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Sample records for mimicking metastatic brain

  1. Invasive Aspergillosis Mimicking Metastatic Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel J. E. G. W. Vanfleteren

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In a patient with a medical history of cancer, the most probable diagnosis of an 18FDG-avid pulmonary mass combined with intracranial abnormalities on brain imaging is metastasized cancer. However, sometimes a differential diagnosis with an infectious cause such as aspergillosis can be very challenging as both cancer and infection are sometimes difficult to distinguish. Pulmonary aspergillosis can present as an infectious pseudotumour with clinical and imaging characteristics mimicking lung cancer. Even in the presence of cerebral lesions, radiological appearance of abscesses can look like brain metastasis. These similarities can cause significant diagnostic difficulties with a subsequent therapeutic delay and a potential adverse outcome. Awareness of this infectious disease that can mimic lung cancer, even in an immunocompetent patient, is important. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman with pulmonary aspergillosis disseminated to the brain mimicking metastatic lung cancer.

  2. Central skeletal sarcoidosis mimicking metastatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmi, Danit; Smith, Stacy; Mulligan, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease that histologically typically shows non-caseating granulomas. The most common radiologic finding is hilar and mediastinal adenopathy. Patients with widely disseminated disease may show involvement of the peripheral appendicular skeleton in 1-13% of such cases. A primary skeletal presentation without other manifestations typical of the disease is rare. We present a case of sarcoidosis in a middle-aged Caucasian man in whom the disease presented with widespread lytic lesions in the axial skeleton and long bones, mimicking metastatic disease. There was no involvement of the peripheral skeleton, skin or lungs. (orig.)

  3. Thoracoabdominal actinomycosis mimicking metastatic disease: case report

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    Ros, L.H.; Villacampa, V.M.; Torres, G.M.; Ros, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative infection with bacteria of the Actinomycetaceae family, characterized by the formation of abundant granular tissue and multiple abscesses. It is a rare entity, and clinical and radiological findings are similar to those in other inflammatory and in neoplastic processes. Actinomycosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis in high-risk patients with predisposing factors, such as alcoholism, poor oral hygiene, maxillofacial trauma, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, steroid ingestion or immunodeficiency, and in patients in whom the disease history does not correlate with widespread metastatic involvement. Early diagnosis is important, to prevent disease progression and unnecessary surgery, since the response to drug treatment is very good. We present a case of diffuse actinomycosis involving multiple organs (liver, kidneys, colon, and lungs) that simulated metastatic disease on radiography and computed tomography (CT). (author)

  4. Thoracoabdominal actinomycosis mimicking metastatic disease: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ros, L.H.; Villacampa, V.M. [Hospital Miguel Servet, Dept. of Radiology, Zaragoza (Spain); Torres, G.M. [Univ. of Florida, Dept. of Radiology, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Ros, P.R. [Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative infection with bacteria of the Actinomycetaceae family, characterized by the formation of abundant granular tissue and multiple abscesses. It is a rare entity, and clinical and radiological findings are similar to those in other inflammatory and in neoplastic processes. Actinomycosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis in high-risk patients with predisposing factors, such as alcoholism, poor oral hygiene, maxillofacial trauma, tuberculosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, steroid ingestion or immunodeficiency, and in patients in whom the disease history does not correlate with widespread metastatic involvement. Early diagnosis is important, to prevent disease progression and unnecessary surgery, since the response to drug treatment is very good. We present a case of diffuse actinomycosis involving multiple organs (liver, kidneys, colon, and lungs) that simulated metastatic disease on radiography and computed tomography (CT). (author)

  5. Treatment of metastatic brain lesion

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    A. M. Zaytsev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Increasing survival in patients with secondary brain damage, and identifying the factors of favorable and adverse prognosis.Material and method. In P. A. Hertsen Moscow Oncology Research Institute from 2007 to 2013 there were treated 268 patients with brain metastases. The mean age was 55.8 years (from 24 to 81 years. Metastases of colorectal cancer identified in 7.8%, cases of lung cancer in 34%, melanoma 9.3 %, breast cancer in 26%, kidney cancer in 11%, with non-identified primary tumor in 4.5%, other tumors accounted for 6.7%. Solitary metastasis was diagnosed in 164 (61,19% patients, oligometastasis (2-3 - 72 (26,87% patients with polymetastasis (more than 3 – 32 (11,94% patients. In 106 (39,55% of patients with brain metastases it was the only manifestation of the generalization process. To control the radical removal of the tumor in 93 (34,7% patients we used the method of fluorescence navigation (FN with the drug Alasens. In 66 (24,6% patients intraoperatively was held a session of photodynamic therapy (PDT. In 212 (79,1% cases, the removal of metastasis performed totally, 55 (20,9% patients stated Subtotal removal.Results. The observation period for the patients ranged from 3 to 79 months. Survival median among the entire group of patients with metastatic brain lesion was 12 months. Overall survival was significantly dependent on RPA class, the volume of postoperative treatment, histological type of primary tumor, number of intracerebral metastases and the timing of the relapse-free period.Conclusions. Factors that affects the overall survival are the features of the histology of the primary lesion, multiplicity of metastatic lesions, RPA class and the synchronous nature of the metastasis. The median of overall survival of patients who did not receive after surgical treatment of a particular type of therapy was only 4 months. If to use the combined treatment (surgical treatment with the irradiation of the whole brain median

  6. A Unique Case of Muscle Invasive Metastatic Breast Cancer Mimicking Myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-28

    TYPE 08/ 03/20 17 Publ ication/Journal 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A unique case of muscle-invasive metastatic breast cancer mimicking myositis 6...Rev. 8/98) Prescnbed by ANSI Std Z39. 18 Adobe Profes11on11 7.0 Title: A Unique Case of M uscle-Invasive Metastatic Breast Cancer M imicking...an 84-year-old female who presented with neck swelling and upper airway obstruction due to metastatic breast cancer invading the sternocleidomastoid

  7. Metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the tibia radiologically mimicking osteosarcoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cunningham, Laurence Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 73-year-old lady with transitional cell carcinoma and no evidence of metastatic disease presenting with gradual weight loss, pretibial swelling and painful weightbearing. Investigations revealed a lesion of the right tibial diaphysis. The radiological and clinical appearance was that of primary osteosarcoma. Biopsy results revealed metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the tibia. Intramedullary nailing was performed which relieved pain on weightbearing. The patient declined radiotherapy and was started on a palliative care regimen. This case illustrates the importance of histological diagnosis in the treatment of diaphyseal lesions.

  8. Stereotactic irradiation for metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Ryutaro

    2017-01-01

    First, this paper reviewed the latest findings of stereotactic irradiation (STI) for metastatic brain tumors. Then, it described the results of randomized controlled trials for single or a few (2-4) metastasis in the following comparison tests: (1) comparison between whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone group and (WBRT + STI) group, (2) comparison between STI alone group and (STI + WBRT) group, (3) comparison between STI alone group and (tumorectomy + WBRT) group, (4) comparison between (STI + WBRT) group and (tumorectomy + WBRT) group, and (5) between (tumorectomy + WBRT) group and (tumorectomy + STI) group. Among these, STI alone without WBRT has obtained a certain consensus. Against multiple metastatic brain tumors of 5 or more, when considering cognitive impairment and QOL loss by adding WBRT, it is general consensus that STI alone may be sufficient. At the authors' institution, cyber knife (CK) was introduced in 2008 and nearly 300 stereotactic radiotherapy for metastatic brain tumors have been performed annually. By adopting a robot arm and development of a lesion tracking system, the positional correction against the deviation of the bone margin of the skull is guaranteed in real time to ensure accuracy during irradiation, and hypofractionated stereotactic irradiation becomes easier. (A.O.)

  9. Metastatic Carcinoma Occurring in a Gastric Hyperplastic Polyp Mimicking Primary Gastric Cancer: The First Reported Case

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    Gabriel M. Groisman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperplastic polyps of the stomach are regarded as benign. However, in rare cases they may contain incipient primary carcinomas. To our knowledge, breast carcinoma metastatic to a gastric hyperplastic polyp has not yet been reported. We describe the case of a 69-year-old woman to whom a gastric polyp was endoscopically excised. The patient had previously undergone a right mastectomy for mixed, invasive ductal and lobular carcinoma 5 years earlier. Histological sections from the gastric lesion showed typical features of hyperplastic polyp with foci of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma including signet ring cells infiltrating the lamina propria. The histologic findings were consistent with a primary gastric cancer. However, the carcinoma cells were immunopositive for estrogen and progesterone receptors and GATA3 and negative for CDX2, Hep Par 1, and MUC5AC. E-cadherin showed membranous reactivity in some of the carcinoma cells while in others it was negative. Accordingly, metastatic mixed, lobular and ductal breast carcinoma was diagnosed. We conclude that metastatic adenocarcinoma mimicking primary gastric cancer can be rarely encountered in hyperplastic gastric polyps.

  10. A case of pulmonary Serratia marcescens granuloma radiologically mimicking metastatic malignancy and tuberculosis infection.

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    Das, Joyutpal; Layton, Benjamin; Lamb, Harriet; Sinnott, Nicola; Leahy, Bernard C

    2015-11-01

    Serratia marcescens is a saprophytic gram-negative bacillus capable of causing a wide range of infections. A 57-year-old female was admitted to our hospital for four weeks with community acquired pneumonia. A chest x-ray, six weeks after discharge, demonstrated multiple, bilateral 'cannon ball'-like opacities and mediastinal lymphadenopathy which were highly suspicious of disseminated malignancy or tuberculosis. The only symptom that this patient had was a productive cough. She had multiple commodities, but no specific immunodeficiency disorder. Interestingly, her sputum and bronchial washing samples grew S. marcescens. The computed tomography-guided lung biopsy demonstrated necrotic granulomatous changes. There was no pathological evidence of tuberculosis or fungal infection, malignancy or vasculitis. There are only a handful of reported cases of Serratia granulomas. Thus, we are reporting a rare instance of pulmonary Serratia marcescens granuloma radiologically mimicking metastatic malignancy and tuberculosis infection. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Systemic Cystic Angiomatosis Mimicking Metastatic Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Vivek Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic cystic angiomatosis is a rare benign disorder due to the maldeveloped vascular and lymphatic system with less than 50 cases reported in literature so far. We report here a case of systemic cystic angiomatosis (SCA with multisystem involvement affecting the neck, thyroid, thoracic cavity, and skeletal system. The patient initially presented in her 4th decade of life with isolated lymphangioma in the neck requiring surgery. However, she experienced full-blown manifestations of SCA in her 6th decade which closely mimicked metastatic cancer. The diagnosis of SCA could only be established after multiple biopsies. The radiological and histological features of SCA with its course over 31 years in this patient have been described.

  12. Peritumoral edema associated with metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirotani, Toshiki; Takiguchi, Hiroshi; Shima, Katsuji; Chigasaki, Hiroo; Tajima, Atsushi; Watanabe, Satoru.

    1992-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) examinations were performed in 94 lesions of 50 patients with metastatic brain tumors. Peritumoral edema (A E ) and tumor area (A T ) were measured using the planimetric method on the CT scan films that demonstrated maximum size of the tumor. Then, the volume of the peritumoral edema (V E ) and the surface area of the tumor (S T ) were claculated from these data. Eighty-three brain lesions from lung cancers were subdivided into 49 adenocarcinomas, 11 squamous cell carcinomas, 16 small cell carcinomas and 7 large cell carcinomas. Eleven metastatic tumors from breast cancers were all adenocarcinomas. There was statistical correlation between the surface area of tumor and the volume of the peritumoral edema for the adenocarcinoma (r=0.4043, p E /S T ratios in small cell carcinomas were smaller then those in non-small cell carcinomas, when the volume of the tumor was larger than 10 mm 3 . Accordingly, we suggest that the volume of the peritumoral edema in the small cell carcinoma is generally smaller than that in others. (author)

  13. Metastatic breast cancer to the liver with hepatoid features and Hep Par 1 antibody positive mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Affleck, Authur; Lyman, William B; Jacobs, W Carl; Livasy, Chad A; Martinie, John B; Iannitti, David A; Vrochides, Dionisios

    2018-05-09

    The hepatocyte paraffin 1 antibody (Hep Par 1) has a high positive predictive value for differentiating hepatocellular carcinoma from cholangiocarcinoma and metastatic carcinoma. 1 We report a case of metastatic breast cancer to the liver with hepatoid histology and strong positive staining for Hep Par 1 mimicking hepatocellular carcinoma. To our knowledge, primary breast carcinoma staining Hep Par 1 positive has not been reported in the setting of hepatic metastasis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Brain abscess mimicking brain metastasis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khullar, P.; Datta, N.R.; Wahi, I.K.; Kataria, S.

    2016-01-01

    61 year old female presented with chief complaints of headache for 30 days, fever for 10 days, altered behavior for 10 days and convulsion for 2 days. She was diagnosed and treated as a case of carcinoma of left breast 5 years ago. MRI brain showed a lobulated lesion in the left frontal lobe. She came to our hospital for whole brain radiation as a diagnosed case of carcinoma of breast with brain metastasis. Review of MRI brain scan, revealed metastasis or query infective pathology. MR spectroscopy of the lesion revealed choline: creatinine and choline: NAA (N-Acety- laspartate) ratios of 1.6 and 1.5 respectively with the presence of lactate within the lesion suggestive of infective pathology. She underwent left fronto temporal craniotomy and evacuation of abscess and subdural empyema. Gram stain showed gram positive cocci. After 1 month of evacuation and treatment she was fine. This case suggested a note of caution in every case of a rapidly evolving space-occupying lesion independent of the patient’s previous history

  15. Brain abscess mimicking brain metastasis in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khullar, Pooja; Datta, Niloy R; Wahi, Inderjeet Kaur; Kataria, Sabeena

    2016-03-01

    61 year old female presented with chief complaints of headache for 30 days, fever for 10 days, altered behavior for 10 days and convulsion for 2 days. She was diagnosed and treated as a case of carcinoma of left breast 5 years ago. MRI brain showed a lobulated lesion in the left frontal lobe. She came to our hospital for whole brain radiation as a diagnosed case of carcinoma of breast with brain metastasis. Review of MRI brain scan, revealed metastasis or query infective pathology. MR spectroscopy of the lesion revealed choline: creatinine and choline: NAA (N-Acetylaspartate) ratios of ∼1.6 and 1.5 respectively with the presence of lactate within the lesion suggestive of infective pathology. She underwent left fronto temporal craniotomy and evacuation of abscess and subdural empyema. Gram stain showed gram positive cocci. After 1 month of evacuation and treatment she was fine. This case suggested a note of caution in every case of a rapidly evolving space-occupying lesion independent of the patient's previous history. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion mimicking a metastatic lymph node in the retropharyngeal space: A case report

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    Kim, Jae Min; Kim, Jin Na; Kim, Se Hoon; Choi, Eun Chang [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The superior cervical sympathetic ganglion, the largest and most cranial of the three cervical sympathetic ganglia, transfers sympathetic signals to specific targets on the head and neck. This ganglion is located just lateral to the retropharyngeal space along the medial margin of the carotid sheath. Located thus, an enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion can mimic a metastatic lymph node in the retropharyngeal space of the suprahyoid neck in head and neck cancer patients. However, this is often disregarded by radiologists due to lack of interest in its anatomic location. We present a case of an enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion mimicking a retropharyngeal metastatic lymph node in a 42-year-old man with oral tongue cancer.

  17. Metastatic Gastric Linitis Plastica from Bladder Cancer Mimicking a Primary Gastric Carcinoma: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Won Sun; Chung, Dong Jin; Lee, Jae Mun; Byun, Jae Ho; Hahn, Seong Tae

    2009-01-01

    Primary gastric carcinoma is the most common cause of linitis plastica. Less frequently, metastatic gastric cancer from the breast, omental metastases and non-Hodgkin lymphoma involving the stomach have been reported to show similar radiographic findings as for linitis plastica. A metastatic gastric cancer from bladder cancer is extremely rare. We present an unusual case, the first to our knowledge, of gastric linitis plastica that resulted from a metastatic urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

  18. Asymptomatic brain metastases in patients with cutaneous metastatic malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Schmidt, Henrik; Asmussen, Jon T

    2013-01-01

    -enhanced CT scan of the brain before the start of interleukin-2 (IL-2)-based immunotherapy. Among the 697 patients, 80 had asymptomatic brain metastases (12%). Patients' characteristics did not differ significantly between groups with and without brain metastases. Patients received systemic treatment (IL-2......The aim of the study was to identify the frequency of asymptomatic brain metastases detected by computed tomography (CT) scans in patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma referred to first-line systemic treatment. Between 1995 and 2009, 697 Danish patients were screened with a contrast......-based or cytotoxic chemotherapy), local treatment (stereotactic radiotherapy, whole-brain radiotherapy or surgery), or best supportive care only. The survival was significantly shorter for patients with asymptomatic brain metastases compared with patients without brain metastases (P...

  19. Urothelial-Type adenocarcinoma of the prostate mimicking metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma

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    Brian P. Adley

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenocarcinoma arising in urinary bladder or prostatic urethra is uncommon. When they occur, the tumor can be mistaken for metastatic lesions, especially from the colon. Here we report the fifth case of a primary urothelial-type adenocarcinoma arising in the prostate which showed enteric differentiation. The patient was a 55 year-old male whose prostatic needle core biopsy showed a high grade adenocarcinoma which was initially thought to be metastatic colon cancer. A follow-up colonoscopy was unremarkable. Subsequent prostatectomy revealed a high grade adenocarcinoma which was positive for cytokeratins 7 and 20, carcinoembryonic antigen, CDX2, and high molecular weight cytokeratin, and negative for prostate specific antigen, prostate specific acid phosphatase and AMACR. A diagnosis of urothelial-type adenocarcinoma of the prostate was rendered. We review the literature regarding this entity, and discuss the differential diagnosis, emphasizing utility of immunohistochemistry in making the diagnosis. Finally, we speculate on the behavior of these rare tumors.

  20. Local recurrence of metastatic brain tumor after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoura, Nobusada; Yamada, Ryoji; Okamoto, Koichiro; Nakamura, Osamu; Shitara, Nobuyuki; Karasawa, Katsuyuki

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed factors associated with the local recurrence of brain metastases after surgery. Forty-seven patients with 67 metastatic brain tumors underwent surgery between 1994 and 2001. The survival time in the ''no recurrence'' group (34.7 months) was significantly longer than that in the recurrence group (21.9 months) (p=0.0008; log rank test). The factors affecting the local recurrence of brain metastases after surgery were as follows: cyst (p=0.0156), dural invasion (p=0.0029) of tumors, failure to totally remove tumors (p=0.0040), and lack of post-surgical irradiation (p<0.0001). Sex, age, tumor histology, tumor size, pre-surgical radiation, dose (≥45 vs <45, ≥50 vs <50 Gy) and the method (local vs whole brain) of post-surgical radiation did not affect the local recurrence rate of brain metastases after surgery. To avoid early recurrences of metastatic brain tumors, the factors associated with local recurrence should be considered in providing optimal treatment of tumors by surgery. (author)

  1. Gamma knife radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer

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    Serizawa, Toru; Ono, Junichi; Iuchi, Toshihiko [Chiba Cardiovascular Center, Ichihara (Japan). Chiba Cancer Center] (and others)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the effectiveness of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) alone for metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer. Two hundred thirty-one consecutive patients with metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer filling the following 4 criteria were analyzed for this study; no prior brain tumor treatment, 25 or fewer lesions, a maximum 5 tumors with diameter of 2 cm or more, no surgically inaccessible tumor 3 cm or greater in diameter. According to the same treatment protocol, large tumors ({>=} 3 cm) were surgically removed and all the other small lesions (<3 cm) were treated with GKS. New lesions were treated with repeated GKS. The tumor-progression-free, overall, neurological, lowered-QOL (quality of life)-free and new-lesion-free survivals were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. The poor prognostic factors for each survival were also analyzed with the Cox's proportional hazard model. The tumor control rate at 1 year was 96.5%. The estimated median overall survival time was 7.7 months. The first-year survival rates were 83.0% in neurological survival and 76.0% in lowered-QOL-free survival. The new-lesion-free survival at 1 year was 27.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed significant poor prognostic factors for neurological and lowered-QOL-free survivals were carcinomatous meningitis and >10 brain lesions. This study suggests the results of GKS for metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer are quite satisfactory considering prevention of neurological death and maintenance of QOL. But cases with carcinomatous meningitis and/or >10 brain lesions are not good candidates for GKS alone. (author)

  2. Reactive Hypertrophy of an Accessory Spleen Mimicking Tumour Recurrence of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Christin Tjaden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo occurrence of an accessory spleen after splenectomy is worth noting for two reasons. First, it is known that splenectomy can cause reactive hypertrophy of initially inactive and macroscopically invisible splenic tissue. Second, it can mimic tumour recurrence in situations in which splenectomy has been performed for oncological reasons. This might cause difficulties in differential diagnosis and the clinical decision for reoperation. We report the case of a patient with suspected recurrence of renal cell carcinoma after total pancreatectomy and splenectomy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma, which finally revealed an accessory spleen as the morphological correlate of the newly diagnosed mass in the left retroperitoneum.

  3. Colloid Carcinoma of the Extrahepatic Biliary Tract with Metastatic Lymphadenopathy Mimicking Cystic Neoplasm: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Na Yeon; Park, Beom Jin; Sung, Deuk Jae; Kim, Min Ju; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Dong Sik; Lee, Jeong Hyeon

    2013-01-01

    The patient is a previously healthy 52-year-old woman who presented with dyspepsia for two months. Multiple imaging modalities including ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bile duct dilatation with an obstructive lesion of the distal extrahepatic biliary duct (EHD) as well as two masses in the peripancreatic area. The peripancreatic masses appeared cystic with posterior acoustic enhancement on ultrasound, low density on CT imaging, and high signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI. The lesion in the distal EHD exhibited similar characteristics on CT and MRI. A Whipple procedure was performed and histological specimens showed malignant cells with large mucin pools that was consistent with a diagnosis of colloid carcinoma of the EHD with metastatic lymphadenopathies. Colloid carcinoma, also called mucinous carcinoma, is classified as a histologic variant of adenocarcinoma. Because the colloid carcinoma of the biliary tree is exceedingly rare, the imaging characteristics and the clinical features of colloid carcinoma remain relatively unknown. We report a case of colloid carcinoma of the common bile duct and its accompanied metastatic lymphadenopathies with characteristic imaging findings reflecting abundant intratumoral mucin pools

  4. Radiological features of superomedial iliac insufficiency fractures: a possible mimicker of metastatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, Andrea; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Rafii, Mahvash; Lax, Allison

    2009-01-01

    Pelvic insufficiency fractures are common in elderly patients. Because both osteoporosis and metastatic disease occur in similar patient populations, insufficiency fractures may be mistaken for metastatic foci. Although the ilium is not an uncommon location for metastases, insufficiency fractures rarely involve the ilium. The radiological features of insufficiency fractures adjacent to the sacroiliac joint (superomedial ilium) have not been well described. We describe the computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging findings of these rare fractures. Six patients (five female, one male; mean age 66 years, age range 47-83 years) with iliac insufficiency fractures adjacent to the sacroiliac joint were identified following retrospective review of a clinical database. Imaging studies, including CT (n = 4), MR (n = 3), and PET (n = 2) were reviewed by two radiologists. Tissue biopsy result was available in one patient. CT demonstrated subtle fracture lucency (n = 2) or linear sclerosis (n = 3) adjacent to the sacroiliac joint; MR marrow changes adjacent to the sacroiliac joint demonstrated a low T1, high T2 signal intensity line (n = 2), or a low T1 and low T2 signal intensity line (n = 1). Fractures were fluorodeoxyglucose avid (n = 2) with average SUV max 2.2. Iliac fractures were bilateral in three patients; additional pelvic insufficiency fractures were present in one patient. In one patient, CT-guided biopsy showed no evidence of malignancy. Recognition of the radiological characteristics of iliac insufficiency fractures is important in order to distinguish them from malignancy. The presence of additional pelvic fractures in characteristic locations in the setting of osteoporosis may help to confirm the diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Radiological features of superomedial iliac insufficiency fractures: a possible mimicker of metastatic disease

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    Donovan, Andrea; Schweitzer, Mark E. [NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States); Rafii, Mahvash [New York, NY (United States); Lax, Allison [Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Pelvic insufficiency fractures are common in elderly patients. Because both osteoporosis and metastatic disease occur in similar patient populations, insufficiency fractures may be mistaken for metastatic foci. Although the ilium is not an uncommon location for metastases, insufficiency fractures rarely involve the ilium. The radiological features of insufficiency fractures adjacent to the sacroiliac joint (superomedial ilium) have not been well described. We describe the computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging findings of these rare fractures. Six patients (five female, one male; mean age 66 years, age range 47-83 years) with iliac insufficiency fractures adjacent to the sacroiliac joint were identified following retrospective review of a clinical database. Imaging studies, including CT (n = 4), MR (n = 3), and PET (n = 2) were reviewed by two radiologists. Tissue biopsy result was available in one patient. CT demonstrated subtle fracture lucency (n = 2) or linear sclerosis (n = 3) adjacent to the sacroiliac joint; MR marrow changes adjacent to the sacroiliac joint demonstrated a low T1, high T2 signal intensity line (n = 2), or a low T1 and low T2 signal intensity line (n = 1). Fractures were fluorodeoxyglucose avid (n = 2) with average SUV{sub max} 2.2. Iliac fractures were bilateral in three patients; additional pelvic insufficiency fractures were present in one patient. In one patient, CT-guided biopsy showed no evidence of malignancy. Recognition of the radiological characteristics of iliac insufficiency fractures is important in order to distinguish them from malignancy. The presence of additional pelvic fractures in characteristic locations in the setting of osteoporosis may help to confirm the diagnosis. (orig.)

  6. Brain abscess mimicking lung cancer metastases; a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Michiko; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Fuchimoto, Yasuko; Ono, Katsuichiro; Ozaki, Shinji; Kimura, Fumiaki; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2013-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman came to us because of staggering, fever, dysarthria, and appetite loss. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed multiple masses with surrounding edema. Chest X-ray and computed tomography demonstrated a mass-like lesion in the left lung and left pleural effusion. Lung cancer and multiple brain metastases were suspected. However, the brain lesions demonstrated a high intensity through diffusion-weighted MRI. The finding was an important key to differentiate brain abscesses from lung cancer metastases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Utility and limitation of radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Kota; Kiya, Katsuzo; Satoh, Hideki; Mizoue, Tatsuya; Matsushige, Toshinori; Araki, Hayato; Akimitsu, Tomohide

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility and limitations of radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions, and to compare the clinical results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with those of whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in 45 patients with metastatic brain tumors. The patients were divided into two groups: the SRS group (22 patients) and the WBRT group (23 patients). Mean survival was not significantly different between the two groups. However, in patients with 6 or more lesions, both survival time and recurrence-free time in the SRS group were inferior to those in the WBRT group. The main complication in the SRS group was perifocal edema, while dementia was seen in the WBRT group. The bedridden period was longer in the WBRT group than in the SRS group. Death caused by brain lesions was rare in both groups. From these results, SRS preserves high quality of life longer than WBRT, but SRS should be cautiously used in patients with 6 or more lesions. (author)

  8. Toxoplasmic Lymphadenitis Mimicking a Metastatic Thyroid Carcinoma at 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treglia, Giorgio; Bongiovanni, Massimo; Ceriani, Luca; Paone, Gaetano; Giovanella, Luca

    2013-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman underwent total thyroidectomy for a papillary thyroid carcinoma in the right thyroid lobe (pTx, pN1b). Subsequently a 131 I-ablation (4.4 GBq) was performed. Four years later the patient presented increased thyroglobulin (Tg) serum levels (8.4 μg/l) during thyroxine treatment. Furthermore, enlarged hypoechoic and round-shaped bilateral cervical lymph nodes were detected at cervical ultrasonography (US). Based on laboratory and US findings suspicious for lymph nodal recurrence of thyroid carcinoma, the patient underwent an 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET/CT) to check for distant metastases (Fig. 1). The patient underwent a US-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology on an 18 F-FDG-avid cervical lymph-node. The smears were hypercellulated and consisted of numerous small- to medium-sized lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and tingible body macrophages. The cytological diagnosis was consistent with that of reactive lymphadenitis. Serological test revealed elevated IgM and IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies with a very low IgG-avidity, indicating an acute toxoplasmosis. Serum Tg was then measured by using heterophilic antibody blocking tubes, as previously reported, and serum value dropped to 18 F-FDG-PET/CT in oncological patients. Few reports have described toxoplasmic infection mimicking malignancy at 18 F-FDG-PET/CT; these findings were found mainly in immunodepressive patients or with history of lymphoma. Conversely, we described here a case of toxoplasmosis inducing false-positive Tg measurement, neck US and 18 F-FDG-PET/CT findings in a patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma

  9. Possible neuro-Sweet disease mimicking brain tumor in the medulla oblongata--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Chihiro; Esaki, Takanori; Ando, Maya; Furuya, Tsuyoshi; Noda, Kazuyuki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Mori, Kentaro

    2011-01-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with a rare case of possible neuro-Sweet Disease (NSD) mimicking brain tumor in the medulla oblongata, manifesting as numbness in the bilateral upper and lower extremities, gait disturbance, dysarthria, and swallowing disturbance which gradually deteriorated over 3 months. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass lesion in the medulla oblongata, extending to the upper cervical cord with rim enhancement by gadolinium. The preoperative diagnosis was brain tumor, such as glioma, or inflammatory disease. His neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated, so biopsy was performed through the midline suboccipital approach. Histological examination showed infiltration of inflammatory cells, mainly lymphocytes and macrophages. Human leukocyte antigen typing showed Cw1 and B54 which strongly suggested possible NSD. Steroid pulse therapy was started after surgery and the clinical symptoms improved. Neurosurgeons should be aware of inflammatory disorders such as NSD mimicking brain tumor.

  10. Toxoplasmic Lymphadenitis Mimicking a Metastatic Thyroid Carcinoma at {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treglia, Giorgio; Bongiovanni, Massimo; Ceriani, Luca; Paone, Gaetano; Giovanella, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2013-12-15

    A 28-year-old woman underwent total thyroidectomy for a papillary thyroid carcinoma in the right thyroid lobe (pTx, pN1b). Subsequently a {sup 131}I-ablation (4.4 GBq) was performed. Four years later the patient presented increased thyroglobulin (Tg) serum levels (8.4 μg/l) during thyroxine treatment. Furthermore, enlarged hypoechoic and round-shaped bilateral cervical lymph nodes were detected at cervical ultrasonography (US). Based on laboratory and US findings suspicious for lymph nodal recurrence of thyroid carcinoma, the patient underwent an {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) to check for distant metastases (Fig. 1). The patient underwent a US-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology on an {sup 18}F-FDG-avid cervical lymph-node. The smears were hypercellulated and consisted of numerous small- to medium-sized lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and tingible body macrophages. The cytological diagnosis was consistent with that of reactive lymphadenitis. Serological test revealed elevated IgM and IgG anti-Toxoplasma antibodies with a very low IgG-avidity, indicating an acute toxoplasmosis. Serum Tg was then measured by using heterophilic antibody blocking tubes, as previously reported, and serum value dropped to <0.2 μg/l. It is well known that antibody interference may falsely increase serum Tg; in particular, increased anti-Toxoplasma antibodies likely interfered to the Tg measurement in our case. Additionally, activated granulocytes and macrophages may display significantly increased glucose consumption, giving false-positive results at {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in oncological patients. Few reports have described toxoplasmic infection mimicking malignancy at {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT; these findings were found mainly in immunodepressive patients or with history of lymphoma. Conversely, we described here a case of toxoplasmosis inducing false-positive Tg measurement, neck US and {sup 18}F

  11. Occupational Neurobrucellosis Mimicking a Brain Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Algahtani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a zoonotic bacterial infection which is transmitted to humans from infected animals and is endemic in many parts of the world including Saudi Arabia. In this article, we report a case of occupational neurobrucellosis that presented with a space-occupying lesion mimicking a brain tumor. We stress on the importance of obtaining detailed social history including occupation to reach the diagnosis in several conditions including brucellosis. We also stress on taking universal precautions when handling any specimens. It may be advisable that manipulation of all unknown specimens arriving at the laboratory should occur in biological safety cabinet until a highly infectious organism is ruled out. Neurobrucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients presenting with solitary mass lesion mimicking brain tumor especially in endemic areas or high occupational risk group.

  12. Gamma-knife radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors from primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Bine; Satoh, Ken; Saijo, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    Forty patients with metastatic brain tumors from primary lung cancer underwent radiosurgery (γ-knife). We retrospectively compared their prior treatment history, number of metastatic foci, and performance status, to evaluate the effects of, and indications for, γ-knife therapy. After both the primary and the metastatic tumors were controlled, performance status could be used as an index in the choice of γ-knife therapy. Our results demonstrate that repeated γ-knife radiosurgeries prolonged survival time. Gamma-knife radiosurgery improves quality of life and prognosis of patients with metastatic brain tumors. (author)

  13. Peritumoral hemorrhage immediately after radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Masafumi; Kitajima, Satoru; Miyazaki, Chikao; Otsuka, Takashi; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Shibata, Iekado

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of a 44-year-old woman with metastatic brain tumors who suffered peri-tumoral hemorrhage soon after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). She had been suffering from breast cancer with multiple systemic metastasis. She started to have headache, nausea, dizziness and speech disturbance 1 month before admission. There was no bleeding tendency in the hematological examination and the patient was normotensive. Neurological examination disclosed headache and slightly aphasia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a large round mass lesion in the left temporal lobe. It was a well-demarcated, highly enhanced mass, 45 mm in diameter. SRS was performed on four lesions in a single session (Main mass: maximum dose was 30 Gy in the center and 20 Gy in the margin of the tumor. Others: maximum 25 Gy margin 20 Gy). After radiosurgery, she had severe headache, nausea and vomiting and showed progression of aphasia. CT scan revealed a peritumoral hemorrhage. Conservative therapy was undertaken and the patient's symptoms improved. After 7 days, she was discharged, able to walk. The patient died of extensive distant metastasis 5 months after SRS. Acute transient swelling following conventional radiotherapy is a well-documented phenomenon. However, the present case indicates that such an occurrence is also possible in SRS. We have hypothesized that acute reactions such as brain swelling occur due to breakdown of the fragile vessels of the tumor or surrounding tissue. (author)

  14. Cryptococcoma mimicking a brain tumor in an immunocompetent patient: case report of an extremely rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Aline Lariessy Campos; Aguiar, Guilherme Brasileiro de; Lovato, Renan Maximilian; Zanetti, Arthus Vilar Deolindo; Panagopoulos, Alexandros Theodoros; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves

    2017-11-06

    Central nervous system (CNS) infectious diseases have high prevalence in developing countries and their proper diagnosis and treatment are very important for public health planning. Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungus that may cause several CNS manifestations, especially in immunocompromised patients. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common type of involvement. Mass-effect lesions are uncommon: they are described as cryptococcomas and their prevalence is even lower among immunocompetent patients. The aim here was to report an extremely rare case of cryptococcoma causing a mass effect and mimicking a brain tumor in an immunocompetent patient. The literature on CNS cryptococcal infections was reviewed with emphasis on cryptococcomas. Clinical, surgical and radiological data on a female patient with this rare presentation of cryptococcoma mimicking a brain tumor are described. A 54-year-old female patient presented to the emergency department with a rapid-onset progressive history of confusion and completely dependency for basic activities. Neuroimaging showed a left occipital lesion and neurosurgical treatment was proposed. From histopathological evaluation, a diagnosis of cryptococcoma was established. She received clinical support with antifungals, but despite optimal clinical treatment, her condition evolved to death. Cryptococcal infections have several forms of presentation and, in immunocompetent patients, their manifestation may be even more different. Cryptococcoma is an extremely rare presentation in which proper surgical and clinical treatment should be instituted as quickly as possible, but even so, there is a high mortality rate.

  15. MRI of metastatic adenocarcinomas to the brain. Differential diagnosis of colorectal and pulmonary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukusumi, Akio; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Katsutoshi

    1998-01-01

    To clarify the characteristic features of MR imagings of metastatic adenocarcinomas to the brain and search for differential points between the lesions from colorectal cancer and those of lung cancer, we evaluated retrospectively intraparenchymal metastatic lesions of 13 colorectal origins and 13 pulmonary origins on MR imagings, compared with resected specimens. Metastatic lesions from colorectal cancer showed marked hypointense solid components on T2WI, which correspond to the dense tumor cells and coagulated necrosis pathologically. Metastatic lesions from lung cancers showed mixed intensity and various components on T2WI, which correspond to various histological components, such as solid tumor cell's nests, hemorrhage, necrosis and cystic fluid collection. Pathological specimens suggested that the low signal intensity on T2WI of MRI derived from concentration of tumor cells and coagulated necrosis including macrophages and lymphocytes. This study may contribute to make the differential diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinomas to the brain from colorectal and pulmonary cancers. (author)

  16. Perfusion and spectroscopy magnetic resonance imaging in a case of lymphocytic vasculitis mimicking brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muccio, Carmine Franco; Di Blasi, Arturo; Esposito, Gennaro; Brunese, Luca; D’Arco, Felice; Caranci, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Lymphocytic vasculitis of the central nervous system is an uncommon subtype of primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) – a rare inflammatory disorder affecting parenchymal and leptomeningeal arteries and veins. Establishing diagnosis on the basis of neuroimaging only is difficult, as it can mimic a brain tumor. Thus, histological diagnosis is essential for appropriate management. We present a case of biopsy-proven lymphocytic vasculitis mimicking a brain tumor on neuroimaging that was subsequently successfully treated with steroid therapy. We also discuss the findings in perfusion MR (PWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Regional hypoperfusion on PWI and elevation of glutamate and glutamine levels on MRS (without associated typical tumor spectra) are common findings in inflammatory disorders, including PACNS, and can be useful in differential diagnosis with tumors

  17. A study of perifocal low-density area in metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ryuta; Okada, Kodai; Hiratsuka, Hideo; Inaba, Yutaka; Tsuyumu, Matsutaira.

    1980-01-01

    It is well known that vasogenic brain edema often develops in brain tumors, head injuries, and inflammatory brain lesions. In order to investigate the development and resolution of vasogenic brain edema, some CT findings of metastatic brain tumors were studied in detail. 20 cases of metastatic brain tumors of the past three years were examined by means of a CT scan. In almost all the cases there was a perifocal low-density area (PFL) in the CT findings. In the tumors which were cystic and/or located in the infratentorial space, PFL was not present or, if present, only slightly so. On the contrary, in the tumors which were nodular and/or in the supratentorial space, PFL was present extensively. In the supratentorial metastasis, PFL seemed to be restricted within the white matter and not to involve the gray matter nor such midline structures as basal ganglia and corpus callosum. Besides, PFL was always in contact with the lateral ventricular wall. These results show that PFL in the metastatic tumors resembles in shape the experimental cold-induced brain edema in cats. PFL is presumed to represent vasogenic brain edema; these findings support the hypothesis that the main mechanism of the resolution of vasogenic brain edema is the drainage of the edema fluid into the ventricular CSF. (author)

  18. Study of perifocal low-density area in metastatic brain tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, R; Okada, K; Hiratsuka, H; Inaba, Y [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Tsuyumu, M

    1980-04-01

    It is well known that vasogenic brain edema often develops in brain tumors, head injuries, and inflammatory brain lesions. In order to investigate the development and resolution of vasogenic brain edema, some CT findings of metastatic brain tumors were studied in detail. 20 cases of metastatic brain tumors of the past three years were examined by means of a CT scan. In almost all the cases there was a perifocal low-density area (PFL) in the CT findings. In the tumors which were cystic and/or located in the infratentorial space, PFL was not present or, if present, only slightly so. On the contrary, in the tumors which were nodular and/or in the supratentorial space, PFL was present extensively. In the supratentorial metastasis, PFL seemed to be restricted within the white matter and not to involve the gray matter nor such midline structures as basal ganglia and corpus callosum. Besides, PFL was always in contact with the lateral ventricular wall. These results show that PFL in the metastatic tumors resembles in shape the experimental cold-induced brain edema in cats. PFL is presumed to represent vasogenic brain edema; these findings support the hypothesis that the main mechanism of the resolution of vasogenic brain edema is the drainage of the edema fluid into the ventricular CSF.

  19. C19orf12 mutations in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation mimicking juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschauer, M; Gaul, C; Behrmann, C; Prokisch, H; Zierz, S; Haack, T B

    2012-11-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been recently identified as the molecular genetic cause of a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). Given the mitochondrial localization of the gene product the new NBIA subtype was designated mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration. Frequent features in the patients described so far included extrapyramidal signs and pyramidal tract involvement. Here, we report three C19orf12-mutant patients from two families presenting with predominant upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction mimicking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with juvenile onset. While extrapyramidal signs were absent, all patients showed neuropsychological abnormalities with disinhibited or impulsive behavior. Optic atrophy was present in the simplex case. T2-weighted cranial MRI showed hypointensities suggestive of iron accumulation in the globi pallidi and the midbrain in all patients. Sequence analysis of C19orf12 revealed a novel mutation, p.Gly66del, compound heterozygous with known mutations in all patients. These patients highlight that C19orf12 defects should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with juvenile onset motor neuron diseases. Patients have to be examined carefully for neuropsychological abnormalities, optic neuropathy, and signs of brain iron accumulation in MRI.

  20. Gene expression profiles help identify the Tissue of Origin for metastatic brain cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VandenBerg Scott R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic brain cancers are the most common intracranial tumor and occur in about 15% of all cancer patients. In up to 10% of these patients, the primary tumor tissue remains unknown, even after a time consuming and costly workup. The Pathwork® Tissue of Origin Test (Pathwork Diagnostics, Redwood City, CA, USA is a gene expression test to aid in the diagnosis of metastatic, poorly differentiated and undifferentiated tumors. It measures the expression pattern of 1,550 genes in these tumors and compares it to the expression pattern of a panel of 15 known tumor types. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the Tissue of Origin Test in the diagnosis of primary sites for metastatic brain cancer patients. Methods Fifteen fresh-frozen metastatic brain tumor specimens of known origins met specimen requirements. These specimens were entered into the study and processed using the Tissue of Origin Test. Results were compared to the known primary site and the agreement between the two results was assessed. Results Fourteen of the fifteen specimens produced microarray data files that passed all quality metrics. One originated from a tissue type that was off-panel. Among the remaining 13 cases, the Tissue of Origin Test accurately predicted the available diagnosis in 12/13 (92.3% cases. Discussion This study demonstrates the accuracy of the Tissue of Origin Test when applied to predict the tissue of origin of metastatic brain tumors. This test could be a very useful tool for pathologists as they classify metastatic brain cancers.

  1. Metastatic neuroblastoma in the brain parenchyma; a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ho Kyu; Suh, Dae Chul

    2000-01-01

    During childhood, neuroblastoma is a relatively common malignant neoplasm which commonly metastasizes to other organs. Metastasis to the central nervous system from an extracranial neuroblastoma is rare, however, and brain parenchymal metastasis is very rare. We describe a case of brain parenchymal metastasis from primary abdominal neuroblastoma, and review the literature

  2. Computed tomographic brain scanning in the diagnosis of metastatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringelstein, E.B.; Zeumer, H.; Hacke, W.; Keulers, P.

    1981-01-01

    Clinical investigations and computed brain scanning were done in 305 patients with primary extracerebral malignant tumours. One third of the patients had cerebral metastases. In most patients with brain metastases extracerebral secondary tumours were known already. Silent brain metastases were present in only 0.6% of all investigated tumour patients. All other patients had either objective neurologic-psychiatric defects or at least symptoms (headache, vomiting). Use of cranial computed tomography in all tumour patients as a pure screening method is thus not justified. The indication for the investigation is dependent on the clinical symptomatology. However, not only objective neurologic-psychiatric defects must be taken into account, but also occurrence of new symptoms. (orig.) [de

  3. RT-06GAMMA KNIFE SURGERY AFTER NAVIGATION-GUIDED ASPIRATION FOR CYSTIC METASTATIC BRAIN TUMORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yasuyoshi; Mori, Kanji; Toyota, Shingo; Kumagai, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Shota; Sugano, Hirofumi; Taki, Takuyu

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic brain tumors over 3 cm in diameter (volume of 14.1ml) are generally considered poor candidates for Gamma Knife surgery (GKS). We retrospectively assessed the method and efficacy of GKS for large cystic metastatic brain tumors after navigation-guided aspiration under local anesthesia. From September 2007 to April 2014, 38 cystic metastatic brain tumors in 32 patients (12 males, 20 females; mean age, 63.2 years) were treated at Kansai Rosai Hospital. The patients were performed navigation-guided cyst aspiration under local anesthesia, then at the day or the next day, were performed GKS and usually discharged on the day. The methods for preventing of leptomeningeal dissemination are following: 1) puncture from the place whose cerebral thickness is 1 cm or more; 2) avoidance of Ommaya reservoir implantation; and 3) placement of absorbable gelatin sponge to the tap tract. Tumor volume, including the cystic component, decreased from 25.4 ml (range 8.7-84.7 ml) to 11.4 ml (range 2.9-36.7 ml) following aspiration; the volume reduction was approximately 51.6%. Follow-up periods in the study population ranged from 0 to 24 months (median 3.5 months). The overall median survival was 6.7 months. There was no leptomeningeal dissemination related to the aspiration. One patient experienced radiation necrosis after GKS, one patient experienced re-aspiration by failure of aspiration, and two patients experienced surgical resections and one patient experienced re-aspiration by cyst regrowth after GKS. Long-term hospitalization is not desirable for the patients with brain metastases. In japan, Long-term hospitalization is required for surgical resection or whole brain radiation therapy, but only two days hospitalization is required for GKS after navigation-guided aspiration at our hospital. This GKS after navigation-guided aspiration is more effective and less invasive than surgical resection or whole brain radiation therapy.

  4. Prognosis of patients treated with whole brain radiation therapy for metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, Naomi R.; Mychalczak, Borys; Jones, Walter; Spriggs, David

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the effect of multiple treatment and disease related variables on the local control and survival of patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy for metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease. Materials and Methods: Between November 1967 and December 1994, 21 patients were treated at our institution for gestational trophoblastic disease metastatic to the brain. 29% ((6(21))) were diagnosed with their brain metastases before the onset of chemotherapy (early group). 79% ((15(21))) developed their brain metastases during or after the administration of first-line chemotherapy (late group). All patients were treated with whole brain radiation therapy. The total dose ranged from 200 cGy to 3600 cGy (median 2200 cGy). Sixteen patients (76%) received concurrent systemic chemotherapy. None of the patients received intrathecal chemotherapy as a component of their initial treatment. Survival and local control were calculated from the date of diagnosis of brain metastases. Follow-up ranged from 11 months to 170 months with a median of 77 months. Results: The median overall survival was 21 months, with 2- and 5-year actuarial survivals of 46% and 31%, respectively. Neither survival nor local control was significantly affected by age at diagnosis of brain metastases (<35 vs. ≥35 years), time of presentation of brain metastases (early vs. late), or use of concurrent chemotherapy. The total dose of radiation (<2200 cGy vs. ≥2200 cGy) significantly affected initial local control, but not survival. The 5-year actuarial local control of the initial brain metastases with ≥2200 cGy was 91%, as compared to 24% with <2200 cGy (p=0.05). Survival was significantly affected by control of disease at extracranial sites. The 2- and 5-year actuarial survivals of the 9 patients whose disease was controlled at extracranial sites were 100% and 83%, respectively, as compared to 8% and 0% for the 12 whose extracranial disease was not controlled (p=0

  5. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  6. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis brain abscess mimicking meningitis after surgery for glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, L?a; Dubourg, Gr?gory; Graillon, Thomas; Honnorat, Estelle; Lepidi, Hubert; Drancourt, Michel; Seng, Piseth; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Salmonella brain abscess associated with brain tumor is rare. Only 11 cases have been reported to date. Here we report a case of brain abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mimicking post-surgical meningitis in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Case presentation A 60-year-old Algerian woman was admitted through an emergency department for a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting, and behavioral disorders. Surgery for cerebral tumor excision was per...

  7. Brain Tuberculomas Mimicking Intracranial Metastasis in a Patient Presenting with Fits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondal, M.; Hussain, T.; Mushtaq, S.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tuberculosis is still prevalent in many developing countries, especially Asian countries. Tuberculomas should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of enhancing intra-axial lesions of the brain. Brain tuberculomas can present in many different clinical and radiological patterns clinically like headache, fits, cranial nerve palsies and very rarely as brain tuberculomas. We describe the case of a 48 years old male patient presenting with persistent headache and fits, referred for workup of brain metastasis or primary brain neoplasm. On further imaging, it turned out to be multiple tuberculomas of brain which resolved on anti-tuberculous treatment along with symptoms relief. (author)

  8. MR imaging-guided cryoablation of metastatic brain tumours: initial experience in six patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chengli; Wu, Lebin; Song, Jiqing; Liu, Ming; Lv, Yubo; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the initial experience and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided transcranial cryoablation in cystic metastatic brain tumours. Seven cystic metastatic brain tumours in six patients were treated with cryoablation. The approval from the local ethics committee and individual patient consent were acquired before the study. Before the procedure the tumours were detected with conventional CT or MRI. The procedure was performed under local anaesthesia and conscious sedation. A 0.23-T open MRI system with optical tracking was used for procedural planning, instrument guidance and procedural monitoring of the ice ball formation. An MR-compatible, argon-based cryoablation system was used. The schedule of follow-up imaging ranged from 12 days to 12 months. Seven treatment sessions were performed. All the cryoprobes were successfully inserted into the target with one pass. All the patients tolerated the procedure well without experiencing any neurological deficits during the treatment phase or during the immediate post-treatment period. One patient died 12 days after cryoablation. MR-guided and monitored metastasis brain tumour cryoablation is technically feasible and may represent an alternative treatment in selected patients. (orig.)

  9. Ageing and chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea do not modify local brain tissue stiffness in healthy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorba, Ignasi; Menal, Maria José; Torres, Marta; Gozal, David; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Colell, Anna; Montserrat, Josep M; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of Alzheimer´s disease (AD), with the latter promoting alterations in brain tissue stiffness, a feature of ageing. Here, we assessed the effects of age and intermittent hypoxia (IH) on brain tissue stiffness in a mouse model of OSA. Two-month-old and 18-month-old mice (N=10 each) were subjected to IH (20% O 2 40s - 6% O 2 20s) for 8 weeks (6h/day). Corresponding control groups for each age were kept under normoxic conditions in room air (RA). After sacrifice, the brain was excised and 200-micron coronal slices were cut with a vibratome. Local stiffness of the cortex and hippocampus were assessed in brain slices placed in an Atomic Force Microscope. For both brain regions, the Young's modulus (E) in each animal was computed as the average values from 9 force-indentation curves. Cortex E mean (±SE) values were 442±122Pa (RA) and 455±120 (IH) for young mice and 433±44 (RA) and 405±101 (IH) for old mice. Hippocampal E values were 376±62 (RA) and 474±94 (IH) for young mice and 486±93 (RA) and 521±210 (IH) for old mice. For both cortex and hippocampus, 2-way ANOVA indicated no statistically significant effects of age or challenge (IH vs. RA) on E values. Thus, neither chronic IH mimicking OSA nor ageing up to late middle age appear to modify local brain tissue stiffness in otherwise healthy mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Study on medical economic evaluation methods for metastatic brain tumors therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takura, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Motohiro; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi; Uetsuka, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    Treatment design for metastatic brain tumors is required to firstly care about the life and function for which the patient hopes because it is terminal care. Therefore, to discuss the value of the therapy, a viewpoint of the quality of life (QOL) and the socioeconomic factors other than the survival rate is important. However, examination that applies these factors to the therapy needs to be carried out more thoroughly. With this in mind, we discuss cost effectiveness of therapy for metastatic brain tumor, through a pilot study on gamma knife therapy. We studied 18 patients (mean age 61.6 years old) undergoing therapy for metastatic brain tumors. The health rate QOL was assessed by the profile-type measure SF-36 (Short-Form 36-Item Ver1.2) and the preference-based measure EQ-5D (EuroQoL-5D), before and six months after gamma knife therapy. Cost-utility-analysis (yen/Qaly) was carried out from quality adjusted life years (Qalys) and medical fee claims. In addition, we made a correlation analysis of the irradiation procedure and the gains attained. The observation by SF-36 for six months was useful for metastatic brain tumor. As a result, the QOL indicators showed increased mental health (MH: p=0.040) and role emotional (RE: p=0.029) with significant difference. In the measurement of EQ-5D, it was added only for one month based on the significant difference (p=0.022) from the pre-therapy QOL. The utilities that were analyzed became 0.052±0.175 standard deviation (SD) (score), and Qalys were 0.135. Because the cost was 721.4±5.2 SD (thousand yen), the performance of cost-utility-analysis was estimated as 5,330,000 (yen/Qaly). In addition, positive correlation (r=0.845/p=0.034) was found between the EQ-5D utility score and the tumor irradiation energy (mJ), etc. We established a new value over and above mere survival rate concerning metastatic brain tumor therapy. The socioeconomics and efficacy of therapy are more difficult to discuss in this disease than in other

  11. Mimicking the brain: evaluation of St Jude Medical's Prodigy Chronic Pain System with Burst Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven; Plazier, Mark; Vancamp, Tim

    2015-03-01

    The Prodigy is a new type of internal pulse generator that controls the delivery of electrical stimuli to nervous tissue. It is capable of delivering burst stimulation, which is a novel waveform that consists of closely spaced high-frequency electrical impulses delivered in packets riding on a plateau, and followed by a quiescent period. Its inception was based on mimicking burst firing in the nervous system and usually delivered by unmyelinated fibers that uniformly have a motivational affective homeostatic function. It thereby targets a multimodal salience network, even though the stimuli are delivered at the level of the spinal cord. As such, it is specifically capable of influencing the affective/attentional components of pain. Burst stimulation was initially safely applied off-label to the auditory cortex for tinnitus, and later also to the spinal cord, the somatosensory cortex for neuropathic pain, subcutaneously for failed back surgery syndrome, and cingulate cortex for addiction and tinnitus.

  12. Prognostic effect of symptomatic extracranial lesions on survival of recursive partitioning analysis Class III brain metastatic patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Jun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The presence of SELs was a negative prognosis factor for the survival of RPA Class III brain metastatic patients. If RPA Class III brain metastatic patients were without SELs, SRT may be a reasonable treatment option, but if they had SELs, SRT may not be a reasonable treatment due to the short overall survival time and KDT.

