WorldWideScience

Sample records for mineral phases including

  1. Stochastic modelling of two-phase flows including phase change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurisse, O.; Minier, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic modelling has already been developed and applied for single-phase flows and incompressible two-phase flows. In this article, we propose an extension of this modelling approach to two-phase flows including phase change (e.g. for steam-water flows). Two aspects are emphasised: a stochastic model accounting for phase transition and a modelling constraint which arises from volume conservation. To illustrate the whole approach, some remarks are eventually proposed for two-fluid models. (authors)

  2. Mineral vein dynamics modeling (FRACS). Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urai, J.; Virgo, S.; Arndt, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Geologie-Endogene Dynamik] [and others

    2013-07-15

    The Mineral Vein Dynamics Modeling group ''FRACS'' is a team of 7 research groups from the Universities of Mainz, Aachen, Tuebingen, Karlsruhe, Bayreuth, ETH Zuerich and Glasgow working on an understanding of the dynamic development of fracturing, fluid flow and fracture sealing. World-class field laboratories, especially carbonate sequences from the Oman Mountains are studied and classified. State of the art numerical programs are written, expanded and used to simulate the dynamic interaction of fracturing, flow and resealing and the results are compared with the natural examples. Newest analytical technologies including laser scanning, high resolution X-ray microtomography, fluid inclusion and isotope analysis are performed to understand and compare the results of simulations with natural examples. A new statistical program was developed to classify the natural fracture and vein systems and compare them with dynamic numerical simulations and analytical models. The results of the first project phase are extremely promising. Most of the numerical models have been developed up to the stage where they can be used to simulate the natural examples. The models allow a definition of the first proxies for high fluid pressure and tectonic stresses. It was found out that the Oman Mountains are a complex and very dynamic system that constantly fractures and reseals from the scale of small veins up to the scale of large normal and strike slip faults. The numerical simulations also indicate that the permeability of such systems is not a constant but that the system adjusts to the driving force, for ex-ample high fluid pressure. When the system reseals fast a fluctuating behavior can be observed in the models where the system constantly fractures and reseals, which is in accordance with the observation of the natural laboratory.

  3. Alternating phase focussing including space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, W.H.; Gluckstern, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Longitudinal stability can be obtained in a non-relativistic drift tube accelerator by traversing each gap as the rf accelerating field rises. However, the rising accelerating field leads to a transverse defocusing force which is usually overcome by magnetic focussing inside the drift tubes. The radio frequency quadrupole is one way of providing simultaneous longitudinal and transverse focusing without the use of magnets. One can also avoid the use of magnets by traversing alternate gaps between drift tubes as the field is rising and falling, thus providing an alternation of focussing and defocusing forces in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The stable longitudinal phase space area is quite small, but recent efforts suggest that alternating phase focussing (APF) may permit low velocity acceleration of currents in the 100-300 ma range. This paper presents a study of the parameter space and a test of crude analytic predictions by adapting the code PARMILA, which includes space charge, to APF. 6 refs., 3 figs

  4. Heteroaggregation of graphene oxide with minerals in aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Liu, Feifei; Wang, Zhenyu; Cao, Xuesong; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-03-03

    Upon release into waters, sediments, and soils, graphene oxide (GO) may interact with fine mineral particles. We investigated the heteroaggregation of GO with different minerals, including montmorillonite, kaolinite, and goethite, in aqueous phase. GO significantly enhanced the dispersion of positively charged goethite (>50%) via heteroaggregation, while there was no interaction between GO and negatively charged montmorillonite or kaolinite. Electrostatic attraction was the dominant force in the GO-goethite heteroaggregation (pH 4.0-8.5), and the dissolved Fe ions (formation of multilayered GO-goethite complex with high configurational stability. These findings are useful for understanding the interaction of GO with mineral surfaces, and potential fate and toxicity of GO under natural conditions in aquatic environments, as well as in soils and sediments.

  5. Phanerozoic Rifting Phases And Mineral Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassaan, Mahmoud

    2016-04-01

    connected with NW,WNW and N-S faults genetically related to volcano-hydrothermal activity associated the Red Sea rifting. At Sherm EL-Sheikh hydrothermal manganese deposit occurs in Oligocene clastics within fault zone. Four iron-manganese-barite mineralization in Esh-Elmellaha plateau are controlled by faults trending NW,NE and nearly E-W intersecting Miocene carbonate rocks. Barite exists disseminated in the ores and as a vein in NW fault. In Shalatee - Halaib district 24 manganese deposits and barite veins with sulphide patches occur within Miocene carbonates distributed along two NW fault planes,trending 240°and 310° and occur in granite and basalt . Uranium -lead-zinc sulfide mineralization occur in Late Proterozoic granite, Late Cretaceous sandstones, and chiefly in Miocene clastic-carbonate-evaporate rocks. The occurrences of uranium- lead-zinc and iron-manganese-barite mineralization have the characteristic features of hypogene cavity filling and replacement deposits correlated with Miocene- Recent Aden volcanic rocks rifting. In western Saudi Arabia barite-lead-zinc mineralization occurs at Lat. 25° 45' and 25° 50'N hosted by Tertiary sediments in limestone nearby basaltic flows and NE-SW fault system. The mineralized hot brines in the Red Sea deeps considered by the author a part of this province. The author considers the constant rifting phases of Pangea and then progressive fragmentation of Western Gondwana during the Late Carboniferous-Lias, Late Jurassic-Early Aptian, Late Aptian - Albian and Late Eocene-Early Miocene and Oligocene-Miocene, responsible for formation of the mineral deposits constituting the M provinces. During these events, rifting, magmatism and hydrothermal activities took place in different peri-continental margins.

  6. Analysis of Mineral Assemblages Containing Unstable Hydrous Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Wilson, S. A.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S.

    2011-12-01

    Minerals in many environments can be treated as durable phases that preserve a record of their formation. However many minerals, especially those with hydrogen-bonded H2O molecules as part of their structure, are ephemeral and are unlikely to survive disturbance let alone removal from their environment of formation. Minerals with exceptionally limited stability such as meridianiite (Mg-sulfate 11 hydrate), ikaite (Ca-carbonate 6 hydrate), and mirabilite (Na-sulfate 10 hydrate) are very susceptible to destabilization during analysis, and even modest changes in temperature or relative humidity can lead to change in hydration state or deliquescence. The result may be not only loss of the salt hydrate but dissolution of other salts present, precipitation of new phases, and ion exchange between the concentrated solution and otherwise unaffected phases. Exchange of H2O molecules can also occur in solid-vapor systems without any liquid involvement; moreover, recent work has shown that cation exchange between smectite and sulfate hydrates can occur without any liquid phase present other than a presumed thin film at the salt-silicate interface. Among hydrous silicates, clay minerals are susceptible to cation exchange and similar alteration can be expected for zeolites, palagonite, and possibly other hydrous silicate alteration products. Environmentally sensitive phases on Mars, such as meridianiite, may occur at higher latitudes or in the subsurface where permafrost may be present. Accurate determination of the presence and paragenesis of such minerals will be important for understanding the near-surface hydrogeology of Mars, and in situ analysis may be the only way to obtain this information. Access to the subsurface may be required, yet the act of exposure by excavation or drilling can itself lead to rapid degradation as the sample is exposed or brought to the surface for analysis. Mars is not the only body with which to be concerned, for similar concerns can be raised

  7. Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including keeping your bones, muscles, heart, and brain working properly. Minerals are also important for making enzymes and hormones. ...

  8. Analysis of mineral phases in coal utilizing factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roscoe, B.A.; Hopke, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    The mineral phase inclusions of coal are discussed. The contribution of these to a coal sample are determined utilizing several techniques. Neutron activation analysis in conjunction with coal washability studies have produced some information on the general trends of elemental variation in the mineral phases. These results have been enhanced by the use of various statistical techniques. The target transformation factor analysis is specifically discussed and shown to be able to produce elemental profiles of the mineral phases in coal. A data set consisting of physically fractionated coal samples was generated. These samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis and then their elemental concentrations examined using TTFA. Information concerning the mineral phases in coal can thus be acquired from factor analysis even with limited data. Additional data may permit the resolution of additional mineral phases as well as refinement of theose already identified

  9. Headspace analysis gas-phase infrared spectroscopy: a study of xanthate decomposition on mineral surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenhil, Andrew J.; Brienne, Stephane H. R.; Markwell, Ross D.; Butler, Ian S.; Finch, James A.

    1997-03-01

    The O-ethyldithiocarbonate (ethyl xanthate, CH 3CH 2OCS -2) anion is a widely used reagent in mineral processing for the separation of sulphide minerals by froth flotation. Ethyl xanthate interacts with mineral powders to produce a hydrophobic layer on the mineral surface. A novel infrared technique, headspace analysis gas-phase infrared spectroscopy (HAGIS) has been used to study the in situ thermal decomposition products of ethyl xanthate on mineral surfaces. These products include CS 2, COS, CO 2, CH 4, SO 2, and higher molecular weight alkyl-containing species. Decomposition pathways have been proposed with some information determined from 2H- and 13C-isotope labelling experiments.

  10. Mineral phases identification inside an abandoned Zn/Pb mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goienaga, N.; Carrero, J.A.; Olivares, M.; Castro, K.; Fernandez, L.A.; Madariaga, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The aim of the work is the identification of the sulphurated phase's outbreak on an aragonite, dolomite and calcite-based original rock inside an abandoned mine. The studied Blende/Galena (ZnS/PbS) Mine, located in Lanestosa (Bizkaia, North of Spain) was operative until 1950. After decades, the area has only supported wild life and thus nowadays it could be considered as a polluted site which has become naturalized. The main alteration factors inside the mine are percolated water, gases come from the outside (CO 2 , O 2 ) and biological activities. Mining activities generates loads of ore minerals and unwanted materials that with the time impact the surrounding environment. The waste includes granular, broken rock and soils ranging in size from the fine sand to large boulders, with the content of fine material largely dependent on the nature of the formation and extraction methods employed during mining. Waste materials geochemistry varies widely from mine to mine and may vary significantly at individual mines over time as different lithologic strata are exposed and geochemical processes alter characteristics of the waste. In order to determine the finest mineral composition in the galleries, several samples were collected. Once dried in a fume hood and sieved, the portions below 250 μm were subjected to non-destructive Raman spectroscopic analysis. The measurements reflected the ore precursors (primary phases: Blende, and Galena), several primary carbonates (dolomite, calcite and aragonite) with secondary minerals in trace levels (Brookite, Libethenite, Fluorapatita, Anatasa, Quartz, Apatite, Augite, Diopside, Anthracite, Hematite, Cosalite, Epidote, Rutile) and transformation products, probably of recent formation (Smithsonite, Massicot, Plattnerite, Gypsum, Siderite, Mendiphite, Escorodite, Gauberite, Goethite or Mascagnite). The origin of the secondary mineral may be related to percolated rain and snow water. This

  11. Australian mineral industry annual review 1977 (including information to June 1978)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J

    1979-01-01

    This article records growth of the Australian mineral industry and reports production, consumption, treatment, trade, prices, new developments, exploration, and resources for all mineral commodities including fuels. Equivalent development abroad is summarized. Appendices include principal mineral producers, associations, etc. and royalties. Black coal is described under the headings: production, ex-mine value of output, employment, wages and salaries, production per manshift, interstate trade, port facilities, consumption, stock, prices, new developments, exploration, resources, world review, and coke. There are numerous tables of data and a flow chart of the Australian black coal industry, 1977. Brown coal includes production, consumption, new developments, exploration, resources, and world review.

  12. Heavy metal immobilization in mineral phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apblett, A.

    1993-01-01

    A successful waste form for toxic or radioactive metals must not only have the ability to chemically incorporate the elements but it must also be extremely stable in the geological environment. Thus, ceramic wasteforms are sought which mimic those minerals that have sequestered the hazardous metals for billions of years. One method for producing ceramics, metal organic deposition (MOD) is outstanding in its simplicity, versatility, and inexpensiveness. The major contribution that the MOD process can make to ceramic waste forms is the ability to mix the toxic metals at a molecular level with the elements which form the ceramic matrix. With proper choice of organic ligands, the inclusion of significant amounts of alkali metals in the ceramic and, hence, their detrimental effect on durability may be avoided. In the first stage of our research we identified thermally-unstable ligands which could fulfill the role of complexing toxic metal species and allowing their precipitation or extraction into nonaqueous solvents

  13. COMPOSITION OF MINERAL PHASES OF THE GHIDIRIM DIATOMITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Rusu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the mineralogical composition of diatomite from the Ghidirim location of RM, as well as of the extracted clay phase are presented. The mineral phase of the diatomite contains a number of clay minerals, like montmorillonite (in a mixture with insignificant quantities of slightly chloritized montmorillonite, illite and kaolinite. Diatomite contains also non-clay components as fine-dispersed quartz and amorphous material, the more probable sources of which are opal, amorphous alumosilicates, aluminum and iron hydroxides. The applied procedure for separation of clay fractions by sizing settling in liquid media proves to be very useful, enabling possibilities for more accurate identification of the clay constituents of diatomic material. Procedure allows to separate very clean clay fraction especially rich in montmorillonite, which can be utilized itself as mineral adsorbent for practical purposes.

  14. Scattering Phase Functions of Constituents of Mineral Dust Aerosols ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Montmorillonte, Hematite, Calcite and Quartz. The behaviour of these constituents as observed by their phase functions provide information on the optical properties and radiative effects of the mineral dust types and is therefore useful on regional and global scales in assessing radiative impacts of dust outbreak events.

  15. Permeability of Granite Including Macro-Fracture Naturally Filled with Fine-Grained Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Kato, Masaji; Niri, Ryuhei; Kohno, Masanori; Sato, Toshinori; Fukuda, Daisuke; Sato, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Information on the permeability of rock is essential for various geoengineering projects, such as geological disposal of radioactive wastes, hydrocarbon extraction, and natural hazard risk mitigation. It is especially important to investigate how fractures and pores influence the physical and transport properties of rock. Infiltration of groundwater through the damage zone fills fractures in granite with fine-grained minerals. However, the permeability of rock possessing a fracture naturally filled with fine-grained mineral grains has yet to be investigated. In this study, the permeabilities of granite samples, including a macro-fracture filled with clay and a mineral vein, are investigated. The permeability of granite with a fine-grained mineral vein agrees well with that of the intact sample, whereas the permeability of granite possessing a macro-fracture filled with clay is lower than that of the macro-fractured sample. The decrease in the permeability is due to the filling of fine-grained minerals and clay in the macro-fracture. It is concluded that the permeability of granite increases due to the existence of the fractures, but decreases upon filling them with fine-grained minerals.

  16. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  17. Saturation of the hydroxyapatite mineral phase using radioactive fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores de la Torre, J.A.; Badillo A, V.E.; Lopez D, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    With the purpose of knowing the Anion exchange capacity (CIA) of the hydroxyapatite mineral phase, marketed by BIO-RAD, becomes necessary to saturate the surface of the mineral with an anion specie that possesses a strong affinity by this solid as it is the case of the fluorine. Moreover it takes advantage that offers the radioactive tracer technique, using the radioactive isotope of the fluorine, 18 F, produced in the cyclotron of the UNAM. This saturation is obtained in terms of the quantity of retained fluorine (mmol/ 100 g) in the synthetic hydroxyapatite in function of the concentration of the solution of NaF that oscillates from 0.7 M up to 0.16 M to fixed values of pH of 9.2. Those results demonstrate that to this fixed pH value the saturation of the surface of the hydroxyapatite is achieved in approximately 30 mmol/ 100 g, using important concentrations of NaF that correspond to 0.14 M from now on. This result demonstrates the high capacity of the solid considered to retain considerable quantities of fluorine even to basic pH values. (Author)

  18. Changes in bone mineral metabolism parameters, including FGF23, after discontinuing cinacalcet at kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Xoana; Fuster, David; Paschoalin, Raphael; Oppenheimer, Federico; Rubello, Domenico; Perlaza, Pilar; Pons, Francesca; Torregrosa, Jose V

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of the administration of cinacalcet in dialytic patients who are scheduled for kidney transplantation, and in particular about the changes in FGF23 and other mineral metabolism parameters after surgery compared with recipients not on cinacalcet at kidney transplantation. We performed a prospective observational cohort study with recruitment of consecutive kidney transplant recipients at our institution. Patients were classified according to whether they were under treatment with cinacalcet before transplantation. Bone mineral metabolism parameters, including C-terminal FGF23, were measured at baseline, on day 15, and at 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. In previously cinacalcet-treated patients, cinacalcet therapy was discontinued on the day of surgery and was not restarted after transplantation. A total of 48 kidney transplant recipients, 20 on cinacalcet at surgery and 28 cinacalcet non-treated patients, completed the follow-up. Serum phosphate declined significantly in the first 15 days after transplantation with no differences between the two groups, whereas cinacalcet-treated patients showed higher FGF23 levels, although not significant. After transplantation, PTH and serum calcium were significantly higher in cinacalcet-treated patients. We conclude that patients receiving cinacalcet on dialysis presented similar serum phosphate levels but higher PTH and serum calcium levels during the initial six months after kidney transplantation than cinacalcet non-treated patients. The group previously treated with cinacalcet before transplantation showed higher FGF23 levels without significant differences, so further studies should investigate its relevance in the management of these patients.

  19. Constitutive modeling of multiphase materials including phase transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Khan, A.S.; Meredith, C; Farrokh, B

    2011-01-01

    A constitutive model is developed for materials involving two or more different phases in their microstructure such as DP (Dual Phase) or TRIP (TRansformation Induced Plasticity) steels. Homogenization of the response of the phases is achieved by the Mean-Field method. One of the phases in TRIP

  20. Mineral and Nutrient Leaf Composition of Two Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz Cultivars Defoliated at Varying Phenological Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyeyemi Adigun DADA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defoliation on mineral and food value of two cassava varieties defoliated at varying phenological phases was studied to ascertain the appropriate phenological phase when harvested leaves would contain the optimum mineral and proximate composition, gross energy and the least cyanide content. Two cassava cultivars were subjected to defoliation at varying phenological stages including logarithmic, vegetative and physiological maturity phases. The mineral content was highest at the logarithmic phase than any other phases. The proximate composition of the cassava leaves showed that crude protein was highest at physiological maturity, while the least HCN was observed in cassava defoliated at logarithmic phase. Analysis of mineral and proximate content showed that leaf of the �TMS30572� cultivar had the highest mineral content, fat, fibre, ash, dry matter and gross energy at the logarithm phase while �Oko-Iyawo� had the highest crude protein and HCN at physiological maturity. This study indicates the high potential of cassava leaf as an unconventional source of protein for both humans and animals when defoliated at logarithmic growth phase.

  1. 75 FR 64411 - Lowering Miners' Exposure to Respirable Coal Mine Dust, Including Continuous Personal Dust Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... industries, such as mining, by reducing workplace deaths and improving the health of coal miners. This..., enhanced enforcement, collaborative outreach, and education and training. The initiative will reduce, and... reducing the respirable coal mine dust levels, miners continue to develop black lung. Based on recent data...

  2. An assessment of PCB degradation by microogransims including methods for measuring mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadden, C.; Edenborn, H.; Osborne, T.; Holdsworth, G.; Revis, N.

    1990-12-31

    These studies sought to isolate and identify organism(s) from PCB contaminated soil and sediment that degrade PCB; to provide information on the potential of organisms in soil samples taken from a PCB-contaminated area to mineralize or dechlorinate PCB congeners; to assess potential enhancement of PCB biodegradation as a result of nutritional amendment of the samples; and to carry out analyses of successive lysimeter samples to determine whether field treatments have had an effect on the capacity of soil microbes to mineralize PCBS. We have expended considerable effort to validate the fractionation procedure used to assess mineralization and conversion of PCB substrates. The assessment relies on the ability to measure [{sup 14}C]-labeled CO{sub 2} in the presence of potentially volatile [{sup 14}C]-labeled PCB and degradation products to differentiate between volatile and non-volatile [{sup 14}C]-labeled compounds between water-soluble products of metabolism and a mixture of unchanged substrate and other water-insoluble products and between metabolism and loss or non-extractability of the substrate.

  3. An assessment of PCB degradation by microogransims including methods for measuring mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadden, C.; Edenborn, H.; Osborne, T.; Holdsworth, G.; Revis, N.

    1990-01-01

    These studies sought to isolate and identify organism(s) from PCB contaminated soil and sediment that degrade PCB; to provide information on the potential of organisms in soil samples taken from a PCB-contaminated area to mineralize or dechlorinate PCB congeners; to assess potential enhancement of PCB biodegradation as a result of nutritional amendment of the samples; and to carry out analyses of successive lysimeter samples to determine whether field treatments have had an effect on the capacity of soil microbes to mineralize PCBS. We have expended considerable effort to validate the fractionation procedure used to assess mineralization and conversion of PCB substrates. The assessment relies on the ability to measure [ 14 C]-labeled CO 2 in the presence of potentially volatile [ 14 C]-labeled PCB and degradation products to differentiate between volatile and non-volatile [ 14 C]-labeled compounds between water-soluble products of metabolism and a mixture of unchanged substrate and other water-insoluble products and between metabolism and loss or non-extractability of the substrate

  4. Stabilization of organic matter in soils: role of amorphous mineral phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewde Tamrat, Wuhib; Rose, Jérôme; Levard, Clément; Chaurand, Perrine; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) globally contributes the largest portion of continental carbon stock. One major issue concerning this large C pool includes its instability by mineralization and erosion due to land use. The main hypothesis of this work is that physicochemical stabilization of SOM is mainly driven by interactions of organic compounds, not with mineral surfaces as classically considered, but with amorphous polymers continuously formed by the alteration of soil minerals(1-3). Our objective is to understand how nano-organomineral complexes (nCOMx) are structured at the nanoscale, assess mechanisms of their formation, and quantify the effects of their occurrence on SOM turnovers. Due to inherent high complexity of natural samples, our methodology is based on the formation of nCOMx from both synthetic systems and natural mineral-weathered components. For the mineral component, biotite (from Bancroft, Canada) was selected. For the organic component, 3,4-Dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine, an amino acid with hydroxyl (pKa=9.95), carboxyl (pKa=2,58), amino (pKa=9,24) and an aromatic functions was chosen. The methodology aimed at developing conditions that generate biotite dissolution and nCOMx precipitation. The second step of the experiment consisted of the precipitation of nCOMx by slowly increasing pH over 3 to 12 hours of hydrolysis. Three final pH conditions were tested (4.2, 5 and 7) with Metal/Carbon ratios of 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 'No Carbon'. The first results of dissolution rates and congruency, AFM imaging, ICPMS, HR-TEM and XRD as well as XAS characterizations (transmission and florescence mode at the Fe K-edge) of nCOMx will be presented. Experiments and analysis techniques were designed to study these synthetic phases with regard to Si, Al, Fe and OM proportions to increase the OM proportion (as in natural soil phases) and also increase the stability of the OM phase (as in increased residence time of OM in the soil). We will focus particularly on the Fe state

  5. Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aren't minerals something you find in the earth, like iron and quartz? Well, yes, but small ... canned salmon and sardines with bones leafy green vegetables, such as broccoli calcium-fortified foods — from orange ...

  6. The influence of included minerals on the intrinsic reactivity of chars prepared under N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Huan; Chen, Jiabao; Zhao, Bo; Hu, Guangzhou [China Univ. of Mining and Technology, Jiangsu (China). School of Chemical Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Oxy-fuel technology could be successfully used to retrofit existing coal-fired power plants or alternatively be used to design and build new coal-fired power plants with almost zero emissions. Char reactivity under oxy-fuel conditions will have a significant impact on the coal burnout. In this paper, two fractions, representing organic-rich particles and organic particles with included minerals, were separated from each of three Chinese coals of different rank. They were then devolatilized at 1,450 C in a drop tube furnace (DTF) under N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} environment, respectively. The chars were subjected to nitrogen adsorption study, thermogravimetric analysis and XRD analysis. It was found that char reactivity of all three pairs of chars were increased under CO{sub 2} environment as compared with that under N{sub 2} environment, but with differing trend. For the organic-rich samples the reactivity difference is increased with decreasing rank. On the contrary, for the samples of organic particles with included minerals, the reactivity difference is decreased with decreasing rank. Mechanism analysis showed that they are resulted not from gasification, but from a combination of changes in surface area and in the orderness of carbon structure in the chars, both of which, in turn, are resulted from the higher heat capacity of CO{sub 2} and the interaction between metastable liquid phase and the included minerals.

  7. Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaquero, M. P.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The possible changes in the mineral composition of food during frying could be the consequence of losses by leaching, or changes in concentrations caused by exchanges between the food and culinary fat of other compounds. The net result depends on the type of food, the frying fat used and the frying process. Moreover, the modifications that frying produces in other nutrients could indirectly affect the availability of dietary minerals. The most outstanding ones are those that can take place in the fat or in the protein. With respect to the interactions between frying oils and minerals, we have recent knowledge concerning the effects of consuming vegetable oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without turnover, on the nutritive utilization of dietary minerals. The experiments have been carried out in pregnant and growing rats, which consumed diets containing, as a sole source of fat, the testing frying oils or unused oils. It seems that the consumption of various frying oils, with a polar compound content lower or close to the maximum limit of 25% accepted for human consumption, does not alter the absorption and metabolism of calcium, phosphorous, iron or copper. Magnesium absorption from diets containing frying oils tends to increase but the urinary excretion of this element increases, resulting imperceptible the variations in the magnesium balance. The urinary excretion of Zn also increased although its balance remained unchanged. Different studies referring to the effects of consuming fried fatty fish on mineral bioavailability will also be presented. On one hand, frying can cause structural changes in fish protein, which are associated with an increase in iron absorption and a decrease in body zinc retention. The nutritive utilization of other elements such as magnesium, calcium and copper seems to be unaffected. On the other hand; it has been described that an excess of fish fatty acids in the diet produces iron depletion, but when fatty

  8. Phase transformations of pyrophyllite clay mineral after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The termal transformation of the Pyrophyllite clay mineral, given by the equations: AL sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2).H sub(2) O → Al sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2) + H sub(2) O Pyrophyllite Anhydride Water vapour. 3 (Al sub(2) O sub(3).4SiO sub(2)) → 3 Al sub(2) O sub(3). 2SiO sub(2) + 10 (SiO sub(2)) Pyrophyllite Anhydride Mullite Cristobalite, were studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) associated to Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAD), applied to a very pure sample, colected at Diamantina, M.G. Some other tgechniques were also used, as X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), applied to other different Pyrophyllite samples. A thermodynamical theoretical study was undertaken to estimate the values for the entropyu of formation, enthalpy and molar thermal capacity for the Pyrophyllite Anhydride. (author)

  9. Durability of crystalline phase in concrete microstructure modified by the mineral powders: evaluation by nanoindentation tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajczakowska Magdalena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the nanoindentation investigation of the evolution of concrete microstructure modified by the Internal Crystallization Technology mineral powders. The samples under study were retrieved from a fragment of a circular concrete lining of the vertical mine shaft at a depth of approximately 1,000 m. Due to the aggressive environment and exposure to contaminated water, the internal surface of the structure was deteriorated, decreasing its strength significantly. The mineral powders were applied directly on the surface lining. The specimens were investigated one month, three months and one year after the application of the aforementioned substance in order to verify the time dependence of the strengthening processes and durability of the crystalline phase. The microstructural changes of concrete were assessed with the use of nanoindentation technique. The testing procedure involved including the previously cut specimens in the epoxy resin and grinding and polishing in order to reduce the surface roughness. As a result of the nanoindentation tests the hardness as well as Young’s modulus of the material were evaluated. The results were then compared and statistically analyzed. As a consequence, the disintegration time of the crystalline network in the pores of concrete was identified.

  10. Fast phase processing in off-axis holography by CUDA including parallel phase unwrapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backoach, Ohad; Kariv, Saar; Girshovitz, Pinhas; Shaked, Natan T

    2016-02-22

    We present parallel processing implementation for rapid extraction of the quantitative phase maps from off-axis holograms on the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) of the computer using computer unified device architecture (CUDA) programming. To obtain efficient implementation, we parallelized both the wrapped phase map extraction algorithm and the two-dimensional phase unwrapping algorithm. In contrast to previous implementations, we utilized unweighted least squares phase unwrapping algorithm that better suits parallelism. We compared the proposed algorithm run times on the CPU and the GPU of the computer for various sizes of off-axis holograms. Using the GPU implementation, we extracted the unwrapped phase maps from the recorded off-axis holograms at 35 frames per second (fps) for 4 mega pixel holograms, and at 129 fps for 1 mega pixel holograms, which presents the fastest processing framerates obtained so far, to the best of our knowledge. We then used common-path off-axis interferometric imaging to quantitatively capture the phase maps of a micro-organism with rapid flagellum movements.

  11. Mineral phases and metals in baghouse dust from secondary aluminum production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouse dust (BHD) is a solid waste generated by air pollution control systems during secondary aluminum processing (SAP). Management and disposal of BHD can be challenging in the U.S. and elsewhere. In this study, the mineral phases, metal content and metal leachability of 78...

  12. Saturation of the hydroxyapatite mineral phase using radioactive fluorine; Saturacion de la fase mineral hidroxiapatita utilizando fluor radiactivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores de la Torre, J.A.; Badillo A, V.E. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Lopez D, F.A. [Unidad PET Ciclotron, Facultad de Medicina, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.f. (Mexico)]. e-mail: ebadillo@cantera.reduaz.mx

    2005-07-01

    With the purpose of knowing the Anion exchange capacity (CIA) of the hydroxyapatite mineral phase, marketed by BIO-RAD, becomes necessary to saturate the surface of the mineral with an anion specie that possesses a strong affinity by this solid as it is the case of the fluorine. Moreover it takes advantage that offers the radioactive tracer technique, using the radioactive isotope of the fluorine, {sup 18}F, produced in the cyclotron of the UNAM. This saturation is obtained in terms of the quantity of retained fluorine (mmol/ 100 g) in the synthetic hydroxyapatite in function of the concentration of the solution of NaF that oscillates from 0.7 M up to 0.16 M to fixed values of pH of 9.2. Those results demonstrate that to this fixed pH value the saturation of the surface of the hydroxyapatite is achieved in approximately 30 mmol/ 100 g, using important concentrations of NaF that correspond to 0.14 M from now on. This result demonstrates the high capacity of the solid considered to retain considerable quantities of fluorine even to basic pH values. (Author)

  13. The role of upper mantle mineral phase transitions on the current structure of large-scale Earth's mantle convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoraval, C.

    2017-12-01

    Describing the large-scale structures of mantle convection and quantifying the mass transfer between upper and lower mantle request to account for the role played by mineral phase transitions in the transition zone. We build a density distribution within the Earth mantle from velocity anomalies described by global seismic tomographic models. The density distribution includes thermal anomalies and topographies of the phase transitions at depths of 410 and 660 km. We compute the flow driven by this density distribution using a 3D spherical circulation model, which account for depth-dependent viscosity. The dynamic topographies at the surface and at the CMB and the geoid are calculated as well. Within the range of viscosity profiles allowing for a satisfying restitution of the long wavelength geoid, we perform a parametric study to decipher the role of the characteristics of phase diagrams - mainly the Clapeyron's slopes - and of the kinetics of phase transitions, which may modify phase transition topographies. Indeed, when a phase transition is delayed, the boundary between two mineral phases is both dragged by the flow and interfere with it. The results are compared to recent estimations of surface dynamic topography and to the phase transition topographies as revealed by seismic studies. The consequences are then discussed in terms of structure of mantle flow. Comparisons between various tomographic models allow us to enlighten the most robust features. At last, the role played by the phase transitions on the lateral variations of mass transfer between upper and lower mantle are quantified by comparison to cases with no phase transitions and confronted to regional tomographic models, which reflect the variability of the behaviors of the descending slabs in the transition zone.

  14. Ash liberation from included minerals during combustion of pulverized coal: the relationship with char structure and burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H.; Wall, T.; Liu, G.; Bryant, G. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). CRC for Black Coal Utilization and Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-12-01

    In this study, the float fraction ({lt} specific gravity of 2.0) of a size cut (63-90 {mu}m) bituminous coal was combusted in a drop tube furnace (DTF) at a gas temperature of 1300{degree}C under an atmosphere of air, to investigate the ash liberation at five coal burnoff levels (35.5%, 54.3%, 70.1%, 87.1% and 95.6%). The data indicated that char structure determines the ash liberation at different burnoff levels. Fragmentation of porous char was found to be the determinative mechanism for formation of fine ash during the early and middle stages of char combustion, while coalescence of included mineral matter determines the coarse ash formed in the later stages of combustion. The investigation confirmed that the char morphology and structure play a key role in determining char fragmentation, char burnout history, and the ash liberation during combustion. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Fissure minerals, literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, S.Aa.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a review of methods used for direct and indirect dating of tectonic events. Isotope geochemistry including stable isotopes as well as fission track- dating, fluid inclusion and thermoluminescens techniques have been considered. It has been concluded that an investigation of tectonic (and thermal) events should start with a detailed study of the mineral phases grown in seald fissures as well as minerals from fissure walls. This study should include phase identification, textures as well as mineral chemistry. The information from this study is fundamental for the decision of further investigations. Mineral chemistry including isotopes and fluid inclusion studies will give an essential knowledge about crystallization conditions for fissure minerals concerned. Direct dating using fission tracks as well as radioactive isotopes could be useful for some minerals. Application of thermoluminescens dating on fissure minerals is doubtful. (Auth.)

  16. Nanoscale Phase Stability Reversal During the Nucleation and Growth of Titanium Oxide Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummmer, D. R.; Heaney, P. J.; Kubicki, J. D.; Kent, P. R.; Post, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Fine-grained titanium oxide minerals are important in soils, where they affect a variety of geochemical processes. They are also industrially important as catalysts, pigments, food additives, and dielectrics. Recent research has indicated an apparent reversal of thermodynamic stability between TiO2 phases at the nanoscale thought to be caused by an increased contribution of surface energy to the total free energy. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments in which titanium oxides crystallize from aqueous TiCl4 solutions confirm that anatase, a metastable phase, is always the first phase to nucleate under our range of initial conditions. Rutile peaks are observed only minutes after the first appearance of anatase, after which anatase abundance slowly decreases while rutile continues to form. Whole pattern refinement of diffraction data reveals that lattice constants of both phases increase throughout the crystallization process. In addition, transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations and kinetic modeling indicate that anatase does not undergo a solid-state transformation to the rutile structure as once thought. Instead, anatase appears to re-dissolve and then feed the growth of already nucleated rutile nanocrystals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to model 1, 2, and 3 nm particles of both mineral phases. The total surface energies calculated from these models did yield lower values for anatase than for rutile by 8-13 kJ/mol depending on particle size, indicating that surface free energy is sufficient to account for stability reversal. However, these whole-particle surface energies were much higher than the sum of energies of each particle's constituent crystallographic surfaces. We attribute the excess energy to defects associated with the edges and corners of nanoparticles, which are not present on a 2-D periodic surface. This previously unreported edge and corner energy may play a dominant role in the stability reversal

  17. PHASE ANALYSES OF URANIUM BEARING MINERALS FROM THE HIGH GRADE ORE, NOPAL I, PENA BLANCA, MEXICO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, M.; Goodell, P.; Kelts, A.; Anthony, E.Y.; Fayek, M.; Fan, C.; Beshears, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Pena Blanca district, approximately 40 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit was formed by hydrothermal processes within the fracture zone of welded silicic volcanic tuff. The ages of volcanic formations are between 35 to 44 m.y. and there was secondary silicification of most of the formations. After the formation of at least part of the uranium deposit, the ore body was uplifted above the water table and is presently exposed at the surface. Detailed petrographic characterization, electron microprobe backscatter electron (BSE) imagery, and selected x-ray maps for the samples from Nopal I high-grade ore document different uranium phases in the ore. There are at least two stages of uranium precipitation. A small amount of uraninite is encapsulated in silica. Hexavalent uranium may also have been a primary precipitant. The uranium phases were precipitated along cleavages of feldspars, and along fractures in the tuff. Energy dispersive spectrometer data and x-ray maps suggest that the major uranium phases are uranophane and weeksite. Substitutions of Ca and K occur in both phases, implying that conditions were variable during the mineralization/alteration process, and that compositions of the original minerals have a major influence on later stage alteration. Continued study is needed to fully characterize uranium behavior in these semi-arid to arid conditions

  18. Dynamics of mineral crystallization from precipitated slab-derived fluid phase: first in situ synchrotron X-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Nadia; Alvaro, Matteo; Campione, Marcello; Wilhelm, Heribert; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-03-01

    Remnants of the fluid phase at ultrahigh pressure (UHP) in subduction environments may be preserved as primary multiphase inclusions in UHP minerals. The mode of crystallization of daughter minerals during precipitation within the inclusion and/or the mechanism of interaction between the fluid at supercritical conditions and the host mineral are still poorly understood from a crystallographic point of view. A case study is represented by garnet-orthopyroxenites from the Maowu Ultramafic Complex (China) deriving from harzburgite precursors metasomatized at ~4 GPa, 750 °C by a silica- and incompatible trace element-rich fluid phase. This metasomatism produced poikilitic orthopyroxene and inclusion-rich garnet porphyroblasts. Solid multiphase primary inclusions in garnet display a size within a few tens of micrometres and negative crystal shapes. Infilling minerals (spinel: 10-20 vol%; amphibole, chlorite, talc, mica: 80-90 vol%) occur with constant volume proportions and derive from trapped solute-rich aqueous fluids. To constrain the possible mode of precipitation of daughter minerals, we performed for the first time a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment by synchrotron radiation at Diamond Light Source. In combination with electron probe microanalyses, this measurement allowed the unique identification of each mineral phase and reciprocal orientations. We demonstrated the epitaxial relationship between spinel and garnet and between some hydrous minerals. Such information is discussed in relation to the physico-chemical aspects of nucleation and growth, shedding light on the mode of mineral crystallization from a fluid phase trapped at supercritical conditions.

  19. Structural effects of C60+ bombardment on various natural mineral samples-Application to analysis of organic phases in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siljestroem, S.; Lausmaa, J.; Hode, T.; Sundin, M.; Sjoevall, P.

    2011-01-01

    Organic phases trapped inside natural mineral samples are of considerable interest in astrobiology, geochemistry and geobiology. Examples of such organic phases are microfossils, kerogen and oil. Information about these phases is usually retrieved through bulk crushing of the rock which means both a risk of contamination and that the composition and spatial distribution of the organics to its host mineral is lost. An attractive of way to retrieve information about the organics in the rock is depth profiling using a focused ion beam. Recently, it was shown that it is possible to obtain detailed mass spectrometric information from oil-bearing fluid inclusions, i.e. small amounts of oil trapped inside a mineral matrix, using ToF-SIMS. Using a 10 keV C 60 + sputter beam and a 25 keV Bi 3 + analysis beam, oil-bearing inclusions in different minerals were opened and analysed individually. However, sputtering with a C 60 + beam also induced other changes to the mineral surface, such as formation of topographic features and carbon deposition. In this paper, the cause of these changes is explored and the consequences of the sputter-induced features on the analysis of organic phases in natural mineral samples (quartz, calcite and fluorite) in general and fluid inclusions in particular are discussed. The dominating topographical features that were observed when a several micrometers deep crater is sputtered with 10 keV C 60 + ions on a natural mineral surface are conical-shaped and ridge-like structures that may rise several micrometers, pointing in the direction of the incident C 60 + ion beam, on an otherwise flat crater bottom. The sputter-induced structures were found to appear at places with different chemistry than the host mineral, including other minerals phases and fluid inclusions, while structural defects in the host material, such as polishing marks or scratches, did not necessarily result in sputter-induced structures. The ridge-like structures were often covered

  20. Slowing the rate of loss of mineral wetlands on human dominated landscapes - Diversification of farmers markets to include carbon (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, I. F.; Badiou, P.; Lobb, D.

    2013-12-01

    Canada is the fourth-largest exporter of agriculture and agri-food products in the world (exports valued at 28B), but instability of agriculture markets can make it difficult for farmers to cope with variability, and new mechanisms are needed for farmers to achieve economic stability. Capitalizing on carbon markets will help farmers achieve environmentally sustainable economic performance. In order to have a viable carbon market, governments and industries need to know what the carbon capital is and what potential there is for growth, and farmers need financial incentives that will not only allow them to conserve existing wetlands but that will also enable them to restore wetlands while making a living. In southern Ontario, farmers' needs to maximize the return on investment on marginal lands have resulted in loss of 70-90% of wetlands, making this region one of the most threatened region in terms of wetland degradation and loss in Canada. Our project establishes the role that mineral wetlands have in the net carbon balance by contributing insight into the potential benefits to carbon management provided by wetland restoration efforts in these highly degraded landscapes. The goal was to establish the magnitude of carbon offsets that could be achieved through wetland conservation (securing existing carbon stocks) and restoration (creating new carbon stocks). The experimental design was to focus on (1) small (0.2-2.0 ha) and (2) isolated (no inflow or outflow) mineral wetlands with the greatest restoration potential that included (3) a range of restoration ages (drained (0 yr), 3 yr, 6 yr, 12 yr, 20 yr, 35 yr, intact marshes) to capture potential changes in rates of carbon sequestration with restoration age of wetland. From each wetland, wetland soil carbon pools samples were collected at four positions: centre of wetland (open-water); emergent vegetation zone; wet meadow zone where flooding often occurs (i.e., high water mark); and upland where flooding rarely

  1. Ab initio calculation of the bcc Fe-Al phase diagram including magnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales-Ormeno, Pablo Guillermo; Petrilli, Helena Maria; Schoen, Claudio Geraldo

    2006-01-01

    The metastable phase diagram of the body-centered cubic-based ordering equilibria in the Fe-Al system has been calculated by the cluster expansion method, through the combination of the full potential-linear augmented plane wave and cluster variation methods. The results are discussed with reference to the effect of including the spin polarizations of Fe in the thermodynamic model

  2. The competition between mineral dust and soot ice nuclei in mixed-phase clouds (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B. J.; Atkinson, J.; Umo, N.; Browse, J.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Whale, T.; Baustian, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Dobbie, S.; O'Sullivan, D.; Malkin, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    The amount of ice present in mixed-phase clouds, which contain both supercooled liquid water droplets and ice particles, affects cloud extent, lifetime, particle size and radiative properties. The freezing of cloud droplets can be catalysed by the presence of aerosol particles known as ice nuclei. In this talk our recent laboratory and global aerosol modelling work on mineral dust and soot ice nuclei will be presented. We have performed immersion mode experiments to quantify ice nucleation by the individual minerals which make up desert mineral dusts and have shown that the feldspar component, rather than the clay component, is most important for ice nucleation (Atkinson et al. 2013). Experiments with well-characterised soot generated with eugenol, an intermediate in biomass burning, and n-decane show soot has a significant ice nucleation activity in mixed-phase cloud conditions. Our results for soot are in good agreement with previous results for acetylene soot (DeMott, 1990), but extend the efficiency to much higher temperatures. We then use a global aerosol model (GLOMAP) to map the distribution of soot and feldspar particles on a global basis. We show that below about -15oC that dust and soot together can explain most observed ice nuclei in the Earth's atmosphere, while at warmer temperatures other ice nuclei types are needed. We show that in some regions soot is the most important ice nuclei (below -15oC), while in others feldspar dust dominates. Our results suggest that there is a strong anthropogenic contribution to the ice nuclei population, since a large proportion of soot aerosol in the atmosphere results from human activities. Atkinson, J. D., Murray, B. J., Woodhouse, M. T., Carslaw, K. S., Whale, T. F., Baustian, K. J., Dobbie, S., O'Sullivan, D., and Malkin, T. L.: The importance of feldspar for ice nucleation by mineral dust in mixed-phase clouds, Nature, 10.1038/nature12278, (2013). Demott, P. J. 1990. An Exploratory-Study of Ice Nucleation by Soot

  3. Direct-phase-variable model of a synchronous reluctance motor including all slot and winding harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obe, Emeka S.; Binder, A.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed model in direct-phase variables of a synchronous reluctance motor operating at mains voltage and frequency is presented. The model includes the stator and rotor slot openings, the actual winding layout and the reluctance rotor geometry. Hence, all mmf and permeance harmonics are taken into account. It is seen that non-negligible harmonics introduced by slots are present in the inductances computed by the winding function procedure. These harmonics are usually ignored in d-q models. The machine performance is simulated in the stator reference frame to depict the difference between this new direct-phase model including all harmonics and the conventional rotor reference frame d-q model. Saturation is included by using a polynomial fitting the variation of d-axis inductance with stator current obtained by finite-element software FEMAG DC (registered) . The detailed phase-variable model can yield torque pulsations comparable to those obtained from finite elements while the d-q model cannot.

  4. Epidemiological study of radon-exposed mineral mine workers in north east Bavaria including chromosome dosimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenzel, H.; Scherpenberg, H. van; Zimmer, R.

    1980-01-01

    360 hard-rock miners were examined for breathing organ health, working conditions, smoking habits, and partly for chromosome aberrations (115 persons, 100 cells each). Long-time exposure at diameter 1 to 4 WL Rn-daughters and/or occasional >= 1000 pCi Rn/l air increased rates of S 2 -type aberrations (x 3,4; P 2 -rates. From dose estimations, bronchial radiation conditions appear as bronchitis cofactor; lymphocyte but not lymph node dose fairly fits S 2 -rate after 20 years' exposure. (orig.) [de

  5. INTER-PHASE CONTACTS IN BITUMEN-MINERAL SYSTEMS AND THEIR STRENGTHENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. N. Kovalev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Presently bitumen-mineral materials (including asphalt-concrete comprise nearly 98 % for construction of expensive road pavement. Large resources of local minerals (quartz sand and industrial wastes in the form of used molding sand (foundry by-product are widely applied for reduction of their cost. Such approach is economically and ecologically reasonable but it requires its justification because an adhesion interaction in the bitumen-quartz substrate system (with SiO2 more than 95 % is rather poor in natural state and due to water action it is still more decreasing. In this connection an objective necessity arises to modify significantly technology of bitumen-mineral compositions for ensuring reliability of road pavements while using silicon components.All the ideas pertaining to strengthening of adhesion bonds in the “quartz mineral substrate - bitumen” system are traditionally of physical and chemical nature and they presuppose mainly usage of colloidal chemistry methods. The paper considers the matter on the basis of molecular kinetic theory of matter taking into account the fact that there is absence of generally accepted calculations for intermolecular interactions of components in the SiO2 - organic matrix material system.As a theoretical supposition the following well-known regulatory principle in physics is used: as every atom or molecular have its own electromagnetic field then action of external electromagnetic fields initiates their interaction that leads to excitement of electrons, deformations and rupture of chemical bonds. Literature analysis shows that the existing electric bonds between components of the SiO2 - organic matrix material system provide the possibility to apply various electro-physical methods having an effect on these components with the purpose to strengthen their adhesion interaction.The paper investigates matters for determination of bond energy during physical adsorption and adhesion in the SiO2 - organic

  6. Calculation of proton-deuteron phase parameters including the Coulomb force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alt, E.O.; Sandhas, W.; Ziegelmann, H.

    1985-04-01

    A previously proposed exact method for including the Coulomb force in three-body collisions is applied to proton-deuteron scattering. We present phase shifts for angular momenta up to L=9, from elastic threshold to 50 MeV proton laboratory energy. Separable rank-one potentials are taken for the nuclear interactions. A charge-independent and a charge-symmetric choise, while leading to different neutron-deuteron and proton-deuteron phase parameters, nevertheless yields practically the same Coulomb corrections. We, moreover, investigate the question of P-wave resonances.A critical comparison of our results with those obtained in a co-ordinate space formalism is performed. Furthermore, proposals for an approximate inclusion of the Coulomb potential are tested, and found unsatisfactory. (orig.)

  7. Platinum-Group Minerals and Other Accessory Phases in Chromite Deposits of the Alapaevsk Ophiolite, Central Urals, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Zaccarini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An electron microprobe study has been carried out on platinum-group minerals, accessory phases, and chromite in several chromite deposits of the Alapaevsk ophiolite (Central Urals, Russia namely the Bakanov Kluch, Kurmanovskoe, Lesnoe, 3-d Podyony Rudnik, Bol’shaya Kruglyshka, and Krest deposits. These deposits occur in partially to totally serpentinized peridotites. The microprobe data shows that the chromite composition varies from Cr-rich to Al-rich. Tiny platinum-group minerals (PGM, 1–10 µm in size, have been found in the chromitites. The most abundant PGM is laurite, accompanied by minor cuproiridsite and alloys in the system Os–Ir–Ru. A small grain (about 20 μm was found in the interstitial serpentine of the Bakanov Kluch chromitite, and its calculated stoichiometry corresponds to (Ni,Fe5P. Olivine, occurring in the silicate matrix or included in fresh chromite, has a mantle-compatible composition in terms of major and minor elements. Several inclusions of amphibole, Na-rich phlogopite, and clinopyroxene have been identified. The bimodal Cr–Al composition of chromite probably corresponds to a vertical distribution in the ophiolite sequence, implying formation of Cr-rich chromitites in the deep mantle, and Al-rich chromitites close to the Moho-transition zone, in a supra-subduction setting. The presence of abundant hydrous silicate inclusions, such as amphibole and phlogopite, suggests that the Alapaevsk chromitites crystallized as a result of the interaction between a melt enriched in fluids and peridotites. Laurite and cuproiridsite are considered to be magmatic in origin, i.e., entrapped as solid phases during the crystallization of chromite at high temperatures. The sulfur fugacity was relatively high to allow the precipitation of Ir-bearing sulfides, but below the Os–OsS2 buffer. The alloys in the system Os–Ir–Ru are classified as secondary PGM, i.e., formed at low temperature during the serpentinization process. The

  8. Low Level RF Including a Sophisticated Phase Control System for CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Mourier, J; Nonglaton, J M; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L

    2004-01-01

    CTF3 (CLIC Test Facility 3), currently under construction at CERN, is a test facility designed to demonstrate the key feasibility issues of the CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) two-beam scheme. When completed, this facility will consist of a 150 MeV linac followed by two rings for bunch-interleaving, and a test stand where 30 GHz power will be generated. In this paper, the work that has been carried out on the linac's low power RF system is described. This includes, in particular, a sophisticated phase control system for the RF pulse compressor to produce a flat-top rectangular pulse over 1.4 µs.

  9. The effects of the mineral phase on C stabilization mechanisms and the microbial community along an eroding slope transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doetterl, S.; Opfergelt, S.; Cornelis, J.; Boeckx, P. F.; van oost, K.; Six, J.

    2013-12-01

    An increasing number of studies show the importance of including soil redistribution processes in understanding carbon (C) dynamics in eroding landscapes. The quality and quantity of soil organic carbon in sloping cropland differs with topographic position. These differences are commonly more visible in the subsoil, while the size and composition of topsoil C pools are similar along the hillslope. The type (plant- or microbial-derived) and quality (level of degradation) of C found in a specific soil fraction depends on the interplay between the temporal dynamic of the specific mechanism and it's strength to protect C from decomposition. Here, we present an analysis that aims to clarify the bio/geo-chemical and mineralogical components involved in stabilizing C at various depths and slope positions and how they affect the microbial community and the degradation of C. For this we analyzed soil samples from different soil depths along a slope transect applying (i) a sequential extraction of the reactive soil phase using pyrophosphate, oxalate and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate, (ii) a semi-quantitative and qualitative analysis of the clay mineralogy, (iii) an analysis of the microbial community using amino sugars and (iv) an analysis of the level of degradation of C in different soil fractions focusing on the soil Lignin signature. The results show that the pattern of minerals and their relative importance in stabilizing C varies greatly along the transect. In the investigated soils, pyrophosphate extractable Manganese, and not Iron or Aluminum as often observed, is strongly correlated to C in the bulk soil and in the non-aggregated silt and clay fractions. This suggests a certain role of Manganese for C stabilization where physical protection is absent. In contrast, pyrophosphate extractable Iron and Aluminum components are largely abundant in water-stable soil aggregates but not correlated to C, suggesting importance of these extracts to stabilize aggregates and

  10. Mineral and chemical composition of rock core and surface gas composition in Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraga, Naoto; Ishii, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    The following three kinds of analyses were conducted for the 1st phase of the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory Project. Mineral composition analysis of core sample. Whole rock chemical composition analysis of core sample. Surface gas composition analysis. This document summarizes the results of these analyses. (author)

  11. Anelasticity maps for acoustic dissipation associated with phase transitions in minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhiying

    2011-07-01

    Acoustic dissipation due to structural phase transitions in minerals could give rise to large seismic attenuation effects superimposed on the high temperature background contribution from dislocations and grain boundaries in the Earth. In addition to the possibility of a sharp peak actually at a transition point for both compressional and shear waves, significant attenuation might arise over wider temperature intervals due to the mobility of transformation twins or other defects associated with the transition. Attenuation due to structural phase transitions in quartz, pyroxenes, perovskites, stishovite and hollandite, or to spin state transitions of Fe2+ in magnesiowüstite and perovskite and the hcp/bcc transition in iron-nickel (Fe-Ni) alloy, are reviewed from this perspective. To these can be added possible loss behaviour associated with reconstructive transitions which might occur by a ledge mechanism on topotactic interfaces (orthopyroxene/clinopyroxene, olivine/spinel and perovskite/postperovskite), with impurities (Snoek effect) or with mobility of protons. There are experimental difficulties associated with measuring dissipation effects in situ at simultaneous high pressures and temperatures, so reliance is currently placed on investigation of analogue phases such as LaCoO3 for spin-state behaviour and LaAlO3 for the dynamics of ferroelastic twin walls. Similarly, it is not possible to measure loss dynamics simultaneously at the low stresses and low frequencies that pertain in seismic waves, so reliance must be placed on combining different techniques, such as dynamic mechanical analysis (low frequency, relatively high stress) and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (high frequency, low stress), to extrapolate acoustic loss behaviour over wide frequency, temperature and stress intervals. In this context 'anelasticity maps' provide a convenient means of representing different loss mechanisms. Contouring of the inverse mechanical quality factor, Q-1, can be

  12. A High-Rate, Single-Crystal Model including Phase Transformations, Plastic Slip, and Twinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addessio, Francis L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Bronkhorst, Curt Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Bolme, Cynthia Anne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Explosive Science and Shock Physics Division; Brown, Donald William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Cerreta, Ellen Kathleen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Lebensohn, Ricardo A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Lookman, Turab [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Luscher, Darby Jon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Mayeur, Jason Rhea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Morrow, Benjamin M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Rigg, Paulo A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Inst. for Shock Physics

    2016-08-09

    An anisotropic, rate-­dependent, single-­crystal approach for modeling materials under the conditions of high strain rates and pressures is provided. The model includes the effects of large deformations, nonlinear elasticity, phase transformations, and plastic slip and twinning. It is envisioned that the model may be used to examine these coupled effects on the local deformation of materials that are subjected to ballistic impact or explosive loading. The model is formulated using a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient. A plate impact experiment on a multi-­crystal sample of titanium was conducted. The particle velocities at the back surface of three crystal orientations relative to the direction of impact were measured. Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the details of the high-­rate deformation and pursue issues related to the phase transformation for titanium. Simulations using the single crystal model were conducted and compared to the high-­rate experimental data for the impact loaded single crystals. The model was found to capture the features of the experiments.

  13. OCV Hysteresis in Li-Ion Batteries including Two-Phase Transition Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Roscher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation between batteries' state of charge (SOC and open-circuit voltage (OCV is a specific feature of electrochemical energy storage devices. Especially NiMH batteries are well known to exhibit OCV hysteresis, and also several kinds of lithium-ion batteries show OCV hysteresis, which can be critical for reliable state estimation issues. Electrode potential hysteresis is known to result from thermodynamical entropic effects, mechanical stress, and microscopic distortions within the active electrode materials which perform a two-phase transition during lithium insertion/extraction. Hence, some Li-ion cells including two-phase transition active materials show pronounced hysteresis referring to their open-circuit voltage. This work points out how macroscopic effects, that is, diffusion limitations, superimpose the latte- mentioned microscopic mechanisms and lead to a shrinkage of OCV hysteresis, if cells are loaded with high current rates. To validate the mentioned interaction, Li-ion cells' state of charge is adjusted to 50% with various current rates, beginning from the fully charged and the discharged state, respectively. As a pronounced difference remains between the OCV after charge and discharge adjustment, obviously the hysteresis vanishes as the target SOC is adjusted with very high current rate.

  14. SPheno 3.1: extensions including flavour, CP-phases and models beyond the MSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porod, W.; Staub, F.

    2012-11-01

    We describe recent extensions of the program SPhenoincluding flavour aspects, CP-phases, R-parity violation and low energy observables. In case of flavour mixing all masses of supersymmetric particles are calculated including the complete flavour structure and all possible CP-phases at the 1-loop level. We give details on implemented seesaw models, low energy observables and the corresponding extension of the SUSY Les Houches Accord. Moreover, we comment on the possibilities to include MSSM extensions in SPheno. Catalogue identifier: ADRV_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADRV_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 154062 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1336037 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran95. Computer: PC running under Linux, should run in every Unix environment. Operating system: Linux, Unix. Classification: 11.6. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADRV_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 153(2003)275 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The first issue is the determination of the masses and couplings of supersymmetric particles in various supersymmetric models, the R-parity conserved MSSM with generation mixing and including CP-violating phases, various seesaw extensions of the MSSM and the MSSM with bilinear R-parity breaking. Low energy data on Standard Model fermion masses, gauge couplings and electroweak gauge boson masses serve as constraints. Radiative corrections from supersymmetric particles to these inputs must be calculated. Theoretical constraints on the soft SUSY breaking parameters from a high scale theory are imposed and the parameters at the electroweak scale are obtained from the

  15. Numerical Treatment of Two-phase Flow in Porous Media Including Specific Interfacial Area

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we present a numerical treatment for the model of two-phase flow in porous media including specific interfacial area. For numerical discretization we use the cell-centered finite difference (CCFD) method based on the shifting-matrices method which can reduce the time-consuming operations. A new iterative implicit algorithm has been developed to solve the problem under consideration. All advection and advection-like terms that appear in saturation equation and interfacial area equation are treated using upwind schemes. Selected simulation results such as pc–Sw–awn surface, capillary pressure, saturation and specific interfacial area with various values of model parameters have been introduced. The simulation results show a good agreement with those in the literature using either pore network modeling or Darcy scale modeling.

