of the independently supported gradient bending magnets to the closed orbit response is given. An analytic formula is written to give a rough estimate of the closed orbit distortion due to ground motion, taking into account the closed orbit response function and girder transfer function. As an example, the result of SSRF case is given.

  2. Towards the Minimum Inner Edge Distance of the Habitable Zone

    CERN Document Server

    Zsom, Andras; de Wit, Julien

    2013-01-01

    We explore the minimum distance from a host star for an exoplanet to be potentially habitable, in order to maximize future chances of finding other habitable worlds. We find that the inner edge of the Habitable Zone (HZ) for hot desert worlds is at 0.5 AU around a solar-like star (well within the orbit of Venus). The relative humidity is the key controlling factor in determining the inner edge distance because water vapor has a strong impact on the greenhouse warming of the atmosphere, yet too little water vapor will deactivate precipitation and enable CO2 to accumulate. We estimate that a relative humidity as low as 1% can be sufficient to maintain a liquid water cycle and wash out CO2 from the atmosphere. If the surface pressure is too low (~0.1 bar), the water loss timescale of the planet is too short to support life. If the surface pressure is too high (~100 bars), we show using atmospheric circulation arguments, that the day-night side temperature difference on slow rotators and tidally locked planets is...

  3. Minimum quality standards and international trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltzer, Kenneth Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of a non-discriminating minimum quality standard (MQS) on trade and welfare when the market is characterized by imperfect competition and asymmetric information. A simple partial equilibrium model of an international Cournot duopoly is presented in which...... prefer different levels of regulation. As a result, international trade disputes are likely to arise even when regulation is non-discriminating....

  4. Proposed production test for reducing minimum downtime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaklevick, J.F.

    1961-11-29

    The object of the production test described in this report is to evaluate the operational aspects of a proposed method for reducing minimum downtime. The excess xenon poisoning, which occurs during the first 32--38 hours after the shutdown of a reactor from present equilibrium levels, will be partially overridden by a central enriched zone whose added reactivity contribution would be compensated during normal operation by means of poison splines.

  5. Minimum Description Length Shape and Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling is reviewed. It solves the point correspondence problem of selecting points on shapes defined as curves so that the points correspond across a data set. An efficient numerical implementation is presented and made available as open s...... source Matlab code. The problems with the early MDL approaches are discussed. Finally the MDL approach is extended to an MDL Appearance Model, which is proposed as a means to perform unsupervised image segmentation....

  6. Minimum degree and density of binary sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Stephan; Müttel, J.; Rautenbach, D.

    2010-01-01

    For d,k∈N with k ≤ 2d, let g(d,k) denote the infimum density of binary sequences (x)∈{0,1} which satisfy the minimum degree condition σ(x+) ≥ k for all i∈Z with xi=1. We reduce the problem of computing g(d,k) to a combinatorial problem related to the generalized k-girth of a graph G which...

  7. Time crystals from minimum time uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizal, Mir; Khalil, Mohammed M.; Das, Saurya

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal. As an application of our formalism, we analyze the effect of such a deformation on the rate of spontaneous emission in a hydrogen atom.

  8. Time crystals from minimum time uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faizal, Mir [University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Khalil, Mohammed M. [Alexandria University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Alexandria (Egypt); Das, Saurya [University of Lethbridge, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lethbridge, AB (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal. As an application of our formalism, we analyze the effect of such a deformation on the rate of spontaneous emission in a hydrogen atom. (orig.)

  9. Energy transfer in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelbring, H.

    2013-12-01

    Different types of energy transfer are presented from the literature and are approached and commented on. It follows from these articles that energy transfer in addition to solar irradiation is less well understood by contemporary scientist. The transformation of energy between kinetic and potential energy in planetary orbits might be of crucial importance for understanding energy transfer between celestial bodies and the development of commensurabilities. There is evidence pointing to interactions (friction) between space and satellites producing volcanism. The reversible transfer of energy between the orbit of Moon and Earth's rotational energy is crucial to the creation of the 13.6-day and 27.3-day periods in both solar variables and Earth bound climate variables. It is hypothesized that the Earth-Moon system is modulating the sunspot numbers and creating both these periods, and that the great planets are responsible for the 11 yr solar cycle.

  10. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  11. What causes geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Kirov, Boian; Georgieva, Katya; Obridko, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The average geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum has been continuously decreasing in the last four cycles. The geomagnetic activity is caused by both interplanetary disturbances - coronal mass ejections and high speed solar wind streams, and the background solar wind over which these disturbances ride. We show that the geomagnetic activity in cycle minimum does not depend on the number and parameters of coronal mass ejections or high speed solar wind streams, but on the background solar wind. The background solar wind has two components: slower and faster. The source of the slower component is the heliospheric current sheet, and of the faster one the polar coronal holes. It is supposed that the geomagnetic activity in cycle minimum is determined by the thickness of the heliospheric current sheet which is related to the portions of time the Earth spends in slow and in fast solar wind. We demonstrate that it is also determined by the parameters of these two components of the background solar wind which v...