  13. Re-irradiation for metastatic brain tumors with whole-brain radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Takeshi; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kogawa, Asuka; Komatsu, Tetsuya; Tamai, Yoshifumi; Ohizumi, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether second whole-brain irradiation is beneficial for patients previously treated with whole-brain irradiation. A retrospective analysis was done for 31 patients with brain metastases who had undergone re-irradiation. Initial whole-brain irradiation was performed with 30 Gy/10 fractions for 87% of these patients. Whole-brain re-irradiation was performed with 30 Gy/10 fractions for 42% of these patients (3-40 Gy/1-20 fractions). Three patients underwent a third whole-brain irradiation. The median interval between the initial irradiation and re-irradiation was 10 months (range: 2-69 months). The median survival time after re-irradiation was 4 months (range: 1-21 months). The symptomatic improvement rate after re-irradiation was 68%, and the partial and complete tumor response rate was 55%. Fifty-two percent of the patients developed Grade 1 acute reactions. On magnetic resonance imaging, brain atrophy was observed in 36% of these patients after the initial irradiation and 74% after re-irradiation. Grade ≥2 encephalopathy or cognitive disturbance was observed in 10 patients (32%) after re-irradiation. Based on univariate analysis, significant factors related to survival after re-irradiation were the location of the primary cancer (P=0.003) and the Karnofsky performance status at the time of re-irradiation (P=0.008). A Karnofsky performance status ≥70 was significant based on multivariate analysis (P=0.050). Whole-brain re-irradiation for brain metastases placed only a slight burden on patients and was effective for symptomatic improvement. However, their remaining survival time was limited and the incidence of cognitive disturbance was rather high. (author)

  14. Neuro-Behçet disease mimicking brain tumor: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontini, Pedro L.; Finkelsztejn, Alessandro; Duarte, Juliana Á.; Santos, Guilherme T.; Roesler, Rafael; Isolan, Gustavo R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Behçet's disease (BD) is an inflammatory multisystem disease with unknown etiology, and consists of a TRIAD comprising recurrent oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. In some cases, the disease affects the central nervous system, called Neuro-Behçet Disease (NBD). Few cases of NBD simulating a brain tumor have been previously reported. Case Description: Here, we describe the case of a 46-year-old male patient with a previous diagnosis of brain tumor who was later diagnosed for BD. Conclusion: This case highlights the importance of differential diagnosis of lesions with tumoral features. Checking for the possibility of NBD may help avoiding biopsy in these types of cases. PMID:28695044

  15. Adult Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma Mimicking a Cortical Brain Tumor: MR Imaging Findings

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    Jang, Jong Chang; Weon, Young Cheol; Suh, Jae Hee; Kim, Young; Hwang, Jae Cheol [Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    A pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently identified low-grade neoplasm that was previously classified as a pilocytic astrocytoma (PA), yet demonstrates unique histological features and more aggressive behavior. Although a PMA is generally a tumor of early childhood and typically occurs in the hypothalamic/chiasmatic region, it can mimic cortical tumors, especially in adults. We report the MR findings of a PMA presenting as a cortical brain tumor in an adult with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1)

  16. Risk Factors for Preoperative Seizures and Loss of Seizure Control in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Adela; Weingart, Jon D; Gallia, Gary L; Lim, Michael; Brem, Henry; Bettegowda, Chetan; Chaichana, Kaisorn L

    2017-08-01

    Metastatic brain tumors are the most common brain tumors in adults. Patients with metastatic brain tumors have poor prognoses with median survival of 6-12 months. Seizures are a major presenting symptom and cause of morbidity and mortality. In this article, risk factors for the onset of preoperative seizures and postoperative seizure control are examined. Adult patients who underwent resection of one or more brain metastases at a single institution between 1998 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Of 565 patients, 114 (20.2%) patients presented with seizures. Factors independently associated with preoperative seizures were preoperative headaches (P = 0.044), cognitive deficits (P = 0.031), more than 2 intracranial metastatic tumors (P = 0.013), temporal lobe location (P = 0.031), occipital lobe location (P = 0.010), and bone involvement by tumor (P = 0.029). Factors independently associated with loss of seizure control after surgical resection were preoperative seizures (P = 0.001), temporal lobe location (P = 0.037), lack of postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.010), subtotal resection of tumor (P = 0.022), and local recurrence (P = 0.027). At last follow-up, the majority of patients (93.8%) were seizure-free. Thirty patients (5.30%) in total had loss of seizure control, and only 8 patients (1.41%) who did not have preoperative seizures presented with new-onset seizures after surgical resection of their metastases. The brain is a common site for metastases from numerous primary cancers, such as breast and lung. The identification of factors associated with onset of preoperative seizures as well as seizure control postoperatively could aid management strategies for patients with metastatic brain tumors. Patients with preoperative seizures who underwent resection tended to have good seizure control after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Olanzapine and Betamethasone Are Effective for the Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting due to Metastatic Brain Tumors of Rectal Cancer

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    M. Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain lesions originating from metastasis of colorectal cancer represent 3-5% of all brain metastases and are relatively rare. Of all distant metastases of colorectal cancer, those to the liver are detected in 22-29% of cases, while those to the lungs are detected in 8-18% of cases. In contrast, brain metastasis is quite rare, with a reported incidence ranging from 0.4 to 1.8%. Treatments for metastatic brain tumors include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and supportive care with steroids, etc. Untreated patients exhibit a median survival of only approximately 1 month. The choice of treatment for brain metastasis depends on the number of lesions, the patient's general condition, nerve findings and presence of other metastatic lesions. We herein report the case of a 78-year-old male who presented with brain metastases originating from rectal carcinoma. He suffered from nausea, vomiting, anorexia and vertigo during body movement. He received antiemetics, glycerol and whole brain radiation therapy; however, these treatments proved ineffective. Olanzapine therapy was started at a dose of 1.25 mg every night. The persistent nausea disappeared the next day, and the frequency of vomiting subsequently decreased. The patient was able to consume solid food. Olanzapine is an antipsychotic that has recently been used as palliative therapy for refractory nausea and vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy. We consider that olanzapine was helpful as a means of supportive care for the treatment of nausea and vomiting due to brain metastasis.

  18. Challenges in providing culturally-competent care to patients with metastatic brain tumours and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Lianne; Slater, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a metastatic brain tumour can be devastating as it is characterized by very low cure rates, as well as significant morbidity and mortality. Given the poor life expectancy and progressive disability that ensues, patients and family members experience much turmoil, which includes losses that bring about changes to family roles, routines and relationships. Crisis and conflict are common during such major disruptions to a family system, as individual members attempt to make sense of the illness experience based on cultural and spiritual beliefs, past experiences and personal philosophies. It is imperative health care providers strive towards increased awareness and knowledge of how culture affects the overall experience of illness and death in order to help create a mutually satisfactory care plan. Providing culturally-competent care entails the use of proper communication skills to facilitate the exploration of patient and family perspectives and allows for mutual decision making. A case study will illustrate the challenges encountered in providing culturally-competent care to a woman with brain cancer and her family. As the patient's health declined, the family entered into a state of crisis where communication between family members and health care professionals was strained; leading to conflict and sub-optimal outcomes. This paper will address the ethical dilemma of providing culturally-competent care when a patient's safety is at risk, and the nursing implications of upholding best practices in the context of differing beliefs and priorities.

  19. Clinical manifestations and computed tomography of the pseudovascular form of metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurimoto, Tadahisa; Mizuno, Makoto; Tani, Sadayasu; Miki, Kazuhito; Kawamura, Yasuo; Matsumura, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Forty-two cases of metastatic brain tumor were subdivided into 3 groups (acute, subacute, and chronic) from their mode of the onset of symptoms and signs. The clinical symptoms and signs and the computed tomogram were all analyzed and compared with each other. The acute form was found in 14 cases (33%), of which 7% (3 cases) were seizures and 26% (11 cases) were acute neurological deficits, including hemorrhages from tumors (3 cases, 7%). There were no significant differences in their age, sex, or primary lesions. The characteristic course of the acute form, other than seizure and hemorrhage, involved acutely and progressively developing neurological symptoms, symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure were rare. In computed tomogram, the solitary metastasis in the parietal and occipital lesions was much more in the acute form than in other forms, and the perifocal low-density area showed a tendency to be larger than the other forms. In these cases, acute symptoms and signs appeared to occur easily when perifocal edema was joined in the above locations. The pathogenesis of acute neurological symptoms and signs other than seizure and hemorrhage is unclear. We suggest that the location of a tumor and peritumoral edema be important factors in causing acute symptoms and signs, but, in addition to that, abrupt hemodynamic changes in the peritumoral edema may also be of importance. (J.P.N.)

  20. Clinical outcomes from maximum-safe resection of primary and metastatic brain tumors using awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groshev, Anastasia; Padalia, Devang; Patel, Sephalie; Garcia-Getting, Rosemarie; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Forsyth, Peter A; Vrionis, Frank D; Etame, Arnold B

    2017-06-01

    To retrospectively analyze outcomes in patients undergoing awake craniotomies for tumor resection at our institution in terms of extent of resection, functional preservation and length of hospital stay. All cases of adults undergoing awake-craniotomy from September 2012-February 2015 were retrospectively reviewed based on an IRB approved protocol. Information regarding patient age, sex, cancer type, procedure type, location, hospital stay, extent of resection, and postoperative complications was extracted. 76 patient charts were analyzed. Resected cancer types included metastasis to the brain (41%), glioblastoma (34%), WHO grade III anaplastic astrocytoma (18%), WHO grade II glioma (4%), WHO grade I glioma (1%), and meningioma (1%). Over a half of procedures were performed in the frontal lobes, followed by temporal, and occipital locations. The most common indication was for motor cortex and primary somatosensory area lesions followed by speech. Extent of resection was gross total for 59% patients, near-gross total for 34%, and subtotal for 7%. Average hospital stay for the cohort was 1.7days with 75% of patients staying at the hospital for only 24h or less post surgery. In the postoperative period, 67% of patients experienced improvement in neurological status, 21% of patients experienced no change, 7% experienced transient neurological deficits, which resolved within two months post op, 1% experienced transient speech deficit, and 3% experienced permanent weakness. In a consecutive series of 76 patients undergoing maximum-safe resection for primary and metastatic brain tumors, awake-craniotomy was associated with a short hospital stay and low postoperative complications rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prescription Dose Guideline Based on Physical Criterion for Multiple Metastatic Brain Tumors Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahgal, Arjun; Barani, Igor J.; Novotny, Josef; Zhang Beibei; Petti, Paula; Larson, David A.; Ma Lijun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Existing dose guidelines for intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are primarily based on single-target treatment data. This study investigated dose guidelines for multiple targets treated with SRS. Methods and Materials: A physical model was developed to relate the peripheral isodose volume dependence on an increasing number of targets and prescription dose per target. The model was derived from simulated and clinical multiple brain metastatic cases treated with the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion at several institutions, where the total number of targets ranged from 2 to 60. The relative increase in peripheral isodose volumes, such as the 12-Gy volume, was studied in the multitarget treatment setting based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 90-05 study dose levels. Results: A significant increase in the 12-Gy peripheral isodose volumes was found in comparing multiple target SRS to single-target SRS. This increase strongly correlated (R 2 = 0.92) with the total number of targets but not the total target volumes (R 2 = 0.06). On the basis of the correlated curve, the 12-Gy volume for multiple target treatment was found to increase by approximately 1% per target when a low target dose such as 15 Gy was used, but approximately 4% per target when a high dose such as 20-24 Gy was used. Reduction in the prescription dose was quantified for each prescription level in maintaining the 12-Gy volume. Conclusion: Normal brain dose increases predictably with increasing number of targets for multitarget SRS. A reduction of approximately 1-2 Gy in the prescribed dose is needed compared with single target radiosurgery.

  2. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis brain abscess mimicking meningitis after surgery for glioblastoma multiforme: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Léa; Dubourg, Grégory; Graillon, Thomas; Honnorat, Estelle; Lepidi, Hubert; Drancourt, Michel; Seng, Piseth; Stein, Andreas

    2016-07-07

    Salmonella brain abscess associated with brain tumor is rare. Only 11 cases have been reported to date. Here we report a case of brain abscess caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis mimicking post-surgical meningitis in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. A 60-year-old Algerian woman was admitted through an emergency department for a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting, and behavioral disorders. Surgery for cerebral tumor excision was performed and histopathological analysis revealed glioblastoma multiforme. On the seventh day post-surgery, she presented a sudden neurological deterioration with a meningeal syndrome, confusion, and fever of 39.8°C. Her cerebrospinal fluid sample and blood cultures were positive for S. enterica Enteritidis. She was treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. On the 17th day post-surgery, she presented a new neurological disorder and purulent discharge from the surgical wound. Brain computed tomography revealed a large cerebral abscess located at the operative site. Surgical drainage of the abscess was performed and microbial cultures of surgical deep samples were positive for the same S. enterica Enteritidis isolate. She recovered and was discharged 6 weeks after admission. In this case report, a brain abscess was initially diagnosed as Salmonella post-surgical meningitis before the imaging diagnosis of the brain abscess. The diagnosis of brain abscess should be considered in all cases of non-typhoidal Salmonella meningitis after surgery for brain tumor. Surgical brain abscess drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic treatment remains a major therapeutic option.

  3. Alzheimer’s Disease Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Brain Tissue Stiffness Compared to Wild-type Mice in both Normoxia and following Intermittent Hypoxia Mimicking Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Menal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEvidence from patients and animal models suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA may increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and that AD is associated with reduced brain tissue stiffness.AimTo investigate whether intermittent hypoxia (IH alters brain cortex tissue stiffness in AD mutant mice exposed to IH mimicking OSA.MethodsSix-eight month old (B6C3-Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE985Dbo/J AD mutant mice and wild-type (WT littermates were subjected to IH (21% O2 40 s to 5% O2 20 s; 6 h/day or normoxia for 8 weeks. After euthanasia, the stiffness (E of 200-μm brain cortex slices was measured by atomic force microscopy.ResultsTwo-way ANOVA indicated significant cortical softening and weight increase in AD mice compared to WT littermates, but no significant effects of IH on cortical stiffness and weight were detected. In addition, reduced myelin was apparent in AD (vs. WT, but no significant differences emerged in the cortex extracellular matrix components laminin and glycosaminoglycans when comparing baseline AD and WT mice.ConclusionAD mutant mice exhibit reduced brain tissue stiffness following both normoxia and IH mimicking sleep apnea, and such differences are commensurate with increased edema and demyelination in AD.

  4. Targeting metastatic breast cancer with ANG1005, a novel peptide-paclitaxel conjugate that crosses the blood-brain-barrier (BBB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We devoted this short interview piece with Dr Shou-Ching Tang at Augusta University to feature some promising results from a clinical phase II trial on a novel brain-penetrating peptide-paclitaxel-conjugate, ANG1005, in treating brain metastatic breast cancer. These results were presented by Dr. Tang at the recent annual meeting of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO 2016 Congress. This development heralds an important step forward towards the development of effective chemotherapeutic agents, which can cross the blood-brain-barrier and effectively treat and prevent the brain metastatic cancers.

  5. Comparison of 1H-MRS-detected metabolic characteristics in single metastatic brain tumors of different origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, M.F.; Ono, Yuko; Kubo, Osami; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2006-01-01

    Various types of intracranial metastases exhibit different growth patterns, which can be reflected in their metabolic characteristics and investigated noninvasively by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS). The objective of the present study was comparison of the 1 H-MRS-detected metabolic parameters in brain metastases of different origin. Twenty-five patients (15 men and 10 women; mean age, 62.0 years) with single, previously nontreated metastatic brain tumors were investigated by long-echo single-voxel volume-selected 1 H-MRS. The primary cancer was located in the lungs (10 cases), colon and rectum (8 cases), breast (3 cases), kidney (2 cases), prostate (1 case), and cardiac muscle (1 case). Comparison of clinical and radiological variables, including type of tumor contrast enhancement and extension of peritumoral edema, did not disclose statistically significant differences in metastatic brain tumors of different origin. At the same time, comparison of 1 H-MRS-detected metabolic characteristics revealed that metastases of colorectal carcinoma have greater content of mobile lipids (Lip) compared to other neoplasms. In conclusion, high Lip content in the viable brain metastases of colorectal carcinoma can be used as an additional diagnostic clue for noninvasive identification of these tumors and should be taken into consideration in cases of 1 H-MRS-based differentiation of their recurrence and radiation-induced necrosis after radiosurgical or radiotherapeutic treatment. (author)

  6. Peritumoral hemorrhage after radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumor; A case report

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    Motozaki, Takahiko (Nishinomiya City General Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)); Ban, Sadahiko; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Hamasaki, Masatake

    1994-08-01

    An unusual case of peritumoral hemorrhage after radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic brain tumor is reported. This 64-year-old woman had a history of breast cancer and underwent right mastectomy in 1989. She remained well until January 1993, when she started to have headache, nausea and speech disturbance, and was hospitalized on February 25, 1993. Neurological examination disclosed right hemiparesis and bilateral papilledema. CT scan and MR imaging showed a solitary round mass lesion in the left basal ganglia region. It was a well-demarcated, highly enhanced mass, 37 mm in diameter. Cerebral angiography confirmed a highly vascular mass lesion in the same location. She was treated with radiosurgery on March 8 (maximum dose was 20 Gy in the center and 10 Gy in the peripheral part of the tumor). After radiosurgery, she had an uneventful course and clinical and radiosurgical improvement could be detected. Her neurological symptoms and signs gradually improved and reduction of the tumor size and perifocal edema could be seen one month after radiosurgery. However, 6 weeks after radiosurgery, she suddenly developed semicoma and right hemiplegia. CT scan disclosed a massive peritumoral hemorrhage. Then, emergency craniotomy, evacuation of the hematoma and total removal of the tumor were performed on April 24. Histopathological diagnosis was adenocarcinoma. It was the same finding as that of the previous breast cancer. Histopathological examination revealed necrosis without tumor cells in the center and residual tumor cells in the peripheral part of the tumor. It is postulated that peritumoral hemorrhage was caused by hemodynamic changes in the vascular-rich tumor after radiosurgery and breakdown of the fragile abnormal vessels in the peripheral part of the tumor. (author).

  7. Brain metastases in patients who receive trastuzumab-containing chemotherapy for HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Makiko; Ando, Masashi; Yunokawa, Mayu

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a high rate of brain metastases has been reported among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer who were treated with trastuzumab. The present study examined risk factors for the development of brain metastasis in patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer who were treated with trastuzumab. We retrospectively reviewed 204 patients with HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer who were treated with a trastuzumab-containing regimen between 1999 and 2006. Patients with clinical symptoms were diagnosed as having brain metastases when brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed positive findings for brain metastases. The median follow-up time of this cohort was 53.6 months. Among the patients who received a trastuzumab-containing regimen, 74 patients (36.3%) developed brain metastases. The median survival from the diagnosis of brain metastases was 13.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.2-14.7 months). The median time interval between the beginning of trastuzumab treatment and the diagnosis of brain metastases was 13.6 months (range, 0.0-45.8 months). Among patients with brain metastases, the median overall survival period was 39 months. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age (≤50 years), recurrent breast cancer, and liver metastases were significant risk factors for the development of brain metastases. Patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer treated with trastuzumab had a high incidence of brain metastases (36.3%). Routine screening for brain metastases 1 year after the start of trastuzumab treatment, may be warranted in younger patients (≤50 years) who had recurrent breast cancer with liver metastases. (author)

  8. A Case Report of Unilateral Severe Visual Loss Along with Bilateral Optic Disc Cupping Secondary to Metastatic Brain Tumor

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    M Mahdavi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of unilateral severe visual loss and bilateral optic disc cupping secondary to brain metastasis of bronchogenic carcinoma Patient and findings: A 48 year-old woman presented with severe visual loss of left eye without redness or pain or any systemic findings .Clinical findings included decreased visual acuity of left eye to 4 m CF and (+3 positive Marcus-Gunn reflex .There was asymmetric optic disc cupping associated with visual field defect in left eye The neurologic investigations showed a secondary metastatic tumor in the brain from bronchogenic carcinoma. Conclusion: Before making a diagnosis of normal -tension glaucoma in asymmetric optic disc cupping and normal intraocular pressure, ophthalmologists should rule out neurologic defects and brain tumors.

  9. Peritumoral edema of meningiomas and metastatic brain tumors: differences in diffusion characteristics evaluated with diffusion-tensor MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toh, Cheng-Hong; Wong, Alex M.-C; Wong, Ho-Fai; Wan, Yung-Liang; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Ng, Shu-Hang

    2007-01-01

    We prospectively compared the fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of the peritumoral edema of meningiomas and metastatic brain tumors with diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The study protocol was approved by the local ethics committee, and written informed consent was obtained. Preoperative diffusion-tensor MR imaging was performed in 15 patients with meningiomas and 11 patients with metastatic brain tumors. Regions of interest (ROI) were placed in the peritumoral edema and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of the contralateral hemisphere to measure the FA and MD. The FA and MD ratios were calculated for each ROI in relation to the NAWM of the contralateral hemisphere. Changes in peritumoral MD and FA, in terms of primary values and ratios, were compared using a two-sample t-test; P -3 mm 2 /s) of the peritumoral edema for metastases and meningiomas, respectively, were 0.902 ± 0.057 and 0.820 ± 0.094, the mean MD ratios were 220.3 ± 22.6 and 193.1 ± 23.4, the mean FA values were 0.146 ± 0.026 and 0.199 ± 0.052, and the mean FA ratios were 32.3 ± 5.9 and 46.0 ± 12.1. All the values were significantly different between metastases and meningiomas (MD values P 0.016, MD ratios P = 0.006, FA values P = 0.005, FA ratios P = 0.002). The peritumoral edema of metastatic brain tumors and meningiomas show different MD and FA on diffusion-tensor MR imaging. (orig.)

  10. Peritumoral edema of meningiomas and metastatic brain tumors: differences in diffusion characteristics evaluated with diffusion-tensor MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toh, Cheng-Hong; Wong, Alex M.-C; Wong, Ho-Fai; Wan, Yung-Liang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Tao-Yuan (China); Chang Gung University, School of Medicine and Medical Technology, Tao-Yuan (China); Wei, Kuo-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Tao-Yuan (China); Chang Gung University, School of Medicine and Medical Technology, Tao-Yuan (China); Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Tao-Yuan (China); Chang Gung University, School of Medicine and Medical Technology, Tao-Yuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Molecular Image Center, Tao-Yuan (China)

    2007-06-15

    We prospectively compared the fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of the peritumoral edema of meningiomas and metastatic brain tumors with diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The study protocol was approved by the local ethics committee, and written informed consent was obtained. Preoperative diffusion-tensor MR imaging was performed in 15 patients with meningiomas and 11 patients with metastatic brain tumors. Regions of interest (ROI) were placed in the peritumoral edema and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of the contralateral hemisphere to measure the FA and MD. The FA and MD ratios were calculated for each ROI in relation to the NAWM of the contralateral hemisphere. Changes in peritumoral MD and FA, in terms of primary values and ratios, were compared using a two-sample t-test; P < 0.05 was taken as indicating statistical significance. The mean MD values (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) of the peritumoral edema for metastases and meningiomas, respectively, were 0.902 {+-} 0.057 and 0.820 {+-} 0.094, the mean MD ratios were 220.3 {+-} 22.6 and 193.1 {+-} 23.4, the mean FA values were 0.146 {+-} 0.026 and 0.199 {+-} 0.052, and the mean FA ratios were 32.3 {+-} 5.9 and 46.0 {+-} 12.1. All the values were significantly different between metastases and meningiomas (MD values P = 0.016, MD ratios P = 0.006, FA values P = 0.005, FA ratios P = 0.002). The peritumoral edema of metastatic brain tumors and meningiomas show different MD and FA on diffusion-tensor MR imaging. (orig.)

  11. Quality of Life in Patients With Primary and Metastatic Brain Tumors in the Literature as Assessed by the FACT-Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nicholas; Chiu, Leonard; Zeng, Liang; Zhang, Liying; Cella, David; Popovic, Marko; Chow, Ronald; Lam, Henry; Poon, Michael; Chow, Edward

    2012-12-01

    The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain (FACT-Br) is a quality of life (QOL) assessment tool that was originally developed for use in patients with primary brain tumors. However, the tool has also been used to assess QOL in patients with metastatic brain tumors. The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in QOL responses as assessed by the FACT-Br in patients with primary and metastatic brain neoplasms. A systematic literature search was conducted using the OvidSP platform in MEDLINE (1946 to July Week 2 2012) and EMBASE (1980 to 2012 Week 28). Articles in which the FACT-Br was used as a QOL assessment for patients with malignant brain tumors (both primary and metastatic) were included in the study. The weighted means of FACT-Br subscale and overall scores were calculated for the studies. To compare these scores, weighted analysis of variance was conducted and PROC GLM was performed for the data. A P-value of Br for assessment of QOL were identified. Social and functional well-being were significantly better in patients with primary brain tumors (weighted mean score of 22.2 vs. 10.7, P = 0.0026, 16.9 vs. 6.2, P = 0.0025, respectively). No other scale of the FACT-Br was significantly different between the two groups and the performance status of patients included in both groups was similar. Patients with primary brain cancer seemed to have better social and functional well-being scores than those with metastatic brain tumors. Other QOL domains were similar between these two groups. However, the heterogeneity in the included studies and the low sample size of included samples in patients with metastatic brain tumors could have confounded our findings.

  12. Cryptococcus gattii fungemia: report of a case with lung and brain lesions mimicking radiological features of malignancy Fungemia por Cryptococcus gattii: relato de um caso com lesões cerebrais e pulmonares nos achados radiológicos mimetizando câncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio de Mattos Oliveira

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old apparently immunocompetent white man developed lung and brain lesions of disseminated cryptococcosis. The radiologic features mimicked those of lung cancer metastatic to the central nervous system. C. gattii was recovered from cultures of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, brain biopsy, and blood. The same fungus was recovered from pulmonary and brain specimens at autopsy. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid cryptococcal antigen tests were diagnostic in our case and should be included in the diagnostic evaluation of unexplained pulmonary and cerebral lesions. A literature search showed few reports of fungemia by this species of Cryptococcus, contrasting to C. neoformans.Homem branco de 64 anos, aparentemente imunocompetente, desenvolveu lesões pulmonares e cerebrais por criptococose disseminada. Os achados radiológicos foram similares àqueles encontrados em pacientes com câncer de pulmão e metástase no sistema nervoso central. C. gattii foi isolado de cultivos de lavado broncoalveolar, biópsia cerebral e sangue. O mesmo fungo foi encontrado em fragmentos pulmonares e cerebrais obtidos da autópsia. Testes de antígeno no soro e no líquido cefalorraquidiano foram diagnóstico no nosso caso e devem ser incluídos na avaliação diagnóstica de lesões pulmonares e cerebrais indefinidas. Pesquisa na literatura mostrou poucos relatos de fungemia por esta espécie de Cryptococcus, contrastando com C. neoformans.

  13. Littoral cell angioma mimicking metastatic tumors

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    Szumilo Justyna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Littoral cell angioma is a rare primary, vascular tumor thought to originate from the endothelial cells lining the sinuses of the splenic red pulp (the “littoral cells”. It is a benign, usually asymptomatic lesion diagnosed incidentally. Ultrasound and tomography appearance is not characteristic and histopathological examination is required. This work provides a case-study of littoral cell angioma which was seen in a 55-year-old female who complained of non-specific upper abdominal pain. Computed tomography revealed multiple hypo-attenuated splenic lesions suggestive for metastasis. A splenectomy was performed and routine microscopic examination supported by immunohistochemistry reactions with CD68, CD34 and CD31 showed littoral cell angioma.

  14. Prognostic factors derived from recursive partition analysis (RPA) of radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) brain metastases trials applied to surgically resected and irradiated brain metastatic cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agboola, Olusegun; Benoit, Brien; Cross, Peter; Silva, Vasco da; Esche, Bernd; Lesiuk, Howard; Gonsalves, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: (a) To identify the prognostic factors that determine survival after surgical resection and irradiation of tumors metastatic to brain. (b) To determine if the prognostic factors used in the recursive partition analysis (RPA) of brain metastases cases from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) studies into three distinct survival classes is applicable to surgically resected and irradiated patients. Method: The medical records of 125 patients who had surgical resection and radiotherapy for brain metastases from 1985 to 1997 were reviewed. The patients' disease and treatment related factors were analyzed to identify factors that independently determine survival after diagnosis of brain metastasis. The patients were also grouped into three classes using the RPA-derived prognostic parameters which are: age, performance status, state of the primary disease, and presence or absence of extracranial metastases. Class 1: patients ≤ 65 years of age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of ≥70, with controlled primary disease and no extracranial metastases; Class 3: patients with KPS < 70. Patients who do not qualify for Class 1 or 3 are grouped as Class 2. The survival of these patients was determined from the time of diagnosis of brain metastases to the time of death. Results: The median survival of the entire group was 9.5 months. The three classes of patients as grouped had median survivals of 14.8, 9.9, and 6.0 months respectively (p = 0.0002). Age of < 65 years, KPS of ≥ 70, controlled primary disease, absence of extracranial metastases, complete surgical resection of the brain lesion(s) were found to be independent prognostic factors for survival; the total dose of radiation was not. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the patients and disease characteristics have significant impact on the survival of patients with brain metastases treated with a combination of surgical resection and radiotherapy. These parameters could be used in selecting

  15. Changes in the peritumoral hypoperfusion area immediately after radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumor. Analysis using 3D-SPECT

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    Nemoto, Masaaki [Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    Sixteen patients with single metastatic brain tumor underwent SPECT using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine ({sup 123}I-IMP) before and after radiosurgery. Influence of treatment was evaluated using three-dimensional SPECT images, threshold-voxel graphs and changes in the volume of the peritumoral hypoperfusion area. A three-detector type scanner, the PRISM3000, was also used. SPECT scanning was performed for 30 minutes after intravenous administration of {sup 123}I-IMP with sequential scans every 1 minutes. The data obtained 16-30 minutes after administration were processed using a low-pass ramp filter, and three-dimensional SPECT images were constructed from these data using the Application Visualization System (AVS). Furthermore, a threshold-voxel graph was plotted and the volume of the peritumoral hypoperfusion area was calculated. SPECT was performed before radiosurgery, and 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after, and these data were compared. Three-dimensional SPECT presented the area of peritumoral hypoperfusion as a deficit image and changes were evaluated visually. Threshold-voxel graphs were evaluated as follows: changes in voxels with a threshold of 40-50% indicated a hypoperfusion area, and changes in voxels with a threshold of 70-95% indicated a hyperperfusion area in the tumor side hemisphere. The volume of the peritumoral hypoperfusion area was calculated using the voxel difference between the tumor side and normal hemispheres. Our results showed that the peritumoral hypoperfusion area gradually decreased after an initial first-day increase following radiosurgery. Visual three-dimensional SPECT allowed us to monitor both the volume of the peritumoral hypoperfusion area of metastatic brain tumors after radiosurgery by means of a threshold-voxel graph and changes in the peritumoral hypoperfusion area. (author)

  16. Ultrasound-mediated delivery and distribution of polymeric nanoparticles in the normal brain parenchyma of a metastatic brain tumour model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Baghirov

    Full Text Available The treatment of brain diseases is hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB preventing most drugs from entering the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS with microbubbles can open the BBB safely and reversibly. Systemic drug injection might induce toxicity, but encapsulation into nanoparticles reduces accumulation in normal tissue. Here we used a novel platform based on poly(2-ethyl-butyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles to permeabilize the BBB in a melanoma brain metastasis model. With a dual-frequency ultrasound transducer generating FUS at 1.1 MHz and 7.8 MHz, we opened the BBB using nanoparticle-microbubbles and low-frequency FUS, and applied high-frequency FUS to generate acoustic radiation force and push nanoparticles through the extracellular matrix. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we quantified nanoparticle extravasation and distribution in the brain parenchyma. We also evaluated haemorrhage, as well as the expression of P-glycoprotein, a key BBB component. FUS and microbubbles distributed nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma, and the distribution depended on the extent of BBB opening. The results from acoustic radiation force were not conclusive, but in a few animals some effect could be detected. P-glycoprotein was not significantly altered immediately after sonication. In summary, FUS with our nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles can achieve accumulation and displacement of nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma.

  17. Ultrasound-mediated delivery and distribution of polymeric nanoparticles in the normal brain parenchyma of a metastatic brain tumour model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghirov, Habib; Snipstad, Sofie; Sulheim, Einar; Berg, Sigrid; Hansen, Rune; Thorsen, Frits; Mørch, Yrr; Åslund, Andreas K. O.

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of brain diseases is hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) preventing most drugs from entering the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can open the BBB safely and reversibly. Systemic drug injection might induce toxicity, but encapsulation into nanoparticles reduces accumulation in normal tissue. Here we used a novel platform based on poly(2-ethyl-butyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles to permeabilize the BBB in a melanoma brain metastasis model. With a dual-frequency ultrasound transducer generating FUS at 1.1 MHz and 7.8 MHz, we opened the BBB using nanoparticle-microbubbles and low-frequency FUS, and applied high-frequency FUS to generate acoustic radiation force and push nanoparticles through the extracellular matrix. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we quantified nanoparticle extravasation and distribution in the brain parenchyma. We also evaluated haemorrhage, as well as the expression of P-glycoprotein, a key BBB component. FUS and microbubbles distributed nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma, and the distribution depended on the extent of BBB opening. The results from acoustic radiation force were not conclusive, but in a few animals some effect could be detected. P-glycoprotein was not significantly altered immediately after sonication. In summary, FUS with our nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles can achieve accumulation and displacement of nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma. PMID:29338016

  18. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with renal vein involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, Hatsuko; Miura, Katsutoshi; Baba, Megumi; Nagata, Masao; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi

    2015-02-01

    The common sites of breast cancer metastases include bones, lung, brain, and liver. Renal metastasis from the breast is rare. We report a case of breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with extension into the renal vein. A 40-year-old woman had undergone left mastectomy for breast cancer at the age of 38. A gastric tumor, which was later proved to be metastasis from breast cancer, was detected by endoscopy. Computed tomography performed for further examination of the gastric tumor revealed a large left renal tumor with extension into the left renal vein. It mimicked a primary renal tumor. Percutaneous biopsy of the renal tumor confirmed metastasis from breast cancer. Surgical intervention of the stomach and the kidney was avoided, and she was treated with systemic chemotherapy. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney may present a solitary renal mass with extension into the renal vein, which mimics a primary renal tumor.

  19. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors increase Herceptin transport and treatment efficacy in mouse metastatic brain tumor models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Hu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic drugs and newly developed therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are adequately delivered to most solid and systemic tumors. However, drug delivery into primary brain tumors and metastases is impeded by the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB, significantly limiting drug use in brain cancer treatment.We examined the effect of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5 inhibitors in nude mice on drug delivery to intracranially implanted human lung and breast tumors as the most common primary tumors forming brain metastases, and studied underlying mechanisms of drug transport. In vitro assays demonstrated that PDE5 inhibitors enhanced the uptake of [(14C]dextran and trastuzumab (Herceptin, a humanized monoclonal antibody against HER2/neu by cultured mouse brain endothelial cells (MBEC. The mechanism of drug delivery was examined using inhibitors for caveolae-mediated endocytosis, macropinocytosis and coated pit/clathrin endocytosis. Inhibitor analysis strongly implicated caveolae and macropinocytosis endocytic pathways involvement in the PDE5 inhibitor-enhanced Herceptin uptake by MBEC. Oral administration of PDE5 inhibitor, vardenafil, to mice with HER2-positive intracranial lung tumors led to an increased tumor permeability to high molecular weight [(14C]dextran (2.6-fold increase and to Herceptin (2-fold increase. Survival time of intracranial lung cancer-bearing mice treated with Herceptin in combination with vardenafil was significantly increased as compared to the untreated, vardenafil- or Herceptin-treated mice (p0.05.These findings suggest that PDE5 inhibitors may effectively modulate BTB permeability, and enhance delivery and therapeutic efficacy of monoclonal antibodies in hard-to-treat brain metastases from different primary tumors that had metastasized to the brain.

  20. Characterization of the melanoma brain metastatic niche in mice and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit, Moran; Laider-Trejo, Leonor; Shalom, Vardit; Shabtay-Orbach, Ayelet; Krelin, Yakov; Gil, Ziv

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastases occur in 15% of patients with melanoma and are associated with a dismal prognosis. Here, we investigate the architectural phenotype and stromal reaction of melanoma brain metastasis in mice and humans. A syngeneic, green fluorescence protein (GFP)-expressing murine B16-F1 melanoma clone was introduced via intracardiac injection, and was examined in vivo in comparison with human specimens. Immunofluorescence analyses of the brain metastases revealed that F4/80 + macrophages/microglia were most abundant at the tumor front, but rare in its core, where they were found only around blood vessels (P = 0.01). Similar pattern of infiltration was found in CD3 + T cells (P < 0.01). Infiltrating T cells were prominently CD4 + compared with CD8 + T cells (P < 0.001). Blood vessels (CD31 + ) were less abundant at the tumor front than in its center (12 ± 1 vs. 4 ± 0.6 vessels per high-power field [HPF], P < 0.001). In contrast, there were few vessels at the tumor front, but their diameter was significantly larger at the front (8236 μm 2 vs. 4617 μm 2 average cross-sectional area, P < 0.005). This is the first comparative analysis of melanoma brain metastases showing similar stromal reaction in murine models and human specimens. Our results validate the utility of this murine model of melanoma brain metastases for investigating the mechanism of the human disease

  1. A novel, multimodal theranostic nanoprobe is effectively incorporated into melanoma brain metastatic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aasen, S. N.; Eichler, T. W.; Hrubý, Martin; Pospíšilová, Aneta; Štěpánek, Petr; Spriet, E.; Jirák, D.; Skaftnesmo, K. O.; Thorsen, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 75, 15 Supplement (2015), Abstract nr. 5195 ISSN 0008-5472. [Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research /106./. 18.04.2015-22.04.2015, Philadelphia] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : melanoma brain metastasis * nanoprobe * theranostics Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry

  2. Intracranial microcapsule chemotherapy delivery for the localized treatment of rodent metastatic breast adenocarcinoma in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Urvashi M; Tyler, Betty; Patta, Yoda; Wicks, Robert; Spencer, Kevin; Scott, Alexander; Masi, Byron; Hwang, Lee; Grossman, Rachel; Cima, Michael; Brem, Henry; Langer, Robert

    2014-11-11

    Metastases represent the most common brain tumors in adults. Surgical resection alone results in 45% recurrence and is usually accompanied by radiation and chemotherapy. Adequate chemotherapy delivery to the CNS is hindered by the blood-brain barrier. Efforts at delivering chemotherapy locally to gliomas have shown modest increases in survival, likely limited by the infiltrative nature of the tumor. Temozolomide (TMZ) is first-line treatment for gliomas and recurrent brain metastases. Doxorubicin (DOX) is used in treating many types of breast cancer, although its use is limited by severe cardiac toxicity. Intracranially implanted DOX and TMZ microcapsules are compared with systemic administration of the same treatments in a rodent model of breast adenocarcinoma brain metastases. Outcomes were animal survival, quantified drug exposure, and distribution of cleaved caspase 3. Intracranial delivery of TMZ and systemic DOX administration prolong survival more than intracranial DOX or systemic TMZ. Intracranial TMZ generates the more robust induction of apoptotic pathways. We postulate that these differences may be explained by distribution profiles of each drug when administered intracranially: TMZ displays a broader distribution profile than DOX. These microcapsule devices provide a safe, reliable vehicle for intracranial chemotherapy delivery and have the capacity to be efficacious and superior to systemic delivery of chemotherapy. Future work should include strategies to improve the distribution profile. These findings also have broader implications in localized drug delivery to all tissue, because the efficacy of a drug will always be limited by its ability to diffuse into surrounding tissue past its delivery source.

  3. Sporadic meningioangiomatosis-associated atypical meningioma mimicking parenchymal invasion of brain: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Bo-ning

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Meningioangiomatosis is a rare hamartomatous lesion or meningiovascular malformation in brain. In extremely rare condition, meningioma may occur together with meningioangiomatosis, and only 19 cases have been described in English literature until now. We now report a case of meningioangiomatosis-associated meningioma with atypical and clear cell variant. A 34-year-old man presented a 3-month history of progressive numbness and weakness of his left lower extremity. He had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis type 2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed multifocal lesions in the right frontoparietal lobe. The lesions were totally removed. Microscopically, parts of lesions were atypical and clear cell meningioma corresponding to WHO grade II. The adjacent brain parenchyma showed the histological features of meningioangiomatosis. Neoplastic cells in atypical meningioma area were immunoreactive to epithelial membrane antigen (EMA with high MIB-1 index of up to 20%. However, the spindle cells in meningioangiomatosis area were negative for EMA with low MIB-1 index of up to 1%. The diagnosis of atypical meningioma associated with sporadic meningioangiomatosis was made. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a meningioangiomatosis-associated meningioma with atypical and clear cell variant component to be described. The patient had been followed-up for 11 months without adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy. No tumor recurrence was found during this period. Meningioangiomatosis-associated meningioma is more likely to occur in younger patients and histologically to mimic parenchymal invasion of brain. We suggest that postoperative radiotherapy or chemotherapy should be given careful consideration to avoid over-treatment due to erroneously interpret as malignant meningioma.

  4. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the distinction of high-grade cerebral gliomas from single metastatic brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, Andres; Schellhorn, Till; Haakonsen, Monika; Nakstad, Per H.; Josefsen, Roger; Kulle, Bettina; Maehlen, Jan; Kumar, Theresa; Gadmar, Oeystein; Langberg, Carl W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases and primary high-grade gliomas, including glioblastomas multiforme (GBM) and anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), may be indistinguishable by conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Identification of these tumors may have therapeutic consequences. Purpose: To assess the value of MR spectroscopy (MRS) using short and intermediate echo time (TE) in differentiating solitary brain metastases and high-grade gliomas on the basis of differences in metabolite ratios in the intratumoral and peritumoral region. Material and Methods: We performed MR imaging and MRS in 73 patients with histologically verified intraaxial brain tumors: 53 patients with high-grade gliomas (34 GBM and 19 AA) and 20 patients with metastatic brain tumors. The metabolite ratios of Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA, and NAA/Cr at intermediate TE and the presence of lipids at short TE were assessed from spectral maps in the tumoral core, peritumoral edema, and contralateral normal-appearing white matter. The differences in the metabolite ratios between high-grade gliomas/GBM/AA and metastases were analyzed statistically. Cutoff values of Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA, and NAA/Cr ratios in the peritumoral edema, as well as Cho/Cr and NAA/Cr ratios in the tumoral core for distinguishing high-grade gliomas/GBM/AA from metastases were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: Significant differences were noted in the peritumoral Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA, and NAA/ Cr ratios between high-grade gliomas/GBM/AA and metastases. ROC analysis demonstrated a cutoff value of 1.24 for peritumoral Cho/Cr ratio to provide sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV), and negative predictive values (NPV) of 100%, 88.9%, 80.0%, and 100%, respectively, for discrimination between high-grade gliomas and metastases. By using a cutoff value of 1.11 for peritumoral Cho/NAA ratio, the sensitivity was 100%, the specificity was 91.1%, the PPV was 83.3%, and the NPV was 100%. Conclusion: The results of this

  5. Evaluation of FSE and FSPGR MRI imaging methods for planning cranial stereotactic irradiation of a metastatic brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Masaki; Tanoi, Chiharu

    2003-01-01

    Cranial stereotactic irradiation (STI) of a metastatic brain tumor (BT) was planned by fusing CT images with MRI images using the landmark method of the X-Knife System. The MRI images revealed the BT, the critical optic nerve and brain stem of structures and the eyeball and blood vessels that are landmarks. It was important to improve visibility of the BT with sufficient contrast. Therefore, comparison examinations were performed using the two dimensions fast spin echo (2DFSE), the two dimensions fast spoiled gradient echo (2DFSPGR), and the three dimensions fast spoiled gradient echo (3DFSPGR) methods of T1-weighted imaging with Gd-DTPA contrast. Critical structures and the internal structures of the landmark method were suitable for planning STI when the results of three or more points were combined in visual evaluations. However, the 2DFSE method could showed three or more points. The BT also be visually evaluated using three or less points by the FSPGR method, but had reduced visibility. From detailed contents, the fall of visual evaluation by the small thin and solid BT of the diameter of a BT was characteristic. In the whole signal noise ratio (SNR), the 3DFSPGR method is excellent in images analysis, and the 2DFSE method was excellent in contrast noise ratio (CNR) of a BT. The cystic BT accompanied by dropsy was images with clear and good depiction in all scan parameter. However, the FSPGR method was the boundary not clear in the small solid BT, the FSE method was able to recognize the maximum of the diameter of BT most, and depiction was good. Artifacts of blood flow and motion of the FSE method is a fault. However, the FSE method had the highest useful depiction ability of all BT in the STI plan. (author)

  6. Cerebral gumma mimicking a brain tumor in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Jin

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, and the cerebral gumma is a kind of neurosyphilis which is rare and can be cured by appropriate antibiotic treatments. However, in clinical practices, diagnosis of cerebral syphilitic gumma is often difficult because imaging and laboratory findings revealed elusive results. Herein, we present a rare case of neurosyphilis presenting as cerebral gumma confirmed by histopathological examination, and positive serologic and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. This case report suggests that cerebral gumma should be considered as possible diagnosis for human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients with space-occupying lesion of the brain. And this case also provides importance of clinical suspicions in diagnosing neurosyphilis because syphilis serology is not routinely tested on patients with neurologic symptoms.

  7. Cerebral gumma mimicking a brain tumor in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Woo Jin [Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Syphilis has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, and the cerebral gumma is a kind of neurosyphilis which is rare and can be cured by appropriate antibiotic treatments. However, in clinical practices, diagnosis of cerebral syphilitic gumma is often difficult because imaging and laboratory findings revealed elusive results. Herein, we present a rare case of neurosyphilis presenting as cerebral gumma confirmed by histopathological examination, and positive serologic and cerebrospinal fluid analyses. This case report suggests that cerebral gumma should be considered as possible diagnosis for human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients with space-occupying lesion of the brain. And this case also provides importance of clinical suspicions in diagnosing neurosyphilis because syphilis serology is not routinely tested on patients with neurologic symptoms.

  8. Metastatic disease of the brain: extra-axial metastases (skull, dura, leptomeningeal) and tumour spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroldi, Roberto; Ambrosi, Claudia; Farina, Davide [University of Brescia, Department of Radiology, Brescia, BS (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    Extra-axial intracranial metastases may arise through several situations. Hematogenous spread to the meninges is the most frequent cause. Direct extension from contiguous extra-cranial neoplasms, secondary invasion of the meninges by calvarium and skull base metastases, and migration along perineural or perivascular structures are less common. Leptomeningeal invasion gives rise to tumour cell dissemination by the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), eventually leading to neoplastic coating of brain surfaces. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complementary to CSF examinations and can be invaluable, detecting up to 50% of false-negative lumbar punctures. MR findings range from diffuse linear leptomeningeal enhancement to multiple enhancing extra-axial nodules, obstructive communicating and non-communicating hydrocephalus. Both calvarial and epidural metastases infrequently transgress the dura, which acts as a barrier against tumour spread. Radionuclide bone studies are still a valuable screening test to detect bone metastases. With computed tomography (CT) and MR, bone metastases extending intracranially and primary dural metastases show the characteristic biconvex shape, usually associated with brain displacement away from the inner table. Although CT is better in detecting skull base erosion, MR is more sensitive and provides more detailed information about dural involvement. Perineural and perivascular spread from head and neck neoplasms require thin-section contrast-enhanced MR. (orig.)

  9. Differentiation of Glioblastomas from Metastatic Brain Tumors by Tryptophan Uptake and Kinetic Analysis: A Positron Emission Tomographic Study with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. Kamson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Differentiating high-grade gliomas from solitary brain metastases is often difficult by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; molecular imaging may facilitate such discrimination. We tested the accuracy of α[11C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT–positron emission tomography (PET to differentiate newly diagnosed glioblastomas from brain metastases. AMT-PET was performed in 36 adults with suspected brain malignancy. Tumoral AMT accumulation was measured by standardized uptake values (SUVs. Tracer kinetic analysis was also performed to separate tumoral net tryptophan transport (by AMT volume of distribution [VD] from unidirectional uptake rates using dynamic PET and blood input function. Differentiating the accuracy of these PET variables was evaluated and compared to conventional MRI. For glioblastoma/metastasis differentiation, tumoral AMT SUV showed the highest accuracy (74% and the tumor/cortex VD ratio had the highest positive predictive value (82%. The combined accuracy of MRI (size of contrast-enhancing lesion and AMT-PET reached up to 93%. For ring-enhancing lesions, tumor/cortex SUV ratios were higher in glioblastomas than in metastatic tumors and could differentiate these two tumor types with > 90% accuracy. These results demonstrate that evaluation of tryptophan accumulation by PET can enhance pretreatment differentiation of glioblastomas and metastatic brain tumors. This approach may be particularly useful in patients with a newly diagnosed solitary ring-enhancing mass.

  10. The electroencephalogram in metastatic brain tumors O eletrencefalograma nos tumores metastáticos do encéfalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pinto Pupo

    1967-12-01

    Full Text Available Sixty cases of intracranial metastatic tumors diagnosed either clinically or by neurosurgery (28 operative cases, 26 with radiological contrast examinations and 6 with clinical diagnosis only are reported. The EEG tests had been made previously to the diagnosis of metastasis. The EEG results are analysed according to the previous impression gained from this test and are presented in 5 tables, on which the cases are divided as per the brain topography of the metastasis. The positive EEG data are analysed and the possibility of topographic diagnosis discussed. The results agree with those presented in the literature. The AA. reach the following conclusions: 1 in patients with suspect brain metastasis the normal EEG allows with great probability to exclude the possibility; 2 in patients with malignant tumor the EEG signs of involvement of the nervous parenchyma are the most important elements for positive diagnosis of brain metastasis; 3 in the cases of metastasis developing at the posterior fossa, either there were indicative signs of the process at that level or the EEG was normal; 4 the EEG signs of an irritant process at the brain cortex were less frequent and, in the majority of cases, appeared in the temporal and parietal areas; 5 the signs of involvement of the mesodiencephalic structures in tumors of the brain hemispheres appeared only when the tumor was located in the median part of the hemisphere (temporal or parietal lobes; 6 signs of depression of the basal electric brain activity in the affected areas appeared rarely and in cases of parietal or occipital tumors; 7 the electric brain activity of other areas of the involved hemisphere or in the opposite hemisphere was normal in the majority of the cases observed. Considering the results of the literature and their own the AA. believe that the EEG could be a semiological method to be used at the preoperative examinations of patients with malignant tumors, with a view at establishing the

  11. Metastatic brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fatigue Headache , new or more severe than usual Memory loss, poor judgment, difficulty solving problems Numbness, tingling, pain, and other changes in sensation Personality changes Rapid emotional changes or strange behaviors ...

  12. Adefovir-Induced Hypophosphatemic Osteomalacia Mimicking Bone Metastases From Primary Hepatocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei-Jun; Sun, Zhen-Kui; Shen, Chen-Tian; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2017-09-01

    Adefovir-induced hypophosphatemic osteomalacia in the context of hepatocarcinoma is rare and needs to be differentiated from metastatic hepatocarcinoma. We here report a case of severe osteomalacia whose focal uptakes of radiotracer on the Tc-MDP SPECT/CT images mimicked that of metastatic hepatocarcinoma.

  13. Multiple urinary bladder masses from metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Choo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma that manifested with multiple exophytic intravesical masses, mimicking a multifocal primary bladder tumor. Biopsy with immunohistochemical analysis confirmed metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. The patient was treated palliatively with external beam radiotherapy to prevent possible symptoms from local tumor progression. This case illustrates that when a patient with known prostate cancer presents with multifocal bladder tumors, the possibility of metastatic prostate cancer should be considered.

  14. WE-EF-BRA-10: Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Reduces the Incidence of Brain Metastasis in a Mouse Model of Metastatic Breast Cancerr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D; Debeb, B; Larson, R; Diagaradjane, P; Woodward, W [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is a clinical technique used to reduce the incidence of brain metastasis and improve overall survival in select patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and small-cell lung cancer. We examined whether PCI could benefit breast cancer patients at high risk of developing brain metastases. Methods: We utilized our mouse model in which 500k green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled breast cancer cells injected into the tail vein of SCID/Beige mice resulted in brain metastases in approximately two-thirds of untreated mice. To test the efficacy of PCI, one set of mice was irradiated five days after cell injection with a single fraction of 4-Gy (two 2-Gy opposing fields) whole-brain irradiation on the XRAD 225Cx small-animal irradiator. Four controls were included: a non-irradiated group, a group irradiated two days prior to cell injection, and two groups irradiated 3 or 6 weeks after cell injection. Mice were sacrificed four and eight weeks post-injection and were evaluated for the presence of brain metastases on a fluorescent stereomicroscope. Results: The incidence of brain metastasis in the non-irradiated group was 77% and 90% at four and eight weeks, respectively. The PCI group had a significantly lower incidence, 20% and 30%, whereas the other three control groups had incidence rates similar to the non-treated control (70% to 100%). Further, the number of metastases and the metastatic burden were also significantly lower in the PCI group compared to all other groups. Conclusion: The timing of irradiation to treat subclinical disease is critical, as a small dose of whole-brain irradiation given five days after cell injection abrogated tumor burden by greater than 90%, but had no effect when administered twenty-one days after cell injection. PCI is likely to benefit breast cancer patients at high risk of developing brain metastases and should be strongly considered in the clinic.

  15. Metastatic melanoma misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular disorder: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Samir; Desai, Bhavik; Laskin, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Malignancies in the head and neck region are difficult to diagnose because of their deep location and presence of symptoms mimicking those of temporomandibular disorders or other orofacial pain disorders. A 75-year-old woman reported experiencing right-sided jaw pain, temporal discomfort and paresthesia. She had undergone conservative therapy for temporomandibular joint disorder, which was unsuccessful. A magnetic resonance image of the midface revealed a mass on the base of the tongue along with possible metastatic lesions to the brain. Further investigation of the lesions revealed them to be metastatic melanoma. Patients with atypical symptoms of facial pain, including neurological signs, should undergo further investigation with advanced imaging to determine the source of the symptoms, which could include neoplasms.

  16. Association of Ki-67, p53, and bcl-2 expression of the primary non-small-cell lung cancer lesion with brain metastatic lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubb, Robbin S.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Hachiya, Tsutomu; Milas, Ivan; Ro, Jae Y.; Langford, Lauren; Sawaya, Raymond; Putnam, Joe B.; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D.; McDonnell, Timothy J.; Brock, William; Hong, Waun K.; Roth, Jack A.; Milas, Luka

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The study was conducted to determine whether immunohistochemical analysis of Ki-67, p53, and bcl-2 in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer is associated with a higher rate of brain metastases and whether the intrapatient expression of these biomarkers (in the primary tumors vs. brain lesions) is similar. Methods and Materials: At the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, tumors from 29 case patients with primary lung tumor and brain metastasis and 29 control patients with primary lung tumor but no brain metastasis were resected and examined for immunohistochemical expression. Ki-67, p53, and bcl-2 were analyzed in resected primary lung, lymph node, and metastatic brain tumors. Each control patient was matched by age, gender, and histology to a patient with brain metastasis. Results: No significant differences in patient survival characteristics were detected between the case group and control group. Also, difference in patient outcome between the two groups was not generally predicted by biomarker analysis. However, when the groups were combined, the biomarker analysis was predictive for certain patient outcome end points. Using median values as cutoff points between low and high expression of biomarkers, it was observed that high expression of Ki-67 (>40%) in lung primaries was associated with poorer disease-free survival (p=0.04), whereas low expression of p53 in lung primaries was associated with poorer overall survival (p=0.04), and these patients had a higher rate of nonbrain distant metastases (p=0.02). The patients with brain metastases were particularly prone to developing nonbrain distant metastases if the percentage of p53-positive cells in brain metastases was low (p=0.01). There was a positive correlation in the expression of Ki-67 (p=0.02) (r 2 =0.1608), as well as p53 (p 2 =0.7380), between lung primaries and brain metastases. Compared to Ki-67 and p53, bcl-2 was the least predictive. Conclusion: Differences in biomarker expression between the

  17. Remote Cutaneous Breast Carcinoma Metastasis Mimicking Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annakan V Navaratnam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastases from primary internal malignancies are an uncommon presentation. Cutaneous metastases are more frequently seen in breast cancer than in any other visceral malignancy in women. Medical practitioners should be vigilant of the possibility of unusual presentations of metastatic disease in breast cancer patients with lobular carcinoma presenting as cutaneous lesions mimicking benign dermatological conditions. Herein, we present a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting with cutaneous lobular breast carcinoma metastases on her anterior right leg, which had previously been misdiagnosed as dermatitis for 9 years.

  18. Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastatic cancer is cancer that spreads from its site of origin to another part of the body. Learn how cancer spreads, possible symptoms, common sites where cancer spreads, and how to find out about treatment options.

  19. Brain natriuretic peptide precursor (NT-pro-BNP) levels predict for clinical benefit to sunitinib treatment in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papazisis, Konstantinos T; Kortsaris, Alexandros H; Kontovinis, Lukas F; Papandreou, Christos N; Kouvatseas, George; Lafaras, Christos; Antonakis, Evangelos; Christopoulou, Maria; Andreadis, Charalambos; Mouratidou, Despoina

    2010-01-01

    Sunitinib is an oral, multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Although the majority of sunitinib-treated patients receive a clinical benefit, almost a third of the patients will not respond. Currently there is no available marker that can predict for response in these patients. We estimated the plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP (the N-terminal precursor of brain natriuretic peptide) in 36 patients that were treated with sunitinib for metastatic clear-cell renal carcinoma. From the 36 patients, 9 had progressive disease and 27 obtained a clinical benefit (objective response or disease stabilization). Increases in plasma NT-pro-BNP were strongly correlated to clinical outcome. Patients with disease progression increased plasma BNP at statistically significant higher levels than patients that obtained a clinical benefit, and this was evident from the first 15 days of treatment (a three-fold increase in patients with progressive disease compared to stable NT-pro-BNP levels in patients with clinical benefit, p < 0.0001). Median progression-free survival was 12.0 months in patients with less than 1.5 fold increases (n = 22) and 3.9 months in patients with more than 1.5 fold increases in plasma NT-pro-BNP (n = 13) (log-rank test, p = 0.001). This is the first time that a potential 'surrogate marker' has been reported with such a clear correlation to clinical benefit at an early time of treatment. Due to the relative small number of accessed patients, this observation needs to be further addressed on larger cohorts. More analyses, including multivariate analyses are needed before such an observation can be used in clinical practice

  20. A pilot study to determine the timing and effect of bevacizumab on vascular normalization of metastatic brain tumors in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Bang-Bin; Lu, Yen-Shen; Lin, Ching-Hung; Chen, Wei-Wu; Wu, Pei-Fang; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Yu, Chih-Wei; Wei, Shwu-Yuan; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang

    2016-01-01

    To determine the appropriate time of concomitant chemotherapy administration after antiangiogenic treatment, we investigated the timing and effect of bevacizumab administration on vascular normalization of metastatic brain tumors in breast cancer patients. Eight patients who participated in a phase II trial for breast cancer-induced refractory brain metastases were enrolled and subjected to 4 dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) examinations that evaluated Peak, Slope, iAUC 60 , and Ktrans before and after treatment. The treatment comprised bevacizumab on Day 1, etoposide on Days 2–4, and cisplatin on Day 2 in a 21-day cycle for a maximum of 6 cycles. DCE-MRI was performed before treatment and at 1 h, 24 h, and 21 days after bevacizumab administration. Values of the 4 DCE-MRI parameters reduced after bevacizumab administration. Compared with baseline values, the mean reductions at 1 and 24 h were −12.8 and −24.7 % for Peak, −46.6 and −65.8 % for Slope, −27.9 and −55.5 % for iAUC 60 , and −46.6 and −63.9 % for Ktrans, respectively (all P < .05). The differences in the 1 and 24 h mean reductions were significant (all P < .05) for all the parameters. The generalized estimating equation linear regression analyses of the 4 DCE-MRI parameters revealed that vascular normalization peaked 24 h after bevacizumab administration. Bevacizumab induced vascular normalization of brain metastases in humans at 1 and 24 h after administration, and the effect was significantly higher at 24 h than at 1 h. ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01281696, registered prospectively on December 24, 2010

  1. Comparison of Amino Acid Positron Emission Tomographic Radiotracers for Molecular Imaging of Primary and Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Juhász

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an imaging technology that can detect and characterize tumors based on their molecular and biochemical properties, such as altered glucose, nucleoside, or amino acid metabolism. PET plays a significant role in the diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment of various cancers, including brain tumors. In this article, we compare uptake mechanisms and the clinical performance of the amino acid PET radiotracers (L-[methyl-11C]methionine [MET], 18F-fluoroethyl-tyrosine [FET], 18F-fluoro-L- dihydroxy-phenylalanine [FDOPA], and 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan [AMT] most commonly used for brain tumor imaging. First, we discuss and compare the mechanisms of tumoral transport and accumulation, the basis of differential performance of these radioligands in clinical studies. Then we summarize studies that provided direct comparisons among these amino acid tracers and to clinically used 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose [FDG] PET imaging. We also discuss how tracer kinetic analysis can enhance the clinical information obtained from amino acid PET images. We discuss both similarities and differences in potential clinical value for each radioligand. This comparative review can guide which radiotracer to favor in future clinical trials aimed at defining the role of these molecular imaging modalities in the clinical management of brain tumor patients.