  16. Phase Composition Maps integrate mineral compositions with rock textures from the micro-meter to the thin section scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Kyle V.; Srogi, LeeAnn; Lutz, Tim; Monson, Frederick C.; Pollock, Meagen

    2017-12-01

    Textures and compositions are critical information for interpreting rock formation. Existing methods to integrate both types of information favor high-resolution images of mineral compositions over small areas or low-resolution images of larger areas for phase identification. The method in this paper produces images of individual phases in which textural and compositional details are resolved over three orders of magnitude, from tens of micrometers to tens of millimeters. To construct these images, called Phase Composition Maps (PCMs), we make use of the resolution in backscattered electron (BSE) images and calibrate the gray scale values with mineral analyses by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). The resulting images show the area of a standard thin section (roughly 40 mm × 20 mm) with spatial resolution as good as 3.5 μm/pixel, or more than 81 000 pixels/mm2, comparable to the resolution of X-ray element maps produced by wavelength-dispersive spectrometry (WDS). Procedures to create PCMs for mafic igneous rocks with multivariate linear regression models for minerals with solid solution (olivine, plagioclase feldspar, and pyroxenes) are presented and are applicable to other rock types. PCMs are processed using threshold functions based on the regression models to image specific composition ranges of minerals. PCMs are constructed using widely-available instrumentation: a scanning-electron microscope (SEM) with BSE and EDS X-ray detectors and standard image processing software such as ImageJ and Adobe Photoshop. Three brief applications illustrate the use of PCMs as petrologic tools: to reveal mineral composition patterns at multiple scales; to generate crystal size distributions for intracrystalline compositional zones and compare growth over time; and to image spatial distributions of minerals at different stages of magma crystallization by integrating textures and compositions with thermodynamic modeling.

  17. Preservation in microbial mats: mineralization by a talc-like phase of a fish embedded in a microbial sarcophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesto, Miguel; Zeyen, Nina; López-Archilla, Ana; Bernard, Sylvain; Buscalioni, Ángela; Guerrero, M. Carmen; Benzerara, Karim

    2015-09-01

    Microbial mats have been repeatedly suggested to promote early fossilization of macroorganisms. Yet, experimental simulations of this process remain scarce. Here, we report results of 5 year-long experiments performed onfish carcasses to document the influence of microbial mats on mineral precipitation during early fossilization. Carcasses were initially placed on top of microbial mats. After two weeks, fishes became coated by the mats forming a compact sarcophagus, which modified the microenvironment close to the corpses. Our results showed that these conditions favoured the precipitation of a poorly crystalline silicate phase rich in magnesium. This talc-like mineral phase has been detected in three different locations within the carcasses placed in microbial mats for more than 4 years: 1) within inner tissues, colonized by several bacillary cells; 2) at the surface of bones of the upper face of the corpse buried in the mat; and 3) at the surface of several bones such as the dorsal fin which appeared to be gradually replaced by the Mg-silicate phase. This mineral phase has been previously shown to promote bacteria fossilization. Here we provide first experimental evidence that such Mg-rich phase can also be involved in exceptional preservation of animals.

  18. Mineral phases of green liquor dregs, slaker grits, lime mud and wood ash of a Kraft pulp and paper mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Fernanda Machado [Laboratorio de Quimica Mineral Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica-UFPR, Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), CP 19081, CEP 81531990, Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Munhoz Martins, Joaniel [Laboratorio de Analise de Minerais e Rochas (LAMIR-UFPR) (Brazil); Ferracin, Luiz Carlos [Laboratorio Quimico da Votorantin Cimentos (Brazil); Cunha, Carlos Jorge da [Laboratorio de Quimica Mineral Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica-UFPR, Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), CP 19081, CEP 81531990, Curitiba-PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: cjdcunha@quimica.ufpr.br

    2007-08-17

    Four residues generated in a Kraft, pulp and paper plant, were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimmetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A quantitative phase composition model, that accounts for the observed data and for the physico-chemical conditions of formation, was postulated for each material. Emphasis was given on the identification of the mineral components of each material. The green liquor dregs and the lime mud contain Calcite and Gipsite. The slaker grits contains Calcite, Portlandite, Pirssonite, Larnite and Brucite. The Calcite phase, present in the dregs and in the lime mud, has small amounts of magnesium replacing calcium. The wood ash contains Quartz as the major crystalline mineral phase.

  19. Mineral phases of green liquor dregs, slaker grits, lime mud and wood ash of a Kraft pulp and paper mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Fernanda Machado; Munhoz Martins, Joaniel; Ferracin, Luiz Carlos; Cunha, Carlos Jorge da

    2007-01-01

    Four residues generated in a Kraft, pulp and paper plant, were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimmetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A quantitative phase composition model, that accounts for the observed data and for the physico-chemical conditions of formation, was postulated for each material. Emphasis was given on the identification of the mineral components of each material. The green liquor dregs and the lime mud contain Calcite and Gipsite. The slaker grits contains Calcite, Portlandite, Pirssonite, Larnite and Brucite. The Calcite phase, present in the dregs and in the lime mud, has small amounts of magnesium replacing calcium. The wood ash contains Quartz as the major crystalline mineral phase

  20. Estimation of the reactive mineral surface area during CO2-rich fluid-rock interaction: the influence of neogenic phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scislewski, A.; Zuddas, P.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions actively participate to control fluid chemistry during water-rock interaction. It is however, difficult to estimate and well normalize bulk reaction rates if the mineral surface area exposed to the aqueous solution and effectively participating on the reactions is unknown. We evaluated the changing of the reactive mineral surface area during the interaction between CO2-rich fluids and Albitite/Granitoid rocks (similar mineralogy but different abundances), reacting under flow-through conditions. Our methodology, adopting an inverse modeling approach, is based on the estimation of dissolution rate and reactive surface area of the different minerals participating in the reactions by the reconstruction the chemical evolution of the interacting fluids. The irreversible mass-transfer processes is defined by a fractional degree of advancement, while calculations were carried out for Albite, Microcline, Biotite and Calcite assuming that the ion activity of dissolved silica and aluminium ions was limited by the equilibrium with quartz and kaolinite. Irrespective of the mineral abundance in granite and albitite, we found that mineral dissolution rates did not change significantly in the investigated range of time where output solution’s pH remained in the range between 6 and 8, indicating that the observed variation in fluid composition depends not on pH but rather on the variation of the parent mineral’s reactive surface area. We found that the reactive surface area of Albite varied by more than 2 orders of magnitude, while Microcline, Calcite and Biotite surface areas changed by 1-2 orders of magnitude. We propose that parent mineral chemical heterogeneity and, particularly, the stability of secondary mineral phases may explain the observed variation of the reactive surface area of the minerals. Formation of coatings at the dissolving parent mineral surfaces significantly reduced the amount of surface available to react

  1. Empirical Validation of a Thermal Model of a Complex Roof Including Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Guichard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the empirical validation of a building thermal model of a complex roof including a phase change material (PCM. A mathematical model dedicated to PCMs based on the heat apparent capacity method was implemented in a multi-zone building simulation code, the aim being to increase the understanding of the thermal behavior of the whole building with PCM technologies. In order to empirically validate the model, the methodology is based both on numerical and experimental studies. A parametric sensitivity analysis was performed and a set of parameters of the thermal model has been identified for optimization. The use of the generic optimization program called GenOpt® coupled to the building simulation code enabled to determine the set of adequate parameters. We first present the empirical validation methodology and main results of previous work. We then give an overview of GenOpt® and its coupling with the building simulation code. Finally, once the optimization results are obtained, comparisons of the thermal predictions with measurements are found to be acceptable and are presented.

  2. Effect of the mineral precipitation-dissolution at tunnel walls during the operational and post-operational phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, Cristina; Arcos, David; Duro, Lara; Grandia, Fidel [Enviros Consul ting, Valldoreix, Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    The extent of reversibility of the geochemical conditions disturbed during the construction and operational phases is of importance in order to assess the chemical evolution of the repository system. In this regard, it is essential to have a deep understanding of the chemical status of the repository system at closure in order to describe its immediate geochemical evolution beyond this point. This project assesses the dissolution and precipitation of minerals due to the interaction with groundwater in the deposition tunnel wall-rock during the operational phase (prior to tunnel backfilling) and during the saturation phase, also considering the effect on the backfill material. We have performed a 2D model in which a fracture intersecting the main tunnel has been considered. The project has been developed in two consecutive stages. The first stage simulates the precipitation and dissolution of minerals in the tunnel wall rock during the operational phase (100 years after excavation) when the tunnel is empty and filled with air. During this stage, water flows through fractures into the tunnel. The results of the model suggest that the interaction between groundwater, fracture-filling minerals, and atmospheric O{sub 2}(g) and CO{sub 2}(g) present in the tunnel leads to the precipitation of secondary minerals (calcite and iron(III) oxy-hydroxide) that do not significantly affect the porosity of the area surrounding the tunnel. The second stage starts after the operational phase, once the tunnel is backfilled, and simulates the interaction of groundwater with fracture-filling minerals and the backfill material. The model implemented assumes that the backfill is already water saturated and that water flows following the regional head gradient. Moreover, it also assumes that O2(g) is still present in the tunnel wall, as a result of the operational phase disturbances. The results show that oxygen will oxidise pyrite in the backfill and promote the precipitation of Fe

  3. Analytical dual-energy microtomography: A new method for obtaining three-dimensional mineral phase images and its application to Hayabusa samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Nakano, T.; Uesugi, K.; Uesugi, M.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Noguchi, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuno, J.; Nagano, T.; Imai, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Ogami, T.; Noguchi, T.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Fujimura, A.

    2013-09-01

    We developed a novel technique called "analytical dual-energy microtomography" that uses the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of minerals at two different X-ray energies to nondestructively obtain three-dimensional (3D) images of mineral distribution in materials such as rock specimens. The two energies are above and below the absorption edge energy of an abundant element, which we call the "index element". The chemical compositions of minerals forming solid solution series can also be measured. The optimal size of a sample is of the order of the inverse of the LAC values at the X-ray energies used. We used synchrotron-based microtomography with an effective spatial resolution of >200 nm to apply this method to small particles (30-180 μm) collected from the surface of asteroid 25143 Itokawa by the Hayabusa mission of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). A 3D distribution of the minerals was successively obtained by imaging the samples at X-ray energies of 7 and 8 keV, using Fe as the index element (the K-absorption edge of Fe is 7.11 keV). The optimal sample size in this case is of the order of 50 μm. The chemical compositions of the minerals, including the Fe/Mg ratios of ferromagnesian minerals and the Na/Ca ratios of plagioclase, were measured. This new method is potentially applicable to other small samples such as cosmic dust, lunar regolith, cometary dust (recovered by the Stardust mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA]), and samples from extraterrestrial bodies (those from future sample return missions such as the JAXA Hayabusa2 mission and the NASA OSIRIS-REx mission), although limitations exist for unequilibrated samples. Further, this technique is generally suited for studying materials in multicomponent systems with multiple phases across several research fields.

  4. Removal of uranium(VI) from the aqueous phase by iron(II) minerals in presence of bicarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regenspurg, Simona, E-mail: regens@gfz-potsdam.de [Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Schild, Dieter; Schaefer, Thorsten; Huber, Florian [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Malmstroem, Maria E. [Industrial Ecology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-15

    Uranium(VI) mobility in groundwater is strongly affected by sorption of mobile U(VI) species (e.g. uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) to mineral surfaces, precipitation of U(VI) compounds, such as schoepite (UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}.6H{sub 2}O), and by reduction to U(IV), forming sparingly soluble phases (uraninite; UO{sub 2}). The latter pathway, in particular, would be very efficient for long-term immobilization of U. In nature, Fe(II) is an important reducing agent for U(VI) because it frequently occurs either dissolved in natural waters, sorbed to matrix minerals, or structurally bound in many minerals. Redox reactions between U(VI) and Fe(II) depend not only on the availability of Fe(II) in the environment, but also on the chemical conditions in the aqueous solution. Under natural groundwater condition U(VI) forms complexes with many anionic ligands, which strongly affect its speciation. Carbonate, in particular, is known to form stable complexes with U, raising the question, if U(VI), when complexed by carbonate, can be reduced to UO{sub 2}. The goal of this study was to find out if Fe(II) when structurally bound in a mineral (as magnetite, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) or sorbed to a mineral surface (as corundum, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) can reduce U(VI) to U(IV) in the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Batch experiments were conducted under anaerobic conditions to observe U removal from the aqueous phase by the two minerals depending on HCO{sub 3}{sup -} addition (1 mM), U concentration (0.01-30 {mu}M) and pH value (6-10). Immediately after the experiments, the mineral surfaces were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to obtain information on the redox state of U bound to the solid surfaces. XPS results gave evidence that U(VI) can be reduced both by magnetite and by corundum amended with Fe(II). In the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup -} the amount of reduced U on the mineral surfaces increased compared to carbonate-free solutions. This can be explained by the formation

  5. Methodology for determination of trace elements in mineral phases of iron banded formation by LA-ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Denise V.M. de; Nalini Junior, Herminio A.; Sampaio, Geraldo M.S.; Abreu, Adriana T. de; Lana, Cristiano de C.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the chemical composition of mineral phases of iron formation (FF), especially of trace elements, is an important tool in the understanding of the genesis of these rocks and the contribution of the phases in the composition of whole rock. Low mass fraction of such elements in the mineral phases present in this rock type requires a suitable analytical procedure. The laser ablation technique coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) has been widely used for determination of trace elements in geological samples. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop calibration curves for determination of trace elements (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) in mineral phases of banded iron formations by LA-ICP-MS. Several certified reference materials (CRM) were used for calibrate the equipment. The analytical conditions were checked by CRM NIST SRM 614. The results were satisfactory, since the curves showed good linearity coefficients, good accuracy and precision of results. (author)

  6. A NEW GENERATION OF PARSEC-COLIBRI STELLAR ISOCHRONES INCLUDING THE TP-AGB PHASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marigo, Paola; Aringer, Bernhard; Chen, Yang; Dussin, Marco; Nanni, Ambra; Pastorelli, Giada; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Trabucchi, Michele; Bladh, Sara; Montalbán, Josefina; Girardi, Léo; Bressan, Alessandro; Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Wood, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a new generation of PARSEC–COLIBRI stellar isochrones that includes a detailed treatment of the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase, covering a wide range of initial metallicities (0.0001 < Z i < 0.06). Compared to previous releases, the main novelties and improvements are use of new TP-AGB tracks and related atmosphere models and spectra for M and C-type stars; inclusion of the surface H+He+CNO abundances in the isochrone tables, accounting for the effects of diffusion, dredge-up episodes and hot-bottom burning; inclusion of complete thermal pulse cycles, with a complete description of the in-cycle changes in the stellar parameters; new pulsation models to describe the long-period variability in the fundamental and first-overtone modes; and new dust models that follow the growth of the grains during the AGB evolution, in combination with radiative transfer calculations for the reprocessing of the photospheric emission. Overall, these improvements are expected to lead to a more consistent and detailed description of properties of TP-AGB stars expected in resolved stellar populations, especially in regard to their mean photometric properties from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. We illustrate the expected numbers of TP-AGB stars of different types in stellar populations covering a wide range of ages and initial metallicities, providing further details on the “C-star island” that appears at intermediate values of age and metallicity, and about the AGB-boosting effect that occurs at ages close to 1.6-Gyr for populations of all metallicities. The isochrones are available through a new dedicated web server.

  7. A NEW GENERATION OF PARSEC-COLIBRI STELLAR ISOCHRONES INCLUDING THE TP-AGB PHASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marigo, Paola; Aringer, Bernhard; Chen, Yang; Dussin, Marco; Nanni, Ambra; Pastorelli, Giada; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Trabucchi, Michele; Bladh, Sara; Montalbán, Josefina [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Galileo Galilei, Università di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Girardi, Léo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bressan, Alessandro [SISSA, via Bonomea 365, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Rosenfield, Philip [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Groenewegen, Martin A. T. [Koninklijke Sterrenwacht van België, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Wood, Peter R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2017-01-20

    We introduce a new generation of PARSEC–COLIBRI stellar isochrones that includes a detailed treatment of the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase, covering a wide range of initial metallicities (0.0001 < Z {sub i} < 0.06). Compared to previous releases, the main novelties and improvements are use of new TP-AGB tracks and related atmosphere models and spectra for M and C-type stars; inclusion of the surface H+He+CNO abundances in the isochrone tables, accounting for the effects of diffusion, dredge-up episodes and hot-bottom burning; inclusion of complete thermal pulse cycles, with a complete description of the in-cycle changes in the stellar parameters; new pulsation models to describe the long-period variability in the fundamental and first-overtone modes; and new dust models that follow the growth of the grains during the AGB evolution, in combination with radiative transfer calculations for the reprocessing of the photospheric emission. Overall, these improvements are expected to lead to a more consistent and detailed description of properties of TP-AGB stars expected in resolved stellar populations, especially in regard to their mean photometric properties from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. We illustrate the expected numbers of TP-AGB stars of different types in stellar populations covering a wide range of ages and initial metallicities, providing further details on the “C-star island” that appears at intermediate values of age and metallicity, and about the AGB-boosting effect that occurs at ages close to 1.6-Gyr for populations of all metallicities. The isochrones are available through a new dedicated web server.

  8. Trace metals partitioning among different sedimentary mineral phases and the deposit-feeding polychaete Armandia brevis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Díaz-de-Alba, Margarita; Huerta-Diaz, Miguel Angel; Delgadillo-Hinojosa, Francisco; Hare, Landis; Galindo-Riaño, M. Dolores; Siqueiros-Valencia, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) were determined in two operationally defined fractions (HCl and pyrite) in sediments from Ensenada and El Sauzal harbors (Mexico). The HCl fraction had significantly higher metal concentrations relative to the pyrite fraction in both harbors, underlining the weak tendency of most trace metals to associate with pyrite. Exceptionally, Cu was highly pyritized, with degrees of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) > 80% in both harbors. Dissolved Fe flux measurements combined with solid phase Fe sulfide data indicated that 98 mt of Fe are precipitated as iron sulfides every year in Ensenada Harbor. These Fe sulfides (and associated trace metals) will remain preserved in the sediments, unless they are perturbed by dredging or sediment resuspension. Calculations indicate that dredging activities could export to the open ocean 0.20 ± 0.13 to (0.30 ± 0.56) × 10"3 mt of Cd and Cu, respectively, creating a potential threat to marine benthic organisms. Degrees of pyritization (DOP) values in Ensenada and El Sauzal harbors were relatively low (< 25%) while degrees of sulfidization (DOS) were high (~ 50%) because of the contribution of acid volatile sulfide. DOP values correlated with DTMP values (p ≤ 0.001), indicating that metals are gradually incorporated into pyrite as this mineral is formed. Significant correlations were also found between DTMP values and − log(K_s_p_(_M_e_S_)/K_s_p_(_p_y_r_)) for both harbors, indicating that incorporation of trace metals into the pyrite phase is a function of the solubility product of the corresponding metal sulfide. The order in which elements were pyritized in both harbors was Zn ≈ Mn < Fe < Cd ≈ Pb < Ni ≈ Co < < Cu. Lastly, a strong correlation (r"2 = 0.87, p < 0.01) was found between average reactive trace metal concentrations and metal concentrations measured in Armandia brevis (a deposit-feeding Opheliid polychaete), suggesting that these labile sedimentary metals are

  9. Trace metals partitioning among different sedimentary mineral phases and the deposit-feeding polychaete Armandia brevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz-de-Alba, Margarita [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Biomolecules (INBIO), Faculty of Sciences, CEI-MAR, University of Cadiz, Campus Rio S. Pedro, E-11510, Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Huerta-Diaz, Miguel Angel, E-mail: huertam@uabc.edu.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Campus Ensenada, Km. 103 Carr. Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada 22800, Baja California (Mexico); Delgadillo-Hinojosa, Francisco [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Campus Ensenada, Km. 103 Carr. Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada 22800, Baja California (Mexico); Hare, Landis [Centre Eau Terre Environnement, 490, rue de la Couronne, Québec, Québec G1K 9A9 (Canada); Galindo-Riaño, M. Dolores [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Biomolecules (INBIO), Faculty of Sciences, CEI-MAR, University of Cadiz, Campus Rio S. Pedro, E-11510, Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Siqueiros-Valencia, Arturo [Instituto de Investigaciones Oceanológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Campus Ensenada, Km. 103 Carr. Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada 22800, Baja California (Mexico)

    2016-02-01

    Trace metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) were determined in two operationally defined fractions (HCl and pyrite) in sediments from Ensenada and El Sauzal harbors (Mexico). The HCl fraction had significantly higher metal concentrations relative to the pyrite fraction in both harbors, underlining the weak tendency of most trace metals to associate with pyrite. Exceptionally, Cu was highly pyritized, with degrees of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) > 80% in both harbors. Dissolved Fe flux measurements combined with solid phase Fe sulfide data indicated that 98 mt of Fe are precipitated as iron sulfides every year in Ensenada Harbor. These Fe sulfides (and associated trace metals) will remain preserved in the sediments, unless they are perturbed by dredging or sediment resuspension. Calculations indicate that dredging activities could export to the open ocean 0.20 ± 0.13 to (0.30 ± 0.56) × 10{sup 3} mt of Cd and Cu, respectively, creating a potential threat to marine benthic organisms. Degrees of pyritization (DOP) values in Ensenada and El Sauzal harbors were relatively low (< 25%) while degrees of sulfidization (DOS) were high (~ 50%) because of the contribution of acid volatile sulfide. DOP values correlated with DTMP values (p ≤ 0.001), indicating that metals are gradually incorporated into pyrite as this mineral is formed. Significant correlations were also found between DTMP values and − log(K{sub sp(MeS)}/K{sub sp(pyr)}) for both harbors, indicating that incorporation of trace metals into the pyrite phase is a function of the solubility product of the corresponding metal sulfide. The order in which elements were pyritized in both harbors was Zn ≈ Mn < Fe < Cd ≈ Pb < Ni ≈ Co < < Cu. Lastly, a strong correlation (r{sup 2} = 0.87, p < 0.01) was found between average reactive trace metal concentrations and metal concentrations measured in Armandia brevis (a deposit-feeding Opheliid polychaete), suggesting that these labile sedimentary metals are

  10. Generation of composites for bone tissue-engineering applications consisting of gellan gum hydrogels mineralized with calcium and magnesium phosphate phases by enzymatic means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Timothy E L; Krawczyk, Grzegorz; Pamula, Elzbieta; Declercq, Heidi A; Schaubroeck, David; Bucko, Miroslaw M; Balcaen, Lieve; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Bliznuk, Vitaliy; van den Vreken, Natasja M F; Dash, Mamoni; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Vanhaecke, Frank; Cornelissen, Maria; Dubruel, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Mineralization of hydrogels, desirable for bone regeneration applications, may be achieved enzymatically by incorporation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP). ALP-loaded gellan gum (GG) hydrogels were mineralized by incubation in mineralization media containing calcium and/or magnesium glycerophosphate (CaGP, MgGP). Mineralization media with CaGP:MgGP concentrations 0.1:0, 0.075:0.025, 0.05:0.05, 0.025:0.075 and 0:0.1 (all values mol/dm 3 , denoted A, B, C, D and E, respectively) were compared. Mineral formation was confirmed by IR and Raman, SEM, ICP-OES, XRD, TEM, SAED, TGA and increases in the the mass fraction of the hydrogel not consisting of water. Ca was incorporated into mineral to a greater extent than Mg in samples mineralized in media A-D. Mg content and amorphicity of mineral formed increased in the order A hydroxyapatite (CDHA). Mineral formed in medium C was a combination of CDHA and an amorphous phase. Mineral formed in medium D was an amorphous phase. Mineral formed in medium E was a combination of crystalline and amorphous MgP. Young's moduli and storage moduli decreased in dependence of mineralization medium in the order A > B > C > D, but were significantly higher for samples mineralized in medium E. The attachment and vitality of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were higher on samples mineralized in media B-E (containing Mg) than in those mineralized in medium A (not containing Mg). All samples underwent degradation and supported the adhesion of RAW 264.7 monocytic cells, and samples mineralized in media A and B supported osteoclast-like cell formation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Lepton mixing predictions including Majorana phases from Δ(6n2 flavour symmetry and generalised CP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen F. King

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Generalised CP transformations are the only known framework which allows to predict Majorana phases in a flavour model purely from symmetry. For the first time generalised CP transformations are investigated for an infinite series of finite groups, Δ(6n2=(Zn×Zn⋊S3. In direct models the mixing angles and Dirac CP phase are solely predicted from symmetry. The Δ(6n2 flavour symmetry provides many examples of viable predictions for mixing angles. For all groups the mixing matrix has a trimaximal middle column and the Dirac CP phase is 0 or π. The Majorana phases are predicted from residual flavour and CP symmetries where α21 can take several discrete values for each n and the Majorana phase α31 is a multiple of π. We discuss constraints on the groups and CP transformations from measurements of the neutrino mixing angles and from neutrinoless double-beta decay and find that predictions for mixing angles and all phases are accessible to experiments in the near future.

  12. Lepton mixing predictions including Majorana phases from Δ(6n2) flavour symmetry and generalised CP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Stephen F.; Neder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Generalised CP transformations are the only known framework which allows to predict Majorana phases in a flavour model purely from symmetry. For the first time generalised CP transformations are investigated for an infinite series of finite groups, Δ(6n 2 )=(Z n ×Z n )⋊S 3 . In direct models the mixing angles and Dirac CP phase are solely predicted from symmetry. The Δ(6n 2 ) flavour symmetry provides many examples of viable predictions for mixing angles. For all groups the mixing matrix has a trimaximal middle column and the Dirac CP phase is 0 or π. The Majorana phases are predicted from residual flavour and CP symmetries where α 21 can take several discrete values for each n and the Majorana phase α 31 is a multiple of π. We discuss constraints on the groups and CP transformations from measurements of the neutrino mixing angles and from neutrinoless double-beta decay and find that predictions for mixing angles and all phases are accessible to experiments in the near future

  13. Chapter 5: Modeling and Control of Three-Phase AC/DC Converter Including Phase-Locked Loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Song, Yipeng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, a mathematical model of the power circuit of a three-phase AC/DC converter is developed in the stationary and synchronous reference frames. Then, the operation principle of the phasor locked loop is addressed to exact the angle information of the power grid to realize the accurat...

  14. Bioleaching of vanadium from barren stone coal and its effect on the transition of vanadium speciation and mineral phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Lin, Hai; Dong, Ying-bo; Li, Gan-yu

    2018-03-01

    This study determined the optimal conditions required to obtain maximum vanadium extraction and examined the transition of mineral phases and vanadium speciation during the bioleaching process. Parameters including the initial pH value, initial Fe2+ concentration, solid load, and inoculum quantity were examined. The results revealed that 48.92wt% of the vanadium was extracted through bioleaching under optimal conditions. Comparatively, the chemical leaching yield (H2SO4, pH 2.0) showed a slower and milder increase in vanadium yield. The vanadium bioleaching yield was 35.11wt% greater than the chemical leaching yield. The Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction results revealed that 88.62wt% of vanadium existed in the residual fraction. The bacteria substantially changed the distribution of the vanadium speciation during the leaching process, and the residual fraction decreased to 48.44wt%. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results provided evidence that the crystal lattice structure of muscovite was destroyed by the bacteria.

  15. Techniques of sample attack used in soil and mineral analysis. Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, N.W.; Dean, J.R.; Sill, C.W.

    1984-07-01

    Several techniques of sample attack for the determination of radioisotopes are reviewed. These techniques include: 1) digestion with nitric or hydrochloric acid in Parr digestion bomb, 2) digestion with a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids, 3) digestion with a mixture of hydrofluoric, nitric and perchloric acids, and 4) fusion with sodium carbonate, potassium fluoride or alkali pyrosulfates. The effectiveness of these techniques to decompose various soils and minerals containing radioisotopes such as lead-210 uranium, thorium and radium-226 are discussed. The combined procedure of potassium fluoride fusion followed by alkali pyrosulfate fusion is recommended for radium-226, uranium and thorium analysis. This technique guarantees the complete dissolution of samples containing refractory materials such as silica, silicates, carbides, oxides and sulfates. For the lead-210 analysis, the procedure of digestion with a mixture of hydrofluoric, nitric and perchloric acids followed by fusion with alkali pyrosulfate is recommended. These two procedures are detailed. Schemes for the sequential separation of the radioisotopes from a dissolved sample solution are outlined. Procedures for radiochemical analysis are suggested

  16. Online differentiation of mineral phase in aerosol particles by ion formation mechanism using a LAAP-TOF single-particle mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Nicholas A.; Flynn, Michael J.; Allan, James D.; Coe, Hugh

    2018-01-01

    Mineralogy of silicate mineral dust has a strong influence on climate and ecosystems due to variation in physiochemical properties that result from differences in composition and crystal structure (mineral phase). Traditional offline methods of analysing mineral phase are labour intensive and the temporal resolution of the data is much longer than many atmospheric processes. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS) is an established technique for the online size-resolved measurement of particle composition by laser desorption ionisation (LDI) followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). Although non-quantitative, the technique is able to identify the presence of silicate minerals in airborne dust particles from markers of alkali metals and silicate molecular ions in the mass spectra. However, the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate particles by traditional mass spectral peak area measurements is not possible. This is because instrument function and matrix effects in the ionisation process result in variations in instrument response that are greater than the differences in composition between common mineral phases.In this study, we introduce a novel technique that enables the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate mineral particles by ion formation mechanism measured from subtle changes in ion arrival times at the TOF-MS detector. Using a combination of peak area and peak centroid measurements, we show that the arrangement of the interstitial alkali metals in the crystal structure, an important property in silicate mineralogy, influences the ion arrival times of elemental and molecular ion species in the negative ion mass spectra. A classification scheme is presented that allowed for the differentiation of illite-smectite, kaolinite and feldspar minerals on a single-particle basis. Online analysis of mineral dust aerosol generated from clay mineral standards produced mineral fractions that are in agreement with bulk measurements reported by

  17. Online differentiation of mineral phase in aerosol particles by ion formation mechanism using a LAAP-TOF single-particle mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Marsden

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogy of silicate mineral dust has a strong influence on climate and ecosystems due to variation in physiochemical properties that result from differences in composition and crystal structure (mineral phase. Traditional offline methods of analysing mineral phase are labour intensive and the temporal resolution of the data is much longer than many atmospheric processes. Single-particle mass spectrometry (SPMS is an established technique for the online size-resolved measurement of particle composition by laser desorption ionisation (LDI followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS. Although non-quantitative, the technique is able to identify the presence of silicate minerals in airborne dust particles from markers of alkali metals and silicate molecular ions in the mass spectra. However, the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate particles by traditional mass spectral peak area measurements is not possible. This is because instrument function and matrix effects in the ionisation process result in variations in instrument response that are greater than the differences in composition between common mineral phases.In this study, we introduce a novel technique that enables the differentiation of mineral phase in silicate mineral particles by ion formation mechanism measured from subtle changes in ion arrival times at the TOF-MS detector. Using a combination of peak area and peak centroid measurements, we show that the arrangement of the interstitial alkali metals in the crystal structure, an important property in silicate mineralogy, influences the ion arrival times of elemental and molecular ion species in the negative ion mass spectra. A classification scheme is presented that allowed for the differentiation of illite–smectite, kaolinite and feldspar minerals on a single-particle basis. Online analysis of mineral dust aerosol generated from clay mineral standards produced mineral fractions that are in agreement with bulk

  18. Characterization of mineral phases of agricultural soil samples of Colombian coffee using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Humberto Bustos, E-mail: hbustos@ut.edu.co; Lozano, Dagoberto Oyola; Martinez, Yebrayl Antonio Rojas; Pinilla, Marlene Rivera [Universidad del Tolima, Grupo Ciencia de Materiales y Tecnologia en Plasma (Colombia); Alcazar, German Antonio Perez [Universidad del Valle, Grupo Metalurgia Fisica y Teoria de las Transiciones de Fase (Colombia)

    2012-03-15

    Soil chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectrometry (MS) of {sup 57}Fe were used to characterize mineral phases of samples taken from the productive layer (horizon A) of agricultural coffee soil from Tolima (Colombia). Chemical analysis shows the chemical and textural parameters of samples from two different regions of Tolima, i.e., Ibague and Santa Isabel. By XRD phases like illite (I), andesine (A) and quartz (Q) in both samples were identified. The quantity of these phases is different for the two samples. The MS spectra taken at room temperature were adjusted by using five doublets, three of them associated to Fe{sup + 3} type sites and the other two to Fe{sup + 2} type sites. According to their isomer shift and quadrupole splitting the presence of phases like illite (detected by DRX), nontronite and biotite (not detected by XRD) can be postulated.

  19. HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Identification Preconceptual Phase I Summary Report (Including Attachments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccolo, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the process used by the Team to systematically develop alternative methods or technologies for final disposition of HLW salt. Additionally, this report summarizes the process utilized to reduce the total list of identified alternatives to an ''initial list'' for further evaluation. This report constitutes completion of the team charter major milestone Phase I Deliverable

  20. Determination of soil weathering rates with U-Th series disequilibria: approach on bulk soil and selected mineral phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontier, Adrien

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate weathering and soil formation rates using U-Th disequilibria in bulk soil or separated minerals. The specific objectives of this work were to evaluate the use of U-Th chronometric tools 1) regarding the impact of a land cover change and the bedrock characteristics 2) in selected secondary mineral phases and 3) in primary minerals. On the Breuil-Chenue (Morvan) site, no vegetation effect neither a grain size effect was observed on the U-Th series in the deepest soil layers (≤ 40 cm). The low soil production rate (1-2 mm/ka) is therefore more affected by regional geomorphology than by the underlying bedrock texture. In the second part of this work, based on a thorough evaluation of different techniques, a procedure was retained to extract Fe-oxides without chemical fractionation. Finally, the analysis of biotites hand-picked from one of the studied soil profile showed that U-series disequilibria allow to independently determinate the field-weathering-rate of minerals. (author)

  1. Exergo-economic analysis of finned tube for waste heat recovery including phase change heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Shuang Ying; Jiu, Jing Rui; Xiao, Lan; Li, You Rong; Liu, Chao; Xu, Jin Liang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an exergo-economic criterion, i.e. the net profit per unit transferred heat load, is established from the perspective of exergy recovery to evaluate the performance of finned tube used in waste heat recovery. Also, the dimensionless exergy change number is introduced to investigate the effect of the flow (mechanical) exergy loss rate on the recovered thermal exergy. Selecting R245fa as a working fluid and exhaust flue gas as a heat source, the effects of the internal Reynolds number Re_i, the external Reynolds number Re_o , the unit cost of thermal exergy ε_q , the geometric parameter of finned tube η_oβ and the phase change temperature T_v etc. on the performance of finned tube are discussed in detail. The results show that the higher T_v and η_oβ, and lower Re_i may lead to the negligible flow(mechanical) exergy loss rate. There exists an optimal value of Re_i where the net profit per unit transferred heat load peaks, while the variations of Re_o, ε_q and T_v cause monotonic change of the net profit per unit transferred heat load. The phase change temperature exerts relatively greater influence on the exergo-economic performance of finned tube in comparison with other parameters. And there exists a critical phase change temperature, where the net profit per unit transferred heat load is equal to zero.

  2. A Two-Phase Solid/Fluid Model for Dense Granular Flows Including Dilatancy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2015-04-01

    We propose a thin layer depth-averaged two-phase model to describe solid-fluid mixtures such as debris flows. It describes the velocity of the two phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure, that itself modifies the friction within the granular phase (Iverson et al., 2010). The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by Jackson (2000) based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work (Bouchut et al., 2014). In particular, Pitman and Le replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's equations. We close the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation involving a critical density, or equivalently a critical pressure. Moreover, we relax one boundary condition, making it possible for the fluid to escape the granular media when compression of the granular mass occurs. Furthermore, we introduce second order terms in the equations making it possible to describe the evolution of the pore fluid pressure in response to the compression/dilatation of the granular mass without prescribing an extra ad-hoc equation for the pore pressure. We prove that the energy balance associated with this Jackson closure is dissipative, as well as its thin layer associated model. We present several numerical tests for the 1D case that are compared to the

  3. PHASE ANALYSES OF URANIUM-BEARING MINERALS FROM THE HIGH GRADE ORE, NOPAL I, PENA BLANCA, MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ren; P. Goodell; A. Kelts; E.Y. Anthony; M. Fayek; C. Fan; C. Beshears

    2005-07-11

    The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Pena Blanca district, approximately 40 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit was formed by hydrothermal processes within the fracture zone of welded silicic volcanic tuff. The ages of volcanic formations are between 35 to 44 m.y. and there was secondary silicification of most of the formations. After the formation of at least part of the uranium deposit, the ore body was uplifted above the water table and is presently exposed at the surface. Detailed petrographic characterization, electron microprobe backscatter electron (BSE) imagery, and selected x-ray maps for the samples from Nopal I high-grade ore document different uranium phases in the ore. There are at least two stages of uranium precipitation. A small amount of uraninite is encapsulated in silica. Hexavalent uranium may also have been a primary precipitant. The uranium phases were precipitated along cleavages of feldspars, and along fractures in the tuff. Energy dispersive spectrometer data and x-ray maps suggest that the major uranium phases are uranophane and weeksite. Substitutions of Ca and K occur in both phases, implying that conditions were variable during the mineralization/alteration process, and that compositions of the original minerals have a major influence on later stage alteration. Continued study is needed to fully characterize uranium behavior in these semi-arid to arid conditions.

  4. X-ray-phase and IR-spectral study of clay rocks mineral content of the Caspian Sea Gulf depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakonov, A.N.; Mukhanova, M.U.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of clays selected from different oil fields (Sazankurak, Kemerkol, Kozha and others) and deposition depths are examined on both the X-ray diffractometers (Dron-2 and Dron-4) and the infrared-spectrometers (IR-20). In this diagnostic the American file with different minerals X-ray systematized data is used. The X-ray reflections, which are in compliance with suitable inter-plane distances and clay impurities reflex intensities are determined. With confirmation purpose for mineral content correctness obtained according X-ray-phase analysis the infrared-spectrometric method is used, in which principal attention was paid to absorption field (3,400-3,700 cm -1 ) of H 2 O and OH valency frequency vibrations

  5. Efficient and robust relaxation procedures for multi-component mixtures including phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ee; Hantke, Maren; Müller, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    We consider a thermodynamic consistent multi-component model in multi-dimensions that is a generalization of the classical two-phase flow model of Baer and Nunziato. The exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the phases is described by additional source terms. Typically these terms are handled by relaxation procedures. Available relaxation procedures suffer from efficiency and robustness resulting in very costly computations that in general only allow for one-dimensional computations. Therefore we focus on the development of new efficient and robust numerical methods for relaxation processes. We derive exact procedures to determine mechanical and thermal equilibrium states. Further we introduce a novel iterative method to treat the mass transfer for a three component mixture. All new procedures can be extended to an arbitrary number of inert ideal gases. We prove existence, uniqueness and physical admissibility of the resulting states and convergence of our new procedures. Efficiency and robustness of the procedures are verified by means of numerical computations in one and two space dimensions. - Highlights: • We develop novel relaxation procedures for a generalized, thermodynamically consistent Baer–Nunziato type model. • Exact procedures for mechanical and thermal relaxation procedures avoid artificial parameters. • Existence, uniqueness and physical admissibility of the equilibrium states are proven for special mixtures. • A novel iterative method for mass transfer is introduced for a three component mixture providing a unique and admissible equilibrium state.

  6. The Fulong coastal area in northeast Taiwan: Late Holocene sedimentary phases including destruction and aggradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, Margot; Luethgens, Christopher; Bauersachs, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Coastal areas are often subject to rapid morphological transformations owing to varying processes such as sea level changes, tectonic uplift, and geomorphological changes by catastrophic storm events, followed by phases of resilience. The study sites in northeast Taiwan at Fulong beach and adjacent areas, situated close to a nuclear power plant construction site, give evidence of an aggradational phase, a destructive phase, and resilience by a second aggradational phase. According to OSL data, a first aeolian accumulation started on top of marine and peri-marine/fluvial sediments at about 3 ka and lasted about 1500 years, interrupted by one palaeosoil. These data refer to an outcrop at a meander bluff at the southern bank of the Shuangsi river, not far from its present-day mouth. According to the morphological situation, this sand accumulation is only the remnant of a former greater dune system that has been eroded in its northern part. The former course of the Shuangsi and the location of its mouth are not known. The top of the outcrop is represented by two sand layers which are definitely younger than the lower sands as their deposition started about max. 630 years ago. The present-day dune system to the north of the river shows at least four dune ridges and the seaward aggradation is still continuing. The oldest dune ridge was sampled close to its top and dated to about 600 years ago (Dörschner et al. 2012). About 3 km upstream, a sedimentary sequence at the river bank has been studied, comprising a lower silty deposit with organic remnants and layered tree trunks at its top. This deposit is considered to be of marine origin, probably a peri-marine situation. This fine-grained sediment is covered by coarse fluvial gravels, indicating one or several catastrophic events in this morphological environment. Above the gravels, another fine-grained sediment related to flood events with low energy has been found. Radiocarbon analyses of organic material in both fine

  7. The study of the sorption capacity of mineral kasongan and sand mixture of the waste of uranium organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiyono, M. E.; Sardjono, D.; Sukosrono

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation on the sorption capacity of mineral Kasongan and sand of Progo of the waste of uranium organic phase which to be connected with a backfill material which can be used to carried out of waste transportation from uncertain unit of the wastes to process of the wastes. The aim of the investigation wastes transportation must be conducted of the anticipation, that of the wastes with safe to unit management of wastes. Therefore must be investigated of the uranium organic wastes. This investigations which influence sorption ability, so an experimental investigation on its absorbability is necessary since this nuclide can not be dispersed to the environment. This investigation was carried out by varying some parameters which influence the sorption ability or sorptive capacity of the mineral Kasongan and the sand of Progo. The variables investigated were the grains size of the backfill material. Also the composition of mineral Kasongan/sand of Progo. The grains size were varied from 10-200 mesh and the composition were varied from 100/0 to 0/100 by weight. The sorption capacity of the maximum results was also determined. It can be concluded that the sorption capacity of the mineral Kasongan was the best at the grains of size about 80 mesh. The sorption capacity was 58 x 10 -2 ml/g and the grains size of the sand of Progo about 20 to 80 mesh was 30 x 10 -2 ml/g. The best sorption capacity of 58 x 10 -2 ml/g was gained at the composition of 100 % mineral Kasongan and 0% sand Progo. (author)

  8. How biological crusts are stabilizing the soil surface? The devolpment of organo-mineral interactions in the initial phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T.; Veste, M.; Wiehe, W.; Lange, P.

    2009-04-01

    First colonizers of new land surfaces are cryptogames which often form biological soil crusts (BSC) covering the first millimetre of the top soil in many ecosystems from polar to desert ecosystems. These BSC are assemblages of cyanobacteria, green algae, mosses, liverworts, fungi and/or lichens. The development of soil surface crusts plays a major role for the further vegetation pattern through changes to the physico-chemical conditions and influencing various ecosystem processes. We studied the development of BSC on quaternary substrate of an initial artificial water catchment in Lusatia, Germany. Due to lack of organic matter in the geological substrate, photoautotrophic organisms like green algae and cyanobacteria dominated the initial phases of ecosystem development and, hence, of organo-mineral ineractions. We combined SEM/EDX and FTIR microscopy to study the contact zone of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of green algae and cyanobacteria with quartz, spars and mica on a >40 µm scale in undisturbed biological soil crusts, which had a maximum thickness of approx. 2 mm. SEM/EDX microscopy was used to determine the spatial distribution of S, Ca, Fe, Al, Si and K in the profiles, organic compounds were identified using FTIR microscopy. Exudates of crust organisms served as cementing material between sand particles. The crust could be subdivided into two horizontal layers. The upper layer, which had a thickness of approx. 200 µm, is characterized by accumulation of Al and K, but absence of Fe in microbial derived organic matter, indicating capture of weathering products of feldspars and mica by microbial exudates. The pore space between mineral particles was entirely filled with organic matter here. The underlying layer can be characterized by empty pores and organo-mineral bridges between the sand particles. Contrarily to the upper layer of the crust, Fe, Al and Si were associated with organic matter here but K was absent. Highest similarity of the FTIR

  9. Immiscibility of Fluid Phases at Magmatic-hydrothermal Transition: Formation of Various PGE-sulfide Mineralization for Layered Basic Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitova, L.; Borisenko, A.; Morgunov, K.; Zhukova, I.

    2007-12-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz of the Merensky Reef (Bushveld Complex, South Africa) and the Chineisky Pluton (Transbaikal Region, Russia) were studied using cryometry, microthermometry, Raman-spectroscopy, LA ICP- MS, scanning electronic microscopy, gas-chromatography and isotopic methods. This allowed us to document some examples of fluid phase separation resulting in formation of different types of PGE-sulfide mineralization for layered basic intrusions. The results obtained show at least three generations of fluid separated from boiling residual alumosilicate intercumulus liquid of the Merensky Reef. The earliest fluid phase composed of homogenous high-dense methane and nitrogen gas mixture was identified in primary gas and co-existing anomalous fluid inclusions from symplectitic quartz. The next generation, heterophase fluid, composed of brines containing a free low-dense (mostly of carbon dioxide) gas phase, was observed in primary multiphase and coexisting gas-rich inclusions of miarolitic quartz crystals. The latest generation was also a heterophase fluid (low salinity water-salt solution and free low-dense methane gas phase) found in primary water-salt and syngenetic gas inclusions from peripheral zones of miarolitic quartz crystals. For the Chineisky Pluton reduced endocontact magmatogene fluids changed to oxidized low salinity hydrothermal fluids in exocontact zone. This resulted in formation of sulfide-PGE enrichment marginal zones of intrusion. The results obtained give us a possibility to suggest that: 1) Fluid phase separation is a typical feature of magmatogene fluids for layered basic intrusions. 2) Reduced fluids can extract and transport substantial PGE and sulfide concentrations. 3) Oxidation of reduced fluids is one of the most important geochemical barriers causing abundant PGE minerals and sulfides precipitation. This in turn results in both formation of PGE reefs or enriched contact zones of layered basic intrusions. This work was supported by

  10. Dynamics of mineral crystallization at inclusion-garnet interface from precipitated slab-derived fluid phase: first in-situ synchrotron x-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Nadia; Alvaro, Matteo; Campione, Marcello; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Remnants of the fluid phase at ultrahigh pressure (UHP) in subduction environments may be preserved as primary multiphase inclusions in UHP minerals. These inclusions are frequently hosted by minerals stable at mantle depths, such as garnet, and show the same textural features as fluid inclusions. The mineral infillings of the solid multiphase inclusions are generally assumed to have crystallized by precipitation from the solute load of dense supercritical fluids equilibrating with the host rock. Notwithstanding the validity of this assumption, the mode of crystallization of daughter minerals during precipitation within the inclusion and/or the mechanism of interaction between the fluid at supercritical conditions and the host mineral are still poorly understood from a crystallographic point of view. A case study is represented by garnet orthopyroxenites from the Maowu Ultramafic Complex (China) deriving from harzburgite precursors metasomatised at ~ 4 GPa, 750 °C by a silica- and incompatible trace element-rich fluid phase. This metasomatism produced poikilitic orthopyroxene and inclusion-rich garnet porphyroblasts. Solid multiphase primary inclusions in garnet display a size within a few tens of micrometers and negative crystal shapes. Infilling minerals (spinel: 10-20 vol.%; amphibole, chlorite, talc, mica: 80- 90 vol.%) occur with constant volume ratios and derive from trapped solute-rich aqueous fluids. To constrain the possible mode of precipitation of daughter minerals, we performed for the first time a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment by means of Synchrotron Radiation at DLS-Diamond Light Source. In combination with electron probe microanalyses, this measurement allowed the unique identification of each mineral phase and their reciprocal orientations. We demonstrated the epitaxial relationship between spinel and garnet and between some hydrous minerals. Epitaxy drives a first-stage nucleation of spinel under near-to-equilibrium conditions

  11. Influence of composition of the raw materials on phase formation in solid compounds based on slag and clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, A.V.; Tolebaev, T.; Omarova, V.I.; Burkitbaev, M.; Blynskiy, A.P.; Bachilova, N.V.; Matsynina, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Activation of solidification processes in a compound formed on the basis of slag and clay minerals using sodium hydroxide - the output product from processing the BN-350 sodium coolant it is expedient to form the final product with a phase composition representing (in terms of long term storage) hydro-alumino-silicates incorporating Na-22 and Cs-137 radionuclides, which isomorphly replace other atoms in the crystal lattice sites. Combination of mineral phases, such as alkaline and alkaline-earth hydro-alumino-silicates with zeolite-like structure, providing sorptive properties, and the tobermorite like low-base hydro silicates of calcium defining the physico-mechanical properties of compound is the necessary condition for the compound stability. Investigations of phase formation in the mixtures of Kazakhstan clay, slag materials and alkali have been conducted targeted to control the physico-chemical properties of solid compound. The mixtures of alkali, thermal power plant ashes and clays of various mineralogical genesis (kaolinite, bentonite, Ca-Na-smectite montmorillonite) have been studied. The ashes and phosphorous slag while interacting with alkali are determined to form the non-alkaline hydro-silicates of stavrolite and indianite (anortite) type with free alkali being found in an unbound state. Both alkaline and alkaline-alkaline-earth hydro-silicates of Na 2 Ca 2 Si 2 O 7 H 2 O type are only formed in a compounds containing metallurgical slag. Formation of alkaline hydro-alumino-silicates of NaAlSiO 4 H 2 0 type as well as tomsonite (Na 4 Ca 8 [Al 20S i 20 O 80 ] 24H 2 O) - the zeolite like mineral have been detected in a two-component alkali-clay mixtures. Besides the quantity of tomsonite was determined to be not only dependent on Al 2 O 3 content in clay component but is also defined by stoichiometric composition of the mixture, because zeolite synthesis takes place under conditions of gels co-deposition and high pH value. Maximum quantity of

  12. Mathematical Model of Two Phase Flow in Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Including Flue Gas Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyhlík Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The previously developed model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer is extended to be able to take into account the flow of supersaturated moist air. The two phase flow model is based on void fraction of gas phase which is included in the governing equations. Homogeneous equilibrium model, where the two phases are well mixed and have the same velocity, is used. The effect of flue gas injection is included into the developed mathematical model by using source terms in governing equations and by using momentum flux coefficient and kinetic energy flux coefficient. Heat and mass transfer in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations, where the mass transfer is represented by measured fill Merkel number and heat transfer is calculated using prescribed Lewis factor.

  13. Influence of particle size and mineral phase in the analysis of iron ore slurries by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, Daniel; Leclerc, Remi; Proulx, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to the analysis of iron ore concentrates. The objective was to determine the influence of particle size and mineral phase on the LIBS signal. The LIBS spectra of hematite and magnetite ore concentrates were qualitatively indistinguishable from each other but magnetite yielded systematically less than hematite. This behavior could be set into an empirical equation to correct the iron peak intensities according to the level of magnetite in the analyzed sample. Similarly, an increase of the LIBS signal was observed as the particle size of the ore samples decreased. Again, an equation could be written down to correct the intensity of either iron or silicon in response to a variation of the average particle size of the ore concentrate. Using these corrections, proper response of the silicon signal against the concentration of silica in the samples was restored. The observed dependence of the strength of the iron signal upon the mineral phase is attributed to oxidation of magnetite into hematite

  14. Design of the passive personal dosimeter for miners using an allyl diglycol carbonate plastic. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    The report summarizes the results of the feasibility study on the design and development of a passive personal dosimeter incorporating an allyl diglycol carbonate plastic (CR39) detector, for use by uranium miners. Based upon the feasibility study, a passive personal dosimeter using a capacitor-type electrostatic enhancement device has been designed. Preliminary tests indicate that the prototype could be used in the mine environment to differentiate radon and thoron daughters with a detection efficiency comparable to that of a typical active device. Further study is required, however, into the possible influence in the mine environment of local variations in charged fraction, upon the calibration of this dosimeter

  15. The potential influence of Asian and African mineral dust on ice, mixed-phase and liquid water clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wiacek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This modelling study explores the availability of mineral dust particles as ice nuclei for interactions with ice, mixed-phase and liquid water clouds, also tracking the particles' history of cloud-processing. We performed 61 320 one-week forward trajectory calculations originating near the surface of major dust emitting regions in Africa and Asia using high-resolution meteorological analysis fields for the year 2007. Dust-bearing trajectories were assumed to be those coinciding with known dust emission seasons, without explicitly modelling dust emission and deposition processes. We found that dust emissions from Asian deserts lead to a higher potential for interactions with high ice clouds, despite being the climatologically much smaller dust emission source. This is due to Asian regions experiencing significantly more ascent than African regions, with strongest ascent in the Asian Taklimakan desert at ~25%, ~40% and 10% of trajectories ascending to 300 hPa in spring, summer and fall, respectively. The specific humidity at each trajectory's starting point was transported in a Lagrangian manner and relative humidities with respect to water and ice were calculated in 6-h steps downstream, allowing us to estimate the formation of liquid, mixed-phase and ice clouds. Downstream of the investigated dust sources, practically none of the simulated air parcels reached conditions of homogeneous ice nucleation (T≲−40 °C along trajectories that have not experienced water saturation first. By far the largest fraction of cloud forming trajectories entered conditions of mixed-phase clouds, where mineral dust will potentially exert the biggest influence. The majority of trajectories also passed through atmospheric regions supersaturated with respect to ice but subsaturated with respect to water, where so-called "warm ice clouds" (T≳−40 °C theoretically may form prior to supercooled water or mixed-phase clouds. The importance of "warm ice

  16. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas. Phase I. Final Topical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantz, Brent; Seeker, Randy; Devenney, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Calera's innovative Mineralization via Aqueous Precipitation (MAP) technology for the capture and conversion of CO 2 to useful materials for use in the built environment was further developed and proven in the Phase 1 Department of Energy Grant. The process was scaled to 300 gallon batch reactors and subsequently to Pilot Plant scale for the continuous production of product with the production of reactive calcium carbonate material that was evaluated as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). The Calera SCM(trademark) was evaluated as a 20% replacement for ordinary portland cement and demonstrated to meet the industry specification ASTM 1157 which is a standard performance specification for hydraulic cement. The performance of the 20% replacement material was comparable to the 100% ordinary portland cement control in terms of compressive strength and workability as measured by a variety of ASTM standard tests. In addition to the performance metrics, detailed characterization of the Calera SCM was performed using advanced analytical techniques to better understand the material interaction with the phases of ordinary portland cement. X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Lab confirmed the presence of an amorphous phase(s) in addition to the crystalline calcium carbonate phases in the reactive carbonate material. The presence of carboaluminate phases as a result of the interaction of the reactive carbonate materials with ordinary portland cement was also confirmed. A Life Cycle Assessment was completed for several cases based on different Calera process configurations and compared against the life cycle of ordinary portland cement. In addition to the materials development efforts, the Calera technology for the production of product using an innovative building materials demonstration plant was developed beyond conceptual engineering to a detailed design with a construction schedule and cost estimate.

  17. Retention of actinide and fission products by poly-mineral solid phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peynet, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    This research thesis first reports available knowledge on reactivity of mineral surfaces (notably the thermodynamic modelling of their retention properties) and discusses the different approaches proposed in the literature regarding the prediction of retention of an element on an adsorbent mixing. It also proposes a synthesis of publications on retention properties of montmorillonite, goethite and calcite with respect to elements with high or very low concentrations. Then, the author reports a characterization of solids in terms of ion exchanger theory. Results are used for traces of caesium, americium and selenium. He finally reports measurement results of traces of elements by montmorillonite / goethite and montmorillonite / calcite binary mixings, or by montmorillonite / goethite / calcite ternary mixings

  18. Multiscale characterization of the mineral phase at skeletal sites of breast cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Aaron E.; Loh, Hyun Chae; Lynch, Maureen; Seo, Bo Ri; Song, Young Hye; Hoerth, Rebecca; Bortel, Emely L.; Willie, Bettina M.; Duda, Georg N.; Masic, Admir; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Fratzl, Peter; Fischbach, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal metastases, the leading cause of death in advanced breast cancer patients, depend on tumor cell interactions with the mineralized bone extracellular matrix. Bone mineral is largely composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals with physicochemical properties that vary significantly by anatomical location, age, and pathology. However, it remains unclear whether bone regions typically targeted by metastatic breast cancer feature distinct HA materials properties. Here we combined high-resolution X-ray scattering analysis with large-area Raman imaging, backscattered electron microscopy, histopathology, and microcomputed tomography to characterize HA in mouse models of advanced breast cancer in relevant skeletal locations. The proximal tibial metaphysis served as a common metastatic site in our studies; we identified that in disease-free bones this skeletal region contained smaller and less-oriented HA nanocrystals relative to ones that constitute the diaphysis. We further observed that osteolytic bone metastasis led to a decrease in HA nanocrystal size and perfection in remnant metaphyseal trabecular bone. Interestingly, in a model of localized breast cancer, metaphyseal HA nanocrystals were also smaller and less perfect than in corresponding bone in disease-free controls. Collectively, these results suggest that skeletal sites prone to tumor cell dissemination contain less-mature HA (i.e., smaller, less-perfect, and less-oriented crystals) and that primary tumors can further increase HA immaturity even before secondary tumor formation, mimicking alterations present during tibial metastasis. Engineered tumor models recapitulating these spatiotemporal dynamics will permit assessing the functional relevance of the detected changes to the progression and treatment of breast cancer bone metastasis. PMID:28923958

  19. Miscellaneous Industrial Mineral Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes miscellaneous industrial minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team...