  12. Mars ascent propulsion on a minimum scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.C.; Guernsey, C.S.

    1998-03-03

    A concept is presented for a single stage vehicle intended to lift a Mars sample to an orbital rendezvous. At 200 kg liftoff mass, it can potentially be delivered by a Mars Pathfinder size aeroshell. Based on launch vehicle design principles, propellants are pumped from thin-walled low pressure tanks into compact high pressure thrusters. Technical risk is reduced by using non-cryogenic propellants, and by driving piston pumps with heated helium.

  13. Optimizing Reactors Selection and Sequencing:Minimum Cost versus Minimum Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachid Chebbi

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation targets minimum cost of reactors in series for the case of one single chemical reaction, considering plug flow and stirred tank reactor(s) in the sequence of flow reactors. Using Guthrie’s cost correlations three typical cases were considered based on the profile of the reaction rate reciprocal versus conversion. Significant differences were found compared to the classical approach targeting minimum total reactor volume.

  14. Fourier Series Approximations to J2-Bounded Equatorial Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper offers a comprehensive dynamical analysis and Fourier series approximations of J2-bounded equatorial orbits. The initial conditions of heterogeneous families of J2-perturbed equatorial orbits are determined first. Then the characteristics of two types of J2-bounded orbits, namely, pseudo-elliptic orbit and critical circular orbit, are studied. Due to the ambiguity of the closed-form solutions which comprise the elliptic integrals and Jacobian elliptic functions, showing little physical insight into the problem, a new scheme, termed Fourier series expansion, is adopted for approximation herein. Based on least-squares fitting to the coefficients, the solutions are expressed with arbitrary high-order Fourier series, since the radius and the flight time vary periodically as a function of the polar angle. As a consequence, the solutions can be written in terms of elementary functions such as cosines, rather than complex mathematical functions. Simulations enhance the proposed approximation method, showing bounded and negligible deviations. The approximation results show a promising prospect in preliminary orbits design, determination, and transfers for low-altitude spacecrafts.

  15. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and su

  16. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  17. Diffractive molecular-orbital tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Chunyang; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lan, Pengfei; Wang, Feng; He, Lixin; Shi, Wenjing; Li, Yang; Li, Min; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-03-01

    High-order-harmonic generation in the interaction of femtosecond lasers with atoms and molecules opens the path to molecular-orbital tomography and to probe the electronic dynamics with attosecond-Ångström resolutions. Molecular-orbital tomography requires both the amplitude and phase of the high-order harmonics. Yet the measurement of phases requires sophisticated techniques and represents formidable challenges at present. Here we report a scheme, called diffractive molecular-orbital tomography, to retrieve the molecular orbital solely from the amplitude of high-order harmonics without measuring any phase information. We have applied this method to image the molecular orbitals of N2, CO2, and C2H2 . The retrieved orbital is further improved by taking account the correction of Coulomb potential. The diffractive molecular-orbital tomography scheme, removing the roadblock of phase measurement, significantly simplifies the molecular-orbital tomography procedure and paves an efficient and robust way to the imaging of more complex molecules.

  18. GridOrbit public display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Juan David Hincapie; Tabard, Aurélien; Bardram, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We introduce GridOrbit, a public awareness display that visualizes the activity of a community grid used in a biology laboratory. This community grid executes bioin-formatics algorithms and relies on users to donate CPU cycles to the grid. The goal of GridOrbit is to create a shared awareness about...

  19. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffano, P.; Roccia, F.; Gallesio, C.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and

  20. Low Earth Orbiter: Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Steven E.; Bundick, Steven N.

    1999-01-01

    In response to the current government budgetary environment that requires the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to do more with less, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility has developed and implemented a class of ground stations known as a Low Earth Orbiter-Terminal (LEO-T). This development thus provides a low-cost autonomous ground tracking service for NASA's customers. More importantly, this accomplishment provides a commercial source to spacecraft customers around the world to purchase directly from the company awarded the NASA contract to build these systems. A few years ago, NASA was driven to provide more ground station capacity for spacecraft telemetry, tracking, and command (TT&C) services with a decreasing budget. NASA also made a decision to develop many smaller, cheaper satellites rather than a few large spacecraft as done in the past. In addition, university class missions were being driven to provide their own TT&C services due to the increasing load on the NASA ground-tracking network. NASA's solution for this ever increasing load was to use the existing large aperture systems to support those missions requiring that level of performance and to support the remainder of the missions with the autonomous LEO-T systems. The LEO-T antenna system is a smaller, cheaper, and fully autonomous unstaffed system that can operate without the existing NASA support infrastructure. The LEO-T provides a low-cost, reliable space communications service to the expanding number of low-earth orbiting missions around the world. The system is also fostering developments that improve cost-effectiveness of autonomous-class capabilities for NASA and commercial space use. NASA has installed three LEO-T systems. One station is at the University of Puerto Rico, the second system is installed at the Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks, Alaska, and the third system is installed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. This paper