  2. SU-E-T-471: Improvement of Gamma Knife Treatment Planning Through Tumor Control Probability for Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Feng, Y [East Carolina Univ, Rockville, MD (United States); Lo, S [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Grecula, J [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Mayr, N; Yuh, W [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The dose–volume histogram (DVH) has been normally accepted as a tool for treatment plan evaluation. However, spatial information is lacking in DVH. As a supplement to the DVH in three-dimensional treatment planning, the differential DVH (DDVH) provides the spatial variation, the size and magnitude of the different dose regions within a region of interest, which can be incorporated into tumor control probability model. This study was to provide a method in evaluating and improving Gamma Knife treatment planning. Methods: 10 patients with brain metastases from different primary tumors including melanoma (#1,#4,#5, #10), breast cancer (#2), prostate cancer (#3) and lung cancer (#6–9) were analyzed. By using Leksell GammaPlan software, two plans were prepared for each patient. Special attention was given to the DDVHs that were different for different plans and were used for a comparison between two plans. Dose distribution inside target and tumor control probability (TCP) based on DDVH were calculated, where cell density and radiobiological parameters were adopted from literature. The plans were compared based on DVH, DDVH and TCP. Results: Using DVH, the coverage and selectivity were the same between plans for 10 patients. DDVH were different between two plans for each patient. The paired t-test showed no significant difference in TCP between the two plans. For brain metastases from melanoma (#1, #4–5), breast cancer (#2) and lung cancer (#6–8), the difference in TCP was less than 5%. But the difference in TCP was about 6.5% for patient #3 with the metastasis from prostate cancer, 10.1% and 178.7% for two patients (#9–10) with metastasis from lung cancer. Conclusion: Although DVH provides average dose–volume information, DDVH provides differential dose– volume information with respect to different regions inside the tumor. TCP provides radiobiological information and adds additional information on improving treatment planning as well as adaptive

  3. SU-E-T-471: Improvement of Gamma Knife Treatment Planning Through Tumor Control Probability for Metastatic Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z; Feng, Y; Lo, S; Grecula, J; Mayr, N; Yuh, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The dose–volume histogram (DVH) has been normally accepted as a tool for treatment plan evaluation. However, spatial information is lacking in DVH. As a supplement to the DVH in three-dimensional treatment planning, the differential DVH (DDVH) provides the spatial variation, the size and magnitude of the different dose regions within a region of interest, which can be incorporated into tumor control probability model. This study was to provide a method in evaluating and improving Gamma Knife treatment planning. Methods: 10 patients with brain metastases from different primary tumors including melanoma (#1,#4,#5, #10), breast cancer (#2), prostate cancer (#3) and lung cancer (#6–9) were analyzed. By using Leksell GammaPlan software, two plans were prepared for each patient. Special attention was given to the DDVHs that were different for different plans and were used for a comparison between two plans. Dose distribution inside target and tumor control probability (TCP) based on DDVH were calculated, where cell density and radiobiological parameters were adopted from literature. The plans were compared based on DVH, DDVH and TCP. Results: Using DVH, the coverage and selectivity were the same between plans for 10 patients. DDVH were different between two plans for each patient. The paired t-test showed no significant difference in TCP between the two plans. For brain metastases from melanoma (#1, #4–5), breast cancer (#2) and lung cancer (#6–8), the difference in TCP was less than 5%. But the difference in TCP was about 6.5% for patient #3 with the metastasis from prostate cancer, 10.1% and 178.7% for two patients (#9–10) with metastasis from lung cancer. Conclusion: Although DVH provides average dose–volume information, DDVH provides differential dose– volume information with respect to different regions inside the tumor. TCP provides radiobiological information and adds additional information on improving treatment planning as well as adaptive

  4. Postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery compared with whole brain radiotherapy for resected metastatic brain disease (NCCTG N107C/CEC·3): a multicentre, randomised, controlled, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paul D; Ballman, Karla V; Cerhan, Jane H; Anderson, S Keith; Carrero, Xiomara W; Whitton, Anthony C; Greenspoon, Jeffrey; Parney, Ian F; Laack, Nadia N I; Ashman, Jonathan B; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Hadjipanayis, Costas G; Urbanic, James J; Barker, Fred G; Farace, Elana; Khuntia, Deepak; Giannini, Caterina; Buckner, Jan C; Galanis, Evanthia; Roberge, David

    2017-08-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is the standard of care to improve intracranial control following resection of brain metastasis. However, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the surgical cavity is widely used in an attempt to reduce cognitive toxicity, despite the absence of high-level comparative data substantiating efficacy in the postoperative setting. We aimed to establish the effect of SRS on survival and cognitive outcomes compared with WBRT in patients with resected brain metastasis. In this randomised, controlled, phase 3 trial, adult patients (aged 18 years or older) from 48 institutions in the USA and Canada with one resected brain metastasis and a resection cavity less than 5·0 cm in maximal extent were randomly assigned (1:1) to either postoperative SRS (12-20 Gy single fraction with dose determined by surgical cavity volume) or WBRT (30 Gy in ten daily fractions or 37·5 Gy in 15 daily fractions of 2·5 Gy; fractionation schedule predetermined for all patients at treating centre). We randomised patients using a dynamic allocation strategy with stratification factors of age, duration of extracranial disease control, number of brain metastases, histology, maximal resection cavity diameter, and treatment centre. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment allocation. The co-primary endpoints were cognitive-deterioration-free survival and overall survival, and analyses were done by intention to treat. We report the final analysis. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01372774. Between Nov 10, 2011, and Nov 16, 2015, 194 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to SRS (98 patients) or WBRT (96 patients). Median follow-up was 11·1 months (IQR 5·1-18·0). Cognitive-deterioration-free survival was longer in patients assigned to SRS (median 3·7 months [95% CI 3·45-5·06], 93 events) than in patients assigned to WBRT (median 3·0 months [2·86-3·25], 93 events; hazard ratio [HR] 0·47 [95% CI 0·35-0·63]; p<0·0001

  5. Utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for differentiating glioblastoma, primary central nervous system lymphoma and brain metastatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shanshan, E-mail: lushan1118@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Gao, Qianqian, E-mail: gaoqian123011@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Jing, E-mail: yujing0303@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Yang, E-mail: yuhao040511@163.com [Department of Pathology,The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Cao, Peng, E-mail: peng.cao@ge.com [GE healthcare, Shanghai (China); Shi, Haibin, E-mail: hbshi346@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Hong, Xunning, E-mail: hongxunning@sina.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: The study aimed to investigate the use of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived permeability parameters for the differentiation of glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs), primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs), and brain metastatic tumors (MTs). Materials and methods: Seventy-five patients with histopathologically confirmed GBMs (n = 38), PCNSLs (n = 16) and MTs (n = 21) underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRIs before surgery. The volume transfer constant K{sup trans}, the flux rate constant between extravascular extracellular space and plasma K{sub ep}, the extravascular extracellular volume V{sub e} and the fractional plasma volume V{sub p} were measured within the entire contrast-enhancing tumor by extended Tofts model. A one-way analysis of variance was used to compare all of the parameters among these three tumors, followed by the post-hoc test. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the permeability parameters. Results: Mean K{sup trans} value and V{sub e} value were significantly higher in PCNSLs than in GBMs (P < 0.001 and P = 0.011) and MTs (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in all of the permeability parameters between GBMs and MTs. According to the receiver operating characteristic analyses, both K{sup trans} and V{sub e} had good diagnostic performance for discriminating between PCNSLs and GBMs (the area under the curve: 0.847 and 0.785, respectively), as well as between PCNSLs and MTs (the area under the curve: 0.851 and 0.884, respectively). Conclusions: The K{sup trans} and V{sub e} derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI facilitate the differentiation of PCNSLs from GBMs and MTs.

  6. Fibromatosis of the breast mimicking an abscess: case report of unusual sonographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So Min; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Byung Hoon; Kim, Su Young; Joo, Mee; Kim, Jae Il

    2015-01-01

    Fibromatosis of the breast, also known as a desmoid tumor, is extremely rare and most often appears as an aggressive lesion mimicking breast carcinoma. It lacks metastatic potential but can grow aggressively in a localized area. Ultrasonography often shows an irregular spiculated hypoechoic mass with posterior acoustic shadowing. We discuss a case of breast fibromatosis that presented as a painful palpable breast mass in a 32-year-old woman and mimicked an abscess in the sonogram. We found that this lesion displayed atypical sonographic features such as a heterogeneous echoic mass with an internal anechoic area. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Moyamoya Disease Mimicking Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khalesi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a rare vaso-occlusive illness with an unknown etiology characterized by stenosis of the internal carotid arteries with spontaneous development of a collateral vascular network. A 15-month-old girl was referred to the emergency ward of Imam Reza Hospital due to decreased level of consciousness, focal seizures and fever during the previous 24 hours with an impression of encephalitis. Physical examination revealed left side hemiparesis; however brain CT-Scan did not show any significant lesions. Initial therapy with vancomycin, ceftriaxone and acyclovir was administered. CSF analysis did not show any abnormality and the blood as well as CSF cultures results were negative. Brain MRI showed hyperintensity at right frontal and parietal regions, suggesting vascular lesion. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA showed bilaterally multiple torsions in vessels at the basal ganglia consistent with moyamoya vessels. In all children exhibiting encephalitis, vascular events such as moyamoya disease should be considered. Brain MRI is a critical tool for this purpose. Common causes of encephalitis such as herpes simplex should also be ruled out.

  8. [Primary central nervous system lymphoma mimicking ventriculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shiro; Nagano, Seiji; Shibata, Sumiya; Kunieda, Takeharu; Imai, Yukihiro; Kohara, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with deteriorated bradykinesia, gait disturbance, disorientation, and urinary incontinence for three weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed dilatation of the ventricles. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination demonstrated lymphocytic pleocytosis, elevation of protein levels, and decreased of glucose levels. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI revealed lesions in the ventricular wall and choroid plexus, mimicking ventriculitis. No evidence of bacterial, fungal, mycobacterial, or viral infections were observed in the CSF. Flow cytometry of CSF showed predominance of CD20+, λ+ cells. PCR examination of CSF revealed positive IgH gene rearrangement, suggesting B cell lymphoma. Endoscopic brain biopsy showed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. As the patient had no evidence of lymphoma in the other organs, we made a diagnosed of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). A limited intraventricular spread of PCNSL is rare but important as one of differential diagnosis of ventriculitis.

  9. Brain Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain cancer refers to growths of malignant cells in tissues of the brain. Tumors that start in the brain are called primary brain tumors. Tumors that spread to the brain are called metastatic brain tumors. Start here to find information on brain cancer treatment, research, and statistics.

  10. Targeted Approaches Applied to Uncommon Diseases: A Case of Salivary Duct Carcinoma Metastatic to the Brain Treated with the Multikinase Inhibitor Neratinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl R. Sorenson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Salivary duct carcinoma is a rare malignancy associated with hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 overexpression. Local surgical control is the cornerstone of therapy, but a subset of patients develops metastatic disease portending a poor prognosis and limited management options. Intracranial metastases are an uncommon manifestation and present a therapeutic challenge. We report the case of a 31-year-old male who presented with facial pain and swelling subsequently diagnosed with salivary duct carcinoma. Our patient underwent extensive locoregional resection and analysis of the tumor tissue demonstrated evidence of androgen receptor expression and HER2 overexpression. His course was complicated by metastatic extra- and intracranial recurrence despite combined modality treatment with radiation and chemotherapy followed by anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody therapy and androgen deprivation therapy. After exhausting standard treatment options, he received experimental therapy with a new small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, neratinib, with evidence of a transient clinical response and no significant adverse effects. This case exemplifies the potential and limitations of targeted therapy, particularly when applied to patients with rare diseases and presentations.

  11. Targeted Approaches Applied to Uncommon Diseases: A Case of Salivary Duct Carcinoma Metastatic to the Brain Treated with the Multikinase Inhibitor Neratinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Karl R; Piovezani Ramos, Guilherme; Villasboas Bisneto, Jose Caetano; Price, Katharine

    2017-01-01

    Salivary duct carcinoma is a rare malignancy associated with hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression. Local surgical control is the cornerstone of therapy, but a subset of patients develops metastatic disease portending a poor prognosis and limited management options. Intracranial metastases are an uncommon manifestation and present a therapeutic challenge. We report the case of a 31-year-old male who presented with facial pain and swelling subsequently diagnosed with salivary duct carcinoma. Our patient underwent extensive locoregional resection and analysis of the tumor tissue demonstrated evidence of androgen receptor expression and HER2 overexpression. His course was complicated by metastatic extra- and intracranial recurrence despite combined modality treatment with radiation and chemotherapy followed by anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody therapy and androgen deprivation therapy. After exhausting standard treatment options, he received experimental therapy with a new small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, neratinib, with evidence of a transient clinical response and no significant adverse effects. This case exemplifies the potential and limitations of targeted therapy, particularly when applied to patients with rare diseases and presentations.

  12. Gastric Adenomyoma: The Unexpected Mimicker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Adriana Duran Álvarez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric adenomyoma is a rare benign tumor composed of epithelial structures and smooth muscle stroma. Here, we report an unusual case of gastric adenomyoma mostly composed of smooth muscle that was incidentally found during a laparoscopic intervention. On radiology, it mimicked an acquired hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in an adult patient, and pathologically it resembled a pure smooth muscle hamartoma. Complete submission of the lesion for histology was necessary to find the epithelial component and make the right diagnosis. As a mimicker of benign and malignant entities, gastric adenomyoma is usually an unexpected finding after surgery. The aim of this report is to analyze this adenomyoma variant in the setting of an unexplained thickening of the gastric wall, with explanations concerning histogenesis and biological potential.

  13. Multicystic Hepatocarcinoma Mimicking Liver Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Falidas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC became easier in relation to the improved radiological examinations; however, the neoplasm may occur under atypical presentations mimicking other benign or malignant processes. Multicystic HCC mimicking a liver abscess associated with septic-type fever and leukocytosis is rare, has a poor prognosis, and poses diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. We present the case of an 80-year-old patient, who presented with fever, leukocytosis, and large cystic masses involving right and left lobes of the liver initially considered abscesses and finally diagnosed as HCC after open drainage and liver biopsy. Although the patient died on the tenth postoperative day due to pulmonary oedema, the authors emphasize the high index of suspicion needed in the diagnosis of this unusual presentation of HCC.

  14. Tongue metastasis mimicking an abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavili, Ertuğrul; Oztürk, Mustafa; Yücel, Tuba; Yüce, Imdat; Cağli, Sedat

    2010-03-01

    Primary tumors metastasizing to the oral cavity are extremely rare. Lung is one of the most common primary sources of metastases to the tongue. Although the incidence of lung cancer is increasing, tongue metastasis as the initial presentation of the tumor remains uncommon. Due to the rarity of tongue metastasis, little is known about its imaging findings. Herein we report the magnetic resonance imaging and clinical findings of a lingual metastasis, mimicking an abscess, from a primary lung cancer.

  15. Clozapine Intoxication Mimicking Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D. Villarreal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic drug prescribed for treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The risk of adverse hematologic, cardiovascular, and neurologic effects has tempered its use, and reports of overdoses remain rare. We report a case of accidental acute clozapine intoxication in a clozapine-naïve patient, who presented with symptoms mimicking acute stroke and later developed status epilepticus. Clozapine intoxication is a rare presentation in the emergency department with potential for iatrogenic harm if not correctly identified.

  16. Clinical Outcome in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from the Primary Breast Cancer : Prognostic Factors in Local Treatment Failure and Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seung Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Chang Jin

    2013-01-01

    Objective Brain metastases in primary breast cancer patients are considerable sources of morbidity and mortality. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has gained popularity as an up-front therapy in treating such metastases over traditional radiation therapy due to better neurocognitive function preservation. The aim of this study was to clarify the prognostic factors for local tumor control and survival in radiosurgery for brain metastases from primary breast cancer. Methods From March 2001 to Ma...

  17. Two Domains of Vimentin Are Expressed on the Surface of Lymph Node, Bone and Brain Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lines along with the Putative Stem Cell Marker Proteins CD44 and CD133

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmetz, Nicole F. [Case Western Reserve University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Maurer, Jochen [Sanford-Burnham, Medical Research Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Sheng, Huiming [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Division of Immune Regulation, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Bensussan, Armand [INSERM U976, Hôpital Saint Louis, F-75475 Paris (France); Department of Immunology, Dermatology and Oncology, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMRS976 F-75475 Paris (France); Maricic, Igor; Kumar, Vipin [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Laboratory of Autoimmunity, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Braciak, Todd A., E-mail: tbraciak@tpims.org [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Division of Immune Regulation, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2011-07-13

    Vimentin was originally identified as an intermediate filament protein present only as an intracellular component in many cell types. However, this protein has now been detected on the surface of a number of different cancer cell types in a punctate distribution pattern. Increased vimentin expression has been indicated as an important step in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) required for the metastasis of prostate cancer. Here, using two vimentin-specific monoclonal antibodies (SC5 and V9 directed against the coil one rod domain and the C-terminus of the vimentin protein, respectively), we examined whether either of these domains would be displayed on the surface of three commonly studied prostate cancer cell lines isolated from different sites of metastases. Confocal analysis of LNCaP, PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines (derived from lymph node, bone or brain prostate metastases, respectively) demonstrated that both domains of vimentin are present on the surface of these metastatic cancer cell types. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed that vimentin expression was readily detected along with CD44 expression but only a small subpopulation of prostate cancer cells expressed vimentin and the putative stem cell marker CD133 along with CD44. Finally, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) nanoparticles that target vimentin could bind and internalize into tested prostate cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that at least two domains of vimentin are present on the surface of metastatic prostate cancer cells and suggest that vimentin could provide a useful target for nanoparticle- or antibody- cancer therapeutic agents directed against highly invasive cancer and/or stem cells.

  18. Malignant Mesothelioma Mimicking Invasive Mammary Carcinoma in a Male Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mokhtar Desouki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesothelioma is an uncommon tumor with strong association with asbestos exposure. Few cases of malignant pleural mesothelioma metastatic to the female breast have been reported. Herein, we presented, for the first time, a case of locally infiltrating malignant pleural mesothelioma forming a mass in the breast of a male as the first pathologically confirmed manifestation of the disease. Breast ultrasound revealed an irregular mass in the right breast which involves the pectoralis muscle. Breast core biopsy revealed a proliferation of neoplastic epithelioid cells mimicking an infiltrating pleomorphic lobular carcinoma. IHC studies showed the cells to be positive for calretinin, CK5/6, WT1, and CK7. The cells were negative for MOC-31, BerEp4, ER, and PR. A final diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma, epithelioid type, was rendered. This case demonstrates the importance of considering a broad differential diagnosis in the setting of atypical presentation with application of a panel of IHC markers.

  19. Dabrafenib in patients with Val600Glu or Val600Lys BRAF-mutant melanoma metastatic to the brain (BREAK-MB): a multicentre, open-label, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Georgina V; Trefzer, Uwe; Davies, Michael A; Kefford, Richard F; Ascierto, Paolo A; Chapman, Paul B; Puzanov, Igor; Hauschild, Axel; Robert, Caroline; Algazi, Alain; Mortier, Laurent; Tawbi, Hussein; Wilhelm, Tabea; Zimmer, Lisa; Switzky, Julie; Swann, Suzanne; Martin, Anne-Marie; Guckert, Mary; Goodman, Vicki; Streit, Michael; Kirkwood, John M; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    Brain metastases are common in patients with metastatic melanoma and median overall survival from their diagnosis is typically 17-22 weeks. We assessed dabrafenib in patients with Val600Glu or Val600Lys BRAF-mutant melanoma metastatic to the brain. We undertook a multicentre, open-label, phase 2 trial in 24 centres in six countries. We enrolled patients with histologically confirmed Val600Glu or Val600Lys BRAF-mutant melanoma and at least one asymptomatic brain metastasis (≥5 mm and ≤40 mm in diameter). Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older, had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, and had adequate organ function. Patients were split into two cohorts: those in cohort A had not received previous local treatment for brain metastases and those in cohort B had progressive brain metastases after previous local treatments. Patients received 150 mg oral dabrafenib twice a day until disease progression, death, or unacceptable adverse events. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with Val600Glu BRAF-mutant melanoma who achieved an overall intracranial response, which was defined as a complete response or partial response assessed with a modified form of Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1). We included patients who received at least one dose of dabrafenib in efficacy and safety analyses. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01266967. Between Feb 2, 2011, and Aug 5, 2011, we enrolled 172 patients: 89 (52%) in cohort A and 83 (48%) in cohort B. 139 (81%) had Val600Glu BRAF-mutant melanoma. 29 (39·2%, 95% CI 28·0-51·2) of 74 patients with Val600Glu BRAF-mutant melanoma in cohort A achieved an overall intracranial response, as did 20 (30·8%, 19·9-43·4) of 65 in cohort B. One (6·7%, 0·2-31·9) of 15 patients with Val600Lys BRAF-mutant melanoma achieved an overall intracranial response in cohort A, as did four (22·2%, 6·4-47·6) of 18 such patients in cohort B. Treatment

  20. Metastatic tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma masquerading as a pancreatic cystic tumor and diagnosed by EUS-guided FNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Ryan; Andrawes, Sherif A; Hamele-Bena, Diane; Tong, Guo-Xia

    2017-11-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the pancreas is uncommon and head and neck squamous carcinoma metastatic to the pancreas is extremely rare. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to the pancreas presents a unique diagnostic challenge: in addition to mimicking the rare primary squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas based on cytologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical features, it may be mistaken for a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas because of its high predilection for cystic degeneration in metastatic sites. Herein, we report a case of tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma with a cystic pancreatic metastasis diagnosed by ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA). This represents a third reported case of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to the pancreas from the head and neck region. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of EUS-FNA during evaluation of pancreatic cystic lesion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Metastatic neoplasms of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenner, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    Metastatic neoplasms to the central nervous system are often encountered in the practice of surgical neuropathology. It is not uncommon for patients with systemic malignancies to present to medical attention because of symptoms from a brain metastasis and for the tissue samples procured from these lesions to represent the first tissue available to study a malignancy from an unknown primary. In general surgical pathology, the evaluation of a metastatic neoplasm of unknown primary is a very complicated process, requiring knowledge of numerous different tumor types, reagents, and staining patterns. The past few years, however, have seen a remarkable refinement in the immunohistochemical tools at our disposal that now empower neuropathologists to take an active role in defining the relatively limited subset of neoplasms that commonly metastasize to the central nervous system. This information can direct imaging studies to find the primary tumor in a patient with an unknown primary, clarify the likely primary site of origin in patients who have small tumors in multiple sites without an obvious primary lesion, or establish lesions as late metastases of remote malignancies. Furthermore, specific treatments can begin and additional invasive procedures may be prevented if the neuropathologic evaluation of metastatic neoplasms provides information beyond the traditional diagnosis of ''metastatic neoplasm.'' In this review, differential cytokeratins, adjuvant markers, and organ-specific antibodies are described and the immunohistochemical signatures of metastatic neoplasms that are commonly seen by neuropathologists are discussed

  2. Pre-metastatic niches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peinado, Héctor; Zhang, Haiying; Matei, Irina R.

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that organs of future metastasis are not passive receivers of circulating tumour cells, but are instead selectively and actively modified by the primary tumour before metastatic spread has even occurred. Sowing the 'seeds' of metastasis requires the action of tumour......-secreted factors and tumour-shed extracellular vesicles that enable the 'soil' at distant metastatic sites to encourage the outgrowth of incoming cancer cells. In this Review, we summarize the main processes and new mechanisms involved in the formation of the pre-metastatic niche....

  3. [A case of pulmonary malignant melanoma mimicking lung abscess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Hideaki; Chikui, Emiko; Tokumaru, Aya; Kato, Takayuki; Arai, Tomio; Takahashi, Hideki

    2011-06-01

    An 84-year-old man was admitted with paresis of the right lower limb. Hemorrhagic lesions were demonstrated in the left frontoparietal lobe and cerebellum by cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Chest CT revealed an ill-defined mass measuring 4 x 6 cm in the left lower lobe of the lung, although bronchoscopic examination failed to obtain pathological diagnosis. Clinical diagnosis of primary lung cancer with multiple brain metastases was made, and he underwent whole brain radiotherapy. The pulmonary and cerebral lesions mimicked abscesses during his clinical course, and he died of respiratory failure due to bilateral pneumonia three months after admission. Autopsy revealed that both the pulmonary and brain lesions were malignant melanomas, but no other melanoma lesions could be identified despite meticulous investigation. Although malignant melanoma with an unknown primary site is rare in Japan, careful evaluation of the CT and MRI findings might be the key to correct diagnosis in this case.

  4. Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking Paradental Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Enrico Borgonovo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis.

  5. Gout: radiographic findings mimicking infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, I.; Raymond-Tremblay, D.; Cardinal, E.; Beauregard, C.G.; Braunstein, E.M.; Saint-Pierre, A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To describe radiographic features of gout that may mimic infection. Design and patients: We report five patients with acute bacterial gout who presented with clinical as well as radiological findings mimicking acute bacterial septic arthritis or osteomyelitis. Three patients had delay in the appropriate treatment with the final diagnosis being established after needle aspiration and identification of urate crystals under polarized light microscopy. Two patients underwent digit amputation for not responding to antibiotic treatment and had histological findings confirming the diagnosis of gout. Conclusion: It is important for the radiologist to be aware of the radiological manifestations of acute gout that can resemble infection in order to avoid inappropriate diagnosis and delay in adequate treatment. The definitive diagnosis should rely on needle aspiration and a specific search for urate crystals. (orig.)

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 Encephalitis Mimicking Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM often presents as a brain mass with encephalitis. In a patient with GBM, subsequent presentation with new onset encephalitis may be due to another GBM or Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 encephalitis. We present a case of HSV-1 encephalitis mimicking GBM in a patient with previous GBM.

  7. Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Jim S

    2014-01-01

    Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety

  8. Esophageal Cancer with Bone Marrow Hyperplasia Mimicking Bone Metastasis: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Yasuda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old man visited the clinic with numbness in the right hand. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated multiple low-intensity lesions in the cervical vertebrae and sacrum, which was suspicious of cervical bone metastasis. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography revealed areas of increased fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the thoracic esophagus, sternum and sacrum. A flat, elevated esophageal cancer was identified by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and the macroscopic appearance indicated early-stage disease. From the cervical, thoracic and abdominal computed tomography images, there were no metastatic lesions except for the bone lesions. To confirm whether the bone lesions were metastatic, we performed bone biopsy. The histopathological diagnosis was bone marrow hyperplasia. It was crucial for treatment planning to establish whether the lesions were distant metastases. Here, we report a case of esophageal cancer with bone marrow hyperplasia mimicking bone metastasis.

  9. Cutaneous metastatic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Arun

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A 5.5-year-old male presented with asymptomatic nodules and plaques on his scalp and pubic region of 2 months′ duration. He was having productive cough, haemoptysis, chest pain, anorexia and weight loss and receiving antitubercular treatment for these symptoms for last 3 months. Clinical diagnosis of cutaneous metastatic disease was made. Chest x-ray revealed multiple coin shaped shadows on both sides with pleural effusion. Routine investigations were normal except for anemia and hyperuricemia. Biopsy of skin nodules showed features of metastatic adenocarcinoma. Features and significance of cutaneous metastases are discussed.

  10. Intracardiac Metastatic Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Ho Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old man who visited Samsung Medical Center reported experiencing palpitation for 2 weeks. He had undergone excision of a mass in the right buttock due to rhabdomyosarcoma 7 years prior to this visit. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a pedunculated mass in the left ventricle, which was thought to be a vegetation of infective endocarditis, metastasis of the primary tumor, or thrombus. He underwent removal of the cardiac tumor, and the pathologic report was metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma. Thus, here, we report a rare case of metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma in the left ventricle.

  11. Subaortic membrane mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark Joseph; Arruda-Olson, Adelaide; Gersh, Bernard; Geske, Jeffrey

    2015-11-04

    A 34-year-old man was referred for progressive angina and exertional dyspnoea refractory to medical therapy, with a presumptive diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed asymmetric septal hypertrophy without systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflet and with no dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. However, the LVOT velocity was elevated at rest as well as with provocation, without the characteristic late peaking obstruction seen in HCM. Focused TTE to evaluate for suspected fixed obstruction demonstrated a subaortic membrane 2.2 cm below the aortic valve. Coronary CT angiography confirmed the presence of the subaortic membrane and was negative for concomitant coronary artery disease. Surgical resection of the subaortic membrane and septal myectomy resulted in significant symptomatic relief and lower LVOT velocities on postoperative TTE. This case reminds the clinician to carefully evaluate for alternative causes of LVOT obstruction, especially subaortic membrane, as a cause of symptoms mimicking HCM. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Tanrıverdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC, and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important.

  13. Humanlike Robots - Synthetically Mimicking Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Nature inspired many inventions and the field of technology that is based on the mimicking or inspiration of nature is widely known as Biomimetics and it is increasingly leading to many new capabilities. There are numerous examples of biomimetic successes including the copying of fins for swimming, and the inspiration of the insects and birds flight. More and more commercial implementations of biomimetics are appearing and behaving lifelike and applications are emerging that are important to our daily life. Making humanlike robots is the ultimate challenge to biomimetics and, for many years, it was considered science fiction, but such robots are becoming an engineering reality. Advances in producing such robot are allowing them to perform impressive functions and tasks. The development of such robots involves addressing many challenges and is raising concerns that are related to fear of their application implications and potential ethical issues. In this paper, the state-of-the-art of humanlike robots, potential applications and challenges will be reviewed.

  14. Leiomyoma of the distal oesophagus mimicking achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idenburg, F. J.; Akkermans, L. M.; Smout, A. J.; Kooijman, C. D.; Obertop, H.

    1991-01-01

    An unusual case of a patient with symptoms suggestive of oesophageal achalasia is described. Most oesophageal tumour growths causing secondary achalasia are associated with malignant tumours. This patient had a large oesophageal leiomyoma closely mimicking achalasia. Treatment consisted of

  15. Deformed Skull Morphology Is Caused by the Combined Effects of the Maldevelopment of Calvarias, Cranial Base and Brain in FGFR2-P253R Mice Mimicking Human Apert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fengtao; Xie, Yangli; Xu, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Zhou, Siru; Wang, Zuqiang; Luo, Xiaoqing; Liu, Mi; Chen, Lin; Du, Xiaolan

    2017-01-01

    Apert syndrome (AS) is a common genetic syndrome in humans characterized with craniosynostosis. Apert patients and mouse models showed abnormalities in sutures, cranial base and brain, that may all be involved in the pathogenesis of skull malformation of Apert syndrome. To distinguish the differential roles of these components of head in the pathogenesis of the abnormal skull morphology of AS, we generated mouse strains specifically expressing mutant FGFR2 in chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and progenitor cells of central nervous system (CNS) by crossing Fgfr2 +/P253R-Neo mice with Col2a1-Cre, Osteocalcin-Cre (OC-Cre), and Nestin-Cre mice, respectively. We then quantitatively analyzed the skull and brain morphology of these mutant mice by micro-CT and micro-MRI using Euclidean distance matrix analysis (EDMA). Skulls of Col2a1-Fgfr2 +/P253R mice showed Apert syndrome-like dysmorphology, such as shortened skull dimensions along the rostrocaudal axis, shortened nasal bone, and evidently advanced ossification of cranial base synchondroses. The OC-Fgfr2 +/P253R mice showed malformation in face at 8-week stage. Nestin-Fgfr2 +/P253R mice exhibited increased dorsoventral height and rostrocaudal length on the caudal skull and brain at 8 weeks. Our study indicates that the abnormal skull morphology of AS is caused by the combined effects of the maldevelopment in calvarias, cranial base, and brain tissue. These findings further deepen our knowledge about the pathogenesis of the abnormal skull morphology of AS, and provide new clues for the further analyses of skull phenotypes and clinical management of AS.

  16. Metastatic melanoma of mesentery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, M. S.; Ali, S.A.; Shirazi, B.; Shamim, M.

    2004-01-01

    A case of malignant melanoma metastatic to small bowel mesentery in an old female is reported. Her primary malignant melanoma of nasal mucosa was already treated. She presented with intestinal obstruction, underwent surgical excision of the tumour and was tumour-free postoperatively. (author)

  17. Giant hydronephrosis mimicking progressive malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Andres Jan; Anderer, Georgia; von Knobloch, Rolf; Heidenreich, Axel; Hofmann, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    Background Cases of giant hydronephroses are rare and usually contain no more than 1–2 litres of fluid in the collecting system. We report a remarkable case of giant hydronephrosis mimicking a progressive malignant abdominal tumour. Case presentation A 78-year-old cachectic woman presented with an enormous abdominal tumour, which, according to the patient, had slowly increased in diameter. Medical history was unremarkable except for a hysterectomy >30 years before. A CT scan revealed a giant cystic tumour filling almost the entire abdominal cavity. It was analysed by two independent radiologists who suspected a tumour originating from the right kidney and additionally a cystic ovarian neoplasm. Subsequently, a diagnostic and therapeutic laparotomy was performed: the tumour presented as a cystic, 35 × 30 × 25 cm expansive structure adhesive to adjacent organs without definite signs of invasive growth. The right renal hilar vessels could finally be identified at its basis. After extirpation another tumourous structure emerged in the pelvis originating from the genital organs and was also resected. The histopathological examination revealed a >15 kg hydronephrotic right kidney, lacking hardly any residual renal cortex parenchyma. The second specimen was identified as an ovary with regressive changes and a large partially calcified cyst. There was no evidence of malignant growth. Conclusion Although both clinical symptoms and the enormous size of the tumour indicated malignant growth, it turned out to be a giant hydronephrosis. Presumably, a chronic obstruction of the distal ureter had caused this extraordinary hydronephrosis. As demonstrated in our case, an accurate diagnosis of giant hydronephrosis remains challenging due to the atrophy of the renal parenchyma associated with chronic obstruction. Therefore, any abdominal cystic mass even in the absence of other evident pathologies should include the differential diagnosis of a possible hydronephrosis. Diagnostic

  18. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in an human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient mimicking bilateral eye sign in brain seen in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusany; Thirugnanam, Rajasekar; Shibu, Deepu; Kalarikal, Radhakrishnan Edathurthy; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-04-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has proven useful in the diagnosis, staging, and detection of metastasis and posttreatment monitoring of several malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It also has the ability to make the important distinction between malignancy and infection in the evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) lesions, leading to the initiation of the appropriate treatment and precluding the need for invasive biopsy. We report an interesting case of HIV positive 35-year-old woman presented with headache, disorientation, and decreased level of consciousness. She underwent whole body PET/CT which showed multiple lesions in the cerebrum which mimics bilateral eye in brain. A diagnosis of a primary CNS lymphoma was made and patient was started on chemotherapy.

  19. Primary central nervous system lymphoma in an human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient mimicking bilateral eye sign in brain seen in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusany; Thirugnanam, Rajasekar; Shibu, Deepu; Kalarikal, Radhakrishnan Edathurthy; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has proven useful in the diagnosis, staging, and detection of metastasis and posttreatment monitoring of several malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. It also has the ability to make the important distinction between malignancy and infection in the evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) lesions, leading to the initiation of the appropriate treatment and precluding the need for invasive biopsy. We report an interesting case of HIV positive 35-year-old woman presented with headache, disorientation, and decreased level of consciousness. She underwent whole body PET/CT which showed multiple lesions in the cerebrum which mimics bilateral eye in brain. A diagnosis of a primary CNS lymphoma was made and patient was started on chemotherapy

  20. Curable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hochster, Howard S.

    2010-01-01

    Colon cancer, though already metastatic, may still be curable through multi-modality approaches, which require combined planning between medical and surgical oncologists. Retrospective surgical series have historically shown 5-year survival or “cures” for 30% to 50% of patients with solitary or a few resectable liver metastases. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting has been poorly defined. A recent European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) study randomize...

  1. Prostate carcinoma mimicking a sphenoid wing meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas H. Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that dural-based metastatic lesions may mimic meningiomas, warranting thorough pre-operative work-up to exclude the possibility of metastasis. In certain cases, identification of widespread disease might preclude surgery and favor palliation, instead.

  2. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  3. Metastatic breast disease from cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Lucarelli, Nicola Maria; Martino, Gianluigi; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most rapidly increasing cancer in the world. Breast metastases from melanoma are uncommon but could reflect a widespread disease. We report a case of malignant widespread melanoma presenting with bilateral breast nodules in a 39 year-old pre-menopausal Caucasian woman with an history of cutaneous melanoma of the trunk. Breast clinical examination revealed the presence of a hard and mobile lump located on the left breast. Ultrasound detected two bilateral nodules corresponding to oval opacities with well-defined edges and without calcifications or architectural distortion on mammography. Fine needle aspiration cytology performed on both breast nodules confirmed that the breast lesions were metastases from primary cutaneous malignant melanoma. A total-body CT examination detected brain, lung and abdominal lymph nodes metastases. The breast represents an uncommon site of metastatic disease from extra-mammary tumors. Imaging features of breast metastases from melanoma usually do not allow a differential diagnosis with breast primary tumors. Breast metastases may be asymptomatic or palpable as dense and well-circumscribed nodules. Breast metastases indicate a widespread disease and should lead to avoid aggressive surgical procedures because of the poor prognosis of patients affected by metastatic melanoma. The detection of bilateral breast metastases from melanoma is highly suggestive of metastatic multi-organ disease and could be useful to address the therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Metastatic urachal carcinoma in bronchial brush cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Zahra Aly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Urachal carcinoma is rare comprising less than 1% of all bladder carcinomas. Metastases of urachal carcinoma have been reported to meninges, brain, ovary, lung, and maxilla. Cytologic features of metastatic urachal carcinoma have not been previously reported. We present a case of metastatic urachal adenocarcinoma in bronchial brushings and review the use of immunohistochemistry in its diagnosis. A 47-year-old female was seen initially in 2007 with adenocarcinoma of the bladder dome for which she underwent partial cystectomy. She presented in 2011 with a left lung mass and mediastinal adenopathy. Bronchoscopy showed an endobronchial lesion from which brushings were obtained. These showed numerous groups of columnar cells with medium sized nuclei and abundant cytoplasm. The cells were positive for CK20 and CDX2 and negative for CK7. The cytomorphological findings were similar to those in the previous resection specimen and concurrent biopsy. This is the first case report of bronchial brushings containing metastatic urachal carcinoma. No specific immunohistochemical profile is available for its diagnosis. The consideration of a second primary was a distinct possibility in this case due to the lapse of time from primary resection, absence of local disease, and lack of regional metastases.

  5. Iliacus Abscess with Radiculopathy Mimicking Herniated Nucleus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-02

    May 2, 2016 ... radiculopathy mimicking herniated nucleus pulposus: Aadditional diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging. Niger J Clin Pract. 2017;20:392-3. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 3.0 License, which allows ...

  6. Lymphadenopathy by scrub typhus mimicking metastasis on FDG PET/CT in a patient with a history of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Kyu Taek; Kim, Sung Young; Han, Sun Wook; Kim, Shin Young

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman with left-sided breast cancer who showed lymphadenopathy mimicking metastatic lesions. She underwent surveillance 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) after treatment. PET/CT demonstrated multiple lymphadenopathies with increased FDG uptake, most notably in the right axilla. She had an eschar on the right axillary area, and her serologic test was positive for anti-Orientia tsutsugamushi IgM antibody. Ten months after the treatment, follow-up FDG PET/CT and ultrasonography showed improvement in generalized lymphadenopathy

  7. Lymphadenopathy by scrub typhus mimicking metastasis on FDG PET/CT in a patient with a history of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Mi; Lee, Kyu Taek; Kim, Sung Young; Han, Sun Wook; Kim, Shin Young [Sooncheonhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman with left-sided breast cancer who showed lymphadenopathy mimicking metastatic lesions. She underwent surveillance 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) after treatment. PET/CT demonstrated multiple lymphadenopathies with increased FDG uptake, most notably in the right axilla. She had an eschar on the right axillary area, and her serologic test was positive for anti-Orientia tsutsugamushi IgM antibody. Ten months after the treatment, follow-up FDG PET/CT and ultrasonography showed improvement in generalized lymphadenopathy.

  8. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.

  9. Intra-abdominal gout mimicking pelvic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chia-Hui; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Pan, Huay-Ban; Yang, Chien-Fang

    2005-01-01

    Gout is the most common crystal-induced arthritis. Gouty tophi typically deposit in the extremities, especially toes and fingers. We present an unusual case of intrapelvic tophaceous gout in a patient suffering from chronic gouty arthritis. CT and MRI of the abdomen and pelvic cavity disclosed calcified gouty tophi around both hips, and a cystic lesion with peripheral enhancement in the pelvic cavity along the course of the iliopsoas muscle. The intra-abdominal tophus mimicked pelvic abscess. (orig.)

  10. Intra-abdominal gout mimicking pelvic abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chia-Hui; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Yeh, Lee-Ren; Pan, Huay-Ban; Yang, Chien-Fang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (Taiwan)

    2005-04-01

    Gout is the most common crystal-induced arthritis. Gouty tophi typically deposit in the extremities, especially toes and fingers. We present an unusual case of intrapelvic tophaceous gout in a patient suffering from chronic gouty arthritis. CT and MRI of the abdomen and pelvic cavity disclosed calcified gouty tophi around both hips, and a cystic lesion with peripheral enhancement in the pelvic cavity along the course of the iliopsoas muscle. The intra-abdominal tophus mimicked pelvic abscess. (orig.)

  11. Mycobacterium intracellulare Infection Mimicking Progression of Scleroderma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Engelhart, Merete; Thybo, Sören

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with scleroderma who developed Mycobacterium intracellulare infection, which for more than a year mimicked worsening of her connective tissue disorder. The patient was diagnosed with scleroderma based on puffy fingers that developed into sclerodactyly, abnormal......, unfortunately with significant scarring. Immunodeficiency testing was unremarkable. In summary, an infection with Mycobacterium intracellulare was mistaken for an unusually severe progression of scleroderma....

  12. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and ...

  13. Altering the Microenvironment to Promote Dormancy of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell in a 3D Bone Culture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    of the collagen -rich extracellular matrix . Further addition of metastatic breast cancer cells to the co-culture mimicked the vicious cycle; there was...biodegradable polymers to type I collagen or matrix derived from native extracellular matrix following decellularization. Papadimitropoulos et al., presents a...metastasis, 3D model, osteoblasts, cytokines, extracellular matrix 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a

  14. Group B streptococcal metastatic endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelberg, H P; Petashnick, D E; To, K W; Woodcome, H A

    1994-04-15

    Reports of invasive Group B Streptococcus infection in adults with underlying medical conditions have been increasing. Ocular infection with this organism is unusual. Metastatic endophthalmitis in adults caused by this organism has been reported rarely and has only been associated with endocarditis. We encountered two cases of Group B streptococcal metastatic endophthalmitis in adults who did not have endocarditis. These cases reflect the increasing incidence of invasive Group B Streptococcus infection with its varying manifestations. Additionally, they emphasize the importance of considering this pathogen as a cause of metastatic endophthalmitis in adults with predisposing illnesses.

  15. Hepatoduodenal lymph node metastasis mimicking Klatskin tumor in a patient with sigmoid colon mucinous cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovhannes Vardevanyan, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 48-year-old female patient, who presented with abdominal pain, jaundice, and lack of appetite. Ultrasound showed intrahepatic biliary dilatation with retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. Further magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography detected Klatskin tumor. Computed tomography (CT confirmed the Klatskin tumor with liver metastases and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. Biopsy from the hepatic lesion identified mucinous adenocarcinoma, likely originating from bile ducts. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed 3 times with stents placed in the left and right hepatic bile ducts. Later the patient had hematochezia and was referred to colonoscopy. Tubulovillous adenoma with dysplasia was diagnosed with signs of in situ cancer. Preoperative CT was done for further staging: new pulmonary metastases were discovered. Sigmoid colon was resected. Histopathology verified a poorly differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma within the tubulovillous adenoma. Intraoperative biopsies of porta hepatis mass resembled metastatic lymph nodes in hepatoduodenal ligament, mimicking Klatskin tumor. Retrospective analysis of CT data demonstrated presence of sigmoid colon tumor.

  16. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  17. Radioisotope scans in the evaluation of metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, A.C.; Vincent, R.G.; Bakshi, S.; Takita, H.

    1975-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of radioisotope scans in detecting metastatic lesions in patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. To be included in the study, the patient had to have undergone liver, brain, and/or bone scanning within 10 weeks of autopsy. Other means of evaluating these organs for metastatic involvement were used as well. The liver was checked by palpation and by determination of enzyme levels. A history, physical examination, and neurologic examination were used to establish the possibility of brain metastases. For studying bones, a history, physical examination, and conventional x-ray films were employed. Results of the scans and other tests were compared with findings at autopsy, and accuracy rates for each method of study were determined

  18. Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting Central Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakkı Yılmaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pituitary gland and infundibulum can be involved in a variety of medical conditions, including infiltrative diseases, fungal infections, tuberculosis, and primary and metastatic tumors. Metastases to the pituitary gland are absolutely rare, and they are generally secondary to pulmonary carcinoma in men and breast carcinoma in women. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The posterior lobe involvement may explain why patients with pituitary metastases frequently present with diabetes insipidus. We are presenting a case report of a 78-year-old male patient who had metastatic prostate with sudden onset of polyuria and persistent thirst. He had no electrolyte imbalance except mild hypernatremia. The MRI scan of the brain yielded a suspicious area in pituitary gland. A pituitary stalk metastasis was found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of pituitary. Water deprivation test was compatible with DI. A clinical response to nasal vasopressin was achieved and laboratory results revealed central diabetes insipidus. As a result, the intrasellar and suprasellar masses decreased in size, and urinary output accordingly decreased.

  19. Prostate carcinoma mimicking a sphenoid wing meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Lucas H; Burton, Matthew; Gokden, Murat; Serletis, Demitre

    2015-01-01

    We report here on a rare case of a large, lateral sphenoid wing tumor with radiographic and intraoperative findings highly suggestive of meningioma, yet pathology was in fact consistent with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. An 81 year-old male presented with expressive dysphasia, right-sided weakness and headaches. Imaging revealed a heterogeneously-enhancing lesion based on the left lateral sphenoid wing. The presumed diagnosis was strongly in favor of meningioma, and the patient underwent complete resection of the dural-based lesion. Final pathology confirmed the unexpected finding of a metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. Although he tolerated surgery well, the patient was subsequently referred for palliative therapy given findings of widespread systemic disease. Intracranial metastases may involve the dura, at times presenting with rare radiographic features highly suggestive for meningioma, as in our case here. This makes differentiation, at least based on imaging, a challenge. Elderly patients presenting with neurological deficits secondary to a newly-diagnosed, dural-based lesion should thus be considered for metastasis, prompting additional imaging studies (including body CT, MRI or PET) to rule out a primary lesion elsewhere. In some cases, this may affect the overall decision to proceed with surgical resection, or alternatively, to proceed directly to palliative therapy (the latter decision made in the context of widespread metastatic disease). We conclude that dural-based metastatic lesions may mimic meningiomas, warranting thorough pre-operative work-up to exclude the possibility of metastasis. In certain cases, identification of widespread disease might preclude surgery and favor palliation, instead. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Brain metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2001-01-01

    Brain metastases from colorectal cancer are rare. The prognosis for patients with even a single resectable brain metastasis is poor. A case of surgically treated cerebral metastasis from a rectal carcinoma is reported. The brain tumour was radically resected. However, cerebral, as well...... as extracerebral, disease recurred 12 months after diagnosis. Surgical removal of colorectal metastatic brain lesions in selected cases results in a longer survival time....

  1. Hypertrophic Nonunion Humerus Mimicking an Enchondroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Magu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although fractures of humeral shaft show excellent results with conservative management, nonunion does occur. Case Report. We bring forth the case of a young male with a 1.5-year-old hypertrophic nonunion of the humerus mimicking an enchondroma. The initial X-ray images of the patient appeared to be an enchondroma, which only on further evaluation and histopathological analysis was diagnosed conclusively to be a hypertrophic nonunion. Discussion. Enchondromas are often incidentally diagnosed benign tumours. It is however not common to misdiagnose a hypertrophic nonunion to be an enchondroma. We present this case to highlight the unique diagnostic dilemma the treating team had to face.

  2. Giant Spermatocele Mimicking Hydrocele: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chih Yeh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Spermatoceles are usually asymptomatic and often found incidentally during physical examination. We report a case of giant spermatocele that mimicked a hydrocele. A 55-year-old man suffered from right scrotal enlargement for several years. As the heavy sensation and scrotal soreness worsened in recent months, he came to our outpatient clinic for help. Hydrocele was suspected due to transilluminating appearance of the scrotal content. Surgical exploration was arranged and a giant spermatocele was found. Total excision of the spermatocele was performed and the patient recovered well. The specimen was sent for pathology and spermatocele with spermatozoa was noted.

  3. Nephrogenic rests mimicking Wilms' tumor on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhas, Naveen; Siegelman, Stanley S.; Argani, Pedram; Gearhart, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Nephrogenic rests (NR) are persistent benign remnants of embryonic renal tissue. A small percentage of these may develop into Wilms' tumor (WT). Radiologic imaging is relied upon to differentiate between these entities, with the hallmark of malignant transformation being growth on serial imaging studies. There is, however, considerable overlap in their imaging characteristics. The authors present a case of two biopsy-proven NR in a 2-year-old girl with sporadic aniridia that were indistinguishable from WT on initial radiologic studies. One of the NR grew on serial imaging studies mimicking a WT, but after resection was confirmed to be a benign hyperplastic NR on pathologic examination. (orig.)

  4. Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegmann, J P; Enzenauer, R J

    1995-05-01

    A pediatric case of Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis is described. A 12-year-old black boy was admitted to the pediatric service for presumed right knee septic arthritis. Symptoms included acute pain and swelling with decreased range-of-motion. Although the patient's right knee symptoms and positive Lyme serology were consistent with a diagnosis of Lyme arthritis, the presence of sensorineural hearing loss and interstitial keratitis with inflammatory arthritis suggested a diagnosis of Cogan's syndrome. Subsequent Western blot analysis was negative for Borrelia burgdorferi antigens. The patient had dramatic clinical improvement of musculoskeletal and ophthalmologic complaints shortly after receiving high-dose corticosteroids, although residual sensorineural hearing loss persisted.

  5. Unusual presentation of chondroblastoma mimicking Trevor's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Karkhur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondroblastoma is a benign bone tumor, represents 1%–2% of all primary bone tumors, typically seen in patients 10–25-year-old and more common in males. It occurs most frequently in the distal femur, proximal tibia, and proximal humerus. Soft tissue extension is extremely rare. Adjacent joints may develop effusions, but the tumor mass protruding into the joint has never been seen in case of chondroblastoma. We report a rare case of intra-articular chondroblastoma arising from proximal tibia in a 16-year-old boy and growing into the knee joint mimicking an intra-articular osteochondroma.

  6. Floating retained root lesion mimicking apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ming-Pang; Chen, Chih-Ping; Shieh, Yi-Shing

    2009-10-01

    A case of a retained root tip simulating apical periodontitis on radiographic examination is described. The retained root tip, originating from the left lower first molar, floated under the left lower second premolar apical region mimicking apical periodontitis. It appeared as an ill-defined periapical radiolucency containing a smaller radiodense mass on radiograph. The differential diagnosis included focal sclerosing osteomyelitis (condensing osteitis) and ossifying fibroma. Upon exicisional biopsy, a retained root associated with granulation tissue was found. After 1-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and the periradicular lesion was healing. Meanwhile, the associated tooth showed a normal response to stimulation testing.

  7. Hepatic tuberculosis mimicking metastasis in a case of carcinoma sigmoid colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musharraf Husain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB presenting as isolated liver mass without clinical evidence of TB is difficult to diagnose preoperatively and is usually mimicked by primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver. Hepatic TB associated with carcinoma colon is a rare association which has very rarely been reported in the literature. This case illustrates the diagnostic difficulties of hepatic TB and the need to consider it in the differential diagnosis of hepatic nodular lesions in carcinoma colon patients. Here, we report a case of 48-year-old female who presented in the casualty with features of acute intestinal obstruction. Preoperatively a mass was seen at the hepatic flexure along with three lesions in the liver presumed to be metastatic in origin. However, histopathology of the mass revealed adenocarcinoma colon and the liver lesion proved to be hepatic TB. We wish to highlight that on encountering a hepatic lesion in a carcinoma colon patient the possibility of hepatic TB should also be kept in mind apart from the obvious possibility of metastasis especially in an endemic country like India.

  8. Mimicking Seawater For Culturing Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, Anita Mac; Sonnenschein, Eva; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Only about 1% of marine bacteria have been brought into culture using traditional techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate if mimicking the natural bacterial environment can increase culturability.We used marine substrates containing defined algal polymers or gellan gum as solidif......Only about 1% of marine bacteria have been brought into culture using traditional techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate if mimicking the natural bacterial environment can increase culturability.We used marine substrates containing defined algal polymers or gellan gum...... as solidifying agents, and enumerated bacteria from seawater and algal exudates. We tested if culturability could be influenced by addition of quorum sensing signals (AHLs). All plates were incubated at 15°C. Bacterial counts (CFU/g) from algal exudates from brown algae were highest on media containing algal...... polymers. In general, bacteria isolated from algal exudates preferred more rich media than bacteria isolated from seawater. Overall, culturability ranged from 0.01 to 0.8% as compared to total cell count. Substitution of agar with gellan gum increased the culturability of seawater bacteria approximately...

  9. Imaging findings of mimickers of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Kyoung Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiological imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC as the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC in high-risk patients by typical imaging findings alone is widely adopted in major practice guidelines for HCC. While imaging techniques have markedly improved in detecting small liver lesions, they often detect incidental benign liver lesions and non-hepatocellular malignancy that can be misdiagnosed as HCC. The most common mimicker of HCC in cirrhotic liver is nontumorous arterioportal shunts that are seen as focal hypervascular liver lesions on dynamic contrast-enhanced cross-sectional imaging. Rapidly enhancing hemangiomas can be easily misdiagnosed as HCC especially on MR imaging with liver-specific contrast agent. Focal inflammatory liver lesions mimic HCC by demonstrating arterial-phase hypervascularity and subsequent washout on dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. It is important to recognize the suggestive imaging findings for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC as the management of CC is largely different from that of HCC. There are other benign mimickers of HCC such as angiomyolipomas and focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules. Recognition of their typical imaging findings can reduce false-positive HCC diagnosis.

  10. Clinical and Histologic Mimickers of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-08-17

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel, classically associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. The diagnosis of celiac disease is made when there are compatible clinical features, supportive serologic markers, representative histology from the small bowel, and response to a gluten-free diet. Histologic findings associated with celiac disease include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy, and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lamina propria. It is important to recognize and diagnose celiac disease, as strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can lead to resolution of clinical and histologic manifestations of the disease. However, many other entities can present with clinical and/or histologic features of celiac disease. In this review article, we highlight key clinical and histologic mimickers of celiac disease. The evaluation of a patient with serologically negative enteropathy necessitates a carefully elicited history and detailed review by a pathologist. Medications can mimic celiac disease and should be considered in all patients with a serologically negative enteropathy. Many mimickers of celiac disease have clues to the underlying diagnosis, and many have a targeted therapy. It is necessary to provide patients with a correct diagnosis rather than subject them to a lifetime of an unnecessary gluten-free diet.

  11. Microenvironment Determinants of Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chenyu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metastasis accounts for 90% of cancer-related mortality. Brain metastases generally present during the late stages in the natural history of cancer progression. Recent advances in cancer treatment and management have resulted in better control of systemic disease metastatic to organs other than the brain and improved patient survival. However, patients who experience recurrent disease manifest an increasing number of brain metastases, which are usually refractory to therapies. To meet the new challenges of controlling brain metastasis, the research community has been tackling the problem with novel experimental models and research tools, which have led to an improved understanding of brain metastasis. The time-tested "seed-and-soil" hypothesis of metastasis indicates that successful outgrowth of deadly metastatic tumors depends on permissible interactions between the metastatic cancer cells and the site-specific microenvironment in the host organs. Consistently, recent studies indicate that the brain, the major component of the central nervous system, has unique physiological features that can determine the outcome of metastatic tumor growth. The current review summarizes recent discoveries on these tumor-brain interactions, and the potential clinical implications these novel findings could have for the better treatment of patients with brain metastasis.