  20. The effect of soil mineral phases on the abiotic degradation of selected organic compounds. Final report, June 31, 1990--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    Funds were received from the United States Department of Energy to study the effects of soil mineral phases on the rates of abiotic degradation of tetraphenylborate (TPB) and diphenylboronic acid (DPBA). In addition to kaolinite and montmorillonite clay minerals, the role of goethite, corundum, manganite, and rutile in the degradation of organoborates was also evaluated. The effects of DPBA, argon, molecular dioxygen (O{sub 2}), temperature, and organic matter on the degradation of organoborates were also measured. The results indicated that TPB and DPBA degraded rapidly on the mineral surfaces. The initial products generated from the degradation of TPB were DPBA and biphenyl; however, further degradation resulted in the formation of phenylboric acid and phenol which persisted even after TPB disappeared. The data also showed that the rate of TPB degradation was faster in kaolinite, a 1:1 clay mineral, than in montmorillonite, a double layer mineral. The initial degradation of TPB by corundum was much higher than goethite, manganite and rutile. However, no further degradation by this mineral was observed where as the degradation of TPB continued by goethite and rutile minerals. Over all, the degradation rate of TPB was the highest for goethite as compared to the other metal oxide minerals. The degradation of TPB and DPBA was a redox reaction where metals (Fe, Al, Ti, Mn) acted as Lewis acids. DPBA and argon retarded the TPB degradation where as molecular oxygen organic matter and temperature increased the rate of TPB disappearance.

  1. Nuclear techniques and cross-correlation methods for spectral analysis in two-phase flow measurements in mineral pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Luis E.B.; Salgado, Cesar M., E-mail: brandaos@ien.gov.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Divisao de Radiofarmacos; Sicilliano, Umberto C.C.S., E-mail: umberto.cassara@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia

    2013-07-01

    In mineral industry is common to use water to transport pellets inside pipes. In these units, the correct measurement of flow (both solid and liquid phase) is important to guarantee a safe operation. Cross correlation flow meters are devices specially suited to be used in dual-phase flow and they are based on measure the transit time due the disturbances registered between two points, in our case gamma attenuation from radioactive sources. The emphasis of this work is the application of gamma transmission and scattering technique associated with spectral analysis methods to measure the flow of solid phase in a liquid fluid in side the pipe. The detectors and the sources are out side of the tube and are positioned 10.0 cm distant one from the other. The photons of transmission/scattering gamma radiation were registered, and across-correlation method was applied to measure the flow and spectral analysis was used to study the flow profile inside the pipe. (author)

  2. Differential chemical fractionation of dissolved organic matter during sorption by Fe mineral phases in a tropical soil from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, A. F.; Coward, E.; Ohno, T.; Thompson, A.

    2017-12-01

    Fe-bearing mineral phases contribute substantially to adsorption and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM), due largely to their high specific surface area (SSA) and reactivity. While the importance of adsorption onto mineral surfaces has been well-elucidated, selectivity of various mineral and organic phases remains poorly understood. The goals of this work were to: 1) quantify the contributions of Fe-minerals of varying crystallinity to dissolved organic matter (DOM) sorption, and 2) characterize the molecular fractionation of DOM induced by reactions at the mineral interface, using a highly-weathered Oxisol from the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory (LCZO). Three selective dissolution experiments targeting Fe-mineral phases were followed by specific surface area (SSA) analysis of the residues and characterization of extracted DOM by high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Fe-depleted extraction residue samples, untreated control soil samples, and Fe-enriched ferrihydrite-coated soil samples were then subjected to a batch sorption experiment with litter-derived DOM. Results of selective dissolution experiments indicated that a substantial proportion of soil SSA was derived from extracted Fe-bearing phases, and FT-ICR-MS analysis of extracted DOM revealed distinct chemical signatures. Sorbed C concentrations were well correlated with Fe contents induced by treatments, and thus SSA. Molecular characterization of the DOM post-sorption indicated that poorly crystalline Fe phases preferentially adsorbed highly unsaturated aromatic compounds, and higher-crystallinity Fe phases were associated with more aliphatic compounds. These findings suggests that molecular fractionation via organomineral complexation may act as a physicochemical filter of DOM released to the critical zone.

  3. In Situ Chemical Characterization of Mineral Phases in Lunar Granulite Meteorite Northwest Africa 5744

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, J. J.; Brandon, A. D.; Lapen, T. J.; Peslier, A. H.; Irving, A. J.; Coleff, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 5744 meteorite is a granulitic and troctolitic lunar breccia which may represent nearly pristine lunar crust (Fig. 1). NWA 5744 is unusually magnesian compared to other lunar breccias, with bulk [Mg/(Mg+Fe)] 0.79 [1, 2]. Inspection shows impactor content is likely to be very minor, with low Ni content and a lack of metal grains. Some terrestrial contamination is present, evidenced by calcite within cracks. NWA 5744 has notably low concentrations of incompatible trace elements (ITEs) [2]. The goal of this study is to attempt to classify this lunar granulite through analyses of in situ phases.

  4. Combining selective sequential extractions, X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and X-Ray Powder Diffraction for Cu (II speciation in soil and mineral phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Minkina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of Cu (II ions with the matrix of soil and mineral phases of layered silicates was assessed by the Miller method of selective sequential fractionation and a set of synchrotron X-ray methods, including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES. It was shown that the input of Cu into Calcic Chernozem in the form of monoxide (CuO and salt (Cu(NO32 affected the transformation of Cu compounds and their affinity for metal-bearing phases. It was found that the contamination of soil with a soluble Cu(II salt increased the bioavailability of the metal and the role of organic matter and Fe oxides in the fixation and retention of Cu. During the incubation of soil with Cu monoxide, the content of the metal in the residual fractions increased, which was related to the possible entry of Cu in the form of isomorphic impurities into silicates, as well as to the incomplete dissolution of exogenic compounds at the high level of their input into the soil. A mechanism for the structural transformation of minerals was revealed, which showed that ion exchange processes result in the sorption of Cu (II ions from the saturated solution by active sites on the internal surface of the lattice of dioctahedral aluminosilicates. Surface hydroxyls at the octahedral aluminum atom play the main role. X-ray diagnostics revealed that excess Cu(II ions are removed from the system due to the formation and precipitation of coarsely crystalline Cu(NO3(OH3.

  5. Characteristics of mineral nutrition of plants in the bio-technical life support system with human wastes included in mass exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Ushakova, Sofya; Kalacheva, Galina; Tikhomirov, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The study addresses the effectiveness of using ion exchange substrates (IES) to optimize mineral nutrition of plants grown in the nutrient solutions containing oxidized human wastes for application in bio-technical life support systems. The study shows that the addition of IES to the root-inhabited substrate is favorable for the growth of wheat vegetative organs but causes a decrease in the grain yield. By contrast, the addition of IES to the nutrient solution does not influence the growth of vegetative organs but favors normal development of wheat reproductive organs. Thus, to choose the proper method of adjusting the solution with IES, one should take into account specific parameters of plant growth and development and the possibility of multiple recycling of IES based on the liquid products of mineralization of human wastes.

  6. Fe2+ oxidation rate drastically affect the formation and phase of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral occurred in acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shan; Zhou Lixiang

    2012-01-01

    During the processes of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral formation, Fe 2+ ion was oxidized by the following three methods: (1) biooxidation treatment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans); (2) rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe 2+ with H 2 O 2 (rapid oxidation treatment); (3) slow abiotic oxidation of Fe 2+ with H 2 O 2 (slow oxidation treatment). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, element composition, precipitate weight and total Fe removal efficiency were analyzed. The XRD patterns and element composition of precipitates synthesized through the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments well coincide with those of potassium jarosite, while precipitates formed at the initial stage of incubation in the rapid oxidation treatment showed a similar XRD pattern to schwertmannite. With the ongoing incubation, XRD patterns and element composition of the precipitates that occurred in the rapid oxidation treatment were gradually close to those in the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments. Due to the inhibition of A. ferrooxidans itself and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in aggregation of precipitates, the amount of precipitates and soluble Fe removal efficiency were lower in the biooxidation treatment than in the slow oxidation treatment. Therefore, it is concluded that Fe 2+ oxidation rate can greatly affect the mineral phase of precipitates, and slow oxidation of Fe 2+ is helpful in improving jarosite formation. - Highlights: ► Slow oxidation of Fe 2+ is helpful in jarosite formation. ► The already-formed schwertmannite can be gradually transformed to jarosite. ► Precipitates formation can be inhibited probably by EPS from A. ferrooxidans.

  7. Effects on auto-irradiation on the solubility of mineral phases enriched by actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prot, T.

    1993-07-01

    The scope of the present work is to investigate possible effects of self-irradiation damage induced by α-decay (α-recoil nucleus and α-particle) on the hydrated layer formed by aqueous corrosion of nuclear glass and on alteration phases of a granitic geological repository (calcium carbonate or iron oxides and oxihydroxide) which would be likely irradiated in the framework of high-level radioactive waste disposal, for sufficient concentration of actinides and age. Our experimental procedure relies on a bombardment with external beams of 1.5 to 1.8 MeV He ions and 200 KeV Pb ions, which respectively simulate the radiation effects of α-particles and of α-recoil nuclei. We have observed in a first step, direct irradiation effects (change of volume and refractive index, chemical modification) by means of optical microscopy, microtopographical analysis (surface profilometer) and R.B.S. and X.P.S. In a second step, corrosion tests were performed in static conditions to observe a possible indirect effect (increase of the hydratation rate, actinide release) on the later evolution as for example, a marked increase in solubility (calcium carbonate case)

  8. South Africa's mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The main aim of the Minerals Bureau in presenting this annual review is to provide an up-to-date reference document on the current state of the mineral industry in South Africa. This includes a brief look at the production, trade, economy, resources and deposits of precious metals and minerals, energy minerals, metallic minerals, and non-metallic minerals. One article discusses the production, trade, export, deposits and economy of uranium

  9. Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformation in a solution: Including mass transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqshenas, S R; Ford, I J; Saffari, N

    2018-01-14

    Effects of acoustic waves on a phase transformation in a metastable phase were investigated in our previous work [S. R. Haqshenas, I. J. Ford, and N. Saffari, "Modelling the effect of acoustic waves on nucleation," J. Chem. Phys. 145, 024315 (2016)]. We developed a non-equimolar dividing surface cluster model and employed it to determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallisation induced by an acoustic field in a mass-conserved system. In the present work, we developed a master equation based on a hybrid Szilard-Fokker-Planck model, which accounts for mass transportation due to acoustic waves. This model can determine the kinetics of nucleation and the early stage of growth of clusters including the Ostwald ripening phenomenon. It was solved numerically to calculate the kinetics of an isothermal sonocrystallisation process in a system with mass transportation. The simulation results show that the effect of mass transportation for different excitations depends on the waveform as well as the imposed boundary conditions and tends to be noticeable in the case of shock waves. The derivations are generic and can be used with any acoustic source and waveform.

  10. A fase estrogênica altera a resposta do osso e do metabolismo mineral de ratas com hipertireoidismo? Does the estrogenic phase modify the bone and mineral metabolism response in rats under hyperthyroidism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Ocarino

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the estrogenic phase in the bone and in the mineral metabolism was studied in Wistar adult female rats kept under euthyroidism or hyperthyroidism for 60 days. The rats were divided, according to the stage of the estrous cycle, into four groups: 1 euthyroid (proestrus-estrus, 2 euthyroid (metaestrus-diestrus, 3 hyperthyroid (proestrus-estrus, and 4 hyperthyroid (metaestrus-diestrus. After 60 days the blood plasma was collected and the concentrations of free T4, estradiol, progesterone, calcium, phosphorus, and of alkaline phosphatase were determined. The bones (femur and tibia were analysed microscopically. Despite of the functional state of the thyroid, the levels of estrogen were significantly higher in the proestrus-estrus. The estrogenic phase increased the plasmatic concentration of calcium significantly in the euthyroid rats but it did not alter the levels of phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase. In the hyperthyroid state no significant differences in the plasmatic concentrations of calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase throughout the cycle were found. The phases of the cycle did not also influence the bone morphology in the euthyroid and hyperthyroid states. It was concluded that the estrogenic phase increases the plasmatic concentration of calcium, even without altering the bone morphology of the euthyroid rats. In addition the estrogenic phase does not increase the plasmatic calcium and it does not modify the response of the bone as well as of the mineral metabolism under effect of the hyperthyroidism.

  11. Enhanced performance and interfacial investigation of mineral-based composite phase change materials for thermal energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanchang; Fu, Liangjie; Ouyang, Jing; Yang, Huaming

    2013-01-01

    A novel mineral-based composite phase change materials (PCMs) was prepared via vacuum impregnation method assisted with microwave-acid treatment of the graphite (G) and bentonite (B) mixture. Graphite and microwave-acid treated bentonite mixture (GBm) had more loading capacity and higher crystallinity of stearic acid (SA) in the SA/GBm composite. The SA/GBm composite showed an enhanced thermal storage capacity, latent heats for melting and freezing (84.64 and 84.14 J/g) was higher than those of SA/B sample (48.43 and 47.13 J/g, respectively). Addition of graphite was beneficial to the enhancement in thermal conductivity of the SA/GBm composite, which could reach 0.77 W/m K, 31% higher than SA/B and 196% than pure SA. Furthermore, atomic-level interfaces between SA and support surfaces were depicted, and the mechanism of enhanced thermal storage properties was in detail investigated.

  12. Mineral Phases and Release Behaviors of As in the Process of Sintering Residues Containing As at High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingrun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of sintering temperature and sintering time on arsenic volatility and arsenic leaching in the sinter, we carried out experimental works and studied the structural changes of mineral phases and microstructure observation of the sinter at different sintering temperatures. Raw materials were shaped under the pressure of 10 MPa and sintered at 1000~1350°C for 45 min with air flow rate of 2000 mL/min. The results showed that different sintering temperatures and different sintering times had little impact on the volatilization of arsenic, and the arsenic fixed rate remained above 90%; however, both factors greatly influenced the leaching concentration of arsenic. Considering the product’s environmental safety, the best sintering temperature was 1200°C and the best sintering time was 45 min. When sintering temperature was lower than 1000°C, FeAsS was oxidized into calcium, aluminum, and iron arsenide, mainly Ca3(AsO42 and AlAsO4, and the arsenic leaching was high. When it increased to 1200°C, arsenic was surrounded by a glass matrix and became chemically bonded inside the matrix, which lead to significantly lower arsenic leaching.

  13. Microbial Mineral Transformations at the Fe(II)/Fe(III) Redox Boundary for Solid Phase Capture of Strontium and Other Metal/Radionuclide Contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, F.G.; Roden, E.E.

    2000-01-01

    The migration of 90 Sr in groundwater is a significant environmental concern at former nuclear weapons production sites in the US and abroad. Although retardation of 90 Sr transport relative to mean groundwater velocity is known to occur in contaminated aquifers, Sr 2+ does not sorb as strongly to iron oxides and other mineral phases as do other metal-radionuclides contaminants. Thus, some potential exists for extensive 90 Sr migration from sources of contamination. Chemical or biological processes capable of retarding or immobilizing Sr 2+ in groundwater environments are of interest from the standpoint of understanding controls on subsurface Sr 2+ migration. In addition, it may be possible to exploit such processes for remediation of subsurface Sr contamination. In this study the authors examined the potential for the solid phase sorption and incorporation of Sr 2+ into carbonate minerals formed during microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction as a first step toward evaluating whether this process could be used to promote retardation of 90 Sr migrations in anaerobic subsurface environments. The demonstration of Sr 2+ capture in carbonate mineral phases formed during bacterial HFO reduction and urea hydrolysis suggests that microbial carbonate mineral formation could contribute to Sr 2+ retardation in groundwater environments. This process may also provide a mechanism for subsurface remediation of Sr 2+ and other divalent metal contaminants that form insoluble carbonate precipitates

  14. The influence of mineralization on the phase composition and properties of low-burned clay-dolomited composition materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirin-zade, I.N.; Ganbarov, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    With aim of acceleration of dissociation of carbonates in clay-dolomited compositions Na 2 SiF 6 was added. Addition mineralization raise stability of composition reaches 20-30 MPa. Na 2 SiF 6 mineralization makes more active decomposition of dolomite and accelerate appearance of new creations. It was experimentally proved that adding of mineralization of Na 2 SiF 6 promote to appearance in mixture of intermediate double salts which are bring down temperature of dissociation of carbonates. Accelerated action of mineralization Na 2 SiF 6 accepted by x-ray, DTA and x-ray spectroscopy

  15. Experimental test of a hot water storage system including a macro-encapsulated phase change material (PCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongibello, L.; Atrigna, M.; Bianco, N.; Di Somma, M.; Graditi, G.; Risi, N.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems (TESs) are of fundamental importance for many energetic systems, essentially because they permit a certain degree of decoupling between the heat or cold production and the use of the heat or cold produced. In the last years, many works have analysed the addition of a PCM inside a hot water storage tank, as it can allow a reduction of the size of the storage tank due to the possibility of storing thermal energy as latent heat, and as a consequence its cost and encumbrance. The present work focuses on experimental tests realized by means of an indoor facility in order to analyse the dynamic behaviour of a hot water storage tank including PCM modules during a charging phase. A commercial bio-based PCM has been used for the purpose, with a melting temperature of 58°C. The experimental results relative to the hot water tank including the PCM modules are presented in terms of temporal evolution of the axial temperature profile, heat transfer and stored energy, and are compared with the ones obtained by using only water as energy storage material. Interesting insights, relative to the estimation of the percentage of melted PCM at the end of the experimental test, are presented and discussed.

  16. Towards sustainable processing of columbite group minerals: elucidating the relation between dielectric properties and physico-chemical transformations in the mineral phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Segado, Sergio; Monti, Tamara; Katrib, Juliano; Kingman, Samuel; Dodds, Chris; Jha, Animesh

    2017-12-21

    Current methodologies for the extraction of tantalum and niobium pose a serious threat to human beings and the environment due to the use of hydrofluoric acid (HF). Niobium and tantalum metal powders and pentoxides are widely used for energy efficient devices and components. However, the current processing methods for niobium and tantalum metals and oxides are energy inefficient. This dichotomy between materials use for energy applications and their inefficient processing is the main motivation for exploring a new methodology for the extraction of these two oxides, investigating the microwave absorption properties of the reaction products formed during the alkali roasting of niobium-tantalum bearing minerals with sodium bicarbonate. The experimental findings from dielectric measurement at elevated temperatures demonstrate an exponential increase in the values of the dielectric properties as a result of the formation of NaNbO 3 -NaTaO 3 solid solutions at temperatures above 700 °C. The investigation of the evolution of the dielectric properties during the roasting reaction is a key feature in underpinning the mechanism for designing a new microwave assisted high-temperature process for the selective separation of niobium and tantalum oxides from the remainder mineral crystalline lattice.

  17. The mineral phase evolution behaviour in the production of glass-ceramics from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by melting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jingde; Chai, Meiyun; Li, Rundong; Yao, Pengfei; Khan, Agha Saood

    2016-01-01

    High energy consumption was the major obstacle to the widespread application of melting technology in the treatment of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. Aiming to lower the ash-melting temperature (AMT) for energy-saving, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and the scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the relations between AMT and the mineral evolution. The results indicated that the change of AMT was determined by the types and the contents of mineral crystals. The transition from refractory minerals to fluxing minerals was the key. The transition of the main crystalline phase from pseudowollastonite (Ca3(Si3O9)) to wollastonite (CaSiO3) played a significant role in AMT reduction. A quantum chemistry calculation was carried out to investigate the effect of crystal reaction activity on AMT. In the chemical reaction, the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital played a more important role than any other orbits. Cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)) were apt to enter into the crystal lattice of wollastonite and gehlenite mainly through Si (3), O (1), Si (6), O (10) and Al (2), O (10), and broke the covalent bonds of Si (3)-O (7), Al (1)-O (9) and Al (1)-O (15), respectively. This deconstruction behaviour provided convenient conditions for restructuring and promoted the formation of fluxing minerals. In melts, the excess SiO2 monomers which existed in the form of cristobalite and quartz caused AMT increase.

  18. Mineral CO2 sequestration in basalts and ultra-basic rocks: impact of secondary silicated phases on the carbonation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sissmann, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The formation of carbonates constitutes a stable option for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) geological sequestration, and is prone to play a significant role in reducing emissions of anthropic origin. However, our comprehension of the carbonation mechanism, as well as of the kinetics limitations encountered during this chemical reaction, remains poorly developed. Though there is a large number of studies focusing on the dissolution kinetics of basic silicates and on the precipitation of carbonates, few have inquired about the impact that the formation of non-carbonated secondary phases can have on these reaction's kinetics. It is the approach chosen here, as only solid knowledge of the global carbonation mechanism can make this process predictive and efficient. Experimental data on dissolution and carbonation have therefore been determined in batch reactors, on relevant minerals and rocks. Firstly, we studied the carbonation of olivine (a major phase within peridotites and minor within basalts) at 90 deg. C and under pCO 2 of 280 bars. The dissolution of San Carlos olivine (Mg 1.76 Fe 0.24 SiO 4 ) is slowed down by the formation of a surface silica gel, when the fluid reaches equilibrium with amorphous silica. The transport of species to the reactive medium becomes the limiting step of the process, slowing down the dissolution process of San Carlos olivine by 5 orders of magnitude. However, this passivation doesn't occur during the alteration of Ca-olivine (Ca 2 SiO 4 ), though a surface silica layer does form. This comparison suggests that it isn't the structure of the silicate but its chemical composition, which controls the transport properties through the interfacial layer. The second part explores the effects of organic ligands and of temperature variations on the formation of those phases. The addition of citrate at 90 deg. C increases the kinetics of San Carlos olivine by one order of magnitude, and allows the release of enough Mg in the aqueous medium to form

  19. A study on mineralization U,REE and related processes in anomaly No.6 Khoshomy area central Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidaryan, F.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium mineralization in Khoshomy prospect, located in central. part of Iran, with 303-15000 (cps) and 14 to 4000 (ppm) released, The main rock types include: gneiss, granite, pegmatite and migmatite, that influenced by pegmatite-albitic vines (quartz-heldespatic). Acidic and basic dykes, granodioritic, units and dolomite and marble have been seen. The alteration associated with the mineralization is potassic, argillic, propylitic, carbonization, silisificaition and hematitizaition. Uranium mineralization occurred in a hydrothermal phase with Cu, Mo, Ni and Au elements. Uranium primary minerals include pitchblende, coffinite, uraninite; and uranium secondary minerals include uranophane and . boltwoodite. REE mineralization occurred by the potassic phase in peginatitization process

  20. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy including identification of uranium phases and hydrochemical characterisation of groundwater in borehole KFR106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern; Nilsson, Kersti; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2011-12-01

    This report presents the fracture mineralogy and hydrochemistry of borehole KFR106. The most abundant fracture minerals in the examined drill core samples are clay minerals, calcite, quartz and adularia; chlorite is also common but is mostly altered and found interlayered with corrensite. The most common clay mineral is a mixed layer clay consisting of illite-smectite. Pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite, barite (-celestine) and hematite are also commonly found in the fractures, but usually in trace amounts. Other minerals identified in the examined fractures are U-phosphate, pitchblende, U(Ca)-silicate, asphaltite, biotite, monazite, fluorite, titanite, sericite, xenotime, rutile and (Ca, REEs)-carbonate. Uranium has been introduced, mobilised and reprecipitated during at least four different episodes: 1) Originally, during emplacement of U-rich pegmatites, probably as uraninite. 2) At a second event, uranium was mobilised under brittle conditions during formation of breccia/cataclasite. Uraninite was altered to pitchblende and partly coffinitised. Mobilised uranium precipitated as pitchblende closely associated with hematite and chlorite in cataclasite and fracture sealings prior to 1,000 Ma. 3) During the Palaeozoic U was remobilised and precipitated as U-phosphate on open fracture surfaces. 4) An amorphous U-silicate has also been found in open fractures; the age of this precipitation is not known but it is inferred to be Palaeozoic or younger. Groundwater was sampled in two sections in borehole KFR106 with pumping sequences of about 6 days for each section. The samples from sections KFR106:1 and KFR106:2 (260-300 m and 143-259 m borehole length, i.e. -261 and -187 m.a.s.l. mid elevation of the section, respectively) were taken in November 2009 and yielded groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 3 and 5. In section KFR106:1 and KFR106:2, the chloride contents were 850 and 1,150 mg/L and the drilling water content 6 and 4%, respectively

  1. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy including identification of uranium phases and hydrochemical characterisation of groundwater in borehole KFR106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern [WSP Sverige AB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, Kersti [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    This report presents the fracture mineralogy and hydrochemistry of borehole KFR106. The most abundant fracture minerals in the examined drill core samples are clay minerals, calcite, quartz and adularia; chlorite is also common but is mostly altered and found interlayered with corrensite. The most common clay mineral is a mixed layer clay consisting of illite-smectite. Pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite, barite (-celestine) and hematite are also commonly found in the fractures, but usually in trace amounts. Other minerals identified in the examined fractures are U-phosphate, pitchblende, U(Ca)-silicate, asphaltite, biotite, monazite, fluorite, titanite, sericite, xenotime, rutile and (Ca, REEs)-carbonate. Uranium has been introduced, mobilised and reprecipitated during at least four different episodes: 1) Originally, during emplacement of U-rich pegmatites, probably as uraninite. 2) At a second event, uranium was mobilised under brittle conditions during formation of breccia/cataclasite. Uraninite was altered to pitchblende and partly coffinitised. Mobilised uranium precipitated as pitchblende closely associated with hematite and chlorite in cataclasite and fracture sealings prior to 1,000 Ma. 3) During the Palaeozoic U was remobilised and precipitated as U-phosphate on open fracture surfaces. 4) An amorphous U-silicate has also been found in open fractures; the age of this precipitation is not known but it is inferred to be Palaeozoic or younger. Groundwater was sampled in two sections in borehole KFR106 with pumping sequences of about 6 days for each section. The samples from sections KFR106:1 and KFR106:2 (260-300 m and 143-259 m borehole length, i.e. -261 and -187 m.a.s.l. mid elevation of the section, respectively) were taken in November 2009 and yielded groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 3 and 5. In section KFR106:1 and KFR106:2, the chloride contents were 850 and 1,150 mg/L and the drilling water content 6 and 4%, respectively

  2. Detection of rare-earth-mineral phases by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-rays (SEM/EDX) in the alkaline complexes of Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, S.K.; Nathan, N.P.; Ganesan, V.; Shome, S.

    2005-01-01

    The alkaline complexes of the Southern Granulite Terrain (SGT) are generally restricted within NNW-SSE-trending Dharmapuri Shear Zone (DSZ), extending from Gudiyatham in the north and Bhavani in the south in Tamil Nadu. REE-rich phases have been studied under EDX (Energy Dispersive X-rays) from the different alkaline suites of Tamil Nadu. In Elagiri, the Th-rich epidote/allanite is concentrically zoned and occurs in the outermost coarse sub-solvus syenite, indicating that the REE concentration is restricted within the late-stage magmatic activity. In Koratti, the apatites are LREE rich. In Samalpatti Complex, the carbonatites host a number of REE-rich minerals commonly classified as betafite, along with nioborutite and nioboilmenite. The niobo-rutile and niobo-ilmenite show exsolved texture. The betafite is zoned with mendelyeerite. Some of the molybdenite in Samalpatti is dendritic indicating incomplete crystallisation. In Sivamalai, the REE phases are generally associated with ferrosyenite and nepheline syenite as adsorbed grains around apatite or carbonate. The REE minerals are Zr-REE titanate, REE-titano silicate and REE-yttrium silicate. In the Pikkili Complex, the REE minerals generally occur as rim around apatite and calcite. A discrete metamict allanite grain with radial cracks occurs within syenite. In Pakkanadu Complex zoned allanite occurs with distinct chemical zonation in syenite. Monazite and celesto-barite are associated with barite suggesting that the REE phases are developed in the late intrusive stage. (author)

  3. Characterization of mineral phases of agricultural soil samples of Colombian coffee using Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Humberto Bustos; Lozano, Dagoberto Oyola; Martínez, Yebrayl Antonio Rojas; Pinilla, Marlene Rivera; Alcázar, German Antonio Pérez

    2012-03-01

    Soil chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectrometry (MS) of 57Fe were used to characterize mineral phases of samples taken from the productive layer (horizon A) of agricultural coffee soil from Tolima (Colombia). Chemical analysis shows the chemical and textural parameters of samples from two different regions of Tolima, i.e., Ibagué and Santa Isabel. By XRD phases like illite (I), andesine (A) and quartz (Q) in both samples were identified. The quantity of these phases is different for the two samples. The MS spectra taken at room temperature were adjusted by using five doublets, three of them associated to Fe + 3 type sites and the other two to Fe + 2 type sites. According to their isomer shift and quadrupole splitting the presence of phases like illite (detected by DRX), nontronite and biotite (not detected by XRD) can be postulated.

  4. Characterization of mineral phases of agricultural soil samples of Colombian coffee using Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, Humberto Bustos; Lozano, Dagoberto Oyola; Martínez, Yebrayl Antonio Rojas; Pinilla, Marlene Rivera; Alcázar, German Antonio Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Soil chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectrometry (MS) of 57 Fe were used to characterize mineral phases of samples taken from the productive layer (horizon A) of agricultural coffee soil from Tolima (Colombia). Chemical analysis shows the chemical and textural parameters of samples from two different regions of Tolima, i.e., Ibagué and Santa Isabel. By XRD phases like illite (I), andesine (A) and quartz (Q) in both samples were identified. The quantity of these phases is different for the two samples. The MS spectra taken at room temperature were adjusted by using five doublets, three of them associated to Fe  + 3 type sites and the other two to Fe  + 2 type sites. According to their isomer shift and quadrupole splitting the presence of phases like illite (detected by DRX), nontronite and biotite (not detected by XRD) can be postulated.

  5. Minerals Yearbook, volume I, Metals and Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  6. Multicritical phase diagrams of the Blume-Emery-Griffiths model with repulsive biquadratic coupling including metastable phases: the pair approximation and the path probability method with pair distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Erdinc, Ahmet

    2004-01-01

    As a continuation of the previously published work, the pair approximation of the cluster variation method is applied to study the temperature dependences of the order parameters of the Blume-Emery-Griffiths model with repulsive biquadratic coupling on a body centered cubic lattice. We obtain metastable and unstable branches of the order parameters besides the stable branches and phase transitions of these branches are investigated extensively. We study the dynamics of the model by the path probability method with pair distribution in order to make sure that we find and define the metastable and unstable branches of the order parameters completely and correctly. We present the metastable phase diagram in addition to the equilibrium phase diagram and also the first-order phase transition line for the unstable branches of the quadrupole order parameter is superimposed on the phase diagrams. It is found that the metastable phase diagram and the first-order phase boundary for the unstable quadrupole order parameter always exist at the low temperatures which are consistent with experimental and theoretical works

  7. Construction Minerals Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes construction minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  8. Agricultural Minerals Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes agricultural minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  9. A Comparative Density Functional Theory and Density Functional Tight Binding Study of Phases of Nitrogen Including a High Energy Density Material N8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Capel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparative dispersion-corrected Density Functional Theory (DFT and Density Functional Tight Binding (DFTB-D study of several phases of nitrogen, including the well-known alpha, beta, and gamma phases as well as recently discovered highly energetic phases: covalently bound cubic gauche (cg nitrogen and molecular (vdW-bound N8 crystals. Among several tested parametrizations of N–N interactions for DFTB, we identify only one that is suitable for modeling of all these phases. This work therefore establishes the applicability of DFTB-D to studies of phases, including highly metastable phases, of nitrogen, which will be of great use for modelling of dynamics of reactions involving these phases, which may not be practical with DFT due to large required space and time scales. We also derive a dispersion-corrected DFT (DFT-D setup (atom-centered basis parameters and Grimme dispersion parameters tuned for accurate description simultaneously of several nitrogen allotropes including covalently and vdW-bound crystals and including high-energy phases.

  10. Potash: a global overview of evaporate-related potash resources, including spatial databases of deposits, occurrences, and permissive tracts: Chapter S in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orris, Greta J.; Cocker, Mark D.; Dunlap, Pamela; Wynn, Jeff C.; Spanski, Gregory T.; Briggs, Deborah A.; Gass, Leila; Bliss, James D.; Bolm, Karen S.; Yang, Chao; Lipin, Bruce R.; Ludington, Stephen; Miller, Robert J.; Słowakiewicz, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    Potash is mined worldwide to provide potassium, an essential nutrient for food crops. Evaporite-hosted potash deposits are the largest source of salts that contain potassium in water-soluble form, including potassium chloride, potassium-magnesium chloride, potassium sulfate, and potassium nitrate. Thick sections of evaporitic salt that form laterally continuous strata in sedimentary evaporite basins are the most common host for stratabound and halokinetic potash-bearing salt deposits. Potash-bearing basins may host tens of millions to more than 100 billion metric tons of potassium oxide (K2O). Examples of these deposits include those in the Elk Point Basin in Canada, the Pripyat Basin in Belarus, the Solikamsk Basin in Russia, and the Zechstein Basin in Germany.

  11. Determining the von Mises stress power spectral density for frequency domain fatigue analysis including out-of-phase stress components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonte, M.H.A.; de Boer, Andries; Liebregts, R.

    This paper provides a new formula to take into account phase differences in the determination of an equivalent von Mises stress power spectral density (PSD) from multiple random inputs. The obtained von Mises PSD can subsequently be used for fatigue analysis. The formula was derived for use in the

  12. Digital mineral logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    A digital mineral logging system acquires data from a mineral logging tool passing through a borehole and transmits the data uphole to an electronic digital signal processor. A predetermined combination of sensors, including a deviometer, is located in a logging tool for the acquisition of the desired data as the logging tool is raised from the borehole. Sensor data in analog format is converted in the logging tool to a digital format and periodically batch transmitted to the surface at a predetermined sampling rate. An identification code is provided for each mineral logging tool, and the code is transmitted to the surface along with the sensor data. The self-identifying tool code is transmitted to the digital signal processor to identify the code against a stored list of the range of numbers assigned to that type of tool. The data is transmitted up the d-c power lines of the tool by a frequency shift key transmission technique. At the surface, a frequency shift key demodulation unit transmits the decoupled data to an asynchronous receiver interfaced to the electronic digital signal processor. During a recording phase, the signals from the logging tool are read by the electronic digital signal processor and stored for later processing. During a calculating phase, the stored data is processed by the digital signal processor and the results are outputted to a printer or plotter, or both

  13. Technetium Reduction and Permanent Sequestration by Abiotic and Biotic Formation of Low-Solubility Sulfide Mineral Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tratnyek, Paul G. [Oregon Health & Science Univ., Beaverton, OR (United States); Tebo, Bradley M. [Oregon Health & Science Univ., Beaverton, OR (United States); Fan, Dimin [Oregon Health & Science Univ., Beaverton, OR (United States); Anitori, Roberto [Oregon Health & Science Univ., Beaverton, OR (United States); Szecsody, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jansik, Danielle [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-14

    One way to minimize the mobility of the TcVII oxyanion pertechnetate (TcO4-) is to effect reduction under sulfidogenic conditions (generated abiotically by Fe0 or biotically) to form TcSx, which is significantly slower to oxidize than TcIVO2. In sediment systems, TcSx and other precipitates may oxidize more slowly due to oxygen diffusion limitations to these low permeability precipitate zones. In addition, the TcO4- reduction rate may be more rapid in the presence of sediment because of additional reductive surface phases. This project aims to provide a fundamental understanding of the feasibility of immobilization of TcO4- as TcSx in the vadose zone or groundwater by application nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), and sulfide or sulfate. Biotic batch experiments have used the sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfotomaculum reducens. The iron sulfide mineral mackinawite was generated under these conditions, while vivianite was formed in nZVI only controls. The sulfide/bacteria-containing system consistently reduced aqueous pertechnetate rapidly (> 95% in the first hour), a rate similar to that for the sulfide-free, nZVI only system. Reduced Tc (aged for 3 months) generated in both SRB/nZVI systems was highly resistant to reoxidation. In reduced samples, Tc was found associated with solid phases containing Fe and S (D. reducens/nZVI) or Fe (nZVI only). Experiments using D. reducens without nZVI provided some additional insights. Firstly, stationary phase cultures were able to slowly reduce pertechnetate. Secondly, addition of pertechnetate at the beginning of cell growth (lag phase) resulted in a faster rate of Tc reduction, possibly indicating a direct (e.g. enzymatic) role for D. reducens in Tc reduction. Abiotic batch experiments were conducted with Na2S as the sulfide source. Pertechnetate reduction was

  14. Determining the von Mises stress power spectral density for frequency domain fatigue analysis including out-of-phase stress components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, M. H. A.; de Boer, A.; Liebregts, R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper provides a new formula to take into account phase differences in the determination of an equivalent von Mises stress power spectral density (PSD) from multiple random inputs. The obtained von Mises PSD can subsequently be used for fatigue analysis. The formula was derived for use in the commercial vehicle business and was implemented in combination with Finite Element software to predict and analyse fatigue failure in the frequency domain.

  15. Mineral chemistry of radioactive and associated phases from neoproterozoic unconformity related uranium deposits from Koppunuru, Palnad sub-basin, Guntur District, Andhra Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, A.K.; Rajagopalan, V.; Shivakumar, K.; Verma, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Unconformity proximal uranium mineralization at Koppunuru occurs in basement granitoids and the overlying Banganalapalle Formation of Kurnool Group in Palnad sub-basin. The U-mineralization transgresses the unconformity both above and below. Later remobilization of uranium is evident, as they are intermittently intercepted within the sediments overlying the unconformity. Subsurface exploration by drilling intercepted three mineralization bands, viz. Band A and B upto 80m above the unconformity in the overlying Banganapalle quartzite and Band C, mostly sub-parallel to the unconformity and confined to basal conglomerate/grit horizon except a few boreholes where it is transgressing to granitic horizon ( 2 (upto 2.00 %), ThO 2 (0.03 to 1.51 %) and RE 2 O 3 (0.12 to 3.56 %). Such activities signify the processes of epigenetic fluid/gel related to U-concentration. At increasing depths, possibility of AI- bearing radioactive phases is also envisaged. The radioactive phases present in the samples reveal negligible to low thorium indicating low temperature phenomena. They are likely to be emplaced by the epigenetic solution/gel rich in U, Ti, Si, AI, Ca, P and Pb, preferably along available spaces as vein, cavity and grain boundary. U-associated sulphides occurring as veins and fracture fills, essentially comprise pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite and galena. They have normal chemistry but for subtle variations in minor elements. The pyrite and pyrrhotite are invariably arseniferous and they dominate the sulphides. Thus, it is concluded that the area has potential for multi-episodic epigenetic U-mineralization

  16. Thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria of the secondary copper minerals libethenite, olivenite, pseudomalachite, kröhnkite, cyanochroite, and devilline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majzlan, J.; Zittlau, A.H.; Grevel, K.-D.; Schliesser, J.; Woodfield, B. F.; Dachs, E.; Števko, M.; Chovan, M.; Plášil, Jakub; Sejkora, J.; Milovská, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 5 (2015), s. 937-960 ISSN 0008-4476 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : secondary copper minerals * thermodynamics * pE–pH diagrams * Lippmann diagrams for solid solutions * infrared and Raman spectra Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2015

  17. Mineral commodity summaries 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2015 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2014 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses.

  18. Biomineralization of calcium carbonate in the cell wall of Lithothamnion crispatum (Hapalidiales, Rhodophyta): correlation between the organic matrix and the mineral phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Rodrigo Tomazetto; Salgado, Leonardo Tavares; Amado Filho, Gilberto Menezes; Leal, Rachel Nunes; Werckmann, Jacques; Rossi, André Linhares; Campos, Andrea Porto Carreiro; Karez, Cláudia Santiago; Farina, Marcos

    2017-06-01

    Over the past few decades, progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of coralline algae mineralization. However, the relationship between the mineral phase and the organic matrix in coralline algae has not yet been thoroughly examined. The aim of this study was to describe the cell wall ultrastructure of Lithothamnion crispatum, a cosmopolitan rhodolith-forming coralline algal species collected near Salvador (Brazil), and examine the relationship between the organic matrix and the nucleation and growth/shape modulation of calcium carbonate crystals. A nanostructured pattern was observed in L. crispatum along the cell walls. At the nanoscale, the crystals from L. crispatum consisted of several single crystallites assembled and associated with organic material. The crystallites in the bulk of the cell wall had a high level of spatial organization. However, the crystals displayed cleavages in the (104) faces after ultrathin sectioning with a microtome. This organism is an important model for biomineralization studies as the crystallographic data do not fit in any of the general biomineralization processes described for other organisms. Biomineralization in L. crispatum is dependent on both the soluble and the insoluble organic matrix, which are involved in the control of mineral formation and organizational patterns through an organic matrix-mediated process. This knowledge concerning the mineral composition and organizational patterns of crystals within the cell walls should be taken into account in future studies of changing ocean conditions as they represent important factors influencing the physico-chemical interactions between rhodoliths and the environment in coralline reefs. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  19. EFFECT OF FERRITE PHASE ON THE FORMATION AND COEXISTENCE OF 3CaO.3Al₂O₃.CaSO₄ AND 3CaO.SiO₂ MINERALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Lu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ferrite on the formation and coexistence of 3CaO.3Al₂O₃.CaSO₄ (C₄A₃$ and 3CaO.SiO₂ (C3S was investigated in this paper. The results indicate that 20 % content of ferrite phase with the composition of C₂A0.5F0.5 can facilitate the coexistence of C₄A₃$ and C₃S solid solutions at 1350 ° C. There are other trace elements that incorporate into clinker minerals and form solid solutions. In addition, the dark and polygonal C₄A₃$ solid solution is not dissolved in liquid phase at 1350 ° C. It can promote the burnability of the raw mixes and provide a favorable condition for the formation of C₃S. However, it has an adverse effect on the coexistence of two clinker minerals with the changing of ferrite compositions. This will provide the important basis for the preparation of the calcium sulphoaluminate cement clinker containing C₃S.

  20. Brazilian minerals annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Statistics of Brazilian mineral resources and production in 1977 are presented. Data included refer also to economic aspects, market, taxes, government incentives, manpower, exportation, importation, etc [pt

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 10: Summary report to phase 3 academic library respondents including frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1991-01-01

    Phase 3 of a 4 part study was undertaken to study the use of scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic aerospace community. Phase 3 of this project used three questionnaires that were sent to three groups (i.e., faculty, librarians, and students) in the academic aerospace community. Specific attention was paid to the types of STI used and the methods in which academic users acquire STI. The responses of the academic libraries are focussed on herein. Demographic information on academic aerospace libraries is provided. Data regarding NASA interaction with academic aerospace libraries is also included, as is the survey instrument.

  2. A New Method of Absorption-Phase Nanotomography for 3D Observation of Mineral-Organic-Water Textiles and its Application to Pristine Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Nakato, A.; Matsuno, J.; Sugimoto, M.; Uesugi, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Nakano, T.; Vaccaro, E.; Russel, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Pristine carbonaceous chondrites contain fine-grained matrix, which is composed largely of amorphous silicates, sub-micron silicate and sulfide crystals, and organic materials. They are regarded as primitive dust in the early Solar System that have suffered minimal alteration in their parent bodies. The matrix generally has different lithologies; some of them are unaltered but some are more or less aqueously altered. Their textures have been examined in 2D usually by FE-SEM/EDS, TEM/EDS, nano-SIMS and micro-XRD. Observation of their complex fine textures, such as spatial relation between different lithologies in 3D, is important for understanding aggregation and alteration processes. Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based X-ray tomography reveals 3D structures nondestructively with high spatial resolution of approximately greater than 100 nm. We have developed a new technique using absorption contrasts called "dual-energy tomography" (DET) to obtain 3D distribution of minerals at SPring-8, SR facility in Japan, and applied successfully to Itokawa particles. Phase and absorption contrast images can be simultaneously obtained in 3D by using "scanning-imaging x-ray microscopy" (SIXM) at SPring-8, which can discriminate between void, water and organic materials. We applied this technique combined with FIB micro-sampling to carbonaceous chondrites to search for primitive liquid water. In this study, we combined the DET and SIXM to obtain three dimensional submicron-scale association between minerals, organic materials and water and applied this to pristine carbonaceous chondrites.

  3. Saskatchewan resources. [including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    The production of chemicals and minerals for the chemical industry in Saskatchewan are featured, with some discussion of resource taxation. The commodities mentioned include potash, fatty amines, uranium, heavy oil, sodium sulfate, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium chlorate and bentonite. Following the successful outcome of the Cluff Lake inquiry, the uranium industry is booming. Some developments and production figures for Gulf Minerals, Amok, Cenex and Eldorado are mentioned.

  4. Minerals industry survey, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This is the seventh edition of the statistical survey commissioned by the Australian Mining Industry Council. It represents the most comprehensive review of the financial position of the Australian minerals industry and provides timely financial data on the minerals industry. The tables of this survey have been prepared for AMIC by Coopers and Lybrand, Chartered Accountants, based on information supplied to them in confidence by the respondent companies. For the purpose of the survey, the minerals industry has been defined as including exploration for, and extraction and primary processing of, minerals in Australia. The oil and gas industry is not included.

  5. Characterization of manganese phases in mineral processing products of the Azul Mine, Carajas. Metallurgical implications; Caracterizacao de fases manganesiferas em produtos de beneficiamento da Mina do Azul, Carajas. Implicacoes metalurgicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, G.; Fernandez, O.J.Ch., E-mail: pereiragilcimar@hotmail.co, E-mail: ochoque.fernandez@gmail.co [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Para (IFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Curso de Engenharia de Materiais; Costa, M.L. da, E-mail: mlc@ufpa.b [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias

    2010-07-01

    Were characterized the manganese phases of the processing products using ore microscopy and x-ray diffraction, in order to contribute with new data and help the processing operations of the mine. Cryptomelane is the main manganese mineral in products, and pyrolusite and nsutite are in minor proportion. Were observed distinctive textures of the cryptomelane and others manganese phases, it were formed in different geological times and therefore affecting the operations in mineral processing, principally, comminution. The observed mineralogical variations affect too the unit operations when expand the pit. (author)

  6. Miners' welfare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, C

    1984-06-13

    The Miners' Welfare Committee (MWC) was formed in Britain in 1921 and initiated building programmes to provide welfare amenities for miners and families, using architecture to improve the quality of a miner's working and leisure time. The article reviews the MWC's work, and assesses the design and architecture at the Selby Coalfield. (7 refs.)

  7. Mineral statistics yearbook 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A summary of mineral production in Saskatchewan was compiled and presented as a reference manual. Statistical information on fuel minerals such as crude oil, natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas and coal, and of industrial and metallic minerals, such as potash, sodium sulphate, salt and uranium, was provided in all conceivable variety of tables. Production statistics, disposition and value of sales of industrial and metallic minerals were also made available. Statistical data on drilling of oil and gas reservoirs and crown land disposition were also included. figs., tabs

  8. NAIAD - a computer program for calculation of the steady state and transient behaviour (including LOCA) of compressible two-phase coolant in networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimble, G.D.; Turner, W.J.

    1976-04-01

    The three one-dimensional conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy are solved by a stable finite difference scheme which allows the time step to be varied in response to accuracy requirements. Consideration of numerical stability is not necessary. Slip between the phases is allowed and descriptions of complex hydraulic components can be added into specially provided user routines. Intrinsic choking using any of the nine slip models is possible. A pipe or fuel model and detailed surface heat transfer are included. (author)

  9. Cold Heat Storage Characteristics of O/W-type Latent Heat Emulsion Including Continuum Phase of Water Treated with a Freezing Point Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hideo; Morita, Shin-Ichi

    This paper deals with flow and cold heat storage characteristics of the oil (tetradecane, C14H30, freezing point 278.9 K, Latent heat 229 kJ/kg)/water emulsion as a latent heat storage material having a low melting point. The test emulsion includes a water-urea solution as a continuum phase. The freezing point depression of the continuum phase permits enhancement of the heat transfer rate of the emulison, due to the large temperature difference between the latent heat storage material and water-urea solution. The velocity of emulsion flow and the inlet temperature of coolant in a coiled double tube heat exchanger are chosen as the experimental parameters. The pressure drop, the heat transfer coefficient of the emulsion in the coiled tube are measured in the temperture region over solid and liquid phase of the latent heat storage material. The finishing time of the cold heat storage is defined experimentally in the range of sensible and latent heat storage. It is clarified that the flow behavior of the emulsion as a non-Newtonian fluid has an important role in cold heat storage. The useful nondimentional correlation equations for the additional pressure loss coefficient, the heat transfer coefficient and the finishing time of the cold heat storage are derived in terms of Dean number and heat capacity ratio.

  10. Refractory, Abrasive and Other Industrial Mineral Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes refractory, abrasive, and other industrial minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals...

  11. Dataset for Phase I randomized clinical trial for safety and tolerability of GET 73 in single and repeated ascending doses including preliminary pharmacokinetic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina L. Haass-Koffler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The data in this article outline the methods used for the administration of GET 73 in the first time-in-human manuscript entitled “Phase I randomized clinical trial for the safety, tolerability and preliminary pharmacokinetics of the mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator GET 73 following single and repeated doses in healthy male volunteers” (Haass-Koffler et al., 2017 [1]. Data sets are provided in two different manners. The first series of tables provided includes procedural information about the experiments conducted. The next series of tables provided includes Pharmacokinetic (PK parameters for GET 73 and its main metabolite MET 2. This set of data is comprised by two experiments: Experiment 1 references a single ascending dose administration of GET 73 and Experiment 2 references a repeated ascending dose administration of GET 73. Keywords: Glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5, Allosteric modulator, GET 73, Safety, Tolerability

  12. Dataset for Phase I randomized clinical trial for safety and tolerability of GET 73 in single and repeated ascending doses including preliminary pharmacokinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Goodyear, Kimberly; Long, Victoria M; Tran, Harrison H; Loche, Antonella; Cacciaglia, Roberto; Swift, Robert M; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2017-12-01

    The data in this article outline the methods used for the administration of GET 73 in the first time-in-human manuscript entitled "Phase I randomized clinical trial for the safety, tolerability and preliminary pharmacokinetics of the mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator GET 73 following single and repeated doses in healthy male volunteers" (Haass-Koffler et al., 2017) [1]. Data sets are provided in two different manners. The first series of tables provided includes procedural information about the experiments conducted. The next series of tables provided includes Pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters for GET 73 and its main metabolite MET 2. This set of data is comprised by two experiments: Experiment 1 references a single ascending dose administration of GET 73 and Experiment 2 references a repeated ascending dose administration of GET 73.

  13. Preparation and thermal properties of mineral-supported polyethylene glycol as form-stable composite phase change materials (CPCMs) used in asphalt pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiao; Lin, Feipeng; Liu, Ruohua; Xiao, Ting; Zheng, Jianlong; Qian, Guoping; Liu, Hongfu; Wen, Pihua

    2017-12-05

    Three kinds of mineral-supported polyethylene glycol (PEG) as form-stable composite phase change materials (CPCMs) were prepared to choose the most suitable CPCMs in asphalt pavements for the problems of asphalt pavements rutting diseases and urban heat islands. The microstructure and chemical structure of CPCMs were characterized by SEM, FT-IR and XRD. Thermal properties of the CPCMs were determined by TG and DSC. The maximum PEG absorption of diatomite (DI), expanded perlite (EP) and expanded vermiculite (EVM) could reach 72%, 67% and 73.6%, respectively. The melting temperatures and latent heat of CPCMs are in the range of 52-55 °C and 100-115 J/g, respectively. The results show that PEG/EP has the best thermal and chemical stability after 100 times of heating-cooling process. Moreover, crystallization fraction results show that PEG/EP has slightly higher latent heats than that of PEG/DI and PEG/EVM. Temperature-adjusting asphalt mixture was prepared by substituting the fine aggregates with PEG/EP CPCMs. The upper surface maximum temperature difference of temperature-adjusting asphalt mixture reaches about 7.0 °C in laboratory, and the surface peak temperature reduces up to 4.3 °C in the field experiment during a typical summer day, indicating a great potential application for regulating pavement temperature field and alleviating the urban heat islands.

  14. Mineral facilities of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  15. New seismograph includes filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-02

    The new Nimbus ES-1210 multichannel signal enhancement seismograph from EG and G geometrics has recently been redesigned to include multimode signal fillers on each amplifier. The ES-1210F is a shallow exploration seismograph for near subsurface exploration such as in depth-to-bedrock, geological hazard location, mineral exploration, and landslide investigations.

  16. Law of radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Legal device done in order to standardize and promote the exploration and explotation of radioactive minerals by peruvian and foreign investors. This device include the whole process, since the prospection until the development, after previous auction given by IPEN

  17. Flotation of sulphide minerals 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forssberg, K S.E. [ed.; Luleaa University of Technology, Luleaa (Sweden). Division of Mineral Processing

    1991-01-01

    A total of 27 papers presented at the workshop on flotation of sulphide minerals, reprinted from the International Journal of Mineral Processing, vol. 33, nos. 1-4, are included in this book. They cover various aspects of flotation of such minerals as chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena, malachite and pyrite.

  18. Discrete-fracture-model of multi–scale time-splitting two–phase flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2017-11-23

    In this article, we consider a two-phase immiscible incompressible flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured heterogeneous porous media. The system of the governing equations consists of water saturation, Darcy’s law, nanoparticles concentration in water, deposited nanoparticles concentration on the pore-wall, and entrapped nanoparticles concentration in the pore-throat, as well as, porosity and permeability variation due to the nanoparticles deposition/entrapment on/in the pores. The discrete-fracture model (DFM) is used to describe the flow and transport in fractured porous media. Moreover, multiscale time-splitting strategy has been employed to manage different time-step sizes for different physics, such as saturation, concentration, etc. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed multi-scale time splitting approach.

  19. A Study on the quantification of hydration and the strength development mechanism of cementitious materials including amorphous phases by using XRD/Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kazuo; Hoshino, Seiichi; Hirao, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hiroki

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD)/Rietveld method was applied to measure the phase composition of cement. The quantative analysis concerning the progress of hydration was accomplished in an error of about the maximum 2-3% in spite of including amorphous materials such as blast furnace slag, fly ash, silica fume and C-S-H. The influence of the compressive strength on the lime stone fine powder mixture material was studied from the hydration analysis by Rietveld method. The two stages were observed in the strength development mechanism of cement; the hydration promotion of C 3 S in the early stage and the filling of cavities by carbonate hydrate for the longer term. It is useful to use various mixture materials for the formation of the resource recycling society and the durability improvement of concrete. (author)

  20. Discrete-fracture-model of multi–scale time-splitting two–phase flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we consider a two-phase immiscible incompressible flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured heterogeneous porous media. The system of the governing equations consists of water saturation, Darcy’s law, nanoparticles concentration in water, deposited nanoparticles concentration on the pore-wall, and entrapped nanoparticles concentration in the pore-throat, as well as, porosity and permeability variation due to the nanoparticles deposition/entrapment on/in the pores. The discrete-fracture model (DFM) is used to describe the flow and transport in fractured porous media. Moreover, multiscale time-splitting strategy has been employed to manage different time-step sizes for different physics, such as saturation, concentration, etc. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed multi-scale time splitting approach.

  1. A detailed kinetic mechanism including methanol and nitrogen pollutants relevant to the gas-phase combustion and pyrolysis of biomass-derived fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coda Zabetta, Edgardo; Hupa, Mikko [Aabo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Piispankatu 8, FI-20500 Turku (Finland)

    2008-01-15

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the simulation of the gas-phase combustion and pyrolysis of biomass-derived fuels was compiled by assembling selected reaction subsets from existing mechanisms (parents). The mechanism, here referred to as ''AaA,'' includes reaction subsets for the oxidation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), light hydrocarbons (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}), and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). The mechanism also takes into account reaction subsets of nitrogen pollutants, including the reactions relevant to staged combustion, reburning, and selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR). The AaA mechanism was validated against suitable experimental data from the literature. Overall, the AaA mechanism gave more accurate predictions than three other mechanisms of reference, although the reference mechanisms performed better occasionally. The predictions from AaA were also found to be consistent with the predictions of its parent mechanisms within most of their range of validity, thus transferring the validity of the parents to the inheriting mechanism (AaA). In parametric studies the AaA mechanism predicted that the effect of methanol on combustion and pollutants is often similar to that of light hydrocarbons, but it also showed that there are important exceptions, thus suggesting that methanol should be taken into account when simulating biomass combustion. To our knowledge, the AaA mechanism is currently the only mechanism that accounts for the chemistry of methanol and nitrogen relevant to the gas-phase combustion and pyrolysis of biomass-derived fuels. (author)

  2. United States mineral resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brobst, Donald A.; Pratt, Walden P.

    1973-01-01

    mineral-resource estimates and public policy. In the third chapter, R. L. Erickson discusses some new points of view on the relation of reserves and resources to the crustal abundance of elements. We acknowledge with thanks the cooperation of our colleagues in all phases of the preparation of this volume. Whatever success the book may attain is due entirely to a total effort. A paragraph of acknowledgment originally submitted as a part of the chapter on "Nuclear fuels" is given here instead because we feel it applied to all chapters: "The writers have drawn freely from published information, not all of which is cited, and from their colleagues, none of whom are given specific credit. The reader should be aware that the paper could not have been written without these sources." We extend specific thanks to Michael Fleischer for preparation of summaries of geochemical information that are included in many chapters. 

  3. Methodology for determination of trace elements in mineral phases of iron banded formation by LA-ICP-MS; Metodologia de determinacao de elementos-traco em fases minerais de formacoes ferriferas bandadas por LA-ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Denise V.M. de; Nalini Junior, Herminio A.; Sampaio, Geraldo M.S.; Abreu, Adriana T. de; Lana, Cristiano de C., E-mail: deniseversiane2@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nalini@degeo.ufop.br, E-mail: geraldomssampaio@gmail.com, E-mail: adrianatropia@gmail.com, E-mail: cristianodeclana@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (DEGEO/UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Geologia

    2015-07-01

    The study of the chemical composition of mineral phases of iron formation (FF), especially of trace elements, is an important tool in the understanding of the genesis of these rocks and the contribution of the phases in the composition of whole rock. Low mass fraction of such elements in the mineral phases present in this rock type requires a suitable analytical procedure. The laser ablation technique coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) has been widely used for determination of trace elements in geological samples. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop calibration curves for determination of trace elements (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) in mineral phases of banded iron formations by LA-ICP-MS. Several certified reference materials (CRM) were used for calibrate the equipment. The analytical conditions were checked by CRM NIST SRM 614. The results were satisfactory, since the curves showed good linearity coefficients, good accuracy and precision of results. (author)

  4. Gold and palladium minerals (including empirical PdCuBiSe3) from the former Roter Bär mine, St. Andreasberg, Harz Mountains, Germany: a result of low-temperature, oxidising fluid overprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Alexandre Raphael; Ließmann, Wilfried; Lehmann, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    At Roter Bär, a former underground mine in the polymetallic deposits of St. Andreasberg in the middle-Harz vein district, Germany, native gold and palladium minerals occur very locally in clausthalite-hematite pockets of few millimetres across in carbonate veinlets. The native gold is a Au-Ag intermetallic compound and the palladium minerals are characterised as mertieite-II [Pd8(Sb,As)3] and empirical PdCuBiSe3 with some S. The latter coexists with bohdanowiczite (AgBiSe2), a mineral that is stable below 120 °C. The geological setting of Roter Bär, underneath a post-Variscan unconformity, and its hematite-selenide-gold association suggest that oxidising hydrothermal brines of low temperature were instrumental to the Au-Pd mineralisation. The Roter Bär Au-Pd mineralisation can be explained by Permo-Triassic, red-bed-derived brines in the context of post-Variscan, unconformity-related fluid overprint.

  5. GOLD MINERAL PROSPECTING USING PHASED ARRAY TYPE L-BAND SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR (PALSAR SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING DATA, CENTRAL GOLD BELT, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beiranvand Pour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bentong-Raub Suture Zone (BRSZ of Peninsular Malaysia is one of the significant structural zones in Sundaland, Southeast Asia. It forms the boundary between the Gondwana-derived Sibumasu terrane in the west and Sukhothai arc in the east. The BRSZ is also genetically related to the sediment-hosted/orogenic gold deposits associated with the major lineaments and form-lines in the central gold belt Central Gold Belt of Peninsular Malaysia. In tropical environments, heavy tropical rainforest and intense weathering makes it impossible to map geological structures over long distances. Advances in remote sensing technology allow the application of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data in geological structural analysis for tropical environments. In this investigation, the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR satellite remote sensing data were used to analyse major geological structures in Peninsular Malaysia and provide detailed characterization of lineaments and form-lines in the BRSZ, as well as its implication for sediment-hosted/orogenic gold exploration in tropical environments. The major geological structure directions of the BRSZ are N-S, NNE-SSW, NE-SW and NW-SE, which derived from directional filtering analysis to PALSAR data. The pervasive array of N-S faults in the study area and surrounding terrain is mainly linked to the N-S trending of the Suture Zone. N-S striking lineaments are often cut by younger NE-SW and NW-SE-trending lineaments. Gold mineralized trends lineaments are associated with the intersection of N-S, NE-SW, NNW-SSE and ESE-WNW faults and curvilinear features in shearing and alteration zones. Lineament analysis on PALSAR satellite remote sensing data is a useful tool for detecting the boundary between the Gondwana-derived terranes and major geological features associated with suture zone especially for large inaccessible regions in tropical environments.

  6. A phase I feasibility study of multi-modality imaging assessing rapid expansion of marrow fat and decreased bone mineral density in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Susanta K; Arentsen, Luke; Sueblinvong, Thanasak; Brown, Keenan; Bolan, Pat; Ghebre, Rahel G; Downs, Levi; Shanley, Ryan; Hansen, Karen E; Minenko, Anne G; Takhashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Zhang, Yan; Geller, Melissa; Reynolds, Margaret; Lee, Chung K; Blaes, Anne H; Allen, Sharon; Zobel, Bruno Beomonte; Le, Chap; Froelich, Jerry; Rosen, Clifford; Yee, Douglas

    2015-04-01

    Cancer survivors are at an increased risk for fractures, but lack of effective and economical biomarkers limits quantitative assessments of marrow fat (MF), bone mineral density (BMD) and their relation in response to cytotoxic cancer treatment. We report dual energy CT (DECT) imaging, commonly used for cancer diagnosis, treatment and surveillance, as a novel biomarker of MF and BMD. We validated DECT in pre-clinical and phase I clinical trials and verified with water-fat MRI (WF-MRI), quantitative CT (QCT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Basis material composition framework was validated using water and small-chain alcohols simulating different components of bone marrow. Histologic validation was achieved by measuring percent adipocyte in the cadaver vertebrae and compared with DECT and WF-MRI. For a phase I trial, sixteen patients with gynecologic malignancies (treated with oophorectomy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy) underwent DECT, QCT, WF-MRI and DXA before and 12months after treatment. BMD and MF percent and distribution were quantified in the lumbar vertebrae and the right femoral neck. Measured precision (3mg/cm(3)) was sufficient to distinguish test solutions. Adiposity in cadaver bone histology was highly correlated with MF measured using DECT and WF-MRI (r=0.80 and 0.77, respectively). In the clinical trial, DECT showed high overall correlation (r=0.77, 95% CI: 0.69, 0.83) with WF-MRI. MF increased significantly after treatment (p<0.002). Chemotherapy and radiation caused greater increases in MF than oophorectomy (p<0.032). L4 BMD decreased 14% by DECT, 20% by QCT, but only 5% by DXA (p<0.002 for all). At baseline, we observed a statistically significant inverse association between MF and BMD which was dramatically attenuated after treatment. Our study demonstrated that DECT, similar to WF-MRI, can accurately measure marrow adiposity. Both imaging modalities show rapid increase in MF following cancer treatment. Our results suggest that MF and

  7. High-pressure phase diagram of hydrogen and deuterium sulfides from first principles: Structural and vibrational properties including quantum and anharmonic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Raffaello; Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco

    2018-06-01

    We study the structural and vibrational properties of the high-temperature superconducting sulfur trihydride and trideuteride in the high-pressure I m 3 ¯m and R 3 m phases by first-principles density-functional-theory calculations. On lowering pressure, the rhombohedral transition I m 3 ¯m →R 3 m is expected, with hydrogen-bond desymmetrization and occurrence of trigonal lattice distortion. With both Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) exchange-correlation functional, in hydrostatic conditions we find that, contrary to what is suggested in some recent experiments, if the rhombohedral distortion exists it affects mainly the hydrogen bonds, whereas the resulting cell distortion is minimal. We estimate that the occurrence of a stress anisotropy of approximately 10 % could explain this discrepancy. Assuming hydrostatic conditions, we calculate the critical pressure at which the rhombohedral transition occurs. Quantum and anharmonic effects, which are relevant in this system, are included at nonperturbative level with the stochastic self-consistent harmonic approximation. Within this approach, we determine the transition pressure by calculating the free-energy Hessian, a method that allows to estimate the critical pressure with much higher precision (and much lower computational cost) compared with the free-energy "finite-difference" approach previously used. Using PBE and BLYP, we find that quantum anharmonic effects are responsible for a strong reduction of the critical pressure with respect to the one obtained with the classical harmonic approach. Interestingly, for the two functionals, even if the transition pressures at classical harmonic level differ by 83 GPa, the transition pressures including quantum anharmonic effects differ only by 23 GPa. Moreover, we observe a prominent isotope effect, as we estimate higher transition pressure for D3S than for H3S . Finally, within the stochastic self-consistent harmonic approximation, with PBE

  8. Investigations on the binary systems of boron with chromium, columbium, nickel, and thorium, including a discussion of the Phase TiB in the titanium-boron system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, L H; Kiessling, R

    1950-01-01

    Investigations on the binary systems chromium-, columbium-, nickel-, and thorium-boron are reported. The titanium-boron system is discussed, and it is shown that the phase TiB, previously assumed to have zincblende structure, probably has a face-centered titanium lattice with boron in the octahedral interstices. In the chromium-boron system, the structure of the eta phase has been determined. It has the composition Cr/sub 3/B/sub 4/ and is isomorphous with Ta/sub 3/B/sub 4/ and Mn/sub 3/B/sub 4/. Some data for the delta phase are also given. For the columbium-boron system, a phase analysis has been carried out. The structures of three of the intermediary phases, CbB, Cb/sub 3/B/sub 2/, and CbB/sub 2/ (with extended homogeneity range), have been determined. They are isomorphous with corresponding phases of the tantalum-boron system. A brief phase analysis of the nickel-boron system showed the existence of a phase with lower boron content than Ni/sub 2/B, which has not been previously reported. In the thorium-boron system a new phase, probably with a complicated structure, was found with a boron content of about 50 at. %.

  9. Mineral industry statistics 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    Production, consumption and marketing statistics are given for solid fuels (coal, peat), liquid fuels and gases (oil, natural gas), iron ore, bauxite and other minerals quarried in France, in 1975. Also accident statistics are included. Production statistics are presented of the Overseas Departments and territories (French Guiana, New Caledonia, New Hebrides). An account of modifications in the mining field in 1975 is given. Concessions, exploitation permits, and permits solely for prospecting for mineral products are discussed. (In French)

  10. Isotope analysis of closely adjacent minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method of determining an indicator of at least one of hydrocarbon formation, migration, and accumulation during mineral development. It comprises: searching for a class of minerals in a mineral specimen comprising more than one class of minerals; identifying in the mineral specimen a target sample of the thus searched for class; directing thermally pyrolyzing laser beam radiation onto surface mineral substance of the target sample in the mineral specimen releasing surface mineral substance pyrolysate gases therefrom; and determining isotope composition essentially of the surface mineral substance from analyzing the pyrolysate gases released from the thus pyrolyzed target sample, the isotope composition including isotope(s) selected from the group consisting of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotopes; determining an indicator of at least one of hydrocarbon formation, migration, and accumulation during mineral development of the target mineral from thus determined isotope composition of surface mineral substance pyrolysate

  11. On Numerical Methods for Including the Effect of Capillary Pressure Forces on Two-phase, Immiscible Flow in a Layered Porous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersland, B.G.

    1996-05-01

    This mathematical doctoral thesis contains the theory, algorithms and numerical simulations for a heterogeneous oil reservoir. It presents the equations, which apply to immiscible and incompressible two-phase fluid flow in the reservoir, including the effect of capillary pressure forces, and emphasises in particular the interior boundary conditions at the interface between two sediments. Two different approaches are discussed. The first approach is to decompose the computational domain along the interior boundary and iterate between the subdomains until mass balance is achieved. The second approach accounts for the interior boundary conditions in the basis in which the solution is expanded, the basis being discontinuous over the interior boundaries. An overview of the construction of iterative solvers for partial differential equations by means of Schwartz methods is given, and the algorithm for local refinement with Schwartz iterations as iterative solver is described. The theory is then applied to a core plug problem in one and two space dimensions and the results of different methods compared. A general description is given of the computer simulation model, which is implemented in C++. 64 refs., 49 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Trace Mineral Losses in Sweat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chinevere, Troy D; McClung, James P; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2007-01-01

    Copper, iron and zinc are nutritionally essential trace minerals that confer vital biological roles including the maintenance of cell structure and integrity, regulation of metabolism, immune function...

  13. Aggregate and Mineral Resources - Minerals

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This point occurrence data set represents the current mineral and selected energy resources of Utah. The data set coordinates were derived from USGS topographic maps...

  14. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  15. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  16. BET measurements: Outgassing of minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Liselotte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2000-01-01

    Outgassing minerals at elevated temperatures prior to BET measurements can lead to phase changes, especially in the case of amorphous and poorly crystalline materials. In order to evaluate the applicability of the BET method when low outgassing temperatures are required, selected aquifer minerals...... were outgassed at different temperatures and for different times. The studied minerals are 2-line ferrihydrite, goethite, lepidocrocite, quartz, calcite, ®-alumina, and kaolinite. The results demonstrate that measured specific surface areas of iron oxides are strongly dependent on outgassing conditions...... because the surface area increased by 170% with increasing temperature. In the poorly crystalline minerals, phase changes caused by heating were observed at temperatures lower than 100±C. Therefore low outgassing temperatures are preferable for minimizing phase changes. As demonstrated in this study...

  17. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2009-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2009 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2008 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Because specific information concerning committed inventory was no longer available from the Defense Logistics Agency, National Defense Stockpile Center, that information, which was included in earlier Mineral Commodity Summaries publications, has been deleted from Mineral Commodity Summaries 2009. National reserves and reserve base information for most mineral commodities found in this report, including those for the United States, are derived from a variety of sources. The ideal source of such information would be comprehensive evaluations that apply the same criteria to deposits in different geographic areas and report the results by country. In the absence of such evaluations, national reserves and reserve base estimates compiled by countries for selected mineral commodities are a primary source of national reserves and reserve base information. Lacking national assessment information by governments, sources such as academic articles, company reports, common business practice, presentations by company representatives, and trade journal articles, or a combination of these, serve as the basis for national reserves and reserve base information reported in the mineral commodity sections of this publication. A national estimate may be assembled from the following: historically reported

  18. Fumarolic minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balic Zunic, Tonci; Garavelli, Anna; Jakobsson, Sveinn Peter

    2016-01-01

    The fumarolic mineralogy of the Icelandic active volcanoes, the Tyrrhenian volcanic belt (Italy) and the Aegean active arc (Greece) is investigated, and literature data surveyed in order to define the characteristics of the European fumarolic systems. They show broad diversity of mineral...... associations, with Vesuvius and Vulcano being also among the world localities richest in mineral species. Volcanic systems, which show recession over a longer period, show fumarolic development from the hightemperature alkaline halide/sulphate, calcic sulphate or sulphidic parageneses, synchronous...... with or immediately following the eruptions, through mediumtemperature ammonium minerals, metal chlorides, or fluoride associations to the late low-temperature paragenesis dominated by sulphur, gypsum, alunogen, and other hydrous sulphates. The situation can be different in the systems that are not recessing but show...

  19. Mineral sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an outlook of the Australian mineral sand industry and covers the major operators. It is shown that conscious of an environmentally minded public, the Australian miners have led the way in the rehabilitation of mined areas. Moreover the advanced ceramic industry is generating exciting new perspectives for zircon producers and there is a noticeable growth in the electronic market for rare earths, but in long term the success may depend as much on environmental management and communication skills as on mining and processing skills

  20. Contrasting estimates on the depth of magma storage zones in volcanic systems from mineral barometry and phase equilibrium experiments: a case study from Mount Merapi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Saskia; Martel, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Mount Merapi, located in central Java, erupts on average every 5-10 years by discharging block-and-ash flows that pose local, but spatially restricted hazards. In 2010, however, the volcano erupted with a force that has been unprecedented in over 100 years. Its proximity to the metropolis of Yogyakarta with a population of >4 million makes short- and long-term eruption forecasting a task of vital importance. Critical to the appraisal of the volcano's hazard potential are tight constraints on its upper-crustal magma plumbing system and particularly on the location of its pre-eruptive reservoir. Previous petrological studies have estimated on the basis of amphibole and clinopyroxene barometry that the main magma storage zone below Merapi is located at depths of >10-15 km, while geophysical surveys have inferred significant magma storage zones at depths of ~5.5-9 km. We have carried out phase equilibrium experiments on basaltic andesite erupted in 2010, which indicate that the main pre-eruptive reservoir is located at a depth of ~7-8 km (~200 MPa). Our results thus corroborate the findings of earlier geophysical surveys and highlight the extreme uncertainty of mineral-based pressure estimates for volcanic magma systems. We point out that the commonly employed amphibole barometric calibrations of Ridolfi et al. (2010) and Ridolfi & Renzulli (2012) calculate low crystallization pressure for amphibole crystallized from felsic melt and high crystallization pressure for amphibole crystallized from mafic melt, and that the calculated pressure is thus largely unrelated to true values. Commonly employed clinopyroxene barometers (e.g., those of Nimis 1999; Putirka 2008) are also of limited use for estimating the location of crustal magma reservoirs, because the methods have large standard errors and are extremely temperature-sensitive. As a result, the calculated crystallization pressures inevitably indicate crystallization over a large range of depths, often from deep- to

  1. Comparison of the solid-phase extraction efficiency of a bounded and an included cyclodextrin-silica microporous composite for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons determination in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri-Aucejo, Adela; Amorós, Pedro; Moragues, Alaina; Guillem, Carmen; Belenguer-Sapiña, Carolina

    2016-08-15

    Solid-phase extraction is one of the most important techniques for sample purification and concentration. A wide variety of solid phases have been used for sample preparation over time. In this work, the efficiency of a new kind of solid-phase extraction adsorbent, which is a microporous material made from modified cyclodextrin bounded to a silica network, is evaluated through an analytical method which combines solid-phase extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples. Several parameters that affected the analytes recovery, such as the amount of solid phase, the nature and volume of the eluent or the sample volume and concentration influence have been evaluated. The experimental results indicate that the material possesses adsorption ability to the tested polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Under the optimum conditions, the quantification limits of the method were in the range of 0.09-2.4μgL(-1) and fine linear correlations between peak height and concentration were found around 1.3-70μgL(-1). The method has good repeatability and reproducibility, with coefficients of variation under 8%. Due to the concentration results, this material may represent an alternative for trace analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water trough solid-phase extraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by structure type

  3. Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    The past twenty years or so have seen dramatic development of the experimental and theoretical tools available to study the surfaces of solids at the molecular (?atomic resolution?) scale. On the experimental side, two areas of development well illustrate these advances. The first concerns the high intensity photon sources associated with synchrotron radiation; these have both greatly improved the surface sensitivity and spatial resolution of already established surface spectroscopic and diffraction methods, and enabled the development of new methods for studying surfaces. The second centers on the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques initially developed in the 1980's with the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments. The direct 'observation' of individual atoms at surfaces made possible with these methods has truly revolutionized surface science. On the theoretical side, the availability of high performance computers coupled with advances in computational modeling has provided powerful new tools to complement the advances in experiment. Particularly important have been the quantum mechanics based computational approaches such as density functional theory (DFT), which can now be easily used to calculate the equilibrium crystal structures of solids and surfaces from first principles, and to provide insights into their electronic structure. In this chapter, we review current knowledge of sulfide mineral surfaces, beginning with an overview of the principles relevant to the study of the surfaces of all crystalline solids. This includes the thermodynamics of surfaces, the atomic structure of surfaces (surface crystallography and structural stability, adjustments of atoms at the surface through relaxation or reconstruction, surface defects) and the electronic structure of surfaces. We then discuss examples where specific crystal surfaces have been studied, with the main sulfide minerals organized by

  4. A consistent thermodynamic database for cement minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, P.; Claret, F.; Burnol, A.; Marty, N.; Gaboreau, S.; Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Giffault, E.; Bourbon, X.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of waste confinement and, more specifically, waste from the nuclear industry, concrete is used both as a confinement and as a building material. The exposure to high temperatures makes its geochemical behaviour difficult to predict over large periods of time. The present work aims to elucidate the temperature dependency of the thermodynamic functions related to minerals from the concrete or associated with some of its degradation products. To address precisely these functions is a key issue in order to investigate correctly the cement/clay interaction, from a geochemical point of view. A large set of experimental data has been collected, for the chemical systems CaO-SiO 2 -H 2 O, SO 3 -Al 2 O 3 - CaO-CO 2 -Cl-H 2 O and SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -CaO-H 2 O, including iron and magnesium bearing phases. Data include calorimetric measurements when available and results from equilibration experiments. The stability of C-S-H phases was considered as a specific issue, those phases may appear both as amorphous or crystalline minerals. In addition, the composition of amorphous minerals is still under debate. The phase diagram of crystalline phases was refined, providing the thermodynamic function of most of the main minerals. Then, we were able to build up a polyhedral model from the refined properties. The composition and the equilibrium constants of amorphous C-S-H, at room temperature, were derived from a large a set of equilibration data. Finally, the thermodynamic functions were completed by using the polyhedral model, both for amorphous and crystalline phases, in some cases. A verification test, based on reaction enthalpies derived from experimental data, indicates that predicted values for amorphous C-S-H are in close agreement with experimental data. For phases other than C-S-H, we have proceeded for each mineral the following way: - the equilibrium constant at 25 deg. C is selected from a single experimental

  5. Data set for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of chicken eggshell matrix proteins during the primary events of eggshell mineralization and the active growth phase of calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2015-09-01

    Chicken eggshell is a biomineral composed of 95% calcite calcium carbonate mineral and of 3.5% organic matrix proteins. The assembly of mineral and its structural organization is controlled by its organic matrix. In a recent study [1], we have used quantitative proteomic, bioinformatic and functional analyses to explore the distribution of 216 eggshell matrix proteins at four key stages of shell mineralization defined as: (1) widespread deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), (2) ACC transformation into crystalline calcite aggregates, (3) formation of larger calcite crystal units and (4) rapid growth of calcite as columnar structure with preferential crystal orientation. The current article detailed the quantitative analysis performed at the four stages of shell mineralization to determine the proteins which are the most abundant. Additionally, we reported the enriched GO terms and described the presence of 35 antimicrobial proteins equally distributed at all stages to keep the egg free of bacteria and of 81 proteins, the function of which could not be ascribed.

  6. Data set for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of chicken eggshell matrix proteins during the primary events of eggshell mineralization and the active growth phase of calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Marie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chicken eggshell is a biomineral composed of 95% calcite calcium carbonate mineral and of 3.5% organic matrix proteins. The assembly of mineral and its structural organization is controlled by its organic matrix. In a recent study [1], we have used quantitative proteomic, bioinformatic and functional analyses to explore the distribution of 216 eggshell matrix proteins at four key stages of shell mineralization defined as: (1 widespread deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC, (2 ACC transformation into crystalline calcite aggregates, (3 formation of larger calcite crystal units and (4 rapid growth of calcite as columnar structure with preferential crystal orientation. The current article detailed the quantitative analysis performed at the four stages of shell mineralization to determine the proteins which are the most abundant. Additionally, we reported the enriched GO terms and described the presence of 35 antimicrobial proteins equally distributed at all stages to keep the egg free of bacteria and of 81 proteins, the function of which could not be ascribed.

  7. Anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility of rocks as a tool for direct determination of magnetic subfabrics of some minerals: an introductory study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrouda, F.; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, J.; Pokorný, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 1 (2017), s. 385-402 ISSN 0956-540X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00130801 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : magnetic and electrical properties * magnetic fabrics and anisotropy * magnetic mineralogy and petrology * rock and mineral magnetism Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 2.414, year: 2016

  8. Hydrothermal minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    flux. Circulation of seawater through the oceanic crust and upper mantle gives rise to a complex series of physical and chemical reactions that lead to the 1) formation of seafloor mineral deposits; 2) alteration of oceanic crust; 3) control... temperature in the high-temperature reaction zone near the heat source. Important parameters in determining the high- temperature fluid composition are • pressure, • temperature, • water/rock ratio, • rock composition, • recharge fluid...

  9. Mineral balance studies in very low birth weight infants fed human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanler, R.J.; Abrams, S.A.; Garza, C.

    1988-01-01

    Mineral homeostasis often is disrupted in the very low birth weight (VLBW) infant fed either human milk or commercial formula that contains insufficient quantities of available calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P). Alterations in mineral homeostasis include abnormal patterns of serum (Ca and P concentrations and alkaline phosphatase activity) and urine (Ca and P) biochemical markers, low net Ca and P retentions in comparison with intrauterine estimates of mineral accretion, and decreased bone mineral content. A two-phase study was conducted in our laboratory to test for these alterations in mineral homeostasis. In phase 1, VLBW infants fed a preparation of fortified human milk (either human milk-derived fortifier I or II or cow milk-derived fortifier) or cow milk-based formula specially designed for VLBW infants were evaluated during their hospitalization. In phase 2, after hospitalization, these infants were evaluated during the first 6 months of life when fed either their mother's milk or routine formula exclusively. The bioavailability of Ca and P from the tested preparations varied widely. Although the fortification of human milk resulted in both an improved biochemical pattern and net retention of Ca and P, optimal intrauterine mineral accretion was not achieved in any group tested. Longitudinal assessments of bone mineralization, by single photon absorptiometry, demonstrated that human milk-fed former VLBW infants had reduced bone mineral content. These investigations suggest that former VLBW infants fed human milk exclusively may be at risk for Ca and P deficiencies

  10. Pulmonary response to surface‐coated nanotitanium dioxide particles includes induction of acute phase response genes, inflammatory cascades, and changes in microRNAs: A toxicogenomic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halappanavar, Sabina; Jackson, Petra; Williams, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    with acute phase, inflammation and immune response 5 days post exposure with concomitant changes in several miRNAs. The role of these miRNAs in pulmonary response to inhaled particles is unknown and warrants further research. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2011. © 2011 Wiley‐Liss, Inc....... in increased levels of mRNA for acute phase markers serum amyloid A‐1 (Saa1) and serum amyloid A‐3 (Saa3), several C‐X‐C and C‐C motif chemokines, and cytokine tumor necrosis factor genes. Protein analysis of Saa1 and 3 showed selective upregulation of Saa3 in lung tissues. Sixteen miRNAs were induced by more...... than 1.2‐fold (adjusted P‐value changes in the expression of genes associated...

  11. Mineral and inorganic chemical composition of the Pernik coal, Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yossifova, Mariana G. [Geological Institute, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl.24, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2007-11-22

    The mineral and inorganic chemical composition of five types of samples from the Pernik subbituminous coals and their products generated from the Pernik preparation plant were studied. They include feed coal, low-grade coal, high-grade coal, coal slime, and host rock. The mineral matter of the coals contains 44 species that belong mainly to silicates, carbonates, sulphates, sulphides, and oxides/hydroxides, and to a lesser extent, chlorides, biogenic minerals, and organic minerals. The detrital minerals are quartz, kaolinite, micas, feldspars, magnetite, cristobalite, spessartine, and amphibole. The authigenic minerals include various sulphides, silicates, oxihydroxides, sulphates, and carbonates. Several stages and substages of formation were identified during the syngenetic and epigenetic mineral precipitations of these coals. The authigenic minerals show the greatest diversity of mineral species as the epigenetic mineralization (mostly sulphides, carbonates, and sulphates) dominates qualitatively and quantitatively. The epigenetic mineralization was a result of complex processes occurring mostly during the late development of the Pernik basin. These processes indicate intensive tectonic, hydrothermal and volcanic activities accompanied by a change from fresh to marine sedimentation environment. Thermally altered organic matter due to some of the above processes was also identified in the basin. Most of the trace elements in the Pernik coals (Mo, Be, S, Zr, Y, Cl, Ba, Sc, Ga, Ag, V, P, Br, Ni, Co, Pb, Ca, and Ti) show an affinity to OM and phases intimately associated with OM. Some of the trace elements (Sr, Ti, Mn, Ba, Pb, Cu, Zn, Co, Cr, Ni, As, Ag, Yb, Sn, Ga, Ge, etc.) are impurities in authigenic and accessory minerals, while other trace elements (La, Ba, Cu, Ce, Sb, Bi, Zn, Pb, Cd, Nd, etc.) occur as discrete phases. Elements such as Sc, Be, Y, Ba, V, Zr, S, Mo, Ti, and Ga exceed Clarke concentrations in all of the coal types studied. It was also found that

  12. A graphical user interface (GUI) toolkit for the calculation of three-dimensional (3D) multi-phase biological effective dose (BED) distributions including statistical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauweloa, Kevin I; Gutierrez, Alonso N; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Niko; Mavroidis, Panayiotis

    2016-07-01

    A toolkit has been developed for calculating the 3-dimensional biological effective dose (BED) distributions in multi-phase, external beam radiotherapy treatments such as those applied in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and in multi-prescription treatments. This toolkit also provides a wide range of statistical results related to dose and BED distributions. MATLAB 2010a, version 7.10 was used to create this GUI toolkit. The input data consist of the dose distribution matrices, organ contour coordinates, and treatment planning parameters from the treatment planning system (TPS). The toolkit has the capability of calculating the multi-phase BED distributions using different formulas (denoted as true and approximate). Following the calculations of the BED distributions, the dose and BED distributions can be viewed in different projections (e.g. coronal, sagittal and transverse). The different elements of this toolkit are presented and the important steps for the execution of its calculations are illustrated. The toolkit is applied on brain, head & neck and prostate cancer patients, who received primary and boost phases in order to demonstrate its capability in calculating BED distributions, as well as measuring the inaccuracy and imprecision of the approximate BED distributions. Finally, the clinical situations in which the use of the present toolkit would have a significant clinical impact are indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mineral supplementation for grazing ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, L.R.; Conrad, J.H.; Ellis, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    Grazing ruminants to which concentrate feeds cannot be economically fed must rely on self-feeding of mineral supplements. A number of factors affect mineral consumption of free-choice mixtures. Livestock exhibit little nutritional wisdom and will select palatable mixtures in preference to mixtures designed to meet their requirements. Palatability and appetite stimulators are often used to achieve a more uniform herd-wide consumption. It is best to formulate free-choice mixtures on the basis of analyses or other available data. However, when no information on mineral status is known, a free-choice complete mineral supplement is warranted. A 'complete' mineral mixture usually includes salt, a low fluoride P source, Ca, Co, Cu, I, Mn and Zn. Selenium, Mg, K, S, Fe or additional elements can be incorporated into a mineral supplement as new information suggests a need. The detriment to ruminant production caused by providing Ca, Se and Cu in excess can be greater than any benefit derived by providing a mineral supplement. In regions where high forage Mo predominates, three to five times the Cu content in mineral mixtures is needed to counteract Mo toxicity. Supplemental minerals are most critical during the wet season, when cattle are gaining weight rapidly and energy and protein supplies are adequate. Economic return on mineral supplementation is high. (author)

  14. Thermomechanical model for NiTi-based shape memory alloys including R-phase and material anisotropy under multi-axial loadings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Petr; Frost, Miroslav; Benešová, Barbora; Zineb, T.B.; Šittner, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, DEC 2012 (2012), s. 132-151 ISSN 0749-6419 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/1296; GA ČR GA106/09/1573; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA ČR GAP107/12/0800 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : shape memory alloys * constitutive modeling * R-phase * non-proportional loading * dissipation function Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics; JJ - Other Materials (FZU-D) Impact factor: 4.356, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749641912001027

  15. X-ray micro-analysis of the mineralization patterns in developing enamel in hamster tooth germs exposed to fluoride in vitro during the secretory phase of amelogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Blijleven, N.; Hoeben-Schornagel, K.; Bronckers, A.L.; Woeltgens, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The developing enamel from three-day-old hamster first maxillary (M1) molar tooth germs exposed to fluoride (F-) in vitro was analyzed for its mineral content by means of the energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis technique. The aim of this study was to obtain semi-quantitative data on the F(-)-induced hypermineralization patterns in the enamel and to confirm that the increase in electron density observed in micrographs of F(-)-treated enamel is indeed due to an increase in mineral content in the fluorotic enamel. The tooth germs were explanted during the early stages of secretory amelogenesis and initially cultured for 24 hr in the presence of 10 ppm F- in the culture medium. The germs were then cultured for another 24 hr without F-. In order to compare the ultrastructural results directly with the microprobe data, we used the same specimens for both investigations. The net calcium counts (measurement minus background counts) in the analyses were used as a measure of the mineral content in the enamel. The aprismatic pre-exposure enamel, deposited in vivo before the onset of culture, was the most hypermineralized region in the fluorotic enamel, i.e., it contained the highest amount of calcium measured. The degree of the F(-)-induced hypermineralization gradually decreased (but was not abolished) in the more mature regions of the enamel. The unmineralized enamel matrix secreted during the initial F- treatment in vitro mineralized during the subsequent culture without F-. The calcium content in this enamel layer was in the same order of magnitude as that recorded for the newly deposited enamel in control tooth germs cultured without F-

  16. TUCS/phosphate mineralization of actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This program has as its objective the development of a new technology that combines cation exchange and mineralization to reduce the concentration of heavy metals (in particular actinides) in groundwaters. The treatment regimen must be compatible with the groundwater and soil, potentially using groundwater/soil components to aid in the immobilization process. The delivery system (probably a water-soluble chelating agent) should first concentrate the radionuclides then release the precipitating anion, which forms thermodynamically stable mineral phases, either with the target metal ions alone or in combination with matrix cations. This approach should generate thermodynamically stable mineral phases resistant to weathering. The chelating agent should decompose spontaneously with time, release the mineralizing agent, and leave a residue that does not interfere with mineral formation. For the actinides, the ideal compound probably will release phosphate, as actinide phosphate mineral phases are among the least soluble species for these metals. The most promising means of delivering the precipitant would be to use a water-soluble, hydrolytically unstable complexant that functions in the initial stages as a cation exchanger to concentrate the metal ions. As it decomposes, the chelating agent releases phosphate to foster formation of crystalline mineral phases. Because it involves only the application of inexpensive reagents, the method of phosphate mineralization promises to be an economical alternative for in situ immobilization of radionuclides (actinides in particular). The method relies on the inherent (thermodynamic) stability of actinide mineral phases.

  17. Proceedings of XXIV international mineral processing congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dianzuo; Sun Chuan Yao; Wang Fu Liang; Zhang Li Cheng; Han Long (eds.)

    2008-07-01

    Topics covered in volume 1 include applied mineralogy, comminution, classification, physical separation, flotation chemistry, sulphide flotation, non-sulphide flotation and reagent in mineral industry. Volume 2 covers processing of complex ores, processing of industrial minerals and coal, solid liquid separation, dispersion and aggregation, process simulation, expert systems and control of mineral processing, biohydrometallurgy, and mineral chemical processing. Volume 3 contains powder technology, mineral materials, treatment and recycling for solid wastes, waste water treatment, secondary resource recovery, soil remediation, concentrator engineering and process design, and application of mineral processing in related industry. It includes a CD-ROM of the proceedings.

  18. 77 FR 56273 - Conflict Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... auditor and to certify the audit. In addition, Section 13(p) requires the report to include a description.... Auditor Independence iii. Audit Objective 4. Recycled and Scrap Minerals a. Proposed Rules b. Comments on... Minerals Report must also identify the independent private sector auditor \\23\\ and certify the independent...

  19. ECO2M: A TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Mixtures of Water, NaCl, and CO2, Including Super- and Sub-Critical Conditions, and Phase Change Between Liquid and Gaseous CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.

    2011-04-01

    ECO2M is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.0) that was designed for applications to geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers. It includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H{sub 2}O - NaCl - CO{sub 2} mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for temperature, pressure and salinity conditions in the range of 10 C {le} T {le} 110 C, P {le} 600 bar, and salinity from zero up to full halite saturation. The fluid property correlations used in ECO2M are identical to the earlier ECO2N fluid property package, but whereas ECO2N could represent only a single CO{sub 2}-rich phase, ECO2M can describe all possible phase conditions for brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. This allows for seamless modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO{sub 2}-rich) phase, as well as two-and three-phase mixtures of aqueous, liquid CO{sub 2} and gaseous CO{sub 2} phases. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. TOUGH2/ECO2M is upwardly compatible with ECO2N and accepts ECO2N-style inputs. This report gives technical specifications of ECO2M and includes instructions for preparing input data. Code applications are illustrated by means of several sample problems, including problems that had been previously solved with TOUGH2/ECO2N.

  20. Sorption of pesticides to aquifer minerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Liselotte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes results from a work were the sorption of five pesticides on seven minerals were studied in order to quantify the adsorption to different mineral surfaces. Investigated mineral phases are: quartz, calcite, kaolinite, a-alumina, and three iron oxides (2-line ferrihydrite......, goethite, lepidocrocite). Selected pesticides are: atrazine, isoproturon, mecoprop, 2,4-D, and bentazone. The results demonstrate that pesticides adsorb to pure mineral surfaces. However, the size of the adsorption depends on the type of pesticide and the type of mineral....

  1. Thermochemical properties of silver tellurides including empressite (AgTe) and phase diagrams for Ag-Te and Ag-Te-O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, Mikhail V.; Osadchii, Evgeniy G.; Brichkina, Ekaterina A.

    2017-10-01

    This study compiles original experimental and literature data on the thermodynamic properties (ΔfG°, S°, ΔfH°) of silver tellurides (α-Ag2Te, β-Ag2Te, Ag1.9Te, Ag5Te3, AgTe) obtained by the method of solid-state galvanic cell with the RbAg4I5 and AgI solid electrolytes. The thermodynamic data for empressite (AgTe, pure fraction from Empress Josephine Mine, Colorado USA) have been obtained for the first time by the electrochemical experiment with the virtual reaction Ag + Te = AgTe. The Ag-Te phase diagrams in the T - x and log fTe2 (gas) - 1/ T coordinates have been refined, and the ternary Ag-Te-O diagrams with Ag-Te-TeO2 (paratellurite) composition range have been calculated.

  2. A facile in vitro model to study rapid mineralization in bone tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Anthony J; Aydin, Halil M; Hu, Bin; Konduru, Sandeep; Kuiper, Jan Herman; Yang, Ying

    2014-09-16

    Mineralization in bone tissue involves stepwise cell-cell and cell-ECM interaction. Regulation of osteoblast culture microenvironments can tailor osteoblast proliferation and mineralization rate, and the quality and/or quantity of the final calcified tissue. An in vitro model to investigate the influencing factors is highly required. We developed a facile in vitro model in which an osteoblast cell line and aggregate culture (through the modification of culture well surfaces) were used to mimic intramembranous bone mineralization. The effect of culture environments including culture duration (up to 72 hours for rapid mineralization study) and aggregates size (monolayer culture as control) on mineralization rate and mineral quantity/quality were examined by osteogenic gene expression (PCR) and mineral markers (histological staining, SEM-EDX and micro-CT). Two size aggregates (on average, large aggregates were 745 μm and small 79 μm) were obtained by the facile technique with high yield. Cells in aggregate culture generated visible and quantifiable mineralized matrix within 24 hours, whereas cells in monolayer failed to do so by 72 hours. The gene expression of important ECM molecules for bone formation including collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin, varied temporally, differed between monolayer and aggregate cultures, and depended on aggregate size. Monolayer specimens stayed in a proliferation phase for the first 24 hours, and remained in matrix synthesis up to 72 hours; whereas the small aggregates were in the maturation phase for the first 24 and 48 hour cultures and then jumped to a mineralization phase at 72 hours. Large aggregates were in a mineralization phase at all these three time points and produced 36% larger bone nodules with a higher calcium content than those in the small aggregates after just 72 hours in culture. This study confirms that aggregate culture is sufficient to induce rapid mineralization and that aggregate

  3. Characterization of the disposition of fostamatinib in Japanese subjects including pharmacokinetic assessment in dry blood spots: results from two phase I clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul; Cheung, S Y Amy; Yen, Mark; Han, David; Gillen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to characterize the pharmacokinetics of fostamatinib in two phase I studies in healthy Japanese subjects after single- and multiple-dose administration, and to evaluate the utility of dried blood spot (DBS) sampling. In study A, 40 Japanese and 16 white subjects were randomized in a double-blind parallel group study consisting of seven cohorts, which received either placebo or a fostamatinib dose between 50 and 200 mg after single and multiple dosing. Pharmacokinetics of R406 (active metabolite of fostamatinib) in plasma and urine was assessed, and safety was intensively monitored. Study B was an open-label study that assessed fostamatinib 100 and 200 mg in 24 Japanese subjects. In addition to plasma and urine sampling (as for study A), pharmacokinetics was also assessed in blood. Mean maximum plasma concentration (C max) and area under total plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) increased with increasing dose in Japanese subjects. Steady state was achieved in 5–7 days for all doses. C max and AUC were both higher in Japanese subjects administered a 150-mg single dose than in white subjects. This difference was maintained for steady state exposure by day 10. Overall, R406 blood concentrations were consistent and ∼2.5-fold higher than in plasma. Minimal (blood cells, and DBS sampling was a useful method for assessing R406 pharmacokinetics.

  4. Up-scaling of a two-phase flow model including gravity effect in geological heterogeneous media: application to CO2 sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Tri-Dat

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the mathematical modeling and the numerical simulation of the migration under gravity and capillarity effects of the supercritical CO 2 injected into a geological heterogeneous sequestration site. The simulations are performed with the code DuMux. Particularly, we consider the up-scaling, from the cell scale to the reservoir scale, of a two-phase (CO 2 -brine) flow model within a periodic stratified medium made up of horizontal low permeability barriers, continuous or discontinuous. The up-scaling is done by the two-scale asymptotic method. First, we consider perfectly layered media. An homogenized model is developed and validated by numerical simulation for different values of capillary number and the incident flux of CO 2 . The homogenization method is then applied to the case of a two-dimensional medium made up of discontinuous layers. Due to the gravity effect, the CO 2 accumulates under the low permeability layers, which leads to a non-standard local mathematical problem. This stratification is modeled using the gravity current approach. This approach is then extended to the case of semi-permeable strata taking into account the capillarity. The up-scaled model is compared with numerical simulations for different types of layers, with or without capillary pressure, and its limit of validity is discussed in each of these cases. The final part of this thesis is devoted to the study of the parallel computing performances of the code DuMux to simulate the injection and migration of CO 2 in three-dimensional heterogeneous media (layered periodic media, fluvial media and reservoir model SPE 10). (author) [fr

  5. In situ evidence of mineral physical protection and carbon stabilization revealed by nanoscale 3-D tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yi-Tse; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chiang, Cheng-Cheng; Tsai, Heng; Song, Yen-Fang; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Liang, Biqing

    2018-05-01

    An approach for nanoscale 3-D tomography of organic carbon (OC) and associated mineral nanoparticles was developed to illustrate their spatial distribution and boundary interplay, using synchrotron-based transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM). The proposed 3-D tomography technique was first applied to in situ observation of a laboratory-made consortium of black carbon (BC) and nanomineral (TiO2, 15 nm), and its performance was evaluated using dual-scan (absorption contrast and phase contrast) modes. This novel tool was then successfully applied to a natural OC-mineral consortium from mountain soil at a spatial resolution of 60 nm, showing the fine structure and boundary of OC, the distribution of abundant nano-sized minerals, and the 3-D organo-mineral association in situ. The stabilization of 3500-year-old natural OC was mainly attributed to the physical protection of nano-sized iron (Fe)-containing minerals (Fe oxyhydroxides including ferrihydrite, goethite, and lepidocrocite), and the strong organo-mineral complexation. In situ evidence revealed an abundance of mineral nanoparticles, in dense thin layers or nano-aggregates/clusters, instead of crystalline clay-sized minerals on or near OC surfaces. The key working minerals for C stabilization were reactive short-range-order (SRO) mineral nanoparticles and poorly crystalline submicron-sized clay minerals. Spectroscopic analyses demonstrated that the studied OC was not merely in crisscross co-localization with reactive SRO minerals; there could be a significant degree of binding between OC and the minerals. The ubiquity and abundance of mineral nanoparticles on the OC surface, and their heterogeneity in the natural environment may have been severely underestimated by traditional research approaches. Our in situ description of organo-mineral interplay at the nanoscale provides direct evidence to substantiate the importance of mineral physical protection for the long-term stabilization of OC. This high-resolution 3-D

  6. Multicritical phase diagrams of the ferromagnetic spin-3/2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model with repulsive biquadratic coupling including metastable phases: The cluster variation method and the path probability method with the point distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr; Canko, Osman [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-01-15

    We study the thermal variations of the ferromagnetic spin-3/2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths (BEG) model with repulsive biquadratic coupling by using the lowest approximation of the cluster variation method (LACVM) in the absence and presence of the external magnetic field. We obtain metastable and unstable branches of the order parameters besides the stable branches and phase transitions of these branches are investigated extensively. The classification of the stable, metastable and unstable states is made by comparing the free energy values of these states. We also study the dynamics of the model by using the path probability method (PPM) with the point distribution in order to make sure that we find and define the metastable and unstable branches of the order parameters completely and correctly. We present the metastable phase diagrams in addition to the equilibrium phase diagrams in the (kT/J, K/J) and (kT/J, D/J) planes. It is found that the metastable phase diagrams always exist at the low temperatures, which are consistent with experimental and theoretical works.

  7. Multicritical phase diagrams of the ferromagnetic spin-3/2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model with repulsive biquadratic coupling including metastable phases: The cluster variation method and the path probability method with the point distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Canko, Osman

    2008-01-01

    We study the thermal variations of the ferromagnetic spin-3/2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths (BEG) model with repulsive biquadratic coupling by using the lowest approximation of the cluster variation method (LACVM) in the absence and presence of the external magnetic field. We obtain metastable and unstable branches of the order parameters besides the stable branches and phase transitions of these branches are investigated extensively. The classification of the stable, metastable and unstable states is made by comparing the free energy values of these states. We also study the dynamics of the model by using the path probability method (PPM) with the point distribution in order to make sure that we find and define the metastable and unstable branches of the order parameters completely and correctly. We present the metastable phase diagrams in addition to the equilibrium phase diagrams in the (kT/J, K/J) and (kT/J, D/J) planes. It is found that the metastable phase diagrams always exist at the low temperatures, which are consistent with experimental and theoretical works

  8. Heavy mineral potential of Ramnad Sub-basin, Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaji, T.S.; Alam, M.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Minerals Directorate for the Exploration and Research (AMD) is actively engaged in the surveys and exploration of heavy mineral placers along 980 km long coast of Tamil Nadu since 1950's identifying many major heavy mineral deposits/occurrences of varying grade and dimensions in the beach, coastal dunes and Teri sand environs. Though most of the coastal stretch of Tamil Nadu is fairly understood for its heavy mineral potential, some of the coastal segments of the Ramnad basin of southeastern Tamil Nadu, a storehouse of heavy mineral placer repositories need intensive exploration inputs, to understand its potential completely. The 100 km long study area falls in parts of Ramnad sub basin from Vaippar in Tuticorin to Mandapam in Ramanathpuram districts, constitutes the southern part of Cauvery basin. The unconsolidated coastal sediments of the basin is under active exploration and evaluation since 2012, in a phased manner, to link the known deposits, and completely delineate geo-spatial disposition of the heavy mineral bearing sand bodies in different environs right from the present day shoreline to the inland. Geologically, the area is a part of a long narrow strip of Tertiary/Quaternary sediments which outcrops along the southern Tamil Nadu coast. Precambrian granulites terrain of Southern Granulitic Terrain (SGT) in the hinterland area consisting of predominantly charnockites, gneisses, leptynites with numerous pegmatitic, vein quartz injections. The geomorphological features identified include Holocene Beach ridges, swales, abandoned channels, coastal dunes, and alluvial delta plains of Vaippar

  9. Mineral exploration in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.J.; Clark, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The chapter provides an overview and comparisons of mineral exploration in Botswana and Papua New Guinea, including selection comparisons with Australia and Canada. It describes the history of exploration in Botswana and PNG. The concluding section summarizes the findings

  10. High-performance control of a three-phase voltage-source converter including feedforward compensation of the estimated load current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Andres E.; Solsona, Jorge A.; Busada, Claudio; Chiacchiarini, Hector; Valla, Maria Ines

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a new control strategy for voltage-source converters (VSC) is introduced. The proposed strategy consists of a nonlinear feedback controller based on feedback linearization plus a feedforward compensation of the estimated load current. In our proposal an energy function and the direct-axis current are considered as outputs, in order to avoid the internal dynamics. In this way, a full linearization is obtained via nonlinear transformation and feedback. An estimate of the load current is feedforwarded to improve the performance of the whole system and to diminish the capacitor size. This estimation allows to obtain a more rugged and cheaper implementation. The estimate is calculated by using a nonlinear reduced-order observer. The proposal is validated through different tests. These tests include performance in presence of switching frequency, measurement filters delays, parameters uncertainties and disturbances in the input voltage.

  11. Variation of properties of clayey minerals and associated phases about uranium deposits related to proterozoic discordances; Variation des proprietes des mineraux argileux et des phases associees autour des gisements d'uranium lies aux discordances Proterozoiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaufort, D.; Patrier, P.; Laverret, E.; Gaboreau, St.; Billault, V. [HYDRASA, Universite de Poitiers-CNRS, 86 - Poitiers (France); Quirt, D. [AREVA Resources Canada AREVA Resources Canada Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    The authors propose explanations for the clayey alteration which surrounds uranium deposits related to proterozoic discordances as it is noticed in Canada (Athabasca) and Australia (Kombolgie). The observed mineral sequences are interpreted as the product of an increasing interaction between infiltrated diagenetic acid and oxidising solutions on the one hand, and platform rocks on the other hand, at temperatures between 150 and 200 C. These interpretations are based on crystallographic and crystallochemical investigations

  12. Minerals From the Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Michael J.

    The current interest in minerals centering on, among other things, potential shortages, long-term needs, and deep seabed nodules, accentuates the usefulness and timeliness of this little book authored by a former chairman of the British National Environmental Research Council.In less than 100 pages, the author puts into perspective the potential for producing minerals from offshore areas of the world. After introducing the reader to the ocean environment and the extraordinary variety of the nature of the seabed, the author describes in some detail the variety of minerals found there. This is done in seven separate chapters entitled ‘Bulk and Non-Metallic Minerals From the Seas’ ‘Metals From the Shallow Seas’ ‘Metals From the Deep Oceans’ ‘Minerals From Solution’ ‘Oil and Gas from the Shallow Seas’ ‘Oil and Gas From Deep Waters’ and ‘Coal Beneath the Sea.’ The remaining chapters give a brief regional review of marine minerals distribution for eight areas of significant socioeconomic structure, and a short recapitulation of special problems of mineral recovery in the marine environment including such matters as the effect of water motion on mineral processing and of international law on investments. Glossaries of geological periods and technical terms, a short list of references, and an index complete the work.

  13. A numerical study of three-dimensional flame propagation over thin solids in purely forced concurrent flow including gas-phase radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feier, Ioan I., Jr.

    The effect of flame radiation on concurrent-flow flame spread over a thin solid sample of finite width in a low-speed wind tunnel is modeled using three-dimensional full Navier-Stokes equations and three-dimensional flame radiation transfer equations. The formulation includes the conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species: fuel vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor. The SN discrete ordinates method is used to solve the radiation transfer equation with a mean absorption coefficient kappa = Ckappa p, where kappap is the Planck mean absorption coefficient of the gas mixture. The varying parameter C has a value between 0 and 1; C represents the strength of flame radiation. In addition, the solid fuel absorptivity alpha is varied to ascertain the effect of flame radiation heat feedback to the solid. The flow tunnel modeled has a dimension of 10x10x30 cm, the solid fuel has a width of 6-cm with two 1-cm inert strips as edges. Incoming forced flow velocity (5 cm/s) of 21% oxygen is assumed. For comparison with the three-dimensional results, corresponding two-dimensional computations are also performed. Detailed spatial flame profiles, solid surface profiles, and heat fluxes are presented. Increasing the flame radiation strength decreases the flame length. Although flame radiation provides an additional heat transfer mechanism to preheat the solid, it is insufficient to offset the decreased convective heating due to the shorter flame; the net effect is a slower spread rate. The percentage of unreacted fuel vapor that escapes from the flame is under 2%. It is theorized that some of the pyrolyzed fuel vapor diffuses sideway and reacts at the flame edges. A radiative energy balance is analyzed also. Flame radiative feedback to the solid plays a more important role in two-dimensional flames. With high solid fuel absorptivity, a peak in the flame spread rate occurs at an intermediate value of flame radiation strength---due to the competition between two

  14. Hydrometalurgical processes for mineral complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barskij, L.A.; Danil'chenko, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    Requirements for the technology of the processing of ores including uranium ores and principal stages of the working out of technological schemes are described in brief. There are reference data on commercial minerals and ores including uranium-thorium ores, their classification with due regard for physical, chemical and superficial properties which form the basis for ore-concentrating processes. There are also presented the classification of minerals including uranium minerals by their flotation ability, flotation regimes of minerals, structural-textural characteristics of ores, genetic types of ore formations and their concentrating ability, algorithmization of the apriori evaluation of the concentration and technological diagnostics of the processing of ores. The classification of ore concentration technique is suggested

  15. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  16. Laboratory of minerals purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The laboratory of minerals purification was organized in 1962 where with application of modern physical and chemical methods were investigated the mechanism of flotation reagents interaction with minerals' surface, was elaborated technologies on rising complexity of using of republic's minerals

  17. Mineralization and defluoridation of 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro -1-propanol (TFP) by UV oxidation in a novel three-phase fluidized bed reactor (3P-FBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Tso; Huang, Yao-Hui

    2013-05-01

    2,2,3,3-Tetrafluoro-1-propanol (TFP, C3H4F4O, M.W. = 132.06) is extensively used as the solvent in CD-R and DVD-R fabrication. Since it has a fluorinated alky-chain configuration and is non-biodegradable, its treatment by conventional oxidation methods is typically very inefficient. In this work, novel three-phase fluidized bed reactor (3P-FBR, 7.5 cm in diameter, 50 cm high) that combines photo oxidation (UV/H2O2, one of AOPs (Advanced Oxidation Process) and adsorption (BT5 iron oxide as adsorbent) processes is designed for mineralizing and defluorinizing TFP wastewater. The experimental results reveal that TFP can be efficiently mineralized, and the BT5 that is circulated by aeration in the 3P-FBR system can remove the released fluoride ions in the reaction period. Irradiation with 254 nm UV and a 10 mM H2O2 dose yield a TOC removal of TFP (1.39 mM, equivalent to an initial TOC of 50 ppm) of over 99.95% in 2 h, and 99% of fluoride was removed by BT5 with an adsorption capacity of 24.1 mg-F g(-1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetic theory of oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, R.E.; Gregory, R.T.; Taylor, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic and mass conservation equations are used to describe oxygen isotopic exchange between minerals and water in "closed" and open hydrothermal systems. In cases where n coexisting mineral phases having different reaction rates are present, the exchange process is described by a system of n + 1 simultaneous differential equations consisting of n pseudo first-order rate equations and a conservation of mass equation. The simultaneous solutions to these equations generate curved exchange trajectories on ??-?? plots. Families of such trajectories generated under conditions allowing for different fluid mole fractions, different fluid isotopic compositions, or different fluid flow rates are connected by positive-sloped isochronous lines. These isochrons reproduce the effects observed in hydrothermally exchanged mineral pairs including 1) steep positive slopes, 2) common reversals in the measured fractionation factors (??), and 3) measured fractionations that are highly variable over short distances where no thermal gradient can be geologically demonstrated. ?? 1987.

  19. Australian mineral industry annual review for 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The Australian mineral industry annual review records the activities and development of the Australian mineral industry and reports production, consumption, treatment, trade, prices, new developments, exploration and resources for mineral commodities including fuels, and summarises equivalent developments abroad. The present volume reviews activities and developments in 1982. Part 1 (General Review) - after briefly surveying the world mineral industry, summarises developments in the Australian mineral industry as a whole, under the headings: the industry in the national economy; important recent developments; production; overseas trade; prices; exploration expenditure; investment; income tax; royalties; structural data; wages and salaries; industrial disputes; and government assistance, legislation and controls. Part 2 (Commodity Review) - covers industrial mineral commodities, from abrasives to zirconium. Part 3 (Mining Census) - tabulates statistics extracted from the mining census, together with some mineral processing statistics from the manufacturing census. Part 4 (Miscellaneous) - tabulates quantum and value data on mineral output provided by State departments of mines and their equivalents.

  20. Mineral Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anemia include weakness and fatigue, lightheadedness, and shortness of breath. Iron-rich foods include red meat, pork, fish and shellfish, poultry, lentils, beans and soy foods, green leafy vegetables, and raisins. Some flours, cereals, and grain products are also fortified with ...

  1. Aggregates from mineral wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baic Ireneusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem concerning the growing demand for natural aggregates and the need to limit costs, including transportation from remote deposits, cause the increase in growth of interest in aggregates from mineral wastes as well as in technologies of their production and recovery. The paper presents the issue related to the group of aggregates other than natural. A common name is proposed for such material: “alternative aggregates”. The name seems to be fully justified due to adequacy of this term because of this raw materials origin and role, in comparison to the meaning of natural aggregates based on gravel and sand as well as crushed stones. The paper presents characteristics of the market and basic application of aggregates produced from mineral wastes, generated in the mining, power and metallurgical industries as well as material from demolished objects.

  2. Minerals from Macedonia: XV. Sivec mineral assemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boev, Blazho; Jovanovski, Gligor; Makreski, Petre; Bermanec, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents investigations carried out on the collected minerals from the Sivec deposit. It is situated in the vicinity of the town of Prilep, representing a rare occurrence of sugary white dolomite marbles. The application of suitable methods of exploitation of decorative-dimension stones makes possible to obtain large amounts of commercial blocks well known in the world. Despite the existence of dolomite marbles, a series of exotic minerals are typical in Sivec mineralization. Among them, the most significant are: calcite, fluorite, rutile, phlogopite, corundum, diaspore, almandine, kosmatite (clintonite or margarite), clinochlore, muscovite, quartz, pyrite, tourmaline and zoisite. An attempt to identify ten collected minerals using the FT IR spectroscopy is performed. The identification of the minerals was based on the comparison of the infrared spectra of our specimens with the corresponding literature data for the mineral species originating all over the world. The coloured pictures of all studied silicate minerals are presented as well. (Author)

  3. Develop of analytic method for the determination of vitamin D3 in multivitaminics and minerals using chromatography it liquidates of high efficiency in normal phase with ultraviolet detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis Barrantes, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The good chromatography conditions settled down for the determination vitamin D 3 in multivitaminic samples by means of the analytic technique of chromatography it liquidates of high efficiency (HPLC) in normal phase, with ultraviolet detection to 265 nm. The best conditions in the proposed methodology settled down and the variables of analytic acting were validated, for the analytic quantification of vitamin D 3 in International units. The applicability of the methodology was demonstrated in the vitamin determination D 3 in multivitaminis samples in pill form [es

  4. Australian mineral industry annual review for 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This volume of the Australian Mineral Industry Annual Review records the development and performance of the industry during the calendar year 1986. It reports production, consumption, treatment, trade, prices, new developments, exploration, and resources for mineral commodities including fuels, and summarises equivalent developments abroad. Part 1, 'General Review', after briefly surveying the world mineral industry, summarises developments in the Australian mineral industry as a whole. Part 2, 'Commodity Review', covers individual mineral commodities and commodity groups including brown coal, black coal and peat. Part 3, 'Mining Census', tabulates statistics extracted from the Mining Census, together with some mineral processing statistics from the Manufacturing Census. Part 4, tabulates quantity and value data on mineral output provided by the State departments of mines and their equivalents. The commodity review of black coal has been abstracted separately.