  12. Follicular thyroid carcinoma mimicking meningioma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnalatha Buandasan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC is a well-differentiated tumor which resembles the normal microscopic pattern of the thyroid. Although intracranial metastasis to the brain is frequent in adults, metastasis from FTC is very rare. Dural metastases mimicking meningioma have been documented in the literature now and then. However, cases arising from a FTC are again very rare. We report the case of a middle-aged lady who presented with progressive, painless left eye proptosis. She was noted to have a non-axial proptosis with dystopia, compressive optic neuropathy and exposure keratitis. She also had a painless swelling over the occipital region. She was initially misdiagnosed to have multiple foci of meningioma based on magnetic resonance imaging findings. Subsequent histopathological examination revealed presence of FTC. She was euthyroid but was found to have multiple small thyroid nodules by ultrasonography. Hence, the definite diagnosis of all dural masses must be histological wherever possible and thyroid carcinoma should be considered as a potential primary tumour in such presentations.

  13. Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0390 TITLE: Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Zheng Li CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0390 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Zheng Li 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...14 Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast  Cancer   A. Introduction (1paragraph) The overall goal of this proposal is to prepare TrkC

  14. Immunotherapy of distant metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schadendorf, D; Algarra, S M; Bastholt, L

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated with signif......Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated...

  15. Metastatic breast carcinoma in the mandible presenting as a periodontal abscess: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulias, Evmenios; Melakopoulos, Ioannis; Tosios, Konstantinos

    2011-07-01

    Tumors can metastasize to the oral cavity and affect the jaws, soft tissue and salivary glands. Oral cavity metastases are considered rare and represent approximately 1% of all oral malignancies. Because of their rarity and atypical clinical and radiographic appearance, metastatic lesions are considered a diagnostic challenge. The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a metastatic breast carcinoma mimicking a periodontal abscess in the mandible. A 55-year-old Caucasian woman was referred to our clinic for evaluation of bisphosphonate-induced jaw osteonecrosis. She had undergone modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast. Her clinical examination showed diffuse swelling and a periodontal pocket of 6 mm exhibiting suppuration in the posterior right mandible. Moreover, paresthesia of the lower right lip and chin was noted. There were no significant radiographic findings other than alveolar bone loss due to her periodontal disease. Although the lesion resembled a periodontal abscess, metastatic carcinoma of the breast was suspected on the basis of the patient's medical history. The area was biopsied, and histological analysis confirmed the final diagnosis of metastatic breast carcinoma. The general dentist or dental specialist should maintain a high level of suspicion while evaluating patients with a history of cancer. Paresthesias of the lower lip and the chin should be considered ominous signs of metastatic disease. This case highlights the importance of the value of a detailed medical history and thorough clinical examination for the early detection of metastatic tumors in the oral cavity.

  16. Metastatic breast carcinoma in the mandible presenting as a periodontal abscess: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosios Konstantinos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tumors can metastasize to the oral cavity and affect the jaws, soft tissue and salivary glands. Oral cavity metastases are considered rare and represent approximately 1% of all oral malignancies. Because of their rarity and atypical clinical and radiographic appearance, metastatic lesions are considered a diagnostic challenge. The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a metastatic breast carcinoma mimicking a periodontal abscess in the mandible. Case presentation A 55-year-old Caucasian woman was referred to our clinic for evaluation of bisphosphonate-induced jaw osteonecrosis. She had undergone modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast. Her clinical examination showed diffuse swelling and a periodontal pocket of 6 mm exhibiting suppuration in the posterior right mandible. Moreover, paresthesia of the lower right lip and chin was noted. There were no significant radiographic findings other than alveolar bone loss due to her periodontal disease. Although the lesion resembled a periodontal abscess, metastatic carcinoma of the breast was suspected on the basis of the patient's medical history. The area was biopsied, and histological analysis confirmed the final diagnosis of metastatic breast carcinoma. Conclusion The general dentist or dental specialist should maintain a high level of suspicion while evaluating patients with a history of cancer. Paresthesias of the lower lip and the chin should be considered ominous signs of metastatic disease. This case highlights the importance of the value of a detailed medical history and thorough clinical examination for the early detection of metastatic tumors in the oral cavity.

  17. Acute perimyocarditis mimicking transmural myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hesham R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although acute pericarditis has charachteristic electrocardiographic (ECG findings that differentiate it from acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI; in certain cases diagnosis is somewhat difficult especially when the ECG reveals focal instead of diffuse changes and moreover when pericarditis is associated with an underlying myocarditis causing elevation of the cardiac biomarkers therefore increasing the difficulty in differentiating between both enteties. This is especially important because adverse lethal side effect can occur if thrombolytic therapy is administered for a patient with acute pericarditis, or if a diagnosis of transmural MI is missed. In this case report we are describing an 18 year old male patient who presented with an acute onset of severe chest pain associated with focal ECG changes and elevated cardiac enzymes mimicking transmural MI. This report aims to sensitize readers to this debate and create awareness among cardiologists and intensivists with both presentations and how to reach an accurate diagnosis.

  18. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun; Bae, Ji Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis

  19. Orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H; Hitchon, Patrick W; Smoker, Wendy R K; Lee, Andrew G; Nerad, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to report an orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive orbital neoplasm. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon but can mimic neoplasm. One potential mechanism for the orbital roof destruction is a post-traumatic "growing orbital roof fracture." The growing fracture has been reported mostly in children but can occur in adults. Alternative potential etiologies for the encephalocele are discussed, including Gorham syndrome. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon in adults, and the findings can superficially resemble an orbital neoplasm. Radiographic and clinical features that might suggest the correct diagnosis include a prior history of trauma, overlying frontal lobe encephalomalacia without significant mass effect or edema, and an orbital roof defect. The "growing fracture" mechanism may be a potential explanation for the orbital roof destruction in some cases.

  20. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis.

  1. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-10-07

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth.

  2. Foretinib is effective therapy for metastatic sonic hedgehog medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Claudia C; Golbourn, Brian J; Dubuc, Adrian M; Remke, Marc; Diaz, Roberto J; Agnihotri, Sameer; Luck, Amanda; Sabha, Nesrin; Olsen, Samantha; Wu, Xiaochong; Garzia, Livia; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mack, Stephen C; Wang, Xin; Leadley, Michael; Reynaud, Denis; Ermini, Leonardo; Post, Martin; Northcott, Paul A; Pfister, Stefan M; Croul, Sidney E; Kool, Marcel; Korshunov, Andrey; Smith, Christian A; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor, with metastases present at diagnosis conferring a poor prognosis. Mechanisms of dissemination are poorly understood and metastatic lesions are genetically divergent from the matched primary tumor. Effective and less toxic therapies that target both compartments have yet to be identified. Here, we report that the analysis of several large nonoverlapping cohorts of patients with medulloblastoma reveals MET kinase as a marker of sonic hedgehog (SHH)-driven medulloblastoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of phosphorylated, active MET kinase in an independent patient cohort confirmed its correlation with increased tumor relapse and poor survival, suggesting that patients with SHH medulloblastoma may benefit from MET-targeted therapy. In support of this hypothesis, we found that the approved MET inhibitor foretinib could suppress MET activation, decrease tumor cell proliferation, and induce apoptosis in SHH medulloblastomas in vitro and in vivo. Foretinib penetrated the blood-brain barrier and was effective in both the primary and metastatic tumor compartments. In established mouse xenograft or transgenic models of metastatic SHH medulloblastoma, foretinib administration reduced the growth of the primary tumor, decreased the incidence of metastases, and increased host survival. Taken together, our results provide a strong rationale to clinically evaluate foretinib as an effective therapy for patients with SHH-driven medulloblastoma. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Subdural Hematoma Mimickers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Dragos; Koziarz, Alex; Cenic, Aleksa; Nath, Siddharth; Singh, Sheila; Almenawer, Saleh A; Kachur, Edward

    2016-09-01

    A variety of subdural pathologies that may mimic hematomas are reported in the literature. We aimed to identify the atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of subdural masses that may mimic subdural hematomas. A systematic review of MEDLINE and Embase was conducted independently by 2 reviewers to identify articles describing subdural hematoma mimickers. We also present a patient from our institution with a subdural pathology mimicking a subdural hematoma. We analyzed patient clinical presentations, underlying pathologies, radiologic findings, and clinical outcomes. We included 43 articles totaling 48 patients. The mean ± SD patient age was 55.7 ± 16.8 years. Of the 45 cases describing patient history, 13 patients (27%) had a history of trauma. The underlying pathologies of the 48 subdural collections were 10 metastasis (21%), 14 lymphoma (29%), 7 sarcoma (15%), 4 infectious (8%), 4 autoimmune (8%), and 9 miscellaneous (19%). Findings on computed tomography (CT) scan were 18 hyperdense (41%), 11 hypodense (25%), 9 isodense (20%), 3 isodense/hyperdense (7%), and 3 hypodense/isodense (7%). Thirty-four patients (71%) were treated surgically; among these patients, 65% had symptom resolution. Neither the pathology (P = 0.337) nor the management strategy (P = 0.671) was correlated with improved functional outcomes. Identification of atypical history and radiologic features should prompt further diagnostic tests, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to elucidate the proper diagnosis, given that certain pathologies may be managed nonsurgically. A subdural collection that is hyperdense on CT scan and hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI, along with a history of progressive headache with no trauma, may raise the suspicion of an atypical subdural pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Metastatic skeletal leiomyomatosis (leiomyomatosis ossea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, Jose Raimundo; De Almeida, Ana Luzia Brito; Aymore, Ierece Lins; Pinto, Edna Pottes; Osthoff, Laura; Smith, Julius

    2002-01-01

    We present a unique case of metastatic leiomyomatosis to the skeleton. The very extensive involvement of the axial and peripheral skeleton with ''ring'' lesions and associated cyclical premenstrual pain eventually led to the correct diagnosis and total relief with hormonal therapy. (orig.)

  5. Metastatic skeletal leiomyomatosis (leiomyomatosis ossea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel, Jose Raimundo [Radiologic Clinic Felippe Mattoso, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); De Almeida, Ana Luzia Brito; Aymore, Ierece Lins [Claudio Lemos Surgical Pathology Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pinto, Edna Pottes [Edna Pottes Pinto Clinic, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Osthoff, Laura [Basilio Clinic, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Smith, Julius [National Cancer Institute (INCA), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2002-01-01

    We present a unique case of metastatic leiomyomatosis to the skeleton. The very extensive involvement of the axial and peripheral skeleton with ''ring'' lesions and associated cyclical premenstrual pain eventually led to the correct diagnosis and total relief with hormonal therapy. (orig.)

  6. Increased expression of aquaporin-4 in human traumatic brain injury and brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hua; YAO Hong-tian; ZHANG Wei-ping; ZHANG LEI; DING Wei; ZHANG Shi-hong; CHEN Zhong; WEI Er-qing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), one of the aquaporins (AQPs), in human brain specimens from patients with traumatic brain injury or brain tumors. Methods: Nineteen human brain specimens were obtained from the patients with traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, benign meningioma or early stage hemorrhagic stroke. MRI or CT imaging was used to assess brain edema. Hematoxylin and eosin staining were used to evaluate cell damage. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the AQP4 expression. Results: AQP4 expression was increased from 15h to at least 8 d after injury. AQP4immunoreactivity was strong around astrocytomas, ganglioglioma and metastatic adenocarcinoma. However, AQP4 immunoreactivity was only found in the centers of astrocytomas and ganglioglioma, but not in metastatic adenocarcinoma derived from lung.Conclusion: AQP4 expression increases in human brains after traumatic brain injury, within brain-derived tumors, and around brain tumors.

  7. Tetrofosmin in metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghammer, P.; Obwegeser, R.; Ulm, M.; Wiltschke, C.; Kubista, E.; Sinzinger, H.; Zielinski, C.

    1997-01-01

    Tetrofosmin (1,2-bis[bis(2-ethoxyethyl)phosphino]ethan) is currently under investigation for its tumor seeking properties, encouraged by the incidental finding of a malignant breast-lesion on myocardial scintigraphy in 1995 (Rambaldi et al, Clin Nucl Med 1995) using tetrofosmin. Recent reports have confirmed tetrofosmins role in detecting primary tumors in breast cancer. To investigate whether tetrofosmin significantly helps detect metastatic lesions in such patients we performed tetrofosmin scintigraphy in 21 patients with metastatic breast cancer. Patients and methods: Median age of patients was 61 years. In one patient the primary site was unknown. All patients had at least one distant metastasis. 550 MBq of 99m-Tc-tetrofosmin was administered ten minutes before imaging was begun. After obtaining a planar image, a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done of every suspected distant lesion. CT-scans or MRI were used to confirm positive correlation with tetrofosmin scintigraphy. Results: Tetrofosmin scintigraphy correctly diagnosed metastatic disease in 71 % of patients with no false negative and two false positive results. In each of the two patients a mediastinal hot spot suggestive of malignancy was found, but none of those lesions could be proven using CT scans. Excluding patients with liver metastasis from the present analysis, 91 % of all metastasis would have been correctly diagnosed. The first patient in our department had a large metastasis in the upper mediastinum which could not be seen on regular chest films. In the patient in whom the primary site of cancer was unknown, tetrofosmin scintigraphy showed three consecutive nodules in the left mammary, gland in a coronary fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging then confirmed two single nodules of 0.8 cm in diameter. Conclusions: Evaluating 21 patients, the present study was performed to investigate tetrofosmins properties of detecting metastatic lesions in patients with breast cancer. A 91

  8. [Totally paralyzed or brain dead?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, G.W. van; Vos, P.E.; Eurelings, M.; Jansen, G.H.; Gijn, J. van

    2001-01-01

    In two patients, men aged 23 and 42 years, a condition that mimicked brain death was observed as a consequence of rapidly progressive complete peripheral paralyses, which included the intrinsic and extrinsic eye muscles. However, the EEG revealed a waking pattern. Maximal supportive therapy was

  9. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio L. Heldwein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the current treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, focusing on medical treatment options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The most important recent publications have been selected after a literature search employing PubMed using the search terms: advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, anti-angiogenesis drugs and systemic therapy; also significant meeting abstracts were consulted. RESULTS: Progress in understanding the molecular basis of renal cell carcinoma, especially related to genetics and angiogenesis, has been achieved mainly through of the study of von Hippel-Lindau disease. A great variety of active agents have been developed and tested in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC patients. New specific molecular therapies in metastatic disease are discussed. Sunitinib, Sorafenib and Bevacizumab increase the progression-free survival when compared to therapy with cytokines. Temsirolimus increases overall survival in high-risk patients. Growth factors and regulatory enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase IX may be targets for future therapies. CONCLUSIONS: A broader knowledge of clear cell carcinoma molecular biology has permitted the beginning of a new era in mRCC therapy. Benefits of these novel agents in terms of progression-free and overall survival have been observed in patients with mRCC, and, in many cases, have become the standard of care. Sunitinib is now considered the new reference first-line treatment for mRCC. Despite all the progress in recent years, complete responses are still very rare. Currently, many important issues regarding the use of these agents in the management of metastatic renal cancer still need to be properly addressed.

  10. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of metastatic brain tumor at 3 Tesla. Utility of T1-weighted SPACE compared with 2D spin echo and 3D gradient echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komada, Tomohiro; Naganawa, Shinji; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the newly developed whole-brain, isotropic, 3-dimensional turbo spin-echo imaging with variable flip angle echo train (SPACE) for contrast-enhanced T 1 -weighted imaging in detecting brain metastases at 3 tesla (T). Twenty-two patients with suspected brain metastases underwent postcontrast study with SPACE, magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MP-RAGE), and 2-dimensional T 1 -weighted spin echo (2D-SE) imaging at 3 T. We quantitatively compared SPACE, MP-RAGE, and 2D-SE images by using signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) for GM-to-WM, lesion-to-GM, and lesion-to-WM. Two blinded radiologists evaluated the detection of brain metastases by segment-by-segment analysis and continuously-distributed test. The CNR between GM and WM was significantly higher on MP-RAGE images than on SPACE images (P 1 -weighted imaging. (author)

  11. Ovarian mass mimicking malignancy: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Il; Kim, Seok Ki; Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Sang Mi; Kim, Tae Sung

    2010-01-01

    A 32-year-old female who suffered from abdominal pain underwent 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for the diagnostic workup of pelvic mass lesions. Cystic mass lesions in the bilateral ovaries showed wall thickening and intense hypermetabolism along the rim. In addition, multifocal intense hypermetabolic lymphadenopathies were seen in the left paraaortic lymph node (LN), aortocaval LN, and both common iliac LNs. We interpreted these findings as bilateral ovarian cancer with retroperitoneal metastatic lymphadenopathies rather than endometriosis with reactive lymphadenopathies rather than endometriosis with reactive lymphadenopathies. However, Histopathological examination confirmed the ovarian mass lesions as tubo-ovarian abscesses. We report a case that even if simultaneous hypermetabolic retroperitoneal LNs are seen, intense hypermetabolic lesions in both ovaries can be in consequence of inflammatory change

  12. Ovarian mass mimicking malignancy: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Il; Kim, Seok Ki; Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Sang Mi; Kim, Tae Sung [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    A 32-year-old female who suffered from abdominal pain underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for the diagnostic workup of pelvic mass lesions. Cystic mass lesions in the bilateral ovaries showed wall thickening and intense hypermetabolism along the rim. In addition, multifocal intense hypermetabolic lymphadenopathies were seen in the left paraaortic lymph node (LN), aortocaval LN, and both common iliac LNs. We interpreted these findings as bilateral ovarian cancer with retroperitoneal metastatic lymphadenopathies rather than endometriosis with reactive lymphadenopathies rather than endometriosis with reactive lymphadenopathies. However, Histopathological examination confirmed the ovarian mass lesions as tubo-ovarian abscesses. We report a case that even if simultaneous hypermetabolic retroperitoneal LNs are seen, intense hypermetabolic lesions in both ovaries can be in consequence of inflammatory change

  13. Breast metastasis from cutaneous malignant melanoma mimicking a breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniglio, Marina; Capalbo, Emanuela; Viganò, Sara; Trecate, Giovanna; Scaperrotta, Gianfranco Paride; Panizza, Pietro

    2015-06-25

    Breast metastases are very uncommon, either from solid tumors or malignant melanoma. We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with a history of cutaneous melanoma of the shoulder excised 21 years ago. She presented with a palpable lump in the upper outer quadrant of the right breast. Ultrasound demonstrated a solid mass within a cystic lesion. A core biopsy was taken and first histology reported a poorly differentiated primary breast cancer suspected to be triple negative. MRI detected a satellite lesion in the same breast, a focus of suspected enhancement in the other breast, and the extramammary finding of an enhancing pulmonary lesion. Staging computed tomography detected widespread metastases to the lungs, brain, subcutaneous left shoulder, liver, pancreas, and hepatorenal recess. A core biopsy was taken from the left breast lesion and the previous slides were reviewed; histopathology and immunohistochemistry were in keeping with metastasis from melanoma. The possibility of a metastatic lesion to the breast should be taken into account in any patient presenting with a breast lump and a previous history of melanoma. Breast involvement cannot be considered an isolated finding, as it might be the first manifestation of widespread disease.

  14. Metastatic melanoma after 23 years of primary ocular melanoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Karde, Supriya Ramesh

    2016-11-23

    We describe a case of 52-year-old man who presented with an episode of tonic-clonic seizures. He had right ocular melanoma 23 years ago with subsequent enucleation which was the standard treatment at that time. CT scans of the brain and of the thorax-abdomen-pelvis revealed widespread metastatic lesions in the brain, lung and liver. Further investigations including bronchoscopy with cytopathology uncovered that the metastatic disease was a recurrence of ocular melanoma. He received palliative radiotherapy and died 6 months later. Ocular melanoma is often associated with fulminant metastatic disease after a period of dormancy. Thus, despite successful treatment of the localised disease at initial presentation, an effort is needed for optimal long-term follow-up plan in order to improve survival in case of recurrence.

  15. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis complicating dengue infection with neuroimaging mimicking multiple sclerosis: A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S; Botross, N; Rusli, B N; Riad, A

    2016-11-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) complicating dengue infection is still exceedingly rare even in endemic countries such as Malaysia. Here we report two such cases, the first in an elderly female patient and the second in a young man. Both presented with encephalopathy, brainstem involvement and worsening upper and lower limb weakness. Initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was normal in the first case. Serum for dengue Ig M and NS-1 was positive in both cases. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis in both with Dengue IgM and NS-1 positive in the second case but not done in the first. MRI brain showed changes of perpendicular subcortical palisading white matter, callosal and brainstem disease mimicking multiple sclerosis (MS) in both patients though in the former case there was a lag between the onset of clinical symptoms and MRI changes which was only clarified on reimaging. The temporal evolution and duration of the clinical symptoms, CSF changes and neuroimaging were more suggestive of Dengue ADEM rather than an encephalitis though initially the first case began as dengue encephalitis. Furthermore in dengue encephalitis neuroimaging is usually normal or rarely edema, haemorrhage, brainstem, thalamic or focal lesions are seen. Therefore, early recognition of ADEM as a sequelae of dengue infection with neuroimaging mimicking MS and repeat imaging helped in identifying these two cases. Treatment with intravenous steroids followed by maintenance oral steroids produced good outcome in both patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications : Mammographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Park, Jeong Mi; Goo, Hyun Woo; Bang, Sun Woo

    1996-01-01

    To differentiate fine hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications from true microcalcifications on mammography. Mammograms showing hyperdense dots in ten patients (mean age, 59 years) were evaluated. Two radiologists were asked to differentiate with the naked eye the hyperdense dots seen on ten mammograms and proven microcalcifications seen on ten mammograms. Densitometry was also performed for all lesions and the contrast index was calculated. The shape and distribution of the hyperdense dots were evaluated and enquires were made regarding any history of breast disease and corresponding treatment. Biopsies were performed for two patients with hyperdense dots. Two radiologists made correct diagnoses in 19/20 cases(95%). The contrast index was 0.10-0.88 (mean 0.58) for hyperdense dots and 0.02-0.45 (mean 0.17) for true microcalcifications. The hyperdense dots were finer and homogeneously rounder than the microcalcifications. Distribution of the hyperdense dots was more superficial in subcutaneous fat (seven cases) and subareolar area (six cases). All ten patients with hyperdense dots had history of mastitis and abscesses and had been treated by open drainage (six cases) and/or folk remedy (four cases). In eight patients, herb patches had been attached. Biopsies of hyperdense dots did not show any microcalcification or evidence of malignancy. These hyperdense dots were seen mainly in older patients. Their characteristic density, shape, distribution and clinical history makes differential diagnosis from true microcalcifications easy and could reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures such as surgical biopsy

  17. Hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications : Mammographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Park, Jeong Mi; Goo, Hyun Woo; Bang, Sun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    To differentiate fine hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications from true microcalcifications on mammography. Mammograms showing hyperdense dots in ten patients (mean age, 59 years) were evaluated. Two radiologists were asked to differentiate with the naked eye the hyperdense dots seen on ten mammograms and proven microcalcifications seen on ten mammograms. Densitometry was also performed for all lesions and the contrast index was calculated. The shape and distribution of the hyperdense dots were evaluated and enquires were made regarding any history of breast disease and corresponding treatment. Biopsies were performed for two patients with hyperdense dots. Two radiologists made correct diagnoses in 19/20 cases(95%). The contrast index was 0.10-0.88 (mean 0.58) for hyperdense dots and 0.02-0.45 (mean 0.17) for true microcalcifications. The hyperdense dots were finer and homogeneously rounder than the microcalcifications. Distribution of the hyperdense dots was more superficial in subcutaneous fat (seven cases) and subareolar area (six cases). All ten patients with hyperdense dots had history of mastitis and abscesses and had been treated by open drainage (six cases) and/or folk remedy (four cases). In eight patients, herb patches had been attached. Biopsies of hyperdense dots did not show any microcalcification or evidence of malignancy. These hyperdense dots were seen mainly in older patients. Their characteristic density, shape, distribution and clinical history makes differential diagnosis from true microcalcifications easy and could reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures such as surgical biopsy.

  18. Mimicking Bone - Chemical and Physical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie C Cox

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that chemical and physical features of bone contribute to its functionality, reactivity and mechanical performance. This fundamental rationale underpins the author’s research strategy. This paper presents a summary of efforts to fabricate a synthetic structure, referred to as a scaffold, that both chemically and physical emulates the intricate structure of bone. An understanding of key features of bone tissue that contribute to its remarkable properties is presented as a background to this work. Novel work aimed at improving the understanding of the synthesis of a ceramic biomaterial, namely hydroxyapatite, that is chemically similar to bone mineral is discussed. A case study involving the manufacture of porous scaffolds by 3D printing is also presented. In summary, this article highlights a number of on-going challenges that multidisciplinary tissue engineers aim to solve to get one step closer to mimicking bone, which clinically could improve the quality of life for millions of people worldwide.    Photo credit: By Doc. RNDr. Josef Reischig, CSc. (Author's archive [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

  19. Lymphocitic infundibuloneurohypophysitis mimicking a pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubertus Maximilian Mehdorn

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of infundibulo-neurohypophysitis mimicking a pituitary adenoma is presented. A 69-years-old female patient developed polyuria and polydipsia. Laboratory analysis revealed central diabetes insipidus. No hormonal abnormalities. Cranial-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a left sided mass in the adenohypophysis presuming a pituitary adenoma. The mass had contact to both internal carotids. Admission to our department for neurosurgical treatment followed. Ophthalmo - logic examination and neurological examination yielded normal findings. A second MRI focussing on the sellar-region showed a leftsided (T2-MRI.hyperintense, distended adenohypophysis, without contrast enhancement in T1. The stalk appeared thickened. T1- weighted sequences of the neurohypophysis showed loss of signal intensity. We diagnosed an infundibulo-neurohypophysitis and abstai - ned from surgical removal. The patient was discharged under treatment with corticosteroids and desmopressin. Hypophysitis is rare and shows special clinical characteristics. Despite defined radiological features to differentiate between hypophysitis and adenoma the possibility of misdiagnosis, and unnecessary surgical procedures, should always kept in mind.

  20. Indirect carotid cavernous fistula mimicking ocular myasthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishangthem, Lakshmi; Satti, Sudhakar Reddy

    2017-10-19

    71-year-old woman with progressive left-sided, monocular diplopia and ptosis. Her symptoms mimicked ocular myasthenia, but she had an indirect carotid cavernous fistula (CCF). She was diagnosed with monocular myasthenia gravis (negative acetylcholinesterase antibody) after a positive ice test and started on Mestinon and underwent a thymectomy complicated by a brachial plexus injury. Months later, she developed left-sided proptosis and ocular bruit. She was urgently referred to neuro-interventional surgery and was diagnosed with an indirect high-flow left CCF, which was treated with Onyx liquid and platinum coil embolisation. Mestinon was discontinued. Her ophthalmic symptoms resolved. However, she was left with a residual left arm and hand hemiparesis and dysmetria secondary to a brachial plexus injury. Indirect CCF usually can present with subtle and progressive symptoms leading to delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. It is important for ophthalmologists to consider this differential in a patient with progressive ocular symptoms. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  2. Differential Expression of Ccn4 and Other Genes Between Metastatic and Non-metastatic EL4 Mouse Lymphoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    S. CHAHAL, MANPREET; TERESA KU, H.; ZHANG, ZHIHONG; M. LEGASPI, CHRISTIAN; LUO, ANGELA; M. HOPKINS, MANDI; E. MEIER, KATHRYN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous work characterized variants of the EL4 murine lymphoma cell line. Some are non-metastatic, and others metastatic, in syngenic mice. In addition, metastatic EL4 cells were stably transfected with phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which further enhanced metastasis. Materials and Methods: Microarray analyses of mRNA expression was performed for non-metastatic, metastatic, and PLD2-expressing metastatic EL4 cells. Results: Many differences were observed between non-metastatic and meta...

  3. Metastatic hidradenocarcinoma: Surgery and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amel, Trabelsi; Olfa, Gharbi; Faten, Hammedi; Makrem, Hochlef; Slim, Ben Ahmed; Moncef, Mokni

    2009-12-01

    Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma of high malignant potential. It most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera. We report a case of 52-year-old woman who presented with an invasive hidradenocarcinoma of the finger, treated with surgical excision. The patient presented with skin and lymph node metastases four years after, treated by chemotherapy. Hidradenocarcinoma is an aggressive tumor. It seems important to use adjuvant therapies particularly for recurrent and metastatic forms.

  4. Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a cervicomediastinal ... Her voice was hoarse but there was no eye signs suggestive of thyrotoxicosis. ... A presumptive diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma with retrosternal extension was made.

  5. Deep Granuloma Annulare Mimicking Inflamed Cysts in a Teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Emily L; Degesys, Catherine A; Jahan-Tigh, Richard; Chan, Audrey

    2017-07-01

    We describe deep granuloma annulare (DGA) of the forehead mimicking inflamed cysts. Reactive inflammation and sterile purulent drainage may be an underrecognized feature of DGA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Predicting survival of de novo metastatic breast cancer in Asian women: systematic review and validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hui; Hartman, Mikael; Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Lee, Soo-Chin; Taib, Nur Aishah; Tan, Ern-Yu; Chan, Patrick; Moons, Karel G M; Wong, Hoong-Seam; Goh, Jeremy; Rahim, Siti Mastura; Yip, Cheng-Har; Verkooijen, Helena M

    2014-01-01

    In Asia, up to 25% of breast cancer patients present with distant metastases at diagnosis. Given the heterogeneous survival probabilities of de novo metastatic breast cancer, individual outcome prediction is challenging. The aim of the study is to identify existing prognostic models for patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer and validate them in Asia. We performed a systematic review to identify prediction models for metastatic breast cancer. Models were validated in 642 women with de novo metastatic breast cancer registered between 2000 and 2010 in the Singapore Malaysia Hospital Based Breast Cancer Registry. Survival curves for low, intermediate and high-risk groups according to each prognostic score were compared by log-rank test and discrimination of the models was assessed by concordance statistic (C-statistic). We identified 16 prediction models, seven of which were for patients with brain metastases only. Performance status, estrogen receptor status, metastatic site(s) and disease-free interval were the most common predictors. We were able to validate nine prediction models. The capacity of the models to discriminate between poor and good survivors varied from poor to fair with C-statistics ranging from 0.50 (95% CI, 0.48-0.53) to 0.63 (95% CI, 0.60-0.66). The discriminatory performance of existing prediction models for de novo metastatic breast cancer in Asia is modest. Development of an Asian-specific prediction model is needed to improve prognostication and guide decision making.

  7. Study of metastatic foci by CT in autopsied lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Mitsuru; Nobe, Yoshifumi; Fujii, Kyoichi.

    1983-01-01

    The authors reexamined all of the image diagnoses made during whole hospitalization in 11 lung cancer cases with autopsy. Of 39 metastatic foci observed at autopsy in the liver, kidney, pancreas, adrenal and brain, 12 had been diagnosed on transverse CT images before death. Three foci were missed at initial readings. The period from CT to autopsy was less than 3 months for 9 of 12 correctly diagnosed foci. For 13 of 27 foci undetected by CT, CT was conducted more than 3 months before death. (Chiba, N)

  8. Metabolic Profiles of Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tone F. Bathen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis to the brain is a feared complication of systemic cancer, associated with significant morbidity and poor prognosis. A better understanding of the tumor metabolism might help us meet the challenges in controlling brain metastases. The study aims to characterize the metabolic profile of brain metastases of different origin using high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS to correlate the metabolic profiles to clinical and pathological information. Biopsy samples of human brain metastases (n = 49 were investigated. A significant correlation between lipid signals and necrosis in brain metastases was observed (p < 0.01, irrespective of their primary origin. The principal component analysis (PCA showed that brain metastases from malignant melanomas cluster together, while lung carcinomas were metabolically heterogeneous and overlap with other subtypes. Metastatic melanomas have higher amounts of glycerophosphocholine than other brain metastases. A significant correlation between microscopically visible lipid droplets estimated by Nile Red staining and MR visible lipid signals was observed in metastatic lung carcinomas (p = 0.01, indicating that the proton MR visible lipid signals arise from cytoplasmic lipid droplets. MRS-based metabolomic profiling is a useful tool for exploring the metabolic profiles of metastatic brain tumors.

  9. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis-mimicking Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Han; Kim, Mi Young; Hong, Sun In; Jung, Jiwon; Lee, Hyun Joo; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is occasionally confused with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in transplant recipients, since clinical suspicion and early diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and IPA rely heavily on imaging modes such as computed tomography (CT). We therefore investigated IPA-mimicking tuberculosis in transplant recipients. All adult transplant recipients who developed tuberculosis or IPA at a tertiary hospital in an intermediate tuberculosis-burden country during a 6-year period were enrolled. First, we tested whether experienced radiologists could differentiate pulmonary tuberculosis from IPA. Second, we determined which radiologic findings could help us differentiate them. During the study period, 28 transplant recipients developed pulmonary tuberculosis after transplantation, and 80 patients developed IPA after transplantation. Two experienced radiologists scored blindly 28 tuberculosis and 50 randomly selected IPA cases. The sensitivities of radiologists A and B for IPA were 78% and 68%, respectively (poor agreement, kappa value = 0.25). The sensitivities of radiologists A and B for tuberculosis were 64% and 61%, respectively (excellent agreement, kappa value = 0.77). We then compared the CT findings of the 28 patients with tuberculosis and 80 patients with IPA. Infarct-shaped consolidations and smooth bronchial wall thickening were more frequent in IPA, and mass-shaped consolidations and centrilobular nodules (tuberculosis. Certain CT findings appear to be helpful in differentiating between IPA and tuberculosis. Nevertheless, the CT findings of about one-third of pulmonary tuberculosis cases in transplant recipients are very close to those of IPA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Computed tomography scans of metastatic hepatic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemoto, Kazumasa; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nemoto, Yutaka [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography scans of 114 metastatic hepatic tumors were reviewed. Central low density was found in 82 cases (71.9%) and seems to be characteristic to metastatic hepatic tumors. Dynamic CT was performed on 34 cases, and 21 (61.8%) of these had ring enhancement at the arterial phase. Most of metastatic hepatic tumors could be differentiated from hepatocellular carcinoma. However, metastatic hepatic tumors from renal cell carcinoma, renal rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant melanoma and leiomyosarcoma could not be differentiated from hepatocellular carcinoma, even with use of dynamic study.

  11. Neuromyelitis Optica Lesion Mimicking Brainstem Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl who presented with weakness of the left extremities and right sided sixth cranial nerve palsy had neuromyelitis optica (NMO mistaken for brainstem glioma on MRI, in a report from Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine,Seoul, Republic of KoreaNeuromyelitis Optica, Optic-Spinal Syndrome, Spectroscopy.

  12. Management of recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Makoto

    2018-01-01

    Recently, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have become available for the treatment of recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer. However, a number of clinical challenges that impact the use of VEGFR-targeted TKI in daily clinical practice have arisen. Toxicity is considerable, to the extent that most physicians hesitate to start VEGFR-targeted TKI and prefer to continue a watch-and-wait approach until the patient's disease markedly worsens. This delayed use of VEGFR-targeted TKI leads to a higher incidence of serious adverse events than was reported in clinical trials. Moreover, the watch-and-wait approach has several demerits, including a worsening of quality of life, worsening of outcomes in patients of older age or with follicular thyroid cancer and increased risk of brain metastasis or bleeding. Thus, optimal timing for the start of VEGFR-targeted TKI requires careful consideration. Moreover, management of VEGFR-targeted TKI toxicities requires appropriate supportive care, well-organised infrastructure in the outpatient clinic and patient education. Future treatment will progress to precision medicine based on molecular testing. Promotion of precision medicine requires the establishment of a system of easy access to molecular testing and the promotion of translational research for the development of new drugs.

  13. Metastatic tumours to hypophysis: a report of three cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Šmigoc

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Metastatic tumours to pituitary are rare. The most frequent are metastases from breast and lung.Methods. In this paper, three cases of metastatic tumours to the pituitary are presented with panhypopituitarism as a common symptom: I a 60-year-old gentleman with metastasis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, who presented with diabetes insipidus, II a 54-year-old lady with metastatic renal clear cell carcinoma and consequent disturbances in visual acuity, brain nerve paresis and III a 57-year-old lady with breast cancer metastasis, visual impairment and brain nerve paresis.Results. A transnasal endoscopic resection of the tumours was performed in all cases, followed by oncological treatment. All patients improved after the treatment.Conclusions. Despite the rarity of the disease, a metastatic tumour to the pituitary gland must be included in the differential diagnosis when symptoms such as diabetes insipidus, ophthalmoplegy due to brain nerve palsies, rapid course of the disease and headache are observed. In 20% to 30%, pituitary metastases are the first manifestation of a tumour of unknown origin. Surgical and adjuvant therapy may improve the quality of life. The survival and prognosis are generally poor.

  14. Fulminant intravascular lymphomatosis mimicking acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, D; Sicurelli, F; Cerase, A; Tripodi, S; Cintorino, M; Lazzi, S; Federico, A

    2012-09-15

    Intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL) is a rare non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, usually of B cell lineage, characterized by massive angiotropic growth. The clinical presentation of IVL may include changes in mental status, non-localizing neurological deficits, seizures, fever of unknown origin and skin changes. Because of its rarity and the absence of specific diagnostic procedures except for cerebral biopsy, diagnosis is often postmortem. Brain MRI usually shows non-specific abnormalities. The purpose of this case report is to increase the knowledge of clinical and neuroimaging features of IVL by describing the findings observed in a 71-year-old patient. A 71-year-old male was admitted for right hemiparesis, acute cognitive impairment and febricula. A bone marrow biopsy resulted normal. He then developed a rapid progressive impairment of his mental status and left hemisoma motor seizures. Brain CT and MRI were interpreted as consistent with acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalopathy (AHLE), including multiple areas of restricted diffusion without gadolinium enhancement and a small focal area of gadolinium enhancement in the left temporal lobe white matter. The patient died within a few days and the autopsy led to the diagnosis of IVL. IVL may present with a variety of clinical signs and symptoms, including stroke and hemiparesis. IVL may mimic AHLE at brain MRI. However, the evidence of multiple areas of restricted diffusion without gadolinium enhancement and of a small area of gadolinium enhancement could have led to the correct diagnosis. IVL should be added to the differential diagnosis of AHLE at brain MRI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The shifting landscape of metastatic breast cancer to the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Matthew R; Fukui, Olivia; Chew, Brandon; Bhatia, Sanjay; Karlovits, Steven

    2013-07-01

    The improved survival following the diagnosis of breast cancer has potentially altered the characteristics and course of patients presenting with CNS involvement. We therefore sought to define our current cohort of breast cancer patients with metastatic disease to the CNS in regard to modern biomarkers and clinical outcome. Review of clinical and radiographic records of women presenting to a tertiary medical center with the new diagnosis of CNS metastatic disease from breast cancer. This was a retrospective review from patients identities obtained from two prospective databases. There were 88 women analyzed who were treated over the period of January 2003 to February 2010, average age 56.9 years. At the time of initial presentation of CNS disease, 68 % of patients had multiple brain metastases, 17 % had a solitary metastasis, and 15 % had only leptomeningeal disease (LMD). The median survival for all patients from the time of diagnosis of breast disease was 50.0 months, and 9.7 months from diagnosis of CNS involvement. The only factor related to overall survival was estrogen receptor-positive pathology (57.6 v. 38.2 months, p = .02 log-rank); those related to survival post CNS diagnosis were presentation with LMD (p = .004, HR = 3.1, Cox regression) and triple-negative hormonal/HER2 status (p = .02, HR = 2.3, Cox regression). Patients with either had a median survival of 3.1 months (no patients in common). Of the 75 patients who initially presented with metastatic brain lesions, 20 (26 %) subsequently developed LMD in the course of their disease (median 10.4 months), following which survival was grim (1.8 months median). Symptoms of LMD were most commonly lower extremity weakness (14/33), followed by cranial nerve deficits (11/33). The recently described Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) tumor index stratified median survival at 2.5, 5.9, 13.1, and 21.7 months, respectively, for indices of 1-4 (p = .004, log-rank), which

  16. Challenging metastatic breast cancer with the natural defensin PvD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Tiago N; Oliveira, Filipa D; Almeida, Inês; Mello, Érica O; Gomes, Valdirene M; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Gaspar, Diana

    2017-11-09

    Metastatic breast cancer is a very serious life threatening condition that poses many challenges for the pharmaceutical development of effective chemotherapeutics. As the therapeutics targeted to the localized masses in breast improve, metastatic lesions in the brain slowly increase in their incidence compromising successful treatment outcomes overall. The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) is one important obstacle for the management of breast cancer brain metastases. New therapeutic approaches are in demand for overcoming the BBB's breaching by breast tumor cells. In this work we demonstrate the potential dual role of a natural antimicrobial plant defensin, PvD 1 : it interferes with the formation of solid tumors in the breast and concomitantly controls adhesion of breast cancer cells to human brain endothelial cells. We have used a combination of techniques that probe PvD 1 's effect at the single cell level and reveal that this peptide can effectively damage breast tumor cells, leaving healthy breast and brain cells unaffected. Results suggest that PvD1 quickly internalizes in cancer cells but remains located in the membrane of normal cells with no significant damage to its structure and biomechanical properties. These interactions in turn modulate cell adhesiveness between tumor and BBB cells. PvD 1 is a potential template for the design of innovative pharmacological approaches for metastatic breast cancer treatment: the manipulation of the biomechanical properties of tumor cells that ultimately prevent their attachment to the BBB.

  17. ADVANCED UVEAL MELANOMA WITH SUBDURAL METASTASIS MIMICKING MENINGEOMA - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Kovačević

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Uveal melanoma is a rare malignancy. Its clinical course is highly agressive. At thetime of diagnosis, extraocular extension is present in most of the cases.We present a case of 69-year-old white man admitted for sharp orbital pain. Advanced uveal melanoma was diagnosed. We found black-colored tumor rotruding from the left eye and multiple cutaneous metastases on the scalp. CT scan revealed intracranial tumor mimicking meningeoma in the left parietal region. Lymhogenous metastases were not found and other hematogenous metastases were excluded. After biopsy of the eye tumor and excisional biopsy of one skin tumor, the uveal melanoma was diagnosed and the left orbital exenteration and extirpation of intracranial tumor were performed. The reconstruction was performed using galeacutaneous flap harvested from craniotomy flap. Postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was released from pain. He refused the additional oncological treatment. After four months, he died of liver metastatic disease.The uveal melanoma is highly aggressive malignancy and isolated subdural metastasis is quite rare. The reconstruction with transposed galeacutaneous flap is versatile and secure technique after orbital exenteration.

  18. REPORT OF SEVEN CASES OF METASTATIC TUMOURS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major Adebayo

    Metastatic lesions may mimic odontogenic infections and other disease conditions in the oral cavity in presentation leading to late diagnosis by the unwary clinician. In Nigeria, reports on jaw tumours from metastasis elsewhere are quite scarce. This report presents a series of histologically verified metastatic tumours to the ...

  19. Fetal antigen 2 in primary and secondary brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H Boje; Teisner, B; Schrøder, H D

    1991-01-01

    Immunohistochemical deposition and distribution of fetal antigen 2 (FA2) was examined in normal brain tissue and in primary and metastatic tumors of the brain. In normal brain tissue FA2 was exclusively found linearly around the vessels, along pia and in arachnoidea. A similar localization was seen...

  20. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland.

  1. PET-CT in the evaluation of metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, A.M.; Fulham, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman underwent two PET-CT scans for the evaluation of metastatic breast cancer. A radical left mastectomy with axillary dissection (1 of 43 nodes positive) followed by chemotherapy, was performed in 1998. She represented in October 2003 with a left supraclavicular fossa mass. This was confirmed to be recurrent breast cancer on FNAB. She was considered for a radical neck dissection and the surgeon requested a PET scan. Other imaging at this time included a normal bone scan and CT brain. CT neck/chest/abdomen/pelvis showed soft tissue thickening in the left lower neck. The PET-CT scan showed multiple glucose avid lesions in the sternum, mediastinum and neck lymph nodes as well as a small lesion in the proximal left femur consistent with extensive metastatic disease. Surgery was cancelled and Femara chemotherapy commenced. Femara was stopped in March 2004 and the patient began alternative therapies. In October 2004 she presented to her surgeon with new back and chest pain. CT of the neck/chest/abdomen/pelvis showed a soft tissue mass in the upper sternum and a lymph node at the base of the neck highly suspicious for metastatic disease. There were also 2 suspicious lung nodules and a lesion in the proximal left femur reported as an osteoid osteoma. Wholebody PET-CT scans were performed on a Siemens LSO Biograph, 60mins after the injection of 350Mbq of Fl 8-Fag, with arms at the patient's side and head in the field-of-view. On both occasions the patient had to pay for the scan. On the 2004 PET-CT scan, the CT brain revealed multiple hyperdense lesions consistent with hemorrhagic metastases. In addition, there were innumerable glucose avid foci involving viscera, nodes and skeleton consistent with disseminated disease. Our case illustrates: (i) the value of PET in the management of metastatic breast cancer; (ii) the improved accuracy of PET-CT in delineating sites of disease; (iii) the issues of head movement in PET-CT and. (iv) the problem with lack of

  2. Tumor-mimicking primary angiitis of the central nervous system: initial and follow-up MR features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youkyung; Kim, Ji-hoon; Kim, Eunhee; Yim, Yoo Jeong; Sohn, Chul-Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Park, Sung-Hye [Seoul National University, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Chang, Kee-Hyun [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Neuroscience Research Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-10-15

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is an extremely rare vasculitis of unknown etiology. The purpose of this study was to describe the initial and follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the tumor-mimicking PACNS. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 21 initial and follow-up brain MR images obtained in four patients with biopsy-proven PACNS mimicking brain tumor on MR images during the periods from 1 to 8.1 years. In the initial study, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; n=4), MR angiogram (n=4), conventional catheter angiogram (n=3), perfusion MR (n=1), and computed tomography (n=1) and proton MR spectroscopy (MRS; n=2) were included. The lesions of the brain were qualitatively assessed in terms of location, number, size, shape, signal intensity, absence or presence of hemorrhage, enhancement pattern, and changes on the follow-up studies. Initially, the lesion manifested as single suprasellar (n=1) and frontal hemispheric (n=1) mass and as multiple-enhancing lesions in the unilateral supratentorial hemisphere (n=2). A patient showed steno-occlusive lesions in the internal carotid and middle cerebral arteries. DWI, perfusion imaging, and MRS revealed inconsistent findings among the patients. On the follow-up studies, a patient had two relapses but there was either significant decrease in size and extent or disappearance of the lesions with immunosuppressive therapy in all patients. Tumor-mimicking PACNS shows variable features on initial MR images but shows good responses to appropriate immunosuppressive therapy on follow-up MR images. (orig.)

  3. Tumor-mimicking primary angiitis of the central nervous system: initial and follow-up MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youkyung; Kim, Ji-hoon; Kim, Eunhee; Yim, Yoo Jeong; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye; Chang, Kee-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is an extremely rare vasculitis of unknown etiology. The purpose of this study was to describe the initial and follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the tumor-mimicking PACNS. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 21 initial and follow-up brain MR images obtained in four patients with biopsy-proven PACNS mimicking brain tumor on MR images during the periods from 1 to 8.1 years. In the initial study, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; n=4), MR angiogram (n=4), conventional catheter angiogram (n=3), perfusion MR (n=1), and computed tomography (n=1) and proton MR spectroscopy (MRS; n=2) were included. The lesions of the brain were qualitatively assessed in terms of location, number, size, shape, signal intensity, absence or presence of hemorrhage, enhancement pattern, and changes on the follow-up studies. Initially, the lesion manifested as single suprasellar (n=1) and frontal hemispheric (n=1) mass and as multiple-enhancing lesions in the unilateral supratentorial hemisphere (n=2). A patient showed steno-occlusive lesions in the internal carotid and middle cerebral arteries. DWI, perfusion imaging, and MRS revealed inconsistent findings among the patients. On the follow-up studies, a patient had two relapses but there was either significant decrease in size and extent or disappearance of the lesions with immunosuppressive therapy in all patients. Tumor-mimicking PACNS shows variable features on initial MR images but shows good responses to appropriate immunosuppressive therapy on follow-up MR images. (orig.)

  4. Mimicking Neurotransmitter Release in Chemical Synapses via Hysteresis Engineering in MoS2 Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Andrew J; Razavieh, Ali; Nasr, Joseph R; Schulman, Daniel S; Eichfeld, Chad M; Das, Saptarshi

    2017-03-28

    Neurotransmitter release in chemical synapses is fundamental to diverse brain functions such as motor action, learning, cognition, emotion, perception, and consciousness. Moreover, improper functioning or abnormal release of neurotransmitter is associated with numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy, sclerosis, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. We have utilized hysteresis engineering in a back-gated MoS 2 field effect transistor (FET) in order to mimic such neurotransmitter release dynamics in chemical synapses. All three essential features, i.e., quantal, stochastic, and excitatory or inhibitory nature of neurotransmitter release, were accurately captured in our experimental demonstration. We also mimicked an important phenomenon called long-term potentiation (LTP), which forms the basis of human memory. Finally, we demonstrated how to engineer the LTP time by operating the MoS 2 FET in different regimes. Our findings could provide a critical component toward the design of next-generation smart and intelligent human-like machines and human-machine interfaces.

  5. Ancient schwannoma at the olfactory groove mimicking meningioma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin; Jeong, Hae Woong [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Schwannomas are benign slow-growing nerve sheath tumors, which can develop in any peripheral or central nerve that contains Schwann cells. Schwannomas located near the olfactory groove are extremely rare and radiological diagnosis can be difficult. Moreover, ancient schwannoma is an uncommon variant, and radiologic findings are rarely reported. Herein, we reported a surgically confirmed case of ancient schwannoma at the olfactory groove in a 44-year-old woman presenting with headache and visual disturbance. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a solid and cystic extra-axial mass located in the subfrontal area mimicking an olfactory groove meningioma. Histopathologic diagnosis of ancient schwannoma was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining for S100, CD56, vimentin, and other markers. Furthermore, we described the clinical manifestations, MRI characteristics, and histopathologic findings of the case, and presented a review of related literature.

  6. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage due to Spinal Cord Schwannoma Presenting Findings Mimicking Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Yin-Xi; Zhang, Qing; Song, Shui-Jiang; Liu, Zhi-Rong

    2016-08-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) of spinal origin is uncommon in clinical practice, and spinal schwannomas associated with SAH are even more rarely reported. We report an unusual case of spinal SAH mimicking meningitis with normal brain computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and negative CT angiography. Cerebrospinal fluid examination results were consistent with the manifestation of SAH. Spinal MRI performed subsequently showed an intradural extramedullary mass. The patient received surgery and was finally diagnosed with spinal cord schwannoma. A retrospective chart review of the patient was performed. We describe a case of SAH due to spinal cord schwannoma. Our case highlights the importance of careful history taking and complete evaluation. We emphasize that spinal causes should always be ruled out in patients with angionegative SAH and that schwannoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of SAH etiologies even though rare. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ectopic fascioliasis mimicking a colon tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makay, Ozer; Gurcu, Baris; Caliskan, Cemil; Nart, Deniz; Tuncyurek, Muge; Korkut, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica, a leaf shaped trematode that is common in cattle, sheep and goats, is acquired by eating raw water plants like watercress or drinking water infected with the encysted form of the parasite. The varied clinical presentations of fascioliasis still make a high index of suspicion mandatory. Besides having a wide spectrum of hepatobiliary symptoms like obstructive jaundice, cholangitis and liver cirrhosis, the parasitic infection also has extrabiliary manifestations. Until recently, extrahepatic fascioliasis has been reported in the subcutaneous tissue, brain, lungs, epididymis, inguinal lymph nodes, stomach and the cecum. In this report, a strange manifestation of the fasciola infection in a site other than the liver, a colonic fascioliasis, is presented. PMID:17552017

  8. Differentiation of Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Mesenteric Lymph Nodes by Strain Elastography in Surgical Specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havre, R F; Leh, S M; Gilja, O H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate if strain elastography could differentiate between metastatic and non-metastatic mesenteric lymph nodes ex-vivo. Materials and Methods: 90 mesenteric lymph nodes were examined shortly after resection from 25 patients including 17 patients with colorectal cancer and 8...... patients with Crohn's disease. Ultrasound-based strain elastography was performed with a linear probe. Tissue hardness in lymph nodes was assessed using visual scales and measuring the strain ratio. B-mode characteristics were also recorded. Pathological diagnosis with grading of fibrosis served...... non-metastatic nodes, but the difference was not significant (65.5 vs. 55.0, p = 0.055). There was no difference between lymph nodes in Crohn's and non-metastatic cancer specimens. The metastatic lymph nodes were significantly more fibrotic than the non-metastatic lymph nodes by the ordinal fibrosis...

  9. A Rare Case of Pott's Disease (Spinal Tuberculosis) Mimicking Metastatic Disease in the Southern Region of Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanagic, Azra; Emamifar, Amir; Christian Bang, Jacob; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-06-07

    Pott's disease (PD) or spinal tuberculosis is a rare condition which accounts for less than 1% of total tuberculosis (TB) cases. The incidence of PD has recently increased in Europe and the United States, mainly due to immigration; however, it is still a rare diagnosis in Scandinavian countries, and if overlooked it might lead to significant neurologic complications. A 78-year-old woman, originally from Eastern Europe, presented to the emergency department with a complaint of nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and severe back pain. On admission she was febrile and had leukocytosis and increased C-reactive protein. Initial spinal x-ray was performed and revealed osteolytic changes in the vertebral body of T11 and T12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine illustrated spondylitis of T10, T11, and T12, with multiple paravertebral and epidural abscesses, which was suggestive of PD. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the patient's gastric fluid was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). Based on MRI and PCR findings, standard treatment for TB was initiated. Results of the spine biopsy and culture showed colonies of MT and confirmed the diagnosis afterwards. Due to the instability of the spine and severe and continuous pain, spine-stabilizing surgery was performed. Her TB was cured after nine months of treatment. PD is an important differential diagnosis of malignancy that should be diagnosed instantly. History of exposure to TB and classic radiologic finding can help make the diagnosis.

  10. Primary hepatic actinomycosis mimicking hepatic malignancy with metastatic lymph nodes by F-18 FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic involvement is usually secondary to abdominal actinomycosis infection. Symptom onset is typically subscute and the disease follows a chronic and indolent course. These lesions are called inflammatory pseudotumors and cannot be differentiated from malignant tumors by radiological examination alone. Laboratory tests showed mild anemia; hemoglobin 119 g/L, elevated white blood cell count of 23,060/mm 3 , AST 33 U/L, ALT 45 U/L, and γ-GT 155 U/L.

  11. Primary hepatic actinomycosis mimicking hepatic malignancy with metastatic lymph nodes by F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Eun Jung [Yeungnam Univ. Medical School and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Hepatic involvement is usually secondary to abdominal actinomycosis infection. Symptom onset is typically subscute and the disease follows a chronic and indolent course. These lesions are called inflammatory pseudotumors and cannot be differentiated from malignant tumors by radiological examination alone. Laboratory tests showed mild anemia; hemoglobin 119 g/L, elevated white blood cell count of 23,060/mm{sup 3}, AST 33 U/L, ALT 45 U/L, and γ-GT 155 U/L.

  12. A Rare Case of Pott's Disease (Spinal Tuberculosis) Mimicking Metastatic Disease in the Southern Region of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmanagic, Azra; Emamifar, Amir; Christian Bang, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    leukocytosis and increased C-reactive protein. Initial spinal x-ray was performed and revealed osteolytic changes in the vertebral body of T11 and T12. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine illustrated spondylitis of T10, T11, and T12, with multiple paravertebral and epidural abscesses, which...... was suggestive of PD. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the patient's gastric fluid was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). Based on MRI and PCR findings, standard treatment for TB was initiated. Results of the spine biopsy and culture showed colonies of MT and confirmed the diagnosis afterwards. Due...

  13. Huge Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans Mimicking a Breast Malignant Tumor with Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Kun Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP is an uncommon skin cancer that most commonly occurs on the trunk and extremities. DFSP of the breast has rarely been reported, and then is almost always of small size. We report a case of rapid-growing DFSP of the breast with abscess formation mimicking breast cancer, and also make a review of related literature.

  14. Ectopic decidual reaction mimicking inguinal lymphoma on ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, C.; Prangsgaard, Tina; Lorentzen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic decidual reaction has been described in various intraperitoneal locations. We present a case of unusual ectopic decidual reaction in the groin mimicking inguinal lymphoma on ultrasound in a pregnant woman. This case contributes evidence illustrating the variability of the clinical...... presentation of ectopic decidual reaction....

  15. Cutaneous Silicone Granuloma Mimicking Breast Cancer after Ruptured Breast Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations due to migration of silicone from ruptured implants are rare. Migrated silicone with cutaneous involvement has been found in the chest wall, abdominal wall, and lower extremities. We describe a case of cutaneous silicone granuloma in the breast exhibiting unusual growth mimicking breast cancer after a ruptured implant.

  16. Neoplastic stomach lesions and their mimickers: spectrum of imaging manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Virmani, Vivek; Khandelwal, Ashish; Sethi, Vineeta; Fraser-Hill, Margret; Fasih, Najla; Kielar, Ania

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This review illustrates a wide spectrum of gastric neoplasms with emphasis on imaging findings helpful in characterizing various gastric neoplasms. Both the malignant and benign neoplasms along with focal gastric masses mimicking tumour are illustrated. Moreover, imaging clues to reach an accurate diagnosis are emphasized.