  5. Growth Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Plasma Mineral Chemistry as Affected by Dietary Chloride and Chloride Salts Fed to Broiler Chickens Reared under Phase Feeding System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. H. Mushtaq

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Requirements of dietary chloride (dCl and chloride salts were determined by using 4×2 factorial arrangement under four phase feeding program. Four levels (0.31, 0.45, 0.59 and 0.73% and two sources (NH4Cl and CaCl2 of the dCl were allocated to 1,472 chicks in eight dietary treatments in which each treatment was replicated four times with 46 birds per replicate. The four phase feeding program was comprised of four dietary phases: Prestarter (d 1 to 10, Starter (d 11 to 20, Grower (d 21 to 33 and Finisher (d 34 to 42; and diets were separately prepared for each phase. The cations, anions, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO, temperature, electrical conductivity (EC, total dissolved solids (TDS and salinity were analyzed in drinking water and were not affected by dietary treatments. BW gain (BWG; p≤0.009 and feed:gain (FG; p≤0.03 were improved in CaCl2 supplemented diets during d 1 to 10. The maximum response of BWG and FG was observed at 0.38% and 0.42% dCl, respectively, for d 34 to 42. However, the level of dCl for BWG during d 21 to 33 (p≤0.04 and d 34 to 42 (p≤0.009 was optimized at 0.60% and 0.42%, respectively. The level of dCl for optimized feed intake (FI; p≤0.006, FG (p≤0.007 and litter moisture (LM; p≤0.001 was observed at 0.60%, 0.38% and 0.73%, respectively, for d 1 to 42. Water intake (DWI was not affected by increasing dCl supplementation (p>0.05; however, the ratio between DWI and FI (DWI:FI was found highest at 0.73% dCl during d 1 to 10 (p≤0.05 and d 21 to 33 (p≤0.009. Except for d 34 to 42 (p≤0.006, the increasing level of dCl did not result in a significant difference in mortality during any phase. Blood pH and glucose, and breast and thigh weights (percentage of dressed weight were improved while dressing percentage (DP and gastrointestinal health were exacerbated with NH4Cl as compared to CaCl2 supplemented diets (p≤0.001. Higher plasma Na+ and HCO3− and lower Cl− and Ca++ were observed in NH4Cl supplemented

  6. Effects of Bacterial Siderophore and Biofilm Synthesis on Silicate Mineral Dissolution Kinetics: Results from Experiments with Targeted Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Berghe, M. D.; West, A. J.; Nealson, K. H.

    2018-05-01

    This project aims to characterize and quantify the specific microbial mechanisms and metabolic pathways responsible for silicate mineral dissolution and micronutrient acquisition directly from mineral phases.

  7. Determination of mineral abundances in samples from the exploratory studies facility using x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, S.; Viani, R.

    1998-01-01

    Tuff samples collected from the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) were X-rayed to estimate relative mineral abundances. X-ray analysis was performed on sub-samples of specimens collected from both the Single Heater Test (SHT) and Drift Scale Heater Test (DST) that were used for thermomechanical measurements, as well as samples collected from cores retrieved from boreholes in the Drift Scale Test Area. The abundance of minerals that could affect the behavior of the host rock at repository relevant temperatures is of particular interest. These minerals include crystobalite, which undergoes a phase transition and volume change at elevated temperature (-250 'C), and smectite and clinoptilolite that can dehydrate at elevated temperature with accompanying volume reduction. In addition, the spatial distribution of SiO, polymorphs and secondary minerals may provide evidence for deducing past fluid pathways. The mineral abundances tabulated here include data reported previously in three milestone reports (Roberts and Viani, 1997a,b; Viani and Roberts, 1996) but re-analyzed (see below), as well as previously unreported data. Previous X-ray diffraction analyses of samples from the ESF (Roberts and Viani, 1997a; Viani and Roberts, 1996) utilized the matrix flushing method of Chung (1974) and an internal intensity standard (corundum) to quantify the abundances of the phases present. Although the method is adequate for obtaining relative abundances, its accuracy and precision is limited by the inherent differences between the external standards used to compute the reference intensity ratio and the mineral phases in the sample. In a subsequent report (Roberts and Viani, 1997b) mineral abundances were obtained using the Rietveld method of whole X-ray pattern fitting (Snyder and Bish, 1989; Young, 1993). The Rietveld technique has the potential to be both more accurate and more precise for estimating mineral abundances (Snyder and Bish, 1989)

  8. Significance, mechanisms and environmental implications of microbial bio-mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzerara, K.; Miot, J.; Morin, G.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Skouri-Panet, F.; Ferard, C.

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms can mediate the formation of minerals by a process called bio-mineralization. This process offers an efficient way to sequester inorganic pollutants within relatively stable solid phases. Here we review some of the main mechanisms involved in the mediation of mineral precipitation by microorganisms. This includes supersaturation caused by metabolic activity, the triggering of nucleation by production of more or less specific organic molecules, and the impact of mineral growth. While these processes have been widely studied in the laboratory, assessment of their importance in the environment is more difficult. We illustrate this difficulty using a case study on an As-contaminated acid mine drainage located in the South of France (Carnoules, Gard). In particular, we explore the potential relationships that might exist between microbial diversity and mineral precipitation. The present review, far from being exhaustive, highlights some recent advances in the field of bio-mineralogy and provides non-specialists an introduction to some of the main approaches and some questions that remain unanswered. (authors)

  9. The heterogeneous nature of mineral matter, fly-ash and deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A.; Pohl, J.H.; Devir, G.P.; Su, S. [R.A. Creelman and Associates, Epping, NSW (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    This paper reports on a series of slagging studies investigating the heterogeneous nature of mineral matter, fly ash and deposits, and how this heterogeneity affects deposition. The data come from low temperature ashing (LTA) of pulverised coal, fly ash from boilers, and deposits from pilot-scale furnaces and boilers. The paper presents optical and scanning electron (SEM) micrographs, electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXRA) of mineral matter, individual fly ash particles, and localised regions of deposits. During combustion, the included mineral matter is transformed into fly ash, melts and partially adheres to the char surface, and may form agglomerated masses. Excluded mineral matter has little chance of encountering another ash particle and agglomerating in the gas phase, but can react with other particles in the wall deposits. Certain fly ash particles adhere to the wall where they can combine with other fly ash particles. Analyses of molten regions of deposits have shown, so far, four mineral phase fields to be responsible for forming difficult deposits with melting points below deposit surface temperatures of 1200 to 1350{sup o}C. These mineral fields include iron cordierite, albite and its silica undersaturated equivalent nepheline, anorthite, and compounds with ratios of Ca to P of 2.3-2.5.

  10. The behavior during water-mineral interaction of britholite, an analogue of an apatite structured potential long-term actinide host phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chairat, C.; Oelkers, E.H.; Schott, J.; Harouiya, N.; Lartigue, J-E.; Guy, C.; Audubert, F

    2004-07-01

    Neodymium britholite (Ca{sub 9}Nd(PO{sub 4}){sub 5}SiO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) dissolution rates have been studied because it is an analogue for potential actinide waste hosts; it is believed that the behavior of Nd is representative of that of the actinide elements. Steady-state dissolution rates of britholite were measured in closed and open system reactors as a function of aqueous solution composition at 25 to 90 deg C. Measured britholite dissolution rates based on Ca, P, and F release are found to be close to corresponding apatite dissolution rates; these rates at 25 deg C decrease from 10-8 to 10-11 mol/m{sup 2}/s with increasing pH from 4 to 12. Measured Nd release rates are far slower than those of these other elements; Nd concentrations in solution appear to be in equilibrium with NdPO{sub 4}, which limits aqueous Nd concentrations to less than 10-12 mol/kg at near neutral conditions. By analogy, it appears likely that aqueous actinide release from analogous waste hosts will be similarly limited by the precipitation of sparingly soluble AcPO{sub 4} phases. (authors)

  11. Australian mineral industry annual review for 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the Australian Mineral Industry Annual Review records development and performance of the Australian mineral industry during the calendar year 1984. It reports production, consumption, treatment, trade, prices, new developments, exploration, and resources for mineral commodities including fuels, and summarises equivalent developments abroad. Part 1. 'general review' after briefly surveying the world mineral industry, summarises developments in the Australian mineral industry as a whole, under the headings: the industry in the national economy, prices, exploration expenditure, investment, income tax, royalties, structural data, wages and salaries, industrial disputes, and government assistance, legislation, and controls. Part 2. 'commodity review' covers individual mineral commodity groups, from abrasives to zirconium. Part 3, 'mining census', tabulates statistics extracted from the mining census, together with some mineral processing statistics from the manufacturing census. Part 4 tabulates quantity and value data on mineral output provided by state departments of mines and their equivalents. Listed in appendices are: principal mineral producers; ore buyers and mineral dealers; government mining services; analytical laboratories; state mines departments and equivalents; industry, professional and development organisations and associations, etc; summary of mineral royalties payable in the states and territories; and summary of income tax provisions and federal government levies.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength

  13. Canadian minerals yearbook : 2004 review and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The main focus of the CMY publication is the non-fuel mineral industry, together with uranium, although all mineral fuels are normally included when the total value of Canada's mineral production is reported. The Yearbook includes chapters devoted to each major mineral commodity produced in Canada: aluminum, coal, copper, diamonds, gold, iron ore, magnesium, nickel, potash, salt, silica, and uranium. The subject matter spans all stages of mineral industry activity from geoscience and exploration, through mining and processing, to markets and use. Although domestic issues receive the greatest attention in each chapter, international developments may also be reviewed because of the global nature of the mineral industry and the significant impact that such developments could have on the Canadian industry

  14. Mineral distributions at the developing tendon enthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrea G; Pasteris, Jill D; Genin, Guy M; Daulton, Tyrone L; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Tendon attaches to bone across a functionally graded interface, "the enthesis". A gradient of mineral content is believed to play an important role for dissipation of stress concentrations at mature fibrocartilaginous interfaces. Surgical repair of injured tendon to bone often fails, suggesting that the enthesis does not regenerate in a healing setting. Understanding the development and the micro/nano-meter structure of this unique interface may provide novel insights for the improvement of repair strategies. This study monitored the development of transitional tissue at the murine supraspinatus tendon enthesis, which begins postnatally and is completed by postnatal day 28. The micrometer-scale distribution of mineral across the developing enthesis was studied by X-ray micro-computed tomography and Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Analyzed regions were identified and further studied by histomorphometry. The nanometer-scale distribution of mineral and collagen fibrils at the developing interface was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A zone (∼20 µm) exhibiting a gradient in mineral relative to collagen was detected at the leading edge of the hard-soft tissue interface as early as postnatal day 7. Nanocharacterization by TEM suggested that this mineral gradient arose from intrinsic surface roughness on the scale of tens of nanometers at the mineralized front. Microcomputed tomography measurements indicated increases in bone mineral density with time. Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that the mineral-to-collagen ratio on the mineralized side of the interface was constant throughout postnatal development. An increase in the carbonate concentration of the apatite mineral phase over time suggested possible matrix remodeling during postnatal development. Comparison of Raman-based observations of localized mineral content with histomorphological features indicated that development of the graded mineralized interface is linked to endochondral

  15. Mineral Facilities of Latin America and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Rachel; Eros, Mike; Quintana-Velazquez, Meliany

    2006-01-01

    This data set consists of records for over 900 mineral facilities in Latin America and Canada. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, smelters, or refineries of aluminum, cement, coal, copper, diamond, gold, iron and steel, nickel, platinum-group metals, salt, and silver, among others. Records include attributes such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity if applicable, and generalized coordinates. The data were compiled from multiple sources, including the 2003 and 2004 USGS Minerals Yearbooks (Latin America and Candada volume), data to be published in the 2005 Minerals Yearbook Latin America and Canada Volume, minerals statistics and information from the USGS minerals information Web site (minerals.usgs.gov/minerals), and data collected by USGS minerals information country specialists. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country. Other sources include statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies,and trade journals. Due to the sensitivity of some energy commodity data, the quality of these data should be evaluated on a country-by-country basis. Additional information and explanation is available from the country specialists.

  16. Impact of Bioreduction on Remobilization of Adsorbed Cadmium on Iron Minerals in Anoxic Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanzadeh, Nasrin; Lakzian, Amir; Halajnia, Akram; Choi, Ui-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Kurade, Mayur; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2017-06-01

      The impact of bioreduction on the remobilization of adsorbed cadmium Cd(II) on minerals, including hematite, goethite, and two iron(III)-rich clay minerals nontronites (NAU-1 and NAU-2) under anoxic conditions was investigated. Langmuir isotherm equation better described the sorption of Cd(II) onto the all minerals. The maximum adsorption capacity was 6.2, 18.1, 3.6, and 4 mg g-1 for hematite, goethite, NAU-1 and NAU-2, respectively. The desorption of Cd(II) was due to the production of Fe(II) as a result of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in the minerals by Shewanella putrefaciens. The bioreduction of Cd(II)-loaded Fe(III) minerals was negligible during the initial 5 days followed by a rapid increase up to 20 days. The amount of Cd(II) in solution phase at the end of 30 days increased up to 0.07 mmol L-1 for hematite, NAU-1, and NAU-2 and 0.02 mmol L-1 for goethite. The X-ray diffraction study showed negligible changes in bioreduced minerals phases.

  17. Chitosan: collagen sponges. In vitro mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Virginia da C.A.; Silva, Gustavo M.; Plepis, Ana Maria G.

    2011-01-01

    The regeneration of bone tissue is a problem that affects many people and scaffolds for bone tissue growth has been widely studied. The aim of this study was the in vitro mineralization of chitosan, chitosan:native collagen and chitosan:anionic collagen sponges. The sponges were obtained by lyophilization and mineralization was made by soaking the sponges in alternating solutions containing Ca 2+ and PO 4 3- . The mineralization was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction observing the formation of phosphate salts, possibly a carbonated hydroxyapatite since Ca/P=1.80. The degree of mineralization was obtained by thermogravimetry calculating the amount of residue at 750 deg C. The chitosan:anionic collagen sponge showed the highest degree of mineralization probably due to the fact that anionic collagen provides additional sites for interaction with the inorganic phase. (author)

  18. Mineral Precipitation in Fractures: Multiscale Imaging and Geochemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajirezaie, S.; Peters, C. A.; Swift, A.; Sheets, J. M.; Cole, D. R.; Crandall, D.; Cheshire, M.; Stack, A. G.; Anovitz, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    For subsurface energy technologies such as geologic carbon sequestration, fractures are potential pathways for fluid migration from target formations. Highly permeable fractures may become sealed by mineral precipitation. In this study, we examined shale specimens with existing cemented fractures as natural analogues, using an array of imaging methods to characterize mineralogy and porosity at several spatial scales. In addition, we used reactive transport modeling to investigate geochemical conditions that can lead to extensive mineral precipitation and to simulate the impacts on fracture hydraulic properties. The naturally-cemented fractured rock specimens were from the Upper Wolfcamp formation in Texas, at 10,000 ft depth. The specimens were scanned using x-ray computed tomography (xCT) at resolution of 13 microns. The xCT images revealed an original fracture aperture of 1.9 mm filled with several distinct mineral phases and vuggy void regions, and the mineral phase volumes and surface areas were quantified and mapped in 3D. Specimens were thin-sectioned and examined at micron- and submicron-scales using petrographic microscopy (PM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Collectively these methods revealed crystals of dolomite as large as 900 microns in length overlain with a heterogeneous mixture of carbonate minerals including calcite, dolomite, and Fe-rich dolomite, interspersed at spatial scales as small as 5 microns. In addition, secondary precipitation of SiO2 was found to fill some of the void space. This multiscale imaging was used to inform the reactive transport modeling employed to examine the conditions that can cause the observed mineral precipitation in fractures at a larger scale. Two brines containing solutions that when mixed would lead to precipitation of various carbonate minerals were simulated as injectants into a fracture domain. In particular, the competing

  19. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. Bone mineralization by ultrastructural imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoka

    2015-10-01

    Bone mineralization can be divided into two phases ; one is primary mineralization associated with osteoblastic bone formation, and the other is secondary mineralization which gradually increases mineral density of bone matrix after the primary mineralization. Primary mineralization is initiated by matrix vesicles synthesized by mature osteoblasts. Crystalline calcium phosphates are nucleated inside these matrix vesicles, and then, get out of them forming spherical mineralized nodule, which can grow more by being supplied with Ca2+ and PO4(3-) (matrix vesicle mineralization). Thereafter, the mineralized nodules make contacts with surrounding collagen fibrils, extending mineralization along with their longitudinal axis from the contact points (collagen mineralization). In this review, the ultrastructural findings on bone mineralization, specially, primary mineralization will be provided.

  20. Uranium mineralization at Lagoa Real, BA, Brazil: the role of fluids in its genesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prates, Sonia Pinto; Neves, Jose Marques Correia; Fuzikawa, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    The Lagoa Real uranium province is situated in the central-south of Bahia state . Brazil and it is presently by far the most important and best known uranium occurrence in Brazil. Nowadays 34 anomalies are known in a 30 Km long and 5 km wide area. An open pit mine was open in Cachoeira Mine, in the north portion of the area, and it is the only uranium mine in operation in Brazil and even in South America as well. The uranium mineralization in the Lagoa Real uranium province occurs in metamorphic rocks named albitites, due to their albite content (over 70%). Uraninite is the main uranium mineral, followed by pechblende, uranophane, torbernite and other uranyl minerals. Uraninite occurs as tiny round and irregular crystals (20 a 30 μm) included or associated to mafic minerals, mainly pyroxene and garnet, and also to amphibole and biotite and sometimes to albite. Some secondary minerals such as, for instance, uranophane, torbernite and tyuyamunite are also found. The main albitites minerals from the Cachoeira mine (plagioclase, garnet, biotite, pyroxene, amphibole and titanite) were studied by means of Infrared Spectroscopy Techniques. Good results were obtained from small quantities of material (around 2 mg) and allowed the minerals identification, and also to know their composition (from the peak position) and to detect the presence of water molecules, which indicates an aqueous phase during the uranium formation, probably rich in Fluorine. (author)

  1. Minerals yearbook: The mineral industry of Brazil. 1988 international review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensminger, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    Brazil's gross domestic product (GDP) grew only slightly in 1988 to $277 billion at current prices. The growth rate was the smallest registered since 1983, when the rate was minus 2.8%. The economy's performance was strongly influenced by a 2% to 3% decrease in industrial production and civil construction. The mineral industry, however, countered the downward trend in the industrial sector and grew a modest 1.4%. Topics discussed in the report include the following: Government policies and programs; Production; Trade; Commodity review--Metals (Aluminum, Aluminia, and Bauxite, Columbium, Copper, Gold, Iron and Steel, Manganese, Tin, Titanium); Industrial Minerals (Gem stones, Phosphate rock, Quartz); Mineral fuels (Coal, Natural gas, Petroleum, Nuclear power); Nonmineral energy sources (Alcohol, Hydroelectric)

  2. [Mineral water as a cure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    was to attribute, on the one hand to the physico-chemical properties of the water and on the other hand to the climatic, nutritional and social factors characterising the selected health resort. All over Europe, pharmacists were dealing with mineral waters, among them even very famous names such as Klaproth, Trommsdorf, Lampadius and Fresenius. They were on one side involved in the development and analysis of the waters, while on the other side they were interested in their artificial production. Their knowledge and findings in the area of the mineral water source chemistry gave a crucial impetus to the future evolution of analytic chemistry. Following the improvements in the precision of analysis and classification of the composition of the mineral waters, the imitation of artificial mineral waters increased significantly. Certain pharmacists tried to copy well-known mineral waters in their properly furnished laboratories. At the same time, pharmacies were important sales points: natural and artificial mineral waters as well as their dried components were either sold there, or delivered upon prescription. In the second part of this work, specifically concerning the situation in the Canton Tessin, the most important local sources and spa resorts are described, as well as the analyses performed and the researchers involved. Moreover, the types of therapies used at that time are mentioned. The integration of the local mineral waters into the pharmacopoeia of the Canton Tessin, the Farmacopea Ticinese, is also discussed. Of particular interest are the delivery and the sale of mineral waters and their dried components by a local pharmacy. In the Canton Tessin, the five most frequented spa resorts were Acquarossa, Brissago, Craveggia, Rovio and Stabio. Craveggia spa resort is of course based in Italy; it has however been included in the present work due to its proximity to Switzerland and to a connected historical Substantial differences existed among the individual health

  3. Lagoa Real design - Mineral engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, J.M.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the works realized, in course and to realize of Lagoa Real Design, including the works for implantation of Mineral-Industrial complex with the production capacity of 1.000 ton of U sub(3) O sub(8) per year from 1988. (author)

  4. OPAQUE MINERAL CONTENT OF DUTLUCA VOLCANICS (BURHANİYE - BALIKESİR: THE EFFECT OF HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION ON THESE MINERALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü KOÇ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dutluca volcanics, which are known as Hallaçlar Formation in regional scale in the study area (Kurshens- ky, 1976, are composed of hydrothermally altered andesite and basaltic andesite. In these rocks, sulfidic minerals such as pyrite, enargite and chalcosine, and oxide and hydroxide minerals such as magnetite, hematite and goethite were detected as opaque minerals. The presence of enargite in opaque mineral para- genesis, and the changes observed in structures and textures of opaque and silicate minerals indicate that examined volcanics have been altered by highly sulfidic hydrothermal solutions. During the hydrothermal alteration process, which indicates at least in two phases, a diffuse pyritization rich in H S in reducing conditions and enargite mineral, which is known as pathfinder minerals in such processes, formed in the first phase. Later on; the extensive martitization developed in oxidizing conditions.

  5. Proton induced luminescence of minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo del Castillo, H.; Millan, A.; Calderon, T. [Depto. Geologia y Geoquimica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ctra. Colmenar, km. 15, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Beneitez, P. [Departamento Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ruvalcaba S, J.L. [lFUNAM, Circuito de la lnvestigacion Cientifica s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of Ionoluminescence (IL) for several minerals commonly found in jewellery pieces and/or artefacts of historical interest. Samples including silicates and non-silicates (native elements, halide, oxide, carbonate and phosphate groups) have been excited with a 1.8 MeV proton beam, and IL spectra in the range of 200- 900 nm have been collected for each one using a fiber optic coupled spectrometer. Light emissions have been related to Cr{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+} and Pr{sup 3+} ions, as well as intrinsic defects in these minerals. Results show the potential of IL for impurity characterization with high detection limits, local symmetry studies, and the study of the origin of minerals. (Author)

  6. Preparation of synthetic standard minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrick, C.C.; Bustamante, S.J.; Charls, R.W.; Cowan, R.E.; Hakkila, E.A.; Hull, D.E.; Olinger, B.W.; Roof, R.B.; Sheinberg, H.; Herrick, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    A number of techniques for synthetic mineral preparations have been examined. These techniques include hot-pressing in graphite dies at moderate pressures, high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis in a piston and cylinder apparatus, isostatic pressing under helium gas pressures, hydrous mineral preparations using water as the pressure medium, explosion-generated shock waves, and radiofrequency heating. Minerals suitable for equation-of-state studies (three-inch, high-density discs), for thermodynamic property determinations (low-density powders) and for microprobe standards (fusion-cast microbeads) have been prepared. Mechanical stress-strain calculations in the piston-cylinder apparatus have been initiated and their integration with thermal stress calculations is currently under investigation

  7. Mineralogical characterization of beach sand minerals: traditional and modern approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, P.

    2016-01-01

    Precise identification of beach sand minerals is an essential prerequisite for the reserve estimation of a given deposit and also in the subsequent evaluation of the process flow sheet for its optimal recovery. Traditional methods that are used for the identification of the beach sand minerals such as magnetite, hematite, ilmenite, rutile, anatase, zircon, garnet, sillimanite, monazite, quartz and others include heavy liquid separation (bromoform and methylene iodide) and studying the optical properties of the grains from different fractions so as to identify the specific phases in a sample. Grain counting of specific minerals from a given sievefraction under a petrological microscope to estimate the mode and their subsequent conversion in to weight percent fractions forms the critical second stage that is followed by the reserve estimates. These methodologies are tedious and time consuming often involving a few days for a single sample. The paper introduces the numerous instrumental methods (XRF, XRD - Rietveld and CCSEM) of mineral speciation and their qualification in with case studies from the west coast deposits in India

  8. Continuing Studies on Direct Aqueous Mineral Carbonation of CO{sub 2} Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Nilsen, D.N.; Gerdemann, S.J.; Rush, G.E.; Penner, L.R.; Walters, R.P.; Turner, P.C.

    2002-03-04

    Direct aqueous mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO{sub 2} into a geologically stable, solid final form. The process utilizes a solution of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}), sodium chloride (NaCl), and water, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) or serpentine [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, by diffusion through the surface and gas dispersion within the aqueous phase. The process includes dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of the magnesium carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) in a single unit operation. Activation of the silicate minerals has been achieved by thermal and mechanical means, resulting in up to 80% stoichiometric conversion of the silicate to the carbonate within 30 minutes. Heat treatment of the serpentine, or attrition grinding of the olivine and/or serpentine, appear to activate the minerals by the generation of a non-crystalline phase. Successful conversion to the carbonate has been demonstrated at ambient temperature and relatively low (10 atm) partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO2}). However, optimum results have been achieved using the bicarbonate-bearing solution, and high P{sub CO2}. Specific conditions include: 185 C; P{sub CO2}=150 atm; 30% solids. Studies suggest that the mineral dissolution rate is not solely surface controlled, while the carbonate precipitation rate is primarily dependent on the bicarbonate concentration of the slurry. Current and future activities include further examination of the reaction pathways and pretreatment options, the development of a continuous flow reactor, and an evaluation of the economic feasibility of the process.

  9. Grouping Minerals by Their Formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Bridget

    2018-01-01

    Minerals are commonly taught in ways that emphasize mineral identification for its own sake or maybe to help identify rocks. But how do minerals fit in with other science content taught? The author uses mineral formulas to help Earth science students wonder about the connection between elements, compounds, mixtures, minerals, and mineral formulas.…

  10. The mineral matter characteristics of some Chinese coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X. [China University of Mining and Technology (China). Dept. of Coal Preparation and Utilization

    1994-12-01

    The mineral matter has been separated from 18 coal samples with a low temperature ashes and analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction method. Based on the results of chemical analysis of the coal ash, with reference to the standard composition of minerals, the content of various mineral phases in the coal ash has been determined. Furthermore, this paper summarizes the mineral matter characteristics of the coal samples and discusses the relationship between the composition of mineral matter in coal and its depositional environment.

  11. Silicoaluminous minerals analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, Celia; Fina, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    A group of silicoaluminous minerals of known composition have been analyzed by means of an energy dispersive electron microprobe. The analysis has been performed using a standarless semiquantitative method. The concentration was calculated using the program included in the software of the on-line computer, based on the ZAF correction. It is well known that it is difficult to analyze Si, Al and Na by this method because the absortion correction in the range of 0.9 to 2.0 KeV is not very accurate and the background substraction is also questionable. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the errors involved in these measurements and the best operation conditions. (Author) [es

  12. Sorption and redox reactions of As(III) and As(V) within secondary mineral coatings on aquifer sediment grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, David M; Fox, Patricia M; Guo, Hua; Marcus, Matthew A; Davis, James A

    2013-10-15

    Important reactive phenomena that affect the transport and fate of many elements occur at the mineral-water interface (MWI), including sorption and redox reactions. Fundamental knowledge of these phenomena are often based on observations of ideal mineral-water systems, for example, studies of molecular scale reactions on single crystal faces or the surfaces of pure mineral powders. Much less is understood about MWI in natural environments, which typically have nanometer to micrometer scale secondary mineral coatings on the surfaces of primary mineral grains. We examined sediment grain coatings from a well-characterized field site to determine the causes of rate limitations for arsenic (As) sorption and redox processes within the coatings. Sediments were obtained from the USGS field research site on Cape Cod, MA, and exposed to synthetic contaminated groundwater solutions. Uptake of As(III) and As(V) into the coatings was studied with a combination of electron microscopy and synchrotron techniques to assess concentration gradients and reactive processes, including electron transfer reactions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray microprobe (XMP) analyses indicated that As was primarily associated with micrometer- to submicrometer aggregates of Mn-bearing nanoparticulate goethite. As(III) oxidation by this phase was observed but limited by the extent of exposed surface area of the goethite grains to the exterior of the mineral coatings. Secondary mineral coatings are potentially both sinks and sources of contaminants depending on the history of a contaminated site, and may need to be included explicitly in reactive transport models.

  13. Development of the radioactive minerals prospecting programme. 1981-1983 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The text possesses a merely explanatory aspect and another evaluative of the activities and the operational infrastructure of the Program of exploration of radioactive minerals. The explanatory aspect includes an enumeration of the realized works, results, used set of instruments and technical training as well as a summary bibliography on the development of the activities of the Program. The phase evaluative analyzes especially the methodological aspects of last period, the condition to the exploration, a chapter of conclusions and other one different of perspectives on the future of the Exploration of radioactive minerals the country

  14. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands: Interior... § 19.8 Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest... locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness are contained in parts...

  15. Chemical composition of the humus layer, mineral soil and soil solution of 200 forest stands in the Netherlands in 1995

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeters, E.E.J.M.; Vries, de W.

    2001-01-01

    A nationwide assessment of the chemical composition of the soil solid phase and the soil solution in the humus layer and two mineral layers (0-10 cm and 10-30 cm) was made for 200 forest stands in the year 1995. The stands were part of the national forest inventory on vitality, included seven tree

  16. Radioactive mineral deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1948-01-01

    This publication was designed as a guide for uranium and thorium prospectors in Australia. Physical properties, such as color, streak, luster, hardness, fracture, and specific gravity of the uranium and thorium-bearing minerals are summarized and the various methods suitable for detecting radioactivity in minerals are described. Two colored plates show samples of pitchblende (uraninite), autunite, carnotite, monazite, and others of the most important minerals sources of uranium and thorium.

  17. Holocene paleoclimatic variation in the Schirmacher Oasis, East Antarctica: A mineral magnetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phartiyal, Binita

    2014-12-01

    An analysis of remanent magnetism and radiocarbon ages in the dry lacustrine/sediment fills of the Schirmacher Oasis (SO) in East Antarctica was conducted to reconstruct past climatic condition. The statistically run mineral magnetic data on paleontological statistics software package (multivariate cluster analysis) placed on accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon chronology of the three sediment sections, trace 6 phases of climatic fluctuation between 13 and 3 ka, (Phases 1, 3 and 5 represent cold periods while Phases 2, 4, and 6 represent warm periods). One short warm period (Phase 2, ca. 12.5 ka) occurred in the late Pleistocene, and two marked warm periods (Phase 4, 11-8.7 ka; Phase 6, 4.4-3 ka) occurred in the Holocene. High magnetic susceptibility (χ), saturation isothermal remanent magnetism (SIRM), and soft isothermal remanent magnetism (soft IRM) values correspond to colder periods and low values reflect comparatively warmer lacustrine phases. Holocene Optima (Phase 4) and Mid Holocene Hypsithermal (Phase 6) are distinguished by decreased values of concentrations dependent parameters. Remanence is preserved in the low-coercive minerals. Heavy metals in the sediments include, Fe, Rb, Zn, Mo, Co, Pb, Mn, Cu, and As in order of decreasing abundance.

  18. Reagan issues mineral policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  19. International mineral economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocht, W.R.; Eggert, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    International Mineral Economics provides an integrated overview of the important concepts. The treatment is interdisciplinary, drawing on the fields of economics, geology, business, and mining engineering. Part I examines the technical concepts important for understanding the geology of ore deposits, the methods of exploration and deposit evaluation, and the activities of mining and mineral processing. Part II focuses on the economic and related concepts important for understanding mineral development, the evaluation of exploration and mining projects, and mineral markets and market models. Finally, Part III reviews and traces the historical development of the policies of international organizations, the industrialized countries, and the developing countries. (orig.)

  20. Marine Mineral Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    in EEZ areas are fairly unknown; many areas need detailed mapping and mineral exploration, and the majority of coastal or island states with large EEZ areas have little experience in exploration for marine hard minerals. This book describes the systematic steps in marine mineral exploration....... Such exploration requires knowledge of mineral deposits and models of their formation, of geophysical and geochemical exploration methods, and of data evaluation and interpretation methods. These topics are described in detail by an international group of authors. A short description is also given of marine...

  1. MINERAL WATERS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORGES, TIAGO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disorder affecting nearly 1% of adult population. First-line therapies include disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, but creno-balneotherapyis often prescribed in rheumatic disorders and RA is no exception. Objectives: To know the efficacy of creno-balneotherapy in RA. Methods: A Medline based search was made using MeSH terms “balneology” and “rheumatoid arthritis”. Articles concerning the use of mineral waters in RA treatment were included. Results: In RA, two traditional ways of employing mineral waters are commonly used: immersion and peliotherapy. Each owns their benefits to non-specific or hydrotherapeutic effects and specific or crenotherapeutic effects. Mineral waters must be regarded as an adjuvant therapy in quiescent, stable or non-progressive RA. Significant benefits have been accomplished with radonenriched and sulphurous waters. Isothermal or hyperthermal waters should be preferred. Conclusions: Although there is a global lack of evidence, mineral waters are a safe and effective therapy to be considered in RA.

  2. Minerals Industry' 97. Survey report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this annual survey is to provide timely and accurate financial data such as production, price movements, profitability, distribution of assets by activity, employment and labour cost and taxation on the Australian minerals industry. It aims to facilitate more informed debate on the industry's role and importance in the economy. The report also includes information on the safety and health performance and overseas exploration expenditure of the minerals industry. This twenty-first survey relates to the year ended 30 June 1997. The proportion of activity covered in this year's survey is comparable with the 1996 survey. The mineral industry is defined as including exploration for, extraction and primary processing of minerals in Australia. The oil, gas, iron and steel industries are excluded. As for the uranium industry, increased mine capacity over the medium term saw a switch away from spot market purchases to long term contracts for uranium in 1996. This, coupled with announced releases from the US stockpile, saw downward pressure on spot market prices for uranium during 1996/97. The average spot market price for U 3 O 8 fell by an average of 6 percent during 1996/97 and was approximately 16 percent lower than three years ago. General uncertainty over the future profitability of coal industry is compounded by the likely softness of future coal prices

  3. Comparison of how different feed phosphates affect performance, bone mineralization and phosphorus retention in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Hamdi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the comparative P bio-avalability of different sources of phosphate based on their effects on animal performance, bones mineralization and mineral retention in broilers. To achieve this goal, two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, twenty diets were prepared including five different phosphorus sources, either mono-calcium phosphate (MCP or 4 different batches of di-calcium phosphate, to supplement non phytic P (NPP levels at 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5 g/kg in the diets. In Experiment 2, three treatments were used: the low MCP diet was deficient in NPP (3.1 g/kg for the starter phase and 2.8 g/kg for the grower phase; the high MCP diet and the high TCP (tri-calcium phosphate diet included adequate levels of NPP (4.4-4.7 g/kg for the starter phase and 4.2-4.3 g/kg for the grower phase. Phytase was not added to experimental diets. Results of Exp. 1 indicated that an increase of NPP in the diet from 3.0 to 4.0 g/kg increased weight gain and feed intake between d 1 and d 21 (Trial 1. Alternatively, tibia weight and ash percentage at d 21 responded up to the level of 4.5 g/kg and showed significant difference with birds of the 4.0 g/kg NPP group. In Trial 2, chickens fed with the high MCP and TCP had improved growth performances and bone mineralization. No differences were observed on the P availability among different mineral P sources. A level of 4.5 g/kg, NPP is recommended when phytase is not included to maximize both performance and bone mineralization in broiler chickens up to d 21.

  4. Mineral facilities of Asia and the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric; Soto-Viruet, Yadira

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,500 records of mineral facilities throughout the continent of Asia and the countries of the Pacific Ocean. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the 2008 U.S. Geological Survey Minerals Yearbook (Asia and the Pacific volume), (2) minerals statistics and information from the U.S. Geological Survey Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/), and (3) data collected by U.S. Geological Survey minerals information country specialists. Other sources include statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Due to the sensitivity of some energy commodity data, the quality of these data should be evaluated on a country-by-country basis. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  5. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  6. Adsorption of dextrin on hydrophobic minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Beattie, David A

    2009-09-01

    The adsorption of dextrin on talc, molybdenite, and graphite (three naturally hydrophobic minerals) has been compared. Adsorption isotherms and in situ tapping mode atomic force microscope (TMAFM) imaging have enabled polymer adsorbed amount and morphology of the adsorbed layer (area coverage and polymer domain size) to be determined and also the amount of hydration water in the structure of the adsorbed layer. The effect of the polymer on the mineral contact angles, measured by the captive bubble method on cleaved mineral surfaces, indicates clear correlations between the hydrophobicity reduction of the minerals, the adsorbed amount, and the surface coverage of the adsorbed polymer. Predictions of the flotation recovery of the treated mineral phases have been confirmed by performing batch flotation experiments. The influence of the polymer surface coverage on flotation recovery has highlighted the importance of this key parameter in the predictions of depressant efficiency. The roles of the initial hydrophobicity and the surface structure of the mineral basal plane in determining adsorption parameters and flotation response of the polymer-treated minerals are also discussed.

  7. Thermodynamic and structural characteristics of cement minerals at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Meike, A.; Viani, B.E.; Martin, S.; Phillips, B.L.

    1994-05-01

    We have instituted an experimental and including program designed to elucidate the structural and thermodynamic response of cement minerals to elevated temperature. Components of the program involve: (a) synthesis of hydrated Ca-silicates; (b) structural analysis of cement phases induced by heating and dehydration/rehydration; (c) mechanistic and thermodynamic descriptions of the hydration/dehydration behavior of hydrated Ca-silicates as a function of temperature, pressure and relative humidity; (d) study of naturally occurring hydrated Ca-silicates; and (e) measurements of thermodynamic data for hydrated Ca-silicates

  8. A systematic study of multiple minerals precipitation modelling in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadi Mbamba, Christian; Tait, Stephan; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Batstone, Damien J

    2015-11-15

    Mineral solids precipitation is important in wastewater treatment. However approaches to minerals precipitation modelling are varied, often empirical, and mostly focused on single precipitate classes. A common approach, applicable to multi-species precipitates, is needed to integrate into existing wastewater treatment models. The present study systematically tested a semi-mechanistic modelling approach, using various experimental platforms with multiple minerals precipitation. Experiments included dynamic titration with addition of sodium hydroxide to synthetic wastewater, and aeration to progressively increase pH and induce precipitation in real piggery digestate and sewage sludge digestate. The model approach consisted of an equilibrium part for aqueous phase reactions and a kinetic part for minerals precipitation. The model was fitted to dissolved calcium, magnesium, total inorganic carbon and phosphate. Results indicated that precipitation was dominated by the mineral struvite, forming together with varied and minor amounts of calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate. The model approach was noted to have the advantage of requiring a minimal number of fitted parameters, so the model was readily identifiable. Kinetic rate coefficients, which were statistically fitted, were generally in the range 0.35-11.6 h(-1) with confidence intervals of 10-80% relative. Confidence regions for the kinetic rate coefficients were often asymmetric with model-data residuals increasing more gradually with larger coefficient values. This suggests that a large kinetic coefficient could be used when actual measured data is lacking for a particular precipitate-matrix combination. Correlation between the kinetic rate coefficients of different minerals was low, indicating that parameter values for individual minerals could be independently fitted (keeping all other model parameters constant). Implementation was therefore relatively flexible, and would be readily expandable to include other

  9. Physicochemical characterization of mineral (iron/zinc) bound caseinate and their mineral uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpashree, B G; Arora, Sumit; Kapila, Suman; Sharma, Vivek

    2018-08-15

    Milk proteins (especially caseins) are widely accepted as good vehicle for the delivery of various bioactive compounds including minerals. Succinylation is one of the most acceptable chemical modification techniques to enhance the mineral binding ability of caseins. Addition of minerals to succinylated proteins may alter their physicochemical and biochemical properties. Physicochemical characteristics of succinylated sodium caseinate (S.NaCN)-mineral (iron/zinc) complexes were elucidated. Chromatographic behaviour and fluorescence intensity confirmed the structural modification of S.NaCN upon binding with minerals. The bound mineral from protein complexes showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) in vitro bioavailability (mineral uptake) than mineral salts in Caco-2 cells. Also, iron bound S.NaCN showed higher cellular ferritin formation than iron in its free form. These mineral bound protein complexes with improved bioavailability could safely replace inorganic fortificants in various functional food formulations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of mineral transformation on elemental mobility in aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, T.D.; Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    While laboratory and field studies of uranium uptake on naturally occurring mineral substrates have indicated that interaction with amorphous oxide phases controls the steady state concentration of uranium in the dissolved phase, questions remain concerning the impact of crystallization of these amorphous phases on ability of the minerals to retain adsorbed uranium. Using isotope exchange techniques, the authors confirm that a portion of the adsorbed uranium is retained within the mineral structure on increasing crystallization. In addition, the relationship between increased crystallinity, decreased site density and lowered elemental uptake is discussed, with uranium partitioning to the solids of varying crystallinity successfully modelled using the surface complexation approach

  11. Mineral facilities of Northern and Central Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric; Soto-Viruet, Yadira

    2010-01-01

    This map displays almost 900 records of mineral facilities within the countries that formerly constituted the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2

  12. Mineral oil industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brasser, L.J.; Suess, M.J.; Grefen, K.; Reinisch, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    In this chapter a general picture is presented of the air pollution aspects in the mineral oil industry. The complete field is covered, starting from drilling operations and the well head up to the delivery of the products to the consumer. A large field of activities as is given by the mineral oil

  13. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  14. Mineral commodity summaries 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2018-01-31

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2017 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials.

  15. Indochina area mineral prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-05

    Prospects for commercial mining of various minerals are considered for Kampuchea (Cambodia), Laos, Vietnam, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand. Mineral production is much below its geologic potential for economic and political reasons. Resource potential is limited to tin, tungsten, lead and zinc, barytes and gemstones, and coal. 1 fig.

  16. Bismuth-silver mineralization in the Sergozerskoe gold occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinin A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth-silver mineralization attendant to gold mineralization in the Sergozerskoe gold occurrence has been studied in detail. Bi-Ag mineralization is connected with diorite porphyry dykes, which cut volcanic-sedimentary Lopian complexes of the Strel'ninsky greenstone belt – hornblendite and actinolite-chlorite amphibolites, biotite and bi-micaceous gneisses. Distribution of Bi-Ag mineralization similar to gold mineralization is controlled by 80 m thick zone of silicification. Bi minerals are found in brecciated diorite porphyry. Bismuth-silver mineralization includes native metals (bismuth, electrum, silver, tellurides (hedleyite, hessite, selenides (ikunolite, sulfides and sulfosalts of Bi and Ag (matildite, lillianite, eckerite, jalpaite, prustite, acanthite, a few undiagnosed minerals. All Bi and Ag minerals associate with galena. Composition of mineralization evolved from early to late stages of development, depending on intensity of rock alteration. The earliest Bi-Ag minerals were native bismuth and hedleyite formed dissemination in galena, and electrum with 30-45 mass.% Au. Later native bismuth was partly substituted by silver and bismuth sulfosalts and bismuth sulfides. The latest minerals were low-temperature silver sulfides eckerite, jalpaite, and acanthite, which were noted only in the most intensively altered rocks. As soon as the process of formation of Bi-Ag mineralization is the same as formation of gold, findings of bismuth-silver mineralization can serve as a positive exploration sign for gold in the region.

  17. Taxation of unmined minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremberg, B.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the Kentucky Revenue Cabinet which began implementing its controversial unmined minerals tax program. The Revenue Cabinet should complete its first annual assessment under this program in December, 1989. The Revenue Cabinet's initial efforts to collect basic data concerning the Commonwealth's coal bearing lands has yielded data coverage for 5 million of Kentucky's 10 million acres of coal lands. Approximately 1000 detailed information returns have been filed. The returns will be used to help create an undeveloped mineral reserves inventory, determine mineral ownership, and value mineral reserves. This new program is run by the Revenue Cabinet's Mineral Valuation Section, under the Division of Technical Support, Department of Property Taxation. It has been in business since September of 1988

  18. Mineral industry in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parbo, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reviews the history and growth of the mineral industry in Australia and its significance to the nation's economic growth and overseas trade, particularly over the last twenty years during which time production of coal, iron ore, manganese and mineral sands has increased greatly and new discoveries of petroleum, bauxite and nickel have given rise to major new industries. Australia ranks fourteenths in the value of world trade and is among the world's largest exporters of alumina, iron ore, mineral sands, coal, lead, zinc and nickel. Some details of production, processing and exports of the major minerals are given. Comment is made on the policies and roles of the six State Governments and the Federal Government in respect of ownership and control of the mining, processing and exporting of both energy and non-energy minerals. (orig.) [de

  19. Mineral and surface issues in oil and gas operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasseur, P.F.

    1998-01-01

    The Farmers' Advocate Office was created in 1972 to help put Alberta mineral owners on an equal footing with the energy sector. Most mineral owners are at a disadvantage when dealing with the disposition of their minerals because they have little or no knowledge of what they own or what their surface rights are. This paper addresses key features of mineral leasing arrangements in Alberta and explains their potential impact. It also brings to the mineral owner's attention some specific problems and concerns including mineral rights, the lease agreement, signing considerations, length of leases, delayed production payment, drilling rental, royalties, and gas cost allowance. Issues regarding oil and gas production including shut-in wells, off-set clauses , drilling depth, taxes and prepayment for minerals are also discussed from the perspective of a mineral owner

  20. Radioactive mineral occurrences in the Bancroft area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satterly, J

    1958-12-31

    The report summarizes three years of field work conducted in the Bancroft area investigating occurrences of radioactive minerals, and also includes accounts of properties in the area for which drill logs and survey reports have been filed. It begins with a history of exploration and development of radioactive mineral deposits in the area, a review of the area`s general geology (Grenville metasediments, plutonic rocks), and general descriptions of the types of radioactive mineral deposits found in the area (deposits in granitic and syenitic bodies, metasomatic deposits in limy rocks, hydrothermal deposits). It also describes the mineralogy of radioactive minerals found in the area and the Geiger counter technique used in the investigation. The bulk of the report consists of descriptions of radioactive mineral properties and mine workings, containing (where available) information on exploration history, general and economic geology, and production.

  1. Destabilization of emulsions by natural minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Songhu; Tong, Man; Wu, Gaoming

    2011-09-15

    This study developed a novel method to destabilize emulsions and recycle oils, particularly for emulsified wastewater treatment. Natural minerals were used as demulsifying agents, two kinds of emulsions collected from medical and steel industry were treated. The addition of natural minerals, including artificial zeolite, natural zeolite, diatomite, bentonite and natural soil, could effectively destabilize both emulsions at pH 1 and 60 °C. Over 90% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be removed after treatment. Medical emulsion can be even destabilized by artificial zeolite at ambient temperature. The mechanism for emulsion destabilization by minerals was suggested as the decreased electrostatic repulsion at low pH, the enhanced gathering of oil microdroplets at elevated temperature, and the further decreased surface potential by the addition of minerals. Both flocculation and coalescence were enhanced by the addition of minerals at low pH and elevated temperature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 30 CFR 46.6 - Newly hired experienced miner training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... adversely affect the miner's health or safety. This training must be given before the miner begins work at..., including the safe work procedures of such tasks, the mandatory health and safety standards pertinent to such tasks, information about the physical and health hazards of chemicals in the miner's work area...

  3. Thyroid disorders and bone mineral metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar Dhanwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid diseases have widespread systemic manifestations including their effect on bone metabolism. On one hand, the effects of thyrotoxicosis including subclinical disease have received wide attention from researchers over the last century as it an important cause of secondary osteoporosis. On the other hand, hypothyroidism has received lesser attention as its effect on bone mineral metabolism is minimal. Therefore, this review will primarily focus on thyrotoxicosis and its impact on bone mineral metabolism.

  4. Geomathematical characterisation of the mineralization indicators: a case study from Tincova magmatic intrusion (Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Tudor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Indicators of the hydrothermal mineralization in the Tincova Laramian intrusion were tested at the contact zone between the intrusive body and the metamorphic host rocks. The mineralization consists of Cu, Pb and Zn sulfides, arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite and pyrite in gangue of quartz, carbonates, feldspar, sericite or clay minerals, and includes areas of hydrothermal alteration or oxidation. Seventy-nine samples were analyzed and processed as two distinct populations. Geomathematical methods highlight the importance of factors such as the shape, sizes of the mineralized zones and geological processes involved in the ore genesis. Trend maps for Cu, Pb + Zn, and Ag interpolated by kriging method, show anomalous values of Cu along the edge of the intrusive body with the metamorphic country rocks, and Pb + Zn in a marginal area. Departing from the study of correlations between different variables, the factor analysis (R-mode highlights five factors that represent a sequence of geological processes: pneumatolytic phase (Sn, deposition of the association with arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, pyrite, molybdenite (Ni, Co, Mo, formation of the Cu ± Ag + Bi sulfide mineralization, galena mineralization ± Au, hydrothermal alteration processes (addition of Ba, Sr, V. The dependence of Cu on other elements is performed by multiple linear regression, resulting an equation statistically tested by F-test, and interpreted as originating in a phase of the metallogenetic processes. The shape of the Cu-Mo mineralized stockwork from Vălişor Valley area has been studied on the basis of samples from drillings, Cu trend maps at three depth levels, and a three-dimensional model.

  5. Biologically controlled minerals as potential indicators of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Kaneshiro, E.

    1991-01-01

    Minerals can be produced and deposited either by abiotic or biologic means. Regardless of their origin, mineral crystals reflect the environment conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, chemical composition, and redox potential) present during crystal formation. Biologically-produced mineral crystals are grown or reworked under the control of their host organism and reflect an environment different from the abiotic environment. In addition, minerals of either biologic or abiotic origin have great longevities. For these reasons, biologically produced minerals have been proposed as biomarkers. Biomarkers are key morphological, chemical, and isotopic signatures of living systems that can be used to determine if life processes have occurred. Studies of biologically controlled minerals produced by the protist, Paramecium tetraurelia, were initiated since techniques have already been developed to culture them and isolate their crystalline material, and methods are already in place to analyze this material. Two direct crystalline phases were identified. One phase, whose chemical composition is high in Mg, was identified as struvite. The second phase, whose chemical composition is high in Ca, has not been previously found occurring naturally and may be considered a newly discovered material. Analyses are underway to determine the characteristics of these minerals in order to compare them with characteristics of these minerals in order to compare them with characteristics of minerals formed abiotically, but with the same chemical composition.

  6. Cd Mobility in Anoxic Fe-Mineral-Rich Environments - Potential Use of Fe(III)-Reducing Bacteria in Soil Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E. M.; Adaktylou, I. J.; Obst, M.; Schröder, C.; Behrens, S.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Tylsizczak, T.; Michel, F. M.; Krämer, U.; Kappler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural soils are increasingly burdened with heavy metals such as Cd from industrial sources and impure fertilizers. Metal contaminants enter the food chain via plant uptake from soil and negatively affect human and environmental health. New remediation approaches are needed to lower soil metal contents. To apply these remediation techniques successfully, it is necessary to understand how soil microbes and minerals interact with toxic metals. Here we show that microbial Fe(III) reduction initially mobilizes Cd before its immobilization under anoxic conditions. To study how microbial Fe(III) reduction influences Cd mobility, we isolated a new Cd-tolerant, Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter sp. from a heavily Cd-contaminated soil. In lab experiments, this Geobacter strain first mobilized Cd from Cd-loaded Fe(III) hydroxides followed by precipitation of Cd-bearing mineral phases. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, the original and newly formed Cd-containing Fe(II) and Fe(III) mineral phases, including Cd-Fe-carbonates, Fe-phosphates and Fe-(oxyhydr)oxides, were identified and characterized. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, Cd was mapped in the Fe(II) mineral aggregates formed during microbial Fe(III) reduction. Microbial Fe(III) reduction mobilizes Cd prior to its precipitation in Cd-bearing mineral phases. The mobilized Cd could be taken up by phytoremediating plants, resulting in a net removal of Cd from contaminated sites. Alternatively, Cd precipitation could reduce Cd bioavailability in the environment, causing less toxic effects to crops and soil microbiota. However, the stability and thus bioavailability of these newly formed Fe-Cd mineral phases needs to be assessed thoroughly. Whether phytoremediation or immobilization of Cd in a mineral with reduced Cd bioavailability are feasible mechanisms to reduce toxic effects of Cd in the environment remains to be

  7. ASEAN Mineral Database and Information System (AMDIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Y.; Ohno, T.; Bandibas, J. C.; Wakita, K.; Oki, Y.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    AMDIS has lunched officially since the Fourth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting on Minerals on 28 November 2013. In cooperation with Geological Survey of Japan, the web-based GIS was developed using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. The system is composed of the local databases and the centralized GIS. The local databases created and updated using the centralized GIS are accessible from the portal site. The system introduces distinct advantages over traditional GIS. Those are a global reach, a large number of users, better cross-platform capability, charge free for users, charge free for provider, easy to use, and unified updates. Raising transparency of mineral information to mining companies and to the public, AMDIS shows that mineral resources are abundant throughout the ASEAN region; however, there are many datum vacancies. We understand that such problems occur because of insufficient governance of mineral resources. Mineral governance we refer to is a concept that enforces and maximizes the capacity and systems of government institutions that manages minerals sector. The elements of mineral governance include a) strengthening of information infrastructure facility, b) technological and legal capacities of state-owned mining companies to fully-engage with mining sponsors, c) government-led management of mining projects by supporting the project implementation units, d) government capacity in mineral management such as the control and monitoring of mining operations, and e) facilitation of regional and local development plans and its implementation with the private sector.

  8. Influence of oil and mineral characteristics on oil-mineral interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, P.A.; Lunel, T.; Daniel, F.; Swannell, R.; Lee, K.; Stoffyn-Egli, P.

    1998-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to simulate the process of oil-mineral interaction in seawater. Thirteen different crudes, emulsions and oil products were used in the study. The objective was to improve the fundamental understanding of the characteristics of oils and minerals that influence the process. The findings of an initial phase of studies based on the swirling flask and marine simulation procedures were also described. Oil content associated with flocs to oil and mineral characteristics were discussed. Emulsions were prepared at 10 degrees C by vigorously mixing the oil with excess artificial seawater in a Kilner jar using a high shear homogenizer. Topped oils were prepared by distillation to 250 degrees C. The biodegraded oil was prepared from the topped crude oil. Biodegradation was achieved over a 28 day period using natural seawater and naturally occurring hydrocarbon degraders. The relationships between oil concentration, oil density and mineral exchange capacity were determined. The study showed that greater oil concentrations in the water column could be expected with (1) the presence of mineral fines, (2) minerals with greater cation exchange rates, (3) minerals with finer sizes, and (4) oils of lower viscosity and density. It was determined that in coastal waters the viscosity of the oil/emulsion will likely be the main factor affecting oil-mineral interactions. The viscosity limit for allowing oil fines interaction is likely to be dependent on the energy in the coastal zone affected by the oil pollution. 18 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs

  9. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  10. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    This project is investigating levels or uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema

  11. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1982-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological) and their exposure levels that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumonconiosis and emphysema

  12. Mineralization model for Chahar Gonbad copper-gold deposit (Sirjan, using mineralogical, alteration and geochemical data and multivariate statistical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seayed Jaber Yousefi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study area is located in southeastern Iran, about 110 km southwest of Kerman. Geologically, the area is composed of ophiolitic rocks, volcanic rocks, intrusive bodies and sedimentary rocks. Vein mineralization within andesite, andesitic basalt, andesitic tuffs occurred along the Chahar Gonbad fault. Sulfide mineralization in the ore deposit has taken place as dissemination, veins and veinlets in which pyrite and chalcopyrite are the most important ores. In this area, argillic, phyllic and propylitic alteration types are observed. Such elements as Au, Bi, Cu, S and Se are more enriched than others and the enrichment factors for these elements in comparison with background concentration are 321, 503, 393, 703 and 208, and with respect to Clark concentration are 401, 222, 532, 101 and 156, respectively. According to multivariate analysis, three major mineralization phases are recognized in the deposit. During the first phase, hydrothermal calcite veins are enriched in As, Cd, Pb, Zn and Ca, the second phase is manifested by the enrichment of sulfide veins in Cu, Au, Ag, Bi, Fe and S and the third phase mineralization includes Ni, Mn, Se and Sb as an intermediate level between the two previous phases.

  13. Development of LLNA:DAE: a new local lymph node assay that includes the elicitation phase, discriminates borderline-positive chemicals, and is useful for cross-sensitization testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kunihiko; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Hagiwara, Saori; Itagaki, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    We developed a new local lymph node assay (LLNA) that includes the elicitation phase termed LLNA:DAE for discrimination of borderline-positive chemicals as classified by the LLNA modified by Daicel based on ATP content (LLNA:DA) and for cross-sensitization testing. Although the LLNA:DA method could help identify skin sensitizers, some skin irritants classified as non-sensitizers by the LLNA were classified as borderline positive. In addition, the evaluation for the cross-sensitization potential between chemicals was impossible. In the LLNA:DAE procedure, test group of mice received four applications of chemicals on the dorsum of the right ear for induction and one application on the dorsum of the left ear for elicitation. Control group of mice received one chemical application on the dorsum of the left ear. We evaluated the sensitizing potential by comparing the weights of the lymph nodes from the left ears between the two groups. The results of using the LLNA:DAE method to examine 24 chemicals, which contained borderline-positive chemicals, were consistent with those from the LLNA method, except for nickel chloride (NiCl2). Two chemical pairs, 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) and hydroquinone (HQ) with p-benzoquinone (p-BQ), showed clear cross-sensitization with each other, while another chemical pair, DNFB with hexylcinnamic aldehyde (HCA) did not. Taken together, our results suggest that the LLNA:DAE method is useful for discriminating borderline-positive chemicals and for determining chemical cross-sensitization.

  14. Definitions of Health Terms: Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/definitions/mineralsdefinitions.html Definitions of Health Terms : Minerals To use the sharing features on this page, ... National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements Minerals Minerals are those elements on the earth and ...

  15. Minerals industry survey 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This is the eleventh Minerals Industry Survey produced by the Australian Mining Industry Council. It represents an invaluable time series on the minerals industry's financial performance, as well as an up to date description of the industry for the latest financial year. The survey has been conceived as a supplement to and expansion of the various Australian Bureau of Statistics and Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics publications which describe the exploration, mining and smelting and refining industries in Australia. The tables in this survey have been prepared by Coopers and Lybrand, Chartered Accountants, based on information supplied to them in confidence by the respondent companies.

  16. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A.

    2002-01-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  17. Identification of Uranium Minerals in Natural U-Bearing Rocks Using Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiswenger, Toya N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Gallagher, Neal B. [Eigenvector Research, Inc., Manson, WA, USA; Myers, Tanya L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Szecsody, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Tonkyn, Russell G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Su, Yin-Fong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Sweet, Lucas E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Lewallen, Tricia A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Johnson, Timothy J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA

    2017-10-24

    The identification of minerals, including uranium-bearing minerals, is traditionally a labor-intensive-process using x-ray diffraction (XRD), fluorescence, or other solid-phase and wet chemical techniques. While handheld XRD and fluorescence instruments can aid in field identification, handheld infrared reflectance spectrometers can also be used in industrial or field environments, with rapid, non-destructive identification possible via spectral analysis of the solid’s reflectance spectrum. We have recently developed standard laboratory measurement methods for the infrared (IR) reflectance of solids and have investigated using these techniques for the identification of uranium-bearing minerals, using XRD methods for ground-truth. Due to the rich colors of such species, including distinctive spectroscopic signatures in the infrared, identification is facile and specific, both for samples that are pure or are partially composed of uranium (e.g. boltwoodite, schoepite, tyuyamunite, carnotite, etc.) or non-uranium minerals. The method can be used to detect not only pure and partial minerals, but is quite sensitive to chemical change such as hydration (e.g. schoepite). We have further applied statistical methods, in particular classical least squares (CLS) and multivariate curve resolution (MCR) for discrimination of such uranium minerals and two uranium pure chemicals (U3O8 and UO2) against common background materials (e.g. silica sand, asphalt, calcite, K-feldspar) with good success. Each mineral contains unique infrared spectral features; some of the IR features are similar or common to entire classes of minerals, typically arising from similar chemical moieties or functional groups in the minerals: phosphates, sulfates, carbonates, etc. These characteristic 2 infrared bands generate the unique (or class-specific) bands that distinguish the mineral from the interferents or backgrounds. We have observed several cases where the chemical moieties that provide the

  18. Phase I dose-escalation study of the c-Met tyrosine kinase inhibitor SAR125844 in Asian patients with advanced solid tumors, including patients with MET-amplified gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitara, Kohei; Kim, Tae Min; Yokota, Tomoya; Goto, Masahiro; Satoh, Taroh; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hyo Song; Assadourian, Sylvie; Gomez, Corinne; Harnois, Marzia; Hamauchi, Satoshi; Kudo, Toshihiro; Doi, Toshihido; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2017-10-03

    SAR125844 is a potent and selective inhibitor of the c-Met kinase receptor. This was an open-label, phase I, multicenter, dose-escalation, and dose-expansion trial of SAR125844 in Asian patients with solid tumors, a subgroup of whom had gastric cancer and MET amplification (NCT01657214). SAR125844 was administered by intravenous infusion (260-570 mg/m 2 ) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of each 28-day cycle. Objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to evaluate SAR125844 safety and pharmacokinetic profile. Antitumor activity was also assessed. Of 38 patients enrolled (median age 64.0 years), 22 had gastric cancer, including 14 with MET amplification. In the dose-escalation cohort ( N = 19; unselected population, including three patients with MET -amplification [two with gastric cancer and one with lung cancer]), the MTD was not reached, and the recommended dose was established at 570 mg/m 2 . Most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were nausea (36.8%), vomiting (34.2%), decreased appetite (28.9%), and fatigue or asthenia, constipation, and abdominal pains (each 21.1%); none appeared to be dose-dependent. Grade ≥ 3 AEs were observed in 39.5% of patients and considered drug-related in 7.9%. SAR125844 exposure increased slightly more than expected by dose proportionality; dose had no significant effect on clearance. No objective responses were observed in the dose-escalation cohort, with seven patients (three gastric cancer, two colorectal cancer, one breast cancer, and one with cancer of unknown primary origin) having stable disease. Modest antitumor activity was observed at 570 mg/m 2 in the dose-expansion cohort, comprising patients with MET -amplified tumors ( N = 19). Two gastric cancer patients had partial responses, seven patients had stable disease (six gastric cancer and one kidney cancer), and 10 patients had progressive disease. Single-agent SAR125844 administered up to 570 mg/m 2 has acceptable tolerability and modest

  19. Hydrothermal Gold Mineralization and Structural Controls near May ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mickiale

    Structural data suggests four phases of deformations and NE-SW trending foliation is ... Hawzein area and reported presence of hydrothermal gold and base metal ..... coarse mafic and plagioclase minerals in fine grained ground mass matrix ...

  20. An overview of hydrodynamic studies of mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxiang Chi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow is an integral part of hydrothermal mineralization, and its analysis and characterization constitute an important part of a mineralization model. The hydrodynamic study of mineralization deals with analyzing the driving forces, fluid pressure regimes, fluid flow rate and direction, and their relationships with localization of mineralization. This paper reviews the principles and methods of hydrodynamic studies of mineralization, and discusses their significance and limitations for ore deposit studies and mineral exploration. The driving forces of fluid flow may be related to fluid overpressure, topographic relief, tectonic deformation, and fluid density change due to heating or salinity variation, depending on specific geologic environments and mineralization processes. The study methods may be classified into three types, megascopic (field observations, microscopic analyses, and numerical modeling. Megascopic features indicative of significantly overpressured (especially lithostatic or supralithostatic fluid systems include horizontal veins, sand injection dikes, and hydraulic breccias. Microscopic studies, especially microthermometry of fluid inclusions and combined stress analysis and microthermometry of fluid inclusion planes (FIPs can provide important information about fluid temperature, pressure, and fluid-structural relationships, thus constraining fluid flow models. Numerical modeling can be carried out to solve partial differential equations governing fluid flow, heat transfer, rock deformation and chemical reactions, in order to simulate the distribution of fluid pressure, temperature, fluid flow rate and direction, and mineral precipitation or dissolution in 2D or 3D space and through time. The results of hydrodynamic studies of mineralization can enhance our understanding of the formation processes of hydrothermal deposits, and can be used directly or indirectly in mineral exploration.

  1. A world of minerals in your mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenness, Jane E.; Ober, Joyce A.; Wilkins, Aleeza M.; Gambogi, Joseph

    2016-09-15

    Mobile phones and other high-technology communications devices could not exist without mineral commodities. More than one-half of all components in a mobile device—including its electronics, display, battery, speakers, and more—are made from mined and semiprocessed materials (mineral commodities). Some mineral commodities can be recovered as byproducts during the production and processing of other commodities. As an example, bauxite is mined for its aluminum content, but gallium is recovered during the aluminum production process. The images show the ore minerals (sources) of some mineral commodities that are used to make components of a mobile device. On the reverse side, the map and table depict the major source countries producing these mineral commodities along with how these commodities are used in mobile devices. For more information on minerals, visit http://minerals.usgs.gov.

  2. sequenceMiner algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Detecting and describing anomalies in large repositories of discrete symbol sequences. sequenceMiner has been open-sourced! Download the file below to try it out....

  3. Characterization of minerals, metals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Bai, Chengguang; Carpenter, John; Cai, Mingdong; Firrao, Donato; Kim, Byoung-Gon

    2012-01-01

    This state-of-the-art reference contains chapters on all aspects of the characterization of minerals, metals, and materials. The title presents papers from one of the largest yearly gatherings of materials scientists in the world and thoroughly discusses the characterization of minerals, metals, and materials The scope includes current industrial applications and research and developments in the following areas:  Characterization of Ferrous Metals Characterization of Non-Ferrous Materials Characterization of Minerals and Ceramics Character

  4. A 4-year non-randomized comparative phase-IV study of early rheumatoid arthritis: integrative anthroposophic medicine for patients with preference against DMARDs versus conventional therapy including DMARDs for patients without preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamre HJ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Harald J Hamre,1 Van N Pham,2 Christian Kern,3 Rolf Rau,4 Jörn Klasen,3 Ute Schendel,5 Lars Gerlach,6 Attyla Drabik,2 Ludger Simon6,† 1Institute for Applied Epistemology and Medical Methodology at the Witten/Herdecke University, Freiburg, Germany; 2Institute of Statistics in Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany; 3Department of Integrative Medicine, Asklepios Westklinikum, Hamburg, Germany; 4Department of Rheumatology, Evangelisches Fachkrankenhaus Ratingen, Ratingen, Germany; 5Department of Rheumatology, m&i-Fachklinik Bad Pyrmont, Bad Pyrmont, Germany; 6Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, Filderklinik, Filderstadt, Germany †Dr Ludger Simon passed away on June 10, 2016 Background: While disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs are a mainstay of therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA, some patients with early RA refuse DMARDs. In anthroposophic medicine (AM, a treatment strategy for early RA without DMARDs has been developed. Preliminary data suggest that RA symptoms and inflammatory markers can be reduced under AM, without DMARDs. Patients and methods: Two hundred and fifty-one self-selected patients aged 16–70 years, starting treatment for RA of <3 years duration, without prior DMARD therapy, participated in a prospective, non-randomized, comparative Phase IV study. C-patients were treated in clinics offering conventional therapy including DMARDs, while A-patients had chosen treatment in anthroposophic clinics, without DMARDs. Both groups received corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Primary outcomes were intensity of RA symptoms measured by self-rating on visual analog scales, C-reactive protein, radiological progression, study withdrawals, serious adverse events (SAE, and adverse drug reactions in months 0–48. Results: The groups were similar in most baseline characteristics, while A-patients had longer disease duration (mean 15.1 vs 10.8 months, p<0

  5. Coastal placer minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Gujar, A.R.

    to be processed and purified to extract the metal either by sulphate or chloride route. The economical aspects of placer mining would involve the cost to benefit ratio, which would encompass the money Selective sorting has resulted in two distinct sediments... or mineral at the national and international levels. Interestingly, though gold is the most sought metal and the prices per gram keep rising, there are others that are much more costly such as diamond and rare earth metals. Uses of Heavy Minerals...

  6. [Pneumoconiosis in bauxite miners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinini, R; Pesola, M; Digennaro, M A; Carino, M; Nuzzaco, A; Coviello, F

    1985-01-01

    The authors examined a group of 40 miners who were being working at an Apulian bauxite mine, presently inactive. Radiographic findings of pulmonary micronodulation without significant reduction of lung functions were showed in 15 miners. Mineralogical analysis of mine dust samples excluded any presence of more than 1% free silica. As a result of this study hypotheses have been formulated about pathogenesis of this moderated and non-invasive pneumoconiosis, showed in long exposed subjects to low silica content dusts.

  7. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1987-01-01

    Using both large and small experimental animals, this project is investigating levels of uranium-mine air contaminants that produce respiratory system disease in miners. Lung cancer incidence and deaths from degenerative lung disease are significantly elevated among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema. Histopathological data for 100-working-level (WL) exposure rates show a significant increase in lung tumor risk over 1000-WL exposure rates for comparable cumulative radon-daughter exposures. Exposure of rats to radon daughters and other contaminants continues; the exposure of beagle dogs to uranium ore dust alone was terminated. Renal function and hematology data on ore-dust-exposed dogs are reported. 1 figure, 5 tables

  8. Minerals Yearbook, volume II, Area Reports—Domestic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  9. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  10. Curative or pre-emptive adenovirus-specific T cell transfer from matched unrelated or third party haploidentical donors after HSCT, including UCB transplantations: a successful phase I/II multicenter clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongsheng Qian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, the most widely used potentially curable cellular immunotherapeutic approach in the treatment of hematological malignancies, is limited by life-threatening complications: graft versus host disease (GVHD and infections especially viral infections refractory to antiviral drugs. Adoptive transfer of virus-specific T cells is becoming an alternative treatment for infections following HSCT. We report here the results of a phase I/II multicenter study which includes a series of adenovirus-specific T cell (ADV-VST infusion either from the HSCT donor or from a third party haploidentical donor for patients transplanted with umbilical cord blood (UCB. Methods Fourteen patients were eligible and 11 patients received infusions of ADV-VST generated by interferon (IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic isolation from a leukapheresis from their original donor (42.9% or a third party haploidentical donor (57.1%. One patient resolved ADV infection before infusion, and ADV-VST could not reach release or infusion criteria for two patients. Two patients received cellular immunotherapy alone without antiviral drugs as a pre-emptive treatment. Results One patient with adenovirus infection and ten with adenovirus disease were infused with ADV-VST (mean 5.83 ± 8.23 × 103 CD3+IFN-γ+ cells/kg up to 9 months after transplantation. The 11 patients showed in vivo expansion of specific T cells up to 60 days post-infusion, associated with adenovirus load clearance in ten of the patients (91%. Neither de novo GVHD nor side effects were observed during the first month post-infusion, but GVHD reactivations occurred in three patients, irrespective of the type of leukapheresis donor. For two of these patients, GVHD reactivation was controlled by immunosuppressive treatment. Four patients died during follow-up, one due to refractory ADV disease. Conclusions Adoptive transfer of rapidly isolated ADV

  11. Quantifying elemental compositions of primary minerals from granitic rocks and saprolite within the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybrand, R. A.; Rasmussen, C.

    2011-12-01

    Granitic terrain comprises a significant area of the earth's land surface (>15%). Quantifying weathering processes involved in the transformation of granitic rock to saprolite and soil is central to understanding landscape evolution in these systems. The quantification of primary mineral composition is important for assessing subsequent mineral transformations and soil production. This study focuses on coupling detailed analysis of primary mineral composition to soil development across an array of field sites sampled from the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone observatory (SCM-CZO) environmental gradient. The gradient spans substantial climate-driven shifts in vegetation, ranging from desert scrub to mixed conifer forests. The parent material is a combination of Precambrian and Tertiary aged granites and quartz diorite. Primary mineral type and composition are known to vary among the various aged granitic materials and this variability is hypothesized to manifest as significant variation in regolith forming processes across the SCM-CZO. To address this variability, the mineral composition and mineral formulae of rock and saprolite samples were determined by electron microprobe chemical analyses. The rocks were pre-dominantly quartz, biotite, muscovite, orthoclase and calcium/sodium-rich plagioclase feldspars. Trace minerals observed in the samples included sphene, rutile, zircon, garnet, ilmenite, and apatite. Mineral formulae from electron microprobe analyses were combined with quantitative x-ray diffraction (QXRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data to quantify both primary and secondary mineralogical components in soil profiles from each of the field sites. Further, electron microprobe analyses of <2mm mixed conifer saprolite revealed weathered plagioclase grains coated with clay-sized particles enriched in silica and aluminum (~25% and 15%, respectively), suggesting kaolin as the secondary phase. The coatings were interspersed within each plagioclase grain, a

  12. Minerals in thalassaemia major patients: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Zeynep; Genc, Gizem Esra; Gumuslu, Saadet

    2017-05-01

    Thalassaemia major (TM) is a hereditary blood disease characterised by reduced or absent production of beta globin chains. Erythrocyte transfusions are given to raise the haemoglobin level in patients with thalassaemia major. However, transfusions have been related to increased risk of iron overload and tissue damage related to excess iron. Both elevated oxidative stress due to iron overload and increased hemolysis lead to over utilisation of minerals required for antioxidant enzymes activities. Iron chelators have been used to prevent iron overload in thalassaemia major patients, but these chelators have the possibility of removing minerals from the body. Thalassaemia patients are more at risk for mineral deficiency because of increased oxidative stress and iron chelation therapies. Growth and maturational delay, cardiomyopathy, endocrinopathies and osteoporosis are the complications of thalassaemia. Minerals may play a particular role to prevent these complications. In the current review, we provide an overview of minerals including zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca) in thalassaemia major patients. We, also, underline that some complications of thalassaemia can be caused by an increased need for minerals or lack of the minerals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Plasticity induced phase transformation in molecular crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Koslowski, Marisol

    2014-01-01

    Solid state amorphization (SSA) can be achieved in crystalline materials including metal alloys, intermetallics, semiconductors, minerals and molecular crystals. Even though the mechanisms may differ in different materials, the crystalline to amorphous transformation occurs when the crystal reaches a metastable state in which its free energy is higher than that of the amorphous phase. SSA is observed in metal alloys because of interdiffusion of the crystalline elements during mechanical milli...

  14. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included

  15. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  16. The mineral economy of Brazil--Economia mineral do Brasil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurmendi, Alfredo C.; Barboza, Frederico Lopes; Thorman, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    This study depicts the Brazilian government structure, mineral legislation and investment policy, taxation, foreign investment policies, environmental laws and regulations, and conditions in which the mineral industry operates. The report underlines Brazil's large and diversified mineral endowment. A total of 37 mineral commodities, or groups of closely related commodities, is discussed. An overview of the geologic setting of the major mineral deposits is presented. This report is presented in English and Portuguese in pdf format.

  17. Crystal-Chemical Analysis Martian Minerals in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bish, D. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A. S.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; Vaniman, D. T.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity performed X-ray diffraction analyses on scooped soil at Rocknest and on drilled rock fines at Yellowknife Bay (John Klein and Cumberland samples), The Kimberley (Windjana sample), and Pahrump (Confidence Hills sample) in Gale crater, Mars. Samples were analyzed with the Rietveld method to determine the unit-cell parameters and abundance of each observed crystalline phase. Unit-cell parameters were used to estimate compositions of the major crystalline phases using crystal-chemical techniques. These phases include olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene minerals. Comparison of the CheMin sample unit-cell parameters with those in the literature provides an estimate of the chemical compositions of the major crystalline phases. Preliminary unit-cell parameters, abundances and compositions of crystalline phases found in Rocknest and Yellowknife Bay samples were reported in. Further instrument calibration, development of 2D-to- 1D pattern conversion corrections, and refinement of corrected data allows presentation of improved compositions for the above samples.

  18. Marketing mix of chosen Slovak mineral water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhanová Silvia

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering its small area, Slovakia abounds in many sources of mineral waters and a considerable amount of them can be used for the commercial utilization. STN 86 8000 divides mineral waters in the natural mineral waters, natural mineral table waters and the natural mineral healing waters. Natural mineral water is, after the present norm, in effect water, which rises from natural trapped sources. This type of water contains more than 1 gram of dissolved substances or 1 gram of dissolved CO 2 in 1 litter. Natural mineral table water is water that, with its chemical composition as well as its physical and sensorial attributes is suitable as a refresher. It contains at least 1 gram of melted CO2 and up to 6 grams of dissolved illiquid substances in 1 litter. The mentioned substances are not characterised by any marked pharmacological effect. Natural mineral healing water is water, which with an eye to its chemical composition and physical properties, have a scientifically demonstrable effects to the human health and it is generally used for healing purposes. In the present contribution, an attention is orientated to the occurrence of listed types of waters in Slovakia, in connection with geological conditions of their circulation and accumulation and especially with possibilities of their use on the Slovak buyer’s market.The marketing mix is a complex of information, which can be regulated. Firms accumulate this information to satisfy a customer. Marketing mix of mineral waters includes information about four variables: product (characteristics of product, quality, packing, design..., prices, advertisement, distribution (the way how to get product to customer. Data listed in the contribution come from the sectional market research, which was performed between December 1st and December 22nd 2000 in twenty groceries in

  19. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This topical report covers Phase 2b, which is the construction phase of pilot demonstration subsystems that make up the integrated plant. The subsystems included are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant is now capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The topical report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. At the end of Phase 2b, the CCMP pilot demonstration is fully ready for testing.

  20. Characterization of Rare Earth Element Minerals in Coal Utilization Byproducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montross, Scott N. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Verba, Circe A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States). Research Innovation Center; Collins, Keith [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States). Research Innovation Center

    2017-07-17

    occurrence of REE mineral phases in CUB and allowed us to calculate structural and volumetric estimates of REE. Collectively, the rock and coal ash samples contained minerals such as quartz, kaolinite, muscovite/illite, iron oxide (as hematite or magnetite), mullite, and clinochlore. Trace minerals included pyrite, zircon, siderite, rutile, diopside, foresterite, gypsum, and barite. We identified REE phosphate minerals monazite (Ce,La,Nd,Th)(PO4,SiO4), xenotime (YPO4,SiO4), and apatite (Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH) via SEM and electron microprobe analysis: these materials generally occurred as 1-10 μm-long crystals in the rock and ash samples. As has been shown in other studies, amorphous material-aluminosilicate glass or iron oxyhydroxide-are the major components of coal fly and bottom ash. Trace amounts of amorphous calcium oxide and mixed element (e.g., Al-Si-Ca-Fe) slag are also present. Quartz, mullite, hematite, and magnetite are the crystalline phases present. We found that REEs are present as monomineralic grains dispersed within the ash, as well as fused to or encapsulated by amorphous aluminosilicate glass particles. Monazite and xenotime have relatively high melting points (>1800 °C) compared to typical combustion temperatures; our observations indicate that the REE-phosphates, which presumably contribute a large percentage of REE to the bulk ash REE pool, as measured by mass spectroscopy, are largely unaltered by the combustion. Our study shows that conventional coal combustion processes sequester REE minerals into aluminosilicate glass phases, which presents a new engineering challenge for extracting REE from coal ash. The characterization work summarized in this report provides a semi-quantitative assessments of REE in coal-containing rock and CUB. The data we obtained from 2- and 3-D imaging, elemental mapping, volumetric estimates, and advanced high-resolution pixel classification

  1. Statistical models for optimizing mineral exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wignall, T.K.; DeGeoffroy, J.

    1987-01-01

    The primary purpose of mineral exploration is to discover ore deposits. The emphasis of this volume is on the mathematical and computational aspects of optimizing mineral exploration. The seven chapters that make up the main body of the book are devoted to the description and application of various types of computerized geomathematical models. These chapters include: (1) the optimal selection of ore deposit types and regions of search, as well as prospecting selected areas, (2) designing airborne and ground field programs for the optimal coverage of prospecting areas, and (3) delineating and evaluating exploration targets within prospecting areas by means of statistical modeling. Many of these statistical programs are innovative and are designed to be useful for mineral exploration modeling. Examples of geomathematical models are applied to exploring for six main types of base and precious metal deposits, as well as other mineral resources (such as bauxite and uranium)

  2. Printing nature: Unraveling the role of nacre's mineral bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Grace X; Libonati, Flavia; Wettermark, Susan D; Buehler, Markus J

    2017-12-01

    Creating materials with strength and toughness has been a long-sought goal. Conventional engineering materials often face a trade-off between strength and toughness, prompting researchers seeking to overcome these limitations to explore more sophisticated materials, such as composites. This paradigm shift in material design is spurred by nature, which exhibits a plethora of heterogeneous materials that offer outstanding material properties, and many natural materials are widely regarded as examples of high-performing hybrid materials. A classic example is nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl, which boasts a combination of high stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness. Various microstructural features contribute to the toughness of nacre, including mineral bridges (MBs), nano-asperities, and waviness of the constituent platelets. Recent research in biomimicry suggests that MBs contribute to the high strength and toughness observed in nacre and nacre-inspired materials. However, previous work in this area did not allow for complete control over the length scale of the bridges and had limitations on the volume fraction of mineral content. In this work, we present a systematic investigation elucidating the effects of structural parameters, such as volume fraction of mineral phase and density of MBs, on the mechanical response of nacre-inspired additive manufactured composites. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to tune the composite properties by tuning sizes and content of structural features (e.g. MBs and mineral content) in a heterogeneous material. Looking forward, this systematic approach enables materials-by-design of complex architectures to tackle demanding engineering challenges in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mass change calculations of hydrothermal alterations within the volcanogenic metasediments hosted Cu-Pb (-Zn) mineralization at Halilar area, NW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran Yildirim, Demet; Abdelnasser, Amr; Doner, Zeynep; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    The Halilar Cu-Pb (-Zn) mineralization that is formed in the volcanogenic metasediments of Bagcagiz Formation at Balikesir province, NW Turkey, represents locally vein-type deposit as well as restricted to fault gouge zone directed NE-SW along with the lower boundary of Bagcagiz Formation and Duztarla granitic intrusion in the study area. Furthermore, This granite is traversed by numerous mineralized sheeted vein systems, which locally transgress into the surrounding metasediments. Therefore, this mineralization closely associated with intense hydrothermal alteration within brecciation, and quartz stockwork veining. The ore mineral assemblage includes chalcopyrite, galena, and some sphalerite with covellite and goethite formed during three phases of mineralization (pre-ore, main ore, and supergene) within an abundant gangue of quartz and calcite. The geologic and field relationships, petrographic and mineralogical studies reveal two alteration zones occurred with the Cu-Pb (-Zn) mineralization along the contact between the Bagcagiz Formation and Duztarla granite; pervasive phyllic alteration (quartz, sericite, and pyrite), and selective propylitic alteration (albite, calcite, epidote, sericite and/or chlorite). This work, by using the mass balance calculations, reports the mass/volume changes (gain and loss) of the chemical components of the hydrothermal alteration zones associated with Halilar Cu-Pb (-Zn) mineralization at Balikesir area (Turkey). It revealed that the phyllic alteration has enrichments of Si, Fe, K, Ba, and LOI with depletion of Mg, Ca, and Na reflect sericitization of alkali feldspar and destruction of ferromagnesian minerals. This zone has high Cu and Pb with Zn contents represents the main mineralized zone. On the other hand, the propylitic zone is characterized by addition of Ca, Na, K, Ti, P, and Ba with LOI and Cu (lower content) referring to the replacement of plagioclase and ferromagnesian minerals by albite, calcite, epidote, and sericite

  4. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebush, S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  5. gold mineralization in Masjeddaghi area, east of Jolfa, NW Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Imamalipour; Hossein Abdoli; Behzad Hajalilo

    2010-01-01

    Two types of mineralization including porphyry copper and epithermal gold mineralization have occurred in relation with an intermediate volcano-plutonic complex in Masjeddaghi area. Different alterations including silica, advanced argillic, intermediate argillic and propylitic have been distinguished in relation with epithermal mineralization, which have a zonal pattern. Elemental mass gains and losses during alterations were calculated using Zr as an immobile monitor. Silica zone has enriche...

  6. Diagnostic Genesis Features of Au-Ag Selenide-Telluride Mineralization of Western Java Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euis Tintin Yuningsih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.3.1.67-76The ore mineralogy of the westernmost part of West Java such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cikotok, and Cirotan are characterized by the dominance of silver-arsenic-antimony sulfosalt with silver selenides and rarely tellurides over the argentite, whereas the eastern part of West Java including Arinem and Cineam deposits are dominated by silver-gold tellurides. Mineralogy of Se-type deposits at Pongkor, Cikidang, Cibaliung, Cisungsang, and Cirotan and Te-type deposits at Arinem and Cineam shows their different geochemical characteristics. Mineralogical and geochemical differences can be explained by variation of physico-chemical conditions that existed during gold-silver deposition by applying the phase relation among sulfide, telluride, and selenide mineral association in the deposits. The relative values of ƒSe2(g, ƒTe(g, and ƒS2(g control the actual presence of selenide or telluride minerals within the West Java deposits, which also depend on their concentrations in the hydrothermal fluid. Even though the concentration of selenium in the hydrothermal fluid of Te-type deposits might have been similar or even higher than that in the Se-type, early substitution of selenium in the sulfide minerals prevents its concentration in the hydrothermal fluid to the levels for precipitating selenide minerals. Therefore, early sulfide mineral deposition from reduction fluids will not increase the ƒSe2(g/ƒS2(g ratio to form selenide minerals in Te-type deposits of Arinem and Cineam, other than selenium-bearing sulfide mineral such as Se-bearing galena or Se-bearing pyrargyrite-proustite.

  7. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  8. 30 CFR 285.810 - What must I include in my Safety Management System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my Safety Management System? 285.810 Section 285.810 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR..., COPs and GAPs Safety Management Systems § 285.810 What must I include in my Safety Management System...

  9. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. © 2013.

  10. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  11. Improved accuracy of cortical bone mineralization measured by polychromatic microcomputed tomography using a novel high mineral density composite calibration phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuerling, Justin M.; Rudy, David J.; Niebur, Glen L.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) is increasingly used as a nondestructive alternative to ashing for measuring bone mineral content. Phantoms are utilized to calibrate the measured x-ray attenuation to discrete levels of mineral density, typically including levels up to 1000 mg HA/cm 3 , which encompasses levels of bone mineral density (BMD) observed in trabecular bone. However, levels of BMD observed in cortical bone and levels of tissue mineral density (TMD) in both cortical and trabecular bone typically exceed 1000 mg HA/cm 3 , requiring extrapolation of the calibration regression, which may result in error. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate (1) the relationship between x-ray attenuation and an expanded range of hydroxyapatite (HA) density in a less attenuating polymer matrix and (2) the effects of the calibration on the accuracy of subsequent measurements of mineralization in human cortical bone specimens. Methods: A novel HA-polymer composite phantom was prepared comprising a less attenuating polymer phase (polyethylene) and an expanded range of HA density (0-1860 mg HA/cm 3 ) inclusive of characteristic levels of BMD in cortical bone or TMD in cortical and trabecular bone. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the new HA-polymer calibration phantom were compared to measurements using a conventional HA-polymer phantom comprising 0-800 mg HA/cm 3 and the corresponding ash density measurements on the same specimens. Results: The HA-polymer composite phantom exhibited a nonlinear relationship between x-ray attenuation and HA density, rather than the linear relationship typically employed a priori, and obviated the need for extrapolation, when calibrating the measured x-ray attenuation to high levels of mineral density. The BMD and TMD of cortical bone specimens measured using the conventional phantom was significantly lower than the measured ash density by 19% (p<0.001, ANCOVA) and 33% (p<0.05, Tukey's HSD

  12. Phase I dose-escalation study of the c-Met tyrosine kinase inhibitor SAR125844 in Asian patients with advanced solid tumors, including patients with MET-amplified gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shitara, Kohei; Kim, Tae Min; Yokota, Tomoya; Goto, Masahiro; Satoh, Taroh; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Kim, Hyo Song; Assadourian, Sylvie; Gomez, Corinne; Harnois, Marzia; Hamauchi, Satoshi; Kudo, Toshihiro; Doi, Toshihido; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2017-01-01

    SAR125844 is a potent and selective inhibitor of the c-Met kinase receptor. This was an open-label, phase I, multicenter, dose-escalation, and dose-expansion trial of SAR125844 in Asian patients with solid tumors, a subgroup of whom had gastric cancer and MET amplification (NCT01657214). SAR125844 was administered by intravenous infusion (260–570 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of each 28-day cycle. Objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to evaluate SAR125844 safety...

  13. Mortality among sulfide ore miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlman, K.; Koskela, R.S.; Kuikka, P.; Koponen, M.; Annanmaeki, M.

    1991-01-01

    Lung cancer mortality was studied during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township in North Karelia, where an old copper mine was located. Age-specific lung cancer death rates (1968-1985) were higher among the male population of Outokumpu than among the North Karelian male population of the same age excluding the Outokumpu district (p less than .01). Of all 106 persons who died from lung cancer during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township, 47 were miners of the old mine, 39 of whom had worked there for at least three years and been heavily exposed to radon daughters and silica dust. The study cohort consisted of 597 miners first employed between 1954 and 1973 by a new copper mine and a zinc mine, and employed there for at least 3 years. The period of follow-up was 1954-1986. The number of person-years was 14,782. The total number of deaths was 102; the expected number was 72.8 based on the general male population and 97.8 based on the mortality of the male population of North Karelia. The excess mortality among miners was due mainly to ischemic heart disease (IHD); 44 were observed, the expected number was 22.1, based on the general male population, and the North Karelian expected number was 31.2 (p less than .05). Of the 44 miners who died from IHD, 20 were drillers or chargers exposed to nitroglycerin in dynamite charges, but also to several simultaneous stress factors including PAHs, noise, vibration, heavy work, accident risk, and working alone. Altogether 16 tumors were observed in the cohort. Ten of these were lung cancers, the expected number being 4.3. Miners who had died from lung cancer were 35-64 years old, and had entered mining work between 1954 and 1960. Five of the ten lung cancer cases came from the zinc mine (1.7 expected). Three of them were conductors of diesel-powered ore trains

  14. Minerals in deserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.I.

    1982-01-01

    Almost any kind of mineral deposit can occur in desert areas, and the lack of vegetation and soil cover makes finding them easier. Some kinds of deposits, though, are more likely to occur in deserts than elsewhere. Some of these result from processes genetically related to the present desert climate that improved lower grade deposits of ore. One such process, termed secondary enrichment, is most effective in areas with deep water tables, and many low-grade copper, silver, and uranium deposits have been converted into mineable ore by the downward migration and redeposition of soluble metals. In a desert terrane, placer processes are effective whenever running water flowing over steep slopes erodes outcropping ore bodies and transports and concentrates the heavier ore minerals at lower levels, thus converting low-grade or hard-to-mine bedrock deposits into economically workable concentrations. Other kinds of deposits are better preserved in deserts because the lower rainfall at the surface, and the lower volume of flow and the greater depths to groundwater, result in less destruction of soluble ores; deposits of salines and phosphates are the most notable ores affected by these factors. Still other ore deposits are created as a consequence of the arid climate, mostly because the high evaporation rates operating on standing bodies of water produce brines that can lead directly to concentrations of salts and indirectly to secondary minerals, such as zeolites, that are produced by reaction of silicate minerals with saline waters

  15. Carbonizing bituminous minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-05-01

    A process for carbonizing bituminous minerals, like oil-shale, in a furnace with addition of air in the presence of heat-receiving material is characterized by the fact that to the feed such solid or liquid material (with the exception of oil) is added, which, through vaporization or heat-binding decomposition or conversion, hinders the establishment of excessive temperatures.

  16. Uruguay minerals fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goso, H.

    1967-01-01

    In this report the bases for the development of the necessary works of prospection are exposed on mineral fuels of Uruguay. We have taken the set from: coal, lutitas bituminous, uranium, petroleum and disturbs. In all the cases we have talked about to the present state of the knowledge and to the works that we considered necessary to develop in each case

  17. Fate of Cd during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction by a novel and Cd-tolerant Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Obst, Martin; Hitchcock, Adam; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Behrens, Sebastian; Schröder, Christian; Byrne, James M; Michel, F Marc; Krämer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-12-17

    Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides affect the mobility of contaminants in the environment by providing reactive surfaces for sorption. This includes the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), which prevails in agricultural soils and is taken up by crops. Fe(III)-reducing bacteria can mobilize such contaminants by Fe(III) mineral dissolution or immobilize them by sorption to or coprecipitation with secondary Fe minerals. To date, not much is known about the fate of Fe(III) mineral-associated Cd during microbial Fe(III) reduction. Here, we describe the isolation of a new Geobacter sp. strain Cd1 from a Cd-contaminated field site, where the strain accounts for 10(4) cells g(-1) dry soil. Strain Cd1 reduces the poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxide ferrihydrite in the presence of at least up to 112 mg Cd L(-1). During initial microbial reduction of Cd-loaded ferrihydrite, sorbed Cd was mobilized. However, during continuous microbial Fe(III) reduction, Cd was immobilized by sorption to and/or coprecipitation within newly formed secondary minerals that contained Ca, Fe, and carbonate, implying the formation of an otavite-siderite-calcite (CdCO3-FeCO3-CaCO3) mixed mineral phase. Our data shows that microbially mediated turnover of Fe minerals affects the mobility of Cd in soils, potentially altering the dynamics of Cd uptake into food or phyto-remediating plants.

  18. Comprehensive MRA of the lower limbs including high-resolution extended-phase infra-inguinal imaging with gadobenate dimeglumine: Initial experience with inter-individual comparison to the blood-pool contrast agent gadofosveset trisodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, A.; Chandramohan, S.; Roditi, G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare extended-phase imaging using an extracellular space contrast agent, gadobenate dimeglumine, to imaging with a blood-pool contrast agent, gadofosveset, for magnetic resonance angiography. Materials and methods: A lower-limb magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) protocol (dynamic crural, three-station bolus chase, and infra-inguinal high resolution) designed for blood-pool agent imaging was adapted for use with the extracellular agent, gadobenate dimeglumine, primarily by using a triphasic injection protocol. Ten patients scanned with gadofosveset were compared to 10 patients scanned with gadobenate. The dynamic, bolus chase, and high-resolution images were scored for quality on a Likert scale (from 1–5). Signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios were analysed, and Mann–Whitney U statistical analysis performed. Results: There was no significant difference for the dynamic imaging or the aorto-iliac station of the bolus chase. Infra-inguinal bolus chase images were higher quality (p < 0.05 Mann–Whitney U test) with gadobenate. Signal analysis confirmed lower signal and contrast for venous imaging on the high spatial resolution acquisitions with gadobenate; however, this allowed improved arterial conspicuity. Conclusion: Extended-phase imaging using an extracellular space contrast agent is feasible and provides image quality to equal imaging with a blood-pool contrast agent.

  19. Epitaxial phase diagrams of SrTiO3, CaTiO3, and SrHfO3: Computational investigation including the role of antiferrodistortive and A -site displacement modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angsten, Thomas; Asta, Mark

    2018-04-01

    Ground-state epitaxial phase diagrams are calculated by density functional theory (DFT) for SrTiO3, CaTiO3, and SrHfO3 perovskite-based compounds, accounting for the effects of antiferrodistortive and A -site displacement modes. Biaxial strain states corresponding to epitaxial growth of (001)-oriented films are considered, with misfit strains ranging between -4 % and 4%. Ground-state structures are determined using a computational procedure in which input structures for DFT optimizations are identified as local minima in expansions of the total energy with respect to strain and soft-mode degrees of freedom. Comparison to results of previous DFT studies demonstrates the effectiveness of the computational approach in predicting ground-state phases. The calculated results show that antiferrodistortive octahedral rotations and associated A -site displacement modes act to suppress polarization and reduce the epitaxial strain energy. A projection of calculated atomic displacements in the ground-state epitaxial structures onto soft-mode eigenvectors shows that three ferroelectric and six antiferrodistortive displacement modes are dominant at all misfit strains considered, with the relative contributions from each varying systematically with the strain. Additional A -site displacement modes contribute to the atomic displacements in CaTiO3 and SrHfO3, which serve to optimize the coordination of the undersized A -site cation.

  20. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    1998-01-01

    This report deals with gas phase hydration of pure cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities. This is an important subject in relation to modern high performance concrete which may self-desiccate during hydration. In addition the subject has relevance to storage stability where...... prehydration may occur. In the report both theoretical considerations and experimental data are presented. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during water vapour exposure is nucleation controlled....

  1. Petrography, metasomatism and mineralization of uranium and other radioactive minerals in the Narigan Area (Central Iran) Islamic Republic of Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazeli, A.; Azizaliabad, M.; Iranmanesh, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Narigan Zone is a portion of Yazd Province based on geopolitical division. In the Narigan Valley, rocks of zone have experienced a lot of fracturing and faulting events that are caused by different compressional and tensional tectonic processes. Tensional forces by producing fractures and faults have created an appropriate place for migration of magmatic hydrothermal solutions. The assemblage rock of these study area includes of various mineralogical types such as: acidic rocks, basic rocks, sedimentary rocks, rhyolite and rhyodacite, andesite, limestone layers, quartz-porphyry, metasomatic granites and diabasic dikes. On the basis of petrographical and mineralogical studies, various alterations were observed in the Narigan area, such as: gumbeite or potassic alteration, bresite or phyllic alteration, argillic or clay alteration, propylitic alteration, hornfelsic alteration and hydromica, chlorite, carbonate, magnetite and pyritic alteration. Elevated radiometric counts usually occur in phlogopite-magnetite alteration zone that in this complex usually consists of minerals like biotite, phlogopite, hydromica, magnetite, carbonate, pyrite, chlorite and less commonly apatite. The greatest increase in U content is accompanied by phlogopite-magnetite alteration, sometimes this increase is also observed in the propylitic zone. Respectively, the greatest increases in Th contents were observed by phlogopitic-magnetitic, gumbeitey, bresitic-propylitic intermediate zone and the bresitic and propylitic alteration zones. Increasing amounts of Cu is accompanied by phlogopitic-magnetitic, phyllic, phyllic-propylitic intermediate zone, hornfelsic and propylitic alteration zones. The greatest increase in Mo contents is respectively accompanied by phlogopitic-magnetitic, hornfelsic, bresiticpropylitic intermediate zone, bresitic, propylitic and gumbeitic alteration zones. Respectively, the most increase in amount of Co is associated with phlogopite-magnetite, hornfelsic

  2. Geology and geochemistry of Massangana Granitoid Complex, Brazil, and its relation with tin mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanini, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    The geochemical and petroLogical characteristics of the Massangana Granitoid Complex, situated in the Rondonia Federal Territory, Brazil, aiming to discriminate the tin mineralized granitic rocks from the no mineralized ones. The collected samples consists of examples in tin mineralized and sterile phases. The elements traces were determined by x-ray fluorescence analysis, emission spectrography, molecular absorption spectrophotometry and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The complex edifying evolved in four sucessive episodes called Massangana Phase, Bom Jardim Phase, Sao domingos Phase and Taboca Phase ordered stratigraphycally in this sequence. (author/M.C.K.) [pt

  3. On Mineral Retrosynthesis of a Complex Biogenic Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashit Rao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic relations between organic molecules and mineral precursors regulate biogenic mineralization. Given the remarkable material properties of the egg shell as a biogenic ceramic, it serves as an important model to elucidate biomineral growth. With established roles of complex anionic biopolymers and a heterogeneous organic scaffold in egg shell mineralization, the present study explores the regulation over mineralization attained by applying synthetic polymeric counterparts (polyethylene glycol, poly(acrylic acid, poly(aspartic acid and poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid as additives during remineralization of decalcified eggshell membranes. By applying Mg2+ ions as a co-additive species, mineral retrosynthesis is achieved in a manner that modulates the polymorph and structure of mineral products. Notable features of the mineralization process include distinct local wettability of the biogenic organic scaffold by mineral precursors and mineralization-induced membrane actuation. Overall, the form, structure and polymorph of the mineralization products are synergistically affected by the additive and the content of Mg2+ ions. We also revisit the physicochemical nature of the biomineral scaffold and demonstrate the distinct spatial distribution of anionic biomolecules associated with the scaffold-mineral interface, as well as highlight the hydrogel-like properties of mammillae-associated macromolecules.

  4. Mineral resources in Afghanistan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    Despite Afghanistan's wide variety of mineral resources and long history of small-scale mining of gems, gold, copper, and coal, it was not until the 1950's that the country's mineral resources were subject to systematic exploration. The report documents the past and present status of these resources and examines alternative strategies for their exploitation. Chapter 2 provides a brief history of minerals exploration, exploitation, and planning in Afghanistan, including the roles of Great Britain, France, Germany, the Soviet bloc, and the United States in Afghanistan's mineral sector; mineral policy in the five national plans during the years 1962-83; and sector assessments conducted by the World Bank (1978) and the US Department of Energy (1989). Chapter 3 discusses three strategies for developing the country's mineral and hydrocarbon resources. (1) a national orientation focusing on domestic needs; (2) a regional strategy that would consider markets in countries close to Afghanistan; and (3) an international strategy that would place Afghan resources on the international market

  5. Aggregate and Mineral Resources - Industrial Mineral Mining Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Industrial Mineral Mining Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Industrial Mineral Mining Program. The sub-facility types are listed below:Deep...

  6. Diseases of uranium miners and other underground miners exposed to radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samet, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Excess lung cancer has been demonstrated in many groups of underground miners exposed to radon, including uranium miners and those mining other substances in radon-contaminated mines. In the United States, most underground uranium mines had shut down by the late 1980s, but occupational exposure to radon progeny remains a concern for many other types of underground miners and other underground workers. Worldwide, uranium mining continues, with documented production in Canada, South Africa and other African countries, and Australia. Thus, radon in underground mines remains a significant occupational hazard as the end of the twentieth century approaches.39 references

  7. Effect of soil metal contamination on glyphosate mineralization: role of zinc in the mineralization rates of two copper-spiked mineral soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bojeong; Kim, Young Sik; Kim, Bo Min; Hay, Anthony G; McBride, Murray B

    2011-03-01

    A systematic investigation into lowered degradation rates of glyphosate in metal-contaminated soils was performed by measuring mineralization of [(14)C]glyphosate to (14)CO(2) in two mineral soils that had been spiked with Cu and/or Zn at various loadings. Cumulative (14)CO(2) release was estimated to be approximately 6% or less of the amount of [(14)C]glyphosate originally added in both soils over an 80-d incubation. For all but the highest Cu treatments (400 mg kg(-1)) in the coarse-textured Arkport soil, mineralization began without a lag phase and declined over time. No inhibition of mineralization was observed for Zn up to 400 mg kg(-1) in either soil, suggesting differential sensitivity of glyphosate mineralization to the types of metal and soil. Interestingly, Zn appeared to alleviate high-Cu inhibition of mineralization in the Arkport soil. The protective role of Zn against Cu toxicity was also observed in the pure culture study with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting that increased mineralization rates in high Cu soil with Zn additions might have been due to alleviation of cellular toxicity by Zn rather than a mineralization specific mechanism. Extensive use of glyphosate combined with its reduced degradation in Cu-contaminated, coarse-textured soils may increase glyphosate persistence in soil and consequently facilitate Cu and glyphosate mobilization in the soil environment. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  8. Molecular dynamics of interfacial water and cations associated with clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, Randall T.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie L.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Daemen, Luke L.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay mineral interfaces, including interlayer and external surfaces, play an essential role in many geochemical processes. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these geochemical processes are especially important in evaluating the fate of radionuclide waste in the environment. Such details are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, the basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals offer structurally constrained interfacial environments to better evaluate the local molecular chemistry. We have developed and used classical and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. In particular, inelastic neutron scattering methods provide a successful probe of vibrational behavior of interlayer species to help guide the simulations. Librations involving rock, wag, and twist motions of water molecules are particularly sensitive to the interlayer environment of smectite minerals such as montmorillonite and beidellite. Trends in librational modes for interlayer water as a function of clay structure and cation hydration energy are readily explained using structural and vibrational analysis derived from molecular simulation. Molecular dynamics simulations of virtual phases, including hydrated pyrophyllite, help to explain the behavior of interlayer water that is not associated with cation species. Additionally, we use large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of other layered minerals, such as muscovite, to evaluate adsorption

  9. Some physicochemical aspects of water-soluble mineral flotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijian; Wang, Xuming; Liu, Haining; Zhang, Huifang; Miller, Jan D

    2016-09-01

    Some physicochemical aspects of water-soluble mineral flotation including hydration phenomena, associations and interactions between collectors, air bubbles, and water-soluble mineral particles are presented. Flotation carried out in saturated salt solutions, and a wide range of collector concentrations for effective flotation of different salts are two basic aspects of water-soluble mineral flotation. Hydration of salt ions, mineral particle surfaces, collector molecules or ions, and collector aggregates play an important role in water-soluble mineral flotation. The adsorption of collectors onto bubble surfaces is suggested to be the precondition for the association of mineral particles with bubbles. The association of collectors with water-soluble minerals is a complicated process, which may include the adsorption of collector molecules or ions onto such surfaces, and/or the attachment of collector precipitates or crystals onto the mineral surfaces. The interactions between the collectors and the minerals include electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding, and specific interactions, with electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions being the common mechanisms. For the association of ionic collectors with minerals with an opposite charge, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions could have a synergistic effect, with the hydrophobic interactions between the hydrophobic groups of the previously associated collectors and the hydrophobic groups of oncoming collectors being an important attractive force. Association between solid particles and air bubbles is the key to froth flotation, which is affected by hydrophobicity of the mineral particle surfaces, surface charges of mineral particles and bubbles, mineral particle size and shape, temperature, bubble size, etc. The use of a collector together with a frother and the use of mixed surfactants as collectors are suggested to improve flotation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of melflufen, a peptidase targeted therapy, and dexamethasone in an ongoing open-label phase 2a study in patients with relapsed and relapsed-refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) including an initial report on progression free survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voorhees, P. M.; Magarotto, V.; Sonneveld, P.

    2015-01-01

    to DNA or is readily metabolized by intracellular peptidases into hydrophilic alkylating metabolites. With targeted delivery of alkylating metabolites to tumor cells in vitro (such as multiple myeloma that are rich in activating peptidase), melflufen exerts a 20-100 fold higher anti-tumor potency...... and produces a 20 fold higher intracellular concentration of alkylating moieties compared with melphalan. Methods: Melflufen is evaluated in combination with dexamethasone (dex) 40 mg weekly in an ongoing Phase 1/2a study. RRMM patients with measurable disease and at least 2 prior lines of therapy are eligible......%) and constipation and epistaxis (13%). Treatment-related Grade 3 or 4 AEs were reported in 27 patients (87%). Those occurring in >5% of patients were thrombocytopenia (68%), neutropenia (55%), anemia (42%), leukopenia (32%) and febrile neutropenia, fatigue, pyrexia, asthenia and hyperglycemia each occurred in 6...

  11. The Kongsberg silver deposits, Norway: Ag-Hg-Sb mineralization and constraints for the formation of the deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotková, Jana; Kullerud, Kåre; Šrein, Vladimír; Drábek, Milan; Škoda, Radek

    2018-04-01

    The Kongsberg silver district has been investigated by microscopy and electron microprobe analysis, focusing primarily on the Ag-Hg-Sb mineralization within the context of the updated mineral paragenesis. The earliest mineralization stage is represented by sulfides, including acanthite, and sulfosalts. Native silver formed initially through breakdown of early Ag-bearing phases and later through influx of additional Ag-bearing fluids and silver remobilization. The first two generations of native silver were separated in time by the formation of Ni-Co-Fe sulfarsenides and the monoarsenide niccolite along rims of silver crystals. The presence of As-free sulfosalts and the absence of di- and tri-arsenides suggest a lower arsenic/sulfur activity ratio for the Kongsberg deposits compared to other five-element deposits. Native silver shows binary Ag-Hg and Ag-Sb solid solutions, in contrast to the ternary Ag-Hg-Sb compositions typical for other deposits of similar type. Antimonial silver together with allargentum, dyscrasite, and pyrargyrite was documented exclusively from the northern area of the district. Elsewhere, the only Sb-bearing minerals are polybasite and tetrahedrite/freibergite. Hg-rich silver (up to 21 wt% Hg) has been documented only in the central-western area. Myrmekite of freibergite and chalcopyrite reflects exsolution from an original Ag-poor tetrahedrite upon cooling, while myrmekite of pyrite and silver, forming through breakdown of low-temperature phases (argentopyrite or lenaite) upon heating, characterizes the Kongsberg silver district. Based on the stabilities of minerals and mineral assemblages, the formation of the silver mineralization can be constrained to temperatures between 180 and 250 °C.

  12. Oxygen Extraction from Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen, whether used as part of rocket bipropellant or for astronaut life support, is a key consumable for space exploration and commercialization. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) has been proposed many times as a method for making space exploration more cost effective and sustainable. On planetary and asteroid surfaces the presence of minerals in the regolith that contain oxygen is very common, making them a potential oxygen resource. The majority of research and development for oxygen extraction from minerals has been for lunar regolith although this work would generally be applicable to regolith at other locations in space. This presentation will briefly survey the major methods investigated for oxygen extraction from regolith with a focus on the current status of those methods and possible future development pathways. The major oxygen production methods are (1) extraction from lunar ilmenite (FeTiO3) with either hydrogen or carbon monoxide, (2) carbothermal reduction of iron oxides and silicates with methane, and (3) molten regolith electrolysis (MRE) of silicates. Methods (1) and (2) have also been investigated in a two-step process using CO reduction and carbon deposition followed by carbothermal reduction. All three processes have byproducts that could also be used as resources. Hydrogen or carbon monoxide reduction produce iron metal in small amounts that could potentially be used as construction material. Carbothermal reduction also makes iron metal along with silicon metal and a glass with possible applications. MRE produces iron, silicon, aluminum, titanium, and glass, with higher silicon yields than carbothermal reduction. On Mars and possibly on some moons and asteroids, water is present in the form of mineral hydrates, hydroxyl (-OH) groups on minerals, andor water adsorbed on mineral surfaces. Heating of the minerals can liberate the water which can be electrolyzed to provide a source of oxygen as well. The chemistry of these processes, some key

  13. Indústria mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iran F. Machado

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available A INDÚSTRIA mineral brasileira é analisada, de modo sucinto, face aos desafios impostos pela globalização contemporânea. As mudanças profundas ocorridas no contexto internacional na última década, abrangendo as esferas política, econômica, social e institucional, exigem uma reflexão aprofundada sobre o papel a ser desempenhado pelo Brasil no comércio internacional de bens minerais. De um lado, as oportunidades de aproveitamento de jazidas de classe internacional, principalmente na Amazônia, são bastante promissoras. Por outro, não se deve ignorar que: a explotação dessas reservas terá de obedecer a critérios de sustentabilidade, seguindo paradigmas já adotados em países desenvolvidos; o Brasil terá de garantir a sua competitividade diante dos seus principais concorrentes (Austrália, CEI, China e Índia. A questão dos minerais estratégicos é também abordada, com ênfase nas preocupações demonstradas pelo Departamento de Estado dos EUA. Finalmente, são alinhados três cenários possíveis para o desempenho futuro da mineração brasileira, instando-se o governo a dedicar maior atenção ao destino do nosso subsolo.THE MINERAL industry of Brazil is briefly analysed vis-à-vis the challenges imposed by the cruenta globalization process. The profound changes that occurred in the international framework during the last decade, encompassing the political, economic, social, and institutional structures, demand a thorough appraisal about the role to be played by Brazil in the international market of mineral commodities. On one hand, the opportunities open for world class deposits, mainly in the Amazon, are very promising. On the other hand, it is mandatory to take into account that: the exploitation of these reserves shall comply with sound sustainability criteria, following guidelines already adopted by some developed countries; Brazil will have to demonstrate its competitiveness among the major competitors (Australia

  14. Influence of iron redox cycling on organo-mineral associations in Arctic tundra soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Elizabeth; AlBashaireh, Amineh; Singer, David; Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Gu, Baohua; Graham, David

    2017-06-01

    Arctic tundra stores large quantities of soil organic matter under varying redox conditions. As the climate warms, these carbon reservoirs are susceptible to increased rates of decomposition and release to the atmosphere as the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Geochemical interactions between soil organic matter and minerals influence decomposition in many environments but remain poorly understood in Arctic tundra systems and are not considered in decomposition models. The accumulation of iron (Fe) oxyhydroxides and organo-iron precipitates at redox interfaces may be particularly important for carbon cycling given that ferric iron [Fe(III)] species can enhance decomposition by serving as terminal electron acceptors in anoxic soils or inhibit microbial decomposition by binding organic molecules. Here, we examine chemical properties of solid-phase Fe and organic matter in organic and mineral horizons within the seasonally thawed active layer of Arctic tundra on the North Slope of Alaska. Spectroscopic techniques, including micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping, micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (μXANES) spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), were coupled with chemical sequential extractions and physical density fractionations to evaluate the spatial distribution and speciation of Fe-bearing phases and associated organic matter in soils. Organic horizons were enriched in poorly crystalline and crystalline iron oxides, and approximately 60% of total Fe stored in organic horizons was calculated to derive from upward translocation from anoxic mineral horizons. Ferrihydrite and goethite were present as coatings on mineral grains and plant debris, and in aggregates with clays and particulate organic matter. Minor amounts of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] were present in iron sulfides (i.e., pyrite and greigite) in mineral horizon soils and iron phosphates (vivianite) in organic horizons. Concentrations of organic

  15. The nanosphere iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these 'Mars-soil analogs' were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxyl mineral such as 'green rust', or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable meaghemite (gamma-Fe203) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (aplha-Fe203) by extensive heat treatment. Their chemical reactivity offers a plausible mechanism for the somewhat puzzling observations of the Viking biology experiments. Their unique chemical reactivities are attributed to the combined catalytic effects of the iron oxide/oxyhydroxide and silicate phase surfaces. The mode of formation of these (nanophase) iron oxides on Mars is still unknown.

  16. Mineral facilities of Africa and the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eros, J.M.; Candelario-Quintana, Luissette

    2006-01-01

    This map displays over 1,500 mineral facilities in Africa and the Middle East. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, mills, or refineries of aluminum, cement, coal, copper, diamond, gold, iron and steel, nickel, platinum-group metals, salt, and silver, among others. The data used in this poster were compiled from multiple sources, including the 2004 USGS Minerals Yearbook (Africa and Middle East volume), Minerals Statistics and Information from the USGS Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/), and data collected by USGS minerals information country specialists. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country. Other sources include statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Due to the sensitivity of some energy commodity data, the quality of these data should be evaluated on a country-by-country basis. Additional information and explanation is available from the country specialists. See Table 1 for general information about each mineral facility site including country, location and facility name, facility type, latitude, longitude, mineral commodity, mining method, main operating company, status, capacity, and units.

  17. Outlook 96: Minerals and Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Papers discussing the future of Australia's minerals and energy are presented under the following headings: Australia in the global minerals and energy markets; minerals exploration; steelmaking raw materials; aluminium and alumina; gold; nickel; base metals; titanium minerals; energy for a sustainable future; electricity; electricity in Asia; crude oil; coal trade; natural gas in Australia and uranium. Relevant papers are individually indexed/abstracted. Tabs., figs., refs

  18. International availability of energy minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, N A [Norman White Associates, London (UK)

    1979-06-01

    Whereas the ultimate world supply of energy minerals - defined as fossil fuels and fissile minerals - is controlled by geological factors, the actual supply at any particular time is controlled by economic feasibility, technological innovations and/or political decisions. This paper identifies and discusses the principal uncertainties surrounding the international availability of energy minerals from now until the end of the century. A brief comparison is also made between energy and non-energy minerals.