  17. Sparganosis of the Breast that Mimicked Metastasis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Woon; Hwang, Mi Soo

    2011-01-01

    Sparganosis of the breast is a rare parasitic infection of humans. If the breast is involved, then this condition presents as soft tissue masses that mimic breast cancer. We report here on the radiologic feature of sparganosis in a patient with gastric cancer and this mimicked metastasis. We also briefly review the relevant literature

  18. Effects of mimicking: Acting prosocially by being emotionally moved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stel, M.; Baaren, R.B. van; Vonk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Mimicry is functional for empathy and bonding purposes. Studies on the consequences of mimicry at a behavioral level demonstrated that mimicry increases prosocial behavior. However, these previous studies focused on the mimickee. In the present paper, we investigated whether mimickers also become

  19. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea); Sung, Ki Woong [Department of Paediatrics, Samsung Medical Centre, Seoul 135-710 (Korea)

    2003-11-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  20. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min; Sung, Ki Woong

    2003-01-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  1. Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia mimicking cutaneous lymphoma in a hyperthyroid cat

    OpenAIRE

    Snead, Elisabeth; Kerr, Moira; MacDonald, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat presented for chronic, localized, swelling and crusting of the left upper lip, weight loss, sporadic vomiting, and focal alopecia between the scapulae was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and regional eosinophilic lymphadenitis. Treatment with methimazole exacerbated an underlying hypersensitivity disorder leading to marked generalized lymphadenopathy that histologically mimicked lymphoma.

  2. Friedreich's ataxia mimicking hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panas, Marios; Kalfakis, Nikolaos; Karadima, Georgia; Davaki, Panagiota; Vassilopoulos, Demetris

    2002-11-01

    Four patients from three unrelated families, with clinical and electrophysiological findings compatible with the diagnosis of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, are presented. The molecular analysis showed that the affected individuals were homozygous for the mutation in the X25 gene, characteristic of Friedreich's ataxia. These patients seem to represent a form of Friedreich's ataxia mimicking Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  3. Primary Papillary Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Ureter Mimicking Genitourinary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulwani, Hanni; Jain, Aruna

    2010-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinomas of the renal pelvis and ureter are rare and account for less than 1% of all malignancies at this site. We report a case of primary papillary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the ureter that clinically mimicked genitourinary tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is important for the better outcome. PMID:21151719

  4. Primary Papillary Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Ureter Mimicking Genitourinary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanni Gulwani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary adenocarcinomas of the renal pelvis and ureter are rare and account for less than 1% of all malignancies at this site. We report a case of primary papillary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the ureter that clinically mimicked genitourinary tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is important for the better outcome.

  5. Mimicking expressiveness of movements by autistic children in game play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetteroo, D.; Shirzad, A.; Serras Pereira, M.; Zwinderman, M.J.; Duy, L.; Barakova, E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD)have marked impairments in social interaction. Imitation is a basic social interaction behavior, and mimicking as an element of imitation can be a diagnostic marker for autism and thus a skill that can be targeted by behavioral training. In a comparative

  6. Comparative proteomic investigation of metastatic and non-metastatic osteosarcoma cells of human and canine origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnabi Roy

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in dogs and people. In order to improve clinical outcomes, it is necessary to identify proteins that are differentially expressed by metastatic cells. Membrane bound proteins are responsible for multiple pro-metastatic functions. Therefore characterizing the differential expression of membranous proteins between metastatic and non-metastatic clonal variants will allow the discovery of druggable targets and consequently improve treatment methodology. The objective of this investigation was to systemically identify the membrane-associated proteomics of metastatic and non-metastatic variants of human and canine origin. Two clonal variants of divergent in vivo metastatic potential from human and canine origins were used. The plasma membranes were isolated and peptide fingerprinting was used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Selected proteins were further validated using western blotting, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Over 500 proteins were identified for each cell line with nearly 40% of the proteins differentially regulated. Conserved between both species, metastatic variants demonstrated significant differences in expression of membrane proteins that are responsible for pro-metastatic functions. Additionally, CD147, CD44 and vimentin were validated using various biochemical techniques. Taken together, through a comparative proteomic approach we have identified several differentially expressed cell membrane proteins that will help in the development of future therapeutics.

  7. Comparative proteomic investigation of metastatic and non-metastatic osteosarcoma cells of human and canine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jahnabi; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Pondenis, Holly; Fan, Timothy M; Das, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in dogs and people. In order to improve clinical outcomes, it is necessary to identify proteins that are differentially expressed by metastatic cells. Membrane bound proteins are responsible for multiple pro-metastatic functions. Therefore characterizing the differential expression of membranous proteins between metastatic and non-metastatic clonal variants will allow the discovery of druggable targets and consequently improve treatment methodology. The objective of this investigation was to systemically identify the membrane-associated proteomics of metastatic and non-metastatic variants of human and canine origin. Two clonal variants of divergent in vivo metastatic potential from human and canine origins were used. The plasma membranes were isolated and peptide fingerprinting was used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Selected proteins were further validated using western blotting, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Over 500 proteins were identified for each cell line with nearly 40% of the proteins differentially regulated. Conserved between both species, metastatic variants demonstrated significant differences in expression of membrane proteins that are responsible for pro-metastatic functions. Additionally, CD147, CD44 and vimentin were validated using various biochemical techniques. Taken together, through a comparative proteomic approach we have identified several differentially expressed cell membrane proteins that will help in the development of future therapeutics.

  8. If you don't look, you won't see: intravital multiphoton imaging of primary and metastatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonapace, L.; Wyckoff, J.; Oertner, T.; van Rheenen, J.; Junt, T.; Bentires-Alj, M.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental hallmark of cancer is progression to metastasis and the growth of breast cancer metastases in lung, bone, liver and/or brain causes fatal complications. Unfortunately, the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of the metastatic process remain ill-defined. Recent application of intravital

  9. Characterization of KRAS Rearrangements in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Song; Shankar, Sunita; Dhanasekaran, Saravana M.; Ateeq, Bushra; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Jing, Xiaojun; Robinson, Daniel; Cao, Qi; Prensner, John R.; Yocum, Anastasia K.; Wang, Rui; Fries, Daniel F.; Han, Bo; Asangani, Irfan A.; Cao, Xuhong; Li, Yong; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Pflueger, Dorothee; Gopalan, Anuradha; Reuter, Victor E.; Kahoud, Emily Rose; Cantley, Lewis C.; Rubin, Mark A.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    Using an integrative genomics approach called Amplification Breakpoint Ranking and Assembly (ABRA) analysis, we nominated KRAS as a gene fusion with the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2L3 in the DU145 cell line, originally derived from prostate cancer metastasis to the brain. Interestingly, analysis of tissues revealed that 2 of 62 metastatic prostate cancers harbored aberrations at the KRAS locus. In DU145 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS produces a fusion protein, specific knock-down of which, attenuates cell invasion and xenograft growth. Ectopic expression of the UBE2L3-KRAS fusion protein exhibits transforming activity in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and RWPE prostate epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. In NIH 3T3 cells, UBE2L3-KRAS attenuates MEK/ERK signaling, commonly engaged by oncogenic mutant KRAS, and instead signals via AKT and p38 MAPK pathways. This is the first report of a gene fusion involving Ras family suggesting that this aberration may drive metastatic progression in a rare subset of prostate cancers. PMID:22140652

  10. Characteristic findings of computed tomography in cerebral metastatic malignant melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukita, Chikashige; Nose, Tadao; Nakagawa, Kunio; Tomono, Yuji; Enomoto, Takao; Hashikawa, Masanori; Egashira, Taihei; Maki, Yutaka

    1986-01-01

    Four cases with metastatic cerebral melanoma were studied by means of computed tomography (CT). Two cases were male, and the other two were female, with an average age of 55 years. Their primary lesions were on the chest wall in two cases, around the calcaneus in one, and around the genitalia in one. All cases died within 6 months after the metastatic brain lesions were found. Necropsies were carried out in two cases. CT revealed high-density areas in all cases, and contrast studies showed an enhancement of the lesions, as has previously been reported. On the other hand, autopsied cases revealed neither fresh nor old intratumoral bleedings such as a scattered focus of hemosiderin. These findings suggest that the high-density tumoral shadows in CT are probably not intratumoral bleedings due to a bleeding tendency of the tumors, as some authors have previously supposed. We mentioned some other factors contributing to the high density of the melanoma on computed tomograms. (author)

  11. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-01-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain. (orig.)

  12. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-03-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain.

  13. Predicting survival of de novo metastatic breast cancer in Asian women: systematic review and validation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Miao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Asia, up to 25% of breast cancer patients present with distant metastases at diagnosis. Given the heterogeneous survival probabilities of de novo metastatic breast cancer, individual outcome prediction is challenging. The aim of the study is to identify existing prognostic models for patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer and validate them in Asia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a systematic review to identify prediction models for metastatic breast cancer. Models were validated in 642 women with de novo metastatic breast cancer registered between 2000 and 2010 in the Singapore Malaysia Hospital Based Breast Cancer Registry. Survival curves for low, intermediate and high-risk groups according to each prognostic score were compared by log-rank test and discrimination of the models was assessed by concordance statistic (C-statistic. RESULTS: We identified 16 prediction models, seven of which were for patients with brain metastases only. Performance status, estrogen receptor status, metastatic site(s and disease-free interval were the most common predictors. We were able to validate nine prediction models. The capacity of the models to discriminate between poor and good survivors varied from poor to fair with C-statistics ranging from 0.50 (95% CI, 0.48-0.53 to 0.63 (95% CI, 0.60-0.66. CONCLUSION: The discriminatory performance of existing prediction models for de novo metastatic breast cancer in Asia is modest. Development of an Asian-specific prediction model is needed to improve prognostication and guide decision making.

  14. Endometriosis of the mesoappendix mimicking appendicitis: A case report

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    Suman Mewa Kinoo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although appendicitis is largely a clinical diagnosis, on occasions diagnostic modalities may be needed to aid with the diagnosis. Despite the use of adjuncts and exploratory surgery, the diagnosis may not be clear until a histological diagnosis is achieved. Endometriosis of the appendix mimicking appendicitis is one of these diagnoses described in several case reports. Endometriosis of the meso-appendix has been described in association with intussusception of the appendix in several case reports. However, to our knowledge, endometriosis of the meso-appendix mimicking appendicitis has not been reported to date. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with classic clinical signs and symptoms of appendicitis endorsed on computed tomography imaging. The patient underwent a laparoscopic appendicectomy with the postoperative histology demonstrating a normal appendix with endometriosis of the meso-appendix.

  15. Rare extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma mimicking as adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Michelle; Haenen, Filip W N; Siozopoulou, Vasiliki; Van Cleemput, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma (EES) is a rare finding in comparison with Ewing's sarcoma of bone and usually manifests in young patients. However, even in older patients, one must consider the diagnosis. In this case, we describe a 52-year-old woman diagnosed with EES, mimicking as adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid. The tumor was not visualized by a multi-slice spiral computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with intravenous contrast, and eventually the diagnosis was made by positive immunohistochemical staining for CD99 and by molecular testing for EWSR1 translocation. This combination of the patient's age and the localization of the tumor mimicking an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid has never been described before.

  16. Chemotherapy versus best supportive care in stage IV non-small cell lung cancer, non metastatic to the brain Quimioterapia versus melhor tratamento de suporte em câncer de pulmão estádio clínico IV não metastático para o sistema nervoso central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnaldo Anelli

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer is a fatal disease, with a median survival of 14 months. Systemic chemotherapy is the most common approach. However the impact in overall survival and quality of life still a controversy. OBJECTIVES: To determine differences in overall survival and quality of life among patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer non-metastatic to the brain treated with best supportive care versus systemic chemotherapy. PATIENTS: From February 1990 through December 1995, 78 eligible patients were admitted with the diagnosis of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer . Patients were divided in 2 groups: Group A (n=31 -- treated with best supportive care , and Group B (n=47 -- treated with systemic chemotherapy. RESULTS: The median survival time was 23 weeks (range 5 -- 153 weeks in Group A and 55 weeks (range 7.4 -- 213 weeks in Group B (p=0.0018. In both groups, the incidence of admission for IV antibiotics and need of blood transfusions were similar. Patients receiving systemic chemotherapy were also stratified into those receiving mytomycin, vinblastin, and cisplatinum, n=25 and those receiving other combination regimens (platinum derivatives associated with other drugs, n=22. Patients receiving mytomycin, vinblastin, and cisplatinum, n=25 had a higher incidence of febrile neutropenia and had their cycles delayed for longer periods of time than the other group. These patients also had a shorter median survival time (51 versus 66 weeks, p=0.005. CONCLUSION: In patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer, non-metastatic to the brain, chemotherapy significantly increases survival compared with best supportive care.O câncer de pulmão de células não pequenas em estádio IV é uma doença fatal, com uma sobrevida mediana de seis meses. Quimioterapia é a abordagem mais freqüente, apresentando um impacto na sobrevida controverso e questionável alteração na qualidade de vida. OBJETIVOS: Comparar o impacto na

  17. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

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    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  18. Degenerated uterine leiomyomas mimicking malignant bilateral ovarian surface epithelial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yi Boem Ha; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lee, Min Hee; Choi, Seo Youn; Chung, Soo Ho [Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign uterine neoplasms. Undegenerated uterine leiomyomas are easily recognizable by the typical imaging findings on radiologic studies. However, degenerated fibroids can have unusual and variable appearances. The atypical appearances due to degenerative changes may cause confusion in diagnosis of leiomyomas. In this article, we report a case of a patient with extensive cystic and myxoid degeneration of uterine leiomyoma, mimicking malignant bilateral ovarian surface epithelial tumors.

  19. Addison's Disease Mimicking as Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Sayani; Rao, Karthik N; Patil, Navin; Ommurugan, Balaji; Varghese, George

    2017-04-01

    Over past two decades there has been significant improvement in medical field in elucidating the underlying pathophysiology and genetics of Addison's disease. Adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.8/100,000 cases. The diagnosis may be delayed if the clinical presentation mimics a gastrointestinal disorder or psychiatric illness. We report a case of Addison's disease presenting as acute pain in abdomen mimicking clinical presentation of acute pancreatitis.

  20. An abdominal tuberculosis case mimicking an abdominal mass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An abdominal tuberculosis case mimicking an abdominal mass. Derya Erdog˘ an a. , Yasemin Ta ¸scı Yıldız b. , Esin Cengiz Bodurog˘lu c and Naciye Go¨nu¨l Tanır d. Abdominal tuberculosis is rare in childhood. It may be difficult to diagnose as it mimics various disorders. We present a 12-year-old child with an unusual ...

  1. A case of gallbladder mass: Malakoplakia (The tumor mimicker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwaljeet Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of malakoplakia presenting as gall bladder mass is a diagnostic dilemma faced by pathologists, radiologists, and surgeons. Malakoplakia is a rare inflammatory disorder and tumor mimicker usually occurring in the urinary tract, may occasionally be found in gall bladder. Here, we present a rare case, presenting as gall bladder mass in a known case of gallstone disease, clinically suspected as carcinoma and later turned out to be malakoplakia in gall bladder.

  2. Approaches to radiotherapy in metastatic spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppl, Morten Hiul

    2018-04-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is caused by the progression of metastatic lesions within the vicinity of the spinal cord. The consequences are very severe with loss of neurological function and severe pain. The standard treatment is surgical intervention followed by radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. However, the majority of patients are treated with radiotherapy only due to contraindications to surgery and technical inoperability. Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a technology to deliver higher radiation dose to the radiotherapy target with the use of spatial coordinates. This modality has shown positive results in treating lesions in brain and lungs. Hence, it could prove beneficial in metastatic spinal cord compression. We designed and planned a trial to investigate this method in patients with metastatic spinal cord compression. The method was usable but the trial was stopped prematurely due to low accrual that made comparison with surgery impossible. Low accrual is a known problem for trials evaluating new approaches in radiotherapy. Target definition in radiotherapy of metastatic spinal cord compression is defined by patient history, examination and imaging. Functional imaging could provide information to guide target definition with the sparring of normal tissue e.g. spinal cord and hematopoietic tissue of the bone marrow. In future trials this may be used for dose escalation of spinal metastases. The trial showed that PET/MRI was feasible in this group of patients but did not change the radiotherapy target in the included patients. Neurological outcome is similar irrespective of course length and therefore single fraction radiotherapy is recommended for the majority of patients. In-field recurrence is a risk factor of both short and long fractionation schemes and re-irradiation have the potential risk of radiation-induced myelopathy. In a retrospective study of re-irradiation, we investigated the incidence of radiation-induced myelopathy. In our study

  3. Reactive Astrocytes in Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wasilewski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis, the secondary growth of malignant cells within the central nervous system (CNS, exceeds the incidence of primary brain tumors (i.e., gliomas by tenfold and are seemingly on the rise owing to the emergence of novel targeted therapies that are more effective in controlling extracranial disease relatively to intracranial lesions. Despite the fact that metastasis to the brain poses a unmet clinical problem, with afflicted patients carrying significant morbidity and a fatal prognosis, our knowledge as to how metastatic cells manage to adapt to the tissue environment of the CNS remains limited. Answering this question could pave the way for novel and more specific therapeutic modalities in brain metastasis by targeting the specific makeup of the brain metastatic niche. In regard to this, astrocytes have emerged as the major host cell type that cancer cells encounter and interact with during brain metastasis formation. Similarly to other CNS disorders, astrocytes become reactive and respond to the presence of cancer cells by changing their phenotype and significantly influencing the outcome of disseminated cancer cells within the CNS. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of reactive astrocytes in brain metastasis by focusing on the signaling pathways and types of interactions that play a crucial part in the communication with cancer cells and how these could be translated into innovative therapies.

  4. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amankwah, Ernest K; Conley, Anthony P; Reed, Damon R

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subcutaneous tissue, and lymph nodes. Additionally, many sarcoma patients presenting initially with localized disease may relapse at metastatic sites. While localized sarcomas can often be cured through surgery and often radiation, controversies exist over optimal management of patients with metastatic sarcoma. Combinations of chemotherapy are the most effective in many settings, and many promising new agents are under active investigation or are being explored in preclinical models. Metastatic sarcomas are excellent candidates for novel approaches with additional agents as they have demonstrated chemosensitivity and affect a portion of the population that is motivated toward curative therapy. In this paper, we provide an overview on the common sarcomas of childhood (rhabdomyosarcoma), adolescence, and young adults (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor) and older adults (leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and undifferentiated high grade sarcoma) in terms of the epidemiology, current therapy, promising therapeutic directions and outcome with a focus on metastatic disease. Potential advances in terms of promising therapy and biologic insights may lead to more effective and safer therapies; however, more clinical trials and research are needed for patients with metastatic sarcoma. PMID:23700373

  5. Emerging Therapies in Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Daniel W; Morgans, Alicia K

    2018-04-11

    In the last decade, there have been multiple landmark therapeutic advances for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, both in the castration-resistant and hormone-sensitive setting. In this review, we highlight recent progress and ongoing trials for metastatic prostate cancer, including advances in chemotherapy, androgen receptor-directed therapy, targeted therapies, and immunotherapy. Several landmark studies for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer demonstrated improvement in overall survival with the addition of docetaxel chemotherapy or abiraterone acetate to standard androgen deprivation therapy. A single-arm phase 2 study of the PARP inhibitor olaparib demonstrated high response rates and more favorable progression-free and overall survival for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and DNA repair defects treated with olaparib compared with men without DNA repair defects. Multiple ongoing clinical trials are investigating novel hormonal therapies and combinations of chemotherapy, targeted small molecules, immunotherapy, and radiopharmaceuticals. Progress continues to be made in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, and ongoing clinical trials continue to investigate novel agents and approaches to treatment.

  6. Surgical resection of synchronously metastatic adrenocortical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Benzon M; Strajina, Veljko; Cayo, Ashley K; Richards, Melanie L; Farley, David R; Grant, Clive S; Harmsen, William S; Evans, Doug B; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Bible, Keith C; Young, William F; Perrier, Nancy D; Que, Florencia G; Nagorney, David M; Lee, Jeffrey E; Thompson, Geoffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is rapidly fatal, with few options for treatment. Patients with metachronous recurrence may benefit from surgical resection. The survival benefit in patients with hematogenous metastasis at initial presentation is unknown. A review of all patients undergoing surgery (European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors) stage IV ACC between January 2000 and December 2012 from two referral centers was performed. Kaplan-Meier estimates were analyzed for disease-free and overall survival (OS). We identified 27 patients undergoing surgery for stage IV ACC. Metastases were present in the lung (19), liver (11), and brain (1). A complete resection (R0) was achieved in 11 patients. The median OS was improved in patients undergoing R0 versus R2 resection (860 vs. 390 days; p = 0.02). The 1- and 2-year OS was also improved in patients undergoing R0 versus R2 resection (69.9 %, 46.9 % vs. 53.0 %, 22.1 %; p = 0.02). Patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy (eight patients) had a trend towards improved survival at 1, 2, and 5 years versus no neoadjuvant therapy (18 patients) [83.3 %, 62.5 %, 41.7 % vs. 56.8 %, 26.6 %, 8.9 %; p = 0.1]. Adjuvant therapy was associated with improved recurrence-free survival at 6 months and 1 year (67 %, 33 % vs. 40 %, 20 %; p = 0.04) but not improved OS (p = 0.63). Sex (p = 0.13), age (p = 0.95), and location of metastasis (lung, p = 0.51; liver, p = 0.67) did not correlate with OS after operative intervention. Symptoms of hormonal excess improved in 86 % of patients. Operative intervention, especially when an R0 resection can be achieved, following systemic therapy may improve outcomes, including OS, in select patients with stage IV ACC. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be of use in defining which patients may benefit from surgical intervention. Adjuvant therapy was associated with decreased recurrence but did not improve OS.

  7. The fibrinolytic system facilitates tumor cell migration across the blood-brain barrier in experimental melanoma brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perides, George; Zhuge, Yuzheng; Lin, Tina; Stins, Monique F; Bronson, Roderick T; Wu, Julian K

    2006-01-01

    Patients with metastatic tumors to the brain have a very poor prognosis. Increased metastatic potential has been associated with the fibrinolytic system. We investigated the role of the fibrinolytic enzyme plasmin in tumor cell migration across brain endothelial cells and growth of brain metastases in an experimental metastatic melanoma model. Metastatic tumors to the brain were established by direct injection into the striatum or by intracarotid injection of B16F10 mouse melanoma cells in C57Bl mice. The role of plasminogen in the ability of human melanoma cells to cross a human blood-brain barrier model was studied on a transwell system. Wild type mice treated with the plasmin inhibitor epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) and plg -/- mice developed smaller tumors and survived longer than untreated wild type mice. Tumors metastasized to the brain of wild type mice treated with EACA and plg -/- less efficiently than in untreated wild type mice. No difference was observed in the tumor growth in any of the three groups of mice. Human melanoma cells were able to cross the human blood-brain barrier model in a plasmin dependent manner. Plasmin facilitates the development of tumor metastasis to the brain. Inhibition of the fibrinolytic system could be considered as means to prevent tumor metastasis to the brain

  8. Role of the Blood-Brain Barrier in the Formation of Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István A. Krizbai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of brain metastases originate from lung cancer, breast cancer and malignant melanoma. In order to reach the brain, parenchyma metastatic cells have to transmigrate through the endothelial cell layer of brain capillaries, which forms the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The BBB has a dual role in brain metastasis formation: it forms a tight barrier protecting the central nervous system from entering cancer cells, but it is also actively involved in protecting metastatic cells during extravasation and proliferation in the brain. The mechanisms of interaction of cancer cells and cerebral endothelial cells are largely uncharacterized. Here, we provide a comprehensive review on our current knowledge about the role of junctional and adhesion molecules, soluble factors, proteolytic enzymes and signaling pathways mediating the attachment of tumor cells to brain endothelial cells and the transendothelial migration of metastatic cells. Since brain metastases represent a great therapeutic challenge, it is indispensable to understand the mechanisms of the interaction of tumor cells with the BBB in order to find targets of prevention of brain metastasis formation.

  9. Rad51 expression levels predict synthetic lethality and metastatic potential in high grade breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegmans, A.P.; Al-Ejeh, F.; Khanna, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Among women with breast cancer, 30-40% will develop metastatic disease and only achieve an overall survival of less than 5 years. Despite new-targeted therapy, breast tumors that harbour similar histology or molecular phenotype differ in their response to treatment. To uncover potential new therapeutic targets and improve outcome, we performed data mining of cancer micro array databases. We found that high expression of the homologous recombination protein, RAD51, was significantly associated with high-grade breast cancer, aggressive subtypes and increased risk of metastasis. We confirmed using immunohistochemistry that RAD5 1 was highly expressed in metastatic tumours and high-grade triple negative, HER2+ and luminal-B tumours. This provided a rationale for targeting RAD5 1 in high-grade, therapy-resistant breast cancers. Here, we report for the first time preclinical evaluation of RAD5 1 as a therapeutic target. We found that, in-vitro high RAD5 expressing cell lines were resistant to PARP inhibitor while knockdown reversed this resistance. In-vivo, knockdown of RAD5 1 inhibited metastatic progression using a syngeneic breast cancer model and the seeding of human xenografts to distant sites, including brain and lung. Concurrent PARP inhibition reduced primary tumor growth and delayed metastasis supporting synthetic lethality in-vivo. Together these insights provide pre-clinical data demonstrating RAD5 1 as a new biomarker and potential therapeutic target against aggressive metastatic breast cancer. (author)

  10. Comparison of survival of patients with metastases from known versus unknown primaries: survival in metastatic cancer

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    Riihimäki Matias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP is considered an aggressive metastatic disease but whether the prognosis differs from metastatic cancers of known primary site is not known. Such data may give insight into the biology of CUP and the metastatic process in general. Methods 6,745 cancer patients, with primary metastatic cancer at diagnosis, were identified from the Swedish Cancer Registry, and were compared with 2,881 patients with CUP. Patients were diagnosed and died between 2002 and 2008. The influence of the primary site, known or unknown, on survival in patients with metastases at specific locations was investigated. Hazard ratios (HRs of death were estimated for several sites of metastasis, where patients with known primary sites were compared with CUP patients. Results Overall, patients with metastatic cancers with known primary sites had decreased hazards of death compared to CUP patients (HR = 0.69 [95% CI = 0.66–0.72]. The exceptions were cancer of the pancreas (1.71 [1.54–1.90], liver (1.58 [1.36–1.85], and stomach (1.16 [1.02–1.31]. For individual metastatic sites, patients with liver or bone metastases of known origin had better survival than those with CUP of the liver and bone. Patients with liver metastases of pancreatic origin had an increased risk of death compared with patients with CUP of the liver (1.25 [1.06–1.46]. The median survival time of CUP patients was three months. Conclusions Patients with CUP have poorer survival than patients with known primaries, except those with brain and respiratory system metastases. Of CUP sites, liver metastases had the worst prognosis. Survival in CUP was comparable to that in metastatic lung cancer. The aggressive behavior of CUP may be due to initial immunosuppression and immunoediting which may allow accumulation of mutations. Upon escape from the suppressed state an unstoppable tumor spread ensues. These novel data on the epidemiology of the

  11. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have...... the most common clinically relevant adverse events associated with enzalutamide treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Enzalutamide significantly decreased the risk of radiographic progression and death and delayed the initiation of chemotherapy in men with metastatic prostate cancer. (Funded by Medivation and Astellas...... skeletal-related event (hazard ratio, 0.72), a complete or partial soft-tissue response (59% vs. 5%), the time until prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression (hazard ratio, 0.17), and a rate of decline of at least 50% in PSA (78% vs. 3%) (P

  12. Colon carcinoma metastatic to the thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, J.W. Jr.; Carter, M.P.; Berens, S.V.; Long, R.F.; Caplan, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Metastatic carcinoma to the thyroid gland rarely is encountered in clinical practice; however, autopsy series have shown that it is not a rare occurrence. A case of adenocarcinoma of the colon with metastases to the thyroid is reported. A review of the literature reveals that melanoma, breast, renal, and lung carcinomas are the most frequent tumors to metastasize to the thyroid. Metastatic disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of cold nodules on radionuclide thyroid scans, particularly in patients with a known primary

  13. Metastatic neuroblastoma presenting as refusal to use the left upper extremity in a six-year-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Grover

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial neoplasm in children, commonly presenting at an advanced stage. Despite the high prevalence of metastatic disease with neuroblastoma, metastases to the central nervous system are rare and predominantly involve the spinal cord. We present a case of neuroblastoma with metastases to the brain presenting as refusal to move the left arm. The lesion initially appeared to be both a subdural and epidural hematoma on computed tomography of the head, but upon magnetic resonance imaging, was found to represent metastatic neuroblastoma. In pediatric patients with systemic symptoms and neurologic deficits, metastatic disease, such as neuroblastoma, should be included in the differential diagnosis and appropriate imaging should be obtained.

  14. [10]-gingerol induces apoptosis and inhibits metastatic dissemination of triple negative breast cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ana Carolina B M; Fuzer, Angelina M; Becceneri, Amanda B; da Silva, James Almada; Tomasin, Rebeka; Denoyer, Delphine; Kim, Soo-Hyun; McIntyre, Katherine A; Pearson, Helen B; Yeo, Belinda; Nagpal, Aadya; Ling, Xiawei; Selistre-de-Araújo, Heloisa S; Vieira, Paulo Cézar; Cominetti, Marcia R; Pouliot, Normand

    2017-09-22

    There is increasing interest in the use of non-toxic natural products for the treatment of various pathologies, including cancer. In particular, biologically active constituents of the ginger oleoresin ( Zingiber officinale Roscoe) have been shown to mediate anti-tumour activity and to contribute to the anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antiemetic properties of ginger. Here we report on the inhibitory properties of [10]-gingerol against metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in vitro and in vivo . We show that [10]-gingerol concentration-dependently induces apoptotic death in mouse and human TNBC cell lines in vitro . In addition, [10]-gingerol is well tolerated in vivo , induces a marked increase in caspase-3 activation and inhibits orthotopic tumour growth in a syngeneic mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis. Importantly, using both spontaneous and experimental metastasis assays, we show for the first time that [10]-gingerol significantly inhibits metastasis to multiple organs including lung, bone and brain. Remarkably, inhibition of brain metastasis was observed even when treatment was initiated after surgical removal of the primary tumour. Taken together, these results indicate that [10]-gingerol may be a safe and useful complementary therapy for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and warrant further investigation of its efficacy, either alone or in combination with standard systemic therapies, in pre-clinical models of metastatic breast cancer and in patients.

  15. Development of a green fluorescent protein metastatic-cancer chick-embryo drug-screen model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Vladimir; Plachy, Jiri; Pinterova, Daniela; Kolostova, Katarina; Boubelik, Michael; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Meng; Hoffman, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    The chick-embryo model has been an important tool to study tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis. However, an imageable model with a genetic fluorescent tag in the growing and spreading cancer cells that is stable over time has not been developed. We report here the development of such an imageable fluorescent chick-embryo metastatic cancer model with the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Lewis lung carcinoma cells, stably expressing GFP, were injected on the 12th day of incubation in the chick embryo. GFP-Lewis lung carcinoma metastases were visualized by fluorescence, after seven days additional incubation, in the brain, heart, and sternum of the developing chick embryo, with the most frequent site being the brain. The combination of streptokinase and gemcitabine was evaluated in this GFP metastatic model. Twelve-day-old chick embryos were injected intravenously with GFP-Lewis lung cancer cells, along with these two agents either alone or in combination. The streptokinase-gemcitabine combination inhibited metastases at all sites. The effective dose of gemcitabine was found to be 10 mg/kg and streptokinase 2000 IU per embryo. The data in this report suggest that this new stably fluorescent imageable metastatic-cancer chick-embryo model will enable rapid screening of new antimetastatic agents.

  16. Clear cell carcinoma of the ovary mimicking struma ovarii and carcinoid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduaij, Ahmad; Quddus, M Ruhul

    2011-04-01

    Clear cell carcinomas are considered as high-grade tumor often with poor prognosis. We describe 2 cases of clear cell carcinomas of the ovary mimicking benign or less aggressive tumors encountered in the female genital track. The first case is mimicking a benign monodermal teratoma, the so-called struma ovarii, and the second mimicking a carcinoid tumor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Ability of Mimicking Portfolios in Representing the Background Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Asgharian, Hossein

    2004-01-01

    Our aim is to give a comparative analysis of ability of different factor mimicking portfolios in representing the background factors. Our analysis contains a cross-sectional regression approach, a time-series regression approach and a portfolio approach for constructing factor mimicking portfolios. The focus of the analysis is the power of mimicking portfolios in the asset pricing models. We conclude that the time series regression approach, with the book-to-market sorted portfolios as the ba...

  18. Evaluation of tomosynthesis elastography in a breast-mimicking phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelken, Florian Jan; Sack, Ingolf; Klatt, Dieter; Fischer, Thomas; Fallenberg, Eva Maria; Bick, Ulrich; Diekmann, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether measurement of strain under static compression in tomosynthesis of a breast-mimicking phantom can be used to distinguish tumor-simulating lesions of different elasticities and to compare the results to values predicted by rheometric analysis as well as results of ultrasound elastography. Materials and methods: We prepared three soft breast-mimicking phantoms containing simulated tumors of different elasticities. The phantoms were imaged using a wide angle tomosynthesis system with increasing compression settings ranging from 0 N to 105 N in steps of 15 N. Strain of the inclusions was measured in two planes using a commercially available mammography workstation. The elasticity of the phantom matrix and inclusion material was determined by rheometric analysis. Ultrasound elastography of the inclusions was performed using two different ultrasound elastography algorithms. Results: Strain at maximal compression was 24.4%/24.5% in plane 1/plane 2, respectively, for the soft inclusion, 19.6%/16.9% for the intermediate inclusion, and 6.0%/10.2% for the firm inclusion. The strain ratios predicted by rheometrical testing were 0.41, 0.83 and 1.26 for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions, respectively. The strain ratios obtained for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions were 0.72 ± 0.13, 1.02 ± 0.21 and 2.67 ± 1.70, respectively for tomosynthesis elastography, 0.91, 1.64 and 2.07, respectively, for ultrasound tissue strain imaging, and 0.97, 2.06 and 2.37, respectively, for ultrasound real-time elastography. Conclusions: Differentiation of tumor-simulating inclusions by elasticity in a breast mimicking phantom may be possible by measuring strain in tomosynthesis. This method may be useful for assessing elasticity of breast lesions tomosynthesis of the breast

  19. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Akio; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Taniguchi, Shuji; Sakai, Kazuaki

    2000-01-01

    The results of radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors were evaluated in terms of pain relief, improvement of neurological impairment, and survival. Between 1986 and 1995, 52 symptomatic patients with metastatic spinal tumors treated with radiation therapy were evaluated. The patients all received irradiation of megavoltage energy. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in terms of pain relief and improvement of neurological impairment. Pain relief was observed in 29 (61.7%) of 47 patients with pain. Therapy was effective for 17 (70.8%) of 24 patients without neurological impairment, and efficacy was detected in 12 (52.2%) of 23 patients with neurological impairment. Improvement of neurological symptoms was obtained in seven (25.0%) of 28 patients with neurological impairment. Radiation therapy was effective for pain relief in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. In patients with neurological impairment, less pain relief was observed than in those without impairment. Improvement of neurological impairment was restricted, but radiation therapy was thought to be effective in some cases in the early stage of neurological deterioration. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors contraindicated for surgery was considered effective for improvement of patients' activities of daily living. (author)

  20. Metastatic spinal epidural leiomyoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yoo Na; Kim, Yong Woo; Park, Yeong Mi; Cha, Seong Sook; Bae, Jae Ik; Eun, Choong Ki; Lee, Seon Joo; Lee, Gyung Kyu

    2006-01-01

    We report here on a case of a spinal extradural leiomyoma in a 67-year-old woman, and this tumor was in a very unusual location for a leiomyoma. Because the patient underwent hysterectomy for a uterine leiomyoma 20 years ago, we can speculate that the spinal lesion was a metastatic leiomyoma

  1. Metastatic spinal epidural leiomyoma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Yoo Na; Kim, Yong Woo; Park, Yeong Mi; Cha, Seong Sook; Bae, Jae Ik; Eun, Choong Ki [College of Medicine, Inje University, Sangye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seon Joo [College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyung Kyu [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    We report here on a case of a spinal extradural leiomyoma in a 67-year-old woman, and this tumor was in a very unusual location for a leiomyoma. Because the patient underwent hysterectomy for a uterine leiomyoma 20 years ago, we can speculate that the spinal lesion was a metastatic leiomyoma.

  2. Cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Kure, Elin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NORDIC-VII study is a randomised phase III trial of cetuximab plus continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) vs FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The present report presents an updated and final survival...

  3. A huge renal capsular leiomyoma mimicking retroperitoneal sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lal Anupam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A huge left renal capsular leiomyoma mimicking retroperitoneal sarcoma presented in a patient as an abdominal mass. Computed tomography displayed a large heterogeneous retro-peritoneal mass in the left side of the abdomen with inferior and medial displacement as well as loss of fat plane with the left kidney. Surgical exploration revealed a capsulated mass that was tightly adherent to the left kidney; therefore, total tumor resection with radical left nephrectomy was performed. Histopathology ultimately confirmed the benign nature of the mass. This is the largest leiomyoma reported in literature to the best of our knowledge.

  4. Abdominal Splenosis Mimicking Hepatic Tumor: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Lun Yeh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of abdominal splenosis is often undiagnosed until treatment for splenic rupture or splenectomy. This report describes a patient with splenosis mimicking hepatic tumor. The patient had a history of splenic trauma with splenectomy and chronic hepatitis C. After routine abdominal ultrasound revealed a liver nodule, further imaging studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and angiography, were performed. After the patient eventually underwent surgery, pathology revealed splenic tissue. Despite its distinguishable clinical features, splenosis is difficult to identify by modern imaging modalities. Therefore, accurate and timely diagnosis of this disease requires constant vigilance.

  5. Hızma Induced Papul of Nose Mimicking Pyogenic Granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mualla Polat

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of body piercing is popular among young people, who consider it as a sign of marginality, beauty, or group identity. Piercing procedure is observed to cause a large number of complications such as infections, pain, inflammatory reactions, bleeding, dental fractures or fissures, and gingival damage, etc., mostly in young individuals. Hizma is a traditional body ornament worn by Anatolian women via a piercing procedure. Herein, we describe a papule of nose mimicking pyogenic granuloma as an uncommon complication of Hızma.

  6. Mimicking the effect of gravity using an elastic membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yecun; Zhu, Changqing; Wang, Yijun; Shi, Qingfan

    2014-01-01

    Comparing astrospace with an elastic membrane is an interesting analogy but it lacks a theoretical basis and experimental support. We develop a theoretical model that brings to light the relationship between the conceptual model of a gravity well and an elastic deformation equation of a membrane supporting a heavy ball, and further derive the ‘gravitational constant’ for such a small ‘elastic space’. The experimental data obtained are consistent with the prediction of our model, in mimicking the revolution of a small planet. Teaching practice shows that using an elastic membrane is a simple, intuitive and reliable method to enhance the quality of learning about the effect of gravity. (paper)

  7. Endometriosis mimicking the perianal fistula tract: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Türkcü

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Nowadays, in many cases, although routine use of episiotomy perineal endo metriosis is extremely rare. A 36 year old female patient was referred to our hospital with complaints of pain in the perianal region for five months. On physical examination, stiffness was palpated and then magnetic resonance im aging (MRI was performed. MRI is compatible with fistula tract. The lesion was excised and the histopathological appearance correspond to endometriosis. Perianal endo metriosis is rare in the perianal region and in the clinic mimicking perianal fistulas and malignancy should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis

  8. Unusual Case of Overt Aortic Dissection Mimicking Aortic Intramural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushtrim Disha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report an interesting case in which overt aortic dissection mimicked two episodes of aortic intramural hematoma (IMH (Stanford A, DeBakey I. This took place over the course of four days and had a major influence on the surgical treatment strategy. The first episode of IMH regressed completely within 15 hours after it was clinically diagnosed and verified using imaging techniques. The recurrence of IMH was detected three days thereafter, resulting in an urgent surgical intervention. Overt aortic dissection with evidence of an intimal tear was diagnosed intraoperatively.

  9. Nephrogenic rests mimicking Wilms' tumor on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhas, Naveen; Siegelman, Stanley S. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States); Argani, Pedram [Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States); Gearhart, John P. [Department of Pediatric Urology, Brady Urologic Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Nephrogenic rests (NR) are persistent benign remnants of embryonic renal tissue. A small percentage of these may develop into Wilms' tumor (WT). Radiologic imaging is relied upon to differentiate between these entities, with the hallmark of malignant transformation being growth on serial imaging studies. There is, however, considerable overlap in their imaging characteristics. The authors present a case of two biopsy-proven NR in a 2-year-old girl with sporadic aniridia that were indistinguishable from WT on initial radiologic studies. One of the NR grew on serial imaging studies mimicking a WT, but after resection was confirmed to be a benign hyperplastic NR on pathologic examination. (orig.)

  10. Cartilage Delamination Flap Mimicking a Torn Medial Meniscus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Zhi-Wei Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a chondral delamination lesion due to medial parapatellar plica friction syndrome involving the medial femoral condyle. This mimicked a torn medial meniscus in clinical and radiological presentation. Arthroscopy revealed a chondral delamination flap, which was debrided. Diagnosis of chondral lesions in the knee can be challenging. Clinical examination and MRI have good accuracy for diagnosis and should be used in tandem. Early diagnosis and treatment of chondral lesions are important to prevent progression to early osteoarthritis.

  11. Epithelioid sarcoma mimicking abscess: review of the MRI appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, E.; Forest, M.; Brasseur, J.L.; Grenier, P.; Amoura, Z.

    2001-01-01

    A case of epithelioid sarcoma involving the soft tissue of the ankle is presented. The tumor was a hemorrhagic, fluid-filled, multiloculated lesion with inflammatory changes in the surrounding planes. Tuberculous abscess was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical picture, ultrasound and MRI findings. Surgical exploration of the ankle mass was carried out because of lack of local healing while the patient's general and pulmonary status improved on antituberculosis treatment. This was an unusual case of epithelioid sarcoma mimicking a multilocular abscess. (orig.)

  12. Endometriosis After Surgical Menopause Mimicking Pelvic Malignancy: Surgeons’ Predicament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani A. Bhat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of persistent endometriosis in women after menopause without any hormonal replacement therapy is very rare. This is a case of a woman with previous history of total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for endometriosis who presented with hemoperitoneum, vaginal bleeding, pelvic mass, and pulmonary thromboembolism mimicking as rectovaginal septum carcinoma. This is the first case report with a unique mode of presentation wherein the patient presented with hemoperitoneum requiring emergency embolization of the vessel to stabilize the patient. She underwent en bloc resection of the tumor with high anterior resection of the rectum. Histopathology confirmed endometriosis.

  13. Testicular teratoma, mimicking a simple testicular cyst, in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Dacia; Persico, Antonello; Sindici, Giulia; Lelli Chiesa, Pierluigi

    2013-09-01

    Prepubertal testicular tumors are rare, and teratoma is the second most frequent histologic type. Its typical features are those of a hard and painless scrotal mass at clinical examination, and nonhomogeneous, echoic, often with calcifications at ultrasonography. Rare but reported is the atypical presentation as a transilluminating scrotal mass, due to the presence of some internal cystic areas, detectable at ultrasonography. We report the case of an infant with a transilluminating scrotal mass, mimicking at ultrasonography and surgery a simple, fully liquid cyst, which the pathologic examination revealed to be mature cystic testicular teratoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelien Dinh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  15. Primary bone lymphoma of the distal tibia mimicking brodie's abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jina; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Park, Chan Kum

    2014-01-01

    The 'penumbra sign' on an unenhanced T1-weighted image is a well-known characteristic of Brodie's abscess, and this sign is extremely helpful for discriminating subacute osteomyelitis from other bone lesions. We present a case of primary bone lymphoma of the distal tibia mimicking subacute osteomyelitis with Brodie's abscess in a 50-year-old woman. Initial radiographs and MRI showed a lesion in the distal tibia consistent with Brodie's abscess with the penumbra sign. Histopathological examination of the surgical biopsy specimen confirmed the presence of a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving the bone.

  16. Femoroacetabular impingement mimicking avascular osteonecrosis on bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, Juan Pablo; Domínguez, María Luz; Nogareda, Zulema; Gómez, María Asunción; Muñoz, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a structural abnormality of proximal femur and/or acetabulum. It has been recently described, and there are limited reports in nuclear medicine literature because bone scintigraphy is not listed in its diagnostic protocol, but it should be included on differential diagnosis when evaluating patients, with hip-related symptoms because it may be misinterpreted as degenerative changes or avascular necrosis, and its early treatment avoid progression to osteoarthritis. We describe the case of a male who suffered from hip pain. Bone planar scintigraphic appearance mimicked avascular necrosis, but single photon emission computed tomography (CT) imaging and CT examination confirmed the diagnosis of FAI

  17. Simple bone cyst of mandible mimicking periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hs, Charan Babu; Rai, Bhagawan Das; Nair, Manju A; Astekar, Madhusudan S

    2012-05-29

    Simple bone cysts (SBC) are pseudocysts occurring less commonly in the maxillofacial region. The uncertain and unclear etiopathogenesis led to numerous synonyms to refer this particular cyst. These cysts are devoid of an epithelial lining and are usually empty or contain blood or straw-colored fluid. In jaws initially it mimics a periapical cyst and later can lead to cortical bone expansion warranting for radical approach, which is seldom required. SBC is predominantly diagnosed in first two decades of life. Here we report a case of solitary bone cyst mimicking a periapical cyst of a mandibular molar in a 37-year-old patient.

  18. Simple bone cyst of mandible mimicking periapical cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charan Babu HS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple bone cysts (SBC are pseudocysts occurring less commonly in the maxillofacial region. The uncertain and unclear etiopathogenesis led to numerous synonyms to refer this particular cyst. These cysts are devoid of an epithelial lining and are usually empty or contain blood or straw-colored fluid. In jaws initially it mimics a periapical cyst and later can lead to cortical bone expansion warranting for radical approach, which is seldom required. SBC is predominantly diagnosed in first two decades of life. Here we report a case of solitary bone cyst mimicking a periapical cyst of a mandibular molar in a 37-year-old patient.

  19. Granulomatous mastitis caused by histoplasma and mimicking inflammatory breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, B M

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of a lobular, necrotizing granulomatous process causing a unilateral painful breast mass mimicking carcinoma are presented for comparison. While the morphologic appearance in each case was that of lobular granulomatous mastitis, the etiologic agent in one case appeared to be Histoplasma capsulatum, based on Grocott methenamine silver staining, and represents the second reported case of histoplasmosis involving only breast parenchyma. Awareness of the rare entity, granulomatous mastitis, is important for the pathologist because the definitive diagnosis is made microscopically. Thorough evaluation of the breast tissue is essential for its management and should eventually contribute to the clarification of its etiology.

  20. Differential Expression of Ccn4 and Other Genes Between Metastatic and Non-metastatic EL4 Mouse Lymphoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Manpreet S; Ku, H Teresa; Zhang, Zhihong; Legaspi, Christian M; Luo, Angela; Hopkins, Mandi M; Meier, Kathryn E

    Previous work characterized variants of the EL4 murine lymphoma cell line. Some are non-metastatic, and others metastatic, in syngenic mice. In addition, metastatic EL4 cells were stably transfected with phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which further enhanced metastasis. Microarray analyses of mRNA expression was performed for non-metastatic, metastatic, and PLD2-expressing metastatic EL4 cells. Many differences were observed between non-metastatic and metastatic cell lines. One of the most striking new findings was up-regulation of mRNA for the matricellular protein WNT1-inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (CCN4) in metastatic cells; increased protein expression was verified by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Other differentially expressed genes included those for reproductive homeobox 5 (Rhox5; increased in metastatic) and cystatin 7 (Cst7; decreased in metastatic). Differences between PLD2-expressing and parental cell lines were limited but included the signaling proteins Ras guanyl releasing protein 1 (RGS18; increased with PLD2) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2; decreased with PLD2). The results provide insights into signaling pathways potentially involved in conferring metastatic ability on lymphoma cells. Copyright© 2016, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. Viridans streptococci Intracranial Abscess Masquerading as Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Ruderman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 64-year-old woman with a remote history of breast cancer presented to the emergency department with one day of worsening right-sided weakness and headaches. She had been seen two weeks prior for similar symptoms and underwent unenhanced brain computed tomography (CT, which revealed a left parietal mass suspected to represent new metastatic disease. The patient presented on this visit not only with weakness of her right upper and lower extremity, but was found to be febrile, tachycardic and exhibiting lethargy. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC was 27.1 (x109/L. Given her rapidly declining clinical course and expected time to complete magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain, the decision was made to first perform an emergent contrast-enhanced brain CT to further evaluate the mass. The contrast-enhanced brain CT revealed a large rim-enhancing left parietal lesion (Figures 1 and 2. Significant findings: A non-contrast CT (Figure 1 revealed a large hypoattenuating left parietal lesion. When the CT was enhanced with intravenous contrast (Figure 2, the same lesion showed peripheral rim enhancement, suggestive of a brain abscess. Discussion: Intracranial abscess is a rare yet potentially devastating disease process that can often be difficult to diagnosis, with an incidence of about 0.4-0.9 cases per 100,000 people.1 Mortality rates are about 15% within the past decade, but can increase up to 85% if the abscess ruptures. The most common mechanisms for formation of intracranial abscesses include direct spread from local infections (odontogenic infections or sinusitis, hematogenous spread (congenital heart disease, endocarditis, dental procedures, or intrapulmonary shunting, or penetrating trauma.2 Intracranial abscesses are more likely to occur in severely immunosuppressed patients, after neurosurgical procedures, or in head trauma. About 32%-60% of brain abscesses are polymicrobial, but Viridans streptococci, a

  2. Donor-derived metastatic melanoma in a liver transplant recipient established by DNA fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Eason, James D; Das, Kanak; Sylvestre, Pamela B; Dean, Amanda G; Vanatta, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a donor-derived malignancy that has rarely been reported in liver allograft recipients. We present a case of a transmitted donor-derived melanoma to a liver allograft recipient in whom the diagnosis was established by polymerase chain reaction-based DNA fingerprinting. A 52-year-old African-American man underwent a successful orthotropic liver transplant for alcohol-induced cirrhosis. One year after the orthotropic liver transplant, he presented at our institution with diffuse abdominal pain, and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen and chest showed innumerable masses diffusely involving the liver and multiple subcutaneous nodules in the abdominal and chest wall. A liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic melanoma. The origin of melanoma was traced to the donor by DNA fingerprinting of the native liver, the donor liver, and the donor gallbladder. Chemotherapy was initiated with temozolomide (75 mg/m² daily) and thalidomide (50 mg daily), to which he responded within 8 weeks with radiologic improvement in metastatic lesions. Tacrolimus was switched to sirolimus because of renal insufficiency as well as reported effectiveness against melanoma. Our patient survived for 9 months after the diagnosis of metastatic melanoma. He ultimately died of brain metastases. Donor-derived metastatic melanoma is a rare cancer with the highest transmission and mortality rates, which requires better recognition. Prompt diagnosis of donor-derived melanoma is critical and can be achieved reliably with polymerase chain reaction-based DNA analysis. Management options after diagnosis include de-escalation of immunosuppression, with or without urgent organ removal or retransplant. The roles of chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy require further study.

  3. Brain metastasis from prostate small cell carcinoma: not to be neglected.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, C.E.; Verhagen, W.I.M.; Wauters, C.A.P.; Lindert, E.J. van

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Symptomatic brain metastases from prostatic carcinoma are rare (0.05% to 0.5%). CASE REPORT: A 70-year-old man presented with a homonymous hemianopsia due to brain metastatic prostatic carcinoma shortly before becoming symptomatic of prostatic disease. CT and MRI of the brain showed a

  4. WITHDRAWN: Systemic treatments for metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Tom; Fish, Reg; Coles, Bernadette; Mason, Malcolm

    2018-02-07

    Systemic therapies for metastatic cutaneous melanoma, the most aggressive of all skin cancers, remain disappointing. Few lasting remissions are achieved and the therapeutic aim remains one of palliation.Many agents are used alone or in combination with varying degrees of toxicity and cost. It is unclear whether evidence exists to support these complex regimens over best supportive care / placebo. To review the benefits from the use of systemic therapies in metastatic cutaneous melanoma compared to best supportive care/placebo, and to establish whether a 'standard' therapy exists which is superior to other treatments. Randomised controlled trials were identified from the MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR/CENTRAL databases. References, conference proceedings, and Science Citation Index/Scisearch were also used to locate trials. Cancer registries and trialists were also contacted. Randomised controlled trials of adults with histologically proven metastatic cutaneous melanoma in which systemic anti-cancer therapy was compared with placebo or supportive care. Study selection was performed by two independent reviewers. Data extraction forms were used for studies which appeared to meet the selection criteria and, where appropriate, full text articles were retrieved and reviewed independently. No randomised controlled trials were found comparing a systemic therapy with placebo or best supportive care in metastatic cutaneous melanoma. There is no evidence from randomised controlled clinical trials to show superiority of systemic therapy over best supportive care / placebo in the treatment of malignant cutaneous melanoma.Given that patients with metastatic melanoma frequently receive systemic therapy, it is our pragmatic view that a future systematic review could compare any systemic treatment, or combination of treatments, to single agent dacarbazine.

  5. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankwah EK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ernest K Amankwah,1 Anthony P Conley,2 Damon R Reed2 1Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Sarcoma Department, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subcutaneous tissue, and lymph nodes. Additionally, many sarcoma patients presenting initially with localized disease may relapse at metastatic sites. While localized sarcomas can often be cured through surgery and often radiation, controversies exist over optimal management of patients with metastatic sarcoma. Combinations of chemotherapy are the most effective in many settings, and many promising new agents are under active investigation or are being explored in preclinical models. Metastatic sarcomas are excellent candidates for novel approaches with additional agents as they have demonstrated chemosensitivity and affect a portion of the population that is motivated toward curative therapy. In this paper, we provide an overview on the common sarcomas of childhood (rhabdomyosarcoma, adolescence, and young adults (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and older adults (leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and undifferentiated high grade sarcoma in terms of the epidemiology, current therapy, promising therapeutic directions and outcome with a focus on metastatic disease. Potential advances in terms of promising therapy and biologic insights may lead to more effective and safer therapies; however, more clinical trials and research are needed for patients with metastatic sarcoma. Keywords: chemotherapy, pediatric sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma

  6. Ipilimumab: A First-in-Class T-Cell Potentiator for Metastatic Melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielowski, B.

    2013-01-01

    Ipilimumab, a fully human anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 monoclonal antibody that potentiate s antitumor T-cell responses, has demonstrated improved survival in previously treated and treatment-naive patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma. Survival benefit has also been shown in diverse patient populations, including those with brain metastases. In 2011, ipilimumab (3 mg/kg every 3 weeks for 4 doses) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for unresectable or metastatic melanoma. Ipilimumab can induce novel response patterns for which immune-related response criteria have been proposed. irAEs are common but are usually low grade; higher grades can be severe and life-threatening. irAEs are usually manageable using established guidelines emphasizing vigilance and prompt intervention. This agent provides an additional therapeutic option in metastatic melanoma, and guidelines for management of adverse events facilitate clinical implementation of this new agent.

  7. Tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor-targeted combined chemotherapy for metastatic bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lun Wu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha is noted during the invasive and metastatic process of transitional cell carcinoma. It will upregulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and drive proliferation, invasiveness, metastasis, and antiapoptotic ability of cancer cells. We proposed that tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, sunitinib malate—(Sutent; Pfizer Inc., Taiwan, combined with chemotherapeutic drug may present synergistic cytotoxic enhancement to transitional cell carcinoma cells with subsequent inhibition of their cellular behaviors, including proliferation, invasiveness, and metastatic activity. The contents of VEGF-A in mouse bladder tumor cells (MBT-2 and culture medium were detected by quantification-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot individually. The inhibitory concentrations of various chemotherapeutic drugs, sunitinib, and their combination treatment in MBT-2 were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Microchamber transmembrane migration assay was applied in evaluation of the inhibitory effects of different dosages of sunitinib and combination treatment on tumor cells. The cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed after combination therapy by flow cytometry. Variation in apoptotic pathway was elucidated by Western blot using specific antibodies with cleaved PARP and caspase-3. Metastatic animal model mimicked by tail vein injection of MBT-2 cells was used to evaluate the treatment efficiency in tumor weight and survival rate. The mRNA and protein level of VEGF-A in MBT-2 cells increased by 70% at 48 hours interval under hypoxia stress condition. In MTT assay, MBT-2 cells had shown the highest sensitivity to epirubicin. Sunitinib combined with epirubicin had shown a synergistic cytotoxic effect to MBT-2 cells. Sunitinib and its combination with epirubicin showed significant inhibition on MBT-2 cells migration in microchambers. G2/M phase arrest and

  8. Tension pneumocephalus mimicking septic shock: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Caroline; Mahta, Ali; Wheeler, Lee Adam; Tsiouris, A John; Kamel, Hooman

    2018-02-01

    Tension pneumocephalus can lead to rapid neurologic deterioration. We report for the first time its association with aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock and the efficacy of prompt neurosurgical intervention and critical care support in treating this condition. A 64-year-old man underwent 2-stage olfactory groove meningioma resection. The patient developed altered mental status and gait instability on postoperative day 6. Imaging showed significant pneumocephalus. The patient subsequently developed worsening mental status, respiratory failure, and profound shock requiring multiple vasopressors. Bedside needle decompression, identification and repair of the cranial fossa defect, and critical care support led to improved mental status and reversal of shock and multiorgan dysfunction. Thorough evaluation revealed no evidence of an underlying infection. In this case, tension pneumocephalus incited an aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock. Prompt neurosurgical correction of pneumocephalus and critical care support not only improved neurologic status, but also reversed shock. Such a complication indicates the importance of close monitoring of patients with progressive pneumocephalus.