  19. Reactor design considerations in mineral sequestration of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ityokumbul, M.T.; Chander, S.; O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the promising approaches to lowering the anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere is mineral sequestration. In this approach, the carbon dioxide reacts with alkaline earth containing silicate minerals forming magnesium and/or calcium carbonates. Mineral carbonation is a multiphase reaction process involving gas, liquid and solid phases. The effective design and scale-up of the slurry reactor for mineral carbonation will require careful delineation of the rate determining step and how it changes with the scale of the reactor. The shrinking core model was used to describe the mineral carbonation reaction. Analysis of laboratory data indicates that the transformations of olivine and serpentine are controlled by chemical reaction and diffusion through an ash layer respectively. Rate parameters for olivine and serpentine carbonation are estimated from the laboratory data

  20. Imaging and Analytical Approaches for Characterization of Soil Mineral Weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, Alice; Arey, Bruce; Varga, Tamas; Miller, Micah; Kovarik, Libor

    2017-07-01

    Soil minerals weathering is the primary natural source of nutrients necessary to sustain productivity in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil microbial communities increase soil mineral weathering and mineral-derived nutrient availability through physical and chemical processes. Rhizosphere, the zone immediately surrounding plant roots, is a biogeochemical hotspot with microbial activity, soil organic matter production, mineral weathering, and secondary phase formation all happening in a small temporally ephemeral zone of steep geochemical gradients. The detailed exploration of the micro-scale rhizosphere is essential to our better understanding of large-scale processes in soils, such as nutrient cycling, transport and fate of soil components, microbial-mineral interactions, soil erosion, soil organic matter turnover and its molecular-level characterization, and predictive modeling.

  1. LISp-Miner Control Language description of scripting language implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Simunek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the LISp-Miner Control Language – a scripting language for the LISp-Miner system, an academic system for knowledge discovery in databases. The main purpose of this language is to provide programmable means to all the features of the LISp-Miner system and mainly to automate the main phases of data mining – from data introduction and preprocessing, formulation of analytical tasks, to discovery of the most interesting patterns. In this sense, the language is a necessary prerequisite for the EverMiner project of data mining automation. Language will serve other purposes too – for an automated verification of the LISp-Miner system functionality before a new version is released and as an educational tool in advanced data mining courses.

  2. The bismuth miners study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosche, B.; Kreuzer, M.; Kreisheimer, M.; Schnelzer, M.; Tschense, A.; Gottschalk, K.

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Radiation Protection Office carried out a retrospective cohort study on some 60,000 former employees of the SAG/SDAG Wismut. The purpose of the study was to validate the radon-related risk of acquiring lung cancer previously calculated from 11 jointly evaluated studies among miners on the basis of an independent, homogeneous data record of comparable size. A further goal was to study the risk of acquiring extrapulmonal tumours. This paper only briefly describes the sampling, design and methods used in the study, as these were already presented during the Radon Status Talks. The first follow-up on the cohort was completed in 2003. Around this time a job exposure matrix (JEM) suitable for scientific inquiries was made available by the professional miners' association and the roof organisation of professional trade associations (HVBG). This paper is the first to report on the outcome of the risk analysis in direct comparison with the results found by BEIR

  3. Iodine mineral waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iluta Alexandru

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Iodine mineral waters are found especially in sub-Carpathian region, also in regions with Salif deposits. Waters are currently used iodine in drinking cure for chaps and Basedow. Are also indicated in balneology. Iodine water containing at least 1 mg L, there is pure iodine is usually given the nature of other types of mineral waters further: sodium chlorinated water (Bazna (50-70 mg iodine / l, Baile Govora (50 - 70 mg / l, Bălţăteşti (4-5 mg / l, salted Monteoru (30 mg / l, mine water mixed alkaline chlorination, sulphate, which are indicated for crenoterapie (hypo or isotonic to the bathrooms Olăneşti or Călimăneşti-Căciulata.

  4. Rock and mineral magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    O’Reilly, W

    1984-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a revolution in the earth sciences. The quantitative, instrument-based measurements and physical models of. geophysics, together with advances in technology, have radically transformed the way in which the Earth, and especially its crust, is described. The study of the magnetism of the rocks of the Earth's crust has played a major part in this transformation. Rocks, or more specifically their constituent magnetic minerals, can be regarded as a measuring instrument provided by nature, which can be employed in the service of the earth sciences. Thus magnetic minerals are a recording magnetometer; a goniometer or protractor, recording the directions of flows, fields and forces; a clock; a recording thermometer; a position recorder; astrain gauge; an instrument for geo­ logical surveying; a tracer in climatology and hydrology; a tool in petrology. No instrument is linear, or free from noise and systematic errors, and the performance of nature's instrument must be assessed and ...

  5. Characterization lithium mineralized pegmatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.F.S.; Luz Ferreira, O. da; Cancado, R.Z.L.

    1986-01-01

    Lithium economic importance has increased in the last years. In Brazil its reserves, generally pegmatites bodies, are found in Itinga-Aracuai-MG. This study of characterization belongs to a global plan of lithium mineralized bodies research of 'Arqueana de Minerios e Metais Ltda', which purpose is to give subsidies for implementation of pegmatite unit, in order to make better use of them. (F.E.) [pt

  6. 76 FR 6110 - Conflict Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ...-10] RIN 3235-AK84 Conflict Minerals AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule...'') and would require any such issuer for which conflict minerals are necessary to the functionality or... body of its annual report whether its conflict minerals originated in the Democratic Republic of the...

  7. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Totero Gongora, Juan Sebastian; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Candeloro, Patrizio; Cuda, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  8. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    A series of surface-modified clays containing nanophase (np) iron oxide/oxyhydroxides of extremely small particle sizes, with total iron contents as high as found in Mars soil, were prepared by iron deposition on the clay surface from ferrous chloride solution. Comprehensive studies of the iron mineralogy in these "Mars-soil analogs" were conducted using chemical extractions, solubility analyses, pH and redox, x ray and electron diffractometry, electron microscopic imaging, specific surface area and particle size determinations, differential thermal analyses, magnetic properties characterization, spectral reflectance, and Viking biology simulation experiments. The clay matrix and the procedure used for synthesis produced nanophase iron oxides containing a certain proportion of divalent iron, which slowly converts to more stable, fully oxidized iron minerals. The clay acted as an effective matrix, both chemically and sterically, preventing the major part of the synthesized iron oxides from ripening, i.e., growing and developing larger crystals. The precipitated iron oxides appear as isodiametric or slightly elongated particles in the size range 1-10 nm, having large specific surface area. The noncrystalline nature of the iron compounds precipitated on the surface of the clay was verified by their complete extractability in oxalate. Lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) was detected by selected area electron diffraction. It is formed from a double iron Fe(II)/Fe(III) hydroxy mineral such as "green rust," or ferrosic hydroxide. Magnetic measurements suggested that lepidocrocite converted to the more stable maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) by mild heat treatment and then to nanophase hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) by extensive heat treatment. After mild heating, the iron-enriched clay became slightly magnetic, to the extent that it adheres to a hand-held magnet, as was observed with Mars soil. The chemical reactivity of the iron-enriched clays strongly resembles, and offers a plausible mechanism

  9. Mineral potential tracts for shoreline Ti-Zr placer deposits (phase V, deliverable 85): Chapter P in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Shoreline placer Ti deposits are composed of ilmenite, rutile, zircon, monazite, and magnetite in well-sorted, fine- to medium-grained sand in coastal dunes, beaches and inlets. In addition to titanium, zirconium, in particular, and rare earth elements (REE) have become a major source of value in shoreline placer deposits. Shoreline placer deposits form mostly on tropical beaches around the world (fig. 1), and consist of dark sand layers rich in heavy minerals that are resistant to mechanical abrasion and chemical weathering. According to Hamilton (1995), shoreline placer deposits supply approximately 80 percent of the world’s rutile production, 25 percent of ilmenite, 100 percent of zircon, and 50 percent of both monazite and xenotime.

  10. Molecular nanomechanics of nascent bone: fibrillar toughening by mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Markus J.

    2007-07-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are highly conserved nanostructural building blocks of bone. By a combination of molecular dynamics simulation and theoretical analysis it is shown that the characteristic nanostructure of mineralized collagen fibrils is vital for its high strength and its ability to sustain large deformation, as is relevant to the physiological role of bone, creating a strong and tough material. An analysis of the molecular mechanisms of protein and mineral phases under large deformation of mineralized collagen fibrils reveals a fibrillar toughening mechanism that leads to a manifold increase of energy dissipation compared to fibrils without mineral phase. This fibrillar toughening mechanism increases the resistance to fracture by forming large local yield regions around crack-like defects, a mechanism that protects the integrity of the entire structure by allowing for localized failure. As a consequence, mineralized collagen fibrils are able to tolerate microcracks of the order of several hundred micrometres in size without causing any macroscopic failure of the tissue, which may be essential to enable bone remodelling. The analysis proves that adding nanoscopic small platelets to collagen fibrils increases their Young's modulus and yield strength as well as their fracture strength. We find that mineralized collagen fibrils have a Young's modulus of 6.23 GPa (versus 4.59 GPa for the collagen fibril), yield at a tensile strain of 6.7% (versus 5% for the collagen fibril) and feature a fracture stress of 0.6 GPa (versus 0.3 GPa for the collagen fibril).

  11. Molecular nanomechanics of nascent bone: fibrillar toughening by mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehler, Markus J

    2007-01-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are highly conserved nanostructural building blocks of bone. By a combination of molecular dynamics simulation and theoretical analysis it is shown that the characteristic nanostructure of mineralized collagen fibrils is vital for its high strength and its ability to sustain large deformation, as is relevant to the physiological role of bone, creating a strong and tough material. An analysis of the molecular mechanisms of protein and mineral phases under large deformation of mineralized collagen fibrils reveals a fibrillar toughening mechanism that leads to a manifold increase of energy dissipation compared to fibrils without mineral phase. This fibrillar toughening mechanism increases the resistance to fracture by forming large local yield regions around crack-like defects, a mechanism that protects the integrity of the entire structure by allowing for localized failure. As a consequence, mineralized collagen fibrils are able to tolerate microcracks of the order of several hundred micrometres in size without causing any macroscopic failure of the tissue, which may be essential to enable bone remodelling. The analysis proves that adding nanoscopic small platelets to collagen fibrils increases their Young's modulus and yield strength as well as their fracture strength. We find that mineralized collagen fibrils have a Young's modulus of 6.23 GPa (versus 4.59 GPa for the collagen fibril), yield at a tensile strain of 6.7% (versus 5% for the collagen fibril) and feature a fracture stress of 0.6 GPa (versus 0.3 GPa for the collagen fibril)

  12. Methods of mineral potential assessment of uranium deposits: A mineral systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaireth, S.

    2014-01-01

    Mineral potential represents the likelihood (probability) that an economic mineral deposit could have formed in an area. Mineral potential assessment and prospectivity analysis use a probabilistic concepts to mineral deposits, where the probability of an event (formation of a mineral deposit) is conditional on two factors : i) geological processes occurring in the area, and ii) the presence of geological features indicative of those process. For instance, one of the geological processes critical for the formation of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits in an area is transport of uranium in groundwaters. Geological features indicative of this process in an area comprise, i) presence of leachable source rocks of uranium; ii) presence of highly permeable sandstone; and iii) suitable hydrogeological gradient driving flow groundwaters. Mineral deposits can also be conceptualised as mineral systems with more emphasis on mineralising processes. This concept has some clear parallels with the petroleum systems approach which has proven to be a useful in oil and gas exploration. Mineral systems are defined as ‘all geological factors that control the generation and preservation of mineral deposits’. Seven important geological factors are outlined to define the characteristics of a hydrothermal mineral system. These factors include: i) source of the mineralising fluids and transporting legends; ii) source of metals and other ore components; iii) migration pathways which may include inflow as well as outflow zones; iv) thermal gradients; v) source of energy to mobilised fluids; vi) mechanical and structural focusing mechanism at the trap site; and vii) chemical and/or physical cause for precipitation of ore minerals at the trap site. This approach, commonly known as the ‘source’, ‘transport’ and ‘trap’ paradigm has been redefined to introduce five questions as a basis to understand spatial and temporal evolution of a mineral system at all scales (regional to

  13. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  14. Review of selected global mineral industries in 2011 and an outlook to 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzie, W. David; Soto-Viruet, Yadira; Bermúdez-Lugo, Omayra; Mobbs, Philip M.; Perez, Alberto Alexander; Taib, Mowafa; Wacaster, Susan; ,

    2013-01-01

    This report reviews the world production of selected mineral commodities in 2011 and includes output projections (based on planned capacity expansions) through 2017. It also includes brief discussions of several issues that are of importance to the mineral sector, including the world economy, the availability of strategic minerals, significant company mergers and acquisitions in 2011, exploration investment made during the year, and the moves towards resource nationalization and expropriation of mineral assets by national Governments.

  15. Heterogeneous Reactions of Limonene on Mineral Dust: Impacts of Adsorbed Water and Nitric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Madeline R; Staniec, Allison R; Coates Fuentes, Zoe L; Van Ry, Daryl A; Hinrichs, Ryan Z

    2016-12-08

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), including the monoterpene limonene, are a major source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). While gas-phase oxidation initiates the dominant pathway for BVOC conversion to SOA, recent studies have demonstrated that biogenic hydrocarbons can also directly react with acidic droplets. To investigate whether mineral dust may facilitate similar reactive uptake of biogenic hydrocarbons, we studied the heterogeneous reaction of limonene with mineral substrates using condensed-phase infrared spectroscopy and identified the formation of irreversibly adsorbed organic products. For kaolinite, Arizona Test Dust, and silica at 30% relative humidity, GC-MS identified limonene-1,2-diol as the dominant product with total organic surface concentrations on the order of (3-5) × 10 18 molecules m -2 . Experiments with 18 O-labeled water support a mechanism initiated by oxidation of limonene by surface redox sites forming limonene oxide followed by water addition to the epoxide to form limonenediol. Limonene uptake on α-alumina, γ-alumina, and montmorillonite formed additional products in high yield, including carveol, carvone, limonene oxide, and α-terpineol. To model tropospheric processing of mineral aerosol, we also exposed each mineral substrate to gaseous nitric acid prior to limonene uptake and identified similar surface adsorbed products that were formed at rates 2 to 5 times faster than without nitrate coatings. The initial rate of reaction was linearly dependent on gaseous limonene concentration between 5 × 10 12 and 5 × 10 14 molecules cm -3 (0.22-20.5 ppm) consistent with an Eley-Rideal-type mechanism in which gaseous limonene reacts directly with reactive surface sites. Increasing relative humidity decreased the amount of surface adsorbed products indicating competitive adsorption of surface adsorbed water. Using a laminar flow tube reactor we measured the uptake coefficient for limonene on kaolinite at 25% RH to range from

  16. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... community politics. On the one hand, their mobility and decision-making powers decrease with the increase in the labor mobility of men and their newly gained education is politically devalued when compared to the informal education that men gain through mobility, but on the other hand, schooling strengthens...

  17. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  18. Experiment and simulation study on the effects of cement minerals on the water-rock-CO2 interaction during CO2 geological storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N.; Cheng, J.

    2016-12-01

    The CO2 geological storage is one of the most promising technology to mitigate CO2 emission. The fate of CO2 underground is dramatically affected by the CO2-water-rock interaction, which are mainly dependent on the initial aquifer mineralogy and brine components. The cement minerals are common materials in sandstone reservoir but few attention has been paid for its effects on CO2-water-rock interaction. Five batch reactions, in which 5% cement minerals were assigned to be quartz, calcite, dolomite, chlorite and Ca-montmorillonite, respectively, were conducted to understanding the cement minerals behaviors and its corresponding effects on the matrix minerals alterations during CO2 geological storage. Pure mineral powders were selected to mix and assemble the 'sandstone rock' with different cement components meanwhile keeping the matrix minerals same for each group as 70% quartz, 20% K-feldspar and 5% albite. These `rock' reacted with 750ml deionized water and CO2 under 180° and 18MPa for 15 days, during which the water chemistry evolution and minerals surface micromorphology changes has been monitored. The minerals saturation indexes calculation and phase diagram as well as the kinetic models were made by PHREEQC to uncover the minerals reaction paths. The experiment results indicated that the quartz got less eroded, on the contrary, K-feldspar and albite continuously dissolved to favor the gibbsite and kaolinite precipitations. The carbonates cement minerals quickly dissolved to reach equilibrium with the pH buffered and in turn suppressed the alkali feldspar dissolutions. No carbonates minerals precipitations occurred until the end of reactions for all groups. The simulation results were basically consistent with the experiment record but failed to simulate the non-stoichiometric reactions and the minerals kinetic rates seemed underestimated at the early stage of reactions. The cement minerals significantly dominated the reaction paths during CO2 geological

  19. Development of drilling fluids based on polysaccharides and natural minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanar Nurakhmetova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The technology of oil well drilling in complex geological conditions by applying the drilling muds based on the polysaccharides – gellan, xanthan and their mixture which potentially possess a good flocculation properties and the ability to reversible sol-gel transition in dependence of temperature and concentration of low molecular weight cations in water has been justified in this work. For the preparation of drilling muds, gellan and xanthan were used, these polymers were obtained from biomass by an aerobic fermentation using microorganisms Sphingomonas elodea and Xanthomonas campestris. Bentonite was used as a natural mineral. Physical and chemical characteristics of aqueous and aqueous-salt solutions of natural polysaccharide gellan including: density, intrinsic and effective viscosity, static shear stress, dynamic shear stress, sedimentation stability and other parameters were determined while varying polymer compositions and concentrations, ionic strength of the solution, nature of low molecular weight salts, concentration of dispersion phase, pH of the medium and temperature.

  20. Mineral commodity profiles: nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Nitrogen (N) is an essential element of life and a part of all animal and plant proteins. As a part of the DNA and RNA molecules, nitrogen is an essential constituent of each individual's genetic blueprint. As an essential element in the chlorophyll molecule, nitrogen is vital to a plant's ability to photosynthesize. Some crop plants, such as alfalfa, peas, peanuts, and soybeans, can convert atmospheric nitrogen into a usable form by a process referred to as 'fixation.' Most of the nitrogen that is available for crop production, however, comes from decomposing animal and plant waste or from commercially produced fertilizers. Commercial fertilizers contain nitrogen in the form of ammonium and/or nitrate or in a form that is quickly converted to the ammonium or nitrate form once the fertilizer is applied to the soil. Ammonia is generally the source of nitrogen in fertilizers. Anhydrous ammonia is commercially produced by reacting nitrogen with hydrogen under high temperatures and pressures. The source of nitrogen is the atmosphere, which is almost 80 percent nitrogen. Hydrogen is derived from a variety of raw materials, which include water, and crude oil, coal, and natural gas hydrocarbons. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are produced from ammonia feedstocks through a variety of chemical processes. Small quantities of nitrates are produced from mineral resources principally in Chile. In 2002, anhydrous ammonia and other nitrogen materials were produced in more than 70 countries. Global ammonia production was 108 million metric tons (Mt) of contained nitrogen. With 28 percent of this total, China was the largest producer of ammonia. Asia contributed 46 percent of total world ammonia production, and countries of the former U.S.S.R. represented 13 percent. North America also produced 13 percent of the total; Western Europe, 9 percent; the Middle East, 7 percent; Central America and South America, 5 percent; Eastern Europe, 3 percent; and Africa and Oceania

  1. Characterization of Mexican zeolite minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez C, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    50% of the Mexican territory is formed by volcanic sequences of the Pliocene type, which appear extensively in the northwest states (Sonora, Sinaloa, Chihuahua, Durango) and west of Mexico (Jalisco and Nayarit), in central Mexico (Zacatecas, Guanajuato, San Luis Potosi, Queretaro, Hidalgo) and south of Mexico (Guerrero, Oaxaca); therefore, it is to be expected that in our country big locations of natural zeolites exist in its majority of the clinoptilolite type. The present study was focused toward the characterization of two Mexican natural zeolite rocks presumably of the clinoptilolite and filipsite types, one of them comes from the state of Chihuahua and the other of a trader company of non metallic minerals, due that these materials are not characterized, its are not known their properties completely and therefore, the uses that can be given to these materials. In this investigation work it was carried out the characterization of two Mexican zeolite rocks, one coming from the Arroyo zone, municipality of La Haciendita, in the state of Chihuahua; and the other one was bought to a trader company of non metallic minerals. The two zeolites so much in their natural form as conditioned with sodium; they were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum and elementary microanalysis (EDS), surface area analysis (BET), thermal gravimetric analysis. To differentiate the heulandite crystalline phase of the other clinoptilolite rock, its were carried out thermal treatments. The quantification of Al, Na, Ca, K, Mg, Fe was carried out in solution, by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy and the quantity of Si was determined by gravimetry. The zeolite rocks presented for the major part the crystalline heulandite and clinoptilolite phases for the most part, and it was found that the zeolite coming from the state of Chihuahua possesses a bigger content of heulandite and the denominated filipsite it is really a zeolite

  2. Microcoulometric measurement of water in minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, M.; Elsheimer, H.N.; Escher, E.E.

    1972-01-01

    A DuPont Moisture Analyzer is used in a microcoulometric method for determining water in minerals. Certain modifications, which include the heating of the sample outside the instrument, protect the system from acid gases and insure the conversion of all hydrogen to water vapor. Moisture analyzer data are compared to concurrent data obtained by a modified Penfield method. In general, there is a positive bias of from 0.1 to 0.2% in the moisture analyzer results and a similarity of bias in minerals of the same kind. Inhomogeneity, sample size, and moisture pick-up are invoked to explain deviations. The method is particularly applicable to small samples. ?? 1972.

  3. Overview of the Malaysian mineral industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahan, A.R.B. (Department of Mines (Malaysia))

    1992-08-01

    The article describes the status of the mining industry in Malaysia. Tin dominated the industry until a price fall caused closure of many mines in 1987-1990. Other minerals mined include copper, gold, iron ore, bauxite, barite, kaolin, limestone, clays, sand and gravel. Coal production in Malaysia resumed when an opencast mine was opened in July 1988 in Sarawak. Another started operation in early 1989 by the underground method. At the end of 1990 there was a total of 53 exploration rights granted for gold, coal, base metals and industrial minerals. A few coalfields have been identified. Generally the industry has suffered a decline because of lack of new investment. 1 fig.

  4. Leukaemia and lymphoma among Czech uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasek, L.; Malatova, I.

    2006-01-01

    Leukaemia is one of the most sensitive cancers in relation to ionizing radiation. It is surprising that in studies of uranium miners, no risk of leukaemia in relation to cumulated radon exposure was observed (Darby et al, 1995). However, when the risk among Czech uranium miners was analyzed in dependence on duration of exposure, the trend was significant. These results were based on 10 cases (Tomasek, 1993). Since then the original cohort of 4320 miners has been extended by another cohort, now including nearly 10 000 uranium miners and the follow-up is longer by 10 years. The present report aims to analyze the risk of haemopoietic cancers in the Czech cohort accounting for both external and internal doses, similarly as reported by Jacobi and Roth (1995), and using available data on metal content and airborne particulates for dose estimates.The present results of follow-up show that increased risk of leukaemia among uranium miners is significantly associated with cumulated equivalent red bone marrow doses which is dominated by exposures to long lived alpha radionuclides in airborne particulates. The increased mortality is mainly observed decades after exposure and is consistent with estimated internal dose to red bone marrow. The estimated risk coefficient for leukaemia is consistent with results from other studies, however, further studies are needed to reduce uncertainty in the risk estimates. (N.C.)

  5. Leukaemia and lymphoma among Czech uranium miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasek, L.; Malatova, I. [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-01

    Leukaemia is one of the most sensitive cancers in relation to ionizing radiation. It is surprising that in studies of uranium miners, no risk of leukaemia in relation to cumulated radon exposure was observed (Darby et al, 1995). However, when the risk among Czech uranium miners was analyzed in dependence on duration of exposure, the trend was significant. These results were based on 10 cases (Tomasek, 1993). Since then the original cohort of 4320 miners has been extended by another cohort, now including nearly 10 000 uranium miners and the follow-up is longer by 10 years. The present report aims to analyze the risk of haemopoietic cancers in the Czech cohort accounting for both external and internal doses, similarly as reported by Jacobi and Roth (1995), and using available data on metal content and airborne particulates for dose estimates.The present results of follow-up show that increased risk of leukaemia among uranium miners is significantly associated with cumulated equivalent red bone marrow doses which is dominated by exposures to long lived alpha radionuclides in airborne particulates. The increased mortality is mainly observed decades after exposure and is consistent with estimated internal dose to red bone marrow. The estimated risk coefficient for leukaemia is consistent with results from other studies, however, further studies are needed to reduce uncertainty in the risk estimates. (N.C.)

  6. Sulphurous Mineral Waters: New Applications for Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Carbajo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulphurous mineral waters have been traditionally used in medical hydrology as treatment for skin, respiratory, and musculoskeletal disorders. However, driven by recent intense research efforts, topical treatments are starting to show benefits for pulmonary hypertension, arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, peptic ulcer, and acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. The beneficial effects of sulphurous mineral waters, sulphurous mud, or peloids made from sulphurous mineral water have been attributed to the presence of sulphur mainly in the form of hydrogen sulphide. This form is largely available in conditions of low pH when oxygen concentrations are also low. In the organism, small amounts of hydrogen sulphide are produced by some cells where they have numerous biological signalling functions. While high levels of hydrogen sulphide are extremely toxic, enzymes in the body are capable of detoxifying it by oxidation to harmless sulphate. Hence, low levels of hydrogen sulphide may be tolerated indefinitely. In this paper, we review the chemistry and actions of hydrogen sulphide in sulphurous mineral waters and its natural role in body physiology. This is followed by an update of available data on the impacts of exogenous hydrogen sulphide on the skin and internal cells and organs including new therapeutic possibilities of sulphurous mineral waters and their peloids.

  7. Nuclear minerals in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansoor, M.

    2005-01-01

    Strategic importance of Nuclear Minerals was recognized during early formative years of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, and prospecting for uranium was started in Dera Ghazi Khan in collaboration with the Geological Survey of Pakistan (GSP) as early as 1961. Later, the responsibility for countrywide surveys and exploration was fully entrusted with PAEC and in this respect a Directorate of Nuclear Minerals(DNM) was established in 1966 at Lahore. Later, DNM was shifted to the Atomic Energy Centre (AEC), Lahore building and renamed as Atomic Energy Minerals Centre. It has state-of-the-art Chemistry, Mineralogy, Remote Sensing and Electronics Laboratories and an Ore Processing Pilot Plant. The Centre has Prospecting, Exploration, Geophysics, Geochemistry, Geo-tectonics, Mining and Drilling Sections. Regional Offices have been established to facilitate work at Karachi, Quetta and Peshawar. Siwaliks were recognized as a favorable geological formation of prime importance. Sandstone-shale sequence of Siwaliks Formation is exposed in all provinces of Pakistan and in Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK), broadly categorized into Rajanpur-Dera Ghazi Khan, Bannu Basin-Kohat Plateau and Potwar-AJK zones. Baghalchur, Nangar Nai and Taunsa uranium deposits have been discovered in the Rajanpur- D.G. Khan Zone. Qabul Khel and Shanawah Uranium deposits have been discovered in the Shanawah-Kohat Plateau Zone. Prospection and exploration is in progress. The first uranium mine was opened at Baghalchur, and uranium mill was established at D.G Khan in 1977-78 all by indigenous effort. The uranium mine was the most advanced and mechanized mine of that time in the country. Later, a second uranium mine was opened at Qabul Khel in 1992, which was based on a new and advanced in situ leach technology, developed to suit local geological and ore zone parameters. Mining of Nanganai and Taunsa Deposits was started respectively in 1996 and 2002, and is also based on in situ leach technology which is

  8. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  9. Injury experience in metallic mineral mining, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of metallic mineral mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

  10. Using of Mineral Recourses for Water Purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumanova, I.V.; Nazarenko, O.B.; Anna, Yu.

    2009-01-01

    Pollution of surface waters results in necessity of underground waters using for drinking. Underground waters are characterized by the high quantity of heavy metals salts. This led to development of methods reducing the concentration of the metal salts in water. Wide spread occurrence, cheapness and high sorption properties of nature minerals allow to consider them as perspective sorbents for different impurities extraction, including dissoluble compounds of heavy metals. Reachable purification efficiency with mineral resources use for the moment satisfies sanitary indexes and standards presenting to portable water in Russia. In given material there are presented the results of research of artificial sorbent and certain minerals sorption characteristics, which are typical for West Siberia. For purification quality improvement from Fe and Mn ions there are suggested to use the method of boiling bed.

  11. Bone mineralization in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachrach, L K

    1993-08-01

    Prevention of osteoporosis depends on establishing adequate peak bone mass in the first two decades of life. Achievement of this goal requires an understanding of factors that promote skeletal health. Genetic factors are important determinants of adult bone mass, but nonheritable variables, including body mass, calcium nutriture, sex steroids, and activity can strongly influence whether maximal bone mineral is achieved. Acquisition of bone mineral continues throughout childhood and adolescence, reaching a lifetime maximum in early adulthood. Adolescence is a particularly critical time for bone mineral accretion as more than half of the bone calcium is normally laid down during the teen years. Chronic illness, malnutrition, or endocrine deficiencies at this age may result in profound deficits in bone mass, which may not be fully reversible. These risk factors contribute to the osteopenia associated with anorexia nervosa, exercise-induced amenorrhea, delayed puberty, Turner's syndrome, and growth hormone deficiency.

  12. Minerals and rumen function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanisms are discussed of some clinical disorders, characteristic only of ruminants and related to the effects of abnormal mineral intake on rumen function. With particular attention to tropical conditions, consideration is given to: (a) the possible effects of phosphorus deficiency on rumen microbial activity; (b) the depression of rumen microbial synthesis in sulphur deficiency; (c) the inhibition of magnesium absorption from the forestomachs; and (d) the involvement of the rumen microorganisms in leading to copper and vitamin B 12 deficiencies as a result of low intakes of cobalt. (author)

  13. Reducing coal miner absenteeism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R.H.; Clingan, M.R. (Bureau of Mines, PA (USA). Pittsburgh Research Center)

    1989-09-01

    High absenteeism at coal mines can seriously affect safety and hamper productivity. Several effective strategies for achieving high attendance which mine operators may not have considered are presented and a method is proposed for implementing programs for minimizing absenteeism among coal miners. The best strategies for improving attendance will vary according to the needs and circumstances of the particular mine, however, the process for establishing such a program is relatively invariant. A four-stage process is recommended; evaluate data from prior attendance records, communicate attendance goals and policy, develop and implement an attendance promotion program, and recycle. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Refining mineral oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1946-07-05

    A process is described refining raw oils such as mineral oils, shale oils, tar, their fractions and derivatives, by extraction with a selected solvent or a mixture of solvents containing water, forming a solvent more favorable for the hydrocarbons poor in hydrogen than for hydrocarbons rich in hydrogen, this process is characterized by the addition of an aiding solvent for the water which can be mixed or dissolved in the water and the solvent or in the dissolving mixture and increasing in this way the solubility of the water in the solvent or the dissolving mixture.

  15. RELATIVE TRACE MINERAL BIOAVAILABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Rchard D. Miles; Peter R. Henry

    2006-01-01

    Para determinar a eficiência de utilização de elementos minerais dietéticos, deve-se conhecer a biodisponibilidade relativa de cada elemento de um determinado ingrediente ou de uma ração completa. Análises químicas da dieta ou de um determinado ingrediente não indicam a efetividade biológica de um nutriente. Existem muitos fatores que influenciam a biodisponibilidade dos minerais, especialmente dos minerais-traço, tais como: nível de consumo do mineral, forma química, digestibilidade da dieta...

  16. High temperature phase equilibria and phase diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Chu-Kun; Yan, Dong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    High temperature phase equilibria studies play an increasingly important role in materials science and engineering. It is especially significant in the research into the properties of the material and the ways in which they can be improved. This is achieved by observing equilibrium and by examining the phase relationships at high temperature. The study of high temperature phase diagrams of nonmetallic systems began in the early 1900s when silica and mineral systems containing silica were focussed upon. Since then technical ceramics emerged and more emphasis has been placed on high temperature

  17. Genetic Aspects of Gold Mineralization at Some Occurrences in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Monsef, M.; Slobodník, M.; Salem, I. A.

    2012-04-01

    in each area and revealing the ore mineralogy and the ore textures, geochemical analyses (including rare earth elements) are to be used in order to determine the tectonic setting and magmatic evolution of the host intrusions, scanning electron microscope, microprobe analysis, stable isotopes and fluid inclusions will serve as a new part of this study in detection of the origin and the physico-chemical conditions (P-T condition) for the gold precipitation, Age dating of the host intrusion and mineralization will be based on K-Ar for dating potassium-bearing minerals in fresh host rocks and hydrothermal mineral phases.

  18. The influence of organic substances type on the properties of mineral-organic fertilizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huculak-Mä Czka, Marta; Hoffmann, Krystyna; Hoffmann, Józef

    2010-05-01

    In presented research the lignite coal, peat, poultry droppings and their composts were suggested as a components of mineral-organic fertilizers. Fertility of soil is conditioned by an ability to supply plants with water and nutrients essential to their growth and development. The soil is described as tri-phase system consisting of solid, liquid and gas phase. In solid phase the soil minerals and organic matter can be distinguished. The content of micro-organisms contained in the soil i.e. microfauna and microflora is indispensable for high soil fertility. Nutrients should occur in the forms available for plants in order to obtain high yields of the high quality crops. Organic fertilizing has versatile activity. Increasing contents of humus, providing mineral nutrients included in organic substance and the improvement in physical properties of the soil belong to its main purposes. Due to applying organic fertilizers heavy soils is getting loosen and in consequence become more airy what probably influences stimulation of soil micro-organisms activity. An aqueous as well as sorption capacity of light soils is also increasing, buffer range and the stabilization of the proper level of pH value of the soil, plants are provided with basic macro and micronutrients. Conventional organic fertilizers applied in an arable farms are manure, dung, green manures and composts of different kind. Within compost group the following types can be distinguished: compost from farming, urban wastes, shredded straw, poultry droppings, industrial wastes, bark of coniferous tree etc. Properly developed fertilizer formulas should contain in their composition both mineral as well as organic elements. Such fertilizer should fit its composition to the soil and plant requirements. It should contain organic substance being characterized by a high aqueous and cations sorption capacity, substance undergoing the fast mineralization with the large calcium content. Inorganic substances e.g. bentonites

  19. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  20. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema. Histopathologic data from rats are shown for approximately 300- to 10,000-working-level-month (WLM) radon-daughter exposures. Exposure of male rats to radon daughters and uranium ore dust continues, along with exposure of male and female beagle dogs to uranium ore dust alone. 4 tables

  1. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1986-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system diseases. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies uranium mine air agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema. Histopathologic data from serially sacrificed rats are reported for approximately 20- to 640- working-level-month (WLM) radon-daughter exposures delivered at one-tenth the rate of previous exposures. Exposure of male rats to radon daughters and uranium ore dust continues, along with exposure of male and female beagle dogs to uranium ore dust alone

  2. The peraluminous leucogranitic complex of St Sylvestre (France, Massif Central NW). Evolution of the crystallochemistry of mineral phases and of the geochemistry of major and trace elements. Polygenetism characterization in peraluminous granites. Implication on uranium metallogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.

    1983-07-01

    The main purpose of this study is to improve the knowledge of the behaviour of uranium during magmatic and late magmatic processes. In France and other part of the world the close association of uranium (Sn-W) deposits and showings with this type of granite justifies the metallogenic interest of this study. At the scale of the whole granitic complex two distinct petrological groups are redefined: the facies of Brame and St Sylvestre. Mineral paragenesis closely follow the geochemical differentiation. Abundance of uraninite and scarcity of monazite and zircon, are additional features of these samples. The opposite behaviour of monazite (typical of the less evolved facies) and uraninite (whose abundance is directly related to the degree of differentiation) suggests two conclusions. Abundance in uranium is directly related to the magmatic differentiation processes. The early crystallization of monazite and zircon and their high abundance in poorly evolved facies imply a compatible behaviour for Th, Zr and light rare earths. More detailed geochemical studies evidence heterogeneities at on hectometric and locally at a metric scale. Differentiation processes, which appear to be continuous at a kilometric scale in the St Sylvestre facies, are discontinuous at the hectometric and metric scale. Such petrogeochemical discontinuities, implying petrogenitic heterogeneities are expressed in the concept of polygenetism [fr

  3. Aggregate and Mineral Resources - MO 2014 Industrial Mineral Mines (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — This data set contains names, locations and additional data for active Industrial Mineral Mines permitted with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division...

  4. Thermodynamic stability of actinide pyrochlore minerals in deep geologic repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, YIFENG; Xu, HUIFANG

    2000-01-01

    Crystalline phases of pyrochlore (e.g., CaPuTi 2 O 7 , CaUTi 2 O 7 ) have been proposed as a durable ceramic waste form for disposal of high level radioactive wastes including surplus weapons-usable plutonium. In this paper, the authors use a linear free energy relationship to predict the Gibbs free energies of formation of pyrochlore phases (CaMTi 2 O 7 ). The Pu-pyrochlore phase is predicted to be stable with respect to PuO 2 , CaTiO 3 , and TiO 2 at room temperatures. Pu-pyrochlore is expected to be stable in a geologic repository where silica and carbonate components are absent or limited. The authors suggest that a repository in a salt formation be an ideal environment for disposal of high level, pyrochlore-based ceramic wastes. In such environment, adding CaO as a backfill will make pyrochlore minerals thermodynamically stable and therefore effectively prevent actinide release from these mineral phases

  5. The critical singularities of water and its significance in the hydrothermal mineralization of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Baoqun; Lv Guxian; Wang Fangzheng; Sun Zhanxue; Zhu Peng

    2008-01-01

    Water is the main composition of the geo-fiuid. With the changes of temperature and pressure, its phases and physicochemical properties will vary and the critical singularity occur at the critical point of second-order phase transition. These changes of water will enormously affect the hydrothermal mineralizations. This paper has introduced the types and characteristics of water phase transitions, studied the phase transitions of water in the lithosphere and showed the critical singularity of water with the example of the isobaric heat capacity. The conclusions are as follow: (1) the critical singularities of water are the most obvious as the temperature and pressure near to the critical constants of water; (2) Because the temperature changes with the pressure according to the thermal curve in the lithosphere, it is difficult to find a place where the temperature and pressure can be at the critical constants at same time except the coupling effect of the hydrothermal processes, intermediate-acidic magmatism and faulting; (3) To the hydrothermal mineralization, the significances of water's critical singularities at least include the sharp variation of solubility and instantaneous high pressure to conduct the deposit of ore-forming materials and fault formation. (authors)

  6. Fundamental thermodynamics of actinide-bearing mineral waste forms. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Williamson, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    'The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly, understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpy of formation of actinide substituted zircon, zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stability of these materials. This report summarizes work after eight months of a three year project.'

  7. Fundamental Thermodynamics of Actinide-Bearing Mineral Waste Forms - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Mark A.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2001-03-01

    The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpies of formation of actinide substituted zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stabilities of these materials.

  8. Fundamental Thermodynamics of Actinide-Bearing Mineral Waste Forms - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Mark A.; Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2001-01-01

    The end of the Cold War raised the need for the technical community to be concerned with the disposition of excess nuclear weapon material. The plutonium will either be converted into mixed-oxide fuel for use in nuclear reactors or immobilized in glass or ceramic waste forms and placed in a repository. The stability and behavior of plutonium in the ceramic materials as well as the phase behavior and stability of the ceramic material in the environment is not well established. In order to provide technically sound solutions to these issues, thermodynamic data are essential in developing an understanding of the chemistry and phase equilibria of the actinide-bearing mineral waste form materials proposed as immobilization matrices. Mineral materials of interest include zircon, zirconolite, and pyrochlore. High temperature solution calorimetry is one of the most powerful techniques, sometimes the only technique, for providing the fundamental thermodynamic data needed to establish optimum material fabrication parameters, and more importantly understand and predict the behavior of the mineral materials in the environment. The purpose of this project is to experimentally determine the enthalpy of formation of actinide orthosilicates, the enthalpies of formation of actinide substituted zirconolite and pyrochlore, and develop an understanding of the bonding characteristics and stabilities of these materials

  9. Are iron-phosphate minerals a sink for phosphorus in anoxic Black Sea sediments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Dijkstra

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is a key nutrient for marine organisms. The only long-term removal pathway for P in the marine realm is burial in sediments. Iron (Fe bound P accounts for a significant proportion of this burial at the global scale. In sediments underlying anoxic bottom waters, burial of Fe-bound P is generally assumed to be negligible because of reductive dissolution of Fe(III (oxyhydroxides and release of the associated P. However, recent work suggests that Fe-bound P is an important burial phase in euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic basin sediments in the Baltic Sea. In this study, we investigate the role of Fe-bound P as a potential sink for P in Black Sea sediments overlain by oxic and euxinic bottom waters. Sequential P extractions performed on sediments from six multicores along two shelf-to-basin transects provide evidence for the burial of Fe-bound P at all sites, including those in the euxinic deep basin. In the latter sediments, Fe-bound P accounts for more than 20% of the total sedimentary P pool. We suggest that this P is present in the form of reduced Fe-P minerals. We hypothesize that these minerals may be formed as inclusions in sulfur-disproportionating Deltaproteobacteria. Further research is required to elucidate the exact mineral form and formation mechanism of this P burial phase, as well as its role as a sink for P in sulfide-rich marine sediments.

  10. Are iron-phosphate minerals a sink for phosphorus in anoxic Black Sea sediments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Nikki; Kraal, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Schnetger, Bernhard; Slomp, Caroline P

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a key nutrient for marine organisms. The only long-term removal pathway for P in the marine realm is burial in sediments. Iron (Fe) bound P accounts for a significant proportion of this burial at the global scale. In sediments underlying anoxic bottom waters, burial of Fe-bound P is generally assumed to be negligible because of reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides and release of the associated P. However, recent work suggests that Fe-bound P is an important burial phase in euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic) basin sediments in the Baltic Sea. In this study, we investigate the role of Fe-bound P as a potential sink for P in Black Sea sediments overlain by oxic and euxinic bottom waters. Sequential P extractions performed on sediments from six multicores along two shelf-to-basin transects provide evidence for the burial of Fe-bound P at all sites, including those in the euxinic deep basin. In the latter sediments, Fe-bound P accounts for more than 20% of the total sedimentary P pool. We suggest that this P is present in the form of reduced Fe-P minerals. We hypothesize that these minerals may be formed as inclusions in sulfur-disproportionating Deltaproteobacteria. Further research is required to elucidate the exact mineral form and formation mechanism of this P burial phase, as well as its role as a sink for P in sulfide-rich marine sediments.

  11. Short Range-Ordered Minerals: Insight into Aqueous Alteration Processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Golden, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    Short range-ordered (SRO) aluminosilicates (e.g., allophane) and nanophase ferric oxides (npOx) are common SRO minerals derived during aqueous alteration of basaltic materials. NpOx refers to poorly crystalline or amorphous alteration products that can be any combination of superparamagnetic hematite and/or goethite, akaganeite, schwertmannite, ferrihydrite, iddingsite, and nanometer-sized ferric oxide particles that pigment palagonitic tephra. Nearly 30 years ago, SRO phases were suggested as alteration phases on Mars based on similar spectral properties for altered basaltic tephra on the slopes of Mauna Kea in Hawaii and Martian bright regions measured by Earth-based telescopes. Detailed characterization of altered basaltic tephra on Mauna Kea have identified a variety of alteration phases including allophane, npOx, hisingerite, jarosite, alunite, hematite, goethite, ferrihydrite, halloysite, kaolinite, smectite, and zeolites. The presence of npOx and other Fe-bearing minerals (jarosite, hematite, goethite) was confirmed by the M ssbauer Spectrometer onboard the Mars Exploration Rovers. Although the presence of allophane has not been definitely identified on Mars robotic missions, chemical analysis by the Spirit and Opportunity rovers and thermal infrared spectral orbital measurements suggest the presence of allophane or allophane-like phases on Mars. SRO phases form under a variety of environmental conditions on Earth ranging from cold and arid to warm and humid, including hydrothermal conditions. The formation of SRO aluminosilicates such as allophane (and crystalline halloysite) from basaltic material is controlled by several key factors including activity of water, extent of leaching, Si activity in solution, and available Al. Generally, a low leaching index (e.g., wet-dry cycles) and slightly acidic to alkaline conditions are necessary. NpOx generally form under aqueous oxidative weathering conditions, although thermal oxidative alteration may occasional be

  12. Formation of secondary minerals in a lysimeter approach - A mineral-microbe interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäffner, F.; Merten, D.; De Giudici, G.; Beyer, A.; Akob, D. M.; Ricci, P. C.; Küsel, K.; Büchel, G.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy metal contamination of large areas due to uranium mining operations poses a serious long-term environmental problem. In the Ronneburg district (eastern Thuringia, Germany), leaching of low grade uranium bearing ores (uranium content metals, especially Cd, Ni, Co, Cu and Zn due to a residual contamination even after remediation efforts. To reveal the processes of secondary mineral precipitation in the field a laboratory lysimeter approach was set up under in situ-like conditions. Homogenized soil from the field site and pure quartz sand were used as substrates. In general, in situ measurements of redox potentials in the substrates showed highly oxidizing conditions (200-750 mV). Water was supplied to the lysimeter from below via a mariottés bottle containing contaminated groundwater from the field. Evaporation processes were allowed, providing a continuous flow of water. This led to precipitation of epsomite and probably aplowite on the top layer of substrate, similar to what is observed in field investigations. After 4 weeks, the first iron and manganese bearing secondary minerals became visible. Soil water samples were used to monitor the behaviour of metals within the lysimeter. Saturation indices (SI) for different secondary minerals were calculated with PHREEQC. The SI of goethite showed oversaturation with respect to the soil solution. SEM-EDX analyses and IR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of goethite. Geochemical data revealed that goethite formation was mainly dominated by Eh/pH processes and that heavy metals, e.g. Zn and U, could be enriched in this phase. Although Eh/pH data does not support formation of manganese minerals, Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) could be isolated from field soil samples, supporting the fact that microorganisms may influence this natural attenuation process. Laser ablation ICP-MS data reveal accumulation of manganese in MOB biomass on Mn(II)-containing agar plates. Furthermore, it was possible to show the importance

  13. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-03

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Penggunaan Formula Mineral Lokal dalam Ransum Ayam Petelur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A mineral formula composed of three locally available materials: limestone originated from Bukit Kamang of West Sumatra, freshwater oyster shell and bone meal and fortified with micro minerals of Cu, Zn and I was investigated as mineral supplement for diet of laying hens. The experimental diets were: P0 (diet contained of 6% commercial mineral, P1 (diet contained of 6% local mineral, P2 (diet contained of 6% Bukit Kamangs’ limestone and P3 (diet contained of 6% fresh water oyster shell meal. The total of four experimental diets was then fed to 120 laying hens. The hens were divided into 3 groups based on body weight: heavy, medium and light. Each group was subdivided into 4 subgroups in accordance with number of treatments, so that each treatment consisted of 3 replicates containing of 10 hens. Parameters measured included: feed intake, hen-day egg production, feed conversion ratio (FCR, eggshell quality, mineral retention and mineral composition of tibia bone. Data were subjected to statistical analysis using variance analysis in a completely block design with 4 treatments and 3 blocks as replicates The results showed that the egg weight and eggshell qualities were found not significantly difference, but different mineral sources gave significant effect on egg production and bone mineralization. The laying performances and tibia bone weight of chickens fed diet mixed with the local mineral formula were found not significantly different with those fed diet mixed with commercial formula, but significantly better (P<0.05 than those of fed diet mixed with only limestone or oyster shell. Hens fed with diet mixed with Bukit Kamangs’ limestone showed better performances and heavier tibia bone than those fed with diet mixed with oyster shell. It was concluded that the local mineral formula could be used as sole mineral source for laying hens. The nutritive value of Bukit Kamangs’ limestone was better than that of fresh water oyster shell.

  15. Response of Microbial Soil Carbon Mineralization Rates to Oxygen Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, M.; Denney, A.; Nico, P. S.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The rate of soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is known to be controlled by climatic factors as well as molecular structure, mineral-organic associations, and physical protection. What remains elusive is to what extent oxygen (O2) limitations impact overall rates of microbial SOM mineralization (oxidation) in soils. Even within upland soils that are aerobic in bulk, factors limiting O2 diffusion such as texture and soil moisture can result in an abundance of anaerobic microsites in the interior of soil aggregates. Variation in ensuing anaerobic respiration pathways can further impact SOM mineralization rates. Using a combination of (first) aggregate model systems and (second) manipulations of intact field samples, we show how limitations on diffusion and carbon bioavailability interact to impose anaerobic conditions and associated respiration constraints on SOM mineralization rates. In model aggregates, we examined how particle size (soil texture) and amount of dissolved organic carbon (bioavailable carbon) affect O2 availability and distribution. Monitoring electron acceptor profiles (O2, NO3-, Mn and Fe) and SOM transformations (dissolved, particulate, mineral-associated pools) across the resulting redox gradients, we then determined the distribution of operative microbial metabolisms and their cumulative impact on SOM mineralization rates. Our results show that anaerobic conditions decrease SOM mineralization rates overall, but those are partially offset by the concurrent increases in SOM bioavailability due to transformations of protective mineral phases. In intact soil aggregates collected from soils varying in texture and SOM content, we mapped the spatial distribution of anaerobic microsites. Optode imaging, microsensor profiling and 3D tomography revealed that soil texture regulates overall O2 availability in aggregate interiors, while particulate SOM in biopores appears to control the fine-scale distribution of anaerobic microsites. Collectively, our

  16. Mineral resource of the month: perlite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The article talks about perlite, which is a mineral used as an aggregate for lightweight construction products, filler for paints and horticultural soil blends. Perlite comes from viscous lava, mined and processed to produce lightweight material that competes with pumice, exfoliated vermiculite and expanded clay and shale. It is mined in about 35 countries that include Greece, Japan and the U.S. Other uses include insulation, concrete and plaster aggregate, and stonewashing.

  17. Sub-project 'Simulation in mineral waste of secondary phase formation due to contact with drainage water'. Final report; Teilprojekt 'Simulation der Sekundaermineralbildung in mineralischen Reststoffen in Kontakt mit Sickerwasser'. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, U.; Kersten, M.

    2003-08-01

    3 mio. metric tons of bottom ash are produced by municipal solid waste incineration annually in Germany, which have to be recycled under tough environmental- and construction-based criteria. Before recycled, the ashes have to be reacted in open-air dumps for at least three months. A field-based survey under the framework of this project was conducted to study the ash ageing. This survey demonstrated that in practice these criteria are only partially reached in the topmost surficial layers of the 3-months ash humps due to hindrance of access by water and CO{sub 2}. According to a hypothesis worked out in earlier projects, the heavy metals remobilized from bottom ash are scavenged by secondary minerals formed during ageing, and kept therefore on a very low concentration niveau in the drainage water. In this project it was tried to simulate this long-term reaction sequence by addition of such sorbents to the short-term S4 leaching test already with fresh bottom ash. The main result is that the low metal concentration niveau was reached already within a few weeks of ash storage because the secondary mineral sorbents are apparently formed quite rapidly in sufficient amounts if both water and CO{sub 2} are allowed to drain the material. It is therefore not necessary to modify the S4 test for assessment according to the criteria ''Quellstaerke nach BBodSchV'', in case ash ageing is performed in an appropriate manner. Nonetheless, laboratory experiments showed that in open ash disposal systems but at enhanced gradient formation, considerable heavy metal fluxes may occur due to high remobilization rates, even at the overall low equilibrium concentrations. (orig.) [German] Bei der Siedlungsabfallverbrennung fallen jaehrlich ca. 3 Mio. Tonnen Rostasche an, die unter Einhaltung umwelt- und bautechnischer Kriterien wiederverwertet werden muessen. Vor der eigentlichen Verwertung ist eine dreimonatige Alterung der Aschen vorgeschrieben. Im Rahmen dieses

  18. Development of industrial minerals in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Belinda F.; Knepper, Daniel H.; Langer, William H.; Cappa, James A.; Keller, John W.; Widmann, Beth L.; Ellefsen, Karl J.; Klein, Terry L.; Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Dersch, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Technology and engineering have helped make mining safer and cleaner for both humans and the environment. Inevitably, mineral development entails costs as well as benefits. Developing a mine is an environmental, engineering, and planning challenge that must conform to many Federal, State, and local regulations. Community collaboration, creative design, and best management practices of sustainability and biodiversity can be positive indicators for the mining industry. A better understanding of aesthetics, culture, economics, geology, climate, vegetation and wildlife, topography, historical significance, and regional land planning is important in resolving land-use issues and managing mineral resources wisely. Ultimately, the consuming public makes choices about product use (including water, food, highways, housing, and thousands of other items) that influence operations of the mineral industry. Land planners, resource managers, earth scientists, designers, and public groups have a responsibility to consider sound scientific information, society's needs, and community appeals in making smart decisions concerning resource use and how complex landscapes should change. An effort to provide comprehensive geosciences data for land management agencies in central Colorado was undertaken in 2003 by scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Colorado Geological Survey. This effort, the Central Colorado Assessment Project, addressed a variety of land-use issues: an understanding of the availability of industrial and metallic rocks and minerals, the geochemical and environmental effects of historic mining activity on surface water and groundwater, and the geologic controls on the availability and quality of groundwater. The USDA Forest Service and other land management agencies have the opportunity to contribute to the sustainable management of natural aggregate and other mineral resources through the identification and selective development of mineral resources and the

  19. Destructive textures around radioactive minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montel, J.M.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In most of the rocks, natural uranium and thorium are concentrated in some minerals which provide favourable crystallographic sites. These minerals are thus submitted to an intense auto-irradiation which may transform them. Using conventional investigation methods (petrographic or scanning electronic microscopy, electronic micro-probe) and less conventional ones (transmission electronic microscopy), the authors studied the interfaces between radioactive minerals and their host minerals. They comment the possible mechanical and structural aspects of this interaction by irradiation, and the influence of geological events

  20. Sulfide mineralization in ultramafic rocks of the Faryab ophiolite complex, southern Kerman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Rajabzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Worldwide, Ni-Cu and PGE magmatic sulfide deposits are confined to the lower parts of stratiform mafic and ultramafic complexes. However, ophiolite mafic and ultramafic complexes have been rarely explored for sulfide deposits despite the fact that they have been extensively explored and exploited for chromite. Sulfide saturation during magmatic evolution is necessary for sulfide mineralization, in which sulfide melts scavenge chalcophile metals from the parent magma and concentrate them in specific lithological zones. The lack of exploration for sulfides in this environment suggests that sulfide saturation is rarely attained in ophiolite-related magmas. Some ophiolites, however, contain sulfide deposits, such as at Acoje in Philippines, and Cliffs in Shetland, U.K. (Evans, 2000; Naldrett, 2004. The Faryab ophiolite complex in southern Kerman Province, the most important mining area for chromite deposits in Iran, is located in the southwest part of the Makran Zone. Evidence of sulfide mineralization has been reported there by some authors (e.g. Rajabzadeh and Moosavinasab, 2013. This paper discusses the genesis of sulfides in the Faryab ophiolite using mineral chemistry of the major mineral phases in different rocks of the ophiolite column in order to determine the possible lithological location of sulfide deposits. Materials and methods Seventy three rock samples from cumulate units were collected from surficial occurrences and drill core. The samples were studied using conventional microscopic methods and the mineralogy confirmed by x-ray diffraction. Electron microprobe analysis was carried out on different mineral phases in order to determine the chemistry of the minerals used in the interpretation of magma evolution in the Faryab ophiolite. Lithologically, the Faryab ophiolite complex is divided into two major parts: the northern part includes magmatic rocks and the southern part is comprised of rocks residual after partial

  1. Registry of Mineral and Petroleum Titles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maclellan, I. M.; Kaizer, J. L.; McCulloch, P. D.; Ratcliffe, R.; Wenning, A. S. [Nova Scotia Dept. of Natural Resources, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Activities of the Nova Scotia Registry of Mineral and Petroleum Titles are described, including statistical information about staking and mining activity in the province during 1999. In terms of activities, the Registry receives applications and issues licenses and leases for mineral and petroleum rights, receives statements of exploration expenditures and assessment reports that pertain to renewal of licenses and leases, maintains maps showing the disposition of lands under license or lease, and maintains a system of prospector registration. In addition, the Registry processes applications for underground gas storage rights and treasure trove rights and maintains a database of information concerning production and employment in Nova Scotia mines and quarries. At the end 1999 there were 230,660 hectares under exploration licence. Exploration expenditures, including engineering, economic and feasibility studies during 1999 totalled $4.2 million, mostly by junior mining companies searching for industrial mineral commodities. Mining activity during 1999 generated revenues of $340 million. Coal production dropped by 25 per cent, due mainly to the closure of the Phalen Mine. Gypsum production was up to 7.9 million tonnes; shipments of cement, barite and clay products also increased during 1999; salt production remained unchanged from 1998 with 842,000 tonnes. Production of construction aggregates totalled 10.6 million tonnes, down slightly from the year before. Mineral industry employment was roughly 2,500 persons, down by 24 per cent from 1998 levels, due primarily to the closure of the Phalen Mine.

  2. Probing the rhizosphere to define mineral organic relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M. S.; Dohnalkova, A.; Stonestrom, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation and stabilization over time is an important process as soils are a large carbon reservoir in which feedbacks under changing climates are unclear. The association of SOM with poorly crystalline or short-range-ordered secondary minerals has been shown to be important for carbon stabilization. Commonly used soil extraction techniques display correlations of SOM with secondary phases but do not show causation. The fate of root exudates in soils and processes controlling exudate associations with mineral phases are as yet structurally undefined. Sub-micron exploration of in-situ relations provides valuable information on SOM-mineral interactions. Soils of the Santa Cruz (California) marine terrace chronosequence are used to illustrate changes in deep (> 1 m) rhizosphere through time. Cracks and soil ped faces are sites of high root density and organic matter (biofilm or mucilage) deposition. We employ a variety of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques for high resolution imaging and elemental analyses of deep rhizosphere and associated carbon mineral interactions. In these coastal prairie soils microscopy reveals secondary clay minerals associated with and possibly forming from organic-rich mucilage that occurs along the aforementioned rooting networks on fracture surfaces. We hypothesize that the production of secondary clays in the rhizosphere is an important mode of C incorporation into secondary minerals.