  9. Tension pneumocephalus mimicking septic shock: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Miranda, MD

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tension pneumocephalus can lead to rapid neurologic deterioration. We report for the first time its association with aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock and the efficacy of prompt neurosurgical intervention and critical care support in treating this condition. A 64-year-old man underwent 2-stage olfactory groove meningioma resection. The patient developed altered mental status and gait instability on postoperative day 6. Imaging showed significant pneumocephalus. The patient subsequently developed worsening mental status, respiratory failure, and profound shock requiring multiple vasopressors. Bedside needle decompression, identification and repair of the cranial fossa defect, and critical care support led to improved mental status and reversal of shock and multiorgan dysfunction. Thorough evaluation revealed no evidence of an underlying infection. In this case, tension pneumocephalus incited an aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock. Prompt neurosurgical correction of pneumocephalus and critical care support not only improved neurologic status, but also reversed shock. Such a complication indicates the importance of close monitoring of patients with progressive pneumocephalus.

  10. Why does Jack, and not Jill, break his crown? Sex disparity in brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Tao; Warrington, Nicole M; Rubin, Joshua B

    2012-01-01

    Abstract It is often reported that brain tumors occur more frequently in males, and that males suffer a worse outcome from brain tumors than females. If correct, these observations suggest that sex plays a fundamental role in brain tumor biology. The following review of the literature regarding primary and metastatic brain tumors, reveals that brain tumors do occur more frequently in males compared to females regardless of age, tumor histology, or region of the world. Sexually dimorphic mecha...

  11. Acute parietal lobe infarction presenting as Gerstmann’s syndrome and cognitive decline mimicking senile dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen TY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tien-Yu Chen,1 Chun-Yen Chen,1,3 Che-Hung Yen,2,3 Shin-Chang Kuo,1,3 Yi-Wei Yeh,1,3 Serena Chang,1 San-Yuan Huang1,31Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Neurology, Tri-Service General Hospital, School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, 3Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaAbstract: Gerstmann’s syndrome encompasses the tetrad of finger agnosia, agraphia, acalculia, and right-left confusion. An elderly man with a history of several cardiovascular diseases was initially brought to the psychiatric outpatient department by his family because of worsening of recent memory, executive function, and mixed anxious-depressive mood. Gerstmann’s syndrome without obvious motor function impairment and dementia-like features could be observed at first. Emergent brain computed tomography scan revealed new left-middle cerebral artery infarction over the left posterior parietal lobe. This case reminds us that acute cerebral infarction involving the parietal lobe may present as Gerstmann’s syndrome accompanied by cognitive decline mimicking dementia. As a result, emergent organic workups should be arranged, especially for elderly patients at high risk for cerebral vascular accident.Keywords: Gerstmann’s syndrome, dementia, parietal lobe infarction

  12. Short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation mimicked in single inorganic synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Takeo; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Terabe, Kazuya; Gimzewski, James K.; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-08-01

    Memory is believed to occur in the human brain as a result of two types of synaptic plasticity: short-term plasticity (STP) and long-term potentiation (LTP; refs , , , ). In neuromorphic engineering, emulation of known neural behaviour has proven to be difficult to implement in software because of the highly complex interconnected nature of thought processes. Here we report the discovery of a Ag2S inorganic synapse, which emulates the synaptic functions of both STP and LTP characteristics through the use of input pulse repetition time. The structure known as an atomic switch, operating at critical voltages, stores information as STP with a spontaneous decay of conductance level in response to intermittent input stimuli, whereas frequent stimulation results in a transition to LTP. The Ag2S inorganic synapse has interesting characteristics with analogies to an individual biological synapse, and achieves dynamic memorization in a single device without the need of external preprogramming. A psychological model related to the process of memorizing and forgetting is also demonstrated using the inorganic synapses. Our Ag2S element indicates a breakthrough in mimicking synaptic behaviour essential for the further creation of artificial neural systems that emulate characteristics of human memory.

  13. Brain metastasis of Wilms tumor with diffuse anaplasia and complex cytogenetic phenotype in a child with neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsbeyn, Marianna; Bassani, Luigi; Mikolaenko, Irina; Wisoff, Jeffrey H

    2011-10-01

    The authors report the first case of a Wilms tumor (WT) with diffuse anaplasia metastatic to the brain in a 13-year-old girl with a history of neurofibromatosis Type 1. At presentation, the metastatic tumor had radiological features that suggested a meningioma. Histologically it was characterized by striking anaplasia and features similar to the patient's previously resected WT with diffuse anaplasia.

  14. The value of intraoperative ultrasound (IUS) examination for the visualization of metastatic cerebral lesions, compared with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacikowska, M.; Szczerbicki, M.; Grzesiakowska, U.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is: 1. to assess the value of intraoperative ultrasonographic examination (IUSG) in confirming intraoperatively the presence of metastatic tumours detected preoperatively by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance tomography (MRI), 2. to evaluate an accordance of the numbers, localization and dimensions of metastatic tumours recognized preoperatively (CT and MRI) with those shown by intraoperative USG, 3. to comparatively assess the images of metastatic tumours found in preoperative CT and MRI examinations and in intraoperative USG examinations. Sixteen patients were operated upon for metastatic intracranial tumours from various primary foci. All patients had diagnostic brain examinations before the operation: MRI and CT in 7 cases, only MRI in 3 cases, only CT in 6 cases. Intraoperative USG examination was done in all cases. Retrospective analysis included: 1. comparative assessment of the images of metastatic tumours in intraoperative USG versus preoperative MRI and CT findings, 2. analysis of the number, localization and dimensions of metastatic tumours detected preoperatively and in intraoperative USG examination. The comparison of the greatest dimensions of metastatic lesions measured in CT and MRI findings, and in intraoperative USG based on Student t test showed no statistically significant differences between the examinations performed, p=0.2449. No statistically significant difference were found either between the numbers of metastatic lesions detected by these methods, p=0.71830. In the analysis of the images of metastatic lesions in preoperative examinations, the non--homogenous foci with margin enhancement after administration of gadolinium or contrast medium, with inner area not enhanced (necrosis?) were found in 8 cases (10 foci lesions), and in USG in 6 cases (9 focal lesions). In one case (one lesion) USG showed that the tumour was hypo echogenic as a whole, without areola around it. Intraoperative USG examination

  15. Evaluation of dual energy spectral CT in differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer: Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Huanhuan [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Department of Radiology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine (China); Yan, Fuhua; Pan, Zilai; Lin, Xiaozhu; Luo, Xianfu; Shi, Cen [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Xiaoyan [Department of Pathology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Baisong [Department of Biomedical Statistics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang, Huan, E-mail: huanzhangy@126.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer and the status of the regional lymph nodes in rectal cancer is considered to be one of the most powerful prognostic factor in the absence of distant metastatic disease. Detecting LNs metastasis is still a challenging problem due to the presence of microscopic metastasis or inflammatory swelling of LNs. • We investigated the value of dual energy spectral CT in differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer. Our study demonstrated that the quantitative normalized iodine concentration (nIC) could be useful for differentiating metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes. The combination of nIC in portal venous phase and conventional size criterion could improve the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of rectal cancer. - Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the value of dual energy spectral CT (DEsCT) imaging in differentiating metastatic from non-metastatic lymph nodes in rectal cancer. Methods: Fifty-five patients with rectal cancer underwent the arterial phase (AP) and portal venous phase (PP) contrast-enhanced DEsCT imaging. The virtual monochromatic images and iodine-based material decomposition images derived from DEsCT imaging were interpreted for lymph nodes (LNs) measurement. The short axis diameter and the normalized iodine concentration (nIC) of metastatic and non-metastatic LNs were measured. The two-sample t test was used to compare the short axis diameters and nIC values of metastatic and non-metastatic LNs. ROC analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Results: One hundred and fifty two LNs including 92 non-metastatic LNs and 60 metastatic LNs were matched using the radiological-pathological correlation. The mean short axis diameter of metastatic LNs was significantly larger than that of the non-metastatic LNs (7.28 ± 2.28 mm vs. 4.90 ± 1.64 mm, P < 0.001). The mean n

  16. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the nasopharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Yavuz; Topaloglu, Ilhan; Ozcan, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinuses can be misdiagnosed as primary malignant or benign diseases. A 33-year-old male attended our outpatient clinic complaining of difficulty breathing through the nose, bloody nasal discharge, postnasal drop, snoring, and discharge of phlegm. Endoscopic nasopharyngeal examination showed a vascularized nasopharyngeal mass. Under general anesthesia, multiple punch biopsies were taken from the nasopharynx. Pathologically, the tumor cells had clear cytoplasm and were arranged in a trabecular pattern lined by a layer of endothelial cells. After the initial pathological examination, the pathologist requested more information about the patient's clinical status. A careful history revealed that the patient had undergone left a nephrectomy for a kidney mass diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma 3 years earlier. Subsequently, nasopharyngeal metastatic renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining with CD10 and vimentin. Radiotherapy was recommended for treatment.

  17. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the nasopharynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Atar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinuses can be misdiagnosed as primary malignant or benign diseases. A 33-year-old male attended our outpatient clinic complaining of difficulty breathing through the nose, bloody nasal discharge, postnasal drop, snoring, and discharge of phlegm. Endoscopic nasopharyngeal examination showed a vascularized nasopharyngeal mass. Under general anesthesia, multiple punch biopsies were taken from the nasopharynx. Pathologically, the tumor cells had clear cytoplasm and were arranged in a trabecular pattern lined by a layer of endothelial cells. After the initial pathological examination, the pathologist requested more information about the patient′s clinical status. A careful history revealed that the patient had undergone left a nephrectomy for a kidney mass diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma 3 years earlier. Subsequently, nasopharyngeal metastatic renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining with CD10 and vimentin. Radiotherapy was recommended for treatment.

  18. Metastatic melanoma masquerading as a furuncle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Aslam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma metastasizes to the skin in about 10-17% of patients. Although there are reports of metastatic melanoma masquerading as panniculitis and erysipelas, it is very uncommon for it to present as an inflammatory skin lesion. When malignant melanoma cells invade the superficial dermal lymphatic vessels it can result in erythema, edema and induration of the overlying skin. This presentation can be problematic for clinicians if they do not suspect melanoma and choose not to biopsy the lesion. We report a case of an elderly man with a history of invasive melanoma who presented with a furuncle-like lesion that was found to be in-transit metastatic melanoma.

  19. Ziv-aflibercept in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anuj Patel, Weijing Sun Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and antiangiogenic agents has become a conventional treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Ziv-aflibercept is a fusion protein which acts as a decoy receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor (PlGF; it was approved in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that is resistant to or has progressed after an oxaliplatin-containing fluoropyrimidine-based regimen. Herein we review the role of tumor angiogenesis as the rationale for antiangiogenic therapy, the clinical data associated with ziv-aflibercept, and its current role as a treatment option compared to other antiangiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab and regorafenib. Keywords: aflibercept, angiogenesis, colorectal cancer

  20. Sputum cytology of a metastatic postradiation sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshio; Murakami, Itsuko; Awai, Seiji; Ogura, Yasuko; Morishita, Yumiko

    1981-01-01

    A female patient who died of apparent postradiation sarcoma in the inguinal region after irradiating a metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the same site was reported. For approximately 20 months, the patient had received a total of 6,600 and 9,600 Roentgen to the right para-aortic and inguinal areas, respectively. About 10 years later, she developed a sarcoma, namely a malignant fibrous histiocytoma. Sputum cytology demonstrated numerous giant cells with bizarre nuclei; subsequent chest films also presented apparent metastatic tumor shadows. The cellular characteristics and also rather low incidence of detection of nonepithelial malignant tumor by sputum cytology were briefly discussed, and ways of enhancing cytodiagnostic accuracy were proposed. (author)

  1. Memory and learning behaviors mimicked in nanogranular SiO2-based proton conductor gated oxide-based synaptic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Zhou, Ju Mei; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2013-11-07

    In neuroscience, signal processing, memory and learning function are established in the brain by modifying ionic fluxes in neurons and synapses. Emulation of memory and learning behaviors of biological systems by nanoscale ionic/electronic devices is highly desirable for building neuromorphic systems or even artificial neural networks. Here, novel artificial synapses based on junctionless oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid transistors gated by nanogranular phosphorus-doped SiO2-based proton-conducting films are fabricated on glass substrates by a room-temperature process. Short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) are mimicked by tuning the pulse gate voltage amplitude. The LTM process in such an artificial synapse is due to the proton-related interfacial electrochemical reaction. Our results are highly desirable for building future neuromorphic systems or even artificial networks via electronic elements.

  2. A novel method for sensing metastatic cells in the CSF of pediatric population with medulloblastoma by frequency domain FLIM system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Gilad; Fixler, Dror; Gershanov, Sivan; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza

    2016-03-01

    Brain tumors are the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, after leukemia. Patients with cancer in the central nervous system have a very low recovery rate. Today known imaging and cytology techniques are not always sensitive enough for an early detection of both tumor and its metastatic spread, moreover the detection is generally limited, reviewer dependent and takes a relatively long time. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. The aim of our talk is to present the frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system as a possible method for an early detection of MB and its metastatic spread in the cerebrospinal fluids within the pediatric population.

  3. Surgical management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakih, A.R.; Mistry, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The differentiated management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with lymph node and/or systemic metastases is very much a treatable cancer. Interaction between the surgeon and the nuclear medicine specialist is essential to ensure quality survival in these patient. This review is confined to surgical aspects and is based on experience with 417 patients who were operated for DTC at the Tata Memorial Hospital between 1971 and 1985

  4. Spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hassan, S J

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin predominantly affecting elderly Caucasians. It has a high rate of local recurrence and regional lymph node metastases. It is associated with a poor prognosis. Complete spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma has been reported but is a poorly understood phenomenon. Here we present a case of complete spontaneous regression of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma demonstrating a markedly different pattern of events from those previously published.

  5. Managing Potentially Resectable Metastatic Colon Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, John L.

    2008-01-01

    For patients with metastatic colon cancer, management has evolved from resecting a single liver metastasis and having only one chemotherapy medicine, to resecting multiple metastases including those outside the liver as well as using combination chemotherapy (based on recent supportive trials) to improve outcomes. This success has also raised many questions, including the role of adjuvant chemotherapy to downstage borderline resectable tumors, whether patients who receive preoperative chemoth...

  6. Quantitative Method of Measuring Metastatic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated uroldnase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  7. Metastatic myxoid liposarcomas: imaging and histopathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheah, Kenneth; Ouellette, Hugue A.; Torriani, Martin; Kattapuram, Susan; Bredella, Miriam A.; Nielsen, G.P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to describe the imaging and histopathologic characteristics of metastatic myxoid liposarcomas. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and complied with HIPAA guidelines. The study group comprised 12 patients with metastatic myxoid liposarcoma who underwent MRI, CT, or FDG-PET. The location and imaging characteristics of the metastatic lesions were recorded, and the histopathology of all metastatic lesions was reviewed. There were 23 histologically proven metastases in 12 patients. Based on imaging criteria, there were 41 metastases. The mean time from the diagnosis of primary tumor to the first metastasis was 4.4 years. Sixty-seven percent of patients had bone and soft tissue metastases, 33% had pulmonary metastases, 33% had liver metastases, 25% had intra-abdominal, and 16% retroperitoneal metastases. CT demonstrated well-defined lobulated masses with soft tissue attenuation in all cases, without macroscopic fat component. In cases of osseous metastases, CT showed mixed lytic and sclerotic foci, with bone destruction in advanced cases. MRI demonstrated fluid-like signal intensity with mild heterogeneous enhancement in cases of soft tissue metastases. In osseous metastases, MRI showed avid heterogeneous enhancement. FDG-PET showed no significant FDG uptake for all metastases. MRI was the most useful imaging modality for osseous and soft tissue metastases. Myxoid liposarcomas are soft tissue sarcomas, with a high prevalence of extrapulmonary metastases. The bones and soft tissues were the most common site of involvement, followed by the lungs and liver. MRI was the most sensitive modality in the detection of osseous and soft tissue metastases, and is the recommended modality for the diagnosis and follow-up of bone and soft tissue involvement. (orig.)

  8. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the right ventricle

    OpenAIRE

    Datrice, Nicole; Milliken, Jeffrey; Kirsh, M.; Abolhoda, Amir; Saremi, Farhood; Sender, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a round cell neoplasm derived from neural crest cells that is part of the primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) family. It is a rare, aggressive malignancy that affects young people, most commonly in the second decade of life. The treatment of localized disease has improved greatly over the past four decades, but the prognosis for metastatic disease remains poor. Cardiac metastases of Ewing's sarcoma are exceedingly rare, with only a few reported cases. This...

  9. Alpha Particle Therapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Sullivan, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality among men in western countries. Although nearly 85% of patients present with localised disease, up to 40% will eventually develop metastatic disease during the course of illness. Of men dying from prostate cancer, more than 90% have bone metastases many with no other significant metastatic sites. Symptoms related to bone metastases and skeletal related events (SREs) account for the major cause of morbidity in these patients. Bone-seeking radionuclides have been used in the treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases for many years. The first bone seeking radionuclide drug approved by the FDA was Strontium-89. Other agents have also been used including Samarium-153 EDTMP, Rhenium-186 (-188)-HEDP. These radionuclides are all emit shortrange therapeutic beta radiation with bone marrow as the dose limiting toxicity. There is strong clinical trial evidence of benefit for these radionuclides in reducing pain in advanced prostate cancer; however, none of the drugs has been shown to improve survival, albeit none of the clinical trials were powered to detect differences in survival

  10. [A giant myxoid leiomyoma mimicking an inguinal hernia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszár, Orsolya; Zaránd, Attila; Szántó, Gyöngyi; Juhász, Viktória; Székely, Eszter; Novák, András; Molnár, Béla Ákos; Harsányi, László

    2016-03-06

    Leiomyoma is a rare, smooth muscle tumour that can occur everywhere in the human body. The authors present the history of a 60-year-old female, who had a giant, Mullerian type myxoid leiomyoma in the inguinal region mimicking acute abdominal symptoms. After examination the authors removed the soft tissue mass in the right femoral region reaching down in supine position to the middle third of the leg measuring 335 × 495 × 437 mm in greatest diameters in weight 33 kg. Reconstruction of the tissue defect was performed using oncoplastic guidelines. During the follow-up time no tumour recurrence was detected and the quality of life of the patient improved significantly.

  11. Acute dystonic reaction leading to lingual hematoma mimicking angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Özgür; Aydin, Ali Attila; Bilge, Sedat; Arslan, Fatih; Arslan, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    Lingual hematoma is a severe situation, which is rare and endangers the airway. It can develop due to trauma, vascular abnormalities, and coagulopathy. Due to its sudden development, it can be clinically confused with angioedema. In patients who applied to the doctor with complaints of a swollen tongue, lingual hematoma can be confused with angioedema, in particular, at the beginning if the symptoms occurred after drug use. It should especially be considered that dystonia in the jaw can present as drug-induced hyperkinetic movement disorder. Early recognition of this rare clinical condition and taking precautions for providing airway patency are essential. In this case report, we will discuss mimicking angioedema and caused by a bite due to dystonia and separation of the tongue from the base of the mouth developing concurrently with lingual hematoma. PMID:29326495

  12. Pituitary adenoma with extensive calcaficcations mimicking crainopharyngioma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Sung Chan; Lee, Seoung Ro; Kwon, Bae Ju; Moon, Won Jin; Jeon, Eui Yong [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-01-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with complaints of headache and visual disturbance, first noted six months earlier. Simple radiographs of skull sellar widening and calcification. Brian CT revealed a 3 x 3 x 4 cm-sized sellar suprasellar mass with heavy calcification. T1-weighted MR images showed that the signal intencity of the mass was slightly lower than that of the gray matter, while T2-weighted images showed heterogeneous high signal intensity with centrl low-signal-intensity foci, suggesting calcification After contrast infusion, enancement was irregular. Surgery revealed a 4 x 5 cm sized, well-demarcated, lobulated mass adhering to the meninges. Papillary-type pituitary adenoma was histologically confirmed. We report the CT and MR findings of atypical pituitary adenoma with extensive internal calcification mimicking craniopharyngioma.

  13. Concurrent periosteal chondroma and enchondroma of the fibula mimicking chondrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Washimi, Osuke; Yamada, Harumoto; Washimi, Yuki; Itoh, Masato; Kuroda, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    We present a rare concurrence of enchondroma and periosteal chondroma in the right distal fibula that mimicked chondrosarcoma in a 13-year-old boy. Radiographs and CT scans showed a periosteal lesion producing saucerization without periosteal reaction and calcification in the distal metaphysis of the right fibula. MRI showed an intramedullary lesion adjacent to the periosteal lesion, although it was invisible at CT. There was no cortical breach on imaging and gross examination. Because both lesions represented benign cartilaginous tumors on histology, concurrent periosteal chondroma and enchondroma of the fibula was diagnosed. This combination in the same bone in a patient without enchondromatosis is exceedingly rare. Such imaging features may be confused with those of chondrosarcoma. (orig.)

  14. Concurrent periosteal chondroma and enchondroma of the fibula mimicking chondrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Washimi, Osuke; Yamada, Harumoto; Washimi, Yuki; Itoh, Masato [Fujita Health University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Toyoake City, Aichi (Japan); Kuroda, Makoto [Fujita Health University, Department of Pathology, Toyoake City, Aichi (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    We present a rare concurrence of enchondroma and periosteal chondroma in the right distal fibula that mimicked chondrosarcoma in a 13-year-old boy. Radiographs and CT scans showed a periosteal lesion producing saucerization without periosteal reaction and calcification in the distal metaphysis of the right fibula. MRI showed an intramedullary lesion adjacent to the periosteal lesion, although it was invisible at CT. There was no cortical breach on imaging and gross examination. Because both lesions represented benign cartilaginous tumors on histology, concurrent periosteal chondroma and enchondroma of the fibula was diagnosed. This combination in the same bone in a patient without enchondromatosis is exceedingly rare. Such imaging features may be confused with those of chondrosarcoma. (orig.)

  15. Oropharyngeal trauma mimicking a first branchial cleft anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larem, Aisha; Sheikh, Rashid; Al Qahtani, Abdulsalam; Khais, Frat; Ganesan, Shanmugam; Haidar, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    We present a unique and challenging case of a remnant foreign body that presented to us in a child disguised as a strongly suspected congenital branchial cleft anomaly. This case entailed oropharyngeal trauma, with a delayed presentation as a retroauricular cyst accompanied by otorrhea that mimicked the classic presentation of an infected first branchial cleft anomaly. During surgical excision of the presumed branchial anomaly, a large wooden stick was found in the tract. The diagnostic and therapeutic obstacles in the management of such cases are highlighted. In addition to exploring the existing literature, we retrospectively analyzed a plausible explanation of the findings of this case. Laryngoscope, 126:E224-E226, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Mimicking biological stress-strain behaviour with synthetic elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatankhah-Varnosfaderani, Mohammad; Daniel, William F. M.; Everhart, Matthew H.; Pandya, Ashish A.; Liang, Heyi; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Dobrynin, Andrey V.; Sheiko, Sergei S.

    2017-09-01

    Despite the versatility of synthetic chemistry, certain combinations of mechanical softness, strength, and toughness can be difficult to achieve in a single material. These combinations are, however, commonplace in biological tissues, and are therefore needed for applications such as medical implants, tissue engineering, soft robotics, and wearable electronics. Present materials synthesis strategies are predominantly Edisonian, involving the empirical mixing of assorted monomers, crosslinking schemes, and occluded swelling agents, but this approach yields limited property control. Here we present a general strategy for mimicking the mechanical behaviour of biological materials by precisely encoding their stress-strain curves in solvent-free brush- and comb-like polymer networks (elastomers). The code consists of three independent architectural parameters—network strand length, side-chain length and grafting density. Using prototypical poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomers, we illustrate how this parametric triplet enables the replication of the strain-stiffening characteristics of jellyfish, lung, and arterial tissues.

  17. Dense Deposit Disease Mimicking a Renal Small Vessel Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lavleen; Bhardwaj, Swati; Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind; Dinda, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Dense deposit disease is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway and frequently deviates from the classic membranoproliferative pattern of injury on light microscopy. Other patterns of injury described for dense deposit disease include mesangioproliferative, acute proliferative/exudative, and crescentic GN. Regardless of the histologic pattern, C3 glomerulopathy, which includes dense deposit disease and C3 GN, is defined by immunofluorescence intensity of C3c two or more orders of magnitude greater than any other immune reactant (on a 0–3 scale). Ultrastructural appearances distinguish dense deposit disease and C3 GN. Focal and segmental necrotizing glomerular lesions with crescents, mimicking a small vessel vasculitis such as ANCA-associated GN, are a very rare manifestation of dense deposit disease. We describe our experience with this unusual histologic presentation and distinct clinical course of dense deposit disease, discuss the pitfalls in diagnosis, examine differential diagnoses, and review the relevant literature. PMID:26361799

  18. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Białek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  19. Enterobiasis in Ectopic Locations Mimicking Tumor-Like Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Pampiglione

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Both the clinical and the histopathological diagnostic difficulties of oxyuriasis in unusual sites and their importance from a clinical point of view are pointed out. The authors report two ectoptic cases of enterobiasis observed in Northern Italy, one located in a fallopian tube of a 57-year-old woman and the other in a perianal subcutaneous tissue of a 59-year-old man, mimicking tumor-like lesions. The authors take advantage of the occasion to focus the attention of the medical world on this subject, lamenting the scarce importance given to this parasitosis in university courses of medical schools and in medical textbooks as it is incorrectly considered “out-of-fashion.”

  20. Dental technician pneumoconiosis mimicking pulmonary tuberculosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Han Loong; Faisal, Mohamed; Soo, Chun Ian; Ban, Andrea Y L; Manap, Roslina Abdul; Hassan, Tidi M

    2016-09-07

    Dental laboratory technicians are at risk of developing occupational respiratory diseases due to exposure to various potentially toxic substances in their working environment. Since 1939, few cases of silicosis among dental technician have been reported. We illustrate a 38 year-old female, who worked in a dental laboratory for 20 years, initially treated as pulmonary tuberculosis and chronic necrotising aspergillosis without much improvement. Computed tomography guided lung biopsy and bronchoscopic transbronchial lung biopsy were performed. Lung tissue biopsies showed presence of refractile dental materials within the areas of histiocyte proliferation. The diagnosis of dental technician pneumoconiosis was obtained and our patient underwent pulmonary rehabilitation. This case highlights the importance of obtaining a detailed occupational history in tuberculosis endemic area, as pulmonary tuberculosis is a great mimicker of other respiratory diseases.

  1. Nephropathic Cystinosis Mimicking Bartter Syndrome: a Novel Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Funda; Nalcacioglu, Hulya; Ozaltin, Fatih; Korkmaz, Emine; Yel, Sibel

    2018-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from defective lysosomal transport of cystine due to mutations in the cystinosin lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS) gene. The clinical phenotype of nephropathic cystinosis is characterized by renal tubular Fanconi syndrome and development of end-stage renal disease during the first decade. Although metabolic acidosis is the classically prominent finding of the disease, a few cases may present with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis mimicking Bartter syndrome. Bartter-like presentation may lead to delay in diagnosis and initiation of specific treatment for cystinosis. We report a case of a 6-year-old girl initially presenting with the features of Bartter syndrome that was diagnosed 2 years later with nephropathic cystinosis and a novel CTNS mutation.

  2. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour mimicking a periapical cyst in pregnant woman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Bhandari, Neha

    2010-01-01

    EJ, Murrah VA. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor presenting as periapical disease. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 1997;84:557-60) and is associated with the crown of an impacted tooth, commonly the maxillary canine. We present a rare case of extrafollicular AOT mimicking a periapical...... cyst that originated in a woman in her first trimester of pregnancy and enlarged rapidly thereafter. The lesion was enucleated and sent for histopathology and immunohistochemistry, which revealed AOT with a cystic component with no dependence on oestrogen or progestrone for its growth. This case of AOT...... introduces us to the unique variation in its presentation and the difficulty in differentiation from periapical disease of inflammatory origin....

  3. Huge uterine-cervical diverticulum mimicking as a cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Chufal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report an incidental huge uterine-cervical diverticulum from a total abdominal hysterectomy specimen in a perimenopausal woman who presented with acute abdominal pain. The diverticulum was mimicking with various cysts present in the lateral side of the female genital tract. Histopathological examination confirmed this to be a cervical diverticulum with communication to uterine cavity through two different openings. They can attain huge size if left ignored for long duration and present a diagnostic challenge to clinicians, radiologists, as well as pathologists because of its extreme rarity. Therefore, diverticula should also be included as a differential diagnosis. Its histopathological confirmation also highlights that diverticula can present as an acute abdomen, requiring early diagnosis with appropriate timely intervention. Immunohistochemistry CD 10 has also been used to differentiate it from a mesonephric cyst.

  4. Teflon granulomas mimicking cerebellopontine angle tumors following microvascular decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Nicholas L; Graffeo, Christopher S; Copeland, William R; Link, Michael J; Atkinson, John L; Neff, Brian A; Raghunathan, Aditya; Carlson, Matthew L

    2017-03-01

    To report two patients with a history of microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm who presented with Teflon granulomas (TG) mimicking cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumors and to perform a systematic review of the English-language literature. Case series at a single tertiary academic referral center and systematic review. Retrospective chart review with analysis of clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. Systematic review using PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and Web of Science databases. Two patients with large skull base TGs mimicking CPA tumors clinically and radiographically were managed at the authors' institution. The first presented 4 years after MVD with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss, multiple progressive cranial neuropathies, and brainstem edema due to a growing TG. Reoperation with resection of the granuloma confirmed a foreign-body reaction consisting of multinucleated giant cells containing intracytoplasmic Teflon particles. The second patient presented 11 years after MVD with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss and recurrent hemifacial spasm. No growth was noted over 2 years, and the patient has been managed expectantly. Only one prior case of TG after MVD for hemifacial spasm has been reported in the English literature. TG is a rare complication of MVD for hemifacial spasm. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients presenting with a new-onset enhancing mass of the CPA after MVD, even when performed decades earlier. A thorough clinical and surgical history is critical toward establishing an accurate diagnosis to guide management and prevent unnecessary morbidity. Surgical intervention is not required unless progressive neurologic complications ensue. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:715-719, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes. Quantification and different distribution of iodine uptake assessed by dual-energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Stefania [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Radice, Davide [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Femia, Marco; Vigorito, Raffaella [Universita di Milano, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy); De Marco, Paolo; Origgi, Daniela [Medical Physics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Preda, Lorenzo [Division of Radiology, National Centre of Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO Foundation), Pavia (Italy); University of Pavia, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, Pavia (Italy); Barberis, Massimo [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Pathology, Milan (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Interventional Radiology, Milan (Italy); Mauro, Alberto [GE Medical Systems Italia SpA, Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [European Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano, Department of Oncology, Milan (Italy)

    2018-02-15

    To evaluate quantification of iodine uptake in metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes (LNs) by dual-energy CT (DECT) and to assess if the distribution of iodine within LNs at DECT correlates with the pathological structure. Ninety LNs from 37 patients (23 with lung and 14 with gynaecological malignancies) were retrospectively selected. Information of LNs sent for statistical analysis included Hounsfield units (HU) at different energy levels; decomposition material densities fat-iodine, iodine-fat, iodine-water, water-iodine. Statistical analysis included evaluation of interobserver variability, material decomposition densities and spatial HU distribution within LNs. Interobserver agreement was excellent. There was a significant difference in iodine-fat and iodine-water decompositions comparing metastatic and non-metastatic LNs (p < 0.001); fat-iodine and water-iodine did not show significant differences. HU distribution showed a significant gradient from centre to periphery within non-metastatic LNs that was significant up to 20-30% from the centre, whereas metastatic LNs showed a more homogeneous distribution of HU, with no significant gradient. DECT demonstrated a lower iodine uptake in metastatic compared to non-metastatic LNs. Moreover, the internal iodine distribution showed an evident gradient of iodine distribution from centre to periphery in non-metastatic LNs, and a more homogeneous distribution within metastatic LNs, which corresponded to the pathological structure. (orig.)

  6. Toxocariasis masquerading as liver and lung metastatic nodules in patents with gastrointestinal cancer: clinicopathologic study of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghui; Kim, Yun Soo; Kim, Yu Jin; Kyung, Sun Young; Park, Jeong-Woong; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Lee, Sang Pyo

    2012-01-01

    There are sporadic reports in the literature in which radiologic liver and lung lesions found incidentally during follow-up metastatic surveillance were shown to be caused by toxocariasis. The objective of the work discussed in this report was to identify common clinical and histopathological features of toxocariasis resembling metastatic nodules in five patients with gastrointestinal cancer. We retrospectively analyzed clinical features of five gastrointestinal cancer patients with liver or lung nodules mimicking metastasis. Serologic tests for parasitic infestations and pathologic examinations were performed. All five patients were males and three patients had gastric cancer and two had colorectal cancer. All the cases of toxocariasis were confirmed serologically. On follow-up imaging, the lesions improved or resolved, suggestive of the phenomenon of visceral larva migrans. In two patients, liver biopsy was performed and showed eosinophilic abscess. Serologic tests and liver or lung biopsy should be performed aggressively to exclude toxocariasis when patients with underlying gastrointestinal cancer present with hepatic or pulmonary nodules associated with eosinophilia, particularly if the patients have a clinical history of raw animal liver ingestion. Curative surgical intervention should not be excluded just because of multiple nodules in the liver or the lungs.

  7. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  8. Non-FDG PET imaging of brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zemin; GUAN Yihui; ZUO Chuantao; ZHANG Zhengwei; XUE Fangping; LIN Xiangtong

    2007-01-01

    Due to relatively high uptake of glucose in the brain cortex, the use of FDG PET imaging is greatly limited in brain tumor imaging, especially for low-grade gliomas and some metastatic tumours. More and more tracers with higher specificity were developed lately for brain tumor imaging. There are 3 main types of non-FDG PET tracers:amino acid tracers, choline tracers and nucleic acid tracers. These tracers are now widely applied in many aspects of brain tumor imaging. This article summarized the general use of non-FDG PET in different aspects of brain tumor imaging.

  9. Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-18

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma

  10. Non-pituitary origin sellar tumours mimicking pituitary macroadenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abele, T.A., E-mail: travaus@gmail.com [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Yetkin, Z.F.; Raisanen, J.M.; Mickey, B.E.; Mendelsohn, D.B. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Although the large majority of sellar tumours are pituitary adenomas, several other pituitary and non-pituitary origin tumours arise in the sellar and parasellar regions. Given their location, non-adenomatous lesions frequently mimic pituitary macroadenomas and can pose a diagnostic challenge for the radiologist. Distinguishing rare sellar lesions from the common macroadenoma helps to direct the correct surgical approach and reduce the risk of incomplete resection and/or complications such as cerebrospinal fluid leak with the potential for meningitis. The purpose of this article is to review the imaging features of non-pituitary-origin sellar tumours, focusing on characteristics that may distinguish them from pituitary macroadenomas. Lesions include meningioma, metastatic disease, epidermoid cyst, germinoma, chondrosarcoma, giant cell tumour, and giant aneurysm.

  11. High Grade Leiomyosarcoma Mimicking a Recurrent Angiomyxoma in the Perineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Neha; Swaika, Abhisek; Hanooshi, Bashar; Waldorf, James; Peterson, Jennifer; Wu, Kevin; Attia, Steven; Dinh, Tri A

    2015-05-05

    Perineal leiomyosarcoma is an extremely rare and aggressive cancer with a high metastatic potential and no defined standard treatment. There are only a few (six) reported cases in the literature. We report the case of a 67-year-old woman with a perineal leiomyosarcoma arising at the same site of a previously resected superficial angiomyxoma. Initially, she was treated for a presumptive recurrence of angiomyxoma. As she did not respond to medical therapy, she underwent repeat surgical excision. Pathology revealed a high grade leiomyosarcoma, histologically strikingly distinct from the initial diagnosis. She received adjuvant local radiation therapy, and remains without evidence of recurrent disease 36 months after completion of all therapy. This is the first reported case of a high grade perineal leiomyosarcoma originating at the same site as a resected benign superficial angiomyxoma. Our case emphasizes the necessity of a prompt histological diagnosis in cases of presumed recurrent perineal angiomyxoma.

  12. High grade leiomyosarcoma mimicking a recurrent angiomyxoma in the perineum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Sood

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Perineal leiomyosarcoma is an extremely rare and aggressive cancer with a high metastatic potential and no defined standard treatment. There are only a few (six reported cases in the literature. We report the case of a 67-year-old woman with a perineal leiomyosarcoma arising at the same site of a previously resected superficial angiomyxoma. Initially, she was treated for a presumptive recurrence of angiomyxoma. As she did not respond to medical therapy, she underwent repeat surgical excision. Pathology revealed a high grade leiomyosarcoma, histologically strikingly distinct from the initial diagnosis. She received adjuvant local radiation therapy, and remains without evidence of recurrent disease 36 months after completion of all therapy. This is the first reported case of a high grade perineal leiomyosarcoma originating at the same site as a resected benign superficial angiomyxoma. Our case emphasizes the necessity of a prompt histological diagnosis in cases of presumed recurrent perineal angiomyxoma.

  13. Polymerization of a divalent/tetravalent metal-storing atom-mimicking dendrimer

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, Ken; Hirabayashi, Yuki; Otake, Masaya; Mendori, Shin; Tobari, Yuta; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2016-01-01

    The phenylazomethine dendrimer (DPA) has a layer-by-layer electron density gradient that is an analog of the Bohr atom (atom mimicry). In combination with electron pair mimicry, the polymerization of this atom-mimicking dendrimer was achieved. The valency of the mimicked atom was controlled by changing the chemical structure of the dendrimer. By mimicking a divalent atom, a one-dimensional (1D) polymer was obtained, and by using a planar tetravalent atom mimic, a 2D polymer was obtained. Thes...

  14. Cediranib for Metastatic Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummar, Shivaani; Allen, Deborah; Monks, Anne; Polley, Eric C.; Hose, Curtis D.; Ivy, S. Percy; Turkbey, Ismail B.; Lawrence, Scott; Kinders, Robert J.; Choyke, Peter; Simon, Richard; Steinberg, Seth M.; Doroshow, James H.; Helman, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a rare, highly vascular tumor, for which no effective standard systemic treatment exists for patients with unresectable disease. Cediranib is a potent, oral small-molecule inhibitor of all three vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs). Patients and Methods We conducted a phase II trial of once-daily cediranib (30 mg) given in 28-day cycles for patients with metastatic, unresectable ASPS to determine the objective response rate (ORR). We also compared gene expression profiles in pre- and post-treatment tumor biopsies and evaluated the effect of cediranib on tumor proliferation and angiogenesis using positron emission tomography and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Results Of 46 patients enrolled, 43 were evaluable for response at the time of analysis. The ORR was 35%, with 15 of 43 patients achieving a partial response. Twenty-six patients (60%) had stable disease as the best response, with a disease control rate (partial response + stable disease) at 24 weeks of 84%. Microarray analysis with validation by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on paired tumor biopsies from eight patients demonstrated downregulation of genes related to vasculogenesis. Conclusion In this largest prospective trial to date of systemic therapy for metastatic ASPS, we observed that cediranib has substantial single-agent activity, producing an ORR of 35% and a disease control rate of 84% at 24 weeks. On the basis of these results, an open-label, multicenter, randomized phase II registration trial is currently being conducted for patients with metastatic ASPS comparing cediranib with another VEGFR inhibitor, sunitinib. PMID:23630200

  15. 3-62 Protective Effects of Hydroxysaffor Yellow A on Brain Injury in Mice Irradiated by 300 MeV/u 12C6+ Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan; Lu[1; Zhang; Hong[1

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment modality for head and neck cancers, nasopharyngeal cancers, primary brain tumors and brain metastases. A large number of patients in the world with primary or metastatic brain tumors will require large volume or whole brain irradiation every year. However, therapeutic irradiation not only kills tumor cells, but also injures normal brain tissue, which is commonly associated with significant functional morbidity and decreased quality of life in patients treated with brain radiotherapy[1].

  16. Breast Angiosarcoma Metastatic to the Ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico F. Souza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian masses are common findings in general gynecological practice. Approximately 5%–10% of ovarian malignancies are diagnosed as metastatic tumors. Primary angiosarcoma can arise anywhere in the body and when it arises in the breast, it usually affects women in their 3rd and 4th decades and accounts for one in 1700–2300 cases of primary breast cancer. Although unusual, breast angiosarcomas tend to metastasize hematogenously rather than lymphogenously, have high rates of local recurrence, that often develop metastases soon after treatment, and have a dismal prognosis. We present a case of a solitary ovarian metastasis from angiosarcoma of the breast.

  17. MOLECULAR MARKERS FOR METASTATIC PROSTATE ADENOCARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Kunin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of molecular markers of metastasing and prognosis in prostate cancer remains an urgent task. In this study, we investigated the relationship of gene expression heparanase-1 (HPSE1 and D-glucuronil C5-epimerase (GLCE with early disease relapse and metastasis of a 2,5−3 years after diagnosis. It was shown that the ratio of the expression levels of genes HPSE1/GLCE > 1 may serve as a prognostic relapse marker and trends of the tumour to metastasis. The data obtained suggest to use this option as a molecular marker for the diagnostics of metastatic process and the disease prognosis.

  18. Pulmonary metastatic calcification: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozi, Lilian Christine Franchiotti [Radiology, Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    The present report describes the case of a 48-year-old female patient suffering from chronic renal failure on dialysis for 13 years. She presented with hemoptysis, fever, productive cough and dyspnoea. Chest radiography showed predominance of ill-defined opacities in the middle and lower lung fields, bilaterally. Chest computed tomography showed ground glass opacities associated with poorly defined centrilobular nodules with ground-glass attenuation. The patient was submitted to bronchoalveolar lavage that was negative for mycobacteria and fungi. On the basis of such findings, open lung biopsy was performed, which revealed metastatic pulmonary calcification. (author)

  19. Paclitaxel and doxorubicin in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, J; Boesgaard, M; Paaske, T

    1996-01-01

    For the past decades the anthracyclines have been regarded as among the most active drugs for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. However, the 5-year survival rate in patients with stage IV breast cancer continues to be below 20%, and new active drugs and drug combinations clearly must...... be explored. Paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) has been demonstrated to be highly effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer, including those with anthracycline-resistant breast cancer, a fact that has led to efforts to combine paclitaxel and anthracyclines...

  20. An in vitro correlation of mechanical forces and metastatic capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indra, Indrajyoti; Undyala, Vishnu; Kandow, Casey; Thirumurthi, Umadevi; Beningo, Karen A; Dembo, Micah

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical forces have a major influence on cell migration and are predicted to significantly impact cancer metastasis, yet this idea is currently poorly defined. In this study we have asked if changes in traction stress and migratory properties correlate with the metastatic progression of tumor cells. For this purpose, four murine breast cancer cell lines derived from the same primary tumor, but possessing increasing metastatic capacity, were tested for adhesion strength, traction stress, focal adhesion organization and for differential migration rates in two-dimensional and three-dimensional environments. Using traction force microscopy (TFM), we were surprised to find an inverse relationship between traction stress and metastatic capacity, such that force production decreased as the metastatic capacity increased. Consistent with this observation, adhesion strength exhibited an identical profile to the traction data. A count of adhesions indicated a general reduction in the number as metastatic capacity increased but no difference in the maturation as determined by the ratio of nascent to mature adhesions. These changes correlated well with a reduction in active beta-1 integrin with increasing metastatic ability. Finally, in two dimensions, wound healing, migration and persistence were relatively low in the entire panel, maintaining a downward trend with increasing metastatic capacity. Why metastatic cells would migrate so poorly prompted us to ask if the loss of adhesive parameters in the most metastatic cells indicated a switch to a less adhesive mode of migration that would only be detected in a three-dimensional environment. Indeed, in three-dimensional migration assays, the most metastatic cells now showed the greatest linear speed. We conclude that traction stress, adhesion strength and rate of migration do indeed change as tumor cells progress in metastatic capacity and do so in a dimension-sensitive manner

  1. Molecular Subgroup of Primary Prostate Cancer Presenting with Metastatic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven M; Knight, Laura A; McCavigan, Andrena M; Logan, Gemma E; Berge, Viktor; Sherif, Amir; Pandha, Hardev; Warren, Anne Y; Davidson, Catherine; Uprichard, Adam; Blayney, Jaine K; Price, Bethanie; Jellema, Gera L; Steele, Christopher J; Svindland, Aud; McDade, Simon S; Eden, Christopher G; Foster, Chris; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E; Mason, Malcolm D; Kay, Elaine W; Waugh, David J; Harkin, D Paul; Watson, R William; Clarke, Noel W; Kennedy, Richard D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 4-25% of patients with early prostate cancer develop disease recurrence following radical prostatectomy. To identify a molecular subgroup of prostate cancers with metastatic potential at presentation resulting in a high risk of recurrence following radical prostatectomy. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was performed using gene expression data from 70 primary resections, 31 metastatic lymph nodes, and 25 normal prostate samples. Independent assay validation was performed using 322 radical prostatectomy samples from four sites with a mean follow-up of 50.3 months. Molecular subgroups were identified using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. A partial least squares approach was used to generate a gene expression assay. Relationships with outcome (time to biochemical and metastatic recurrence) were analysed using multivariable Cox regression and log-rank analysis. A molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancer with biology similar to metastatic disease was identified. A 70-transcript signature (metastatic assay) was developed and independently validated in the radical prostatectomy samples. Metastatic assay positive patients had increased risk of biochemical recurrence (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 1.62 [1.13-2.33]; p=0.0092) and metastatic recurrence (multivariable HR=3.20 [1.76-5.80]; p=0.0001). A combined model with Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment post surgical (CAPRA-S) identified patients at an increased risk of biochemical and metastatic recurrence superior to either model alone (HR=2.67 [1.90-3.75]; pmolecular subgroup of primary prostate cancers with metastatic potential. The metastatic assay may improve the ability to detect patients at risk of metastatic recurrence following radical prostatectomy. The impact of adjuvant therapies should be assessed in this higher-risk population. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Targeting Potassium Channels for Increasing Delivery of Imaging Agents and Therapeutics to Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Nagendra Sanyasihally Ningaraj; Divya eKhaitan

    2013-01-01

    Every year in the US, 20,000 new primary and nearly 200,000 metastatic brain tumor cases are reported. The cerebral microvessels/ capillaries that form the blood–brain barrier (BBB) not only protect the brain from toxic agents in the blood but also pose a significant hindrance to the delivery of small and large therapeutic molecules. Different strategies have been employed to circumvent the physiological barrier posed by blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). Studies in our laboratory have identifi...

  3. Role of KCNMA1 gene in breast cancer invasion and metastasis to brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaitan, Divya; Sankpal, Umesh T; Weksler, Babette; Meister, Edward A; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ningaraj, Nagendra S

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with breast tumor metastases to brain is extremely poor. Identification of prognostic molecular markers of the metastatic process is critical for designing therapeutic modalities for reducing the occurrence of metastasis. Although ubiquitously present in most human organs, large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channel (BK Ca ) channels are significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells. In this study we investigated the role of KCNMA1 gene that encodes for the pore-forming α-subunit of BK Ca channels in breast cancer metastasis and invasion. We performed Global exon array to study the expression of KCNMA1 in metastatic breast cancer to brain, compared its expression in primary breast cancer and breast cancers metastatic to other organs, and validated the findings by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study the expression and localization of BK Ca channel protein in primary and metastatic breast cancer tissues and breast cancer cell lines. We performed matrigel invasion, transendothelial migration and membrane potential assays in established lines of normal breast cells (MCF-10A), non-metastatic breast cancer (MCF-7), non-brain metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), and brain-specific metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-361) to study whether BK Ca channel inhibition attenuates breast tumor invasion and metastasis using KCNMA1 knockdown with siRNA and biochemical inhibition with Iberiotoxin (IBTX). The Global exon array and RT-PCR showed higher KCNMA1 expression in metastatic breast cancer in brain compared to metastatic breast cancers in other organs. Our results clearly show that metastatic breast cancer cells exhibit increased BK Ca channel activity, leading to greater invasiveness and transendothelial migration, both of which could be attenuated by blocking KCNMA1. Determining the relative abundance of BK Ca channel expression in breast cancer metastatic to brain and the mechanism of its

  4. Role of KCNMA1 gene in breast cancer invasion and metastasis to brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couraud Pierre-Olivier

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for patients with breast tumor metastases to brain is extremely poor. Identification of prognostic molecular markers of the metastatic process is critical for designing therapeutic modalities for reducing the occurrence of metastasis. Although ubiquitously present in most human organs, large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channel (BKCa channels are significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells. In this study we investigated the role of KCNMA1 gene that encodes for the pore-forming α-subunit of BKCa channels in breast cancer metastasis and invasion. Methods We performed Global exon array to study the expression of KCNMA1 in metastatic breast cancer to brain, compared its expression in primary breast cancer and breast cancers metastatic to other organs, and validated the findings by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study the expression and localization of BKCa channel protein in primary and metastatic breast cancer tissues and breast cancer cell lines. We performed matrigel invasion, transendothelial migration and membrane potential assays in established lines of normal breast cells (MCF-10A, non-metastatic breast cancer (MCF-7, non-brain metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, and brain-specific metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-361 to study whether BKCa channel inhibition attenuates breast tumor invasion and metastasis using KCNMA1 knockdown with siRNA and biochemical inhibition with Iberiotoxin (IBTX. Results The Global exon array and RT-PCR showed higher KCNMA1 expression in metastatic breast cancer in brain compared to metastatic breast cancers in other organs. Our results clearly show that metastatic breast cancer cells exhibit increased BKCa channel activity, leading to greater invasiveness and transendothelial migration, both of which could be attenuated by blocking KCNMA1. Conclusion Determining the relative abundance of BKCa channel expression in breast

  5. CD147 and matrix-metalloproteinase-2 expression in metastatic and non-metastatic uveal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüke, Julia; Vukoja, Vlatka; Brandenbusch, Tim; Nassar, Khaled; Rohrbach, Jens Martin; Grisanti, Salvatore; Lüke, Matthias; Tura, Aysegül

    2016-06-03

    Extracellular matrix remodelling regulated by matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) inducer (CD147) is a crucial process during tumor cell invasion and regulation of blood supply. In this study, we evaluated the correlation of CD147 and MMP-2 expression with major prognostic factors for uveal melanoma and the development of metastasis. The expression of CD147 and MMP-2 was analyzed in 49 samples of uveal melanomas. Triple immunofluorescence stainings using markers against glial cells (GFAP), endothelial cells (CD34) and macrophages (CD68) were performed to further analyse the exact localisation of CD147 and MMP-2 positivity. In 28 cases clinical metastatic disease were found. The remaining 21 cases showed no signs of metastatic disease for an average follow-up of 10 years. Correlation analysis (Pearson correlation) was performed to analyse the association of CD147 and MMP-2 expression with known prognostic factors, vasculogenic mimicry (VM), the mature vasculature (von Willebrand Factor) and tumor induced angiogenesis (by means of Endoglin expression). CD147 and MMP-2 were expressed in 47 (96.0 %) of the uveal melanomas. CD147 up-regulation was significantly correlated with a higher MMP-2 expression. The overall expression analysis revealed no significant difference in the metastatic (p = 0.777) and non-metastatic subgroup (p = 0.585). No correlation of CD147 expression and any system of blood supply was evident. In the non-metastatic sub-group a significant correlation of clustered CD147 positive cells with largest basal diameter (p = 0.039), height (p = 0.047) and TNM-stage (p = 0.013) was evident. These data may indicate that CD147 regulates MMP-2 expression in uveal melanoma cells.

  6. Optical imaging of metabolic adaptability in metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Lisa; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2018-02-01

    Accurate methods for determining metastatic risk from the primary tumor are crucial for patient survival. Cell metabolism could potentially be used as a marker of metastatic risk. Optical imaging of the endogenous fluorescent molecules nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) provides a non-destructive and label-free method for determining cell metabolism. The optical redox ratio (FAD/FAD+NADH) is sensitive to the balance between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We have previously established that hypoxia-reoxygenation stress leads to metastatic potential-dependent changes in optical redox ratio. The objective of this study was to monitor the changes in optical redox ratio in breast cancer cells in response to different periods of hypoxic stress as well various levels of hypoxia to establish an optimal protocol. We measured the optical redox ratio of highly metastatic 4T1 murine breast cancer cells under normoxic conditions and after exposure to 30, 60, and 120 minutes of 0.5% O2. This was followed by an hour of reoxygenation. We found an increase in the optical redox ratio following reoxygenation from hypoxia for all durations. Statistically significant differences were observed at 60 and 120 minutes (p˂0.01) compared with normoxia, implying an ability to adapt to OXPHOS after reoxygenation. The switch to OXPHOS has been shown to be a key promoter of cell invasion. We will present our results from these investigations in human breast cancer cells as well as non-metastatic breast cancer cells exposed to various levels of hypoxia.

  7. Pleiotropic function of ezrin in human metastatic melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Cristina; Brambilla, Daria; Lozupone, Francesco; Matarrese, Paola; de Milito, Angelo; Lugini, Luana; Iessi, Elisabetta; Cecchetti, Serena; Marino, Marialucia; Perdicchio, Maurizio; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Spada, Massimo; Malorni, Walter; Fais, Stefano

    2009-06-15

    The membrane cytoskeleton cross-linker, ezrin, has recently been depicted as a key regulator in the progression and metastasis of several pediatric tumors. Less defined appears the role of ezrin in human adult tumors, especially melanoma. We therefore addressed ezrin involvement in the metastatic phenotype of human adult metastatic melanoma cells. Our results show that cells resected from melanoma metastatic lesions of patients, display marked metastatic spreading capacity in SCID mice organs. Stable transfection of human melanoma cells with an ezrin deletion mutant comprising only 146 N-terminal aminoacids led to the abolishment of metastatic dissemination. In vitro experiments revealed ezrin direct molecular interactions with molecules related to metastatic functions such as CD44, merlin and Lamp-1, consistent with its participation to the formation of phagocitic vacuoles, vesicular sorting and migration capacities of melanoma cells. Moreover, the ezrin fragment capable of binding to CD44 was shorter than that previously reported, and transfection with the ezrin deletion mutant abrogated plasma membrane Lamp-1 recruitment. This study highlights key involvement of ezrin in a complex machinery, which allows metastatic cancer cells to migrate, invade and survive in very unfavorable conditions. Our in vivo and in vitro data reveal that ezrin is the hub of the metastatic behavior also in human adult tumors. Copyright 2008 UICC.

  8. Mammary tuberculosis mimicking breast cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroulis Ioannis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The incidence of tuberculosis is rising worldwide and rare manifestations of the past are seen more often nowadays. Mammary tuberculosis is a rare clinical entity, often mimicking breast cancer or abscesses of benign or malignant origin. Clinical awareness is necessary during diagnostic work-up for establishing the correct diagnosis and treatment. Case presentation We present a case of breast tuberculosis diagnosed in a 73 year old woman at our institution. The patient presented with a palpable mass of the right breast with clinical, laboratory and mammographic findings indicative of breast carcinoma. The patient underwent lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy. Frozen section of the tumor and the sentinel node revealed "granulomatous inflammation", while gross examination confirmed the diagnosis of tuberculous mastitis. The patient received anti-tuberculosis therapy for six months with no side effects or any further complications. Conclusion Breast tuberculosis is an obscure disease often mistaken for carcinoma or pyogenic abscess of the breast, especially if well-defined clinical features are absent. A high index of suspicion is required because the disease can usually be treated conservatively with current antituberculous modalities while surgical intervention is reserved for rare cases only.

  9. Retinal pigmentary changes in chronic uveitis mimicking retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevgi, D Damla; Davoudi, Samaneh; Comander, Jason; Sobrin, Lucia

    2017-09-01

    To present retinal pigmentary changes mimicking retinitis pigmentosa (RP) as a finding of advanced uveitis. We retrospectively reviewed charts of patients without a family history of inherited retinal degenerations who presented with retinal pigment changes and signs of past or present intraocular inflammation. Comprehensive eye examination including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp examination and dilated fundus examination was performed on all patients in addition to color fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography (FA), and full-field electroretinogram testing. We identified five patients with ages ranging from 33 to 66 years, who presented with RP-like retinal pigmentary changes which were eventually attributed to longstanding uveitis. The changes were bilateral in three cases and unilateral in two cases. Four of five cases presented with active inflammation, and the remaining case showed evidence of active intraocular inflammation during follow-up. This study highlights the overlapping features of advanced uveitis and RP including the extensive pigmentary changes. Careful review of possible past uveitis history, detailed examination of signs of past or present inflammation and ancillary testing, with FA often being most helpful, are required for the correct diagnosis. This is important, because intervention can prevent further damage if the cause of the pigmentary changes is destructive inflammation.

  10. Orbital compressed air and petroleum injury mimicking necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellington, Faye E; Bacon, Annette S; Abu-Bakra, Mohammed A J; Martinez-Devesa, Pablo; Norris, Jonathan H

    2014-09-01

    Orbital injury secondary to petroleum-based products is rare. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a combined compressed air and chemical orbital injury, which mimicked necrotizing fasciitis. A 58-year-old man was repairing his motorcycle engine when a piston inadvertently fired, discharging compressed air and petroleum-based carburetor cleaner into his left eye. He developed surgical emphysema, skin necrosis, and a chemical cellulitis, causing an orbital compartment syndrome. He was treated initially with antibiotics and subsequently with intravenous steroid and orbital decompression surgery. There was almost complete recovery by 4 weeks postsurgery. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Petroleum-based products can cause severe skin irritation and necrosis. Compressed air injury can cause surgical emphysema. When these two mechanisms of injury are combined, the resulting orbitopathy and skin necrosis can mimic necrotizing fasciitis and cause diagnostic confusion. A favorable outcome is achievable with aggressive timely management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Duodenal White Spots Mimicking Intestinal Candidiasis: Report of Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Turk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Duodenal white spots are mentioned in these nonspecific lesions until recently. Although there is not enough studies about duedonal white spots yet; these lesions described in a separate syndrome. Here now we reported a case that we diagnosed multiple Duodenal white spots mimicking intestinal candidiasis. Clinical manifestation and endoscopic appearance of lesions gave rise to thought intestinal candidiasis histopathological examination revealed us several duodenitis. There was no evidence of fungal infection in PAS staining. Early after endoscopy patient took treatment of Lansoprozole at the 30 mg dose and bismuth salicylate. Patients compliant declined and control endoscopy exposed white duodenal spots cleared away three months later. Duodenal white spots are becoming to be designated as a separate disease even a syndrome. Etiology of duodenal white spots must be determined carefully during endoscopy. Sometimes it is difficult to make the correct diagnosis by appearance of lesion; in such cases histopathological examination can be useful both differential diagnosis of disease and determination of etiological factor. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(4.000: 249-252

  12. Papillary thyroid carcinoma with tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy mimicking metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M; Subhan, A.; Aslam, A.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the frequency of tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy mimicking metastasis from papillary thyroid cancer. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit-I, Ward-3 of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from March 2005 to March 2010. Methodology: All patients above 12 years of age of either gender diagnosed on investigations as papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) were included in the study. Ultrasound and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), neck of solitary thyroid nodules (STN) and cervical lymph nodes were done. Total thyroidectomy and excision biopsy of cervical lymph nodes was performed, histopathological results were recorded and patients were managed accordingly. Results: A total of 55 patients had PTC and 25 had cervical lymphadenopathy. Eighteen patients of PTC with cervical lymphadenopathy were diagnosed after investigations as cases of tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy (TCL) initially considered as metastasis from PTC; 5 patients had metastasis from PTC. Two patients proved to be of reactive hyperplasia which initially showed tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy on FNAC. So 80% patients of cervical lymphadenopathy with PTC were due to benign disease and 20% had metastasis in lymph node due to PTC. Conclusion: PTC with cervical lymphadenopathy due to co-existent tuberculosis is common. Metastasis from PTC in lymph nodes were less common than tuberculous lymphodenitis in this study. Tuberculosis should be considered before deciding for neck dissection in cases of PTC. (author)

  13. Mimicking biochar-albedo feedback in complex Mediterranean agricultural landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzi, E; Genesio, L; Miglietta, F; Toscano, P; Pieri, M

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of charcoal produced by biomass pyrolysis (biochar) in agricultural soils is a potentially sustainable strategy for climate change mitigation. However, some side effects of large-scale biochar application need to be investigated. In particular a massive use of a low-reflecting material on large cropland areas may impact the climate via changes in surface albedo. Twelve years of MODIS-derived albedo data were analysed for three pairs of selected agricultural sites in central Italy. In each pair bright and dark coloured soil were identified, mimicking the effect of biochar application on the land surface albedo of complex agricultural landscapes. Over this period vegetation canopies never completely masked differences in background soil colour. This soil signal, expressed as an albedo difference, induced a local instantaneous radiative forcing of up to 4.7 W m −2 during periods of high solar irradiance. Biochar mitigation potential might therefore be reduced up to ∼30%. This study proves the importance of accounting for crop phenology and crop management when assessing biochar mitigation potential and provides more insights into the analysis of its environmental feedback. (letter)

  14. Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Delia; Ravignani, Andrea; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Whiten, Andrew

    2014-06-13

    Cumulative tool-based culture underwrote our species' evolutionary success, and tool-based nut-cracking is one of the strongest candidates for cultural transmission in our closest relatives, chimpanzees. However the social learning processes that may explain both the similarities and differences between the species remain unclear. A previous study of nut-cracking by initially naïve chimpanzees suggested that a learning chimpanzee holding no hammer nevertheless replicated hammering actions it witnessed. This observation has potentially important implications for the nature of the social learning processes and underlying motor coding involved. In the present study, model and observer actions were quantified frame-by-frame and analysed with stringent statistical methods, demonstrating synchrony between the observer's and model's movements, cross-correlation of these movements above chance level and a unidirectional transmission process from model to observer. These results provide the first quantitative evidence for motor mimicking underlain by motor coding in apes, with implications for mirror neuron function.

  15. A series of parapharyngeal glial heterotopia mimicking lymphatic malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haloob, Nora; Pepper, Christopher; Hartley, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Otolaryngologists will most frequently encounter extra-cranial glial tissue within the nasal cavity, where it is known as a 'nasal glioma', and may communicate with the dura. However, glial tissue can also present extra-nasally in the form of a neck mass with no intracranial connection. In these rare cases, they can present soon after birth as an enlarging neck mass, causing compressive symptoms with airway obstruction and feeding difficulties. In this way, it is often initially misdiagnosed as a more common lesion such as a lymphatic malformation, teratoma, branchial anomaly or vascular malformation. As with many congenital head and neck masses, offering the most the appropriate management relies heavily on radiological imaging and, where possible, histopathology from a diagnostic biopsy. Once the diagnosis of extra-nasal glial heterotopia has been confirmed, the gold standard management is complete surgical excision. We review three cases of extra-nasal glial heterotopia presenting to our institution over an eleven year period as a large neck mass, which mimicked other congenital neck lumps, and discuss them in the context of those in the literature. We highlight how their clinical and radiological features can easily be confused with lymphatic malformations, and the potential implications of misdiagnosis. Raising awareness of this diagnostic confusion will highlight the need for management of these cases within an appropriate paediatric multidisciplinary setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chloroquine cardiotoxicity mimicking connective tissue disease heart involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereckei, András; Fazakas, Adám; Baló, Timea; Fekete, Béla; Molnár, Mária Judit; Karádi, István

    2013-04-01

    The authors report a case of rare chloroquine cardiotoxicity mimicking connective tissue disease heart involvement in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) manifested suddenly as third degree A-V block with QT(c) interval prolongation and short torsade de pointes runs ultimately degenerating into ventricular fibrillation. Immunological tests suggested an MCTD flare, implying that cardiac arrest had resulted from myocardial involvement by MCTD. However, QT(c) prolongation is not a characteristic of cardiomyopathy caused by connective tissue disease, unless anti-Ro/SSA positivity is present, but that was not the case. Therefore, looking for another cause of QT(c) prolongation the possibility of chloroquine cardiotoxicity emerged, which the patient had been receiving for almost two years in supramaximal doses. Biopsy of the deltoid muscle was performed, because in chloroquine toxicity, specific lesions are present both in the skeletal muscle and in the myocardium, and electron microscopy revealed the accumulation of cytoplasmic curvilinear bodies, which are specific to antimalarial-induced myocyte damage and are absent in all other muscle diseases, except neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Thus, the diagnosis of chloroquine cardiotoxicity was established. It might be advisable to supplement the periodic ophthalmological examination, which is currently the only recommendation for patients on long-term chloroquine therapy, with ECG screening.

  17. Various appearances of rib companion shadow mimicking a pathologic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yo Won; Yoo, Shi Joon; Im, Jung Gil

    1992-01-01

    We have observed that the companion shadow of the upper rib may be misinterpreted as a small pneumothorax or pleural plaque associated with asbestosis. To observe the radiographic characteristics of the normal companion shadow, we analyzed, on the posteroanterior(PA) chest radiographs, the companion shadow of 50 normal cases. Factors such as occurrence on each rib, the sharpness of the margin, the relative position to the rib, the shape and the thickness were observed. Also, we analyzed the displaced pleura of 4 pneumothorax cases to differentiate their findings from the findings of normal companion shadows. On 50 normal chest radiographs, 192 companion shadows were observed on the first to fourth ribs. In 173 of those shadows, the visceral margin of the companion shadow on the second rib simulated pneumothorax more closely than those on any other ribs due to its apical location and thinness. In six of 50 normal cases, the companion shadow in the first or second rib showed an inwardly convex lower margin, mimicking pleural plaque. The companion shadow was suggested on the plain chest radiograph by the following characteristics imultiplicity (47/50), thicker than normal pleura (3/4), persistent on serial films with the same shape and specific location(4/4)

  18. The cytopathology of Actinomyces, Nocardia, and their mimickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Kelsey E; Sturgis, Charles D; Procop, Gary W; Rhoads, Daniel D

    2017-12-01

    Nocardia species and Actinomyces species are 2 of the most commonly diagnosed filamentous bacteria in routine cytopathology practice. These genera share many overlapping cytomorphologic features, including their thin, beaded, branching, Gram-positive, GMS-positive filamentous structures that fragment at their peripheries into bacillary- and coccoid-appearing forms. Features that help distinguish between these 2 microorganisms include the width of their filamentous structures, the angles at which they branch, and their ability or lack thereof to retain a modified acid-fast stain. In addition to cytomorphologic overlap, overlap in clinical presentation is frequent with pulmonary and mucocutaneous presentations seen in both. Differentiating between Nocardia and Actinomyces is essential because patients with these infections require different approaches to medical management. Both antibiotic susceptibilities and the need for early surgical intervention as part of the treatment plan vary greatly among these 2 groups. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, cytomorphology and staining characteristics that can be useful in identifying and distinguishing between Nocardia and Actinomyces infections, as well as their mimickers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm mimicking an adnexal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristian, Daniel Alin; Grama, Florin Andrei; Becheanu, Gabriel; Pop, Anamaria; Popa, Ileana; Şurlin, Valeriu; Stănilescu, Sorin; Bratu, Ana Magdalena; Burcoş, Traean

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of malignant epithelial neoplasm of the appendix, an uncommon disorder encountered in clinical practice, which poses a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. We report a particular case in which the appendix was abnormally located in the pelvis, mimicking an adnexal mass. Therefore, it was difficult to make the preoperative diagnosis on clinical examination, imaging studies and laboratory tests and we discovered the lesion during the diagnostic laparoscopy. No lymphadenopathy or mucinous ascites were found. The case was completely handled via the laparoscopic approach keeping the appendix intact during the operation. The frozen section, the detailed histopathology overview as well as multiple immunostaining with a complex panel of markers report diagnosed a low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm (LAMN) with no invasion of the wall. No adjuvant therapy was considered needed. At a one-year follow-up oncological assessment, the patient was free of disease. In women with cystic mass in the right iliac fossa an appendiceal mucocele should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Laparoscopic appendectomy can represent an adequate operation for the appendiceal mucinous neoplasm if the histological report is clear and surgical precautionary measures are taken.

  20. Osteopoikilosis: A Sign Mimicking Skeletal Metastases in a Cancer Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasrolahi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopoikilosis is a rare benign osteosclerotic bone disorder that may be misdiagnosed as skeletal metastases. Here we describe a case of coincidental breast cancer and osteopoikilosis mimicking skeletal metastases. A 41-year-old woman underwent right modified radical mastectomy in April 2007. Twenty-eight months after initial treatment,the patient complained of bilateral knee and foot pain. Plain X-rays of the feet and knees showed multiple well-defined osteosclerotic lesions. According to the radiographic appearance, the most likely differential diagnoses included skeletal metastases from breast cancer and osteopoikilosis. A whole-body bone scintigraphy showed no increase in uptake by the sclerotic lesions, and serum lactic dehydrogenase, carcinoembryonic antigen, alkaline phosphatase and cancer antigen 15-3 were not elevated. We therefore diagnosed the patient’s skeletal lesions as osteopoikilosis. This case and ourliterature review suggest that the radiographic appearance of osteopoikilosis may mimic or mask skeletal metastases, potentially leading to misdiagnosis in patients with cancer.

  1. Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, Delia; Ravignani, Andrea; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Whiten, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative tool-based culture underwrote our species' evolutionary success, and tool-based nut-cracking is one of the strongest candidates for cultural transmission in our closest relatives, chimpanzees. However the social learning processes that may explain both the similarities and differences between the species remain unclear. A previous study of nut-cracking by initially naïve chimpanzees suggested that a learning chimpanzee holding no hammer nevertheless replicated hammering actions it witnessed. This observation has potentially important implications for the nature of the social learning processes and underlying motor coding involved. In the present study, model and observer actions were quantified frame-by-frame and analysed with stringent statistical methods, demonstrating synchrony between the observer's and model's movements, cross-correlation of these movements above chance level and a unidirectional transmission process from model to observer. These results provide the first quantitative evidence for motor mimicking underlain by motor coding in apes, with implications for mirror neuron function. PMID:24923651

  2. Toxicology Analysis of Tissue-Mimicking Phantom Made From Gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbashid, A. S.; Hamzah, N.; Zaman, W. S. W. K.; Mokhtar, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    Skin phantom mimics the biological skin tissues as it have the ability to respond to changes in its environment. The development of tissue-mimicking phantom could contributes towards the reduce usage of animal in cosmetics and pharmacokinetics. In this study, the skin phantoms made from gelatin were tested with four different commonly available cosmetic products to determine the toxicity of each substance. The four substances used were; mercury-based whitening face cream, carcinogenic liquid make-up foundation, paraben-based acne cleanser, and organic lip balm. Toxicity test were performed on all of the phantoms. For toxicity testing, topographical and electrophysiological changes of the phantoms were evaluated. The ability of each respective phantom to react with mild toxic substances and its electrical resistance were analysed in to determine the toxicity of all the phantom models. Four-electrode method along with custom made electrical impedance analyser was used to differentiate electrical resistance between intoxicated phantom and non-intoxicated phantom in this study. Electrical resistance values obtained from the phantom models were significantly higher than the control group. The result obtained suggests the phantom as a promising candidate to be used as alternative for toxicology testing in the future.

  3. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A W

    2015-04-21

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel "magic boron" counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters.

  4. Novel investigational drugs mimicking exercise for the treatment of cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, F; Pin, F; Ballarò, R; Baccino, F M; Costelli, P

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia is a syndrome characterized by body weight loss, muscle wasting and metabolic abnormalities, that frequently complicates the management of people affected by chronic diseases. No effective therapy is actually available, although several drugs are under clinical evaluation. Altered energy metabolism markedly contributes to the pathogenesis of cachexia; it can be improved by exercise, which is able to both induce anabolism and inhibit catabolism. This review focuses on exercise mimetics and their potential inclusion in combined protocols to treat cachexia. The authors pay with particular reference to the cancer-associated cachexia. Even though exercise improves muscle phenotype, most patients retain sedentary habits which are quite difficult to disrupt. Moreover, they frequently present with chronic fatigue and comorbidities that reduce exercise tolerance. For these reasons, drugs mimicking exercise could be beneficial to those who are unable to comply with the practice of physical activity. Since some exercise mimetics may exert serious side effects, further investigations should focus on treatments which maintain their effectiveness on muscle phenotype while remaining tolerable at the same time.

  5. Moderately nonlinear ultrasound propagation in blood-mimicking fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharin, Nikolay A; Vince, D Geoffrey

    2004-04-01

    In medical diagnostic ultrasound (US), higher than-in-water nonlinearity of body fluids and tissue usually does not produce strong nonlinearly distorted waves because of the high absorption. The relative influence of absorption and nonlinearity can be characterized by the Gol'dberg number Gamma. There are two limiting cases in nonlinear acoustics: weak waves (Gamma 1). However, at diagnostic frequencies in tissue and body fluids, the nonlinear effects and effects of absorption more likely are comparable (Gol'dberg number Gamma approximately 1). The aim of this work was to study the nonlinear propagation of a moderately nonlinear US second harmonic signal in a blood-mimicking fluid. Quasilinear solutions to the KZK equation are presented, assuming radiation from a flat and geometrically focused circular Gaussian source. The solutions are expressed in a new simplified closed form and are in very good agreement with those of previous studies measuring and modeling Gaussian beams. The solutions also show good agreement with the measurements of the beams produced by commercially available transducers, even without special Gaussian shading.

  6. Differential diagnosis and treatment of periodontitis-mimicking actinomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Ryang; Park, Jun-Beom; Ko, Youngkyung

    2012-12-01

    Actinomycosis is an uncommon chronic granulomatous disease that presents as a slowly progressive, indolent, indurated infiltration with multiple abscesses, fistulas, and sinuses. The purpose of this article is to report on a case of actinomycosis with clinical findings similar to periodontitis. A 46-year-old female presented with recurrent throbbing pain on the right first and second molar of the mandible three weeks after root planing. Exploratory flap surgery was performed, and the bluish-gray tissue fragment found in the interproximal area between the two molars was sent for histopathology. The diagnosis from the biopsy was actinomycosis. The clinical and radiographic manifestations of this case were clinically indistinguishable from periodontitis. The patient did not report any symptoms, and she is scheduled for a follow-up visit. The present study has identified periodontitis-mimicking actinomycosis. Actinomycosis should be included in the differential diagnosis in cases with periodontal pain and inflammation that do not respond to nonsurgical treatment for periodontitis. More routine submissions of tissue removed from the oral cavity for biopsies may be beneficial for differential diagnosis.

  7. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Bilir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts, the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  8. Metastatic craniopharyngioma: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangou, Evan Mark; Tynan, Jennifer Ruth; Robinson, Christopher Adam; Ogieglo, Lissa Marie; Vitali, Aleksander Michal

    2009-09-01

    Distant spread of craniopharyngioma is a rare but important complication. Most cases are a result of spread along the surgical path. We describe a rare case of metastatic leptomeningeal craniopharyngioma as a result of dissemination along CSF pathways in a child. A review of previously described cases is provided. A 14-year-old male was diagnosed with metastatic craniopharyngioma on routine follow-up imaging after multiple surgeries and radiation for locally recurrent craniopharyngioma. The lesion was erosive through the right parietal bone, but had remained clinically silent. The lesion was distant from previous surgical paths. The patient underwent right parietal craniotomy and resection of the lesion. Duraplasty and cranioplasty were necessary for closure. Histopathology confirmed adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma. One-year follow-up demonstrated no recurrence. A review of reported cases suggests that leptomeningeal implantation may be an important step in metastases of craniopharyngioma, although the mechanism is poorly understood. Attention to tumor spillage at the time of surgery may be important in preventing distant recurrences.

  9. Metastatic thyroid follicular carcinoma of masticator space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, Tae In; Heo, Min Suk; An, Chang Hyeon; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; Choi, Mi

    2002-01-01

    Follicular carcinomas are the second most common form of thyroid cancer, accounting for 10 to 20% of all thyroid cancers. Follicular carcinomas have a propensity to metastasize via the bloodstream, spreading to bone, lungs, liver, and elsewhere. We described the case of a 48-year-old woman who presented with swelling of the left pre auricular area, which was a consequence of a metastatic follicular carcinoma of the masticator space. Plain films showed ill defined erosive bony changes from the left condylar head to the mandibular notch. Contrast-enhanced CT images showed a well circumscribed round mass with well enhancement within left masticator space. On MR images, the mass was heterogenously hyperintense to the muscle on T2-weighted images and isointense or hyperintense to the muscle on T1-weighted images, and showed good enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Upon microscopic examination, the metastatic mass was found to be composed of fairly uniform cells forming small follicles containing colloid, showing capsular and vascular invasion.

  10. Pleural pneumatocoeles mimicking congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurora, P.; McHugh, K.

    1998-01-01

    We present the plain radiographic and CT appearances of large intrapleural pneumatocoeles in a 13-week-old infant, resulting in compression atelectasis of the left upper and lower lobes, and mimicking congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation. (orig.)

  11. Systemic treatments for metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sandro; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Chiarion Sileni, Vanna; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Mocellin, Simone

    2018-02-06

    The prognosis of people with metastatic cutaneous melanoma, a skin cancer, is generally poor. Recently, new classes of drugs (e.g. immune checkpoint inhibitors and small-molecule targeted drugs) have significantly improved patient prognosis, which has drastically changed the landscape of melanoma therapeutic management. This is an update of a Cochrane Review published in 2000. To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of systemic treatments for metastatic cutaneous melanoma. We searched the following databases up to October 2017: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS. We also searched five trials registers and the ASCO database in February 2017, and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We considered RCTs of systemic therapies for people with unresectable lymph node metastasis and distant metastatic cutaneous melanoma compared to any other treatment. We checked the reference lists of selected articles to identify further references to relevant trials. Two review authors extracted data, and a third review author independently verified extracted data. We implemented a network meta-analysis approach to make indirect comparisons and rank treatments according to their effectiveness (as measured by the impact on survival) and harm (as measured by occurrence of high-grade toxicity). The same two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias of eligible studies according to Cochrane standards and assessed evidence quality based on the GRADE criteria. We included 122 RCTs (28,561 participants). Of these, 83 RCTs, encompassing 21 different comparisons, were included in meta-analyses. Included participants were men and women with a mean age of 57.5 years who were recruited from hospital settings. Twenty-nine studies included people whose cancer had spread to their brains. Interventions were categorised into five groups: conventional

  12. Subependymal Heterotopia Mimicking Mass in Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Demonstration With 3T Advanced Neuroimages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Filiz; Ogul, Hayri

    2017-10-01

    The authors reported a rare patient with large subependymal heterotopia mimicking cerebral neoplasia. A 22-year-old female was admitted with a history of right-sided paresthesia accompanied by progressive headache. Cerebral magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a large solid lesion in the left frontal lobe. Advanced MR images proved that the lesion was compatible with subependymal heterotopia. Large subependymal heterotopia may mimick cerebral neoplasia.

  13. Measurement of guided mode wavenumbers in soft tissue–bone mimicking phantoms using ultrasonic axial transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiangang; Su Zhongqing; Cheng Li; Foiret, Josquin; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Talmant, Maryline; Laugier, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Human soft tissue is an important factor that influences the assessment of human long bones using quantitative ultrasound techniques. To investigate such influence, a series of soft tissue–bone phantoms (a bone-mimicking plate coated with a layer of water, glycerol or silicon rubber) were ultrasonically investigated using a probe with multi-emitter and multi-receiver arrays in an axial transmission configuration. A singular value decomposition signal processing technique was applied to extract the frequency-dependent wavenumbers of several guided modes. The results indicate that the presence of a soft tissue-mimicking layer introduces additional guided modes predicted by a fluid waveguide model. The modes propagating in the bone-mimicking plate covered by the soft-tissue phantom are only slightly modified compared to their counterparts in the free bone-mimicking plate, and they are still predicted by an elastic transverse isotropic two-dimensional waveguide. Altogether these observations suggest that the soft tissue–bone phantoms can be modeled as two independent waveguides. Even in the presence of the overlying soft tissue-mimicking layer, the modes propagating in the bone-mimicking plate can still be extracted and identified. These results suggest that our approach can be applied for the purpose of the characterization of the material and structural properties of cortical bone. (paper)

  14. Management of Melanoma Brain Metastases in the Era of Targeted Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, D. G.; Samlowski, W. E.; Samlowski, W. E.; Samlowski, W. E.; Samlowski, W. E.

    2011-01-01

    Disseminated metastatic disease, including brain metastases, is commonly encountered in malignant melanoma. The classical treatment approach for melanoma brain metastases has been neurosurgical resection followed by whole brain radiotherapy. Traditionally, if lesions were either too numerous or surgical intervention would cause substantial neurologic deficits, patients were either treated with whole brain radiotherapy or referred to hospice and supportive care. Chemotherapy has not proven effective in treating brain metastases. Improvements in surgery, radiosurgery, and new drug discoveries have provided a wider range of treatment options. Additionally, recently discovered mutations in the melanoma genome have led to the development of "targeted therapy."These vastly improved options are resulting in novel treatment paradigms for approaching melanoma brain metastases in patients with and without systemic metastatic disease. It is therefore likely that improved survival can currently be achieved in at least a subset of melanoma patients with brain metastases.

  15. Management of melanoma brain metastases in the era of targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Daniela Gonsalves; Samlowski, Wolfram E

    2011-01-01

    Disseminated metastatic disease, including brain metastases, is commonly encountered in malignant melanoma. The classical treatment approach for melanoma brain metastases has been neurosurgical resection followed by whole brain radiotherapy. Traditionally, if lesions were either too numerous or surgical intervention would cause substantial neurologic deficits, patients were either treated with whole brain radiotherapy or referred to hospice and supportive care. Chemotherapy has not proven effective in treating brain metastases. Improvements in surgery, radiosurgery, and new drug discoveries have provided a wider range of treatment options. Additionally, recently discovered mutations in the melanoma genome have led to the development of "targeted therapy." These vastly improved options are resulting in novel treatment paradigms for approaching melanoma brain metastases in patients with and without systemic metastatic disease. It is therefore likely that improved survival can currently be achieved in at least a subset of melanoma patients with brain metastases.

  16. The blood-brain barrier and oncology : new insights into function and modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, J; Groen, HJM; Hendrikse, NH; van der Graaf, WTA; Vaalburg, W; de Vries, EGE

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapy for malignant primary or metastatic brain tumours is still poor. This is at least partly due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The functionality of the BBB can be explained by physicochemical features and efflux pump mechanisms. An overview of the

  17. Cetuximab in the treatment of metastatic mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the salivary glands: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grisanti Salvatore

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Patients with metastatic mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary glands have a poor outcome. The epidermal growth factor receptor protein is overexpressed in approximately 70% of mucoepidermoid carcinoma patients and may represent a therapeutic target. However, whether treatment with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor agents is effective is unclear and clinical trials are difficult due to the rarity of the disease. Here we assessed the activity of cetuximab in mucoepidermoid carcinoma on a molecular basis. Case presentation We present the case of a 40-year old Caucasian man with a mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the major salivary glands who developed distant bone and visceral metastases despite platinum-based chemotherapy. Epidermal growth factor receptor was overexpressed and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated a chromosome 7 polysomy. The patient was treated with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab in combination with cisplatin. After 11 doses of cetuximab, the patient developed brain metastases but evidence of response was documented at all extracranial metastatic sites. Conclusion This case report indicates that cetuximab can be active in mucoepidermoid carcinoma and may restore sensitivity to cisplatin in platinum-treated patients. Cetuximab does not cross the blood brain barrier and may select a metastatic clone to home the central nervous system while responding at other sites.

  18. Unusual metastatic localizations of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Rais, N.; Ghfir, I.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The majority of thyroid cancers have a slow evolution, a more often loco-regional extension, and a good forecast. Remote metastases, when they exist, generally touch the osseous skeleton and/or pulmonary tissue. However, unusual metastatic localizations much more exceptional are possible. The authors report through these work five cases of atypical metastasis of differentiated thyroid carcinoma followed in Nuclear Medicine department of Ibn Sina hospital in Rabat under the directives of Professor N Ben Rais. Materials and methods: Our five patients had initially undergone a total thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma histologically confirmed. They had profited 4 weeks after the surgical gesture from a reference isotopic exploration (131 Iodine whole body scan and thyroglobulin dosage). The paraclinic assessment was supplemented by a computed tomography (CT). Results: Revealing symptomatology in the first 69 year old patient was dominated by blindness associated with an elective up-take of radioactive 131-Iodine on the level of hypophyseal gland extending to the sphenoid bone. The second 55 year old patient reported right basithoracic pains resisting to the usual antalgic treatment with a bulky mass driving back the kidney right to the bottom at CT with and important up-take 131-Iodine at whole body scan; a surrenalectomy was thus carried out with conservation of the kidney. The three other patients presented at the clinical examination dermohypodermic nodular lesions of various localizations whose anatomopathologic study had confirmed their thyroid metastatic origin. In the 5 patients the rate of thyroglobulin was considerably high. An activity of 3,7 GBq 131-Iodine was managed with the 5 patients. The evolution was marked, in the short run, at the first patient by a recovery partial of the sight, the disappearance of pain in the second patient and a remarkable reduction of thyroglobulin level for all our patients. Conclusion

  19. Brain metastases: computed tomography assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordillo, Victoria; Yagual, Glenda; Vinueza, Clayreth

    1998-01-01

    Intracranial metastatic tumor is relatively frequent in patients with cancer from other origin. Its location and type of metastasis varies in relation to its linage from the primary tumor. And the sequence goes from the most frequent: lung and breast cancer, melanoma, GU tract, leukemia, GI tract, head and neck tumor. Computed tomography findings are extremely varied and non specific, so there are no radiologic characteristics even from the primary tumor. We reviewed 29 TC studies in the Radiology department of ION-SOLCA, from patients with diagnosis of brain metastasis, our findings showed the great variability in the radio-diagnosis imaging. (The author)

  20. Herpes zoster sciatica mimicking lumbar canal stenosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Masao; Mannoji, Chikato; Oikawa, Makiko; Murakami, Masazumi; Okamoto, Yuzuru; Kon, Tamiyo; Okawa, Akihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masashi; Furuya, Takeo

    2015-07-29

    Symptom of herpes zoster is sometimes difficult to distinguish from sciatica induced by spinal diseases, including lumbar disc herniation and spinal canal stenosis. Here we report a case of sciatica mimicking lumbar canal stenosis. A 74-year-old Chinese male patient visited our hospital for left-sided sciatic pain upon standing or walking for 5 min of approximately 1 month's duration. At the first visit to our hospital, there were no skin lesions. A magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal canal stenosis between the 4th and 5th lumbar spine. Thus, we diagnosed the patient with sciatica induced by spinal canal stenosis. We considered decompression surgery for the stenosis of 4th and 5th lumbar spine because conservative therapy failed to relieve the patient's symptom. At that time, the patient complained of a skin rash involving his left foot for several days. A vesicular rash and erythema were observed on the dorsal and plantar surfaces of the great toe and lateral malleolus. The patient was diagnosed with herpes zoster in the left 5th lumbar spinal nerve area based on clinical findings, including the characteristics of the pain and vesicular rash and erythema in the 5th lumbar spinal dermatome. The patient was treated with famciclovir (1,500 mg/day) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. After 1 week of medication, the skin rash resolved and pain relief was obtained. In conclusion, spinal surgeons should keep in mind herpes zoster infection as one of the possible differential diagnoses of sciatica, even if there is no typical skin rash.

  1. Central Lesions With Selective Semicircular Canal Involvement Mimicking Bilateral Vestibulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP, which is due to peripheral lesions, may selectively involve certain semicircular canal (SCC. Recent eye movement recordings with search coil and video head impulse test (HIT have provided insight in central lesions that can cause bilateral and selective SCC deficit mimicking BVP. Since neurological signs or ocular motor deficits maybe subtle or absent, it is critical to recognize central lesions correctly since there is prognostic and treatment implication. Acute floccular lesions cause bilateral horizontal SCC (HC impairment while leaving vertical SCC function unaffected. Vestibular nuclear lesions affect bilateral HC and posterior SCC (PC function, but anterior SCC (AC function is spared. When both eyes are recorded, medial longitudinal fasciculus lesions cause horizontal dysconjugacy in HC function and catch-up saccades, as well as selective deficiency of PC over AC function. Combined peripheral and central lesions may be difficult to distinguish from BVP. Anterior inferior cerebellar artery stroke causes two types of deficits: 1. ipsilateral pan-SCC deficits and contralateral HC deficit and 2. bilateral HC deficit with vertical SCC sparing. Metabolic disorders such as Wernicke encephalopathy characteristically involve HC but not AC or PC function. Gaucher disease causes uniform loss of all SCC function but with minimal horizontal catch-up saccades. Genetic cerebellar ataxias and cerebellar-ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome typically do not spare AC function. While video HIT does not replace the gold-standard, search coil HIT, clinicians are now able to rapidly and accurately identify specific pattern of SCC deficits, which can aid differentiation of central lesions from BVP.

  2. Atypical lymphocytes in malaria mimicking dengue infection in Thailand

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    Polrat Wilairatana

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Polrat Wilairatana1, Noppadon Tangpukdee1, Sant Muangnoicharoen1, Srivicha Krudsood2, Shigeyuki Kano31Department of Clinical Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Tropical Hygiene, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Department of Tropical Medicine and Malaria, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Patients with uncomplicated falciparum or vivax malaria usually present with acute febrile illness and thrombocytopenia similar to dengue infection. We retrospectively studied atypical lymphocytes (AL and atypical lymphocytosis (ALO, defined as AL > 5% of total white blood cells in 1310 uncomplicated malaria patients. In 718 falciparum malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 53.2% and 5.7% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–10%, whereas in 592 vivax malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 55.4% and 9.5% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–14%. After antimalarial treatment, AL and ALO declined in both falciparum and vivax malaria. However, AL and ALO remained in falciparum malaria on days 7, 14, and 21, whereas AL and ALO remained in vivax malaria on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. In both falciparum and vivax malaria patients, there was a positive correlation between AL and total lymphocytes, but a negative correlation between AL and highest fever on admission, white blood cells, and neutrophils, eosinophils, and platelets (P < 0.05. In conclusion, AL or ALO may be found in uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria mimicking dengue infection. In tropical countries where both dengue and malaria are endemic, presence of AL or ALO in any acute febrile patients with thrombocytopenia (similar to the findings in dengue malaria could not be excluded. Particularly if the patients have risk of malaria infection, confirmative microscopic examination for malaria should be carried out

  3. Cicatricial organising pneumonia mimicking a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Bilawich, AnaMaria

    2018-04-01

    Organising pneumonia (OP) is composed of loose granulation tissue plugs in distal airspaces; these disappear with steroid treatment. Recently a variant labelled 'cicatricial' OP has been described in which the granulation tissue organised to much denser fibrous tissue but still retained the usual pattern of OP. Here we report 10 patients thought to have an interstitial lung disease, and who on biopsy had a variant of cicatricial OP characterised by linear bands or small nodular masses of dense fibrous tissue that does not resemble ordinary OP. The bands/nodules were usually distributed randomly but occasionally resembled fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia in local areas. Small foci of loose granulation tissue at the edge of the fibrotic bands sometimes mimicked fibroblast foci. Recognisable conventional OP was always present, but often in very small amounts. Four cases, including one patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, showed formation of bone in the fibrotic bands and nodules. On computerised tomography (CT) scan of the chest some cases looked like typical OP, but some demonstrated only irregularly distributed linear opacities, sometimes with associated calcification. Follow-up imaging on six cases showed that the process either markedly improved or remained stable over time; no case had progressive disease. Cicatricial OP with this pathological pattern represents an uncommon form of OP that appears to be a generally benign process which may have persisting linear opacities on CT scan but that does not progress; however, it can be confused on biopsy and CT with a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Chronic multifocal non-bacterial osteomyelitis in hypophosphatasia mimicking malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warmuth-Metz Monika

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypophosphatasia (HP is characterized by a genetic defect in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP gene and predominantly an autosomal recessive trait. HP patients suffer from reduced bone mineralization. Biochemically, elevated concentrations of substrates of TNSALP, including pyridoxal-5'-phosphate and inorganic pyrophosphate occur in serum, tissues and urine. The latter has been associated with chronic inflammation and hyperprostaglandinism. Case presentation We report on 2 affected children presenting with multifocal inflammatory bone lesions mimicking malignancy: A 6 years old girl with short stature had been treated with human growth hormone since 6 months. Then she started to complain about a painful swelling of her left cheek. MRI suggested a malignant bone lesion. Bone biopsy, however, revealed chronic inflammation. A bone scan showed a second rib lesion. Since biopsy was sterile, the descriptive diagnosis of chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO was established. The diagnostic tests related to growth failure were repeated and subsequent analyses demonstrated a molecular defect in the TNSALP gene. The second girl (10 years old complained about back pain after she had fallen from her bike. X rays of her spine revealed compressions of 2 thoracic vertebrae. At first these were considered trauma related, however a bone scan did show an additional lesion in the right 4th rib. A biopsy of this rib revealed a sterile lympho- plasmocytoid osteomyelitis suggesting multifocal CNO. Further analyses did show a decreased TNSALP in leukocytes and elevated pyridoxal phosphate in plasma, suggesting a heterozygous carrier status of HP. Conclusion Chronic bone oedema in adult HP and chronic hyper-prostaglandinism in childhood HP do suggest that in some HP patients bone inflammation is present in conjunction with the metabolic defect. Sterile multifocal osteomyelitis could be demonstrated. Non-steroidal anti

  5. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia mimicking Wilms tumor at presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amitabh; Mandal, Anirban; Guru, Vijay; Seth, Rachna

    2016-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the commonest malignancy of childhood, is known to manifest with a myriad of atypical presentations. Nephromegaly is a rare presentation of childhood ALL with hepatic mass being even rarer. We present a 3 year-old child with unilateral renal mass and hepatic mass lesion with normal blood counts, initially suspected to have metastatic Wilms tumor based on clinical, radiological and WT1 positivity on immunocytochemistry of renal mass. He was later diagnosed as ALL with peripheral blood flowcytometry and bone marrow examination. Renomegaly at presentation of acute leukemia is not necessarily due to leukemic infiltration and rarely leads to renal impairment. The radiological differential of such a renal mass includes both benign and malignant entities including metastasis. Over-expression of WT1 mRNA has been found in a number of solid tumors and hematological malignancies and is far from being diagnostic of Wilms tumor. Again, a small number of children with acute leukemia may have a deceptively normal complete blood count at presentation. Though, initial all (clinical, radiological, hematological, and immunocytological) parameters pointed towards a diagnosis of Wilms tumor in our case, the subsequent development of thrombocytopenia and lymphocytic leukocytosis prompted further investigation and final diagnosis of ALL. WT1 positivity is a known phenomenon in childhood ALL and undifferentiated lymphoblasts may be positive for WT1 and negative for Leucocyte common antigen. Acute leukemia with renal and hepatic mass with normal blood counts at presentation is a diagnostic challenge.

  6. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  7. Unusual presentation of metastatic gall bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Shukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To report the first case of rare isolated breast metastasis from carcinoma gall bladder. Single patient case report. A 35-year-old pre-menopausal female presented with 2 FNx01 2 cm right upper outer quadrant breast lump. Post-mastectomy, histology confirmed it to be metastatic adenocarcinoma positive for both Cytokeratin (CK 7 and CK20. Past history as told by the patient revealed that 2 years back, cholecystectomy was performed for gall stones, of which no histology reports were present; she had a port site scar recurrence which showed it to be adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy was advised which the patient did not complete. This is probably the first case reported of isolated breast metastasis from gall bladder carcinoma, diagnosed retrospectively. It also highlights the importance of adjuvant treatment in gall bladder malignancy.

  8. Hyperthyroidism with metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, C.N.; Sziklas, J.J.; Spencer, R.P.; Bower, B.F.; Rosenberg, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A 70-yr-old woman presented with hyperthyroidism and metastatic follicular carcinoma of the thyroid. The blood level of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSIg) was elevated. A total thyroidectomy was performed. One month later she remained hyperthyroid. Three weeks after therapy with 218 mCi of I-131 sodium iodide, the patient was euthyroid. Six months after the initial radioiodide therapy, she was again hyperthyroid and was given a second oral treatment dose of I-131 (220 mCi). Five months later, the patient had again become euthyroid. It is likely that initially the woman's metastases were producing sufficient hormone to render her hyperthyroid. After thyroidectomy and two large doses of radioiodide, she has remained euthyroid without having to take exogenous hormone

  9. Metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma penis: Case report

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    Pablo Santiago Caicedo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Describe a case report of a patient with prostatic adenocarcinoma metastatic to penis due to shortage reports of similar cases to perform a literature review. Methods: We identified a case of a patient with prostatic adenocarcinoma, who during de the course of a cystoscopy at Hospital Universitario San Jose (Third-level Public Hospital in Popayan, Colombia a suspicious nodule of malignancy was observed in the penis. We described the clinical case in order to proceed to a literature search for the discussion. Results: 72-year-old patient diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma Gleason Score 4+5=9, treated with bilateral orchiectomy and a suspicious nodule of malignancy incidentally observed in the penis, currently undergoing palliative care with Karnofsky score of 30 points. Conclusion: cutaneous metastases are rare; indicate longstanding disease and poor prognosis.

  10. Cetuximab in treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guren, Tormod Kyrre; Thomsen, Maria Morandi; Kure, Elin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The NORDIC-VII study is a randomised phase III trial of cetuximab plus continuous or intermittent fluorouracil, folinic acid, and oxaliplatin (Nordic FLOX) vs FLOX alone in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The present report presents an updated and final survival...... population). RAS was mutated in 46% and BRAF in 12% of the tumours. RAS and BRAF, if mutated, were negative prognostic factors. The updated analyses confirmed the finding of the primary report that cetuximab did not provide any additional benefit when added to FLOX in patients with RAS/BRAF wild-type tumours......, neither on progression-free nor overall survival. However, the outcomes in a subset of patients, which, after the first eight treatment cycles, received cetuximab alone, suggested a beneficial effect of cetuximab monotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Adding cetuximab to Nordic FLOX did not provide any clinical...

  11. Metastatic malignant subungal melanoma: Importance of FNAC

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    Radhika Punshi Nandwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subungual melanoma is a rare type of skin cancer. It is an uncommon form of acral lentiginous melanoma. Approximately 85% of cases are misdiagnosed initially, and it is generally associated with a poor prognosis. Herein, we describe a case of metastatic subungal melanoma to the axillary lymph node in a 45-year-old male. Diagnosis of metastasis was made based on cytology, where the clinicians were guided to search for primary. This case report highlights the role of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC in the diagnosis of this entity to draw the attention of the reader to the possible underreporting of melanoma because of a variant that evades diagnosis and our reluctance to think about its existence.

  12. Metastatic mammary carcinoma in a cow

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    Manoela Marchezan Piva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Mammary gland neoplasms in cattle are rarely observed in the field veterinary diagnostics routine. Therefore, the objective of this study is to report a metastatic mammary carcinoma in a fourteen-year-old Holstein cow in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. The animal was diagnosed by the field veterinarian with clinical mastitis that was unresponsive to treatment, and was euthanized due to the poor prognosis. At the necropsy, multiple yellow, firm, and sometimes friable nodules, ranging from 0.1 to 20cm were observed in all mammary glands, lymph nodes, kidneys, spleen, liver, pancreas, mediastinal lymph nodes, heart, and lungs. The final diagnosis of mammary carcinoma was established through the association of clinical, necropsy, histopathological, and immunohistochemical findings. Differential diagnoses included diseases such as bovine tuberculosis and chronic fungal or bacterial mastitis.

  13. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

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    Bradford R Hirsch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network's Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future.

  14. Metastatic Medulloblastoma in Childhood: Chang's Classification Revisited

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    Christelle Dufour

    2012-01-01

    Patients and Methods. This population-based study concerned 117 newly diagnosed children with disseminated medulloblastoma treated at the Institute Gustave Roussy between 1988 and 2008. Metastatic disease was assessed using the Chang staging system, their form (positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, nodular or laminar, and their extension (positive cerebrospinal fluid, local, extensive. All patients received preirradiation chemotherapy. Results. The overall survival did not differ according to Chang M-stage. The 5-year overall survival was 59% in patients with nodular metastases compared to 35% in those with laminar metastases. The 5-year overall survival was 76% in patients without disease at the end of pre-irradiation chemotherapy compared to 34% in those without a complete response (P=0.0008. Conclusions. Radiological characteristics of metastases correlated with survival in patients with medulloblastoma. Complete response to sandwich chemotherapy was a strong predictor of survival.

  15. Treatment of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis in a Patient with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Rainey Johnson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death with a median survival of 3–11 months when metastatic. We present a patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer and an exceptional response to initial systemic chemotherapy with FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin. Despite evidence of disease control on body imaging, he developed symptomatic leptomeningeal disease and brain metastases 29 months into treatment. He received aggressive treatment with capecitabine and irinotecan, intrathecal topotecan, and eventually bevacizumab. He did well for 36 weeks on this regimen until developing sepsis. This patient significantly outlived his expected survival and, moreover, did so with very good quality of life. This case demonstrates the natural history of pancreatic cancer progressing to involve the central nervous system when systemic disease is otherwise responsive to chemotherapy. It is the first case to demonstrate the potential effectiveness of intrathecal topotecan in combination with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Molecularly targeted drugs for metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng YD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ying-dong Cheng, Hua Yang, Guo-qing Chen, Zhi-cao Zhang Department of General Surgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: The survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has significantly improved with applications of molecularly targeted drugs, such as bevacizumab, and led to a substantial improvement in the overall survival rate. These drugs are capable of specifically targeting the inherent abnormal pathways in cancer cells, which are potentially less toxic than traditional nonselective chemotherapeutics. In this review, the recent clinical information about molecularly targeted therapy for mCRC is summarized, with specific focus on several of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted drugs for the treatment of mCRC in the clinic. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with mCRC was improved greatly by the addition of bevacizumab and/or cetuximab to standard chemotherapy, in either first- or second-line treatment. Aflibercept has been used in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–irinotecan (FOLFIRI chemotherapy in mCRC patients and among patients with mCRC with wild-type KRAS, the outcomes were significantly improved by panitumumab in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–oxaliplatin (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI. Because of the new preliminary studies, it has been recommended that regorafenib be used with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI as first- or second-line treatment of mCRC chemotherapy. In summary, an era of new opportunities has been opened for treatment of mCRC and/or other malignancies, resulting from the discovery of new selective targeting drugs. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, cetuximab, panitumumab, clinical trial, molecularly targeted therapy

  17. Patterns of metastatic progression after definitive radiation therapy for early-stage and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Garrett L; Tang, Chad; Hess, Kenneth R; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel R

    2017-06-01

    Current preclinical models of metastatic disease (particularly oligometastases) suggest that metastases appear in a hierarchical order. We attempted to identify systematic patterns of metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after radiation therapy (XRT). We analyzed 1074 patients treated from 12/21/1998 through 8/20/2012 with ≥60 Gy definitive radiation for initially non-metastatic NSCLC. Location and time of metastases were recorded. Regional nodal failure was noted, as was subsequent distal failure. For further analysis, we considered only the five most common sites of metastasis (bone, brain, liver, adrenal, and lung). Metastatic progression over time was defined and patterns elucidated with Chi square tests. Histologic findings were analyzed with Wilcoxon rank sum tests. A significant multistep linear progression was not apparent. Having a first metastasis in lung or bone was associated with respective 16% (median 2.4 months) and 15% likelihoods (median 7.9 months) of secondary brain metastasis. Initial metastasis in the brain led to metastasis in another organ 29.3% of the time, most often in the lung, bone, and liver (medians 3.6, 7.9, and 3.1 months). Adenocarcinoma was more likely than squamous to metastasize to the brain (18 vs. 9%) and any of the five major sites (41 vs. 27%). We did not appreciate dominant patterns suggesting a multi-step hierarchical order of metastasis. Rather, our findings suggest that certain subgroups may develop different patterns of spread depending on a variety of factors.

  18. Treatment of initially metastatic small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohutek, F.; Bystricky, B.; Tamasova, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of death associated with neoplasms. The incidence of LC in 2007 was 71.3/100,000 men and 18.6/100,000 women in Slovakia. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) includes 15 - 18% of all cases. The diagnosis of LC is based on patient's history, physical examination, basic laboratory tests, x-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging and histology. The material required for histology can be obtained by means of endoscopy or surgery. Ultrasonography (USG) and/or CT of abdomen is commonly performed as a part of staging process, along with CT or MRI of brain. Bone scan is performed in case of suspicion of bone involvement. According to TNM classification, seventh edition, the same classification can be used for SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are available for treatment of initially metastatic SCLC. First-line chemotherapy regimen should be based on combination of cisplatin or carboplatin with etoposide (PE). Alternatively, CAV regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine) can be used. Newer regimens did not provide benefit when compared to standard regimens. If progression occurs later than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, the same regimen may be used in second-line chemotherapy. If progression occurs earlier than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, topotecan-based regimen is an option for second-line line chemotherapy. Despite promising outcomes of amrubicin-based second-line chemotherapy in Japan, amrubicin is not available in countries of E U. Standard therapy schedules do not include radiotherapy targeted on primary tumor and affected lymph-nodes. According to American and European guidelines, prophylactic cranial irradiation is recommended for patients with extensive disease-SCLC with good performance status after achieving complete or partial response to first-line chemotherapy. (author)

  19. Control of Metastatic Progression by microRNA Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, Nora; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression is a defining feature of human malignancy. Specific miRNAs have been identified as promoters or suppressors of metastatic progression. These miRNAs control metastasis through divergent or convergent regulation of metastatic gene pathways. Some miRNA regulatory networks govern cell-autonomous cancer phenotypes, while others modulate the cell-extrinsic composition of the metastatic microenvironment. The use of small RNAs as probes into the molecular and cellular underpinnings of metastasis holds promise for the identification of candidate genes for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:23728460

  20. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to Pleural Fluid: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Young Rhee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin that shows locoregional or distant metastasis. Metastasis of MCC to body cavity effusion is extremely rare; only three cases have been reported so far. Metastatic MCC in effusion cytology shows small blue round cells with fine stippled chromatin like other small blue round cell tumors such as small cell lung carcinoma or lymphoma. The diagnosis of metastatic MCC can grant patients good chances at recently advanced therapeutic options. Here, we present a case of metastatic MCC to pleural effusion with characteristic single file-like pattern.

  1. Merkel Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to Pleural Fluid: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Ye-Young; Kim, Soo Hee; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Se Hoon

    2018-05-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare aggressive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin that shows locoregional or distant metastasis. Metastasis of MCC to body cavity effusion is extremely rare; only three cases have been reported so far. Metastatic MCC in effusion cytology shows small blue round cells with fine stippled chromatin like other small blue round cell tumors such as small cell lung carcinoma or lymphoma. The diagnosis of metastatic MCC can grant patients good chances at recently advanced therapeutic options. Here, we present a case of metastatic MCC to pleural effusion with characteristic single file-like pattern.

  2. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to Jejunum: An Unusual Case Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Medic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The small intestine is a very uncommon and peculiar site for metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC. We present a clinical presentation of insidious and unusual development of a jejunal metastasis while having stable disease in a remainder of metastatic sites, in a patient undergoing immunotherapy with nivolumab. Due to the extreme rarity of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the lumen of the small bowel, it is easy to overlook and misdiagnose symptoms of this pathologic entity, particularly when the remainder of metastatic disease responds well to ongoing therapy.

  3. Trastuzumab and survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Karin; Schoffer, Olaf; Link, Theresa; Forberger, Almuth; Petzold, Andrea; Niedostatek, Antje; Werner, Carmen; Klug, Stefanie J; Werner, Andreas; Gatzweiler, Axel; Richter, Barbara; Baretton, Gustavo; Wimberger, Pauline

    2017-08-01

    Prognosis of Her2-positive breast cancer has changed since the introduction of trastuzumab for treatment in metastatic and early breast cancer. It was described to be even better compared to prognosis of Her2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of trastuzumab in our cohort. Besides the effect of adjuvant pretreatment with trastuzumab on survival of patients with metastatic Her2-positive breast cancer was analyzed. All patients with primary breast cancer of the Regional Breast Cancer Center Dresden diagnosed during the years 2001-2013 were analyzed for treatment with or without trastuzumab in the adjuvant and in the metastatic treatment setting using Kaplan-Meier survival estimation and Cox regression. Age and tumor stage at time of first diagnosis of breast cancer as well as hormone receptor status, grading, time, and site of metastasis at first diagnosis of distant metastatic disease were analyzed. Of 4.481 female patients with primary breast cancer, 643 presented with metastatic disease. Her2-positive status was documented in 465 patients, including 116 patients with primary or secondary metastases. Median survival of patients with Her2-positive primary metastatic disease was 3.0 years (95% CI 2.3-4.0). After adjustment for other factors, survival was better in patients with Her2-positive breast cancer with trastuzumab therapy compared to Her2-negative metastatic disease (HR 2.10; 95% CI 1.58-2.79). Analysis of influence of adjuvant therapy with and without trastuzumab by Kaplan-Meier showed a trend for better survival in not pretreated patients. Median survival was highest in hormone receptor-positive Her2-positive (triple-positive) primary metastatic breast cancer patients with 3.3 years (95% CI 2.3-4.6). Prognosis of patients with Her2-positive metastatic breast cancer after trastuzumab treatment is more favorable than for Her2-negative breast cancer. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy with or without

  4. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  5. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  6. Computed tomography in brain metastases of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Matsukado, Yasuhiko; Sueyoshi, Nobuyuki [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Nonaka, Nobuhito; Sano, Yoshinori; Itoyama, Yoichi; Miura, Giichi

    1984-10-01

    Metastatic brain tumors from colorectal cancers are relatively rare. In previous reports, the incidence ranged from 3 to 5 percent of all metastatic brain tumors. We report 7 cases of metastatic brain tumors from colorectal cancers. The time interval from the diagnosis of the primary tumors to the brain metastasis was 3 years on the average. Metastasis to the lung and liver were also found in 6 cases at the time of the diagnosis of the brain metastasis. The CEA levels in the serum were highly elevated in all cases. Solitary metastasis was found in all cases; cancers tend to metastasize in the deep area of the cerebrum or cerebellum. On a plain CT scan, tumors were demonstrated as ring-type, with a high-density mass, and ring-like enhancement was seen in 6 cases. Prognosis was very poor in most cases. The median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastasis was 4.5 months in the 2 cases with surgery and 3.5 months in the 4 cases without surgery.

  7. STAT3 labels a subpopulation of reactive astrocytes required for brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priego, Neibla; Zhu, Lucía; Monteiro, Cátia; Mulders, Manon; Wasilewski, David; Bindeman, Wendy; Doglio, Laura; Martínez, Liliana; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Cajal, Santiago Ramón Y; Megías, Diego; Hernández-Encinas, Elena; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Martínez, Lola; Zarzuela, Eduardo; Muñoz, Javier; Fustero-Torres, Coral; Pineiro, Elena; Hernández-Laín, Aurelio; Bertero, Luca; Poli, Valeria; Sánchez-Martínez, Melchor; Menendez, Javier A; Soffietti, Riccardo; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Valiente, Manuel

    2018-06-11

    The brain microenvironment imposes a particularly intense selective pressure on metastasis-initiating cells, but successful metastases bypass this control through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Reactive astrocytes are key components of this microenvironment that confine brain metastasis without infiltrating the lesion. Here, we describe that brain metastatic cells induce and maintain the co-option of a pro-metastatic program driven by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in a subpopulation of reactive astrocytes surrounding metastatic lesions. These reactive astrocytes benefit metastatic cells by their modulatory effect on the innate and acquired immune system. In patients, active STAT3 in reactive astrocytes correlates with reduced survival from diagnosis of intracranial metastases. Blocking STAT3 signaling in reactive astrocytes reduces experimental brain metastasis from different primary tumor sources, even at advanced stages of colonization. We also show that a safe and orally bioavailable treatment that inhibits STAT3 exhibits significant antitumor effects in patients with advanced systemic disease that included brain metastasis. Responses to this therapy were notable in the central nervous system, where several complete responses were achieved. Given that brain metastasis causes substantial morbidity and mortality, our results identify a novel treatment for increasing survival in patients with secondary brain tumors.

  8. Piecewise parabolic method for simulating one-dimensional shear shock wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, B. B.; Espíndola, D.; Pinton, G. F.

    2017-11-01

    The recent discovery of shear shock wave generation and propagation in the porcine brain suggests that this new shock phenomenology may be responsible for a broad range of traumatic injuries. Blast-induced head movement can indirectly lead to shear wave generation in the brain, which could be a primary mechanism for injury. Shear shock waves amplify the local acceleration deep in the brain by up to a factor of 8.5, which may tear and damage neurons. Currently, there are numerical methods that can model compressional shock waves, such as comparatively well-studied blast waves, but there are no numerical full-wave solvers that can simulate nonlinear shear shock waves in soft solids. Unlike simplified representations, e.g., retarded time, full-wave representations describe fundamental physical behavior such as reflection and heterogeneities. Here we present a piecewise parabolic method-based solver for one-dimensional linearly polarized nonlinear shear wave in a homogeneous medium and with empirical frequency-dependent attenuation. This method has the advantage of being higher order and more directly extendable to multiple dimensions and heterogeneous media. The proposed numerical scheme is validated analytically and experimentally and compared to other shock capturing methods. A Riemann step-shock problem is used to characterize the numerical dissipation. This dissipation is then tuned to be negligible with respect to the physical attenuation by choosing an appropriate grid spacing. The numerical results are compared to ultrasound-based experiments that measure planar polarized shear shock wave propagation in a tissue-mimicking gelatin phantom. Good agreement is found between numerical results and experiment across a 40 mm propagation distance. We anticipate that the proposed method will be a starting point for the development of a two- and three-dimensional full-wave code for the propagation of nonlinear shear waves in heterogeneous media.