  3. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  4. Role of clay minerals in the formation of atmospheric aggregates of Saharan dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadros, Javier; Diaz-Hernandez, José L.; Sanchez-Navas, Antonio; Garcia-Casco, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Saharan dust can travel long distances in different directions across the Atlantic and Europe, sometimes in episodes of high dust concentration. In recent years it has been discovered that Saharan dust aerosols can aggregate into large, approximately spherical particles of up to 100 μm generated within raindrops that then evaporate, so that the aggregate deposition takes place most times in dry conditions. These aerosol aggregates are an interesting phenomenon resulting from the interaction of mineral aerosols and atmospheric conditions. They have been termed "iberulites" due to their discovery and description from aerosol deposits in the Iberian Peninsula. Here, these aggregates are further investigated, in particular the role of the clay minerals in the aggregation process of aerosol particles. Iberulites, and common aerosol particles for reference, were studied from the following periods or single dust events and locations: June 1998 in Tenerife, Canary Islands; June 2001 to August 2002, Granada, Spain; 13-20 August 2012, Granada; and 1-6 June 2014, Granada. Their mineralogy, chemistry and texture were analysed using X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, SEM and TEM. The mineral composition and structure of the iberulites consists of quartz, carbonate and feldspar grains surrounded by a matrix of clay minerals (illite, smectite and kaolinite) that also surrounds the entire aggregate. Minor phases, also distributed homogenously within the iberulites, are sulfates and Fe oxides. Clays are apparently more abundant in the iberulites than in the total aerosol deposit, suggesting that iberulite formation concentrates clays. Details of the structure and composition of iberulites differ from descriptions of previous samples, which indicates dependence on dust sources and atmospheric conditions, possibly including anthropic activity. Iberulites are formed by coalescence of aerosol mineral particles captured by precursor water droplets. The concentration of

  5. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-01-11

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

  6. Mineral fibres and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The use of inorganic fibrous materials is a comparatively new phenomenon and was uncommon before the Industrial Revolution. Humans evolved in a comparatively fibre-free environment and consequently never fully developed the defence mechanisms needed to deal with the consequences of inhaling fibres. However, the urban environment now has an airborne fibre concentration of around 1 f.l -1 , which is a tenfold increase on the natural background. Any sample of ambient air collected indoors or outdoors will probably contain some mineral fibres, but there is little evidence that these pose any risk to human health. They come from asbestos used in brakes, glass and mineral wools used as insulation and fire proofing of buildings, gypsum from plaster and a variety of types from many sources. Few of these have the potential to do any harm. Asbestos is the only fibre of note but urban levels are insignificant compared to occupational exposures. When the health of cohorts occupationally exposed to the several types of asbestos is studied the problem can be put into perspective. Studies of workers in the chrysotile industry exposed to much higher dust levels than in a factory today show no excess lung cancer or mesothelioma. By comparison those living near crocidolite mines, let alone working in them, may develop asbestos-related disease. As always, dose is the critical factor. Chrysotile is cleared from the lungs very efficiently, only the amphiboles are well retained. The only real health problem comes from the earlier use of asbestos products that may now be old, friable and damaged and made from amphibole or mixed fibre. If though, these are still in good condition, they do not pose a health problem. Asbestos-related diseases are very rare in those not occupationally exposed. Where they exist exposure has nearly always been to crocidolite. (author)

  7. In-situ nanoscale imaging of clay minerals with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosbach, D.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay minerals play a key role in many concepts for high-level nuclear waste repository systems in deep geological formations. Various aspects related to the long-term safety of nuclear disposal are linked to their fundamental physical-chemical properties, in particular with respect to their reactivity in aqueous environments. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows high resolution imaging of clay minerals in-situ while they are exposed to an aqueous solution. The presentation is intended to provide an overview of examples of AFM studies on clay minerals: 1. AFM is an ideal tool to visualize the shape of individual clay particles down to molecular scales including a quantitative description of for example their aspect ratio. Furthermore, the particle size can be easily extracted from AFM data for individual particles as well as particle size distribution. 2. Surface area of clay minerals is a key issue when discussing heterogeneous reactions such as dissolution, adsorption or (surface) precipitation - total surface area, BET surface area, reactive surface area need to be distinguished. In particular reactive surface area is linked to specific reactive surface sites. AFM is of course able to identify such sites and consequently AFM data allow to characterize and to quantify reactive surface area. 3. The reactivity of clay mineral surfaces in aqueous environments controls the behaviour of clay minerals under repository conditions and also affects the migration/retention of radionuclides. It could be shown that the dissolution of smectite particles under acidic conditions at room temperature primarily occurs at (hk0) particle edges, whereas the reactivity of the (001) basal surfaces is very limited. The heterogeneous (surface) precipitation of secondary iron (hydr)oxides phase could be unraveled by AFM observations. Surface precipitation occurs preferentially at (hk0) edges surfaces. Ignoring the surface site specific

  8. Of minerals and men. [Discovery of new mineral species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Waal, S.W. (Council for Mineral Technology, Randburg (South Africa))

    1983-01-01

    The rate of discovery of new mineral species appears to be on the increase in Southern Africa and classification and nomenclature, once haphazard, are now subject to international scientific screening and rules. Earlier names entrenched in the literature provide a fascinating background to the minerals scene.

  9. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  10. The Thermodynamics of Selenium Minerals in Near-Surface Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Krivovichev

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selenium compounds are relatively rare as minerals; there are presently only 118 known mineral species. This work is intended to codify and systematize the data of mineral systems and the thermodynamics of selenium minerals, which are unstable (selenides or formed in near-surface environments (selenites, where the behavior of selenium is controlled by variations of the redox potential and the acidity of solutions at low temperatures and pressures. These parameters determine the migration of selenium and its precipitation as various solid phases. All selenium minerals are divided into four groups—native selenium, oxide, selenides, and oxysalts—anhydrous selenites (I and hydrous selenites and selenates (II. Within each of the groups, minerals are codified according to the minimum number of independent elements necessary to define the composition of the mineral system. Eh–pH diagrams were calculated and plotted using the Geochemist’s Workbench (GMB 9.0 software package. The Eh–pH diagrams of the Me–Se–H2O systems (where Me = Co, Ni, Fe, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Hg, Ag, Bi, As, Sb, Al and Ca were plotted for the average contents of these elements in acidic waters in the oxidation zones of sulfide deposits. The possibility of the formation of Zn, Cd, Ag and Hg selenites under natural oxidation conditions in near surface environments is discussed.

  11. Phase field approaches of bone remodeling based on TIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François; Rahouadj, Rachid; Boisse, Julien; Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The process of bone remodeling includes a cycle of repair, renewal, and optimization. This adaptation process, in response to variations in external loads and chemical driving factors, involves three main types of bone cells: osteoclasts, which remove the old pre-existing bone; osteoblasts, which form the new bone in a second phase; osteocytes, which are sensing cells embedded into the bone matrix, trigger the aforementioned sequence of events. The remodeling process involves mineralization of the bone in the diffuse interface separating the marrow, which contains all specialized cells, from the newly formed bone. The main objective advocated in this contribution is the setting up of a modeling and simulation framework relying on the phase field method to capture the evolution of the diffuse interface between the new bone and the marrow at the scale of individual trabeculae. The phase field describes the degree of mineralization of this diffuse interface; it varies continuously between the lower value (no mineral) and unity (fully mineralized phase, e.g. new bone), allowing the consideration of a diffuse moving interface. The modeling framework is the theory of continuous media, for which field equations for the mechanical, chemical, and interfacial phenomena are written, based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Additional models for the cellular activity are formulated to describe the coupling of the cell activity responsible for bone production/resorption to the kinetics of the internal variables. Kinetic equations for the internal variables are obtained from a pseudo-potential of dissipation. The combination of the balance equations for the microforce associated to the phase field and the kinetic equations lead to the Ginzburg-Landau equation satisfied by the phase field with a source term accounting for the dissipative microforce. Simulations illustrating the proposed framework are performed in a one-dimensional situation showing the evolution of

  12. Biological mineralization of iron: Studies using Moesbauer spectroscopy and complementary techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, J.; Kim, K.S.; Tran, K.C.; Pierre, T.G.S.

    1988-01-01

    Biological deposition of solid Fe-containing phases can be studied using 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. Other techniques are needed in order to understand this complex process. These include proton-induced X-ray and γ-ray emission (PIXE/PIGME), electron microscopy, electron and X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and chemical characterization of organic components. This paper reviews and evaluates the application of these techniques to biological mineralization of Fe, particularly that occurring in the radula teeth of the marine molluscs, chitons and limpets. (orig.)

  13. Single-Phase Bundle Flows Including Macroscopic Turbulence Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yoon, Han Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seok Jong; Cho, Hyoung Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To deal with various thermal hydraulic phenomena due to rapid change of fluid properties when an accident happens, securing mechanistic approaches as much as possible may reduce the uncertainty arising from improper applications of the experimental models. In this study, the turbulence mixing model, which is well defined in the subchannel analysis code such as VIPRE, COBRA, and MATRA by experiments, is replaced by a macroscopic k-e turbulence model, which represents the aspect of mathematical derivation. The performance of CUPID with macroscopic turbulence model is validated against several bundle experiments: CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. In this study, the macroscopic k-e model has been validated for the application to subchannel analysis. It has been implemented in the CUPID code and validated against CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. The results showed that the macroscopic k-e turbulence model can estimate the experiments properly.

  14. Planning for Planetary Science Mission Including Resource Prospecting, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in computer-aided mission planning can enhance mission operations and science return for surface missions to Mars, the Moon, and beyond. While the...

  15. Clinker mineral hydration at reduced relative humidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben; Lachowski, Eric E.

    1999-01-01

    and experimental data are presented showing that C(3)A can hydrate at lower humidities than either C3S or C2S. It is suggested that the initiation of hydration during exposure to water vapour is nucleation controlled. When C(3)A hydrates at low humidity, the characteristic hydration product is C(3)AH(6......Vapour phase hydration of purl cement clinker minerals at reduced relative humidities is described. This is relevant to modern high performance concrete that may self-desiccate during hydration and is also relevant to the quality of the cement during storage. Both the oretical considerations...

  16. Pulmonary mineralization in four dogs with Cushing's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, C.R.; Ackerman, N.; Monce, K.

    1994-01-01

    The clinical and imaging features of four dogs with Cushing's syndrome and pulmonary mineralization are reviewed. Three dogs presented with a primary complaint of respiratory distress/dyspnea. Three dogs had pituitary dependent Cushing's syndrome, while the remaining one dog had iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. Each dog had clinical features typical for Cushing's syndrome. Two of the dogs were euthanized due to progressive hypoxemia. In each dog, the serum calcium, phosphorous, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were normal. A generalized increase in unstructured interstitial pulmonary opacity with diffuse mineralization was noted on thoracic radiographs of all dogs. In one dog, an ill-defined nodular interstitial pattern of mineralization was present. Delayed bone phase scintigraphy using 99m Technetium methylene diphosphonate documented generalized pulmonary uptake in two dogs. 99m Technetium labeled microaggregated albumin lung perfusion scans were normal in these two dogs. 99m Tc-MDP scintigraphy can provide useful information in diagnosing pulmonary mineralization in Cushingoid dogs

  17. Geoethical approach to mineral activities in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talalay, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Antarctica is the outermost from civilization space continent. From 14.0 million km2 of surface area about 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages at least 1.6 km in thickness. Geologically, the continent is the least explored in the world, and it is almost absolutely unknown what mineral resources Antarctica has as they are buried in rock that is covered by a thick ice sheet. It is thought to have large and valuable mineral deposits under the ice. This is because of what has been found in samples taken from the small areas of rock that are exposed, and also from what has been found in South Africa and South America. Up until 180 million years ago, Antarctica was a part of the Gondwanaland super continent, attached to South America, the Southern part of Africa, India and Australia, these continents then drifted apart until they reached their current positions. This leads to a possibility that Antarctica may also share some of the mineral wealth of these continents. Right now on the ice-free areas of Antarctica iron ore, chromium, copper, gold, nickel, platinum, coal and hydrocarbons have been found. The Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, also known as the Madrid Protocol, was signed in 1991 by the signatories to the Antarctic Treaty and became law in January 1998. The Protocol provides for comprehensive protection of the Antarctic environment and associated ecosystems and includes a ban on all commercial mining for at least fifty years (this is up for review in 2041). Current climate change and melting ice in Polar Regions is opening up new opportunities to exploit mineral and oil resources. Even Antarctica's weather, ice and distance from any industrialized areas mean that mineral extraction would be extremely expensive and also extremely dangerous, the depletion of mineral recourses on the Earth can reverse banning of mining in Antarctica in future. There is no question that any resource exploitation in Antarctica will cause

  18. 30 CFR 285.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 285.659 Section 285.659 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply with the Clean Air Act...

  19. Bone mineral density in reflex sympathetic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saghaphi, M.; Azarian, A.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) is a complex of symptoms that produce pain burning sensation, swelling, tenderness, autonomic and physical dysfunction in joint areas, particularly distal of a limb. Osteopenia or osteoporosis is an important finding that is produced gradually in involved limb. Three phase bone can scan help to diagnosis of RSD. The disease may be bilateral but is mostly unilateral. As it is believed that bone densitometry will show osteopenia more accurate than plain comparative radiographs of the involved limbs, we investigated in patients with RSD. Methods: During last three years, 8 patients with RSD were admitted. Bone mineral density was measured for 5 patients by DEXA method. The patients were 3 males and 2 females with age range of 20 to 48 years (mean 32 years). The involved areas were ankle and foot in 4, and wrist and hand in one patient. Results: Mean Bone Mineral Content (BMC) of 4 involved lower limbs were 475 +-73 grams comparing with 516+-72 grams of uninvolved limbs (p t h patient was not significant. conclusion: comparative bone mineral density in patients with RSD of the lower limbs contributes to more accurate diagnosis than plain radiographs

  20. Plant macro- and micronutrient minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    All plants must obtain a number of inorganic mineral elements from their environment to ensure successful growth and development of both vegetative and reproductive tissues. A total of fourteen mineral nutrients are considered to be essential. Several other elements have been shown to have beneficia...

  1. Radioisotopes in plant mineral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Bhupinder

    2016-01-01

    Extensive investigations on mineral composition of different plant species growing on various soils, helped in realizing that neither the presence nor the concentration of a mineral element in a plant can be regarded as a criterion for essentially. Plants have a limited capability for selective uptake of those mineral elements which are essential for their growth. They also take up mineral element which are not necessary for growth and may even be toxic. The mineral composition of plants growing in soils cannot, therefore, be used to establish essentially of a mineral element. Once this fact was appreciated, both water and sand culture experiments were carried out in which particular mineral elements were omitted. Von Sach and Knop are credited with reintroduction of the solution culture method using which they demonstrated the absolute requirement of ten macronutrients. As evident, these techniques made possible a more precise characterization of essentially of mineral elements and led to a better understanding of their role in plant metabolism. By the beginning of 20"t"h century importance of micronutrients like B, Mn, Cu, Mo and CI was also established

  2. Miners' strike 1984-85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L; Salter, S [comps.

    1985-01-01

    References relating to the 1984-85 UK miners strike are listed under the following subject headings: events and analysis - a chronological record; short term effects - coal stocks and supplies, electricity supplies, financial, industrial and economic; the miners and their leadership; social aspects - civil liberties, media coverage, mining communities, picketing, policing, the future; pit closures. 240 references.

  3. Ways to defuse miners' anger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The violence and riots which often occur with mining personnel are considered. The emotions and feelings which miners often experience because of their work environment are dealth with. From recognizing the pressures, the article then works to present methods to help defuse the miners' hostility and anger

  4. Heavy mineral occurrence off Hazira, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vora, K.H.; Mislankar, P.G.; Gujar, A.R.

    The occurrence of heavy mineral placers on the west coast of India are well known from Konkan and Malabar Coast. However, a geological and geophysical investigation (including echosounding and side scan sonar profiles and 7 samples) off Hazira...

  5. A Lesson in Complexity: Seabed Minerals and Easter Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druker, Kristen

    1984-01-01

    This high school-level classroom activity presents a hypothetical situation based on scientific fact concerning the likelihood that seabed mineral deposits lie off Easter Island. Activity goals, instructional strategies, and instructions for students are included. (JN)

  6. Chemical and colloidal aspects of collectorless flotation behavior of sulfide and non-sulfide minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh, Sajjad; Mousavinezhad, Seyed Kamal; Gharabaghi, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Flotation has been widely used for separation of valuable minerals from gangues based on their surface characterizations and differences in hydrophobicity on mineral surfaces. As hydrophobicity of minerals widely differs from each other, their separation by flotation will become easier. Collectors are chemical materials which are supposed to make selectively valuable minerals hydrophobic. In addition, there are some minerals which based on their surface and structural features are intrinsically hydrophobic. However, their hydrophobicities are not strong enough to be floatable in the flotation cell without collectors such as sulfide minerals, coal, stibnite, and so forth. To float these minerals in a flotation cell, their hydrophobicity should be increased in specific conditions. Various parameters including pH, Eh, size distribution, mill types, mineral types, ore characterization, and type of reaction in flotation cells affect the hydrophobicity of minerals. Surface analysis results show that when sulfide minerals experience specific flotation conditions, the reactions on the surface of these minerals increase the amount of sulfur on the surface. These phenomenons improve the hydrophobicity of these minerals due to strong hydrophobic feature of sulfurs. Collectorless flotation reduces chemical material consumption amount, increases flotation selectivity (grade increases), and affects the equipment quantities; however, it can also have negative effects. Some minerals with poor surface floatability can be increased by adding some ions to the flotation system. Depressing undesirable minerals in flotation is another application of collectorless flotation.

  7. The three-dimensional distribution of minerals in potato tubers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Nithya K.; White, Philip J.; Broadley, Martin R.; Ramsay, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The three-dimensional distributions of mineral elements in potato tubers provide insight into their mechanisms of transport and deposition. Many of these minerals are essential to a healthy human diet, and characterizing their distribution within the potato tuber will guide the effective utilization of this staple foodstuff. Methods The variation in mineral composition within the tuber was determined in three dimensions, after determining the orientation of the harvested tuber in the soil. The freeze-dried tuber samples were analysed for minerals using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Minerals measured included those of nutritional significance to the plant and to human consumers, such as iron, zinc, copper, calcium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium and sulphur. Key Results The concentrations of most minerals were higher in the skin than in the flesh of tubers. The potato skin contained about 17 % of total tuber zinc, 34 % of calcium and 55 % of iron. On a fresh weight basis, most minerals were higher in tuber flesh at the stem end than the bud end of the tuber. Potassium, however, displayed a gradient in the opposite direction. The concentrations of phosphorus, copper and calcium decreased from the periphery towards the centre of the tuber. Conclusions The distribution of minerals varies greatly within the potato tuber. Low concentrations of some minerals relative to those in leaves may be due to their low mobility in phloem, whereas high concentrations in the skin may reflect direct uptake from the soil across the periderm. In tuber flesh, different minerals show distinct patterns of distribution in the tuber, several being consistent with phloem unloading in the tuber and limited onward movement. These findings have implications both for understanding directed transport of minerals in plants to stem-derived storage organs and for the dietary implications of different food preparation methods for potato tubers

  8. Placer mineral resources of Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anil Kumar, V.

    2016-01-01

    Tamil Nadu, the southernmost state with second longest coast line in India has many placer heavy mineral deposits. These deposits contain economically important light heavy minerals like ilmenite, rutile, leucoxene, monazite, zircon, garnet, sillimanite, kyanite and non-economic minerals like pyroxenes, amphiboles and magnetite along with associated accessory minerals like staurolite, epidote, spinel, biotite and tourmaline. Geologically, granulitic rocks, principally Khondalites (garnet-sillimanite-graphite gneisses), charnockites and granitic gneisses bordered by sedimentary rocks are exposed along the eastern coastal plains of the Tamil Nadu. The principal highland areas, as for example, Shavaroys, Nilgiris, Palni-Kodaikanal Hills and Cardomom hills consists primarily of Charnockites. The margins of highland show a gradation into less metamorphosed rocks generally of amphibolite facies. The khondalites are found south of Kodaikanal massif. Anorthosites and layered mafic complexes occur at Sittampundi, Kadavur areas. Alkaline rocks and carbonatites are prominent at Simalpatti, Sevattur and Sivamalai. Coastal sedimentaries include, Gondwanas, Cretaceous, Tertiary and Quaternary rocks along with lateritic soils and beach sands

  9. Tannins in Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Rutledge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study provides an up to date review of tannins, specifically quebracho, in mineral processing and metallurgical processes. Quebracho is a highly useful reagent in many flotation applications, acting as both a depressant and a dispersant. Three different types of quebracho are mentioned in this study; quebracho “S” or Tupasol ATO, quebracho “O” or Tupafin ATO, and quebracho “A” or Silvafloc. It should be noted that literature often refers simply to “quebracho” without distinguishing a specific type. Quebracho is most commonly used in industry as a method to separate fluorite from calcite, which is traditionally quite challenging as both minerals share a common ion—calcium. Other applications for quebracho in flotation with calcite minerals as the main gangue source include barite and scheelite. In sulfide systems, quebracho is a key reagent in differential flotation of copper, lead, zinc circuits. The use of quebracho in the precipitation of germanium from zinc ores and for the recovery of ultrafine gold is also detailed in this work. This analysis explores the wide range of uses and methodology of quebracho in the extractive metallurgy field and expands on previous research by Iskra and Kitchener at Imperial College entitled, “Quebracho in Mineral Processing”.

  10. Phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Sole, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V; Sol, Ricard V; Solé, Ricard V

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions--changes between different states of organization in a complex system--have long helped to explain physics concepts, such as why water freezes into a solid or boils to become a gas. How might phase transitions shed light on important problems in biological and ecological complex systems? Exploring the origins and implications of sudden changes in nature and society, Phase Transitions examines different dynamical behaviors in a broad range of complex systems. Using a compelling set of examples, from gene networks and ant colonies to human language and the degradation of diverse ecosystems, the book illustrates the power of simple models to reveal how phase transitions occur. Introductory chapters provide the critical concepts and the simplest mathematical techniques required to study phase transitions. In a series of example-driven chapters, Ricard Solé shows how such concepts and techniques can be applied to the analysis and prediction of complex system behavior, including the origins of ...

  11. Novel anatomic adaptation of cortical bone to meet increased mineral demands of reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macica, Carolyn M; King, Helen E; Wang, Meina; McEachon, Courtney L; Skinner, Catherine W; Tommasini, Steven M

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of reproductive adaptations to mineral homeostasis on the skeleton in a mouse model of compromised mineral homeostasis compared to adaptations in control, unaffected mice. During pregnancy, maternal adaptations to high mineral demand include more

  12. 1.3. Chemical and mineral additives of concretes and water used for concrete mix preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidov, D.Kh.

    2011-01-01

    It is known that chemical and mineral additives increase physicochemical properties of concretes, thus, chemical and mineral additives, including super plasticizer and organo mineral additives are examined in this work. It was noted that along with salt water fresh water can also be used for concrete mix preparation.

  13. Advances in Mineral Dust Source Composition Measurement with Imaging Spectroscopy at the Salton Sea, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. O.; Realmuto, V. J.; Thompson, D. R.; Mahowald, N. M.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Clark, R. N.; Swayze, G. A.; Okin, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust emitted from the Earth's surface is a principal contributor to direct radiative forcing over the arid regions, where shifts in climate have a significant impact on agriculture, precipitation, and desert encroachment around the globe. Dust particles contribute to both positive and negative forcing, depending on the composition of the particles. Particle composition is a function of the surface mineralogy of dust source regions, but poor knowledge of surface mineralogy on regional to global scales limits the skill of Earth System models to predict shifts in regional climate around the globe. Earth System models include the source, emission, transport and deposition phases of the dust cycle. In addition to direct radiative forcing contributions, mineral dust impacts include indirect radiative forcing, modification of the albedo and melting rates of snow and ice, kinetics of tropospheric photochemistry, formation and deposition of acidic aerosols, supply of nutrients to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and impact on human health and safety. We demonstrate the ability to map mineral dust source composition in the Salton Sea dust source region with imaging spectroscopy measurements acquired as part of the NASA HyspIRI preparatory airborne campaign. These new spectroscopically derived compositional measurements provide a six orders of magnitude improvement over current atlases for this dust source region and provide a pathfinder example for a remote measurement approach to address this critical dust composition gap for global Earth System models.

  14. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castor, S.B.; Lock, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km 2 that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain

  15. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  16. Het belang van mineraalsuppletie voor gebit en kaak [The importance of mineral supplementation for dentition and jaw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theuns, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this article the importance of mineral suppletion for teeth and jawbone is explained in a step-wise manner. The steps discussed are the pre-eruptive phase of teeth and the growth, adult and ageing phase of the skeleton. Mineral suppletion should be seen as a measure to prevent dental caries

  17. Enhancing market potentials, contract and trading of Nigerian solid minerals in world market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwa, Y. B.

    1997-01-01

    The mineral endowments of Nigeria is discussed. Most of these minerals are mined for their export potential and also to meet domestic industrial needs. Minerals mined for export include tin, columbite, tantalite, lead/zinc, coal, and iron. Minerals meet specified requirements to qualify for export or application in the industrial sector. For export, a number of issues relating to pricing, shipping, insurance, international laws and contractual agreements must be clearly articulated

  18. Structural financing and management of investment projects in the Nigerian mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akingbola, E. B. O.

    1997-01-01

    The mineral industry is attractive because of the diversity and abundance of the deposits. The economic and financial implications of exploiting these are considered. The issues discussed include capital requirement, international outlook, investment opportunities in the mineral industry, oil and gas, solid minerals, attracting investment into the mineral industry,structural financing, macro economic stability. The paper concludes that the ability of the industry to continue attracting foreign capital is crucial to its survival, growth and development

  19. Heavy minerals and provenance of the paleozoic suffi formation, Western desert, iraq.

    OpenAIRE

    Al Juboury, Ali I. [علي الجبوري; Hassan, Zeki M.

    1996-01-01

    Heavy minerals analyses were carried out on 10 samples from the clastic Suffi Formation (the Ordovician-Carboniferous unit in the western Iraqi desert). The suite of minerals consists mainly of opaque minerals including pyrite, ilmenite, magnetite and hematite and the non-opaques is represented by zircon, tourmaline, cutile, garnet, epidote, kyanite, staurolite, leucoxene, chlorite and biotite. The nature and occurrence of the above heavy minerals association reflect a source area of the crys...

  20. Accuracy in mineral identification: image spectral and spatial resolutions and mineral spectral properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pompilio

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Problems related to airborne hyperspectral image data are reviewed and the requirements for data analysis applied to mineralogical (rocks and soils interpretation are discussed. The variability of mineral spectral features, including absorption position, shape and depth is considered and interpreted as due to chemical composition, grain size effects and mineral association. It is also shown how this variability can be related to well defined geologic processes. The influence of sensor noise and diffuse atmospheric radiance in classification accuracy is also analyzed.

  1. Method of refining mineral and shale oils, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1950-12-06

    A method is described for refining mineral oils, shale oils, tar oil. The oil is preferably treated with concentrated sulphuric acid, of not less than 90% by weight concentration or with chloro-sulphonic acid in order to extract the more reactive components of the oil. The solution (extract phase) is separated from the treated oil (raffinate phase) by centrifuging, characterised by centrifugally separating the extract phase from the raffinate phase before any noticeable chemical reaction with subsequent solution of acid reaction products in the raffinate phase has taken place. The acid remaining in the raffinate phase is allowed to react chemically with the more reactive constituents. The sludge formed is removed from the raffinate phase by centrifuging.

  2. Self-Ordering and Complexity in Epizonal Mineral Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Richard W.; Berger, Byron R.

    Epizonal base and precious metal deposits makeup a range of familiar deposit styles including porphyry copper-gold, epithermal veins and stockworks, carbonate-replacement deposits, and polymetallic volcanic rock-hosted (VHMS) deposits. They occur along convergent plate margins and are invariably associated directly with active faults and volcanism. They are complex in form, variable in their characteristics at all scales, and highly localized in the earth's crust. More than a century of detailed research has provided an extensive base of observational data characterizing these deposits, from their regional setting to the fluid and isotope chemistry of mineral deposition. This has led to a broad understanding of the large-scale hydrothermal systems within which they form. Low salinity vapor, released by magma crystallization and dispersed into vigorously convecting groundwater systems, is recognized as a principal source of metals and the gases that control redox conditions within systems. The temperature and pressure of the ambient fluid anywhere within these systems is close to its vapor-liquid phase boundary, and mineral deposition is a consequence of short timescale perturbations generated by localized release of crustal stress. However, a review of occurrence data raises questions about ore formation that are not addressed by traditional genetic models. For example, what are the origins of banding in epithermal veins, and what controls the frequency of oscillatory lamination? What controls where the phenomenon of mineralization occurs, and why are some porphyry deposits, for example, so much larger than others? The distinctive, self-organized characteristics of epizonal deposits are shown to be the result of repetitive coupling of fracture dilation consequent on brittle failure, phase separation ("boiling"), and heat transfer between fluid and host rock. Process coupling substantially increases solute concentrations and triggers fast, far

  3. Energy flow and mineral cycling mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, L.E.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of energy flow patterns and mineral cycling mechanisms provides a first step in identifying major transport pathways away from waste management areas. A preliminary food web pattern is described using results from ongoing and completed food habit studies. Biota possessing the greatest potential for introducing radionuclides into food chains leading to man include deer, rabbits, hares, waterfowl, honeybees and upland game birds and are discussed separately

  4. On the interfacial interaction between bituminous binders and mineral surfaces as present in asphalt mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.; Dillingh, E.C.; Hermse, C.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    The interfacial interaction between bituminous binders and several mineral surfaces of different chemical nature as present in asphalt mixtures has been investigated using atomic force microscopy. Several dry mineral surfaces display comparable wetting with respect to the different phases present in

  5. Economic drivers of mineral supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lorie A.; Sullivan, Daniel E.; Sznopek, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The debate over the adequacy of future supplies of mineral resources continues in light of the growing use of mineral-based materials in the United States. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the quantity of new materials utilized each year has dramatically increased from 161 million tons2 in 1900 to 3.2 billion tons in 2000. Of all the materials used during the 20th century in the United States, more than half were used in the last 25 years. With the Earth?s endowment of natural resources remaining constant, and increased demand for resources, economic theory states that as depletion approaches, prices rise. This study shows that many economic drivers (conditions that create an economic incentive for producers to act in a particular way) such as the impact of globalization, technological improvements, productivity increases, and efficient materials usage are at work simultaneously to impact minerals markets and supply. As a result of these economic drivers, the historical price trend of mineral prices3 in constant dollars has declined as demand has risen. When price is measured by the cost in human effort, the price trend also has been almost steadily downward. Although the United States economy continues its increasing mineral consumption trend, the supply of minerals has been able to keep pace. This study shows that in general supply has grown faster than demand, causing a declining trend in mineral prices.

  6. Evolution of Morphology and Crystallinity of Silica Minerals Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, H.

    2011-12-01

    Silica minerals are quite common mineral species in surface environment of the terrestrial planets. They are good indicator of terrestrial processes including hydrothermal alteration, diagenesis and soil formation. Hydrothermal quartz, metastable low temperature cristobalite and amorphous silica show characteristic morphology and crystallinity depending on their formation processes and kinetics under wide range of temperature, pressure, acidity and thermal history. In this study, silica minerals produced by acidic hydrothermal alteration related to volcanic activities and hydrothermal crystallization experiments from diatom sediment are examined with crystallographic analysis and morphologic observations. Low temperature form of cistobalite is a metastable phase and a common alteration product occured in highly acidic hydrothermal environment around fumaroles in geothermal / volcanic areas. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree of whole rock is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Detailed powder XRD analysis show that the primary diffraction peak of cristobalite composed with two or three phases with different d-spacing and FWHM by peak profile fitting analysis. Shorter d-spacing and narrower FWHM cristobalite crystallize from precursor materials with less-crystallized, longer d-spacing and wider FWHM cristobalite. Textures of hydrothermal cristobalite in altered rock shows remnant of porphylitic texture of the host rock, pyroxene-amphibole andesite. Diatom has amorphous silica shell and makes diatomite sediment. Diatomite found in less diagenetic Quarternary formation keeps amorphous silica diatom shells. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of amorphous silica diatomite sediment are carried out from 300 °C to 550 °C. Mineral composition of run products shows crystallization of cristobalite and quartz progress depending on temperature and run durations. Initial crystallization product, cristobalite grains occur as characteristic lepispheres and

  7. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2017-06-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  8. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2017-06-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH 3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH 2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  9. herbage mineral nutrition indexed as tools for rapid mineral status

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    mineral indices were calculated from chemical analysis with a view to generate relevant fertilisation recommenda- tions. Although the dry .... P, and K established in temperate climate (Blanfort ..... like rotational grazing rhythms or stocking rates.

  10. Critical mineral resources of the United States—An introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Many changes have taken place in the mineral resource sector since the publication by the U.S. Geological Survey of Professional Paper 820, “United States Mineral Resources,” which is a review of the long-term United States resource position for 65 mineral commodities or commodity groups. For example, since 1973, the United States has continued to become increasingly dependent on imports to meet its demands for an increasing number of mineral commodities. The global demand for mineral commodities is at an alltime high and is expected to continue to increase, and the development of new technologies and products has led to the use of a greater number of mineral commodities in increasing quantities to the point that, today, essentially all naturally occurring elements have several significant industrial uses. Although most mineral commodities are present in sufficient amounts in the earth to provide adequate supplies for many years to come, their availability can be affected by such factors as social constraints, politics, laws, environmental regulations, land-use restrictions, economics, and infrastructure.This volume presents updated reviews of 23 mineral commodities and commodity groups viewed as critical to a broad range of existing and emerging technologies, renewable energy, and national security. The commodities or commodity groups included are antimony, barite, beryllium, cobalt, fluorine, gallium, germanium, graphite, hafnium, indium, lithium, manganese, niobium, platinum-group elements, rare-earth elements, rhenium, selenium, tantalum, tellurium, tin, titanium, vanadium, and zirconium. All these commodities have been listed as critical and (or) strategic in one or more of the recent studies based on assessed likelihood of supply interruption and the possible cost of such a disruption to the assessor. For some of the minerals, current production is limited to only one or a few countries. For many, the United States currently has no mine production or any

  11. Mineral mining machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mc Gaw, B H

    1984-01-01

    A machine for mining minerals is patented. It is a cutter loader with a drum actuating element of the worm type equipped with a multitude of cutting teeth reinforced with tungsten carbide. A feature of the patented machine is that all of the cutting teeth and holders on the drum have the identical design. This is achieved through selecting a slant angle for the cutting teeth which is the mean between the slant angle of the conventional radial teeth and the slant angle of the advance teeth. This, in turn, is provided thanks to the corresponding slant of the holders relative to the drum and (or) the slant of the cutting part of the teeth relative to their stems. Thus, the advance teeth projecting beyond the surface of the drum on the face side and providing upper and lateral clearances have the same angle of attack as the radial teeth, that is, from 20 to 35 degrees. A series of modifications of the cutting teeth is patented. One of the designs allows the cutting tooth to occupy a varying position relative to the drum, from the conventional vertical to an inverted, axially projecting position. In the last case the tooth in the extraction process provides the upper and lateral clearances for the drum on the face side. Among the different modifications of the cutting teeth, a design is proposed which provides for the presence of a stem which is shaped like a truncated cone. This particular stem is designed for use jointly with a wedge which unfastens the teeth and is placed in a holder. The latter is completed in a transverse slot thanks to which the rear end of the stem is compressed, which simplifies replacement of a tooth. Channels are provided in the patented machine for feeding water to the worm spiral, the holders and the cutting teeth themselves in order to deal with dust.

  12. Vitamins and Minerals in Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate A to Z Health Guide Vitamins and Minerals in Kidney Disease Tweet Share Print Email Are ... you need to know. What are vitamins and minerals? Vitamins and minerals are substances your body needs ...

  13. 76 FR 44892 - Information Collection; Locatable Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Locatable Minerals AGENCY: Forest... on the extension of a currently approved information collection, Locatable Minerals-36 CFR part 228...: Comments concerning this notice should be addressed to: USDA, Forest Service, Minerals and Geology...

  14. [Vitamins and Minerals in Oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holch, Julian Walter; Michl, Marlies; Heinemann, Volker; Erickson, Nicole

    2017-06-01

    The use of vitamins and minerals to prevent cancer as well as their supportive use in oncological patients is widespread and often occurs without the knowledge of the treating physician. Beyond general recommendations with regard to a balanced and healthy diet, no evidence exists supporting the use of vitamins and minerals in the prevention of cancer. Furthermore, the diet of oncological patients should contain vitamins and minerals of the same quantity as for healthy individuals. In particular, there is currently no rationale for a high-dosage administration of antioxidants. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Numerical modeling of the impact of temperature on the behavior of minerals in the Soultz-sous-Forêts enhanced geothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ngo, Viet; Lucas, Yann; Clément, Alain; Fritz, Bertrand

    2015-04-01

    Operation of the enhanced geothermal system (EGS) requires to re-inject fluid, after heat exchange at the surface to the energy production, into the geothermal reservoir. This cold re-injected fluid can cause a strong disequilibrium with the fluid and granitic rock within the geothermal reservoir and then implies the possible dissolution/precipitation of minerals. The hydrothermal alterations include the transformation of plagioclase, biotite and K-feldspar and the precipitation of various secondary minerals. The major sealing phases observed in the main fracture zones are quartz, calcite, and clay minerals. These mineralogical transformations may modify the porosity, permeability and fluid pathways of the geothermal reservoir. In the Soultz-sous-Forêts EGS (Alsace, France), the hydraulic connection between the injection well and the production well is quite poor. Therefore, understanding the impact of changes in temperature, which are caused by the re-injected fluid, on the behavior of minerals (especially for the main newly-formed minerals such as quartz, calcite and clay minerals) is a critical preliminary step for the long-term prediction of their evolution. The approach used in the present work is typically based on a geochemical code, called THERMA, which enables to calculate the changes in equilibrium constants of all primary and secondary minerals and aqueous species as a function of temperature. Our model accounted for a wide range of different mineral groups in order to make sure a large freedom for the numerical calculations. The modeling results showed that when the temperature of geothermal reservoir is cooled down, quartz, calcite, illites, galena and pyrite have tendency towards equilibrium state, which indicates that they are precipitated under the geothermal conditions. In contrast, other minerals including plagioclase, K-feldspar and biotite remained unsaturated. These behaviors of minerals were further illustrated by the Khorzinsky stability

  16. Utilization of Mineral Wools as Alkali-Activated Material Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juho Yliniemi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mineral wools are the most common insulation materials in buildings worldwide. However, mineral wool waste is often considered unrecyclable because of its fibrous nature and low density. In this paper, rock wool (RW and glass wool (GW were studied as alkali-activated material precursors without any additional co-binders. Both mineral wools were pulverized by a vibratory disc mill in order to remove the fibrous nature of the material. The pulverized mineral wools were then alkali-activated with a sodium aluminate solution. Compressive strengths of up to 30.0 MPa and 48.7 MPa were measured for RW and GW, respectively, with high flexural strengths measured for both (20.1 MPa for RW and 13.2 MPa for GW. The resulting alkali-activated matrix was a composite-type in which partly-dissolved fibers were dispersed. In addition to the amorphous material, sodium aluminate silicate hydroxide hydrate and magnesium aluminum hydroxide carbonate phases were identified in the alkali-activated RW samples. The only crystalline phase in the GW samples was sodium aluminum silicate. The results of this study show that mineral wool is a very promising raw material for alkali activation.

  17. Fluid Inclusion Analysis of other Host Minerals besides Quartz: Application to Granite-Related Quartz-Topaz Veins and Garnet Skarns in Porphyry Copper-Gold Ore Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schlöglova, Katerina

    2018-01-01

    Fluid inclusions are the only available samples of paleo-fluids responsible for crystallization of hydrothermal minerals including ore phases. Analysis of fluid inclusions implicitly assumes that the inclusions have preserved their chemical composition since the time of their entrapment. There is, however, an increasing evidence from experimental work and analytical studies of natural samples showing that inclusions hosted in quartz – a ubiquitous host in many ore-forming systems – can experi...

  18. A call to expand regulation to all carcinogenic fibrous minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, F.; Steele, I.; Ambrosi, J.; Carbone, M.

    2013-05-01

    The regulatory term "asbestos" groups only the six fibrous minerals that were commercially used among approximately 400. The carcinogenicity of these six regulated minerals has been largely demonstrated and is related to fiber structure, fiber length/diameter ratio, and bio-persistence. From a public perception, the generic term "asbestos" refers to the fibrous minerals that cause asbestosis, mesothelioma and other cancers. However, other non-regulated fibrous minerals are potentially as dangerous as the regulatory asbestos because they share similar physical and chemical properties, epidemiological studies have demonstrated their relationship with asbestos-related diseases, and both in vitro and in vivo experiments have established the toxicity of these minerals. For example, the non-regulated asbestiform winchite and richterite minerals that contaminated the vermiculite mined from Libby, Montana, (USA) were associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis observed among the area's residents and miners. Many other examples of non-regulated carcinogenic fibrous minerals include, but are not limited to, antigorite, arfvedsonite, balangeroite, carlosturanite, erionite, fluoro-edenite, hornblende, mordenite, palygorskite, and sepiolite. To propose a regulatory definition that would provide protection from all carcinogenic fibers, we have conducted an interdisciplinary literature review to compare the characteristics of "asbestos" and of non-regulated mineral fibers that relate to carcinogenicity. We specifically studied two non-regulated fibrous minerals that are associated with asbestos-related diseases: the serpentine antigorite and the zeolite erionite. Both examples underscore the problem of regulation based on commercial, rather than scientific principles: 1) the occurrence of fibrous antigorite in materials used to pave roads has been correlated with high mesothelioma rates in New Caledonia. Antigorite was also the cause of asbestosis in Poland, and in

  19. Natural radionuclides in some romanian medicinal mineral water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botezatu, E.; Iacob, O. [Institute of Public Health, Iasi (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    Radioactive minerals occur irregularly in the bedrock, similar to other minerals and they dissolve easily in water. Bedrock contains naturally occurring radioactivity including uranium, thorium, radium and potassium. The natural radioactivity results from water passing through deposits of naturally occurring radioactive materials.Many mineral water springs are traditionally used as drinking mineral water sources in the area.During the period from 1997 to 2000, we accomplished a study that had as basic objectives the radioacty control of the drinking mineral waters according to existing standards and evaluation of doses to population by ingestion of mineral water (bottled waters commercially available for human intake and some spring waters).For this reason, we were interested in finding out the extent to which these waters can be a natural radiation source. This survey aimed at assessing the radioactive content of these waters and their contribution to the population exposure.The presented data contribute to a national database concerning the natural radioactive content of Romanian mineral waters. A hypothetical person that undergoes a cure of mineral water by ingestion, inhalation and immersion is receiving an average supplementary dose of 3 {mu}Sv over background radiation of 2,512 {mu}Sv.y{sup -1} due to all natural radiation sources in Romania. The contribution of mineral water used in therapeutic purposes to the natural irradiation of population is very slight, almost insignificant. This supports the conclusion that these spring mineral waters can be used without any restrictions for drinking or bathing / washing for medical therapy of ailing persons even other sources of exposure are also taken into account. (N.C.)

  20. [Mechanism of tritium persistence in porous media like clay minerals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Jie; Wang, Jin-Sheng; Teng, Yan-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Ni

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of tritium persistence in clay minerals, three types of clay soils (montmorillonite, kaolinite and illite) and tritiated water were used in this study to conduct the tritium sorption tests and the other related tests. Firstly, the ingredients, metal elements and heat properties of clay minerals were studied with some instrumental analysis methods, such as ICP and TG. Secondly, with a specially designed fractionation and condensation experiment, the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in the clay minerals separated from the tritium sorption tests were fractionated for investigating the tritium distributions in the different types of adsorptive waters. Thirdly, the location and configuration of tritium adsorbed into the structure of clay minerals were studied with infrared spectrometry (IR) tests. And finally, the forces and mechanisms for driving tritium into the clay minerals were analyzed on the basis of the isotope effect of tritium and the above tests. Following conclusions have been reached: (1) The main reason for tritium persistence in clay minerals is the entrance of tritium into the adsorbed water, the interlayer water and the structural water in clay minerals. The percentage of tritium distributed in these three types of adsorptive water are in the range of 13.65% - 38.71%, 0.32% - 5.96%, 1.28% - 4.37% of the total tritium used in the corresponding test, respectively. The percentages are different for different types of clay minerals. (2) Tritium adsorbed onto clay minerals are existed in the forms of the tritiated hydroxyl radical (OT) and the tritiated water molecule (HTO). Tritium mainly exists in tritiated water molecule for adsorbed water and interlayer water, and in tritiated hydroxyl radical for structural water. (3) The forces and effects driving tritium into the clay minerals may include molecular dispersion, electric charge sorption, isotope exchange and tritium isotope effect.

  1. Modeling CO2-Water-Mineral Wettability and Mineralization for Carbon Geosequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yunfeng; Tsuji, Shinya; Jia, Jihui; Tsuji, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2017-07-18

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage (CCS) is an important climate change mitigation option along with improved energy efficiency, renewable energy, and nuclear energy. CO 2 geosequestration, that is, to store CO 2 under the subsurface of Earth, is feasible because the world's sedimentary basins have high capacity and are often located in the same region of the world as emission sources. How CO 2 interacts with the connate water and minerals is the focus of this Account. There are four trapping mechanisms that keep CO 2 in the pores of subsurface rocks: (1) structural trapping, (2) residual trapping, (3) dissolution trapping, and (4) mineral trapping. The first two are dominated by capillary action, where wettability controls CO 2 and water two-phase flow in porous media. We review state-of-the-art studies on CO 2 /water/mineral wettability, which was found to depend on pressure and temperature conditions, salt concentration in aqueous solutions, mineral surface chemistry, and geometry. We then review some recent advances in mineral trapping. First, we show that it is possible to reproduce the CO 2 /water/mineral wettability at a wide range of pressures using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. As the pressure increases, CO 2 gas transforms into a supercritical fluid or liquid at ∼7.4 MPa depending on the environmental temperature. This transition leads to a substantial decrease of the interfacial tension between CO 2 and reservoir brine (or pure water). However, the wettability of CO 2 /water/rock systems depends on the type of rock surface. Recently, we investigated the contact angle of CO 2 /water/silica systems with two different silica surfaces using MD simulations. We found that contact angle increased with pressure for the hydrophobic (siloxane) surface while it was almost constant for the hydrophilic (silanol) surface, in excellent agreement with experimental observations. Furthermore, we found that the CO 2 thin films at the CO 2 -hydrophilic

  2. GHGRP Minerals Sector Industrial Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. The profiles available for download below contain detailed analyses for the Minerals industry.

  3. Infrared spectra of mineral species

    CERN Document Server

    Chukanov, Nikita V

    2014-01-01

    This book details more than 3,000 IR spectra of more than 2,000 mineral species collected during last 30 years. It features full descriptions and analytical data of each sample for which IR spectrum was obtained.

  4. (MEPE) mineralization ability in vitro

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    matrix proteins and is associated with bone and teeth mineralization. We developed .... acetic acid) and bands were visualized by dynamic integrated exposure using .... approximate agreement with the expected molecular size. Purification of.

  5. VT Mineral Resources - MRDS Extract

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) MRDSVT is an extract from the Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS) covering the State of Vermont only. MRDS database contains the records provided...

  6. Mineral resources potential of Antarctica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Splettstoesser, John F; Dreschhoff, Gisela A. M

    1990-01-01

    .... This volume of the Antarctic Research Series results from an attempt to assemble a summary of current factual knowledge and scientific data related to issues of mineral resources in Antarctica...

  7. Hydrokinesitherapy in thermal mineral water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendulić-Slivar Senka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of clients in health spa resorts entails various forms of hydrotherapy. Due to specific properties of water, especially thermal mineral waters, hydrokinesitherapy has a positive effect on the locomotor system, aerobic capabilities of organism and overall quality of human life. The effects of use of water in movement therapy are related to the physical and chemical properties of water. The application of hydrotherapy entails precautionary measures, with an individual approach in assessment and prescription. The benefits of treatment in thermal mineral water should be emphasized and protected, as all thermal mineral waters differ in composition. All physical properties of water are more pronounced in thermal mineral waters due to its mineralisation, hence its therapeutical efficiency is greater, as well.

  8. BLM Colorado Federal Mineral Estate

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Shapefile Format –This Federal Mineral Estate (Subsurface) dataset is a result of combining data sets that were collected at each BLM Colorado Field Office and using...

  9. Mineral resources of Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kušnír Imrich

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Vietnam je bohatý na nerastné suroviny, ktoré sa nachádzajú prevažne na severe krajiny. Ložiská bauxitov, fosfátov, vzácnych zemín (REE, majú svetový význam. Ale i zásoby celého radu ïalších surovín (ropy, uhlia, zlata, železných rúd, chromitu, cínu, ilmenitu, medi, grafitu, atï. sú významné, ekonomicky ažite¾né a ich potenciál je obrovský. Za uvedené nerastné bohatstvo je „zodpovednᓠrozmanitá geologická stavba krajiny. Taktiež i morfológia a klíma (vlhká, tropická prispeli ku vytvoreniu niektorých ložísk (bauxity v krasových priehlbniach, atï.. Súèasná produkcia, okrem ropy (3,5 Mt/rok, zahròuje: 10,7 Mt uhlia, 3,5 Mt chromitu, asi 1 000 kg zlata, grafitu, kaolínu a mnohé iné minerály. Napriek tomu, je banícky priemysel v porovnaní so surovinovou základòou slabo vyvinutý. K jeho rozvoju urèite prispeje i úèas zahranièných spoloèností, odnedávna prítomných pri prieskume a ažbe surovín urèených pre export. Okrem struèného úvodu do geológie krajiny, obsahuje tento èlánok krátky popis nerastného bohatstva Vietnamu.

  10. Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy study of mineral-organic matter associations in pasture soil clay fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunmei; Dynes, James J; Wang, Jian; Karunakaran, Chithra; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-06-17

    There is a growing acceptance that associations with soil minerals may be the most important overarching stabilization mechanism for soil organic matter. However, direct investigation of organo-mineral associations has been hampered by a lack of methods that can simultaneously characterize organic matter (OM) and soil minerals. In this study, STXM-NEXAFS spectroscopy at the C 1s, Ca 2p, Fe 2p, Al 1s, and Si 1s edges was used to investigate C associations with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si species in soil clay fractions from an upland pasture hillslope. Bulk techniques including C and N NEXAFS, Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy, and XRD were applied to provide additional information. Results demonstrated that C was associated with Ca, Fe, Al, and Si with no separate phase in soil clay particles. In soil clay particles, the pervasive C forms were aromatic C, carboxyl C, and polysaccharides with the relative abundance of carboxyl C and polysaccharides varying spatially at the submicrometer scale. Only limited regions in the soil clay particles had aliphatic C. Good C-Ca spatial correlations were found for soil clay particles with no CaCO3, suggesting a strong role of Ca in organo-mineral assemblage formation. Fe EXAFS showed that about 50% of the total Fe in soils was contained in Fe oxides, whereas Fe-bearing aluminosilicates (vermiculite and Illite) accounted for another 50%. Fe oxides in the soil were mainly crystalline goethite and hematite, with lesser amounts of poorly crystalline ferrihydrite. XRD revealed that soil clay aluminosilicates were hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, Illite, and kaolinite. C showed similar correlation with Fe to Al and Si, implying a similar association of Fe oxides and aluminosilicates with organic matter in organo-mineral associations. These direct microscopic determinations can help improve understanding of organo-mineral interactions in soils.

  11. Characterization of fluid inclusions from mineralized pegmatites of the Damara Belt, Namibia: insight into late-stage fluid evolution and implications for mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Luisa; Kinnaird, Judith Ann; Nex, Paul Andrew Martin; Erasmus, Rudolph Marthinus; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef

    2018-05-01

    Mineralized NYF and LCT pegmatites occur throughout the northeast-trending Neoproterozoic Damara Belt, Namibia. Mineralization in the pegmatites varies geographically, from the northeast, where they are enriched in Li-Be, to the southwest, where they also contain notable Sn and U. Similar fluid inclusion populations occur throughout the pegmatites, regardless of their respective metal enrichments, and primary fluid inclusion textures were destroyed by continued fluid activity. Pseudosecondary to secondary inclusions are aqueo-carbonic, carbonic, and aqueous in composition, and have been divided into five types. The earliest populations are saline (>26.3 eq. wt.% NaCl), homogenizing at temperatures in excess of 300 °C. Their carbonic phase is composed of CO2, with minor CH4, and micro-elemental mapping indicates they contain trace metals, including Ca, Fe, Zn, Cu, and K. Type 3 inclusions formed later, homogenize at 325 °C, and are less saline, with a carbonic phase composed of CO2. Type 4 carbonic inclusions are composed of pure CO2, and represent the latest stages of fluid evolution, while Type 5 aqueous inclusions are believed to be unrelated to the crystallization of the pegmatites, and rather the result of regional Cretaceous magmatism, or the ingress of meteoric water. The similarities in fluid inclusion populations observed in the pegmatites suggest that differences in mineralization were driven by magma composition rather than fluid activity alone, however saline fluids facilitated the enrichment and deposition of metals during the late stages of crystallization. Furthermore, the similarities between fluid inclusion populations in different pegmatites suggests they share a similar fluid evolution.

  12. Inhalation hazards to underground miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    Massive radon-daughter exposures to miners have caused lung cancer for centuries. Exposures in US uranium mines have been regulated for 15 years and, during this time, relatively few miners have been exposed to over 4 WLM year. Present trends are toward lower annual exposures and shorter working lives. The net effect has been to hold cumulative lifetime exposures well below the level at which statistically significant excess risk has been shown

  13. Sea urchin tooth mineralization: Calcite present early in the aboral plumula

    OpenAIRE

    Stock, Stuart R.; Veis, Arthur; Xiao, Xianghui; Almer, Jonathan D.; Dorvee, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    In both vertebrate bone, containing carbonated hydroxyapatite as the mineral phase, and in invertebrate hard tissue comprised of calcium carbonate, a popular view is that the mineral phase develops from a long-lived amorphous precursor which later transforms into crystal form. Important questions linked to this popular view are: When and where is the crystallized material formed, and is amorphous solid added subsequently to the crystalline substrate? Sea urchin teeth, in which the earliest mi...

  14. Lung Cancer in uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chundi; Fan Jixiong; Wang Liuhu; Huang Yiehan; Nie Guanghua

    1987-01-01

    This paper analyese the clinical data of 39 uranium miners with lung cancer and of 20 patients with lung cancer who have not been exposed to uranium as control. The age of uranium miners with lung cancer was 36∼61 with an average of 48.8, nine years earlier than that of the control group (57.3). In the uranium miner patients the right lung was more susceptible to cancer than the left, the ratio being 2.5:1. However, in the control group the right lung had an equal incidence of cancer as the left lung. The relative frequency of small cell anaplastic carcinoma in uranium miner was higher than that in the control group. In the miner patients the mean occupation history was 11.1 ± 5.2 years; the exposure dose to radon and its daughters in 50% patients was 0.504J(120 WLM). The etiologic factor of lung cancer in uranium miners is strongly attributed, in addition to smoking, to the exposure to radon and its daughters in uranium mines

  15. Mineral resources of Peru's ancient societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    Northern Peru has an exceptionally rich archaeological heritage that includes metalwork, ceramics and textiles. The success of at least a half-dozen pre-Columbian societies dating back 3,000 years and subsequent Spanish colonization in the 1400s has rested on the effective use of northern Peru's abundant resources. In the summer of 2000, my son Matt and I learned about that connection firsthand by volunteering at the Santa Rita B archaeological site in the Chao Valley near Trujillo in northern Peru. Riding donkey-back through the Andes and talking with local people, we got our hands dirty in the rich archaeology and geology of the area. We were able to correlate mineral occurrences to their various roles in society - opening a window into the region's fascinating past. From construction to metallurgy, pre-Columbian societies flourished and advanced because of their understanding and use of the available mineral resources.

  16. Thermodynamics of Minerals Stable Near the Earth's Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    OAK B262 Research and Education Activities We are working on developing calorimetric techniques for sulfide minerals. We have completed calorimetric studies of (Na, K, H3O) jarosites, of Na and K jarosite -alunite solid solutions, and of Cr6+ - containing jarosites. We are now working on phases containing As and Pb. These studies are important to issues of heavy metal pollution in the environment. A number of postdocs, graduate students, and undergrads have participated in the research. We have active collaboration with Dirk Baron, faculty at California State University, Bakersfield. In a collaboration with Peter Burns, Notre Dame University, we are working on thermochemistry of U6+ minerals. Navrotsky has participated in a number of national workshops that are helping to define the interfaces between nanotechnology and earth/environmental science. Major Findings Our first finding on uranyl minerals shows that studtite, a phase containing structural peroxide ion, is thermodynamically unstable in the absence of a source of aqueous peroxide ion but is thermodynamically stable in contact with a solution containing peroxide concentrations expected for the radiolysis of water in contact with spent nuclear fuel. This work is in press in Science. We have a consistent thermodynamic data set for the (Na, K, H3O) (Al, Fe) jarosite, alunite minerals and for Cr6+ substituting for S6+ in jarosite. The latter phases represent one of the few solid sinks for trapping toxic Cr6+ in groundwater. Contributions within Discipline Better understanding of thermodynamic driving for and constraints on geochemical and environmental processes

  17. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Europe and Central Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  18. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Asia and the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each coun