  9. Rare Presentation of Prostate Cancer Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma with Generalized Lymphadenopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Fen Tsai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer typically metastasizes to bones and regional lymph nodes. Generalized lymphadenopathy is a rare manifestation of metastatic prostate cancer. We report a case of prostate cancer in a 65-year-old male with initial presentation of generalized lymphadenopathy and no urinary symptoms. Lymph node biopsy revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma, and immunohistochemical staining was positive for prostate-specific antigen (PSA compatible with a prostatic origin. Directed biopsy confirmed that the tumor originated in the prostate. Therefore, the prostate should be considered a possible origin of metastatic adenocarcinoma in men, and presentations consistent with generalized lymphadenopathy cannot exclude a diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  10. Retinitis Pigmentosa Sine Pigmento Mimicking a Chiasm Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Francesco; Prosdocimo, Giovanni; Romano, Francesco; Interlandi, Emanuela

    2017-08-01

    A 75-year-old woman presented to her ophthalmologist complaining of visual loss for several years. The ophthalmic examination was remarkable for a bitemporal visual field defect. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the brain was normal without evidence of chiasm compression. Neuro-ophthalmic examination was consistent with a retinal rather than a chiasmal disease. Retinal multimodal imaging helped in the correct diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa, later confirmed by genetic testing.

  11. Early phase II study on BNCT in metastatic malignant melanoma using the boron carrier BPA (EORTC protocol 11011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittig, Andrea; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Moss, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the trial is to examine the clinical response of metastatic melanoma following BNCT with BPA. The trial contains an optional biodistribution sub-study, which is done if operable metastases are removed prior BNCT. BNCT is applied in 2 fractions at the HFR in Petten. In cases of diffuse brain metastases the whole brain is irradiated homogeneously using 5 irradiation beams from different directions. Up to now 4 patients suffering from multiple brain metastases (more than 20) have been included. In all cases we observed a partial response or no change in the irradiated volume. However, none of the patients survived more than 3 months. The pharmacokinetic of the BPA can be predicted very precisely using a two-compartment model. The treatment can be performed safety. (author)

  12. Foe or friend? Janus-faces of the neurovascular unit in the formation of brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Imola; Fazakas, Csilla; Molnár, Kinga; Végh, Attila G; Haskó, János; Krizbai, István A

    2018-04-01

    Despite the potential obstacle represented by the blood-brain barrier for extravasating malignant cells, metastases are more frequent than primary tumors in the central nervous system. Not only tightly interconnected endothelial cells can hinder metastasis formation, other cells of the brain microenvironment (like astrocytes and microglia) can also be very hostile, destroying the large majority of metastatic cells. However, malignant cells that are able to overcome these harmful mechanisms may benefit from the shielding and even support provided by cerebral endothelial cells, astrocytes and microglia, rendering the brain a sanctuary site against anti-tumor strategies. Thus, cells of the neurovascular unit have a Janus-faced attitude towards brain metastatic cells, being both destructive and protective. In this review, we present the main mechanisms of brain metastasis formation, including those involved in extravasation through the brain vasculature and survival in the cerebral environment.

  13. Ultrasonic imaging of metastatic carcinoma in thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Ling; Yang Tao; Tang Ying; Mao Jingning; Chen Wei; Wang Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the ultrasonic findings of metastatic thyroid carcinoma and to evaluate the diagnostic value of the ultrasonic imaging for patients with metastatic thyroid neoplasm. Methods: The ultrasonic imaging characteristics of ten patients who were diagnosed with metastatic thyroid carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. In all the cases, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the thyroid was performed during the clinical diagnosis. Results: The ultrasonic images of the ten patients fell into four types: multiple nodules in the thyroid, single nodule in the thyroid, diffuse calcification and heterogeneous echo. Seven cases showed speckled calcific foci. Abnormal blood flow signal was found in 9 cases. Conclusion: The ultrasonic findings of metastatic carcinoma in the thyroid gland are various and non-specific. Color Doppler ultrasound may provide ample evidence. The diagnosis depends on FNAC. (authors)

  14. Metastatic Breast Cancer and Hormonal Receptor Status among a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ANNALS of AFRICAN SURGERY | www.sskenya.org. The ANNALS of ... metastatic lesions and survival among breast cancer patients. ... year survival rate (2). Breast ... Three core ... ER negative and 35 (49.3%) had PR positive tumours.

  15. Chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and cetuximab in metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, J.; Koopman, M.; Cats, A.; Rodenburg, C.J.; Creemers, G.J.M.; Schrama, J.G.; Erdkamp, F.L.G.; Vos, A.H.; van Groeningen, C.J.; Sinnige, H.A.M.; Richel, D.J.; Voest, E.E.; Dijkstra, J.R.; Vink-Börger, M.E.; Antonini, N.F.; Mol, L.; van Krieken, J.H.J.M.; Dalesio, O.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Fluoropyrimidine- based chemotherapy plus the anti - vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody bevacizumab is standard first- line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. We studied the effect of adding the anti - epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab to

  16. Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and Cetuximab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Jolien; Koopman, Miriam; Cats, Annemieke; Rodenburg, Cees J.; Creemers, Geert J. M.; Schrama, Jolanda G.; Erdkamp, Frans L. G.; Vos, Allert H.; van Groeningen, Cees J.; Sinnige, Harm A. M.; Richel, Dirk J.; Voest, Emile E.; Dijkstra, Jeroen R.; Vink-Börger, Marianne E.; Antonini, Ninja F.; Mol, Linda; van Krieken, Johan H. J. M.; Dalesio, Otilia; Punt, Cornelis J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Fluoropyrimidine- based chemotherapy plus the anti - vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF) antibody bevacizumab is standard first- line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. We studied the effect of adding the anti - epidermal growth factor receptor ( EGFR) antibody cetuximab

  17. CASE REPORT CASE CASE Metastatic calcification as a result of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are lytic lesions involving the inner and outer table of the calvarium and a soft-tissue ... radiological diagnosis considered at this stage was metastatic neuroblas- ... regions were normal, as were plain radiographs and CT of the lungs.

  18. Cytoreductive surgery for men with metastatic prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolas Katelaris

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: This data supports recent findings demonstrating that radical prostatectomy for metastatic prostate cancer is feasible. Further studies are needed to explore the role of cytoreductive surgery with regards to the potential oncological benefit.

  19. Epidermotropic metastatic melanoma with perilesional depigmentation in an Indian male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana Doshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a rare form of cutaneous malignancy encountered in the dark skin population. Epidermotropic metastatic melanoma is a rare form of cutaneous metastatic melanoma which can mimic primary melanoma on histopathology. Hence its differentiation is of immense prognostic importance. The occurrence of rim of depigmentation around the primary cutaneous melanoma has previously been reported to portend a bad prognosis. The occurrence of vitiligo like lesions in patients with metastatic melanoma in comparison has a better prognosis. However the occurrence of depigmentation around the secondaries is rare and its importance is not well known. Hence we wish to report a case of epidermotropic metastatic melanoma with perilesional depigmentation in a 78 year old Indian male.

  20. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  1. Prognostic impact of metastatic pattern in stage IV breast cancer at initial diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Vallejo, Carlos Teodoro; Romero, Alberto Omar; Machiavelli, Mario Raúl; Pérez, Juan Eduardo; Leone, Julieta; Leone, José Pablo

    2017-02-01

    To analyze the prognostic influence of metastatic pattern (MP) compared with other biologic and clinical factors in stage IV breast cancer at initial diagnosis (BCID) and evaluate factors associated with specific sites of metastases (SSM). We evaluated women with stage IV BCID with known metastatic sites, reported to the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program from 2010 to 2013. MP was categorized as bone-only, visceral, bone and visceral (BV), and other. Univariate and multivariate analyses determined the effects of each variable on overall survival (OS). Logistic regression examined factors associated with SSM. We included 9143 patients. Bone represented 37.5% of patients, visceral 21.9%, BV 28.8%, and other 11.9%. Median OS by MP was as follows: bone 38 months, visceral 21 months, BV 19 months, and other 33 months (P < 0.0001). Univariate analysis showed that higher number of metastatic sites had worse prognosis. In multivariate analysis, older age (hazard ratio 1.9), black race (hazard ratio 1.17), grade 3/4 tumors (hazard ratio 1.6), triple-negative (hazard ratio 2.24), BV MP (hazard ratio 2.07), and unmarried patients (hazard ratio 1.25) had significantly shorter OS. As compared with HR+/HER2- tumors, triple-negative and HR-/HER2+ had higher odds of brain, liver, lung, and other metastases. HR+/HER2+ had higher odds of liver metastases. All three subtypes had lower odds of bone metastases. There were substantial differences in OS according to MP. Tumor subtypes have a clear influence among other factors on SSM. We identified several prognostic factors that could guide therapy selection in treatment naïve patients.

  2. Addison's disease as a presentation of metastatic malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, B; Patel, M; Ethunandan, M; Ilankovan, V

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma accounts for 5% of all skin cancers. The risk of metastasis is related to the thickness of the tumour, and can affect local, regional and distant sites. Adrenal metastasis from melanoma of the head and neck is uncommon and often asymptomatic. Addison's disease as a presentation of metastatic melanoma is extremely rare and we are unaware of previous reports in the world literature. We report a case of a patient with metastatic melanoma presenting with signs and symptoms of Addison's disease.

  3. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    deprivation therapy (ADT) or androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibition (ARPI) but eventually develops into lethal castration resistance prostate cancer ...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0553 TITLE: Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Martin Gleave...Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0553 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Martin Gleave 5d

  4. Delayed radiation necrosis of the brain simulating a brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hiroya; Kanai, Nobuhiro; Kamikawa, Kiyoo

    1976-01-01

    Two cases of delayed radiation necrosis of the brain are reported. Case 1 was a 50-year-old man who had right hemiparesis and disorientation 26 months after Linac irradiation (5,000 rad), preceded by an operation for right maxillar carcinoma. A left carotid angiogram demonstrated a left temporal mass lesion, extending to the frontal lobe. Case 2 was a 41-year-old man who had previously had an operation for right intraorbital plasmocytoma, followed by two Co irradiations (6,400 rad, and 5,000 rad). He had the signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension 36 months after his last irradiation. A left carotid angiogram demonstrated a left temporal mass lesion. Both cases were treated by administration of steroid hormone (which alleviated the signs and symptoms) and by temporal lobectomy. Microscopic examinations showed necrosis of the brain tissues associated with hyaline degeneration of blood vessel walls and perivascular cell infiltration. The signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension subsided postoperatively. Thirteen other cases the same as ours were collected from literature. They showed the signs and symptoms simulating a brain tumor (like a metastatic brain tumor) after irradiation to extracranial malignant tumors. Diagnosis of radiation necrosis was made by operation or autopsy. A follow-up for a long time is necessary, because the pathological changes in the brain may be progressive and extending in some cases, although decompressive operations for mass lesions give excellent results. (auth.)

  5. Effect of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery and Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor Antagonists on Metastatic Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Molly; Nordmann, Tyler; Sperduto, Paul W; Clark, H. Brent; Hunt, Matthew A

    2017-01-01

    Learning objectives To evaluate radiation-induced changes in patients with brain metastasis secondary to malignant melanoma who received treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor antagonists. Introduction  Stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapeutics are used together for treatment of metastatic melanoma and have been linked to delayed radiation-induced vasculitic leukoencephalopathy (DRIVL). There have been reports of more intense interactions with new immunotherapeutics targeting PD-1 receptors, but their interactions have not been well described and may result in an accelerated response to GKRS. Here we present data on subjects treated with this combination from a single institution. Methods Records from patients who underwent treatment for metastatic melanoma to the brain with GKRS from 2011 to 2016 were reviewed. Demographics, date of brain metastasis diagnosis, cause of death when applicable, immunotherapeutics, and imaging findings were recorded. The timing of radiation therapy and medications were also documented.  Results A total of 79 subjects were treated with GKRS, and 66 underwent treatment with both GKRS and immunotherapy. Regarding the 30 patients treated with anti-PD-1 immunotherapy, 21 patients received pembrolizumab, seven patients received nivolumab, and two patients received pembrolizumab and nivolumab. Serial imaging was available for interpretation in 25 patients, with 13 subjects who received GKRS and anti-PD-1 immunotherapy less than six weeks of each other. While four subjects had indeterminate/mixed findings on subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nine subjects were noted to have progression. Two of these patients showed progression but subsequent imaging revealed a decrease in progression or improvement on MRI to previously targeted lesions by GKRS. None of the 13 subjects had surgery following their combined therapies. Conclusions This data suggests that there is need for

  6. Rationale for the Use of Upfront Whole Brain Irradiation in Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes V. Tallet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second most common cause of brain metastases and deserves particular attention in relation to current prolonged survival of patients with metastatic disease. Advances in both systemic therapies and brain local treatments (surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery have led to a reappraisal of brain metastases management. With respect to this, the literature review presented here was conducted in an attempt to collect medical evidence-based data on the use of whole-brain radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer. In addition, this study discusses here the potential differences in outcomes between patients with brain metastases from breast cancer and those with brain metastases from other primary malignancies and the potential implications within a treatment strategy.

  7. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Katsuzo; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1980-01-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief. (author)

  8. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, K; Matsumoto, S [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-10-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief.

  9. Immune checkpoint inhibitors for metastatic bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Di Nunno, Vincenzo; Cubelli, Marta; Santoni, Matteo; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Cheng, Liang; Lopez-Beltran, Anto; Battelli, Nicola; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    Chemotherapy has represented the standard therapy for unresectable or metastatic urothelial carcinoma for more than 20 years. The growing knowledge of the interaction between tumour and immune system has led to the advent of new classes of drugs, the immune-checkpoints inhibitors, which are intended to change the current scenario. To date, immunotherapy is able to improve the overall responses and survival. Moreover, thanks to its safety profile immune-checkpoint inhibitors could be proposed also to patients unfit for standard chemotherapy. No doubts that these agents have started a revolution expected for years, but despite this encouraging results it appears clear that not all subjects respond to these agents and requiring the development of reliable predictive response factors able to isolate patients who can more benefit from these treatments as well as new strategies aimed to improve immunotherapy clinical outcome. In this review we describe the active or ongoing clinical trials involving Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1), Programmed Death receptor 1 (PD-1) and Cytotoxic-T Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA 4) inhibitors in urothelial carcinoma focusing our attention on the developing new immune-agents and combination strategies with immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC) of Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, K; Hamaloğlu, E

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, agressive, neurocutaneous malignancy with a high potential to metastasize. We present a 59 year-old woman referred to general surgery department with a complaint of epigastric pain. The abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed and revealed amass of 3 cm in the head of the pancreas. The significant debate in the patient's medical history was that she had a MCC in size of 5 cm removed from the left gluteal region 7 months ago. Following preoperative preparation a pancreatic oduodenectomy with Whipple procedure was performed fort hepancreatic head mass. As the tumor showed morphologically similar properties with the patient's primary neoplasm, it was accepted as a metastatic MCC. Following the operation the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and at a 30 months follow-up it was observed that the patient is disease free and has no complications related to the disease progression or recurrence. Although MCC is an aggresive and poor prognostic tumor, good results can be obtained with correct diagnosis and proper surgical treatment. Celsius.

  11. A Novel Differentiation Therapy Approach to Reduce the Metastatic Potential of Basal, Highly Metastatic, Triple-Negative Breast Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    metastatic process (Condeelis and Pollard 2006), we quantitated macrophage recruitment in the lungs of mice injected with 231-Empty or 231-GATA3 cells by...image quantitation of Ki-67 expression and H&E staining of metastatic lung lesions using Apirio Image Analysis software (Figure 9) which demonstrated...expression in MD A-MB-231 and in another triple negative breast cancer cell line, Hs578T Transient knock down of GATA3 in the lum inal GATA3 positiv

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to Thyroid Gland, Presenting Like Anaplastic Carcinoma of Thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Riaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC has unpredictable and diverse behavior. The classic triad of hematuria, loin pain, and abdominal mass is uncommon. At time of diagnosis, 25%–30% of patients are found to have metastases. Bones, lungs, liver, and brain are the frequent sites of metastases. RCC with metastasis to the head and neck region and thyroid gland is the rarest manifestation and anaplastic carcinoma behaving metastatic thyroid mass is an extremely rare presentation of RCC. Case Presentation. A 56-year-old Saudi man with past history of right radical nephrectomy 5 years back presented with 3 months history of rapid increasing neck mass with dysphagia, presenting like anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Tru-cut biopsy turned out to be metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Patient was treated with radiation therapy 30 Gy in 10 fractions to mass. Patient died 4 months after the discovery of anaplastic thyroid looking metastasis. Conclusion. Rapidly progressing thyroid metastases secondary to RCC are rare and found often unresectable which are not amenable to surgery. Palliative radiotherapy can be considered for such patients.

  13. Electrocardiogram artifact caused by rigors mimicking narrow complex tachycardia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Anne Thushara; Indrakumar, Jegarajah

    2014-02-04

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is useful in the diagnosis of cardiac and non-cardiac conditions. Rigors due to shivering can cause electrocardiogram artifacts mimicking various cardiac rhythm abnormalities. We describe an 80-year-old Sri Lankan man with an abnormal electrocardiogram mimicking narrow complex tachycardia during the immediate post-operative period. Electrocardiogram changes caused by muscle tremor during rigors could mimic a narrow complex tachycardia. Identification of muscle tremor as a cause of electrocardiogram artifact can avoid unnecessary pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention to prevent arrhythmias.

  14. Brown tumor mimicking maxillary sinus mucocele as the first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldfred, Liviu-Adelin; Daugaard, Søren; von Buchwald, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first case of brown tumor mimicking a maxillary sinus mucocele as the first manifestation of the patient's primary hyperparathyroidism. A 34-year old woman presented with a 14 days history of elevation of the right orbit, retrobulbar pain and cheek anesthesia. The CT and MR evalua...... either giant cell granuloma or brown tumor. The finding of hyperparathyroidism confirmed the diagnosis of brown tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cystic brown tumor mimicking a mucocele of the maxillary sinus....

  15. Seven cases of brain metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikekubo, Katsuji; Hino, Megumu; Ito, Hidetomi; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Ueshima, Miho; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Hiromasa; Ishihara, Takashi; Kurahachi, Hiroyuki

    2000-01-01

    Brain metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma are extremely rare and carry a poor prognosis. We describe here clinical details of 7 cases of brain metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma. Of 153 patients with metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary in 123, follicular in 30) treated at our institution between 1981 and 1999, 7 patients (4.6%) had brain metastases. Histologically, the primary tumor was papillary carcinoma in all 7 cases. Four were males and 3 were females. The median age at first diagnosis of distant metastases was 63 yr (range, 47-76 yr). Of these patients, one had brain metastases only and six and metastases to the lungs as well. Five of these patients were treated with 131 I. Three of these 5 patients had marked uptake in the metastases ( 131 I positive) on post-therapy 131 I scans and another 2 patients had no significant activity ( 131 I negative) in both pulmonary and brain metastatic lesions. One of 3 patients with 131 I positive lesions had intense activity in the brain tumor, but no uptake in multiple pulmonary metastatic tumors. In a patient with 131 I positive brain metastases, the tumors progressed rapidly after 131 I therapy. In another one patient, acute hemorrhage of the tumor occurred four days after 131 I therapy, requiring surgical removal. Loner case of 131 I negative 2 patients was treated with radiosurgery (γ-knife) and complete reduction in tumor volume was observed. On the other hand, one of 2 patients receiving no 131 I therapy had radiosurgery (x-knife) and remaining one received conventional external radiation and chemotherapy for small solitary brain and pulmonary metastatic tumors. These therapeutic interventions were useful in both cases. The mean length of survival after the development of brain metastases in the five patients who died of the disease was 30 months. One patient treated with x-knife has been alive at 21 months and another one who has 131 I uptake in the brain tumor without

  16. Vinorelbine plus 3-weekly trastuzumab in metastatic breast cancer: a single-centre phase 2 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staiano Maria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After two studies reporting response rates higher than 70% in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer with weekly trastuzumab and vinorelbine, we planned a phase 2 study to test activity of the same combination, with trastuzumab given every 3 weeks. Methods Patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (3+ at immunohistochemistry or positive at fluorescence in situ hybridization, PS ≤2, normal left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and no more than one chemotherapy line for metastatic disease were eligible. Vinorelbine (30 mg/m2 was given on days 1&8 every 21 and trastuzumab (8 mg/kg day 1, then 6 mg/kg every 21 days. A single-stage phase 2 design, with p0 = 0.45, p1 = 0.65, type I and II error = 0.10, was applied; 22 objective responses were required in 39 patients. Results From Nov 2002 to May 2005, 50 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 54 years (range 31–81. Among 40 patients eligible for response assessment, there were 7 complete and 13 partial responses (overall response rate 50%; 95% exact CI 33.8–66.2; 11 patients had disease stabilization, lasting more than 6 months in 10 cases. Response rate did not vary according to patients and tumor characteristics, type and amount of previous chemotherapy. Within the whole series, median progression-free survival was 9.6 months (95% CI 7.3–12.3, median overall survival 22.7 months (95% CI 19.5-NA. Fifteen patients (30% developed brain metastases at a median time of 12 months (range 1–25. There was one toxic death due to renal failure in a patient receiving concomitant pamidronate. Twenty-three patients (46% had grade 3–4 neutropenia, 2 (4% grade 3 anemia, 4 (8% febrile neutropenia. Two patients stopped treatment because of grade 2 decline of LVEF and one patient because of grade 2 liver toxicity concomitant with a grade 1 decline of LVEF. One patient stopped trastuzumab after 50 cycles because of grade 1 decline of LVEF. Conclusion Although lower

  17. Cerebral relapse of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor during treatment with imatinib mesylate: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waring Paul

    2004-10-01

    occurred. Conclusion This case illustrates that the brain can be a sanctuary site to treatment of GISTs with imatinib. Maintaining dosing of imatinib in the face of isolated sites of disease progression is also important, as other metastatic sites may still be sensitive.

  18. Cerebral relapse of metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor during treatment with imatinib mesylate: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Brett; Yip, Desmond; Goldstein, David; Waring, Paul; Beshay, Victoria; Chong, Guan

    2004-01-01

    The management of unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has previously been difficult as they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The development of imatinib mesylate has made a major impact on the management of advanced GISTs. It is apparent that there are sanctuary sites such as the central nervous system where imatinib does not achieve adequate concentrations. We describe the case of a man with metastatic GIST who experienced multiple cerebral relapses of disease while systemic disease progression appeared to be controlled by imatinib. A 47-year-old man presented in July 1999 with a jejunal GIST with multiple hepatic metastases. The jejunal primary was resected and after unsuccessful cytoreductive chemotherapy, the liver metastases were also resected in December 1999. The patient subsequently relapsed in August 2001 with symptomatic hepatic, subcutaneous gluteal, left choroidal and right ocular metastases all confirmed on CT and PET scanning. Biopsy confirmed recurrent GIST. MRI and lumbar puncture excluded central nervous system involvement. The patient was commenced on imatinib 400 mg bd in September 2001 through a clinical trial. The symptoms improved with objective PET and CT scan response until December 2002 when the patient developed a right-sided foot drop. MRI scan showed a left parasagittal tumor which was resected and confirmed histologically to be metastatic GIST. Imatinib was ceased pre-operatively due to the trial protocol but recommenced in February 2003 on a compassionate use program. The left parasagittal metastasis recurred and required subsequent re-excision in September 2003 and January 2004. Control of the systemic GIST was temporarily lost on reduction of the dose of imatinib (due to limited drug supply) but on increasing the dose back to 800 mg per day, systemic disease was stabilized for a period of time before generalised progression occurred. This case illustrates that the brain can be a

  19. Nucleus-staining with biomolecule-mimicking nitrogen-doped carbon dots prepared by a fast neutralization heat strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Fang, Yang-Wu; Li, Yu-Hao; Li, Wen; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2015-12-11

    Biomolecule-mimicking nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-Cdots) were synthesized from dopamine by a neutralization heat strategy. Fluorescence imaging of various cells validated their nucleus-staining efficiency. The dopamine-mimicking N-Cdots "trick" nuclear membranes to achieve nuclear localization and imaging.

  20. Maintenance Therapy with Trastuzumab in Her2 Positive Metastatic Parotid Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shahid Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salivary ductal carcinomas (SDCs are extremely rare and aggressive malignancies, accounting for approximately 6% of all salivary gland malignancies. One distinct feature is their resemblance to ductal carcinomas of breast. A significant percentage of SDCs overexpress Her2 and the use of targeted therapy with trastuzumab can be considered in these patients. We report a rare case of long term disease control with trastuzumab in Her2 positive metastatic parotid ductal carcinoma. Our case also highlights that isolated brain metastasis should be managed aggressively to allow optimal local control when systemic disease is under remission with trastuzumab. We have also reviewed the published literature on the use of trastuzumab in SDCs.

  1. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome A. Staal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities.

  2. Hypertensive Encephalopathy: Isolated Pons Involvement Mimicking Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamanagatti, S.; Subramanian, S. [India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2006-09-15

    MRI of the brain was performed, and it demonstrated an isolated high signal on the T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences that involved only the central pons with sparing the periphery. There was no restricted diffusion on diffusion weighted imaging. The differential diagnosis included posterior reversible syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis; however, the blood sodium on admission was normal. The pathogenesis of HE is that the auto-regulatory mechanisms that control the cerebral blood flow are exceeded, resulting in hyper-perfusion. The consequent over-distension of the cerebral vessels, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and ultimately, the extravasation of fluid into the interstitium all cause vasogenic edema. In most cases, the changes of hypertensive encephalopathy represent reversible vasogenic edema, which can be seen on T2-weighted images, and restricted diffusion is not seen on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Hypertensive encephalopathy that manifests as a reversible increased signal isolated to the pons on T2-weighted images is extremely uncommon. The differential diagnosis for such pontine T2 hyperintensity includes pontine glioma, ischemic and radiation changes (generally irreversible conditions), as well as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and rhomb-encephalitis. In CPM electrolyte imbalances provide a clue for the diagnosis, where as for glioma, there will be an expansion and mass effect. In conclusion, clinical recognition of brainstem HE may be difficult. The features of a lack of correlation between the severity of the radiological abnormality and the clinical status, combined with the rapid resolution following antihypertensive treatment, should suggest the diagnosis. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with the imaging abnormalities of this life

  3. Hypertensive Encephalopathy: Isolated Pons Involvement Mimicking Central Pontine Myelinolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamanagatti, S.; Subramanian, S.

    2006-01-01

    MRI of the brain was performed, and it demonstrated an isolated high signal on the T2 weighted and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences that involved only the central pons with sparing the periphery. There was no restricted diffusion on diffusion weighted imaging. The differential diagnosis included posterior reversible syndrome and central pontine myelinolysis; however, the blood sodium on admission was normal. The pathogenesis of HE is that the auto-regulatory mechanisms that control the cerebral blood flow are exceeded, resulting in hyper-perfusion. The consequent over-distension of the cerebral vessels, the breakdown of the blood brain barrier and ultimately, the extravasation of fluid into the interstitium all cause vasogenic edema. In most cases, the changes of hypertensive encephalopathy represent reversible vasogenic edema, which can be seen on T2-weighted images, and restricted diffusion is not seen on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Hypertensive encephalopathy that manifests as a reversible increased signal isolated to the pons on T2-weighted images is extremely uncommon. The differential diagnosis for such pontine T2 hyperintensity includes pontine glioma, ischemic and radiation changes (generally irreversible conditions), as well as central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) and demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and rhomb-encephalitis. In CPM electrolyte imbalances provide a clue for the diagnosis, where as for glioma, there will be an expansion and mass effect. In conclusion, clinical recognition of brainstem HE may be difficult. The features of a lack of correlation between the severity of the radiological abnormality and the clinical status, combined with the rapid resolution following antihypertensive treatment, should suggest the diagnosis. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with the imaging abnormalities of this life

  4. Percutaneous acetabuloplasty for metastatic acetabular lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logroscino Giandomenico

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteolytic metastases around the acetabulum are frequent in tumour patients, and may cause intense and drug-resistant pain of the hip. These lesions also cause structural weakening of the pelvis, limping, and poor quality of life. Percutaneous acetabuloplasty is a mini-invasive procedure for the management of metastatic lesions due to carcinoma of the acetabulum performed in patients who cannot tolerate major surgery, or in patients towards whom radiotherapy had already proved ineffective. Methods We report a retrospective study in 25 such patients (30 acetabuli who were evaluated before and after percutaneous acetabuloplasty, with regard to pain, mobility of the hip joint, use of analgesics, by means of evaluation forms: Visual Analog Scale, Harris Hip Score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index of Osteoarthritis (WOMAC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG. The results obtained were analysed using the χ2 Test and Fisher's exact test. Significance was sent at P Results Marked clinical improvement was observed in all patients during the first six post-operative months, with gradual a worsening thereafter from deterioration of their general condition. Complete pain relief was achieved in 15 of our 25 (59% of patients, and pain reduction was achieved in the remaining 10 (41% patients. The mean duration of pain relief was 7.3 months. Pain recurred in three patients (12% between 2 weeks to 3 months. No major complications occurred. There was transient local pain in most cases, and 2 cases of venous injection of cement without clinical consequences. Conclusion Percutaneous acetabuloplasty is effective in improving the quality of life of patients with osteolytic bone tumours, even though the improvement is observed during the first 6 months only. It can be an effective aid to chemo- and radiotherapy in the management of acetabular metastases.

  5. Multiple cortical brain abscesses due to Listeria monocytogenes in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sadia; Kumar, Anil; Kale, Satyajit; Kurkure, Nitin; Nair, Gulsiv; Dinesh, Kavitha

    2018-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular organism which is well recognised for its ability to cause meningeal infections in neonates, immunosuppressed, debilitated and elderly individuals. 1 Other less common central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by Listeria spp. include rhomboencephalitis, cerebritis and abscesses in the brain, brain stem and spinal cord. The neuroradiological appearance of Listeria brain abscesses is similar to other types and may also mimic primary or metastatic brain tumours. 2 , 3 We report a case of Listeria brain abscesses in a patient who was being treated for atypical parkinsonism. A good clinical outcome was achieved after appropriate antimicrobial therapy.

  6. Novel culturing platform for brain slices and neuronal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a novel culturing system for brain slices and neuronal cells, which can control the concentration of nutrients and the waste removal from the culture by adjusting the fluid flow within the device. The entire system can be placed in an incubator. The system has been...... tested successfully with brain slices and PC12 cells. The culture substrate can be modified using metal electrodes and/or nanostructures for conducting electrical measurements while culturing and for better mimicking the in vivo conditions....

  7. Mild toxic anterior segment syndrome mimicking delayed onset toxic anterior segment syndrome after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Na Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS is an acute sterile postoperative anterior segment inflammation that may occur after anterior segment surgery. I report herein a case that developed mild TASS in one eye after bilateral uneventful cataract surgery, which was masked during early postoperative period under steroid eye drop and mimicking delayed onset TASS after switching to weaker steroid eye drop.

  8. Solid-phase synthesis of an apoptosis-inducing tetrapeptide mimicking the Smac protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Quement, Sebastian Thordal; Ishøy, Mette; Petersen, Mette Terp

    2011-01-01

    An approach for the solid-phase synthesis of apoptosis-inducing Smac peptidomimetics is presented. Using a Rink linker strategy, tetrapeptides mimicking the N-4-terminal residue of the Smac protein [(N-Me)AVPF sequence] were synthesized on PEGA resin in excellent purities and yields. Following two...

  9. Cytomegalovirus-associated colitis mimicking necrotizing enterocolitis – A near miss diagnosis of neonatal colonic stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Yeung

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although cytomegalovirus (CMV is a common congenital infection in neonates, most patients are asymptomatic. Gastrointestinal manifestation is unusual. In this report, we described a newborn with perinatal CMV infection presented with symptoms mimicking necrotizing enterocolitis. We hope to alert clinicians about this possible diagnosis when managing newborn gastrointestinal diseases.

  10. Case report: Pulmonary syphilis mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases on chest CT and integrated PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jun Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of syphilis with pulmonary involvement. Chest CT scan and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET/CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases. This was confirmed on follow-up images that showed therapeutic response to penicillin.

  11. Case report: Pulmonary syphilis mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases on chest CT and integrated PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Jun; Seon, Hyun Ju; Shin, Hyo Hyun; Choi, Yoo-Duk

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of syphilis with pulmonary involvement. Chest CT scan and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT showed multiple pulmonary nodules mimicking pulmonary hematogenous metastases. This was confirmed on follow-up images that showed therapeutic response to penicillin

  12. Peroxidase-Mimicking Nanozyme with Enhanced Activity and High Stability Based on Metal-Support Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhihao; Yang, Xiangdong; Yang, Yanbing; Tan, Yaning; He, Yue; Liu, Meng; Liu, Xinwen; Yuan, Quan

    2018-01-09

    Peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes offer unique advantages in terms of high stability and low cost over natural peroxidase for applications in bioanalysis, biomedicine, and the treatment of pollution. However, the design of high-efficiency peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes remains a great challenge. In this study, we adopted a structural-design approach through hybridization of cube-CeO 2 and Pt nanoparticles to create a new peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with high efficiency and excellent stability. Relative to pure cube-CeO 2 and Pt nanoparticles, the as-hybridized Pt/cube-CeO 2 nanocomposites display much improved activities because of the strong metal-support interaction. Meanwhile, the nanocomposites also maintain high catalytic activity after long-term storage and multiple recycling. Based on their excellent properties, Pt/cube-CeO 2 nanocomposites were used to construct high-performance colorimetric biosensors for the sensitive detection of metabolites, including H 2 O 2 and glucose. Our findings highlight opportunities for the development of high-efficiency peroxidase-mimicking nanozymes with potential applications such as diagnostics, biomedicine, and the treatment of pollution. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Being Mimicked Increases Prosocial Behavior in 18-Month-Old Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Malinda; Uebel, Johanna; Tomasello, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Most previous research on imitation in infancy has focused on infants' learning of instrumental actions on objects. This study focused instead on the more social side of imitation, testing whether being mimicked increases prosocial behavior in infants, as it does in adults (van Baaren, Holland, Kawakami, & van Knippenberg, 2004).…

  14. A Rare Case Report of Bilateral Complex Macrocystic Adrenal Hemorrhage Mimicking Fetal Neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhwani, Geetika; Patel, Viral; Jain, Abhinav

    2018-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal adrenal glands are large vascular organs, which make them vulnerable to frequent bleeding. Although neonatal adrenal hemorrhage is commonly reported, it is rarely diagnosed on antenatal sonography. We present a rare case of prenatally diagnosed bilateral adrenal hemorrhage, which mimicked antenatal neuroblastoma.

  15. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction - mimicking an “elephant head” on magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Bhaskar Mehta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO with giant hydronephrosis is relatively rare in adults as compared to children. Most of the UPJO reported or seen in daily practice have a distinct hydronephrosis with a narrow ureteropelvic junction and a collapsed ureter distally. We present images a case of an adult female with Left UPJO, which on MRI mimicked an 'elephant head'.

  16. Mimicking natural ecosystems to develop sustainable supply chains : A theory of socio-ecological intergradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruner, Richard L.; Power, Damien

    2017-01-01

    For most firms, the development of sustainable supply chain practices remains challenging. Using a theory-building approach, we develop a theory of socio-ecological intergradation to provide managers with guidance in mimicking natural ecosystems to develop more local and thus sustainable supply

  17. Characteristics and Patterns of Metastatic Disease from Chordoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A. Young

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare, slow-growing malignant tumor arising from notochordal remnants. A retrospective review of patient records at two major referral centers was undertaken to assess the incidence, location, and prognostic factors of metastatic disease from chordoma. 219 patients with chordoma (1962–2009 were identified. 39 patients (17.8% developed metastatic disease, most frequently to lung (>50%. Median survival from the time of initial diagnosis was 130.4 months for patients who developed metastatic disease and 159.3 months for those who did not (P=0.05. Metastatic disease was most common in the youngest patients (P=0.07, and it was 2.5 times more frequent among patients with local recurrence (26.3% than in those without (10.8% (P=0.003. Patient survival with metastatic disease was highly variable, and it was dependent on both the location of the tumor primary and the site of metastasis. Metastasis to distal bone was the most rapid to develop and had the worst prognosis.

  18. Integrative Genome Comparison of Primary and Metastatic Melanomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Nazarian, Rosalynn M.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Wu, Min; Scott, Kenneth L.; Kwong, Lawrence N.; Xiao, Yonghong; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Granter, Scott R.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Golub, Todd; Duncan, Lyn M.; Wagner, Stephan N.; Brennan, Cameron; Chin, Lynda

    2010-01-01

    A cardinal feature of malignant melanoma is its metastatic propensity. An incomplete view of the genetic events driving metastatic progression has been a major barrier to rational development of effective therapeutics and prognostic diagnostics for melanoma patients. In this study, we conducted global genomic characterization of primary and metastatic melanomas to examine the genomic landscape associated with metastatic progression. In addition to uncovering three genomic subclasses of metastastic melanomas, we delineated 39 focal and recurrent regions of amplification and deletions, many of which encompassed resident genes that have not been implicated in cancer or metastasis. To identify progression-associated metastasis gene candidates, we applied a statistical approach, Integrative Genome Comparison (IGC), to define 32 genomic regions of interest that were significantly altered in metastatic relative to primary melanomas, encompassing 30 resident genes with statistically significant expression deregulation. Functional assays on a subset of these candidates, including MET, ASPM, AKAP9, IMP3, PRKCA, RPA3, and SCAP2, validated their pro-invasion activities in human melanoma cells. Validity of the IGC approach was further reinforced by tissue microarray analysis of Survivin showing significant increased protein expression in thick versus thin primary cutaneous melanomas, and a progression correlation with lymph node metastases. Together, these functional validation results and correlative analysis of human tissues support the thesis that integrated genomic and pathological analyses of staged melanomas provide a productive entry point for discovery of melanoma metastases genes. PMID:20520718

  19. Avelumab: A Review in Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt

    2018-05-24

    Avelumab (Bavencio ® ) is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that is directed against programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Avelumab functions as an immune checkpoint inhibitor and has recently been approved in the USA, the EU and Japan for the treatment of metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). It is thus the first therapeutic agent specifically approved for use in this indication, and is approved for use independent of line of treatment. Approval for avelumab in metastatic MCC was based on the two-part, single-arm, phase II trial, JAVELIN Merkel 200. In Part A of the study, confirmed objective responses were observed in approximately one-third of patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic MCC treated with avelumab. The responses were observed early and appeared to be durable, with an estimated 74% of responses having a duration ≥ 12 months. Furthermore, interim results from a separate cohort of patients (Part B) indicate an objective response rate for avelumab of > 60% in patients who were chemotherapy-naïve in the metastatic disease setting. Avelumab is associated with a risk of immune-related adverse events but, overall, has an acceptable and manageable safety and tolerability profile. In conclusion, currently available data suggest that avelumab presents a clinically beneficial new treatment option for metastatic MCC, a rare but aggressive cancer associated with a poor prognosis.

  20. Tissue mimicking materials for a multi-imaging modality prostate phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Unal, Orhan; Vigen, Karl K.; Frank, Gary R.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2001-01-01

    Materials that simultaneously mimic soft tissue in vivo for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), and computed tomography (CT) for use in a prostate phantom have been developed. Prostate and muscle mimicking materials contain water, agarose, lipid particles, protein, Cu ++ , EDTA, glass beads, and thimerosal (preservative). Fat was mimicked with safflower oil suffusing a random mesh (network) of polyurethane. Phantom material properties were measured at 22 deg. C. (22 deg. C is a typical room temperature at which phantoms are used.) The values of material properties should match, as well as possible, the values for tissues at body temperature, 37 deg. C. For MRI, the primary properties of interest are T1 and T2 relaxations times, for US they are the attenuation coefficient, propagation speed, and backscatter, and for CT, the x-ray attenuation. Considering the large number of parameters to be mimicked, rather good agreement was found with actual tissue values obtained from the literature. Using published values for prostate parenchyma, T1 and T2 at 37 deg. C and 40 MHz are estimated to be about 1100 and 98 ms, respectively. The CT number for in vivo prostate is estimated to be 45 HU (Hounsfield units). The prostate mimicking material has a T1 of 937 ms and a T2 of 88 ms at 22 deg. C and 40 MHz; the propagation speed and attenuation coefficient slope are 1540 m/s and 0.36 dB/cm/MHz, respectively, and the CT number of tissue mimicking prostate is 43 HU. Tissue mimicking (TM) muscle differs from TM prostate in the amount of dry weight agarose, Cu ++ , EDTA, and the quality and quantity of glass beads. The 18 μm glass beads used in TM muscle increase US backscatter and US attenuation; the presence of the beads also has some effect on T1 but no effect on T2. The composition of tissue-mimicking materials developed is such that different versions can be placed in direct contact with one another in a phantom with no long term change in US, MRI, or CT

  1. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  2. Full experimental modelling of a liver tissue mimicking phantom for medical ultrasound studies employing different hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciaro, Sergio; Conversano, Francesco; Musio, Stefano; Casciaro, Ernesto; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro

    2009-04-01

    Tissue mimicking phantoms have been widely reported to be an important tool for development, optimisation and performance testing of ultrasound-based diagnostic techniques. In particular, modern applications of tissue mimicking phantoms often include characterisation of the nonlinear behaviour of experimental ultrasound contrast agents. In such cases, the tissue-mimicking materials should be chosen not only based on the values of their density, speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, but also considering their effect on the appearance of "native harmonics" due to nonlinear distortion of ultrasound signal during propagation. In a previous paper it was demonstrated that a cellulose-based hydrogel is suitable to simulate nonlinear acoustical behaviour of liver tissue for thicknesses up to 8 cm. In this paper we present the experimental characterisation of the nonlinear acoustical behaviour of a different polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA)-based hydrogel, in order to assess whether and how it can improve the performances and overcome some limitations of the cellulose-based hydrogel as liver tissue-mimicking material. Samples of pig liver tissue, cellulose-based hydrogel and PEGDA-based hydrogel were insonified in a through-transmission set-up, employing 2.25-MHz pulses with different mechanical index (MI) values. Second harmonic and first harmonic amplitudes were extracted from the spectra of received signals and their difference was then used to compare sample behaviours. Obtained results show how a new more accurate and combined experimental model of linear and nonlinear acoustical behaviour of liver tissue is feasible. In fact, a further confirmation of the cellulose-based hydrogel effectiveness to precisely simulate the liver tissue for penetration depths up to 8 cm was provided, and it was also shown that the employment of the PEGDA-based hydrogel can extend the range of useful tissue-mimicking material thicknesses up to 11 cm, moreover allowing a

  3. Radiation therapy of brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. J.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. Y.

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and six cases of brain tumors were treated at the Yonsei Cancer Center from January 1972 to August 1978 by Co-60 teletherapy unit. We analyses their clinical findings, histopathological findings, treatment and results. In those cases which computerized tomography had been used before and after radiation therapy, changes in tumor size and the presence of edema or necrosis following treatment was evaluated. 1. Among 106 cases, 90 cases were primary brain tumors and 16 cases were metastatic brain tumors. Pituitary tumors (38), glioma (34) and pinealoma (10) composed of most of primary brain tumors. 2. Post treatment follow-up was possible in 38 cases more than 1 years. Four among 11 cases of giloma expired and survivors had considerable neurological symptoms except 2 cases. Sixty five percent (12/20) of pituitary tumors showed improvement of visual symptoms and all cases (7) of pinealoma which post treatment follow-up was possible, showed remarkable good response. 3. Findings of CT scan after radiation treatment were compatible with results of clinical findings and post treatment follow-up. It showed complete regression of tumor mass in one case of pinealoma and medulloblastoma. One case of pituitary tumor showed almost complete regression of tumor mass. It also showed large residual lesion in cases of glioblastoma multiforme and cystic astrocytoma.

  4. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  5. Brain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become a Member Home Early Development & Well-Being Brain Development A child’s brain undergoes an amazing period of development from birth ... neural connections each second. The development of the brain is influenced by many factors, including a child’s ...

  6. First-Line Use of Vemurafenib to Enable Thyroidectomy and Radioactive Iodine Ablation for BRAF-Positive Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao D. Dao MD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with metastatic or radioactive iodine refractory papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC have poor prognosis due to ineffective therapy for this condition beyond surgery and radioactive iodine (RAI or 131I. BRAF mutation occurs in more than 44% of PCT. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, the most commonly used agents for these patients, have weak BRAF inhibition activity. BRAF inhibitors have demonstrated promising efficacy in relapsed metastatic PCT after standard treatment, though they are not currently approved for this indication. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 48-year-old Hispanic male who initially presented with columnar-cell variant subtype of PTC and positive BRAFV600E mutation. The patient had widespread bulky metastases to lungs, chest wall, brain, and bone. Discussion. Initial use of vemurafenib demonstrated a 42% cytoreduction of targeted pulmonary metastases and facilitated thyroidectomy and RAI treatment. The patient achieved a durable response over 21 months in the setting of widely metastatic disease. Conclusion. Vemurafenib may be effectively used for cytoreduction in patients with bulky metastatic PTC to bridge them to thyroidectomy and RAI treatment.

  7. Effect of two tumors (metastatic and non-metastatic) on tissue distribution of Ga-67 citrate in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durakovic, A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of metastatic and non-metastatic mammary adenocarcinoma on tissue distribution of Ga-67 citrate in Fischer female rats was studied. The homogenate (0.1 ml) of each tumor was injected subcutaneously in separate groups of rats and the animals were studied from day 2-30 after tumor homogenate implantation. All animals were injected with 30 μCi of Ga-67 citrate and sacrificed by halothane anethesia 48 hours later. Tissue samples of blood, lung, heart, liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal, stomach, small and large intestine, ovaries, and lymph nodes (popliteal, lumbar, and mediastinal) were obtained and counted in a gamma well counter. The control group consisted of four animals and tumor bearing groups of seven to eight animals at each time. Ga-67 uptake was increased in the liver (24 days) and in the popliteal lymph nodes on days 7, 10, and 18 in the metastatic tumor group (P<0.05). This probably represents Ga-67 uptake in the metastatic deposits in these organs. No difference was observed in non-metastatic tumor group

  8. Importance of Metastatic Lymph Node Ratio in Non-Metastatic, Lymph Node-Invaded Colon Cancer: A Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Arda; Peker, Kemal; Firat, Deniz; Yilmaz, Bahri; Sayar, Ilyas; Idiz, Oguz; Cakir, Coskun; Demiryilmaz, Ismail; Yilmaz, Ismayil

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic importance of the metastatic lymph node ratio for stage III colon cancer patients and to find a cut-off value at which the overall survival and disease-free survival change. Material/Methods Patients with pathological stage III colon cancer were retrospectively evaluated for: age; preoperative values of Crp, Cea, Ca 19-9, and Afp; pathologic situation of vascular, perineural, lymphatic, and serosal involvement; and metastatic lymph node ratio values were calculated. Results The study included 58 stage III colon cancer patients: 20 (34.5%) females and 38 (65.5%) males were involved in the study. Multivariate analysis was applied to the following variables to evaluate significance for overall survival and disease-free survival: age, Crp, Cea, perineural invasion, and metastatic lymph node ratio. The metastatic lymph node ratio (<0.25 or ≥0.25) is the only independent variable significant for overall and disease-free survival. Conclusions Metastatic lymph node ratio is an ideal prognostic marker for stage III colon cancer patients, and 0.25 is the cut-off value for prognosis. PMID:25087904

  9. Merkel cell carcinoma metastatic to the small bowel mesentery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Yu Yang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is an uncommon cutaneous malignant tumor that presents as a rapidly growing skin nodule on sun-exposed areas of the body. MCC is aggressive with regional nodal and distant metastases to the skin, lung, and bones. There have been no reports of metastatic MCC to the mesentery and 6 reports describing metastasis to the small intestine. We present a case of metastatic MCC to the mesentery with infiltration to the small bowel, 8 years after original tumor resection. This is the 5th metastasis and it encased the small bowel resulting in a hair-pin loop contributing to the unusual clinical presentation. Although MCC metastatic to the bowel is uncommon, it is not rare. It is important to recognize the unusual manifestations of this disease as they are becoming more common in the future. Routine radiologic surveillance and thorough review of systems are important to patient follow-up.

  10. Outcomes of colon resection in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Hwang, Grace; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J; Carmichael, Joseph C

    2016-08-01

    Patients with advanced colorectal cancer have a high incidence of postoperative complications. We sought to identify outcomes of patients who underwent resection for colon cancer by cancer stage. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to evaluate all patients who underwent colon resection with a diagnosis of colon cancer from 2012 to 2014. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate patient outcomes by cancer stage. A total of 7,786 colon cancer patients who underwent colon resection were identified. Of these, 10.8% had metastasis at the time of operation. Patients with metastatic disease had significantly increased risks of perioperative morbidity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.44, P = .01) and mortality (AOR: 3.72, P = .01). Patients with metastatic disease were significantly younger (AOR: .99, P colon cancer have metastatic disease. Postoperative morbidity and mortality are significantly higher than in patients with localized disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Metastatic papillary craniopharyngioma: case study and study of tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmaci, Lhan; Kurtkaya-Yapicier, Ozlem; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Sav, Aydin; Pamir, M. Necmettin; Vidal, Sergio; Kovacs, Kalman; Scheithauer, Bernd W.

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of suprasellar papillary craniopharyngioma metastatic to the temporoparietal region 2 years after its initial resection. The literature documents examples of craniopharyngioma recurrences along the surgical tract, as well as remote ipsi- and contralateral metastases via cerebrospinal fluid seeding. Ours is the second report of a craniopharyngioma of papillary type to exhibit metastatic behavior. The tumor spread opposite the side of craniotomy. Although a rare occurrence, it confirms the limited capacity of histologically benign craniopharyngiomas to undergo meningeal seeding, likely the result of surgical manipulation. Immunohistochemical demonstration of increased microvascular density and vascular endothelial growth factor expression, as well as a high vascular endothelial growth receptor (VEGFR2) signal by in situ hybridization, suggests that tumor vascularity facilitated angiogenesis and may have been involved in the establishment and growth of the metastatic deposit. PMID:11916504

  12. Metastatic cancer of unknown primary in 21 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, F; Aresu, L; Vignoli, M; Buracco, P; Bettini, G; Ferro, S; Gattino, F; Ghiani, F; Costantino, R; Ressel, L; Bellei, E; Marconato, L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to describe clinical features, treatment and outcome of 21 dogs with metastatic cancer of unknown primary (MCUP), a biopsy-proven malignancy being diagnosed at a metastatic stage, in which the anatomical origin of the primary tumour cannot be detected. All dogs underwent total-body computed tomography. Signalment, type and duration of clinical signs, metastasis site, pathology results, treatment and outcome were recorded. Carcinoma was the most common diagnosis (57.1%), followed by sarcoma, melanoma and mast cell tumour. The median number of disease sites per dog was 2, with bones, lymph nodes, lungs and spleen being the most frequent metastatic locations. The median survival for all dogs was 30 days. Overall, a primary site was not identified in 20 (95.2%) dogs. MCUP encompasses a variety of different pathologic entities and harbours a poor prognosis. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Avelumab: a new standard for treating metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mairead; Cordes, Lisa; Brownell, Isaac

    2018-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive skin cancer. Although MCC is chemosensitive, responses to traditional chemotherapeutic agents are not durable. Avelumab, a novel anti-PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, recently became the first FDA-approved agent for the treatment of metastatic MCC and represents a new option to improve patient survival. Areas covered: This article presents an overview of MCC and summarizes the development of avelumab in the treatment of metastatic MCC. Preclinical studies, phase 1 and phase 2 clinical trials, and the safety profile of avelumab are reviewed. Future perspectives and ongoing studies are also discussed. Expert commentary: Avelumab demonstrated rapid and durable responses and a manageable safety profile in the treatment of metastatic MCC. Patient outcomes are favorable when compared to historical responses to standard chemotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials will continue to characterize avelumab and its optimal use in MCC therapy.

  14. Representability of metastatic bone lesions in magnification radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togawa, Takashi

    1981-01-01

    Magnification radiography, bone scintigraphy, and normal roentgenography were performed on patients with malignant tumors to detect their bone metastases, and from the results obtained, these diagnostic procedures were evaluated for the detectability and representability of metastatic bone lesions. Bone scan and normal roentgenography were performed on 90 metastatic bone lesions in 37 patients, and magnification radiography was done on 14 bone lesions noted in 10 of the 37 and another with benign osseous change. Among the three, bone scintigraphy was best, and magnification radiography and normal roentgenography did not differ significantly in detectability. In magnification radiography, some metastatic bone lesions were represented more clearly than by normal roentgeography, but some were not. As regards the representability of the ribs, magnification radiography was very useful. One case of bone destruction was detected by magnification radiography, but not by normal roentgenography. (author)

  15. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas.

  16. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  17. Innovative Therapeutic Strategies in the Treatment of Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tomasello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases (BM are the most common intracranial tumors and their incidence is increasing. Untreated brain metastases are associated with a poor prognosis and a poor performance status. Metastasis development involves the migration of a cancer cell from the bulk tumor into the surrounding tissue, extravasation from the blood into tissue elsewhere in the body, and formation of a secondary tumor. In the recent past, important results have been obtained in the management of patients affected by BM, using surgery, radiation therapy, or both. Conventional chemotherapies have generally produced disappointing results, possibly due to their limited ability to penetrate the blood–brain barrier. The advent of new technologies has led to the discovery of novel molecules and pathways that have better depicted the metastatic process. Targeted therapies such as bevacizumab, erlotinib, gefitinib, sunitinib and sorafenib, are all licensed and have demonstrated improved survival in patients with metastatic disease. In this review, we will report current data on targeted therapies. A brief review about brain metastatic process will be also presented.

  18. Brain metastasis from extramammary Paget's disease of the scrotum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Young; Yun, Suk-Jung; Lee, Ji-Shin; Jung, Shin; Jung, Tae-Young; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Jang, Woo-Youl

    2014-04-01

    We present to our knowledge the first patient with histopathologically proven brain metastasis from extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) and discuss the effect of brain radiation therapy for this condition. A 68-year-old man presented to our hospital with headache and gait disturbance. Brain MRI showed multiple enhancing mass lesions, and two large cystic lesions in the left cerebellum. The patient had been diagnosed with scrotal Paget's disease 3 months previously but no further management had been performed due to his refusal. The patient underwent stereotactic aspiration and biopsy of the two large cystic lesions. A histopathological examination revealed that the tumor was a metastatic adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the tumor cells were strongly positive for cytokeratin 7 and moderately positive for carcinoembryonic antigen and gross cystic disease fluid protein 15. These findings were similar to those of his scrotal skin lesions and were consistent with metastatic EMPD. The patient underwent brain radiation therapy with a total radiation dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. The patient improved neurologically so as to be self-ambulatory, and a mild improvement in the metastatic tumors was found on follow-up MRI. We had planned systemic chemotherapy, but the patient died of acute respiratory failure 2 months after radiation therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinicopathologic factors associated with de novo metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tiansheng; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2016-12-01

    While breast cancers with distant metastasis at presentation (de novo metastasis) harbor significantly inferior clinical outcomes, there have been limited studies analyzing the clinicopathologic characteristics in this subset of patients. In this study, we analyzed 6126 breast cancers diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 to identify factors associated with de novo metastatic breast cancer. When compared to patients without metastasis at presentation, race, histologic grade, estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) and HER2 statuses were significantly associated with de novo metastasis in the entire cohort, whereas age, histologic grade, PR and HER2 status were the significant parameters in the subset of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (Stage IIB/III). The patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer had a significant older mean age and a lower proportion of HER2-positive tumors when compared to those with metastatic recurrence. Further, the HER2-rich subtype demonstrated a drastically higher incidence of de novo metastasis when compared to the luminal and triple-negative breast cancers in the entire cohort [odds ratio (OR)=5.68 and 2.27, respectively] and in the patients with locally advanced disease (OR=4.02 and 2.12, respectively), whereas no significant difference was seen between de novo metastatic cancers and those with metastatic recurrence. Moreover, the luminal and HER2-rich subtypes showed bone-seeking (OR=1.92) and liver-homing (OR=2.99) characteristics, respectively, for the sites of de novo metastasis, while the latter was not observed in those with metastatic recurrence. Our data suggest that an algorithm incorporating clinicopathologic factors, especially histologic grade and receptor profile, remains of significant benefit during decision making in newly diagnosed breast cancer in the pursuit of precision medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Ixabepilone: a new chemotherapeutic option for refractory metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Puhalla

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Shannon Puhalla, Adam BrufskyUPMC Magee-Womens Cancer Program, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Taxane therapy is commonly used in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. However, most patients will eventually become refractory to these agents. Ixabepilone is a newly approved chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Although it targets microtubules similarly to docetaxel and paclitaxel, ixabepilone has activity in patients that are refractory to taxanes. This review summarizes the pharmacology of ixapebilone and clinical trials with the drug both as a single agent and in combination. Data were obtained using searches of PubMed and abstracts of the annual meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium from 1995 to 2008. Ixapebilone is a semi-synthetic analog of epothilone B that acts to induce apoptosis of cancer cells via the stabilization of microtubules. Phase I clinical trials have employed various dosing schedules ranging from daily to weekly to 3-weekly. Dose-limiting toxicites included neuropathy and neutropenia. Responses were seen in a variety of tumor types. Phase II studies verified activity in taxane-refractory metastatic breast cancer. The FDA has approved ixabepilone for use as monotherapy and in combination with capecitabine for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Ixabepilone is an efficacious option for patients with refractory metastatic breast cancer. The safety profile is similar to that of taxanes, with neuropathy and neutropenia being dose-limiting. Studies are ongoing with the use of both iv and oral formulations and in combination with other chemotherapeutic and biologic agents.Keywords: ixabepilone, epothilone, metastatic breast cancer, taxane-refractory